What does Saul mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
שָׁא֔וּל a Benjamite 74
שָׁא֖וּל a Benjamite 54
שָׁאוּל֙ a Benjamite 45
שָׁא֗וּל a Benjamite 34
שָׁא֑וּל a Benjamite 29
שָׁא֜וּל a Benjamite 22
שָׁא֣וּל a Benjamite 21
שָׁא֛וּל upon 19
שָׁאֽוּל a Benjamite 19
σαῦλος the Jewish name of the apostle Paul. 8
לְשָׁא֔וּל a Benjamite 7
σαοὺλ the Jewish name of the apostle Paul. 6
שָׁא֨וּל a Benjamite 5
שָׁא֥וּל a Benjamite 5
וְשָׁא֗וּל a Benjamite 5
לְשָׁאֽוּל a Benjamite 4
לְשָׁא֑וּל a Benjamite 4
וְשָׁא֣וּל a Benjamite 4
σαῦλον the Jewish name of the apostle Paul. 4
σαούλ the Jewish name of the apostle Paul. 3
שָׁא֧וּל a Benjamite 3
שָׁא֤וּל a Benjamite 3
וְשָׁא֛וּל a Benjamite 3
לְשָׁאוּל֙ a Benjamite 3
שָׁא֡וּל a Benjamite 3
σαύλου the Jewish name of the apostle Paul. 2
וְשָׁאוּל֙ a Benjamite 2
שָׁאוּל֩ a Benjamite 2
וְשָׁא֖וּל a Benjamite 2
וְשָׁאוּל֩ a Benjamite 2
וְשָׁא֤וּל a Benjamite 2
לְשָׁא֖וּל a Benjamite 2
וּלְשָׁא֣וּל a Benjamite 2
לְשָׁ֫א֥וּל a Benjamite 1
שָׁא֟וּל a Benjamite 1
שָׁא֞וּל a Benjamite 1
וְשָׁא֥וּל a Benjamite 1
מִשָּׁא֖וּל a Benjamite 1
שָׁ֠אוּל a Benjamite 1
וְשָׁא֞וּל a Benjamite 1
שָׁאוּל֒ a Benjamite 1
؟ שָׁא֑וּל a Benjamite 1
לְשָׁא֗וּל a Benjamite 1
לְשָׁא֜וּל a Benjamite 1
؟ לְשָׁא֔וּל a Benjamite 1
וַיַּחֲזֵ֥ק to strengthen 1
σαύλῳ the Jewish name of the apostle Paul. 1
שָׁ֝א֗וּל a Benjamite 1

Definitions Related to Saul

H7586


   1 a Benjamite, son of Kish, and the 1st king of Israel.
   2 an early king of Edom and a successor of Samlah.
   3 a son of Simeon.
   4 a Levite, son of Uzziah.
   Additional Information: Saul or Shaul = “desired”.
   

G4549


   1 the Jewish name of the apostle Paul.
   2 the son of Kish and the first king of Israel.
   Additional Information: Saul = “desired”.
   

G4569


   1 the Jewish name of the apostle Paul.
   Additional Information: Saul = “desired”.
   

H2388


   1 to strengthen, prevail, harden, be strong, become strong, be courageous, be firm, grow firm, be resolute, be sore.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to be strong, grow strong.
            1a1a to prevail, prevail upon.
            1a1b to be firm, be caught fast, be secure.
            1a1c to press, be urgent.
            1a1d to grow stout, grow rigid, grow hard (bad sense).
            1a1e to be severe, be grievous.
         1a2 to strengthen.
      1b (Piel).
         1b1 to make strong.
         1b2 to restore to strength, give strength.
         1b3 to strengthen, sustain, encourage.
         1b4 to make strong, make bold, encourage.
         1b5 to make firm.
         1b6 to make rigid, make hard.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to make strong, strengthen.
         1c2 to make firm.
         1c3 to display strength.
         1c4 to make severe.
         1c5 to support.
         1c6 to repair.
         1c7 to prevail, prevail upon.
         1c8 to have or take or keep hold of, retain, hold up, sustain, support.
         1c9 to hold, contain.
      1d (Hithpael).
         1d1 to strengthen oneself.
         1d2 to put forth strength, use one’s strength.
         1d3 to withstand.
         1d4 to hold strongly with.
         

Frequency of Saul (original languages)

Frequency of Saul (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Saul
SAUL . 1 . Son of Kish, a Benjamite, the first king of Israel. We first meet him about to abandon the search for his father’s asses, when his servant suggested consulting Samuel . As it was customary to bring a present to a seer, and the wallet was empty, Saul hesitated till the servant produced the fourth part of a shekel of silver to give to the man of God. The seer, Divinely prepared for their arrival, met them as he was on his way to the high place to sacrifice. A banquet was made ready, and special honour paid to Saul by Samuel. The seer told the seekers that the asses had been found, and broached the matter of the kingdom to Saul, and anointed him as he was leaving. Saul was given certain signs in attestation of Samuel’s message, and after leaving the seer’s house, where he and his servant spent the night, he met a band of prophets, and soon was prophesying among them, to the marvel of his acquaintances ( 1 Samuel 10:10 ). This narrative gives no hint that the people asked for a king, or that his selection would be displeasing to either Samuel or Jehovah.
The account is interrupted at 1 Samuel 10:17 by one of a different temper. The people demand a king, which Samuel interprets to be a rejection of Jehovah, their true king, and Saul, after protest, is elected by lot at Mizpah. He remained quietly at home till Nahash’s cruel demand that the men of Jabesh-gilead should surrender to him, and each one lose the right eye, roused him. He was ploughing in the field when the news reached him, and immediately sacrificed the oxen, sending out parts of the sacrifice to his brethren with the command that they should follow him. When the army was mustered he marched to Jabesh-gilead and administered a crushing defeat to Nahash, after which his grateful countrymen made him king at Gilgal (ch. 11). A still greater necessity for a king appears in the encroachments of the Philistines. Saul and Jonathan , his son, were encamped in Michmash and Gibeah (Geba), when Jonathan smote the ‘garrison’ (?) of the Philistines in Geba, thus precipitating the struggle. The plan of the Philistines was to send out plundering parties, and Jonathan threw the whole camp into confusion by surprising one of its guerilla headquarters ( 1 Samuel 13:1-3 , 1 Samuel 14:1 f.). When Saul heard of the flight of the enemy he inquired of the oracle what to do, but the rout was so apparent that he joined pursuit without the answer. The destruction of the enemy would have been greater had not Saul put a taboo on food. In the evening the famished warriors fell upon the cattle, and ate without sacrificing till the reported impiety reached the ears of Saul, who legitimated the meal by sacrificing at a great stone. As he failed to receive an answer from the oracle, when he Inquired whether he should pursue the Philistines farther, Saul concluded that some one had sinned. An inquiry was taken to the oracle, and the fault was found to lie with Jonathan, who confessed to having tasted honey. He was, however, delivered by the people from the penalty, for Saul had sworn that he should die ( 1 Samuel 14:17-45 ).
This narrative (chs. 13, 14) is interrupted at 1 Samuel 13:8 to 1 Samuel 15:35 by an account which represents Samuel as taking issue with Saul for sacrificing at the end of an appointed period of seven days, and announcing his rejection (See art. Samuel, p. 823 n ). We have from another source (ch. 15) a story of the encounter with Amalek , against whom Samuel sent Saul with instructions to destroy men, women, children, and spoil. Saul, however, spares Agag, and part of the booty. This is now assigned as the reason for his rejection. Saul acknowledged his fault, but begged Samuel to honour him before the people by sacrificing with him. In his importunity he lays hold of Samuel’s garment, which is rent, and becomes the symbol of the kingdom wrested from Saul. Samuel relents and worships with him.
The second stage of Saul’s life concerns his relations with David . Saul is advised to employ music as a relief from a deep-seated mental trouble, called ‘an evil spirit from the Lord.’ David, a skilled harper and celebrated soldier, is engaged. Saul loves him, and makes him his armour-bearer ( 1 Samuel 16:14-23 ). The Philistines again assemble, this time at Socoh; Goliath issues his challenge, but no one responds. The lad David, who had come to the camp to visit his brethren, learns of the proffered reward, meets the boaster in single combat, and kills him. In this story Saul seems weak, irresolute, and unacquainted with David (ch. 17). David’s growing popularity and prowess lead Saul to attempt his life. Michal, Saul’s daughter, is offered to him in marriage in return for one hundred Philistines. The hazard involved failed to accomplish his death. Then David’s house is surrounded, but Michal manages David’s escape through a window ( 1 Samuel 18:6-9 , 1 Samuel 20:29 , 1 Samuel 19:11-17 ). Merab, Saul’s elder daughter, was also offered to David, but withdrawn when he should have had her. This seems to be an effort to explain why David did not receive Saul’s daughter after he had slain the giant. David flees to Ramah, and Saul, seeking him there, is seized with the prophetic frenzy and rendered powerless ( 1 Samuel 19:18-24 ). David again flees, and receives help from the priests at Nob. So enraged was Saul that he ordered the slaughter of the entire priesthood there (chs. 20 21). Saul had David all but captured in the hills of Ziph, when a raid of the Philistines called him away ( 1 Samuel 23:14-29 ). Twice Saul was in the power of David, who refused to harm the Lord’s anointed (chs. 24, 26).
The circumstances connected with Saul’s death are told in a dramatic way. The Philistines had gathered together at Aphek, while Saul held the fateful plains of Megiddo at Jezreel. Answer came from neither prophet nor priest. Then in despair he applied to the necromancer at Endor, but received only a hopeless message. The battle joins; Saul’s sons are slain; sore pressed, he calls on his armour bearer to slay him, but being refused he falls upon his sword and dies. The following day the Philistines severed the heads of Saul and his sons, and exposed the bodies on the walls of Beth-shan, whence the grateful Jabesh-gileadites brought them away by night (chs. 28, 31). An Amalekite, who brought the story of Saul’s death to David, claimed that he himself slew him, and was promptly executed by David (2 Samuel 1:1-16 ).
2 . Saul of Tarsus. See Paul.
J. H. Stevenson.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Saul, King of Israel
After Israel’s demand to have a king as the other nations, God directed Samuel to Saul. At his first meeting with Saul, Samuel showed him privately that he was to be king (1 Samuel 9; 1 Samuel 10:1). Later, at a gathering of representative family heads from all Israel, Saul was publicly chosen to be king (1 Samuel 10:17-24). An official crowning ceremony followed in due course (1 Samuel 11:14-15).
Victories and failures
Of the three signs that Samuel had announced to Saul as confirmation of the promised kingship, the most important was the coming of God’s Spirit upon him (1 Samuel 10:1-8). This changed Saul from an ordinary farmer into a national leader (1 Samuel 10:9-13). Because certain people doubted Saul’s suitability, he made no immediate change in the country’s administration, but returned to his home in Gibeah (1 Samuel 10:25-27). After leading Israel to victory in his first battle, he won the support of the whole nation (1 Samuel 11).
Saul was to be under the spiritual direction of Samuel. But Saul wanted complete power, religious as well as political. Therefore, when a suitable occasion arose he rebelled against the limitation that God had placed on his authority. In punishment God announced that one day he would take the kingdom from Saul and give it to another (1 Samuel 13:1-14). God confirmed this judgment on a later occasion when Saul again deliberately disobeyed his instructions through Samuel (1 Samuel 15:1-34).
After this, Saul never saw Samuel again (1 Samuel 14:47-48). Without Samuel’s guidance, his rule from that time on was disastrous. When, at the end of his reign, he made a desperate attempt to consult the spirit of the dead Samuel, he merely received further confirmation of God’s judgment upon him (1 Samuel 28:3-19). (For details of events in this period of Saul’s life see SAMUEL.)
Although Saul was at times calm and tolerant (1 Samuel 10:27; 1 Samuel 11:12-13), at other times he was rash and unpredictable (1 Samuel 14:24-30; 1 Samuel 14:38-45; 1 Samuel 18:10-11). Nevertheless, he brought stability and security to Israel through victories over all those nations that had previously attacked around Israel’s borders (1 Samuel 15:35; 1 Samuel 15:7; 1 Samuel 17:52-53).
Saul and David
God chose David as the man who would one day replace Saul as king. As David grew in experience and maturity, the special power of God’s Spirit began to work through him rather than Saul (1 Samuel 16:13-14). After David’s victory over Goliath, Saul, unaware of God’s purposes for David, made him his armour-bearer and full-time court musician (1 Samuel 16:21-23; 1 Samuel 18:2). Over the next few years Saul became more and more unstable, emotionally and mentally, while David became a popular hero through his military victories. Saul became suspicious that David might be the man to replace him, and in a fit of jealousy tried to kill him (1 Samuel 18:5-11).
This began a long conflict between Saul and David. Saul tried by every possible means to get rid of David, but David steadfastly refused to do anything against Saul. Saul sent David on dangerous missions, hoping he might get killed, but his plans repeatedly failed (1 Samuel 18:13-17; 1 Samuel 18:25). He sent his servants to kill David, and he himself tried to spear him, but all his efforts were without success (1 Samuel 19:1; 1 Samuel 19:10-11). When David sought safety with Samuel, Saul and his servants pursued him, but the Spirit of God protected David by overpowering Saul and his men (1 Samuel 19:18-24).
Year after year the chase went on. The mad Saul slaughtered any he thought had helped David (1 Samuel 22:18-19), whereas David on two occasions spared Saul’s life when he could easily have killed him (1 Samuel 24; 1 Samuel 26:6-25). (For details of events in this period of Saul’s life see DAVID.)
Saul’s tragic life came to an end during a battle with the Philistines on Mt Gilboa. When wounded in the fighting, he took his own life rather than allow himself to be captured and shamefully treated by his enemies (1 Samuel 31:1-4). Loyal Israelites gave him an honourable burial (1 Samuel 31:8-13), and David wrote a song in memory of him. The song also honoured Saul’s son Jonathan, who died in the same battle (2 Samuel 1:17-27).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Saul
Asked for.
A king of Edom (Genesis 36:37,38 ); called Shaul in 1 Chronicles 1:48 .
The son of Kish (probably his only son, and a child of prayer, "asked for"), of the tribe of Benjamin, the first king of the Jewish nation. The singular providential circumstances connected with his election as king are recorded in 1 Samuel 810-10 . His father's she-asses had strayed, and Saul was sent with a servant to seek for them. Leaving his home at Gibeah (10:5, "the hill of God," A.V.; lit., as in RSV marg., "Gibeah of God"), Saul and his servant went toward the north-west over Mount Ephraim, and then turning north-east they came to "the land of Shalisha," and thence eastward to the land of Shalim, and at length came to the district of Zuph, near Samuel's home at Ramah (9:5-10). At this point Saul proposed to return from the three days' fruitless search, but his servant suggested that they should first consult the "seer." Hearing that he was about to offer sacrifice, the two hastened into Ramah, and "behold, Samuel came out against them," on his way to the "bamah", i.e., the "height", where sacrifice was to be offered; and in answer to Saul's question, "Tell me, I pray thee, where the seer's house is," Samuel made himself known to him. Samuel had been divinely prepared for his coming (9:15-17), and received Saul as his guest. He took him with him to the sacrifice, and then after the feast "communed with Saul upon the top of the house" of all that was in his heart. On the morrow Samuel "took a vial of oil and poured it on his head," and anointed Saul as king over Israel ((9:25-10:8),), giving him three signs in confirmation of his call to be king. When Saul reached his home in Gibeah the last of these signs was fulfilled, and the Sprit of God came upon him, and "he was turned into another man." The simple countryman was transformed into the king of Israel, a remarkable change suddenly took place in his whole demeanour, and the people said in their astonishment, as they looked on the stalwart son of Kish, "Is Saul also among the prophets?", a saying which passed into a "proverb." (Comp 19:24.) The intercourse between Saul and Samuel was as yet unknown to the people. The "anointing" had been in secret. But now the time had come when the transaction must be confirmed by the nation. Samuel accordingly summoned the people to a solemn assembly "before the Lord" at Mizpeh. Here the lot was drawn (10:17-27), and it fell upon Saul, and when he was presented before them, the stateliest man in all Israel, the air was rent for the first time in Israel by the loud cry, "God save the king!" He now returned to his home in Gibeah, attended by a kind of bodyguard, "a band of men whose hearts God had touched." On reaching his home he dismissed them, and resumed the quiet toils of his former life.
Soon after this, on hearing of the conduct of Nahash the Ammonite at Jabeshgilead (q.v.), an army out of all the tribes of Israel rallied at his summons to the trysting-place at Bezek, and he led them forth a great army to battle, gaining a complete victory over the Ammonite invaders at Jabesh (11:1-11). Amid the universal joy occasioned by this victory he was now fully recognized as the king of Israel. At the invitation of Samuel "all the people went to Gilgal, and there they made Saul king before the Lord in Gilgal." Samuel now officially anointed him as king (11:15). Although Samuel never ceased to be a judge in Israel, yet now his work in that capacity practically came to an end.
Saul now undertook the great and difficult enterprise of freeing the land from its hereditary enemies the Philistines, and for this end he gathered together an army of 3,000 men (1 Samuel 13:1,2 ). The Philistines were encamped at Geba. Saul, with 2,000 men, occupied Michmash and Mount Bethel; while his son Jonathan, with 1,000 men, occupied Gibeah, to the south of Geba, and seemingly without any direction from his father "smote" the Philistines in Geba. Thus roused, the Philistines, who gathered an army of 30,000 chariots and 6,000 horsemen, and "people as the sand which is on the sea-shore in multitude," encamped in Michmash, which Saul had evacuated for Gilgal. Saul now tarried for seven days in Gilgal before making any movement, as Samuel had appointed (10:8); but becoming impatient on the seventh day, as it was drawing to a close, when he had made an end of offering the burnt offering, Samuel appeared and warned him of the fatal consequences of his act of disobedience, for he had not waited long enough (13:13,14).
When Saul, after Samuel's departure, went out from Gilgal with his 600 men, his followers having decreased to that number (13:15), against the Philistines at Michmash (q.v.), he had his head-quarters under a pomegrante tree at Migron, over against Michmash, the Wady esSuweinit alone intervening. Here at Gibeah-Geba Saul and his army rested, uncertain what to do. Jonathan became impatient, and with his armour-bearer planned an assault against the Philistines, unknown to Saul and the army (14:1-15). Jonathan and his armour-bearer went down into the wady, and on their hands and knees climbed to the top of the narrow rocky ridge called Bozez, where was the outpost of the Philistine army. They surprised and then slew twenty of the Philistines, and immediately the whole host of the Philistines was thrown into disorder and fled in great terror. "It was a very great trembling;" a supernatural panic seized the host. Saul and his 600 men, a band which speedily increased to 10,000, perceiving the confusion, pursued the army of the Philistines, and the tide of battle rolled on as far as to Bethaven, halfway between Michmash and Bethel. The Philistines were totally routed. "So the Lord saved Israel that day." While pursuing the Philistines, Saul rashly adjured the people, saying, "Cursed be the man that eateth any food until evening." But though faint and weary, the Israelites "smote the Philistines that day from Michmash to Aijalon" (a distance of from 15 to 20 miles). Jonathan had, while passing through the wood in pursuit of the Philistines, tasted a little of the honeycomb which was abundant there (14:27). This was afterwards discovered by Saul (ver. 42), and he threatened to put his son to death. The people, however, interposed, saying, "There shall not one hair of his head fall to the ground." He whom God had so signally owned, who had "wrought this great salvation in Israel," must not die. "Then Saul went up from following the Philistines: and the Philistines went to their own place" (1 Samuel 14:24-46 ); and thus the campaign against the Philistines came to an end. This was Saul's second great military success.
