The Meaning of Acts 9:1 Explained

Acts 9:1

KJV: And Saul, yet breathing out threatenings and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, went unto the high priest,

YLT: And Saul, yet breathing of threatening and slaughter to the disciples of the Lord, having gone to the chief priest,

Darby: But Saul, still breathing out threatenings and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, came to the high priest

ASV: But Saul, yet breathing threatening and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, went unto the high priest,

What does Acts 9:1 Mean?

Context Summary

Acts 9:1-9 - Winning A Persecutor
A year had passed since Acts 8:3. "The Way" had become the accepted phrase for the infant Church and its presentation of the truth, Acts 19:9; Acts 22:4. It may refer to the course of life the Christians pursued, or to their method of getting right with God-not by the deeds of the Law, but by their faith in Christ, Romans 10:5-10. Compare with this narrative Acts 26:13; Acts 22:6. Saul's companions saw the light and heard a noise, but did not see the Lord or distinguish what was said.
Mark how the Lord Jesus identifies Himself with His suffering ones. Their sufferings are His, Acts 9:5. To hurt them is to hurt Him. The pricks are the ox-goad. The more the ox resists, the deeper the wound. Even from heaven the Master speaks in parables. Evidently for a long time-perhaps from the death of Stephen-the persecutor had been fighting against conviction. When God needs captains for His army, He not unseldom takes them from the ranks of the enemy. The foremost persecutor became the foremost leader of the Church. The conversion of Saul was due to the personal interposition of the living Christ. It was the pierced hand that arrested and apprehended him. [source]

Chapter Summary: Acts 9

1  Saul, going toward Damascus, is stricken down to the earth,
8  and led blind to Damascus;
10  is called to the apostleship;
18  and is baptized by Ananias
20  He preaches Christ boldly
23  The Jews lay wait to kill him;
29  so do the Grecians, but he escapes both
31  The church having rest, Peter heals Aeneas;
36  and restores Tabitha to life

Greek Commentary for Acts 9:1

Yet [ετι]
As if some time elapsed between the death of Stephen as is naturally implied by the progressive persecution described in Acts 8:3. The zeal of Saul the persecutor increased with success. [source]
Breathing threatening and slaughter [ενπνεων απειλης και πονου]
Present active participle of old and common verb. Not “breathing out,” but “breathing in” (inhaling) as in Aeschylus and Plato or “breathing on” (from Homer on). The partitive genitive of απειλης — apeilēs and πονου — phonou means that threatening and slaughter had come to be the very breath that Saul breathed, like a warhorse who sniffed the smell of battle. He breathed on the remaining disciples the murder that he had already breathed in from the death of the others. He exhaled what he inhaled. Jacob had said that “Benjamin shall ravin as a wolf” (Genesis 49:27). This greatest son of Benjamin was fulfilling this prophecy (Furneaux). The taste of blood in the death of Stephen was pleasing to young Saul (Acts 8:1) and now he revelled in the slaughter of the saints both men and women. In Acts 26:11 Luke quotes Paul as saying that he was “exceedingly mad against them.” [source]
Breathing out [ἐμπνέων]
Lit., breathing upon or at, and so corresponding to against the disciples. [source]
Threatenings and slaughter [ἀπειλῆς καὶ φόνου]
Lit., threatening; so Rev. In the Greek construction, the case in which these words are marks them as the cause or source of the “breathing;” breathing hard out of threatening, and murderous desire. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Acts 9:1

Matthew 10:22 For my name‘s sake [δια το ονομα μου]
In the O.T. as in the Targums and the Talmud “the name” as here stands for the person (Matthew 19:29; Acts 5:41; Acts 9:16; Acts 15:26). “He that endureth to the end” Effective aorist participle with future indicative. [source]
Mark 3:27 His goods [τὰ σκεύη]
Lit., his vessels. So Wyc. Compare Mark 11:16; Acts 9:15; Acts 10:11; 2 Timothy 2:20. The special object of the robber may be precious vessels of gold or silver; but the word is probably used in its general sense of household gear. [source]
Mark 11:4 In a place where two ways met [ἐπὶ τοῦ ἀμφόδου]
Ἄμφοδον is literally any road which leads round ( ἀμφί ) a place or a block of buildings. Hence the winding way. The word occurs only here in the New Testament. Rev., in the open street, which in an Eastern town is usually crooked. Perhaps, by contrast with the usual crookedness, the street in Damascus where Paul lodged was called Straight (Acts 9:11). “It is a topographical note,” says Dr. Morison, “that could only be given by an eye-witness.” The detail of Mark 11:4 is peculiar to Mark. According to Luke (Luke 22:8), Peter was one of those sent, and his stamp is probably on the narrative. [source]
Mark 11:4 A colt tied at the door without in the open street [πωλον δεδεμενον προς τυραν εχω επι του αμποδου]
A carefully drawn picture. The colt was outside the house in the street, but fastened (bound, perfect passive participle) to the door. “The better class of houses were built about an open court, from which a passage way under the house led to the street outside. It was at this outside opening to the street that the colt was tied” (Gould). The word αμποδος — amphodos (from αμπω — amphō both, and οδος — hodos road) is difficult. It apparently means road around a thing, a crooked street as most of them were (cf. Straight Street in Acts 9:11). It occurs only here in the N.T. besides D in Acts 19:28. It is very common in the papyri for vicus or “quarter.” [source]
Luke 3:7 Warned [ὑπέδειξεν]
From ὕπο , under, and δείκνυμι ,to shew. Hence, literally, to shew secretly. The word implies a private or confidential hint or reminder. Compare Luke 12:5; Acts 9:16; Acts 20:35. [source]
Luke 22:43 Strengthening [ἐνισχύων]
Only here and Acts 9:19. See on was not able, Luke 14:30; and cannot, Luke 16:3. Commonly intransitive; to prevail in or among. Used transitively only by Hippocrates and Luke. [source]
Luke 2:14 Peace, good-will toward men [εἰρήνη ἐν ἀνθρώποις εὐδοκία]
Both Tischendorf and Westcott and Hort read εὐδοκίας which the Rev. follows. According to this the rendering is, unto men of good pleasure, or as Rev., among men in whom he is well pleased. Wyc., to men of good-will. For a similar construction, see Acts 9:15; Colossians 1:13. [source]
Luke 15:4 Go after that which is lost [πορευεται επι το απολωλος]
The one lost sheep There is nothing more helpless than a lost sheep except a lost sinner. The sheep went off by its own ignorance and folly. The use of επι — epi for the goal occurs also in Matthew 22:9; Acts 8:26; Acts 9:11.Until he find it (εως ευρηι αυτο — heōs heurēi auto). Second aorist active subjunctive of ευρισκω — heuriskō common verb, with εως — heōs common Greek idiom. He keeps on going (πορευεται — poreuetai linear present middle indicative) until success comes (effective aorist, ευρηι — heurēi). [source]
Luke 3:7 To be baptized of him [βαπτιστηναι υπ αυτου]
This is the purpose of their coming. Matthew 3:7 has simply “to his baptism.” John‘s metaphors are from the wilderness (vipers, fruits, axe, slave boy loosing sandals, fire, fan, thrashing-floor, garner, chaff, stones).Who warned you? (τις επεδειχεν υμιν — tis hepedeixen humiṉ). The verb is like our “suggest” by proof to eye, ear, or brain (Luke 6:47; Luke 12:5; Acts 9:16; Acts 20:35; Matthew 3:7). Nowhere else in the N.T. though common ancient word (υποδεικνυμι — hupodeiknumi show under, point out, give a tip or private hint). [source]
Luke 3:7 Who warned you? [τις επεδειχεν υμιν]
The verb is like our “suggest” by proof to eye, ear, or brain (Luke 6:47; Luke 12:5; Acts 9:16; Acts 20:35; Matthew 3:7). Nowhere else in the N.T. though common ancient word (υποδεικνυμι — hupodeiknumi show under, point out, give a tip or private hint). [source]
John 17:11 And these [και ουτοι]
Note adversative use of και — kai (= but these). I come Futuristic present, “I am coming.” Cf. John 13:3; John 14:12; John 17:13. Christ will no longer be visibly present to the world, but he will be with the believers through the Holy Spirit (Matthew 28:20). Holy Father Only here in the N.T., but see 1 John 2:20; Luke 1:49 for the holiness of God, a thoroughly Jewish conception. See John 6:69 where Peter calls Jesus ο αγιος του τεου — ho hagios tou theou For the word applied to saints see Acts 9:13. See John 17:25 for πατηρ δικαιε — patēr dikaie (Righteous Father). Keep them First aorist (constative) active imperative of τηρεω — tēreō as now specially needing the Father‘s care with Jesus gone (urgency of the aorist tense in prayer). Which Locative case of the neuter relative singular, attracted from the accusative ο — ho to the case of the antecedent ονοματι — onomati (name). That they may be one Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the present active subjunctive of ειμι — eimi (that they may keep on being). Oneness of will and spirit This is Christ‘s prayer for all believers, for unity, not for organic union of which we hear so much. The disciples had union, but lacked unity or oneness of spirit as was shown this very evening at the supper (Luke 22:24; John 13:4-15). Jesus offers the unity in the Trinity (three persons, but one God) as the model for believers. The witness of the disciples will fail without harmony (John 17:21). [source]
Acts 22:15 All men []
He keeps back the offensive word Gentiles (Acts 9:15). [source]
Acts 22:12 A devout man, etc []
In Acts 9:10, he is called a disciple. Paul here “affirms that he was not introduced to Christianity by an opponent of Judaism, but by a strict Jew” (Gloag). [source]
Acts 20:35 I have shewed you all things [πάντα ὑπέδειξα ὑμῖν]
The verb means to shew by example. Thus, Luke 6:47, “I will shew you to whom he is like,” is followed by the illustration of the man who built upon the rock. So Acts 9:16. God will shew Paul by practical experience how great things he must suffer. The kindred noun ὑπόδειγμα is always rendered example or pattern. See John 13:15; James 5:10, etc.; and note on 2 Peter 2:6. Rev., correctly, In all things I gave you an example. [source]
Acts 12:7 Rise up [αναστα]
Short form (Koiné{[28928]}š) of αναστητι — anastēthi second aorist active imperative of ανιστημι — anistēmi intransitive. So also Acts 9:11 (Westcott and Hort text); Ephesians 5:14. Fell off (εχεπεσαν — exepesan). Second aorist active with α — a ending like first aorist of εχπιπτω — expiptō old verb. This miracle was necessary if Peter was to escape without rousing the two guards. [source]
Acts 19:6 When Paul had laid his hands upon them [επιτεντος αυτοις του Παυλου χειρας]