Saul's reign, however, continued to be one of almost constant war against his enemies round about (14:47,48), in all of which he proved victorious. The war against the Amalekites is the only one which is recorded at length (1 Samuel 15 ). These oldest and hereditary (Exodus 17:8 ; Numbers 14:43-45 ) enemies of Israel occupied the territory to the south and south-west of Palestine. Samuel summoned Saul to execute the "ban" which God had pronounced (Deuteronomy 25:17-19 ) on this cruel and relentless foe of Israel. The cup of their iniquity was now full. This command was "the test of his moral qualification for being king." Saul proceeded to execute the divine command; and gathering the people together, marched from Telaim (1 Samuel 15:4 ) against the Amalekites, whom he smote "from Havilah until thou comest to Shur," utterly destroying "all the people with the edge of the sword", i.e., all that fell into his hands. He was, however, guilty of rebellion and disobedience in sparing Agag their king, and in conniving at his soldiers' sparing the best of the sheep and cattle; and Samuel, following Saul to Gilgal, in the Jordan valley, said unto him, "Because thou hast rejected the word of the Lord, he also hath rejected thee from being king" (15:23). The kingdom was rent from Saul and was given to another, even to David, whom the Lord chose to be Saul's successor, and whom Samuel anointed (16:1-13). From that day "the spirit of the Lord departed from Saul, and an evil spirit from the Lord troubled him." He and Samuel parted only to meet once again at one of the schools of the prophets.
David was now sent for as a "cunning player on an harp" (1 Samuel 16:16,18 ), to play before Saul when the evil spirit troubled him, and thus was introduced to the court of Saul. He became a great favourite with the king. At length David returned to his father's house and to his wonted avocation as a shepherd for perhaps some three years. The Philistines once more invaded the land, and gathered their army between Shochoh and Azekah, in Ephes-dammim, on the southern slope of the valley of Elah. Saul and the men of Israel went forth to meet them, and encamped on the northern slope of the same valley which lay between the two armies. It was here that David slew Goliath of Gath, the champion of the Philistines (17:4-54), an exploit which led to the flight and utter defeat of the Philistine army. Saul now took David permanently into his service (18:2); but he became jealous of him (ver. 9), and on many occasions showed his enmity toward him (ver. 10,11), his enmity ripening into a purpose of murder which at different times he tried in vain to carry out.
After some time the Philistines "gathered themselves together" in the plain of Esdraelon, and pitched their camp at Shunem, on the slope of Little Hermon; and Saul "gathered all Israel together," and "pitched in Gilboa" (1 Samuel 28:3-14 ). Being unable to discover the mind of the Lord, Saul, accompanied by two of his retinue, betook himself to the "witch of Endor," some 7 or 8 miles distant. Here he was overwhelmed by the startling communication that was mysteriously made to him by Samuel (ver. 16-19), who appeared to him. "He fell straightway all along on the earth, and was sore afraid, because of the words of Samuel" (ver. 20). The Philistine host "fought against Israel: and the men of Israel fled before the Philistines, and fell down slain in Mount Gilboa" (31:1). In his despair at the disaster that had befallen his army, Saul "took a sword and fell upon it." And the Philistines on the morrow "found Saul and his three sons fallen in Mount Gilboa." Having cut off his head, they sent it with his weapons to Philistia, and hung up the skull in the temple of Dagon at Ashdod. They suspended his headless body, with that of Jonathan, from the walls of Bethshan. The men of Jabesh-gilead afterwards removed the bodies from this position; and having burnt the flesh, they buried the bodies under a tree at Jabesh. The remains were, however, afterwards removed to the family sepulchre at Zelah (2 Samuel 21:13,14 ). (See DAVID .)
"Who is also called Paul" (q.v.), the circumcision name of the apostle, given to him, perhaps, in memory of King Saul ( Acts 7:58 ; 8:1 ; 9:1 ).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Saul of Tarsus
See PAUL.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Saul
(a) (d. 877 BCE) A righteous member of the Tribe of Benjamin. Anointed by Samuel as the first Israelite king in 880 BCE. When he failed to destroy Amalek as commanded by G-d, Samuel anointed David in his stead. Overcome with jealousy, Saul pursued David until he himself was killed in battle by the Philistines. (b) A common Jewish name.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Saul
(Σαούλ)
Saul the son of Kish, of the tribe of Benjamin, is mentioned in St. Paul’s address at Pisidian Antioch as the first king whom God gave to Israel. After he had reigned 40 years, God removed him, and raised up David to be king over Israel, a man after His heart (Acts 13:21-22). Saul of Tarsus could not fail to be profoundly interested in the career of the great king whose name he bore and to whose tribe he belonged. The story of the hero who was called against his will to the throne, and who lived and died fighting for the liberty of his country, has all the elements of high tragedy. By separating the later from the earlier and more authentic narrative contained in 1 Sam., historical criticism enables the reader to understand more fully and to appraise more highly the real services of this protagonist who turned the tide of Philistine conquest into defeat and paved the way for the still greater king who consolidated the Hebrew monarchy. For a fine psychological study of his character, see A. B. Davidson, The Called of God, 1902, p. 143 ff.
James Strahan.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Saul
Personal name meaning, “asked for.” First king of Israel and the Hebrew name of Paul, the apostle. See Paul .
Old Testament The Hebrew name Sha' ul is used of four persons in the Old Testament. It is usually rendered Shaul for a king of Edom ( Genesis 36:37-38 ), the last son of Simeon (Genesis 46:10 ), and a Levite of the Kohathites (1 Chronicles 6:24 ). Saul, however, primarily refers to the first king of a united Israel, a tall and handsome son of Kish from the tribe of Benjamin (1Samuel 9:1-2,1 Samuel 9:21 ). Chosen by God (1 Samuel 9:15-17 ) and secretly anointed by Samuel (1 Samuel 10:1 ), Saul was later selected publicly by lot (1 Samuel 10:17-24 ). Despite some people's skepticism (1 Samuel 10:27 ), he proved himself an able leader by delivering the city of Jabesh-gilead and was acclaimed king at Gilgal (1 Samuel 11:1-15 ).
The numbers in 1 Samuel 13:1 are incomplete in the Hebrew text, but Saul's reign is generally dated about 1020-1000 B.C. He made his capital at “Gibeah of Saul” (“Saul's hill,” 1 Samuel 11:4 ), probably tell el-Ful, three miles north of Jerusalem where excavations have uncovered contemporary foundations of a modest fortresslike palace. From Gibeah, Saul drove the Philistines from the hill country (1 Samuel 13:19-14:23 ) and fought other enemies of Israel (1 Samuel 14:47-48 ).
A tragic figure, Saul's heart was initially changed; he had even prophesied (1 Samuel 10:9-13 ). See Prophets. His presumptuous offering (1 Samuel 13:8-14 ), however, and violation of a holy war ban led to his break with Samuel and rejection by God (1 Samuel 15:7-23 ). The spirit of the Lord left Saul and was replaced by an evil spirit which tormented him. David is introduced as a musician who soothed him by playing the lyre (1 Samuel 16:14-23 ). After the Goliath episode, Saul became jealous and fearful of David (1Samuel 18:7,1 Samuel 18:12 ), eventually making several spontaneous and indirect attempts on David's life (1Samuel 18:10-11,1 Samuel 18:25 ; 1Samuel 19:1,1 Samuel 19:9-11 ). Saul's fits of rage, his obsession with David, and the slaughter of the priests at Nob (1 Samuel 22:17-19 ), make it appear as though he suffered from some sort of psychotic state. His final wretched condition is betrayed by his consultation of the witch at En-dor (1 Samuel 28:7-8 ). The following day, Saul and three sons were killed at the hands of the Philistines on Mount Gilboa (1 Samuel 31:1 ). Saul's body was beheaded and hung on the walls of Beth-shan, from whence it was rescued and buried by the grateful inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead (1 Samuel 31:8-13 ).
The enigma of Saul was sensed by David who refused to lift his hand against “the Lord's anointed” (1Samuel 26:9-11,1 Samuel 26:23 ) and at his death provided a fitting elegy (2 Samuel 1:17-27 ).
New Testament Though the king Saul is mentioned in passing, most occurrences of the name in the New Testament refer to the Hebrew name of the apostle Paul.
Daniel C. Browning, Jr.
Webster's Dictionary - Saul
(1):
(n.) Same as Sal, the tree.
(2):
(n.) Soul.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Saul
King of Israel. His name is as remarkable as his history, if it be derived, as some have thought, from Sheol, or Shaal, hell, or sepulchre. His history we have at large in the first book of Samuel. The great apostle Paul, whose name was originally Saul may, it is probable, have had his name changed at his conversion on this account: but this, the reader will recollect, is only conjecture.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Saul
AND SAMUEL SAID, I AM THE SEER, AND TOMORROW I WILL TELL THEE ALL THAT IS IN THINE HEART
DR. NEWMAN, after attempting three times to preach on Saul, is compelled to confess that Saul's character continues to be obscure to him, and he warns us that we must be exceedingly cautious while considering Saul's so obscure character. Now, if Saul's character was still so obscure to the subtlest and the acutest of all our preachers, I cannot expect to be able to say much to purpose upon it. At the same time, with so much told us about Saul; and told us in such a plain, open, and straightforward style; and told us, as it must have been, for our instruction, we may surely hope to be able, amid all his acknowledged obscurity, to gather sufficient instruction out of Saul to justify us in taking him up for our subject this evening.
But, unhappily, the obscurity begins further back than Saul. The obscurity begins with Saul's father and mother. We never hear of Saul's mother; but what kind of a father can Kish have been? We know all about Samuel. There is no obscurity about Samuel. All Israel, from Dan even to Beersheba, knew that Samuel was established to be a prophet of the Lord; all Israel but Kish and his son Saul. Hannah, and Samuel, and Eli, and Hophni and Phinehas, and Ichabod were all household words, as we say, in every household in Israel. Only, there was a man of Benjamin whose name was Kish, and he had a son whose name was Saul, a choice young man, and a goodly, but neither father nor son, neither Kish nor Saul, had ever heard of Samuel. Kish the father, and Saul the son, were so busy breeding asses that they made light of Samuel, and would not come. Samuel was an old man by this time. Samuel had grown grey in a service that made all Israel acknowledge and know God from the one end of the land to the other; but Saul, all the time, did not know Samuel when he saw him. 'Tell me, I pray thee,' said Saul to a stranger he met on his way when he was in despair about his father's lost asses, 'where is the Seer's house.' 'I am the Seer myself,' said Samuel. 'Come with me, and I will tell thee all that is in thine heart.' Yes, there is some quite inexplicable obscurity about Kish as well as about Saul; an obscurity that perplexes us, and throws us out at the very opening of his son's sad history. And yet, when we turn back and begin to read Saul's whole history over again with our eye on the object; when we stop and look round about us as we read, the ancient obscurity begins to pass off, but only to let alarm and apprehension for ourselves and for our own sons take its place. The prophet Samuel had been a public man, as we say, long before Saul was born. And, but for Saul, we would have said that there could not possibly be a child, or a youth, or a grown-up man in all Israel who had not often sat at Samuel's feet and drunk in his divine words. But the most public men, after all, have only their own public. Saul staggers us and throws us out till we look at ourselves and at the men round about us, and then we soon see, what had before been obscure to us, that our inborn and indulged tastes, likings, dispositions, inclinations, and pursuits rule us also, shape us, occupy us, and decide for us the men we know and the life we lead. Josephus says that Samuel had an inborn love of justice. But Saul had inherited from Kish an inborn and an absorbing love of cattle and sheep; and, till they were lost, Saul had no errand to Samuel's city. Why hold up our hands at Saul's obscurity, and at Saul's ignorance of Samuel? We have it in ourselves. We also see what we bring eyes to see, and ears to hear, and hearts to love. To go no further; take just yesterday's journals. They were full of good books. They were full of public meetings, lectures, classes, sermons, speeches, till reading men, and thinking men, and men set on their own self-improvement and their own salvation from sin, do not know where to turn or what to do next, the doors of life are so many and so wide open. Let him who passed all that before him yesterday, and then laid out all this week, redeeming all the time, that he might read the best and hear the best-let that man, and let no other man, cast the first stone at stupid Saul and his stupid father. For Saul was not more stupid among the pastures of Benjamin than we are among the churches, and the classes, and the libraries, and the reading-rooms, and the booksellers' shops of Edinburgh. 'Behold now,' said Saul's servant when the asses were hopelessly lost, 'there is in this city a man of God, and he is an honourable man: all that he saith cometh surely to pass; now, let us go thither.' If you have no more sense of religion and life than Saul and his father had, at least, like them, see that you have a religious servant. Saul's servant knew Samuel. Saul's servant had sat at Samuel's feet as often as he had a holiday. He had bargained with Kish for a day now and then to see Samuel when he was on circuit, and to hear the prophet when he preached. And your servant who stipulates to get out to church, and takes less wages in order to do so, he will be able to tell you where the Seer lives when you have lost all, and yourself to the bargain. Insignificant people-the sacred writer does not even know that servant's name-have sometimes most important information. Saul was led up to the door of his earthly kingdom by the piety of his father's servant; and you may be led up some day to the door of the heavenly kingdom by one of your servants who has interests and acquaintances and experiences that up to tonight you know nothing about.
After Samuel had anointed Saul to the kingdom, we come upon this very obscure Scripture: 'And it was so that when Saul had turned his back to go from Samuel, God gave Saul another heart, and the Spirit of God came upon Saul, and he prophesied,' Saul, you exclaim, a prophet! Saul with 'another heart'! Saul with the Spirit of God upon him! You cannot understand. No. But words must be read in the light of facts; and Bible words in the light of Bible facts. Profession must be judged by practice, and faith shown by works. And 'another heart' judged what it is by what comes out of it. Nay, prophecy itself is only a sounding brass or a tinkling cymbal if the prophet has not charity. 'Another heart' has more meanings than one in Holy Scripture; and so has the Spirit of God; and so has prophecy. Isaiah prophesied of the atoning death of Christ, but so did Caiaphas. The Spirit of God came upon Jesus at the Jordan, but He came also upon Samson at the camp of Dan, and upon Balaam beside the altar of Baal. Matthew Henry in two or three words makes clear to us all the obscurity of Saul's 'other heart.' 'Saul,' says the most sensible of commentators, 'has no longer the heart of a husbandman, concerned only with corn and cattle; he has now the heart of a statesman, a general, a prince. When God calls to service He will make fit for it. If He advances to another station, He will give another heart; and will preserve that heart to those who sincerely desire to serve Him.' so He will. But that is just what Saul, another heart and all, did not sincerely desire to do. And here hangs the true key to the whole of Saul's sad history. He was elected and crowned king over Israel, but he was as ignorant all the time of the God of Israel as he was of Samuel, the great prophet of the God of Israel. The Spirit of God came upon Saul for outward and earthly acts, but never for an inward change of heart. Saul prophesied, whatever that may mean; what he said has not been thought worthy of preservation; but after he had so prophesied he relapsed and remained the same man he had been before. Saul was like ninety-nine out of a hundred of us preachers. The truth is, another heart, prophetical spirit and all, Saul all along was little better than a heathen at heart. And hence it is that what has often been called the profanity of Saul's character scarcely rises to the dignity of profanity. Saul's most presumptuous sins scarcely attain to profaneness. You must have some sense of what is sacred before you can be really profane. But Saul has no such sense. In his youth he had not one spark of insight or interest in the religious life and worship of lsrael. He had never heard of Samuel. What he could not but hear he immediately forgot. When his sin found him out, and when salvation was at his very door, the poor graceless castaway had no higher request to make of Samuel than this: 'Honour me, I pray thee, before the people.' All sure marks of a man who has not learned the very first principles of the divine life. No. Saul the anointed king of Israel had all the time neither part not lot in the true kingdom of God. At the same time, in giving Saul another heart, the God of Israel gave Saul the greatest opportunity of his life to make himself a new heart. God suddenly made a break in the ungodly and heathenish life of the son of Kish. So much so that Saul for the moment was almost persuaded to become an Israelite indeed. Saul all his days was never so near the kingdom of heaven as when he said to Samuel, 'Am not I a Benjamite, of the smallest of the tribes of Israel, and my family the least of all the families of Benjamin? Wherefore, then, speakest thou so to me?' That is the language of a man whose heart is really touched for the time with divine grace. That is real humility; and humility is the root of all the graces, both natural and supernatural. And had Saul only dwelt on that thought; had he returned all his days to that thought; that thought dwelt upon and added to at every new occasion and fresh proof of God's goodness and his own ill deserts-that would soon have made Saul's heart a new heart; that would soon have made Saul another man. But it was not so to be with Saul. As time went on, and as trials and temptations beset Saul, a hard and stony heart, a spirit of rebellion, and pride, and envy, and jealousy, and despair took possession of Saul, and held possession of Saul to his terrible end.
No; there is no such obscurity about Saul getting another heart and yet that heart coming to nothing. We have all had the same thing in ourselves. We ourselves have gone out on an errand of duty or of pleasure, and have come back with another heart. We were for the time like new creatures. Very little more at that time would have made us new creatures altogether. Such surprises of providence, such opportunities of making ourselves a new heart, are occurring continually. Sometimes it has been at a time of sorrow, and sometimes at a time of joy and gladness. At the death of a father or a mother; at the time of leaving home to take our place in a lonely world; or, again, at that happy time when our loneliness was so graciously dealt with by God. God, I feel sure, lets no man become a married man, for instance, without giving him the great opportunity and the new start in religion He gave to Saul when He made him king of Israel. In the kingly heart that God gives to every bridegroom we are not far for the time from the kingdom of heaven. No man, the most heathen of men, ever became a bridegroom and a married man without having opportunities and intentions and commencements of a new heart and a better life. We have all had times when our hearts were too big for our bosoms. And at such times we were almost persuaded to become Christian men. Yes; at one time or other, and more than once, you have all had Saul's great opportunity. did you or did you not embrace it? The bare remembrance of those times of another heart all but brings them back again. Bring them back. You can. You still can, if you choose. And though their first impression must be somewhat faded and spent, let your resolution in God be all the greater that even yet you are determined to make yourself a new heart out of them. Determine to do it, and God will see it done. Say it, and see if He will not.