Genitive absolute of second aorist active participle of επιτιτημι — epitithēmi This act of laying on of the hands was done in Samaria by Peter and John (Acts 8:16) and in Damascus in the case of Paul (Acts 9:17) and was followed as here by the descent of the Holy Spirit in supernatural power. [source]
Acts 21:39 of Tarsus in Cilicia [Ταρσευς της Κιλικιας]
(Ταρσευς της Κιλικιας — Tarseus tēs Kilikias) by country, belonging to Tarsus (this adjective Ταρσευς — Tarseus only here and Acts 9:11), and proud of it, one of the great cities of the empire with a great university. [source]
Acts 22:21 I will send thee forth far hence unto the Gentiles [Εγω εις ετνη μακραν εχαποστελω σε]
Future active of the double This is a repetition by Jesus of the call given in Damascus through Ananias (Acts 9:15). Paul had up till now avoided the word Gentiles, but at last it had to come, “the fatal word” (Farrar). [source]
Acts 10:44 The Holy Ghost fell [επεπεσεν το πνευμα το αγιον]
Second aorist active indicative of επιπιπτω — epipiptō old verb to fall upon, to recline, to come upon. Used of the Holy Spirit in Acts 8:16; Acts 10:44; Acts 11:15. It appears that Peter was interrupted in his sermon by this remarkable event. The Jews had received the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:4), the Samaritans (Acts 8:17), and now Gentiles. But on this occasion it was before baptism, as was apparently true in Paul‘s case (Acts 9:17.). In Acts 8:16; Acts 19:5 the hands of the apostles were also placed after baptism on those who received the Holy Spirit. Here it was unexpected by Peter and by Cornelius and was indubitable proof of the conversion of these Gentiles who had accepted Peter‘s message and had believed on Jesus Christ as Saviour. [source]
Acts 11:25 To seek for Saul [αναζητησαι Σαυλον]
First aorist (effective) active infinitive of purpose. Αναζητεω — Anazēteō is a common verb since Plato, but in the N.T. only here and Luke 2:44, Luke 2:45, to seek up and down Barnabas knew his own limitations and knew where the man of destiny for this crisis was, the man who already had the seal of God upon him. The hour and the man met when Barnabas brought Saul to Antioch. The door was open and the man was ready, far more ready than when Jesus called him on the road to Damascus. The years in Cilicia and Syria were not wasted for they had not been idle. If we only knew the facts, it is probable that Saul also had been preaching to Hellenes as well as to Hellenists. Jesus had definitely called him to work among the Gentiles (Acts 9:15). In his own way he had come to the same place that Peter reached in Caesarea and that Barnabas now holds in Antioch. God always has a man prepared for a great emergency in the kingdom. The call of Barnabas was simply the repetition of the call of Christ. So Saul came. [source]
Acts 12:7 In the cell [εν τωι οικηματι]
Literally, a dwelling place or habitation (from οικεω — oikeō to dwell, οικος — oikos house), but here not the prison as a whole as in Thucydides, but the room in the prison (cell) where Peter was chained to the two guards. Old word, but only here in the N.T. He smote Peter on the side (παταχας την πλευραν του Πετρου — pataxas tēn pleuran tou Petrou). More exactly, “smote the side of Peter.” Strongly enough to wake Peter up who was sound asleep and yet not rouse the two guards. It was probably between 3 a.m. and 6 a.m., hours when changes in the guards were made. Rise up Short form (Koiné{[28928]}š) of αναστητι — anastēthi second aorist active imperative of ανιστημι — anistēmi intransitive. So also Acts 9:11 (Westcott and Hort text); Ephesians 5:14. Fell off (εχεπεσαν — exepesan). Second aorist active with α — a ending like first aorist of εχπιπτω — expiptō old verb. This miracle was necessary if Peter was to escape without rousing the two guards. [source]
Acts 26:1 Made his defence [απελογειτο]
Inchoative imperfect of απολογεομαι — apologeomai (middle), “began to make his defence.” This is the fullest of all Paul‘s defences. He has no word of censure of his enemies or of resentment, but seizes the opportunity to preach Christ to such a distinguished company which he does with “singular dignity” (Furneaux). He is now bearing the name of Christ “before kings” (Acts 9:15). In general Paul follows the line of argument of the speech on the stairs (chapter Acts 22). [source]
Acts 26:13 Above the brightness of the sun [υπερ την λαμπροτητα του ηλιου]
Here alone not in Acts 9; 22, though implied in Acts 9:3; Acts 22:6, “indicating the supernatural character of the light” (Knowling). Luke makes no effort to harmonize the exact phrases here with those in the other accounts and Paul here (Acts 26:16) blends together what Jesus said to him directly and the message of Jesus through Ananias (Acts 9:15). The word λαμπροτης — lamprotēs old word, is here alone in the N.T. Shining round about me (περιλαμπσαν με — perilampsan me). First aorist active participle of περιλαμπω — perilampō common Koiné{[28928]}š verb, in N.T. only here and Luke 2:9. [source]
Acts 26:17 Delivering thee [εχαιρουμενος σε]
Present middle participle of εχαιρεω — exaireō old verb and usually so rendered, but the old Greek also uses it for “choose” as also in lxx (Isaiah 48:10). The papyri give examples of both meanings and either makes good sense here. God was continually rescuing Paul “out of the hands of Jews and Gentiles and Paul was a chosen vessel” (Acts 9:15). Modern scholars are also divided. [source]
Acts 13:9 Filled with the Holy Spirit [πιμπλημι]
First aorist (ingressive) passive participle of ατενισας — pimplēmi with the genitive case. A special influx of power to meet this emergency. Here was a cultured heathen, typical of the best in Roman life, who called forth all the powers of Paul plus the special help of the Holy Spirit to expose the wickedness of Elymas Barjesus. If one wonders why the Holy Spirit filled Paul for this emergency rather than Barnabas, when Barnabas was named first in Acts 13:2, he can recall the sovereignty of the Holy Spirit in his choice of agents (1 Corinthians 12:4-11) and also the special call of Paul by Christ (Acts 9:15; Acts 26:17.). Fastened his eyes (atenisas). As already in Luke 4:20; Luke 22:56; Acts 3:4, Acts 3:12; Acts 6:15; Acts 10:4. [source]
Acts 26:1 For thyself [υπερ σεαυτου]
Some MSS. have περι — peri (concerning). Paul is allowed to speak in his own behalf. No charges are made against him. In fact, Festus has admitted that he has no real proof of any charges. Stretched forth his hand (εκτεινας την χειρα — ekteinas tēn cheira). Dramatic oratorical gesture (not for silence as in Acts 12:17; Acts 13:16) with the chain still upon it (Acts 26:29) linking him to the guard. First aorist active participle of εκτεινω — ekteinō to stretch out. Made his defence Inchoative imperfect of απολογεομαι — apologeomai (middle), “began to make his defence.” This is the fullest of all Paul‘s defences. He has no word of censure of his enemies or of resentment, but seizes the opportunity to preach Christ to such a distinguished company which he does with “singular dignity” (Furneaux). He is now bearing the name of Christ “before kings” (Acts 9:15). In general Paul follows the line of argument of the speech on the stairs (chapter Acts 22). [source]
Acts 7:30 In a flame of fire in a bush [εν πλογι πυρος βατου]
Horeb in Exodus 3:1; but Sinai and Horeb were “probably peaks of one mountain range” (Page), Horeb “the mountain of the dried-up ground,” Sinai “the mountain of the thorns.” Literally, “in the flame of fire of a bush” (two genitives, πυρος — puros and βατου — batou dependent on πλογι — phlogi flame). Descriptive genitives as in Acts 9:15; 2 Thessalonians 1:8. ατος — Batos (bush) is the wild acacia (mimosa nilotica). In Exodus 3:20 it is Jehovah who speaks. Hence “angel” here with Stephen is understood to be the Angel of the Presence, the Eternal Logos of the Father, the Angel of Jehovah. [source]
Acts 7:59 Receive my spirit [δεχαι το πνευμα μου]
Aorist middle imperative, urgency, receive it now. Many have followed Stephen into death with these words upon their dying lips. See, Acts 9:14, Acts 9:21; Acts 22:16. [source]
Acts 8:17 Laid they their hands [επετιτεσαν τας χειρας]
Imperfect active, repetition. The laying on of hands did not occur at the great Pentecost (Acts 2:4, Acts 2:33) nor in Acts 4:31; Acts 10:44 nor is it mentioned in 1 Corinthians 12; 14. It is mentioned in Acts 6:7 about the deacons and in Acts 13:3 when Barnabas and Saul left Antioch. And in Saul‘s case it was Ananias who laid his hands on him (Acts 9:17). Hence it cannot be concluded that the Holy Spirit was received only by the laying on of the hands of the apostles or by the hands of anyone. The so-called practice of “confirmation” appeals to this passage, but inconclusively. [source]
Acts 8:21 Matter [λογοι]
Literally, word or subject (as in Luke 1:4; Acts 15:6), the power of communicating the Holy Spirit. This use of λογος — logos is in the ancient Greek. Straight (ευτεια — eutheia). Quotation from Psalm 78:37. Originally a mathematically straight line as in Acts 9:11, then moral rectitude as here. [source]
Acts 8:21 Straight [ευτεια]
Quotation from Psalm 78:37. Originally a mathematically straight line as in Acts 9:11, then moral rectitude as here. [source]
Acts 9:4 Saul, Saul [Σαουλ Σαουλ]
The Hebrew form occurs also in Acts 22:7; Acts 26:14 where it is expressly stated that the voice was in the Hebrew (Aramaic) tongue as also in Acts 9:17 (Ananias). Deissmann (Bible Studies, p. 316) terms this use of με — Saoul “the historian‘s sense of liturgical rhythm.” For the repetition of names by Jesus note Luke 10:41 (Martha, Martha), Luke 22:31 (Simon, Simon). Me (me). In persecuting the disciples, Saul was persecuting Jesus, as the words of Jesus in Acts 9:5 made plain. Christ had already spoken of the mystic union between himself and his followers (Matthew 10:40; Matthew 25:40, Matthew 25:45; John 15:1-5). The proverb (Pindar) that Jesus quotes to Saul about kicking against the goad is genuine in Acts 26:14, but not here. [source]
Acts 9:10 In a vision [εν οραματι]
Zeller and others scout the idea of the historicity of this vision as supernatural. Even Furneaux holds that “it is a characteristic of the Jewish Christian sources to point out the Providential ordering of events by the literary device of a vision,” as “in the early chapters of Matthew‘s and Luke‘s Gospels.” He is content with this “beautiful expression of the belief” with no interest in the actual facts. But that is plain illusion, not to say delusion, and makes both Paul and Luke deceived by the story of Ananias (Acts 9:10-18; Acts 22:12-16, Acts 22:26). One MS. of the old Latin Version does omit the vision to Ananias and that is basis enough for those who deny the supernatural aspects of Christianity. [source]
Acts 9:12 Receive his sight [αναβλεπσει]
First aorist active subjunctive with οπως — hopōs (purpose). See again as in Acts 9:17. [source]
Acts 9:15 A chosen vessel [σκευος εκλογης]
A vessel of choice or selection. The genitive of quality is common in the Hebrew, as in the vernacular Koiné. Jesus chose Saul before Saul chose Jesus. He felt of himself that he was an earthen vessel (2 Corinthians 4:7) unworthy of so great a treasure. It was a great message that Ananias had to bear to Saul. He told it in his own way (Acts 9:17; Acts 22:14.) and in Acts 26:16. Paul blends the message of Jesus to Ananias with that to him as one. [source]
Acts 9:17 Laying his hands on him [επιτεις επ αυτον τας χειρας]
As in the vision Saul saw (Acts 9:12). [source]
Acts 9:19 Was strengthened [ενισχυτη]
First aorist passive indicative of ενισχυω — enischuō to receive strength (ισχυς — ischus), comparatively late verb and here only in the N.T. save Luke 22:43 where it is doubtful. Poor verse division. This clause belongs in sense to Acts 9:18. [source]
Acts 9:22 Increased the more [μαλλον ενεδυναμουτο]
Imperfect passive indicative of ενδυναμοω — endunamoō to receive power (late verb), progressive increase in strength as opposition grew. Saul‘s recantation stirred controversy and Saul grew in power. See also Paul in Philemon 4:13; 1 Timothy 1:12; 2 Timothy 2:1; 2 Timothy 4:17; Romans 4:20. Christ, the dynamo of spiritual energy, was now pouring power (Acts 1:8) into Paul who is already filled with the Holy Spirit (Acts 9:17). [source]
Acts 9:23 Took counsel together [συνεβουλευσαντο]
First aorist (effective) middle indicative of συνβουλευω — sunbouleuō old and common verb for counselling Things had reached a climax. It was worse than before he left for Arabia. Paul was now seeing the fulfilment of the prophecy of Jesus about him (Acts 9:16). To kill him (ανελειν αυτον — anelein auton). Second aorist (effective) active infinitive of αναιρεω — anaireō to take up, to make away with, to kill (Luke 23:32; Acts 12:1, etc.). The infinitive expresses purpose here as is done in Acts 9:24 by οπως — hopōs and the aorist active subjunctive of the same verb (ανελωσιν — anelōsin). Saul now knew what Stephen had suffered at his hands as his own life was in peril in the Jewish quarter of Damascus. It was a picture of his old self. He may even have been scourged here (2 Corinthians 11:24). [source]
Romans 1:1 Separated unto the gospel of God [ἀφωρισμένος εἰς εὐαγγέλιον Θεοῦ]
Characterizing the preceding phrase more precisely: definitely separated from the rest of mankind. Compare Galatians 1:15, and “chosen vessel,” Acts 9:15. The verb means “to mark off ( ἀπό ) from others by a boundary ( ὅρος ).” It is used of the final separation of the righteous from the wicked (Matthew 13:49; Matthew 25:32); of the separation of the disciples from the world (Luke 6:22); and of the setting apart of apostles to special functions (Acts 13:2). Gospel is an exception to the almost invariable usage, in being without the article (compare Revelation 14:6); since Paul considers the Gospel rather as to its quality - good news from God - than as the definite proclamation of Jesus Christ as a Savior. The defining elements are added subsequently in Romans 1:3, Romans 1:4. Not the preaching of the Gospel, but; the message itself is meant. For Gospel, see on superscription of Matthew. [source]