Had Saul's change of heart only held, had his conversion only become complete, Saul would have been one of the greatest of all the Old Testament men. Saul was not a common man. He was a choice young man, and a goodly; there was not among the children of Israel a goodlier person than he; from his shoulders upward he was higher than any of the people. He had a splendid body and a stately gait, and the very sins of his soul had a certain lurid grandeur about them also. After God gave Saul another heart his life was full for a time of the finest promise. What could have promised better than his strict silence to his inquiring uncle about his anointing by Samuel? Where a weaker man would have had his head turned and his tongue loosed, Saul told his uncle that the stray asses were at last found; but of the matter of the kingdom he was strictly silent. We are bound to put a good construction on Saul's silence in that matter. It is but fair and just to set Saul's silence that day down to humility and modesty. As also when he hid himself among the stuff on the day of his election. As also when he held his peace at the men of Belial mocking at his election. As also after his first great victory. Bring the men who say, Shall Saul rule over us, said the people, and put them to death this day. But Saul said, There shall not a man be put to death this day, for today the Lord hath wrought salvation in Israel. If all that is not to be set down to Saul's humility, self-command, and magnanimity, not to say piety, then Saul's character is obscure indeed. We would have had no hesitation in setting all that down to the best motives had it not been that all his future so terribly belied all such modesty, humility, self-command, magnanimity, and piety. The great preacher did not say it till he had felt it to be quite impossible to draw out Saul's obscure life into a consistent and open piece. And the more we work on Saul under that great preacher and after him, the more we feel the obscurity and the mystery of Saul's dark character. It would take a Shakespeare to put himself into Saul's place and let us see the obscure working of Saul's heart under all his temptations. But he has gone away and left us to deal with such characters as Esau, and Balaam, and Saul, and Judas for ourselves. Only, there is one dark passage toward the end of Saul's insane life that we need neither Shakespeare nor Newman to open up to us. Saul's mad and murderous envy of David is as clear as day to every man who puts its proper name on what goes on every day in his own evil heart.
Who is your Saul, my brethren? Who is the man that stands in the way of your promotion? Who sits in the seat that should by this time have been yours? Who is the man that casts the javelin of slander and detraction at your good name? Who has cost you home and friends by his spite, and malice, and jealousy? Mark that man. Never let your eye off that man. God will bring that man to your feet one day. He will lie under your sword some day soon. But touch not a hair of his head. Touch not the skirt of his robe, neither the spear at his bolster, nor the cruse at his side. Remember who and what you are. Remember what Name you bear, and walk worthy that day of that Name. Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them that despitefully use you and persecute you. Therefore, if thine enemy hunger, feed him; if he thirst, give him drink, Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good.
Oh! exclaims Thomas Shepard, the grievous shipwrecks of some great ships! We see some boards and planks lying in the mud at low water, but that is all!
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Saul
Hebrew SΗΑUL
1. An early king of Edom (Genesis 36:37-38).
2. Genesis 46:10.
3. 1 Chronicles 6:24.
4. First king of Israel. The names Kish and Ner, Nadab and Abi-nadab, Baal and Mephibosheth, recur in the genealogy in two generations. The family extends to Ezra's time. If the Zimri of 1 Chronicles 9:42 be the Zimri of 1 Kings 16 it is the last stroke of the family of Saul for the kingdom. Saul was son of Kish, son of Ner, son of Abiel or Jehiel. 1 Samuel 9:1 omits Ner, the intermediate link, and makes Kish son of Abiel; 1 Chronicles 8:33 supplies the link, or Ner in 1 Chronicles is not father but ancestor of Kish (1 Chronicles 9:36-39), and Ner son of Abi-Gibeon (father or founder of Gibeon, 1 Chronicles 8:29) is named only because he was progenitor of Saul's line, the intermediate names mentioned in 1 Samuel 9 being omitted. The proud, fierce, and self willed spirit of his tribe, Benjamin, is conspicuous in Saul (see Judges 19; 20; 21). Strong and swift fooled (2 Samuel 1:23), and outtopping the people by head and shoulders (1 Samuel 9:2), he was the "beauty" or "ornament of Israel," "a choice young man," "there was none goodlier than he."
Above all, he was the chosen of the Lord (1 Samuel 9:17; 1 Samuel 10:24; 2 Samuel 21:6). Zelah was Kish's burial place. Gibeah was especially connected with Saul. The family was originally humble (1 Samuel 11:1-21), though Kish was "a mighty man of substance." Searching for Kish's donkeys three days in vain, at last, by the servant's advice, Saul consulted Samuel, who had already God's intimation that He would send at this very time a man of Benjamin who should be king. God's providence, overruling man's free movements to carry out His purpose, appears throughout the narrative. Samuel gave Saul the chiefest place at the feast on the high place to which he invited him, and the choice portion. Setting his mind at ease about his asses, now found, Samuel raised his thoughts to the throne as one "on whom was all the desire of Israel." "Little then in his own sight" (1 Samuel 15:17), and calling himself "of the smallest of the tribes, and his family least of all the families of Benjamin" (1 Samuel 9:21), Saul was very different from what he afterward became in prosperity; elevation tests men (Psalms 73:18).
Samuel anointed and kissed Saul as king. On his coming to the oak ("plain") of Tabor, three men going with offerings to God to Bethel gave him two of three loaves, in recognition of his kingship. Next prophets met him, and suddenly the Spirit of God coming upon him he prophesied among them, so that the proverb concerning him then first began, "is Saul also among the prophets?" The public outward call followed at Mizpeh, when God caused the lot to fall on Saul. So modest was he that he hid himself, shunning the elevation, amidst the baggage. A band whose hearts God had touched escorted him to Gibeah, while the worthless despised him, saying "how shall this man save us?" (compare Luke 14:14, the Antitype, meekly "He held His peace"; Psalms 38:13). NAHASH'S cruel threat against Jabesh Gilead, which was among the causes that made Israel desire a king (1 Samuel 8:3; 1 Samuel 8:19; 1 Samuel 12:12), gave Saul the opportunity of displaying his patriotic bravery in rescuing the citizens and securing their lasting attachment.
His magnanimity too appears in his not allowing any to be killed of those whom the people desired to slay for saying "shall Saul reign over us?" Pious humility then breathed in his ascription of the deliverance to Jehovah, not himself (1 Samuel 11:12-13). Samuel then inaugurated the kingdom again at Gilgal. In 1 Samuel 13:1 read "Saul reigned 40 years"; so Acts 13:21, and Josephus "18 years during Samuel's life and 22 after his death" (Ant. 16:14, section 9). Saul was young in beginning his reign (1 Samuel 9:2), but probably verging toward 40 years old, as his son Jonathan was grown up (1 Samuel 13:2). Ishbosheth his youngest son (1 Chronicles 8:33) was 40 at his death (2 Samuel 2:10), and as he is not mentioned among Saul's sons in 1 Samuel 14:49 he perhaps was born after Saul's accession. In the second year of his reign Saul revolted from the Philistines whose garrison had been advanced as far as Geba (Jehu , N.E. of Rama), (1 Samuel 10:5; 1 Samuel 13:3) and gathered to him an army of 3,000.
Jonathan smote the garrison, and so brought on a Philistine invasion in full force, 30,000 chariots. 6,000 horsemen, and a multitude as the sand. The Israelites, as the Romans under the Etruscan Porscna, were deprived by their Philistine oppressors of all smiths, so that no Israelite save Saul and Jonathan had sword or spear (1 Samuel 13:19-21). Many hid in caves, others fled beyond Jordan, while those (600: 1 Samuel 13:15) who stayed with Saul followed trembling. Already some time previously Samuel had conferred with Saul as to his foreseen struggle against the Philistines, and his going down to Gilgal (not the first going for his inauguration as king, 1 Samuel 11:14-15; but second after revolting from the Philistines) which was the most suitable place for gathering an army.
Samuel was not directing Saul to go at once to Gilgal, as seen as he should go from him, and wait there seven days (1 Samuel 10:8); but that after being chosen king by lot and conquering Ammon and being confirmed as king at Gilgal, he should war with the Philistines (one main end of the Lord's appointing him king, 1 Samuel 9:16, "that he may save My people out of the hand of the Philistines, for I have looked upon My people, because their cry is come unto Me"), and then go down to Gilgal, and "wait there seven days, until I come, before offering the holocaust." The Gilgal meant is that in the Jordan valley, to which Saul withdrew in order to gather soldiers for battle, and offer sacrifices, and then advance again to Gibeah and Geba, thence to encounter the Philistines encamped at Michmash. Now first Saul betrays his real character. Self will, impatience, and the spirit of disobedience made him offer without, waiting the time appointed by Jehovah's prophet; he obeyed so far and so long only as obedience did not require crossing of his self will.
Had he waited but an hour or two, he would have saved his kingdom, which was now transferred to one after God's own heart; we may forfeit the heavenly kingdom by hasty and impatient unbelief (Isaiah 28:16). Saul met Samuel's reproof "what hast thou done?" with self justifying excuses, as if his act had been meritorious not culpable: "I saw the people scattered from me, and thou camest not within the days appointed (Samuel had come before their expiration), and the Philistines gathered themselves. ... Therefore said I, The Philistines will come down now upon me to Gilgal, and I have not made supplication unto Jehovah; I forced myself therefore (he ought to have forced himself to obey not disobey; necessity, is often the plea for sacrificing principle to expediency) and offered." Jonathan's exploit in destroying the Philistine garrison (1 Samuel 14) eventuated in driving the Philistines back to their own land. (See JONATHAN.)
The same reckless and profane impatience appears in Saul; he consults Jehovah by the priest Ahiah (1 Samuel 14:18 read with Septuagint, "bring here the ephod, for he took the ephod that day in the presence of Israel"; for the ark was not usually taken out, but only the ephod, for consultation, and the ark was now at Kirjath Jearim, not in Saul's little camp); then at the increasing tumult in the Philistine host, impatient to join battle, interrupted the priest, "withdraw thine hand," i.e. leave off. Contrast David's patient and implicit following of Jehovah's will, inquired through the priest, in attacking in front as well as in taking a circuit behind the Philistines (2 Samuel 5:19-25). Saul's adjuration that none should eat until evening betrayed his rash temper and marred the victory (1 Samuel 14:29-30). His scrupulosity because the people flew upon the spoil, eating the animals with the blood (1 Samuel 14:32-35), contrasts with true conscientiousness which was wanting in him at Gilgal (1 Samuel 13).
Now he built his first altar. Jonathan's unconscious violation of Saul's adjuration, by eating honey which revived him (1 Samuel 13:27-29, "enlightened his eyes," Psalms 13:3), was the occasion of Saul again taking lightly God's name to witness that Jonathan should die (contrast Exodus 20:7). But the guilt, which God's silence when consulted whether Saul should follow after the Philistines implied, lay with Saul himself, for God's siding "with Jonathan" against the Philistines ("he hath wrought with God this day") was God's verdict acquitting him. Thus convicted Saul desisted from further pursuit of the Philistines. His warlike prowess appears in his securing his regal authority (1 Samuel 14:47, "took the kingdom over Israel") by fighting successfully against all his enemies on every side, Moab, Ammon, Edom, Zobah, the Philistines, and Amalek (summarily noticed 1 Samuel 14:48, in detail in 1 Samuel 15).
Saul's second great disobedience at his second probation by God was (1 Samuel 15) his sparing the Amalekite Agag and the best of the sheep, oxen, etc., and all that was good; again self will set up itself to judge what part of God's command it chose to obey and what to disobey. The same self complacent blindness to his sin appears in his words to Samuel, "I have performed the commandment of Jehovah." "What meaneth then tills bleating of the sheep?" Saul lays on the people the disobedience, and takes to himself with them the merit of the obedience: "they have brought them from the Amalekites, for the people spared the best of the sheep ... to sacrifice ... and the rest we have utterly destroyed." True obedience observes all the law and turns not to the right or left (Joshua 1:7; Deuteronomy 5:32). The spirit of self will shows its nonsubmission to God's will in small but sure indications. Saul had zeal for Israel against the Gibeonites where zeal was misplaced, because not according to God's will (2 Samuel 21); he lacked zeal here, where God required it.
He shifts the blame on "the people" and makes religion a cloak, saying the object was "to sacrifice unto Jehovah, thy God." We must not do evil that good may come (Romans 3:8). Samuel tears off the pretext: "behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, ... for rebellion is as the silt of witchcraft," the very sin which Saul fell into at last (1 Samuel 28). As Saul rejected Jehovah's word so He rejected Saul "from being king." In 1 Chronicles 10:13 "Saul died for his transgression (Hebrew maal , 'prevarication,' shuffling, not doing yet wishing to appear to do, God's will) against Jehovah, and also for asking counsel of one that had a familiar spirit." The secret of Saul's disobedience he discloses, "because I feared the people and obeyed their voice," instead of God's voice (Exodus 23:2; Proverbs 29:25). Even in confession, while using the same words as David subsequently, "I have sinned" (2 Samuel 12:13), he betrays his motive, "turn again with me ... honour me now, I pray thee, before the elders of my people and before Israel" (John 5:44; John 12:43).
Man's favor he regarded more than God's displeasure. Henceforth Samuel, after tearing himself from the king, to the rending of his garment (the symbol of the transference of the kingdom to a better successor), came to Saul no more though mourning for him. As the Spirit of Jehovah came upon David from the day of his anointing (1 Samuel 16:13-14), so an evil spirit from (it is never said OF) Jehovah troubled Saul, and the Spirit of Jehovah departed from hint. David then first was called in to soothe away with the harp the evil spirit; but music did not bring the good Spirit: to fill his soul, so the evil spirit returned worse than ever (Matthew 12:43-45; 1 Samuel 28:4-20). No ritualism or sweet melody, though pleasing the senses, will change the heart; the Holy Spirit alone can attune the soul to purity and peace.
Like his tribe, which should "ravin as a wolf, in the morning devouring the prey and at night ... the spoil" (Genesis 49:27), Saul was energetic, choleric, and impressible, now prophesying with the prophets whose holy enthusiasm infected him, now jealous to madness of David whom he had loved greatly and brought permanently to court (1 Samuel 16:21; 1 Samuel 18:2) and made his armour bearer; and all because of a thoughtless expression of the women in meeting the conquerors after the battle with Goliath, "Saul hath slain his thousands, David his ten thousands" (1 Samuel 17; 1 Samuel 18:7). A word was enough to awaken suspicion, and suspicion was wrested into proof of treason, "what can he have more but the kingdom?" (see Ecclesiastes 4:4; Proverbs 27:4). But David's wise walk made Saul fear him (1 Samuel 18:12; 1 Samuel 18:14-15; 1 Samuel 18:29; Psalms 101:2; Psalms 5:8). God raised up to David a friend, Michal, in his enemy's house, which made Saul the more afraid. So, not daring to lay his own hand on him, he exposed him to the Philistines (1 Samuel 18:17-27); in righteous retribution, it was Saul himself who fell by them (Psalms 9:15-16).
For a brief time a better feeling returned to Saul through Jonathan's intercession for David (1 Samuel 19:4-6); but again the evil spirit returned, and Saul pursued David to Michal's house, and even to Samuel's presence at Naioth in Ramah. But Jehovah, "in whose hand the king's heart is, to turn it wheresoever He will" (Proverbs 21:1), caused him who came to persecute to prophesy with the prophets. Yet soon after, because Jonathan let David go, Saul cast a javelin at his noble unselfish son, saying, "thou hast chosen the son of Jesse to thine own confusion, for as long as he liveth thou shalt not be established, nor thy kingdom" (1 Samuel 20:28-33). Saul's slaughter of the priests at Nob, on Doeg's information, followed (1 Samuel 22), Saul upbraiding his servants as if conspiring with David and feeling no sorrow for the king; "yet can David, as I can (1 Samuel 8:14, compare 1 Samuel 22:7), give every one of you fields and vineyards?" etc., thus answering to David's picture of him (Psalms 53:7), "this is the man that trusted in the abundance of his riches," etc.(See DOEG; DAVID.)
By slaying the priests, so that Abiathar alone escaped to David, Saul's sin recoiled on himself, for Saul thereby supplied him whom he hated with one through whom to consult Jehovah, and deprived himself of the divine oracle, so that at last he had to have recourse to witchcraft, though he had himself tried to extirpate it (1 Samuel 23:2; 1 Samuel 23:9; 1 Samuel 28:3-7, etc.). The Philistines, by whom Saul thought to have slain David, were the unconscious instruments of saving him from Saul at Mann (1 Samuel 23:26-27). David's magnanimity at the cave of Engedi in sparing his deadly foe and only cutting off his skirt, when in his power, moved Saul to tears, so that his better feelings returned for the moment, and he acknowledged David's superiority in spirit and deed, and obtained David's promise not to destroy his seed (1 Samuel 24). Once again (1 Samuel 26), at Hachilah David spared Saul, though urged by Abishai to destroy him; the Altaschith of Psalm 57; 58; 59; refers to David's words on this occasion, "destroy not." (See ALTASCHITH.)
David would not take vengeance out of God's hands (Psalms 35:1-3; Psalms 17:4; Psalms 94:1-2; Psalms 94:23; Romans 12:19). His words were singularly prophetic of Saul's doom, "his day shall come to die, or be shall descend into battle and perish." The "deep sleep from Jehovah" on Saul enabled David unobserved to take spear and cruse from Saul's bolster. From a hill afar off David appealed to Saul, "if thy instigation to (i.e. giving up to the manifestation of thine own) evil be from Jehovah, through His anger against thee for sin, let Him smell sacrifice" (Hebrew), i.e. appease God's wrath by an acceptable sacrifice; "but if thy instigators be men, they drive me out from attaching (Hebrew) myself to the inheritance of Jehovah (the Holy Land); now therefore let not my blood fall to the earth far away from the face of Jehovah," i.e. do not drive me to perish in a heathen land; contrast <
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Saul of Tarsus
See PAUL.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Saul
Son of Kish, of the tribe of Benjamin, and the first king of Israel. He was anointed by Samuel by God's direction when the Israelites demanded a king. As the king whom they had chosen and desired, 'a new heart' was given him, and he had a fair start in his reign; but he signally failed in obedience to God, by the word of Samuel. He was rejected, and David was anointed, whom for years he malignantly persecuted. Being forsaken of God, without faith or conscience he resorted to one with a familiar spirit, and there heard his doom. (See DIVINATION.) He was conquered by the Philistines, the very people he was to have overcome. Thus royalty, as everything else committed to man by God, at once failed. For details of Saul's life see SAMUEL, FIRST BOOK OF.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Saul
Demanded; lent; ditch; death
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Saul
the son of Kish, of the tribe of Benjamin, the first king of the Israelites, 1 Samuel 9:1-2 , &c. Saul's fruitless journey when seeking his father's asses; ( See ASS; ) his meeting the Prophet Samuel; the particulars foretold to him, with his being anointed as king, about A.M. 2909; his prophesying along with the young prophets; his appointment by the lot; his modesty in hiding himself; his first victory over the Ammonites; his rash sacrifice in the absence of Samuel; his equally rash curse; his victories over the Philistines and Amalekites; his sparing of King Agag with the judgment denounced against him for it; his jealousy and persecution of David; his barbarous massacre of the priests and people of Nob; his repeated confessions of his injustice to David, &c, are recorded in 1 Samuel 9-31. He reigned forty years, but exhibited to posterity a melancholy example of a monarch, elevated to the summit of worldly grandeur, who, having cast off the fear of God, gradually became the slave of jealousy, duplicity, treachery, and the most malignant and diabolical tempers. His behaviour toward David shows him to have been destitute of every generous and noble sentiment that can dignify human nature; and it is not an easy task to speak with any moderation of the atrocity and baseness which uniformly mark it. His character is that of a wicked man, "waxing worse and worse;" but while we are shocked at its deformity, it should be our study to profit by it, which we can only do by using it as a beacon to warn us, "lest we also be hardened through the deceitfulness of sin."