Romans 1:1 Called to be an apostle [δουλος]
An apostle by vocation (Denney) as in 1 Corinthians 1:1. In Galatians 1:1 δεσμιος — klētos is not used, but the rest of the verse has the same idea. Separated (κλητος αποστολος — aphōrismenos). Perfect passive participle of κλητος — aphorizō for which verb see note on Galatians 1:15. Paul is a spiritual Pharisee (etymologically), separated not to the oral tradition, but to God‘s gospel, a chosen vessel (Acts 9:15). By man also (Acts 13:2). Many of Paul‘s characteristic words like απωρισμενος — euaggelion have been already discussed in the previous Epistles that will call for little comment from now on. [source]
Romans 1:1 Separated [κλητος αποστολος]
Perfect passive participle of κλητος — aphorizō for which verb see note on Galatians 1:15. Paul is a spiritual Pharisee (etymologically), separated not to the oral tradition, but to God‘s gospel, a chosen vessel (Acts 9:15). By man also (Acts 13:2). Many of Paul‘s characteristic words like απωρισμενος — euaggelion have been already discussed in the previous Epistles that will call for little comment from now on. [source]
Romans 9:21 To make one vessel unto honor and another unto dishonor [ποιῆσαι ὃ μεν εἰς τιμὴν σκεῦος , ὃ δὲ εἰς ἀτιμίαν]
Rev., more correctly, to make one part a vessel unto honor, and another part, etc. For vessel, see on 1 Peter 3:7; compare Matthew 12:29; Acts 9:15. The vessel here is the one which has just come from the potter's hand. Those in Romans 9:22have been in household use. [source]
Romans 1:1 Paul [Παυλος]
Roman name See note on Acts 13:9 for the origin of this name by the side of Saul. Servant (doulos). Bond-slave of Jesus Christ (or Christ Jesus as some MSS. give it and as is the rule in the later Epistles) for the first time in the Epistles in the opening sentence, though the phrase already in Galatians 1:10. Recurs in Philemon 1:1 and desmios (bondsman) in Philemon 1:1. Called to be an apostle An apostle by vocation (Denney) as in 1 Corinthians 1:1. In Galatians 1:1 δεσμιος — klētos is not used, but the rest of the verse has the same idea. Separated (κλητος αποστολος — aphōrismenos). Perfect passive participle of κλητος — aphorizō for which verb see note on Galatians 1:15. Paul is a spiritual Pharisee (etymologically), separated not to the oral tradition, but to God‘s gospel, a chosen vessel (Acts 9:15). By man also (Acts 13:2). Many of Paul‘s characteristic words like απωρισμενος — euaggelion have been already discussed in the previous Epistles that will call for little comment from now on. [source]
1 Corinthians 9:1 Seen Jesus []
See 1 Corinthians 15:8; Acts 9:17; Acts 18:9; Acts 22:17, Acts 22:18; 2 Corinthians 12:1sqq. Compare Acts 22:14. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:15 I had baptized [ἐβάπτισα]
The correct reading is ἐβαπτίσθητε yewere baptized. So Rev. Paul's commission contains no mention of baptism. Compare Acts 9:15, with Matthew 28:15. From his peculiar position as the inaugurator of a second epoch of Christianity, many would be tempted to regard him as the real founder of the Church, and to boast of having been baptized into his name. “No outward initiation of converts entered into his ministry” (Edwards). [source]
1 Corinthians 9:1 Have I not seen Jesus our Lord? [ουχι Ιησουν τον Κυριον ημων εορακα]
Proof (1 Corinthians 15:8; Acts 9:17, Acts 9:27; Acts 18:9; Acts 22:14, Acts 22:17.; 2 Corinthians 12:1.) that he has the qualification of an apostle (Acts 1:22) though not one of the twelve. Note strong form of the negative ουχι — ouchi here. All these questions expect an affirmative answer. The perfect active εορακα — heoraka from οραω — horaō to see, does not here have double reduplication as in John 1:18. [source]
1 Corinthians 9:16 For necessity is laid upon me [αναγκη γαρ μοι επικειται]
Old verb, lies upon me (dative case μοι — moi). Jesus had called him (Acts 9:6, Acts 9:15; Galatians 1:15.; Romans 1:14). He could do no other and deserves no credit for doing it. Woe is me (ουαι γαρ μοι — ouai gar moi). Explaining the αναγκη — anagkē (necessity). Paul had to heed the call of Christ that he had heard. He had a real call to the ministry. Would that this were the case with every modern preacher. [source]
1 Corinthians 9:1 Am I not an apostle? [ουκ ειμι αποστολοσ]
He has the exceptional privileges as an apostle to support from the churches and yet he foregoes these. Have I not seen Jesus our Lord? (ουχι Ιησουν τον Κυριον ημων εορακα — ouchi Iēsoun ton Kurion hēmōn heoraka̱). Proof (1 Corinthians 15:8; Acts 9:17, Acts 9:27; Acts 18:9; Acts 22:14, Acts 22:17.; 2 Corinthians 12:1.) that he has the qualification of an apostle (Acts 1:22) though not one of the twelve. Note strong form of the negative ουχι — ouchi here. All these questions expect an affirmative answer. The perfect active εορακα — heoraka from οραω — horaō to see, does not here have double reduplication as in John 1:18.Are not ye? They were themselves proof of his apostleship. [source]
Galatians 1:22 Of Judaea []
The province, as distinguished from Jerusalem, where he must have been known as the persecutor of the church. See Acts 9:1, Acts 9:2. [source]
Ephesians 6:9 And forbear threatening [ανιεντες την απειλην]
Present active participle of ανιημι — aniēmi old verb, to loosen up, to relax. “Letting up on threatening.” Απειλη — Apeilē is old word for threat, in N.T. only here and Acts 4:29; Acts 9:1. [source]
1 Thessalonians 1:4 Your election [την εκλογην υμων]
That is the election of you by God. It is an old word from εκλεγομαι — eklegomai used by Jesus of his choice of the twelve disciples (John 15:16) and by Paul of God‘s eternal selection (Ephesians 1:4). The word εκλογη — eklogē is not in the lxx and only seven times in the N.T. and always of God‘s choice of men (Acts 9:15; 1 Thessalonians 1:4; Romans 9:11; Romans 11:5, Romans 11:7, Romans 11:8; 2 Peter 1:10). The divine εκλογη — eklogē was manifested in the Christian qualities of 1 Thessalonians 1:3 (Moffatt). [source]
1 Thessalonians 1:4 Election of God []
Incorrect. Const. of or by ( ὑπὸ ) God with beloved. Ἑκλογὴ electionin N.T., mostly by Paul. Elsewhere only Acts 9:15, and 2 Peter 1:10. This, and the kindred words, ἐκλέγειν tochoose, and ἐκλεκτὸς chosenor elect, are used of God's selection of men or agencies for special missions or attainments; but neither here nor elsewhere in the N.T. is there any warrant for the revolting doctrine that God has predestined a definite number of mankind to eternal life, and the rest to eternal destruction. The sense in this passage appears to be defined by the succeeding context. The Thessalonians had been chosen to be members of the Christian church, and their conduct had justified the choice. See 1 Thessalonians 1:5-10. [source]
1 Thessalonians 1:4 Beloved by God [ηγαπημενοι υπο του τεου]
Perfect passive participle of αγαπαω — agapaō the verb so common in the N.T. for the highest kind of love. Paul is not content with the use of αδελποι — adelphoi here (often in this Epistle as 1 Thessalonians 2:1, 1 Thessalonians 2:14, 1 Thessalonians 2:17; 1 Thessalonians 3:7; 1 Thessalonians 4:1, 1 Thessalonians 4:10), but adds this affectionate phrase nowhere else in the N.T. in this form (cf. Judges 1:3) though in Sirach 45:1 and on the Rosetta Stone. But in 2 Thessalonians 2:13 he quotes “beloved by the Lord” from Deuteronomy 33:12. The use of αδελποι — adelphoi for members of the same brotherhood can be derived from the Jewish custom (Acts 2:29, Acts 2:37) and the habit of Jesus (Matthew 12:48) and is amply illustrated in the papyri for burial clubs and other orders and guilds (Moulton and Milligan‘s Vocabulary). Your election (την εκλογην υμων — tēn eklogēn humōn). That is the election of you by God. It is an old word from εκλεγομαι — eklegomai used by Jesus of his choice of the twelve disciples (John 15:16) and by Paul of God‘s eternal selection (Ephesians 1:4). The word εκλογη — eklogē is not in the lxx and only seven times in the N.T. and always of God‘s choice of men (Acts 9:15; 1 Thessalonians 1:4; Romans 9:11; Romans 11:5, Romans 11:7, Romans 11:8; 2 Peter 1:10). The divine εκλογη — eklogē was manifested in the Christian qualities of 1 Thessalonians 1:3 (Moffatt). [source]
2 Timothy 2:22 Call on the Lord [ἐπικαλουμένων τὸν κύριον]
A Pauline phrase, only here in Pastorals. See Romans 10:12, Romans 10:13, Romans 10:14; 1 Corinthians 1:2. See also Acts 2:21; Acts 9:14; Acts 22:16. [source]
2 Timothy 2:20 Vessels [σκεύη]
See on Matthew 12:29; see on Mark 3:27; see on Acts 9:15; see on Acts 27:17; see on 1 Peter 3:7. [source]
1 Peter 2:23 Threatened not [ουκ ηπειλει]
Imperfect again (repeated acts) of απειλεω — apeileō old compound (from απειλη — apeilē threat, Acts 9:1), in N.T. only here and Acts 4:17. [source]
1 Peter 3:7 Vessel [σκεύει]
Compare 1 Thessalonians 4:4. The primary idea of vessel, which is formed from the Latin vasellum, the diminutive of vas, a vase, is that of the receptacle which covers and contains; the case or protecting cover. Hence it is allied, etymologically, with vest, vestment, and wear. It is used in the New Testament (1) in the sense of a cup or dish (Luke 8:16; John 19:29; 2 Timothy 2:20; Revelation 2:27; Revelation 18:12). (2) Of the man, as containing the divine energy, or as a subject of divine mercy or wrath, and hence becoming a divine instrument. Thus Paul is a chosen vessel to bear God's name (Acts 9:15). Vessels of wrath (Romans 9:22); of mercy (Romans 9:23). So of the woman, as God's instrument, along with man, for his service in the family and in society. (3) Collectively, in the plural, of all the implements of any particular economy, as a house, or a ship. Matthew 12:29, goods; Acts 27:17, the tackling orgear of a ship. [source]
1 Peter 2:23 Reviled not again [ουκ αντελοιδορει]
Imperfect active (for repeated incidents) of αντιλοιδορεω — antiloidoreō late and rare compound (Plutarch, Lucian, one papyrus example with compound following the simplex verb as here, Moulton and Milligan‘s Vocabulary), here only in N.T. Idiomatic use of αντι — anti (in turn, return, back).Threatened not (ουκ ηπειλει — ouk ēpeilei). Imperfect again (repeated acts) of απειλεω — apeileō old compound (from απειλη — apeilē threat, Acts 9:1), in N.T. only here and Acts 4:17.But committed himself Imperfect active again (kept on committing himself) of παραδιδωμι — paradidōmi to hand over, usually of one to a judge, but here not of another (as the Sanhedrin), but himself (supply εαυτον — heauton), for Jesus uses this very idea in Luke 23:46 as he dies. Jesus thus handed himself and his cause over to the Father who judges righteously (τωι κρινοντι δικαιως — tōi krinonti dikaiōs dative of present active articular participle of κρινω — krinō). [source]
1 Peter 4:14 For the name of Christ [εν ονοματι Χριστου]
“In the matter of the name of Christ.” For the idea see Matthew 5:11.; Matthew 19:29; Acts 5:41; Acts 9:16; Acts 21:13. This is the only N.T. example of just ονομα Χριστου — onoma Christou here used because of the use of Χριστιανος — Christianos in 1 Peter 4:16. For the beatitude μακαριοι — makarioi see Matthew 5:11.The Spirit of glory and the Spirit of God (το της δοχης και το του τεου πνευμα — to tēs doxēs kai to tou theou pneuma). Note repetition of the article (το — to) though πνευμα — pneuma only once. The reference is to the Holy Spirit, who is the Spirit of Glory and of God.Resteth upon you Quotation from Isaiah 11:2. Present middle indicative of αναπαυω — anapauō to give rest, refresh (Matthew 11:28). “He rests upon the Christian as the Shechinah rested upon the tabernacle” (Bigg). Cf. 1 Peter 1:8; Matthew 3:16. [source]
1 John 2:9 His brother [τὸν ἀδελφόν]
His fellow-Christian. The singular, brother, is characteristic of this Epistle. See 1 John 2:10, 1 John 2:11; 1 John 3:10, 1 John 3:15, 1 John 3:17; 1 John 4:20, 1 John 4:21; 1 John 5:16. Christians are called in the New Testament, Christians (Acts 11:26; Acts 26:28; 1 Peter 4:16), mainly by those outside of the Christian circle. Disciples, applied to all followers of Christ (John 2:11; John 6:61) and strictly to the twelve (John 13:5sqq.). In Acts 19:1, to those who had received only John's baptism. Not found in John's Epistles nor in Revelation. Brethren. The first title given to the body of believers after the Ascension (Acts 1:15, where the true reading is ἀδελφῶν brethrenfor μαθητῶν disciples). See Acts 9:30; Acts 10:23; Acts 11:29; 1 Thessalonians 4:10; 1 Thessalonians 5:26; 1 John 3:14; 3 John 1:5, 3 John 1:10; John 21:23. Peter has ἡ ἀδελφότης thebrotherhood (1 Peter 2:17; 1 Peter 5:9). The believers. Under three forms: The believers ( οἱ πιστοί ; Acts 10:45; 1 Timothy 4:12); they that believe ( οἱ πιστεύοντες ; 1 Peter 2:7; 1 Thessalonians 1:7; Ephesians 1:19); they that believed ( οἱ πιστεύσαντες ; Acts 2:44; Acts 4:32; Hebrews 4:3). The saints ( οἱ ἅγιοι ); characteristic of Paul and Revelation. Four times in the Acts (Acts 9:13, Acts 9:32, Acts 9:41; Acts 26:10), and once in Jude (Judges 1:3). Also Hebrews 6:10; Hebrews 13:24. In Paul, 1 Corinthians 6:1; 1 Corinthians 14:33; Ephesians 1:1, Ephesians 1:15, etc. In Revelation 5:8; Revelation 8:3, Revelation 8:4; Revelation 11:18, etc.|Until now ( ἕως ἄρτι )|Though the light has been increasing, and though he may claim that he has been in the light from the first. The phrase occurs in John 2:10; John 5:17; John 16:24; and is used by Paul, 1 Corinthians 4:13; 1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 15:6.| [source]
Revelation 18:12 Vessel [σκεῦος]
See on 1 Peter 3:7, and see on Acts 9:15. Also see on goods, Matthew 12:29; see on Mark 3:27; and see on strake sail, Acts 27:17. [source]
Revelation 1:1 The Revelation [ἀποκάλυψις]