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Saul
Saul (sawl), asked for, desired. 1. The first king of Israel. He was the son of Kish, of the tribe of Benjamin. 1 Samuel 9:1-2; 1 Samuel 10:1; 1 Samuel 10:21; 1 Samuel 10:23-24 In personal appearance he was tall, remarkably fine and noble. After his signal defeat of the Ammonites, Saul was confirmed on the throne by the army at Gilgal, 1 Samuel 11:1-15, though the continuance of the theocracy was earnestly insisted on by Samuel. 1 Samuel 12:1-25. He carried on successful wars against the Ammonites, the Philistines, the Moabites, and the Amalekites. 1 Samuel 13:1-21; 1 Samuel 14:46-52. Saul, however, in two instances, forgot that he was subject to Jehovah, the invisible King. 1 Samuel 13:11-14; 1 Samuel 15:1-35. Hence Jehovah commanded Samuel to anoint David privately, as Saul's successor to the kingdom. 1 Samuel 16:1-13. From this time Saul is exhibited as the slave of jealousy, duplicity, and malice; he fell at last into a deep melancholy. David was introduced to the court to soothe Saul, and there he became acquainted with the manners of the court, and the business of government. 1 Samuel 16:14-23. See David. The Philistines mustered an army so formidable, that Saul, finding himself abandoned of God, applied in his emergency to a witch at Endor. Disheartened by the ambiguous answer of the wily sorceress, Saul advanced against the Philistines. The Hebrews were routed, and Saul, finding himself wounded, fell upon his own sword, b.c. 1056, after a reign of forty years. 1 Samuel 28:1-25; 1 Samuel 31:1-13. There is no character in history more pitiable than this wretched king, swayed by evil impulse, tormented by his own conscience, powerless as it seemed for everything but mischief. His better thoughts, if temporarily awakened, were stings and scourges to him. 1 Samuel 24:17; 1 Samuel 26:21.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saul
First king of Israel. When the people demanded a king, he was anointed by the prophet Samuel, but lost the favour of God through disobedience. he received David into his household, and later persecuted him in jealousy. After visiting the witch of Enor in order to communicate with Samuel's spirit, he was defeated by the Philistines, and then took his own life.
King James Dictionary - Saul
SAUL, an old spelling of soul.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Saul
The son of Kish, of the tribe of Benjamin, the first king of the Israelites, anointed by Samuel, B. C. 1091, and after a reign of forty years filled with various events, slain with his sons on Mount Gilboa. He was succeeded by David, who was his son-in-law, and whom he had endeavored to put to death. His history is contained in 1 Samuel 10:1-31:13 . It is a sad and admonitory narrative. The morning of his reign was bright with special divine favors, both providential, and spiritual, 1 Samuel 9:20 10:1-11,24,25 . But he soon began to disobey God, and was rejected as unworthy to found a line of kings; his sins and misfortunes multiplied, and his sun went down in gloom. In his first war with the Ammonites, God was with him; but then follow his presumptuous sacrifice, in the absence of Samuel; his equally rash vow; his victories over the Philistines and the Amalekites; his sparing Agag and the spoil; his spirit of distracted and foreboding melancholy; his jealousy and persecution of David; his barbarous massacre of the priests and people at Nob, and of the Gibeonites; his consulting the witch on Endor; the battle with the Philistines in which his army was defeated and his sons were slain; and lastly, his despairing self-slaughter, his insignia of royalty being conveyed to David by an Amalekite, 1 Samuel 31:1-13 2 Samuel 1:1-27 1 Chronicles 10:13,14 . The guilty course and the awful end of this first king of the Hebrews were a significant reproof of their sin in desiring any king but Jehovah; and also show to what extremes of guilt and ruin one may go who rebels against God, and is ruled by his own ambitious and envious passions.
SAUL was also the Hebrew name of the apostle Paul.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Saul
Son of Kish, of the tribe of Benjamin, and the first king of Israel. He was anointed by Samuel by God's direction when the Israelites demanded a king. As the king whom they had chosen and desired, 'a new heart' was given him, and he had a fair start in his reign; but he signally failed in obedience to God, by the word of Samuel. He was rejected, and David was anointed, whom for years he malignantly persecuted. Being forsaken of God, without faith or conscience he resorted to one with a familiar spirit, and there heard his doom. (See DIVINATION.) He was conquered by the Philistines, the very people he was to have overcome. Thus royalty, as everything else committed to man by God, at once failed. For details of Saul's life see SAMUEL, FIRST BOOK OF.

Sentence search

Doeg - ” An Edomite in the service of King Saul (1 Samuel 21:7 ). He was present at Nob at the time David arrived there during the course of his flight from Saul. Doeg subsequently reported to Saul that the priest Ahimelech had given assistance to David. After confronting Ahimelech, Saul ordered his guards to slay the priests of Nob. When the guards refused to obey, Saul told Doeg to kill the priests. See Saul
Armourbearer - When Saul loved David he made him his armourbearer. On Saul being wounded, his armourbearer refused to kill him; but when Saul was dead the armourbearer fell upon his sword and died also
Doeg the edomite - (9th century BCE) When David was fleeing from Saul, Ahimelech, a priest in Nob, provided him with food and weapons. Doeg, the former head of the Sanhedrin who had abandoned the path of the Torah, informed Saul what Ahimelech had done. Saul ordered the execution of the 85 priests in Nob, and Doeg himself carried out the execution
Saul, King of Israel - After Israel’s demand to have a king as the other nations, God directed Samuel to Saul. At his first meeting with Saul, Samuel showed him privately that he was to be king (1 Samuel 9; 1 Samuel 10:1). Later, at a gathering of representative family heads from all Israel, Saul was publicly chosen to be king (1 Samuel 10:17-24). ...
Victories and failures...
Of the three signs that Samuel had announced to Saul as confirmation of the promised kingship, the most important was the coming of God’s Spirit upon him (1 Samuel 10:1-8). This changed Saul from an ordinary farmer into a national leader (1 Samuel 10:9-13). Because certain people doubted Saul’s suitability, he made no immediate change in the country’s administration, but returned to his home in Gibeah (1 Samuel 10:25-27). ...
Saul was to be under the spiritual direction of Samuel. But Saul wanted complete power, religious as well as political. In punishment God announced that one day he would take the kingdom from Saul and give it to another (1 Samuel 13:1-14). God confirmed this judgment on a later occasion when Saul again deliberately disobeyed his instructions through Samuel (1 Samuel 15:1-34). ...
After this, Saul never saw Samuel again (1 Samuel 15:35). (For details of events in this period of Saul’s life see SAMUEL. )...
Although Saul was at times calm and tolerant (1 Samuel 10:27; 1 Samuel 11:12-13), at other times he was rash and unpredictable (1 Samuel 14:24-30; 1 Samuel 14:38-45; 1 Samuel 18:10-11). ...
Saul and David...
God chose David as the man who would one day replace Saul as king. As David grew in experience and maturity, the special power of God’s Spirit began to work through him rather than Saul (1 Samuel 16:13-14). After David’s victory over Goliath, Saul, unaware of God’s purposes for David, made him his armour-bearer and full-time court musician (1 Samuel 16:21-23; 1 Samuel 18:2). Over the next few years Saul became more and more unstable, emotionally and mentally, while David became a popular hero through his military victories. Saul became suspicious that David might be the man to replace him, and in a fit of jealousy tried to kill him (1 Samuel 18:5-11). ...
This began a long conflict between Saul and David. Saul tried by every possible means to get rid of David, but David steadfastly refused to do anything against Saul. Saul sent David on dangerous missions, hoping he might get killed, but his plans repeatedly failed (1 Samuel 18:13-17; 1 Samuel 18:25). When David sought safety with Samuel, Saul and his servants pursued him, but the Spirit of God protected David by overpowering Saul and his men (1 Samuel 19:18-24). The mad Saul slaughtered any he thought had helped David (1 Samuel 22:18-19), whereas David on two occasions spared Saul’s life when he could easily have killed him (1 Samuel 24; 1 Samuel 26:6-25). (For details of events in this period of Saul’s life see DAVID. )...
Saul’s tragic life came to an end during a battle with the Philistines on Mt Gilboa. The song also honoured Saul’s son Jonathan, who died in the same battle (2 Samuel 1:17-27)
Ahiah - Son of Ahitub, and high priest in the reign of Saul, 1 Samuel 14:3 . He was probably the brother of his successor Ahimelech, slain by Saul, 1 Samuel 22:9
Michal - When Michal, the younger daughter of King Saul, fell in love with David, Saul promised her to David as wife, provided David could kill one hundred Philistines as the bride-price. Saul, being jealous of David, hoped David would be killed in the attempt, but David was spectacularly successful (1 Samuel 18:20-27). ...
Not long after the marriage, Saul laid a plot to kill David in David’s house, but Michal’s quick thinking saved him (1 Samuel 19:11-17). When David was forced to flee from Saul, Saul took Michal and gave her as wife to another man, Paltiel (1 Samuel 25:44). ...
After Saul died, David came out of hiding and was proclaimed king, though some of Saul’s former followers disputed his right to the throne. This strengthened his claim to Saul’s throne, but it left Paltiel broken-hearted (2 Samuel 3:13-16)
Jehoadah - ” Descendant of Saul in tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:36 ), the list showing a continued interest in lineage of Saul long after his death
Shaul - Saul
Ner - (a light or lamp ), son of Jehiel, according to ( 1 Chronicles 8:33 ) father of Abner, and grandfather of King Saul. ) Abner was, therefore, uncle to Saul, as is expressly stated in (1 Samuel 14:50 )
Nob - When David was fleeing Saul, Ahimelech, a priest in Nob, provided him with food and weapons. Saul then ordered the execution of Nob’s 85 priests
Jonathan - 877 BCE BCE) Son of Saul and sworn friend of David. Helped David escape Saul’s designs on his life
Saul - Saul . As it was customary to bring a present to a seer, and the wallet was empty, Saul hesitated till the servant produced the fourth part of a shekel of silver to give to the man of God. A banquet was made ready, and special honour paid to Saul by Samuel. The seer told the seekers that the asses had been found, and broached the matter of the kingdom to Saul, and anointed him as he was leaving. Saul was given certain signs in attestation of Samuel’s message, and after leaving the seer’s house, where he and his servant spent the night, he met a band of prophets, and soon was prophesying among them, to the marvel of his acquaintances ( 1 Samuel 10:10 ). The people demand a king, which Samuel interprets to be a rejection of Jehovah, their true king, and Saul, after protest, is elected by lot at Mizpah. Saul and Jonathan , his son, were encamped in Michmash and Gibeah (Geba), when Jonathan smote the ‘garrison’ (?) of the Philistines in Geba, thus precipitating the struggle. When Saul heard of the flight of the enemy he inquired of the oracle what to do, but the rout was so apparent that he joined pursuit without the answer. The destruction of the enemy would have been greater had not Saul put a taboo on food. In the evening the famished warriors fell upon the cattle, and ate without sacrificing till the reported impiety reached the ears of Saul, who legitimated the meal by sacrificing at a great stone. As he failed to receive an answer from the oracle, when he Inquired whether he should pursue the Philistines farther, Saul concluded that some one had sinned. He was, however, delivered by the people from the penalty, for Saul had sworn that he should die ( 1 Samuel 14:17-45 ). 13, 14) is interrupted at 1 Samuel 13:8 to 1 Samuel 15:35 by an account which represents Samuel as taking issue with Saul for sacrificing at the end of an appointed period of seven days, and announcing his rejection (See art. 15) a story of the encounter with Amalek , against whom Samuel sent Saul with instructions to destroy men, women, children, and spoil. Saul, however, spares Agag, and part of the booty. Saul acknowledged his fault, but begged Samuel to honour him before the people by sacrificing with him. In his importunity he lays hold of Samuel’s garment, which is rent, and becomes the symbol of the kingdom wrested from Saul. ...
The second stage of Saul’s life concerns his relations with David . Saul is advised to employ music as a relief from a deep-seated mental trouble, called ‘an evil spirit from the Lord. Saul loves him, and makes him his armour-bearer ( 1 Samuel 16:14-23 ). In this story Saul seems weak, irresolute, and unacquainted with David (ch. David’s growing popularity and prowess lead Saul to attempt his life. Michal, Saul’s daughter, is offered to him in marriage in return for one hundred Philistines. Merab, Saul’s elder daughter, was also offered to David, but withdrawn when he should have had her. This seems to be an effort to explain why David did not receive Saul’s daughter after he had slain the giant. David flees to Ramah, and Saul, seeking him there, is seized with the prophetic frenzy and rendered powerless ( 1 Samuel 19:18-24 ). So enraged was Saul that he ordered the slaughter of the entire priesthood there (chs. Saul had David all but captured in the hills of Ziph, when a raid of the Philistines called him away ( 1 Samuel 23:14-29 ). Twice Saul was in the power of David, who refused to harm the Lord’s anointed (chs. ...
The circumstances connected with Saul’s death are told in a dramatic way. The Philistines had gathered together at Aphek, while Saul held the fateful plains of Megiddo at Jezreel. The battle joins; Saul’s sons are slain; sore pressed, he calls on his armour bearer to slay him, but being refused he falls upon his sword and dies. The following day the Philistines severed the heads of Saul and his sons, and exposed the bodies on the walls of Beth-shan, whence the grateful Jabesh-gileadites brought them away by night (chs. An Amalekite, who brought the story of Saul’s death to David, claimed that he himself slew him, and was promptly executed by David (2 Samuel 1:1-16 ). Saul of Tarsus
Dichu, Saint - Confessor (4th and 5th century), died Saul, Ireland. The son of an Ulster chieftain, Dichu was Saint Patrick's first convert in Ireland, and he presented Saint Patrick with ground at Saul for his first Irish church
Agag - At G-d’s command, communicated through the prophet Samuel, the Saul-led Israelite army killed the entire Amalekite population—aside from Agag, who was spared and taken captive. After chastising Saul for allowing Agag to live
Rizpah - A concubine of Saul, taken after his death by the ambitious Abner. Her two sons were afterwards hung, with five other sons of Saul, to avenge the wrongs he had inflicted on the Gibeonites. With the most devoted maternal affection, Rizpah watched over their remains day and night, apparently from May to October; and David, being informed of her painful watchings, gathered the bones of all the family of Saul and gave them an honorable burial, 2 Samuel 3:7-11 ; 21:1-14
Saul - Saul, an old spelling of soul
Ahimelech - He received David when fleeing from Saul, gave him the showbread and the sword of Goliath. This being reported to Saul by Doeg the Edomite, Ahimelech and the other priests were put to death, Abiathar alone escaping. A Hittite, companion of David when persecuted by Saul
a'Dri-el - (flock of God ), son of Barzillai, to whom Saul gave his daughter Merab, although he had previously promised her to David. ) His five sons were amongst the seven descendants of Saul whom David surrendered to the Gibeonites
Agag - (ay' gag) is a common title for Amalekite kings and in particular names the Amalekite king defeated by Saul and killed by Samuel. In 1 Samuel 15:8 , Saul destroyed all the Amalekites but King Agag. Since the Lord had ordered the complete destruction of the Amalekites, Samuel, Saul's priest, rebuked Saul for his disobedience and reported God's rejection of Saul as king
Saul - Saul (sawl), asked for, desired. After his signal defeat of the Ammonites, Saul was confirmed on the throne by the army at Gilgal, 1 Samuel 11:1-15, though the continuance of the theocracy was earnestly insisted on by Samuel. Saul, however, in two instances, forgot that he was subject to Jehovah, the invisible King. Hence Jehovah commanded Samuel to anoint David privately, as Saul's successor to the kingdom. From this time Saul is exhibited as the slave of jealousy, duplicity, and malice; he fell at last into a deep melancholy. David was introduced to the court to soothe Saul, and there he became acquainted with the manners of the court, and the business of government. The Philistines mustered an army so formidable, that Saul, finding himself abandoned of God, applied in his emergency to a witch at Endor. Disheartened by the ambiguous answer of the wily sorceress, Saul advanced against the Philistines. The Hebrews were routed, and Saul, finding himself wounded, fell upon his own sword, b
Michal - (David's wife): (a) (9th century BCE) Daughter of King Saul, her hand in marriage was given to David after he killed Goliath. While David was fleeing Saul’s wrath, Michal was wedded to Paltiel ben Laish
Zeror - An ancestor of Saul ( 1 Samuel 9:1 )
Eshek - A descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:39 )
Eshek - Descendant of Saul through Jonathan
Ishui - Son of Saul and Ahinoam
Armo'ni, - son of Saul by Rizpah
Hachilah - After his reconciliation with Saul at Engedi (24:1-8), David returned to Hachilah, where he had fixed his quarters. The Ziphites treacherously informed Saul of this, and he immediately (26:1-4) renewed his pursuit of David, and "pitched in the hill of Hachilah. " David and his nephew Abishai stole at night into the midst of Saul's camp, when they were all asleep, and noiselessly removed the royal spear and the cruse from the side of the king, and then, crossing the intervening valley to the height on the other side, David cried to the people, and thus awoke the sleepers. He then addressed Saul, who recognized his voice, and expostulated with him. Saul professed to be penitent; but David could not put confidence in him, and he now sought refuge at Ziklag. David and Saul never afterwards met
Hachilah - David resorted there when pursued by Saul, and there David spared Saul when he was in his power
Armoni - Son of Saul by Rizpah ( 2 Samuel 21:8 )
Cis, - the father of Saul, (Acts 13:21 ) usually called KISH
Gilboa - A mountain east of the plain of Jezreel, and where Saul and Jonathan were slain in battle, and from whence Saul went to consult the witch of Endor
Azel - Descendant of Saul
Jehush - Son of Eshek, a descendant of Saul
Cis - The same as Kish, the father of Saul
Hareth - Forest where David hid himself from Saul
Zeror - Son of Bechorath, an ancestor of Saul
Azel - (noble ), a descendant of Saul
King david - This earned him the hand of King Saul�s daughter Michal in marriage. Anointed by Samuel to succeed Saul after the latter failed to annihilate Amalek. This aroused Saul's jealousy, who then pursued him relentlessly. David became king after Saul�s death
David, king - This earned him the hand of King Saul�s daughter Michal in marriage. Anointed by Samuel to succeed Saul after the latter failed to annihilate Amalek. This aroused Saul's jealousy, who then pursued him relentlessly. David became king after Saul�s death
Azel - Noble, a descendant of king Saul (1 Chronicles 8:37 ; 9:43,44 )
e'Shek - (oppression ), one of the late descendants of Saul
Naioth - David sought refuge from Saul at Naioth. Three groups of royal messengers and finally Saul himself fell victim to prophetic frenzy when they attempted to capture David there
Sheariah - A descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:33 ; 1 Chronicles 9:44 )
Armoni - Son of Saul and Rizpah, hanged by the Gibeonites
Aphiah - A 'mighty man of power,' an ancestor of Saul
Aphi'ah - (refreshed ), one of the fore-fathers of King Saul
Jeho'Adah - (whom Jehovah adorns ), one of the descendants of Saul
Binea - Son of Moza, descendant of Saul
Merab - Daughter of Saul, (1 Samuel 14:49) Her name is taken from Rabah, mistress
Mel'Chi-Shu'a, - A son of Saul
Rizpah - Concubine of Saul, whose two sons Armoni and Mephibosheth were given up by David to avenge the deeds of Saul against the Gibeonites
Kish - (קִישׁ, Κίς), the father of Saul, called Cis in the Authorized Version (Acts 13:21)
Pithon - Son of Micah, a descendant of Saul
Melech - Son of Micah, a descendant of Saul
Bin'ea - (fountain ), one of the descendants of Saul
Mephibosheth - When David found himself in peaceable possession of the kingdom, he sought for all that remained of the house of Saul, that he might show them kindness, in consideration of the friendship between him and Jonathan. He gave Mephibosheth the estate of his grandfather Saul. David subsequently took care to exempt him from the number of the descendants of Saul given up to the vengeance of the Gibeonites, 2 Samuel 21:1-14 , though another Mephibosheth, a son of Saul was slain, 2 Samuel 21:8
Adriel - Son of Barzillai, the Meholathite to whom Merab, Saul's daughter, was given to wife, after having been promised to David. She bare Adriel five sons, and these were given up to death to avenge the Gibeonites because Saul had slain some of them. In 2 Samuel 21:8 these are said to be the "sons of Michal [1] the daughter of Saul, whom she brought up for Adriel. ' It seems therefore most probable that the name Michal is here the mistake of an early copyist, and the passage should read, "the five sons of Merab the daughter of Saul, whom she bare unto Adriel;" or it might originally have stood, "the five sons of the daughter of Saul whom she bare to Adriel," and some one unadvisedly added Michal in the margin which afterwards found its way into the text
Matrites - A family of the tribe of Benjamin to which Saul belonged ( 1 Samuel 10:21 )
Jehoaddah - A descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:36 ); called in 1 Chronicles 9:42 Jarah
je'Hush - (to whom God hastens ), son of eshek, a remote descendant of Saul
Saul - NEWMAN, after attempting three times to preach on Saul, is compelled to confess that Saul's character continues to be obscure to him, and he warns us that we must be exceedingly cautious while considering Saul's so obscure character. Now, if Saul's character was still so obscure to the subtlest and the acutest of all our preachers, I cannot expect to be able to say much to purpose upon it. At the same time, with so much told us about Saul; and told us in such a plain, open, and straightforward style; and told us, as it must have been, for our instruction, we may surely hope to be able, amid all his acknowledged obscurity, to gather sufficient instruction out of Saul to justify us in taking him up for our subject this evening. ...