The Greek word is transcribed in Apocalypse. The word occurs only once in the Gospels, Luke 2:32, where to lighten should be rendered for revelation. It is used there of our Lord, as a light to dispel the darkness under which the heathen were veiled. It occurs thirteen times in Paul's writings, and three times in first Peter. It is used in the following senses: (a.) The unveiling of something hidden, which gives light and knowledge to those who behold it. See Luke 2:32(above). Christianity itself is the revelation of a mystery (Romans 16:25). The participation of the Gentiles in the privileges of the new covenant was made known by revelation (Ephesians 3:3). Paul received the Gospel which he preached by revelation (Galatians 1:12), and went up to Jerusalem by revelation (Galatians 2:2). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(b.) Christian insight into spiritual truth. Paul asks for Christians the spirit of revelation (Ephesians 1:17). Peculiar manifestations of the general gift of revelation are given in Christian assemblies (1 Corinthians 14:6, 1 Corinthians 14:26). Special revelations are granted to Paul (2 Corinthians 12:1, 2 Corinthians 12:7). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(c.) The second coming of the Lord (1 Peter 1:7, 1 Peter 1:13; 2 Thessalonians 1:7; 1 Corinthians 1:7) in which His glory shall be revealed (1 Peter 4:13), His righteous judgment made known (Romans 2:5), and His children revealed in full majesty (Romans 8:19). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The kindred verb ἀποκαλύπτω is used in similar connections. Following the categories given above,-DIVIDER-
(a.) Galatians 1:16; Galatians 3:23; Ephesians 3:5; 1 Peter 1:12. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(b.) Matthew 11:25, Matthew 11:27; Matthew 16:17; Luke 10:21, Luke 10:22; 1 Corinthians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 14:30; Philemon 3:15. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(c.) Matthew 10:26; Luke 2:35; Luke 12:2; Luke 17:30; Romans 1:17, Romans 1:18; Romans 8:18; 1 Corinthians 3:13; 2 Thessalonians 2:3, 2 Thessalonians 2:6, 2 Thessalonians 2:8; 1 Peter 1:5; 1 Peter 5:1. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The word is compounded with ἀπό fromand καλύπτω tocover. Hence, to remove the cover from anything; to unveil. So of Balaam, the Lord opened or unveiled his eyes ( ἀπεκάλυψεν τοὺς ὀφθαλμοὺς : Numbers 22:31, Sept.). So Boaz to Naomi's kinsman: “I thought to advertise thee:” Rev., “disclose it unto thee” ( ἀποκαλύψω τὸ οὖς σου : Rth 4:4 , Sept.). Lit., I will uncover thine ear. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The noun ἀποκάλυψις revelationoccurs only once in the Septuagint (1 Samuel 20:30), in the physical sense of uncovering. The verb is found in the Septuagint in Daniel 2:19, Daniel 2:22, Daniel 2:28. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In classical Greek, the verb is used by Herodotus (i., 119) of uncovering the head; and by Plato: thus, “reveal ( ἀποκαλύψας ) to me the power of Rhetoric” (“Gorgias,” 460): “Uncover your chest and back” (“Protagoras,” 352). Both the verb and the noun occur in Plutarch; the latter of uncovering the body, of waters, and of an error. The religious sense, however, is unknown to heathenism. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The following words should be compared with this: Ὀπτασία avision (Luke 1:22; Acts 26:19; 2 Corinthians 12:1). Ὅραμα avision (Matthew 17:9; Acts 9:10; Acts 16:9). Ὅρασις avision (Acts 2:17; Revelation 9:17. Of visible form, Revelation 4:3). These three cannot be accurately distinguished. They all denote the thing seen or shown, without anything to show whether it is understood or not. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
As distinguished from these, ἀποκάλυψις includes, along with the thing shown or seen, its interpretation or unveiling. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Ἐπιφάνεια appearing(hence our epiphany ), is used in profane Greek of the appearance of a higher power in order to aid men. In the New Testament by Paul only, and always of the second appearing of Christ in glory, except in 2 Timothy 1:10, where it signifies His first appearing in the flesh. See 2 Thessalonians 2:8; 1 Timothy 6:14; Titus 2:13. As distinguished from this, ἀπολάλυψις is the more comprehensive word. An apocalypse may include several ἐπιφάνειαι appearingsThe appearings are the media of the revealings. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Φανέρωσις manifestationonly twice in the New Testament; 1 Corinthians 12:7; 2 Corinthians 4:2. The kindred verb φανερόω tomake manifest, is of frequent occurrence. See on John 21:1. It is not easy, if possible, to show that this word has a less dignified sense than ἀποκάλυψις . The verb φανερόω is used of both the first and the second appearing of our Lord (1 Timothy 3:16; 1 John 1:2; 1 Peter 1:20; Colossians 3:4; 1 Peter 5:4). See also John 2:11; John 21:1. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Some distinguish between φανέρωσις as an external manifestation, to the senses, but single and isolated; while ἀποκάλυψις is an inward and abiding disclosure. According to these, the Apocalypse or unveiling, precedes and produces the φανέρωσις or manifestation. The Apocalypse contemplates the thing revealed; the manifestation, the persons to whom it is revealed. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The Revelation here is the unveiling of the divine mysteries.Of Jesus ChristNot the manifestation or disclosure of Jesus Christ, but the revelation given by Him.To shew ( δεῖξαι )Frequent in Revelation (Revelation 4:1; Revelation 17:1; Revelation 21:9; Revelation 22:1). Construe with ἔδωκεν gavegave him to shew. Compare “I will give him to sit” (Revelation 3:21): “It was given to hurt” (Revelation 7:2): “It was given him to do;” (A.V. “had power to do;” Revelation 13:14).Servants ( δούλοις )Properly, bond-servants. See on Matthew 20:26; see on Mark 9:35.Must ( δεῖ )As the decree of the absolute and infallible God.Shortly come to pass ( γενέσθαι ἐν τάχει )For the phrase ἐν τάχει shortlysee Luke 18:8, where yet long delay is implied. Expressions like this must be understood, not according to human measurement of time, but rather as in 2 Peter 3:8. The idea is, before long, as time is computed by God. The aorist infinitive γενέσθαι is not begin to come to pass, but denotes a complete fulfilment: must shortly come to pass in their entirety. He sent ( ἀποστείλας )See on Matthew 10:2, Matthew 10:16.Signified ( ἐσήμανεν )From σῆμα asign. Hence, literally, give a sign or token. The verb occurs outside of John's writings only in Acts 11:28; Acts 25:27. See John 12:33; John 18:32; John 21:19. This is its only occurrence in Revelation. The word is appropriate to the symbolic character of the revelation, and so in John 12:33, where Christ predicts the mode of His death in a figure. Compare sign, Revelation 12:1.Angel ( ἀγγέλου )Strictly, a messenger. See Matthew 11:10; Luke 8:24; Luke 9:52. Compare the mediating angel in the visions of Daniel and Zechariah (Daniel 8:15, Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21; Daniel 10:10; Zechariah 1:19). See on John 1:51.ServantDesignating the prophetic office. See Isaiah 59:5; Amos 3:7; compare Revelation 19:10; Revelation 22:9.JohnJohn does not name himself in the Gospel or in the Epistles. Here “we are dealing with prophecy, and prophecy requires the guarantee of the individual who is inspired to utter it” (Milligan). Compare Daniel 8:1; Daniel 9:2. [source]