But, unhappily, the obscurity begins further back than Saul. The obscurity begins with Saul's father and mother. We never hear of Saul's mother; but what kind of a father can Kish have been? We know all about Samuel. All Israel, from Dan even to Beersheba, knew that Samuel was established to be a prophet of the Lord; all Israel but Kish and his son Saul. Only, there was a man of Benjamin whose name was Kish, and he had a son whose name was Saul, a choice young man, and a goodly, but neither father nor son, neither Kish nor Saul, had ever heard of Samuel. Kish the father, and Saul the son, were so busy breeding asses that they made light of Samuel, and would not come. Samuel had grown grey in a service that made all Israel acknowledge and know God from the one end of the land to the other; but Saul, all the time, did not know Samuel when he saw him. 'Tell me, I pray thee,' said Saul to a stranger he met on his way when he was in despair about his father's lost asses, 'where is the Seer's house. ' Yes, there is some quite inexplicable obscurity about Kish as well as about Saul; an obscurity that perplexes us, and throws us out at the very opening of his son's sad history. And yet, when we turn back and begin to read Saul's whole history over again with our eye on the object; when we stop and look round about us as we read, the ancient obscurity begins to pass off, but only to let alarm and apprehension for ourselves and for our own sons take its place. The prophet Samuel had been a public man, as we say, long before Saul was born. And, but for Saul, we would have said that there could not possibly be a child, or a youth, or a grown-up man in all Israel who had not often sat at Samuel's feet and drunk in his divine words. Saul staggers us and throws us out till we look at ourselves and at the men round about us, and then we soon see, what had before been obscure to us, that our inborn and indulged tastes, likings, dispositions, inclinations, and pursuits rule us also, shape us, occupy us, and decide for us the men we know and the life we lead. But Saul had inherited from Kish an inborn and an absorbing love of cattle and sheep; and, till they were lost, Saul had no errand to Samuel's city. Why hold up our hands at Saul's obscurity, and at Saul's ignorance of Samuel? We have it in ourselves. Let him who passed all that before him yesterday, and then laid out all this week, redeeming all the time, that he might read the best and hear the best-let that man, and let no other man, cast the first stone at stupid Saul and his stupid father. For Saul was not more stupid among the pastures of Benjamin than we are among the churches, and the classes, and the libraries, and the reading-rooms, and the booksellers' shops of Edinburgh. 'Behold now,' said Saul's servant when the asses were hopelessly lost, 'there is in this city a man of God, and he is an honourable man: all that he saith cometh surely to pass; now, let us go thither. ' If you have no more sense of religion and life than Saul and his father had, at least, like them, see that you have a religious servant. Saul's servant knew Samuel. Saul's servant had sat at Samuel's feet as often as he had a holiday. Saul was led up to the door of his earthly kingdom by the piety of his father's servant; and you may be led up some day to the door of the heavenly kingdom by one of your servants who has interests and acquaintances and experiences that up to tonight you know nothing about. ...
After Samuel had anointed Saul to the kingdom, we come upon this very obscure Scripture: 'And it was so that when Saul had turned his back to go from Samuel, God gave Saul another heart, and the Spirit of God came upon Saul, and he prophesied,' Saul, you exclaim, a prophet! Saul with 'another heart'! Saul with the Spirit of God upon him! You cannot understand. Matthew Henry in two or three words makes clear to us all the obscurity of Saul's 'other heart. ' 'Saul,' says the most sensible of commentators, 'has no longer the heart of a husbandman, concerned only with corn and cattle; he has now the heart of a statesman, a general, a prince. But that is just what Saul, another heart and all, did not sincerely desire to do. And here hangs the true key to the whole of Saul's sad history. The Spirit of God came upon Saul for outward and earthly acts, but never for an inward change of heart. Saul prophesied, whatever that may mean; what he said has not been thought worthy of preservation; but after he had so prophesied he relapsed and remained the same man he had been before. Saul was like ninety-nine out of a hundred of us preachers. The truth is, another heart, prophetical spirit and all, Saul all along was little better than a heathen at heart. And hence it is that what has often been called the profanity of Saul's character scarcely rises to the dignity of profanity. Saul's most presumptuous sins scarcely attain to profaneness. But Saul has no such sense. Saul the anointed king of Israel had all the time neither part not lot in the true kingdom of God. At the same time, in giving Saul another heart, the God of Israel gave Saul the greatest opportunity of his life to make himself a new heart. So much so that Saul for the moment was almost persuaded to become an Israelite indeed. Saul all his days was never so near the kingdom of heaven as when he said to Samuel, 'Am not I a Benjamite, of the smallest of the tribes of Israel, and my family the least of all the families of Benjamin? Wherefore, then, speakest thou so to me?' That is the language of a man whose heart is really touched for the time with divine grace. And had Saul only dwelt on that thought; had he returned all his days to that thought; that thought dwelt upon and added to at every new occasion and fresh proof of God's goodness and his own ill deserts-that would soon have made Saul's heart a new heart; that would soon have made Saul another man. But it was not so to be with Saul. As time went on, and as trials and temptations beset Saul, a hard and stony heart, a spirit of rebellion, and pride, and envy, and jealousy, and despair took possession of Saul, and held possession of Saul to his terrible end. ...
No; there is no such obscurity about Saul getting another heart and yet that heart coming to nothing. God, I feel sure, lets no man become a married man, for instance, without giving him the great opportunity and the new start in religion He gave to Saul when He made him king of Israel. Yes; at one time or other, and more than once, you have all had Saul's great opportunity. ...
Had Saul's change of heart only held, had his conversion only become complete, Saul would have been one of the greatest of all the Old Testament men. Saul was not a common man. After God gave Saul another heart his life was full for a time of the finest promise. What could have promised better than his strict silence to his inquiring uncle about his anointing by Samuel? Where a weaker man would have had his head turned and his tongue loosed, Saul told his uncle that the stray asses were at last found; but of the matter of the kingdom he was strictly silent. We are bound to put a good construction on Saul's silence in that matter. It is but fair and just to set Saul's silence that day down to humility and modesty. Bring the men who say, Shall Saul rule over us, said the people, and put them to death this day. But Saul said, There shall not a man be put to death this day, for today the Lord hath wrought salvation in Israel. If all that is not to be set down to Saul's humility, self-command, and magnanimity, not to say piety, then Saul's character is obscure indeed. The great preacher did not say it till he had felt it to be quite impossible to draw out Saul's obscure life into a consistent and open piece. And the more we work on Saul under that great preacher and after him, the more we feel the obscurity and the mystery of Saul's dark character. It would take a Shakespeare to put himself into Saul's place and let us see the obscure working of Saul's heart under all his temptations. But he has gone away and left us to deal with such characters as Esau, and Balaam, and Saul, and Judas for ourselves. Only, there is one dark passage toward the end of Saul's insane life that we need neither Shakespeare nor Newman to open up to us. Saul's mad and murderous envy of David is as clear as day to every man who puts its proper name on what goes on every day in his own evil heart. ...
Who is your Saul, my brethren? Who is the man that stands in the way of your promotion? Who sits in the seat that should by this time have been yours? Who is the man that casts the javelin of slander and detraction at your good name? Who has cost you home and friends by his spite, and malice, and jealousy? Mark that man
Mephibosheth - The son of Jonathan and grandson of Saul, 2 Samuel 4:4; also called "Meribbaal"= contender against Baal. He was only about five years of age when his father was slain, and on the news of this catastrophe the nurse who had charge of him, apprehending that the whole house of Saul would be exterminated, fled away with him; but in her flight stumbled with the child, and lamed him for life. A son of Saul by his concubine Rizpah
Achish - King of Gath, a Philistine city, to whom David fled in fear of Saul (1 Samuel 21:10 ). David joined Achish to fight Saul (1 Samuel 28:1-2 ), but the Philistine leaders forced him to leave without fighting (1 Samuel 29:1-11 ). Saul and his sons, including Jonathan, died in the battle (1 Samuel 31:1-6 )
Matri, Matrites - (may' tri) The family within the tribe of Benjamin from which Saul came (1 Samuel 10:21 )
Shalim And Shalisha - Two unknown districts through which Saul passed in quest of his father's asses
David, King - The son of Jesse, and a shepherd-boy, he was anointed by the prophet Samuel in place of Saul, whom God had rejected. When Saul was ill,David was brought to soothe him by playing on his harp; in reward he was made Saul's armor-bearer. During the Philistine war, David, relying on God, slew the giant Goliath and won the friendship of Jonathan, son of Saul. He then received a permanent position at court, and married Michol, daughter of Saul, but Saul's jealousy of his popularity forced him into exile. When Saul and Jonathan fell at Gilboa, David, by God's command, went up to Hebron to claim the throne. He was supported by Juda, but the rest of Israel, led by Abner, was faithful to Isobeth, son of Saul
Pithon - Descendant of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:35 ; 1 Chronicles 9:41 )
Armoni - Saul's son by Rizpah (2 Samuel 21:8). Slain to appease the Gibeonites, whose blood Saul had shed
Melech - ” Descendant of King Saul (1 Chronicles 8:35 ; 1 Chronicles 9:41 )
Zeror - ” Ancestor of Saul (1 Samuel 9:1 )
Jarah - A descendant of Saul, 1 Chronicles 9:42
Jarah - Son of Ahaz, a descendant of Saul
ze'Ror - (a bundle ), a Benjamite, ancestor of Kish the father of Saul
Shmuel - Anointed Saul and David, the first two Israelite monarchs. ...
Shmuel: The (two-part) book of Tanach relating the history of the Israelites during Samuel's lifetime and during the reigns of Saul and David (931-c
Zelah - City in Benjamin, where Saul and his sons were buried
Ishbosheth - The son of Saul; (2 Samuel 2:8) a man of shame; from Ish, a man; and bosh, shame
Ner - Father to Abner, captain of the host to Saul
Bocheru - ” Descendant of King Saul in the tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:38 )
Tarea - Descendant of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:35 ; Tahrea 1 Chronicles 9:41 )
She-Ari'ah - (valued by Jehovah ), one of the six sons of Azel a descendant of Saul
la'Ish - (lion ), father of Phaltiel, to whom Saul had given Michal, David's wife
Saul - His father's she-asses had strayed, and Saul was sent with a servant to seek for them. , "Gibeah of God"), Saul and his servant went toward the north-west over Mount Ephraim, and then turning north-east they came to "the land of Shalisha," and thence eastward to the land of Shalim, and at length came to the district of Zuph, near Samuel's home at Ramah (9:5-10). At this point Saul proposed to return from the three days' fruitless search, but his servant suggested that they should first consult the "seer. , the "height", where sacrifice was to be offered; and in answer to Saul's question, "Tell me, I pray thee, where the seer's house is," Samuel made himself known to him. Samuel had been divinely prepared for his coming (9:15-17), and received Saul as his guest. He took him with him to the sacrifice, and then after the feast "communed with Saul upon the top of the house" of all that was in his heart. On the morrow Samuel "took a vial of oil and poured it on his head," and anointed Saul as king over Israel ((9:25-10:8),), giving him three signs in confirmation of his call to be king. When Saul reached his home in Gibeah the last of these signs was fulfilled, and the Sprit of God came upon him, and "he was turned into another man. " The simple countryman was transformed into the king of Israel, a remarkable change suddenly took place in his whole demeanour, and the people said in their astonishment, as they looked on the stalwart son of Kish, "Is Saul also among the prophets?", a saying which passed into a "proverb. ) The intercourse between Saul and Samuel was as yet unknown to the people. Here the lot was drawn (10:17-27), and it fell upon Saul, and when he was presented before them, the stateliest man in all Israel, the air was rent for the first time in Israel by the loud cry, "God save the king!" He now returned to his home in Gibeah, attended by a kind of bodyguard, "a band of men whose hearts God had touched. At the invitation of Samuel "all the people went to Gilgal, and there they made Saul king before the Lord in Gilgal. ...
Saul now undertook the great and difficult enterprise of freeing the land from its hereditary enemies the Philistines, and for this end he gathered together an army of 3,000 men (1 Samuel 13:1,2 ). Saul, with 2,000 men, occupied Michmash and Mount Bethel; while his son Jonathan, with 1,000 men, occupied Gibeah, to the south of Geba, and seemingly without any direction from his father "smote" the Philistines in Geba. Thus roused, the Philistines, who gathered an army of 30,000 chariots and 6,000 horsemen, and "people as the sand which is on the sea-shore in multitude," encamped in Michmash, which Saul had evacuated for Gilgal. Saul now tarried for seven days in Gilgal before making any movement, as Samuel had appointed (10:8); but becoming impatient on the seventh day, as it was drawing to a close, when he had made an end of offering the burnt offering, Samuel appeared and warned him of the fatal consequences of his act of disobedience, for he had not waited long enough (13:13,14). ...
When Saul, after Samuel's departure, went out from Gilgal with his 600 men, his followers having decreased to that number (13:15), against the Philistines at Michmash (q. Here at Gibeah-Geba Saul and his army rested, uncertain what to do. Jonathan became impatient, and with his armour-bearer planned an assault against the Philistines, unknown to Saul and the army (14:1-15). Saul and his 600 men, a band which speedily increased to 10,000, perceiving the confusion, pursued the army of the Philistines, and the tide of battle rolled on as far as to Bethaven, halfway between Michmash and Bethel. " While pursuing the Philistines, Saul rashly adjured the people, saying, "Cursed be the man that eateth any food until evening. This was afterwards discovered by Saul (ver. "Then Saul went up from following the Philistines: and the Philistines went to their own place" (1 Samuel 14:24-46 ); and thus the campaign against the Philistines came to an end. This was Saul's second great military success. ...
Saul's reign, however, continued to be one of almost constant war against his enemies round about (14:47,48), in all of which he proved victorious. Samuel summoned Saul to execute the "ban" which God had pronounced (Deuteronomy 25:17-19 ) on this cruel and relentless foe of Israel. " Saul proceeded to execute the divine command; and gathering the people together, marched from Telaim (1 Samuel 15:4 ) against the Amalekites, whom he smote "from Havilah until thou comest to Shur," utterly destroying "all the people with the edge of the sword", i. He was, however, guilty of rebellion and disobedience in sparing Agag their king, and in conniving at his soldiers' sparing the best of the sheep and cattle; and Samuel, following Saul to Gilgal, in the Jordan valley, said unto him, "Because thou hast rejected the word of the Lord, he also hath rejected thee from being king" (15:23). The kingdom was rent from Saul and was given to another, even to David, whom the Lord chose to be Saul's successor, and whom Samuel anointed (16:1-13). From that day "the spirit of the Lord departed from Saul, and an evil spirit from the Lord troubled him. ...
David was now sent for as a "cunning player on an harp" (1 Samuel 16:16,18 ), to play before Saul when the evil spirit troubled him, and thus was introduced to the court of Saul. Saul and the men of Israel went forth to meet them, and encamped on the northern slope of the same valley which lay between the two armies. Saul now took David permanently into his service (18:2); but he became jealous of him (ver. ...
After some time the Philistines "gathered themselves together" in the plain of Esdraelon, and pitched their camp at Shunem, on the slope of Little Hermon; and Saul "gathered all Israel together," and "pitched in Gilboa" (1 Samuel 28:3-14 ). Being unable to discover the mind of the Lord, Saul, accompanied by two of his retinue, betook himself to the "witch of Endor," some 7 or 8 miles distant. In his despair at the disaster that had befallen his army, Saul "took a sword and fell upon it. " And the Philistines on the morrow "found Saul and his three sons fallen in Mount Gilboa. ), the circumcision name of the apostle, given to him, perhaps, in memory of King Saul ( Acts 7:58 ; 8:1 ; 9:1 )
Agag - ...
Another king of the Amalekites whom Saul spared unlawfully, but whom Samuel on his arrival in the camp of Saul ordered, in retributive justice (Judges 1 ), to be brought out and cut in pieces (1Samuel 15:8-33
Naioth - ’ Here David fled to Samuel after Saul had attacked him with a javelin; hither Saul pursued him, and was seized with an ecstatic fit of some kind ( 1 Samuel 19:18-24 )
Samuel - Anointed Saul and David, the first two Israelite monarchs. ...
Samuel, the book of: The (two-part) book of Tanach relating the history of the Israelites during Samuel's lifetime and during the reigns of Saul and David (931-c
Ner - Son of Abiel, father of Abner, and Saul's uncle. ...
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Saul. ...
This differs from the Chronicles, where Ner is the son of Jehiel of Gibeon, and the father of Kish, the father of Saul
Sheariah - ” Descendant of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:38 )
Siphmoth - Fruitful places, some unknown place in the south, where David found friends when he fled from Saul (1 Samuel 30:28 )
Seneh - Rock in the "passage of Michmash" where the Philistines had a garrison in the days of Saul
Aphiah - ” An ancestor of King Saul from the tribe of Benjamin (1 Samuel 9:1 )
ba'al -
A Reubenite (1 Chronicles 5:5 ) ...
The son of Jehiel, and grandfather of Saul
ba'al -
A Reubenite (1 Chronicles 5:5 ) ...
The son of Jehiel, and grandfather of Saul
ba'al -
A Reubenite (1 Chronicles 5:5 ) ...
The son of Jehiel, and grandfather of Saul
ra'Pha -
Son of Binea, among the descendants of Saul
Saul - If the Zimri of 1 Chronicles 9:42 be the Zimri of 1 Kings 16 it is the last stroke of the family of Saul for the kingdom. Saul was son of Kish, son of Ner, son of Abiel or Jehiel. 1 Samuel 9:1 omits Ner, the intermediate link, and makes Kish son of Abiel; 1 Chronicles 8:33 supplies the link, or Ner in 1 Chronicles is not father but ancestor of Kish (1 Chronicles 9:36-39), and Ner son of Abi-Gibeon (father or founder of Gibeon, 1 Chronicles 8:29) is named only because he was progenitor of Saul's line, the intermediate names mentioned in 1 Samuel 9 being omitted. The proud, fierce, and self willed spirit of his tribe, Benjamin, is conspicuous in Saul (see Judges 19; 20; 21). Gibeah was especially connected with Saul. " Searching for Kish's donkeys three days in vain, at last, by the servant's advice, Saul consulted Samuel, who had already God's intimation that He would send at this very time a man of Benjamin who should be king. Samuel gave Saul the chiefest place at the feast on the high place to which he invited him, and the choice portion. " "Little then in his own sight" (1 Samuel 15:17), and calling himself "of the smallest of the tribes, and his family least of all the families of Benjamin" (1 Samuel 9:21), Saul was very different from what he afterward became in prosperity; elevation tests men (Psalms 73:18). ...
Samuel anointed and kissed Saul as king. Next prophets met him, and suddenly the Spirit of God coming upon him he prophesied among them, so that the proverb concerning him then first began, "is Saul also among the prophets?" The public outward call followed at Mizpeh, when God caused the lot to fall on Saul. NAHASH'S cruel threat against Jabesh Gilead, which was among the causes that made Israel desire a king (1 Samuel 8:3; 1 Samuel 8:19; 1 Samuel 12:12), gave Saul the opportunity of displaying his patriotic bravery in rescuing the citizens and securing their lasting attachment. ...
His magnanimity too appears in his not allowing any to be killed of those whom the people desired to slay for saying "shall Saul reign over us?" Pious humility then breathed in his ascription of the deliverance to Jehovah, not himself (1 Samuel 11:12-13). In 1 Samuel 13:1 read "Saul reigned 40 years"; so Acts 13:21, and Josephus "18 years during Samuel's life and 22 after his death" ( Saul was young in beginning his reign (1 Samuel 9:2), but probably verging toward 40 years old, as his son Jonathan was grown up (1 Samuel 13:2). Ishbosheth his youngest son (1 Chronicles 8:33) was 40 at his death (2 Samuel 2:10), and as he is not mentioned among Saul's sons in 1 Samuel 14:49 he perhaps was born after Saul's accession. In the second year of his reign Saul revolted from the Philistines whose garrison had been advanced as far as Geba (Jehu , N. The Israelites, as the Romans under the Etruscan Porscna, were deprived by their Philistine oppressors of all smiths, so that no Israelite save Saul and Jonathan had sword or spear (1 Samuel 13:19-21). Many hid in caves, others fled beyond Jordan, while those (600: 1 Samuel 13:15) who stayed with Saul followed trembling. Already some time previously Samuel had conferred with Saul as to his foreseen struggle against the Philistines, and his going down to Gilgal (not the first going for his inauguration as king, 1 Samuel 11:14-15; but second after revolting from the Philistines) which was the most suitable place for gathering an army. ...
Samuel was not directing Saul to go at once to Gilgal, as seen as he should go from him, and wait there seven days (1 Samuel 10:8); but that after being chosen king by lot and conquering Ammon and being confirmed as king at Gilgal, he should war with the Philistines (one main end of the Lord's appointing him king, 1 Samuel 9:16, "that he may save My people out of the hand of the Philistines, for I have looked upon My people, because their cry is come unto Me"), and then go down to Gilgal, and "wait there seven days, until I come, before offering the holocaust. " The Gilgal meant is that in the Jordan valley, to which Saul withdrew in order to gather soldiers for battle, and offer sacrifices, and then advance again to Gibeah and Geba, thence to encounter the Philistines encamped at Michmash. Now first Saul betrays his real character. Saul met Samuel's reproof "what hast thou done?" with self justifying excuses, as if his act had been meritorious not culpable: "I saw the people scattered from me, and thou camest not within the days appointed (Samuel had come before their expiration), and the Philistines gathered themselves. )...
The same reckless and profane impatience appears in Saul; he consults Jehovah by the priest Ahiah (1 Samuel 14:18 read with Septuagint, "bring here the ephod, for he took the ephod that day in the presence of Israel"; for the ark was not usually taken out, but only the ephod, for consultation, and the ark was now at Kirjath Jearim, not in Saul's little camp); then at the increasing tumult in the Philistine host, impatient to join battle, interrupted the priest, "withdraw thine hand," i. Saul's adjuration that none should eat until evening betrayed his rash temper and marred the victory (1 Samuel 14:29-30). Jonathan's unconscious violation of Saul's adjuration, by eating honey which revived him (1 Samuel 13:27-29, "enlightened his eyes," Psalms 13:3), was the occasion of Saul again taking lightly God's name to witness that Jonathan should die (contrast Exodus 20:7). But the guilt, which God's silence when consulted whether Saul should follow after the Philistines implied, lay with Saul himself, for God's siding "with Jonathan" against the Philistines ("he hath wrought with God this day") was God's verdict acquitting him. Thus convicted Saul desisted from further pursuit of the Philistines. ...
Saul's second great disobedience at his second probation by God was (1 Samuel 15) his sparing the Amalekite Agag and the best of the sheep, oxen, etc. " "What meaneth then tills bleating of the sheep?" Saul lays on the people the disobedience, and takes to himself with them the merit of the obedience: "they have brought them from the Amalekites, for the people spared the best of the sheep . Saul had zeal for Israel against the Gibeonites where zeal was misplaced, because not according to God's will (2 Samuel 21); he lacked zeal here, where God required it. for rebellion is as the silt of witchcraft," the very sin which Saul fell into at last (1 Samuel 28). As Saul rejected Jehovah's word so He rejected Saul "from being king. " In 1 Chronicles 10:13 "Saul died for his transgression (Hebrew maal , 'prevarication,' shuffling, not doing yet wishing to appear to do, God's will) against Jehovah, and also for asking counsel of one that had a familiar spirit. " The secret of Saul's disobedience he discloses, "because I feared the people and obeyed their voice," instead of God's voice (Exodus 23:2; Proverbs 29:25). Henceforth Samuel, after tearing himself from the king, to the rending of his garment (the symbol of the transference of the kingdom to a better successor), came to Saul no more though mourning for him. As the Spirit of Jehovah came upon David from the day of his anointing (1 Samuel 16:13-14), so an evil spirit from (it is never said OF) Jehovah troubled Saul, and the Spirit of Jehovah departed from hint. the spoil" (Genesis 49:27), Saul was energetic, choleric, and impressible, now prophesying with the prophets whose holy enthusiasm infected him, now jealous to madness of David whom he had loved greatly and brought permanently to court (1 Samuel 16:21; 1 Samuel 18:2) and made his armour bearer; and all because of a thoughtless expression of the women in meeting the conquerors after the battle with Goliath, "Saul hath slain his thousands, David his ten thousands" (1 Samuel 17; 1 Samuel 18:7). But David's wise walk made Saul fear him (1 Samuel 18:12; 1 Samuel 18:14-15; 1 Samuel 18:29; Psalms 101:2; Psalms 5:8). God raised up to David a friend, Michal, in his enemy's house, which made Saul the more afraid. So, not daring to lay his own hand on him, he exposed him to the Philistines (1 Samuel 18:17-27); in righteous retribution, it was Saul himself who fell by them (1618169733_15). ...
For a brief time a better feeling returned to Saul through Jonathan's intercession for David (1 Samuel 19:4-6); but again the evil spirit returned, and Saul pursued David to Michal's house, and even to Samuel's presence at Naioth in Ramah. Yet soon after, because Jonathan let David go, Saul cast a javelin at his noble unselfish son, saying, "thou hast chosen the son of Jesse to thine own confusion, for as long as he liveth thou shalt not be established, nor thy kingdom" (1 Samuel 20:28-33). Saul's slaughter of the priests at Nob, on Doeg's information, followed (1 Samuel 22), Saul upbraiding his servants as if conspiring with David and feeling no sorrow for the king; "yet can David, as I can (1 Samuel 8:14, compare 1 Samuel 22:7), give every one of you fields and vineyards?" etc. )...
By slaying the priests, so that Abiathar alone escaped to David, Saul's sin recoiled on himself, for Saul thereby supplied him whom he hated with one through whom to consult Jehovah, and deprived himself of the divine oracle, so that at last he had to have recourse to witchcraft, though he had himself tried to extirpate it (1 Samuel 23:2; 1 Samuel 23:9; 1 Samuel 28:3-7, etc. The Philistines, by whom Saul thought to have slain David, were the unconscious instruments of saving him from Saul at Mann (1 Samuel 23:26-27). David's magnanimity at the cave of Engedi in sparing his deadly foe and only cutting off his skirt, when in his power, moved Saul to tears, so that his better feelings returned for the moment, and he acknowledged David's superiority in spirit and deed, and obtained David's promise not to destroy his seed (1 Samuel 24). Once again (1 Samuel 26), at Hachilah David spared Saul, though urged by Abishai to destroy him; the Altaschith of Psalm 57; 58; 59; refers to David's words on this occasion, "destroy not. His words were singularly prophetic of Saul's doom, "his day shall come to die, or be shall descend into battle and perish. " The "deep sleep from Jehovah" on Saul enabled David unobserved to take spear and cruse from Saul's bolster. From a hill afar off David appealed to Saul, "if thy instigation to (i
Binea - (bihn' ih uh) A descendant of the tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:37 ) and of King Saul (1 Chronicles 10:43 )
ja'Rah - (honey ), a descendant of Saul; son of Micah and great-grandson of Mephibosheth
Ish'ui - (quiet ), the second son of Saul by his wife Ahinoam ( 1 Samuel 14:4 ) comp
Baal - A Gibeonite, granduncle of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:33 = 1 Chronicles 9:36 )
Mal'Chi-Shu'a - (king of help ), one of the sons of King Saul
ma'Tri - (rain of Jehovah ), a family of the tribe of Benjamin, to which Saul the King of Israel belonged
Ahimelech - Doeg, an Edomite overseer for Saul, saw the transaction and reported to Saul. When his servants refused to kill God's priest, Saul ordered Doeg to do so
Abinadab - A son of Jesse, one of the three who followed Saul in the war with the Philistines, 1 Samuel 16:8 ; 17:13 . A son of Saul, slain in the battle at Gilboa, 1 Samuel 31:2
Merab - ” Eldest daughter of King Saul (1 Samuel 14:49 ), who was twice promised to David in exchange for killing Goliath (1 Samuel 17:25 ) and for fighting the Lord's battles against the Philistines (1 Samuel 18:17-19 ). Saul reneged on his promise and gave Merab to Adriel
Ishbosheth - a son of King Saul, and his successor in the throne. He reigned two years in peace, but the remaining eight years were spent in perpetual wars between his troops and those of David, till in the end he perished, and with him ended the royal dignity of the house of Saul
Amasai - A Levite, who joined David with thirty gallant men, while in the desert flying from Saul, 1 Chronicles 6:25 ; 12:16-18
Flea - The well-known small insect, to which David compared himself when being hunted by Saul
Eshek - ” A member of the tribe of Benjamin descended from King Saul (1 Chronicles 8:39 )
Zelah - Slope; side, a town in Benjamin, where Saul and his son Jonathan were buried (2 Samuel 21:14 ). It was probably Saul's birthplace
Doeg - An Idumean, chief of Saul's herdsmen. With officious eagerness and talebearing exaggeration (marked in the title of Psalm 52 by the tautology "came and told and said") he gave information which he knew well his master Saul would keenly listen to. Doeg told substantially the fact; it was Saul who put on it the "lying" construction of treason on the part of the priests (compare Psalms 52:3-4 with 1 Samuel 22:13). He was but the accomplice and ready tool; Saul, the "mighty man" (Psalms 52:1) who "trusted in the abundance of his riches" (Psalms 52:7) as means of destroying David, was the real" boaster in mischief," for this was the very appeal that Saul made, and that induced Doeg to inform (1 Samuel 22:7): "Hear now, ye Benjamites, will the son of Jesse (as I can) give every one of you fields and vineyards?" (compare 1 Samuel 8:14. )...
On Doeg's information, and by Doeg's own sacrilegious hand, at Saul's command, when the king's "footmen" declined in reverential awe to kill Jehovah's priests, eighty-five of them fell, and Saul "boasted" (Psalms 52:1) of it as a sample of the fate of all who should help David. The cruel sycophancy of Doeg was so well known to David that he said unto Abiathar, the only survivor of the slaughter, "I knew it that day, when Doeg the Edomite was there, that he would surely tell Saul;" therefore with characteristic sensitiveness of conscience David adds, "I have occasioned the death of all the persons of thy father's house
Telaim - Young lambs, a place at which Saul gathered his army to fight against Amalek (1 Samuel 15:4 ); probably the same as Telem (2)
Moza - A descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:36-37 ; 1 Chronicles 9:42-43 )
Naioth - The place where David fled from Saul
Cush (1) - An enigmatic title for Saul the Benjamite, with an allusion to the similar sounding name of Saul's father, Kish. David in this Psalms 7:4 alludes to Saul's gratuitous enmity and his own sparing "him that without cause is mine enemy," namely, in the cave at Engedi, when Saul was in his power (1 Samuel 24)
Tamarisk - Abraham planted a tamarisk at Beer-sheba (Genesis 21:33 ), and Saul was buried beneath one at Jabesh-gilead (1 Samuel 31:13 ). Saul convened his court under one (1 Samuel 22:6 )
Endor - Here the witch lived whom Saul consulted, 1 Samuel 28:1-25 . She was amazed and appalled when the form of Samuel really appeared, sent by God himself to put her to shame, and bring to king Saul his last warning
Alemeth - A descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:36 ; 1 Chronicles 9:42 )
al'Emeth - (covering ), a Benjamite, son of Jehoadah or Jarah, ( 1 Chronicles 8:36 ; 9:42 ) and descended from Jonathan the son of Saul
mo'za - (1 Chronicles 2:46 ) ...
Son of Zimri and descendant of Saul
Shemaah - ” Father of Benjaminite military leaders who deserted Saul to join David at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12:3 )
Eshbaal - Man of Baal, the fourth son of king Saul (1 Chronicles 8:33 ; 9:39 )
Malchi-Shua - The third son of Saul ( 1 Samuel 14:49 ); slain by the Philistines at Mt
Merab - Eldest daughter of Saul: she was promised to David, but was given to Adriel the Meholathite
Migron - Place near Gibeah where Saul encamped
Cush - (black ), a Benjamite mentioned only in the title to ( Psalm 7:1 ) He was probably a follower of Saul, the head of his tribe
zi'ba - (statue ), a servant of Saul whom David made steward of Saul's son Mephibosheth
Cush - (black ), a Benjamite mentioned only in the title to ( Psalm 7:1 ) He was probably a follower of Saul, the head of his tribe
Shur, Wilderness of - Saul smote the Amalekites in that area (1 Samuel 15:7 ). David and his men made forays as far as Shur while eluding King Saul (1 Samuel 27:8 )
Abiel - Father of Kish and of Ner; grandfather of Saul and of Abner, according to 1 Samuel 9:1; 1 Samuel 14:51. But Abiel seems to have had "Ner" as his second name (1 Chronicles 8:33; 1 Chronicles 9:35; 1 Chronicles 9:39, where Abiel is also called Jehiel and Saul is represented as his great grandson)
Ahinoam - Daughter of Ahimaaz andwife of Saul. David's wife a woman of Jezreel: she accompanied David in his flight from Saul; and, while residing at Ziklag, was taken captive when the city was burned by the Amalekites; but was recovered
Doeg - An Edomite, and chief of the herdmen [1] of king Saul. ’ Upon his report Saul ordered Ahimelech and his companions to be slain
Sela-Hammahlekoth - A rock or cliff in the wilderness of Maon, at which Saul ‘returned from pursuing after David’ ( 1 Samuel 23:28 )
Tel'a-im - (lambs ), the place at which Saul collected and numbered his forces before his attack on Amalek, ( 1 Samuel 16:4 ) may be identical with TELEM , which see
Raphah - ” A descendant of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:37 )
Telaim - Where Saul numbered his host before attacking Amalek (1 Samuel 15:4)
Adnah - A Manassite officer of Saul who deserted to David at Ziklag ( 1 Chronicles 12:20 )
Malchisua - A son of Saul, who was slain with his father and brothers at mount Gilboa
Lovely - ...
Saul and Jonathan were lovely and pleasant in their lives - 2 Samuel 1
Rizpah - Daughter of Aiah, concubine of Saul, seized by the ambitious Abner after he had placed Ishbosheth (Ishbaal) on the throne. A three years’ famine was divined to be due to the displeasure of Jehovah at the slaughter of the Gibeonites by Saul. When David inquired what expiation he should make, the Gibeonites refused money compensation, but demanded descendants of Saul to expose before Jehovah
Shiggaion - In consonance with this the Hebrew root of Shiggaion occurs in Saul's address to David (1 Samuel 26:21), "behold I have played the fool and erred exceedingly" (compare Psalms 119:21; Psalms 119:118). Psalm 7 refers to David's being accused by Saul (the Benjamite, Cush the Ethiopian unchangeably black at heart toward David: Jeremiah 13:23; Amos 9:7; Cush similar to Kish, Saul's father) of plotting evil against him, whereas he returned good for evil in sparing Saul his deadly foe, when in his power (1 Samuel 24:7); "concerning the words" i. on account of the calumnies which men uttered against David to ingratiate themselves with the king, and which Saul gave ear to (1 Samuel 24:9; 1 Samuel 26:19)
Moza - ...
...
The son of Zimri, of the posterity of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:36,37 ; 9:42,43 )
Rapha -
A Benjamite, the son of Binea (1 Chronicles 8:2,37 ), a descendant of Saul
Rachal - One of David's haunts in southern Judah in his flight from Saul
Moza - Son of Zimri, a descendant of Saul
Ananias - In response to a vision he received from the Lord, this Ananias visited Saul (Paul) three days after Saul had his Damascus road experience. Ananias laid his hands on Saul, after which Saul received both the Holy Spirit and his sight. Acts 9:18 may imply that Ananias was the one who baptized Saul
Saul - Saul, however, primarily refers to the first king of a united Israel, a tall and handsome son of Kish from the tribe of Benjamin (1Samuel 9:1-2,1 Samuel 9:21 ). Chosen by God (1 Samuel 9:15-17 ) and secretly anointed by Samuel (1 Samuel 10:1 ), Saul was later selected publicly by lot (1 Samuel 10:17-24 ). ...