What do the individual words in Acts 9:1 mean?

- But Saul still breathing out threats and murder toward the disciples of the Lord having gone to the high priest
Δὲ Σαῦλος ἔτι ἐμπνέων ἀπειλῆς καὶ φόνου εἰς τοὺς μαθητὰς τοῦ Κυρίου προσελθὼν τῷ ἀρχιερεῖ

  - 
Parse: Article, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Σαῦλος  Saul 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: Σαῦλος  
Sense: the Jewish name of the apostle Paul.
ἔτι  still 
Parse: Adverb
Root: ἔτι  
Sense: yet, still.
ἐμπνέων  breathing  out 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἐμπνέω  
Sense: to breathe in or on.
ἀπειλῆς  threats 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: ἀπειλή  
Sense: a threatening, threat.
φόνου  murder 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: φόνος  
Sense: murder, slaughter.
εἰς  toward 
Parse: Preposition
Root: εἰς  
Sense: into, unto, to, towards, for, among.
μαθητὰς  disciples 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: μαθητής  
Sense: a learner, pupil, disciple.
τοῦ  of  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Κυρίου  Lord 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: κύριος  
Sense: he to whom a person or thing belongs, about which he has power of deciding; master, lord.
προσελθὼν  having  gone 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: προσέρχομαι  
Sense: to come to, approach.
τῷ  to  the 
Parse: Article, Dative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἀρχιερεῖ  high  priest 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: ἀρχιερεύς  
Sense: chief priest, high priest.