The numbers in 1 Samuel 13:1 are incomplete in the Hebrew text, but Saul's reign is generally dated about 1020-1000 B. He made his capital at “Gibeah of Saul” (“Saul's hill,” 1 Samuel 11:4 ), probably tell el-Ful, three miles north of Jerusalem where excavations have uncovered contemporary foundations of a modest fortresslike palace. From Gibeah, Saul drove the Philistines from the hill country (1 Samuel 13:19-14:23 ) and fought other enemies of Israel (1 Samuel 14:47-48 ). ...
A tragic figure, Saul's heart was initially changed; he had even prophesied (1 Samuel 10:9-13 ). The spirit of the Lord left Saul and was replaced by an evil spirit which tormented him. After the Goliath episode, Saul became jealous and fearful of David (1Samuel 18:7,1 Samuel 18:12 ), eventually making several spontaneous and indirect attempts on David's life (1Samuel 18:10-11,1 Samuel 18:25 ; 1Samuel 19:1,1 Samuel 19:9-11 ). Saul's fits of rage, his obsession with David, and the slaughter of the priests at Nob (1 Samuel 22:17-19 ), make it appear as though he suffered from some sort of psychotic state. The following day, Saul and three sons were killed at the hands of the Philistines on Mount Gilboa (1 Samuel 31:1 ). Saul's body was beheaded and hung on the walls of Beth-shan, from whence it was rescued and buried by the grateful inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead (1 Samuel 31:8-13 ). ...
The enigma of Saul was sensed by David who refused to lift his hand against “the Lord's anointed” (1Samuel 26:9-11,1 Samuel 26:23 ) and at his death provided a fitting elegy (2 Samuel 1:17-27 ). ...
New Testament Though the king Saul is mentioned in passing, most occurrences of the name in the New Testament refer to the Hebrew name of the apostle Paul
Samuel - In the oldest narrative, found in 1 Samuel 9:1-27 , he appears as a seer from the land of Zuph, to whom Saul and his servant, who are seeking the lost asses of Kish, Saul’s father, apply for help. Saul had hesitated about applying to the man of God, on the score of not having a gift to present, but the servant produced the fourth part of a shekel of silver with which to compensate the seer. Samuel, who had been Divinely apprised of their coming, met them while he was on his way to worship at the high place, and after they had partaken of his hospitality and passed the night with him, he nominated and anointed Saul as Israel’s coming king. He further gave Saul signs by which he should know that the promises would he fulfilled, and committed him to the Spirit of God. He is succeeded in the judgeship by unworthy sons, and Israel, outraged at their sinfulness and worthlessness, demands a king a proposition, in the estimation of Samuel, tantamount to a rejection of Jehovah, though no such suggestion was made when he voluntarily appointed Saul. Accordingly the people are assembled at Mizpah, again accused of forsaking Jehovah, and Saul is selected by lot (1 Samuel 10:17-24 ). Saul, as well as the monarchy, is controlled and directed by him. 13) from a different source of Saul’s attack on the Philistines. The story is interrupted at 1 Samuel 13:8-15 by a complaint that Saul had disobeyed in offering sacrifice before the battle, although he had waited the required seven days as instructed by Samuel. It is difficult to see wherein Saul was guilty. The Philistines were closing in upon Saul, his army was fast melting away, it was necessary to give battle, and it would have been considered irreligious to inaugurate the battle without sacrifice. ...
Again Saul is instructed by Samuel (ch. This narrative does not seem conscious that the kingdom was already lost to Saul. After this Samuel is sent to the home of Jesse to select and anoint a successor to Saul. We find an account of his keeping a school of the prophets at Ramah, whither David flees to escape Saul ( 1 Samuel 19:18-24 ). 28, and the story of Saul’s application to the witch of Endor to call up Samuel from the dead
Malchi-Shua - King of help, one of the four sons of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:33 )
Joezer - ” Warrior from Saul's tribe of Benjamin who joined David at Ziklag as he fled from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:6 )
Merab - The eldest daughter of Saul, 1 Samuel 14:49, promised to David, but given to Adriel in marriage
Moza - Descendant of King Saul (1 Chronicles 8:36-37 ; 1 Chronicles 9:42-43 )
Eleasah - Son of Rapha, or Rephaiah, a descendant of Saul
Gallim - The native place of Phalti, to whom Michal was given by Saul
Sha'Lim, the Land of - (the land of foxes ), a district through which Saul passed on his journey in quest of his father's asses
Agag - For disobedience in sparing Agag after defeating the Amalecites, Saul was rejected in the name of God by Samuel, who hewed down Agag in his presence
Manaen - He was one of those with Barnabas and Saul at Antioch, w hen the Holy Ghost sent those servants out to the work of the ministry
Cruse, - a small vessel for holding water, such as was carried by Saul when on his night expedition after David, (1 Samuel 26:11,12,16 ) and by Elijah
Abiel - Father of Kish and Ner, and grandfather of Saul ( 1 Samuel 9:1 ; 1 Samuel 14:51 ). The latter passage should run, ‘Kish, the father of Saul, and Ner the father of Abner, were sons of Abiel
Kish - ...
...
A Benjamite, the son of Abiel, and father of king Saul (1 Samuel 9:1,3 ; 10:11,21 ; 14:51 ; 2 Samuel 21:14 ). All that is recorded of him is that he sent his son Saul in search of his asses that had strayed, and that he was buried in Zelah
a'Gag - One king of this name is mentioned in ( Numbers 24:7 ) and another in 1 Samuel 15:8,9,20,32 The latter was the king of the Amalekites, whom Saul spared contrary to Jehovah's well-known will. ( Exodus 17:14 ; 25:17) For this act of disobedience Samuel was commissioned to declare to Saul his rejection, and he himself sent for Agag and cut him in pieces
Jabesh - It was sacked by the Israelites for refusing to aid in chastising the Benjamites, Judges 21:8-10 ...
At a later day, it was besieged by the Ammonites, and relieved by Saul; in gratitude for which service the men of Jabesh-gilead rescued the dead bodies of Saul and his sons from the insults of the Philistines, 1 Samuel 11:1-15 31:11-13 2 Samuel 2:5
na'Ioth - (habitations ), or more fully, "Naioth in Ramah," a place of Mount Ephraim, the birthplace of Samuel and Saul, and in which Samuel and David took refuge together after the latter had made his escape from the jealous fury of Saul
ze'Lah - (a rib ), a city in the allotment of Benjamin, ( Joshua 18:28 ) contained the family tomb of Kish, the father of Saul
Pelet - Benjaminite warrior who defected from Saul to David (1 Chronicles 12:3 )
Ahimelech - David, being reformed by his friend Jonathan that Saul was determined to destroy him, thought it prudent to retire. One day, when Saul was complaining of his officers, that no one was affected with his misfortunes, or gave him any intelligence of what was carrying on against him, 1 Samuel 22:9 , &c, Doeg related to him what had occurred when David came to Ahimelech the high priest. On this information, Saul convened the priests, and having charged them with the crime of treason, ordered his guards to slay them, which they refusing to do, Doeg, who had been their accuser, at the king's command became their executioner, and with his sacrilegious hand massacred no less than eighty-five of them; the Septuagint and Syriac versions make the number of priests slain by Doeg three hundred and five. Nor did Saul stop here; but, sending a party to Nob, he commanded them to slay men, women, and children, and even cattle, with the edge of the sword
Hill of God - Here Saul met a band of ecstatic prophets and joined them in their frenzy (1 Samuel 10:5 )
Armoni - Inhabitant of a fortress, the first-named of the two sons of Saul and Rizpah
Tabor, Oak of - NAS, NRSV designation of a site between Rachel's tomb (near Bethlehem) and Gibeah of Saul (1 Samuel 10:3 )
Ner - ” Father of Saul's general Abner and grandfather of Saul (1 Samuel 14:51 ; 1Samuel 26:5,1 Samuel 26:14 ; 2 Samuel 2:8 ; 1 Chronicles 9:36 )
Eshbaal - Fourth son of Saul
Malchishua, Melchishua - Son of king Saul: he was killed in battle with his father
Michal - Younger daughter of Saul, offered to David, as a snare, on condition that he would slay one hundred Philistines. The popularity of David led Saul to seek his life. Saul then gave Michal to Paltiel
Abiathar - When Saul sent to Nob to murder all the priests, Abiathar escaped the massacre, and fled to David in the wilderness. There he continued in the quality of high priest; but Saul, out of aversion to Ahimelech, whom he imagined to have betrayed his interests, transferred the dignity of the high priesthood from Ithamar's family into that of Eleazar, by conferring this office upon Zadok. Thus there were, at the same time, two high priests in Israel, Abiathar with David, and Zadok with Saul
Dinhabah - Residence of one of earliest kings of Edom in period prior to Saul in Israel (Genesis 36:32 )
Bealiah - ” Soldier who joined David at Ziklag while he fled from Saul and served the Philistines (1 Chronicles 12:5 )
Shaalim - ” Place where Saul sought his father's lost donkeys (1 Samuel 9:4 )
Mephibosheth - ’...
David, on succeeding to the throne, instead of destroying all the family of Saul, as was usual on such occasions, spared Mephibosheth out of regard for his father Jonathan (2 Samuel 9:1 ). Mephibosheth was five years old when Saul fell on Mt. David was informed of his place of concealment in Lo-debar, on the east of the Jordan, by Ziba , who had been steward of Saul ( 2 Samuel 9:1 ff. The king restored to Mephibosheth all the estates of Saul, Ziba became his steward, and Mephibosheth himself was maintained as a permanent guest at David’s table ( 2 Samuel 9:13 ). He also stated that his master had remained in Jerusalem, in hope of obtaining the kingdom of Saul. David seems to have doubted the truthfulness of Mephibosheth or did not wish to alienate Ziba, who had also been faithful, and divided the land of Saul between the two. One of the sons of Saul’s concubine Rizpah, slain by the Gibeonites ( 2 Samuel 21:8 )
Ismaiah - A Gibeonite chief of the men who left Saul, the head of their tribe, to join David at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12:1-4); "a mighty man among the 30 and over the 30
Abner - , "enlightening", the son of Ner and uncle of Saul. He was commander-in-chief of Saul's army (1Samuel 14:50; 17:55; 20:25). He first introduced David to the court of Saul after the victory over Goliath (1Samuel 17:57). After the death of Saul, David was made king over Judah, and reigned in Hebron. Among the other tribes there was a feeling of hostility to Judah; and Abner, at the head of Ephraim, fostered this hostility in the interest of the house of Saul, whose son Ish-bosheth he caused to be proclaimed king (2Samuel 2:8). Being rebuked by Ish-bosheth for the impropriety of taking to wife Rizpah, who had been a concubine of King Saul, he found an excuse for going over to the side of David, whom he now professed to regard as anointed by the Lord to reign over all Israel
Adriel - A son of Barzillai, married Merab, daughter of Saul, who had been promised to David, 1 Samuel 18:19 . Adriel had five sons by her, who were delivered up to the Gibeonites, to be put to death before the Lord, to avenge the cruelty of Saul their grandfather against the Gibeonites
Paphos - ) Here Barnabas and Saul were instrumental in converting Sergius Paulus the proconsul, in spite of Elymas' opposition. ) Saul is here called Paul when "filled with the Holy Spirit" he inflicted blindness from "the hand of the Lord" upon the sorcerer, and thenceforth became more prominent than Barnabas
Abiel - Father of Kish and of Ner and grandfather of Saul and of Abner. That this is the most probable genealogy is confirmed by Ner being said to be Saul's uncle, 1 Samuel 9:1 ; 1 Samuel 14:50,51 ; though in 1 Chronicles 8:33 ; 1 Chronicles 9:39 , Saul is said to be the son of Kish, the son of Ner
Shalisha(h) - ” Territory where Saul sought his father's lost donkeys (1 Samuel 9:4 ); probably the same as Baal Shalishah
Armoni - ” Son of Rizpah and Saul, whom David gave to the Gibeonites in revenge for Saul's earlier killing of Gibeonites (2 Samuel 21:7-9 )
Keilah - A city in the plains of Judah, which David once relieved from a siege by the Philistines, but which afterwards sought to deliver him up to Saul, 1 Samuel 23:1-13 ; Nehemiah 3:17
Samuel, First Book of - God caused Saul the son of Kish providentially to go where Samuel was, and then pointed him out as the one to be anointed as king, that he might save Israel out of the hand of the Philistines. On Nahash the Ammonite declaring that he would make a covenant with the inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead only on the condition of thrusting out all their right eyes, to "lay it for a reproach upon all Israel," Saul was stirred to action by the Spirit of God, and the Ammonites were slain. Samuel called the people to Gilgal (the place where the flesh had been judged), and Saul was made king before the Lord, and peace offerings were offered. Saul is left without Samuel and is put to the test. He had been told that he was to go to Gilgal and wait there seven days for Samuel, for Samuel was the link between Saul and the Lord: 1 Samuel 10:8 . Saul tarried the seven days, and then, because the people were leaving him, he 'forced himself,' as he says, and offered a burnt offering. Jonathan, Saul's son, was a man of faith: he had previously attacked the Philistines, and now, with his armour-bearer only, began again to smite them. The Israelites also attacked them, and there would have been a greater victory had not Saul, in fleshly zeal, put all under a curse who should eat before the evening. When evening arrived the people hasted to kill and eat, and would have eaten with the blood had not Saul restrained them. Saul had all the outward forms of reverence for God, but he was not a man of faith: he called the Israelites Hebrews, missing the point of their relationship with God. Saul is now put to a final test. Saul however saved the best of the sheep and oxen under the plea of these being for sacrifice. Yet Saul said he had obeyed the word of the Lord. Samuel uttered that important principle, "To obey is better than sacrifice," telling Saul that God had rent the kingdom from him. Samuel hewed Agag in pieces before the Lord: he then finally left Saul. Samuel was told by the Lord not to mourn for Saul: He had rejected him. The Spirit of Jehovah came upon David from that day, but He departed from Saul, and an evil spirit troubled him. Saul, a figure of the first man, having been tested and found wanting, the beloved one (David) is brought forward: he is announced as a type of Christ: cf. David must have left Saul, and we know not exactly what interval elapsed before David slew Goliath. ...
Saul set David over the men of war, but the praises of the women, "Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands," raised his envy, and he eyed him from that day and attempted to kill him. David fled to Samuel, and on Saul sending messengers to take him, the Spirit of God was on the messengers and they prophesied. When this had taken place three times, Saul went himself, but the Spirit of God came upon him also, and he prophesied: David was saved. Nothing could teach Saul wisdom — to let God's anointed one alone: it is thus that man cannot bear to be superseded by Christ. Then began the flight of David from the wrath of Saul, and Saul's pursuit of him; the grace of David in twice saving the life of Saul when he had him in his power; the wickedness of Saul in slaying the priestly house of Ahimelech; the mistake of David in joining himself to the Philistines, from which the Lord delivered him; and his discipline in the destruction of Ziklag, and the carrying away of his two wives with the inhabitants, but in mercy all were recovered. ...
When Saul approached his end, and could get no answer from God, he resorted to the witch at Endor: just as man, who has rejected Christ these 2,000 years, will at the close of this age, in the apostasy of Christendom, give himself up to Satan. Samuel was raised, who foretold the speedy death of Saul and of his sons: see DIVINATION. A battle with the Philistines was fought on the next day, three of Saul's sons were slain, and Saul, being sore wounded, fell on his sword, and was put to death by an Amalekite. The bodies of Saul and of his sons were hanged up on the wall of Beth-shan, but were rescued during the night by men of Jabesh-gilead, burnt, and the bones buried under a tree
Ziba - Post; statue, "a servant of the house of Saul" (2 Samuel 9:2 ), who informed David that Mephibosheth, a son of Jonathan, was alive
Goliath - (guh li' uhth) In 1 Samuel 17:4 , the huge Philistine champion who baited the Israelite army under Saul in the valley of Elah for forty days
Ishvi - Second son of Saul by Abinoam ( 1 Samuel 14:49 )
Rehoboth - We read of a river of this name Genesis 36:37; where one Saul, a descendant of Esau, resided on the borders of it
Phalti, Phaltiel - Son of Laish, of Gallim: Saul gave him Michal, David's wife
Barnabas - ...
As we read on in the Acts of the Apostles we come to the sad story of Ananias and Sapphira; then to the creation of the office of the deaconship; then to the great services and the triumphant translation of Stephen; and, then, the east begins to break in the conversion of Saul of Tarsus. It was but yesterday that Saul was seen setting out for Damascus, breathing out threatenings and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord. And, with the blood of so many martyrs still on his hands, it was no wonder that the disciples in Jerusalem were all afraid of Saul, and would not believe that he really intended to be a disciple. Saul of Tarsus a disciple of Jesus Christ! Saul of Tarsus converted, and baptized, and preaching Jesus Christ! No! Depend upon it, this is but another deep-set snare for our feet! This is but another trap baited for us by our bitter enemies! So all the disciples said concerning Saul, and they all bore themselves to Saul accordingly. ...
Barnabas alone of all the disciples and apostles in Jerusalem opened his door to Saul. Barnabas alone held out his hand to Saul. Barnabas alone believed Saul's wonderful story of his conversion and baptism. Barnabas alone rejoiced in God's saving mercy to Saul's soul. "They were all afraid of Saul, and believed not that he was a disciple, But Barnabas took Saul, and brought him to the apostles, and declared unto them how he had seen the Lord in the way to Damascus, and that the Lord had spoken to him, and how he had preached boldly at Damascus in the name of Jesus Christ. " If Barnabas had never done anything else but what he did in those days for Saul of Tarsus, he would deserve, and he would receive, our love and our honour for ever. Barnabas so firmly believed what Saul told him, and so nobly acted on it. He so stood up for Saul when all men were looking askance at him. He so trusted and befriended Saul when every one else suspected him, and cast his past life in his face. Barnabas staked all his good name in Jerusalem, and all his influence with the apostles, on the genuineness of Saul's conversion, and on the sincerity and integrity of his discipleship. Barnabas stood by Saul till he had so turned the tide in Saul's favour, that, timid as Peter was, he actually took Saul to lodge with him in his own house in Jerusalem. And Barnabas gave Saul up to Peter, only too glad to see Saul made so much of by such a pillar of the Apostolic Church as Peter was. With Saul staying fifteen days under Peter's roof, and with James treating Saul with his cautious confidence, Barnabas's battle for Saul was now completely won. But no proud householder of them all can ever steal this honour from Barnabas, that he was the first man of influence and responsibility who opened his heart and his house to Saul of Tarsus, when all Jerusalem was still casting stones at him. Barnabas was not predestinated to shine in the service of Christ and His Church like Paul; but Paul himself never did a more shining deed than Barnabas did when he took Saul to his heart at a time when every other heart in Jerusalem was hardened against him. In all Barnabas's knowledge of men, and it was not narrow, he knew only one man who was equal to the great emergency at Antioch, and that man was no other than Saul of Tarsus. But, then, Saul was comparatively young as yet; he was not much known, and he was not much trusted. And shall Barnabas take on himself the immense responsibility, and, indeed, immense risk, of sending for Saul of Tarsus, and bringing him to Antioch? And shall Barnabas take this great step without first submitting Saul's name to the authorities at Jerusalem? There were great risks in both of these alternatives, and Barnabas had to act on his own judgment and conscience and heart. Antioch must have Saul of Tarsus; and Barnabas, taking counsel with no one but himself, set out to Tarsus to seek for Saul. " John Calvin was Saul of Tarsus over again. "Then departed Barnabas to Tarsus to seek for Saul. " To have the heart to discover a more talented man than yourself, and then to have the heart to go to Tarsus for him, and to make way for him in Antioch, is far better than to have all Saul's talents, and all the praise and all the rewards of those talents to yourself. Speaking for myself I would far rather have a little of Barnabas's grace than have all Saul's genius. Give me Barnabas's self-forgetful heart, and let who will undertake Saul's so extraordinary, but so perilous, endowments. But if Barnabas had to get over any jealousy in connection with Saul's coming to Antioch, that jealousy, at any rate, did not hinder him from setting out to Tarsus to seek for Saul. Barnabas had taken his own measure accurately, and he had taken Saul's measure accurately also, and he took action accordingly. Barnabas had done Saul a good turn before now, and that only made him the more ready to do him this new good turn when the opportunity was afforded him. And he proved that again when he took Saul in his friendlessness and brought him to the apostles in Jerusalem, and compelled them to believe in Saul, and to trust him, and to employ him. And still more conclusively did Barnabas prove his fulness of the Holy Ghost, when he set out to Tarsus to seek for Saul in order that Saul might come to Antioch, and there supersede and extinguish Barnabas himself
Zela - A Benjamite city ( Joshua 18:28 ), where was the family burying-place of Saul ( 2 Samuel 21:14 Tabor, the Plain of - It is mentioned in (1 Samuel 10:3 ) only, as one of the points in the homeward journey of Saul after his anointing by Samuel
u'Lam - ) ...
The first-born of Eshek, a descendant of the house of Saul
Ahiah - Son ofAhitub, and priest in the days of Saul
Eshbaal - 1 Chronicles 8:33 , the fourth son of Saul, generally called Ishbosheth
Achish - Kin of Gath, a city of the Philistines, to whom David twice fled for protection from Saul. Several years after, he returned with a band of 600 men, and was welcomed by Achish as an enemy of Saul and of Israel
Ziba - A servant, probably a freedman, of Saul. He appears before David ( 2 Samuel 9:1-11 ), possessing 15 sons and 20 servants, and is consulted as to the existence of any members of the house of Saul
Ish-Bosheth - ” Son of Saul and his successor as king of Israel (2 Samuel 2:8 ). After Saul's death, Abner the commander of Saul's army proclaimed Ish-bosheth king. See Saul
Michmas - A town of Benjamin noted in the Philistine war of Saul and Jonathan. Geba or Gibeah, where Saul was encamped
Sechu - ” Otherwise unknown site where Saul searched for David (1 Samuel 19:22 )
Ahinoam - The wife of Saul
Palti - The man to whom Michal, David’s wife, was given by Saul ( 1 Samuel 25:44 )
Alemeth - Descendant of Jonathan, son of Saul
Eshbaal - or ISHBOSHETH, the fourth son of Saul
Naioth - It appears to have been a suburb of Ramah; and David, having sought refuge there with Samuel, was pursued by Saul
Jarah - ” Descendant of King Saul (1 Chronicles 9:42 ), apparently the same as Jehoadah in 1 Chronicles 8:36 , the words being spelled the same except for one similarly written letter in Hebrew
Doeg - Fearful, an Edomite, the chief overseer of Saul's flocks (1 Samuel 21:7 ). At the command of Saul he slew the high priest Ahimelech (q
Baal-Tamar - Lord of palm trees, a place in the tribe of Benjamin near Gibeah of Saul (Judges 20:33 )
Adriel - He married Merab, the eldest daughter of Saul, who should have been given to David as the slayer of Goliath ( 1 Samuel 18:19 , 2 Samuel 21:8 [1])
Selahammahlekoth - It is a rock in the wilderness of Maon, where David escaped from Saul
Havock - ...
As for Saul, he made havock of the church
Phalti - ) Saul had wrested her from David and given her to Phalti to attach him to his house (1 Samuel 25:44; 2 Samuel 3:15-16)
Abinadab - Saul had a son of this name; and David a brother
Nob - A city of priests, in Benjamin, near Jerusalem; its inhabitants were once put to the sword by command of Saul, for their hospitality to David, 1 Samuel 21:2 ; 22:9-23 ; Nehemiah 11:32 ; Isaiah 10:32
Bezek - Here Saul reviewed his forces before going to raise the siege of Jabesh-gilead, 1 Samuel 11:8
Jabesh, Jabeshgilead - The city was afterwards saved from the Ammonites by Saul; and when Saul and his sons were killed in battle, the valiant men of the city took up their bodies and buried them
Azekah - A town in the tribe of Judah, about fifteen miles south-west of Jerusalem; mentioned in the narratives of Joshua and Saul, Joshua 10:10 ; 1 Samuel 17:1 ; taken by Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah 34:7 , but afterwards repeopled by the Jews, Nehemiah 11:30
Joelah - ” Warrior from Saul's tribe of Benjamin who joined David at Ziklag as he fled from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:7 )
Ahinoam -
The daughter of Ahimaaz, and wife of Saul (1Samuel 14:50)
Ahimelech - The Hittite who, with Abishai, was asked by David: "Who will go down with me to Saul to the camp?" He lost a precious opportunity of serving the king (Isaiah 6:8); Abishai alone volunteered (1 Samuel 26:6)
Zelah - The last resting place of the bones of Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 21:14); probably therefore the original seat of the Kish family. Gibeah was Saul's residence after becoming king
Shalim, the Land of - ) (1 Samuel 9:4), through which Saul passed, seeking Kish's asses
Jabesh - The inhabitants were friendly to Saul and his family, 1 Samuel 31:11-12
Zadok - The son of Ahitub, and father of Ahimaaz, high-priest of the Jews in the reigns of Saul and David
Jeziel - ” Military leader from tribe of Benjamin, Saul's tribe, who joined David at Ziklag as he fled from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:3 )
Salamis - A city on the south-east coast of Cyprus (Acts 13:5 ), where Saul and Barnabas, on their first missionary journey, preached the word in one of the Jewish synagogues, of which there seem to have been several in that place
Micha - Descendant of King Saul (2 Samuel 9:12 ; See Micah 3:1
Shal'Isha, the Land of, - one of the districts traversed by Saul when in search of the asses of Kish
Malchishua - ” Son of King Saul and Ahinoam (1 Chronicles 8:33 ; 1 Chronicles 9:39 ) killed in battle with the Philistines at Mount Gilboa (1 Samuel 14:49 ; 1 Samuel 31:2 ; 1 Chronicles 10:2 )
Athach - ” Town in southern Judah to which David sent spoils of victory while he fled Saul among the Philistines (1 Samuel 30:30 )
Shaul - Called Saul in Genesis 36:37,38
Ziba - A servant of Saul's house, according to Josephus ( Saul
a'Chish - David twice found a refuge with him when he fled from Saul
Maon - A town in the edge of the hill-country of Judah, Joshua 15:55 , near which Nabal lived and David took refuge from Saul, 1 Samuel 23:24 - 25 ; 25:2
Ahimelech - Here he received David when fleeing from Saul, and gave him the showbread and Goliath's sword. This act, as reported by Doeg the Edomite, Saul viewed as treasonous; and by the hand of this idolatrous and malignant foreigner, he put Ahimelech and eighty-five other priests of Jehovah to death, 1 Samuel 22:1-23 a crime sufficient of itself to forfeit the throne and the favor of God
Ezel - ” Rock where David hid from Saul and watched for Jonathan's signal (1 Samuel 20:19 ). The point of the narrative is clear: David used a natural hiding place to escape Saul and to gain vital information from his friend, the king's son
Merab - Saul's oldest daughter (1 Samuel 14:49). According to promise to the conqueror of Goliath, Saul betrothed Merab to David (1 Samuel 17:25; 1 Samuel 18:17), but with the secret design of inciting him thereby to expose himself to be slain by the Philistines. At the time when Merab should have been given to him Saul gave her to Adriel the Meholathite. Her five sons subsequently were crucified to Jehovah by the Gibeonites among the seven, for Saul's bloodthirsty zeal against them (2 Samuel 21:9). See Exodus 34:7; how Saul's sin recoiled on himself and his! "Michal" is a copyist's error for Merab (2 Samuel 21:8); reading "Michal" we must understand "brought up," not gave birth to (compare Ruth 4:16-17)
Ziph - David hid from Saul in the surrounding wilderness (1 Samuel 23:14-15 ); 1 Samuel 26:2 ). Ziphites, residents of Ziph, twice revealed David's hideouts to Saul (1 Samuel 23:19 ; 1 Samuel 26:1 )
Jonathan - Eldest son of King Saul; mother: Ahinroam; brothers: Abinadab, Malchishua and Ish-baal; sisters Merab and Michal; son Mephibosheth (Meribbaal). Saul discovered that Jonathan was missing, called for the ark of God, went to battle, and defeated the Philistines. Jonathan ate honey, unaware that Saul had forbidden the people to eat that day. Saul would have had Jonathan put to death, but the people spoke in praise of Jonathan and ransomed him from death (1 Samuel 14:27-46 ). Second, Jonathan pleaded successfully with Saul to reinstate David (1 Samuel 19:1-7 ). Third, Jonathan left Saul's table angrily to inform David that the king would never receive David again (1 Samuel 20:1-42 ). ...
The end of 1Samuel reports the end of Saul and three of his sons, Jonathan, Abinadab, and Melchishua, at Mount Gilboa (1 Samuel 31:1-13 ). See Saul ; David ; Mephibosheth
Hagarenes - A people dwelling to the east of Palestine, with whom the tribes of Reuben made war in the time of Saul
ju'Das, - (Matthew 1:2,3 ) ...
A man residing at Damascus, in "the street which is called Straight," in whose house Saul of Tarsus lodged after his miraculous conversion
Ele'Asah - ) ...
Son of Rapha or Rephaiah; a descendant of Saul through Jonathan and Merib-baal or Mephibosheth
ju'Das, - (Matthew 1:2,3 ) ...
A man residing at Damascus, in "the street which is called Straight," in whose house Saul of Tarsus lodged after his miraculous conversion
Kish - Father of Saul (1 Samuel 9:2 ). The description of Saul as being from the humblest family of the tribe of Benjamin is probably a good example of oriental modesty (1 Samuel 9:21 ). He was buried in Zela of Benjamin, where Saul and Jonathan were buried (2 Samuel 21:14 )
Abi'Athar - ) Abiathar was the only one of the all the sons of Ahimelech the high priest who escaped the slaughter inflicted upon his father's house by Saul, in revenge for his father's house by Saul, in revenge of his having inquired of the Lord for David and given him the shew-bread to eat. He adhered to David in his wanderings while pursued by Saul; he was with him while he reigned in Hebron, and afterwards in Jerusalem
Shaul - Transliteration of Hebrew name of King Saul
Ephes-Dammin - ” Town between Shocoh and Azekah where Philistines gathered to fight Saul (1 Samuel 17:1 ) preceding David's killing of Goliath
Zelah - ” Town allotted to Benjamin (Joshua 18:28 ), in which the bones of Saul and Jonathan were buried (2 Samuel 21:14 )
Endor - A place in Issachar, possessed by Manasseh, Joshua 17:11, where Sisera and Jabin were slain, Psalms 83:9-10, and where Saul consulted the witch
Jesse - He was a grandson of Ruth the Moabitess, and in he native land he found an asylum while David was most in danger from the jealous pursuit of Saul, Ruth 4:17 1 Samuel 16:1-23 17:12 22:3 Matthew 1:5
Man'Aen - (comforter ) is mentioned in ( Acts 13:1 ) as one of the teachers and prophets in the church at Antioch at the time of the appointment of Saul and Barnabas as missionaries to the heathen
Samuel - That man was Saul, whom Samuel anointed in a brief private ceremony (1 Samuel 9:15-16; 1 Samuel 10:1). Saul was chosen (1 Samuel 10:17-25) and, after leading Israel to victory in his first battle, was crowned king in a national ceremony at Gilgal (1 Samuel 11:12-15). ...
In time of approaching war, Saul was given one week during which Israel’s leaders could gather the army together, and he himself could go to Gilgal to consult Samuel. Saul was impatient and wanted complete power, religious as well as political. Samuel announced that in judgment God would take the kingdom from Saul (1 Samuel 13:8-14). He confirmed this judgment on a later occasion when Saul again disobeyed God (1 Samuel 15:1-3; 1 Samuel 15:13-28). ...
God then sent Samuel to choose a person who would one day replace Saul as king. When, some years later, Saul became jealous of David and tried to kill him, David took refuge with Samuel. When Saul’s messengers, and then Saul himself, tried to capture David, all of them were overcome by the power of God’s Spirit, which still worked through Samuel and his followers (1 Samuel 19:18-24). Saul so respected Samuel’s power and wisdom that, after Samuel’s death, he went to a woman who consulted the spirits of the dead in order to seek Samuel’s help. But Samuel simply confirmed that God had rejected Saul and that the next day Saul would be dead (1 Samuel 28:3-19)
Jeshimon - Wilderness site near where David hid from Saul. It apparently belonged to the Ziphites, who reported David's location to Saul (1 Samuel 23:19 ; 1 Samuel 26:1 )
Gibeah - A hill or hill-town, "of Benjamin" (1 Samuel 13:15 ), better known as "Gibeah of Saul" (11:4; Isaiah 10:29 ). This was the birthplace of Saul, and continued to be his residence after he became king (1 Samuel 10:26 ; 11:4 ; 15:34 )
Shual - Territory biblical writer used to describe path a group of Philistines took against Saul (1 Samuel 13:17 )
Ahinoam - Daughter of Ahimaaz and wife of Saul, 1 Samuel 14:50
Rephaiah - A descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 9:43 ); called in 8:37 Raphah
Hadar - ...
...
One of the Edomitish kings ( Genesis 36:39 ) about the time of Saul
Ish bosheth - (914-872 BCE) Son of King Saul
Jesui - A son of Saul bears the same Hebrew name (1 Samuel 14:49 ), transliterated into English as Ishui (KJV), Ishvi (NAS, NRSV, NIV), or Ishyo (REB)
Gittaim - The men of Beeroth, one of the Gibeonite towns (Joshua 9:17), took refuge, probably when persecuted by Saul (2 Samuel 21:2), in Gittaim
Hach'Ilah, the Hill, - a hill apparently situated in a wood in the wilderness or waste land in the neighborhood of Ziph, in Judah, in the fastnesses or passes of which David and his six hundred followers were lurking when the Ziphites informed Saul of his whereabouts
Abner - The Son of Ner, Saul's uncle; Abner was consequently Saul's cousin. He was Saul's 'captain of the host' when David slew Goliath, and he presented David to Saul. He was with Saul when David took away the spear and cruse of water while they slept: for which David reproached him, saying he was worthy of death because he had not more faithfully guarded his master. After the death of Saul (apparently about 5 years after) Abner made Ish-bosheth king over Israel; but this did not include Judah over which David was king. Saul had had a concubine named Rizpah, and this woman Abner took; for which he was reproached by Ish-bosheth (who probably thought it was a prelude to his seizing the kingdom). David demanded that Abner should bring with him Michal, Saul's daughter, David's former wife. Personal pique turned him round to David, and yet he knew well, while upholding the house of Saul, that David was God's anointed king
Shemariah - Benjaminite who deserted Saul to join David's army at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12:5 )
Hanan - ...
A descendant of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:38 )
Laish - The father of Palti or Paltiel, to whom Michael, David’s wife, was given by Saul ( 1 Samuel 25:44 , 2 Samuel 3:15 )
Alemeth - Descendant of Saul and Jonathan in tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:36 )
Maon - City in the highlands of Judah, to the 'wilderness' of which David and his men resorted when pursued by Saul
a'bi-el -
Father of Kish, and consequently grandfather of Saul, (1 Samuel 9:1 ) as well as of Abner, Saul's commander-in-chief
Kish -
The father of Saul; a Benjamite of the family of Matri
Christ: Sympathy With His People - If,' says Augustine, 'a man should come up to embrace thee, to kiss and honour thee upward, and beneath with a pair of shoes beaten full of nails, tread upon thy bare foot; the head shall despise the honor done unto it, and for the foot that smarteth, say, Why treadest thou upon me? So when feigned gospellers honor Christ our Head, sitting in heaven, and oppress his members on earth, the Head shall speak for the feet that smart, and say, Why treadest thou on me?' Paul had a zeal toward God, but he did tread upon Christ's feet on earth, for whom the Head crieth forth of heaven, 'Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me?' Although Christ sitteth on the right hand of his Father, yet lieth he on earth; he suffereth all calamities here on earth, he is many times evil entreated here on earth
Jezreel (2) - There Barak and Gideon triumphed; Deborah sung her war song; Saul and Jonathan fell near by, on the mountains of Gilboa; here king Josiah was mortally wounded by the Egyptians. It is the valley of Jezreel proper; the battle-field where Gideon triumphed and Saul and Jonathan were overthrown
Bethshan, Bethshean - In the days of Saul the Philistines appear to have had possession of the town, for on their finding the dead body of Saul it was here that they hung it on the wall
Elasah - ...
...
A descendant of king Saul (1 Chronicles 8:37 ; 9:43 )
Sha'ul - (1 Chronicles 1:48,49 ) In the Authorized Version of (Genesis 36:37 ) he is less accurately called Saul
Ahinoam - Daughter of Ahimaaz and wife of Saul ( 1 Samuel 14:50 )
Amalecites - To Saul and Samuel their extermination was a religious duty, which David took up and the Simeonites finished
Double Heart - These men were not partly for David and partly for Saul
a-i'ah - ...
Father of Rizpah, the concubine of Saul
Zobah - A country of Syria, whose king carried on war with Saul and David, 1 Samuel 14:47 2 Samuel 8:3 10:6
Baanah And Rechab - Sons of Rimmon, in the services of Ish-bosheth the son of Saul
Ger'Zites - (dwellers in the desert ), The, a tribe who with the Geshurites and the Amalekites occupied the land between the south of Palestine and Egypt in the time of Saul
Riz'Pah, - concubine to King Saul, and mother of his two sons Armoni and Mephibosheth
Adriel - Son of Barzillai the Meholathite, to whom Saul gave Merab his daughter in marriage, previously promised to David (1 Samuel 18:19). Five sons from this union were of the seven slain as a blood satisfaction to the Gibeonites whose blood Saul had, in violation of Israel's covenant (Joshua 9:15), shed
Jabesh - A city east of the Jordan; destroyed by the Israelites, Judges 21:8-14; delivered from Nahash by Saul, 1 Samuel 11:1-11, and in gratitude therefor, its people brought the bodies of Saul and his sons, which the Philistines hung upon the walls of Bethshan, to Jabesh, and caused them to be buried in a wood near by. David blessed them, 2 Samuel 2:4-6, but afterward removed the bones to Saul's ancestral burying-place
Gibeah - Gibeah of Saul, probably the same as Gibeah of Benjamin. For notices of Gibeah of Saul, see 1 Samuel 10:26; 1 Samuel 11:4; 1 Samuel 15:34; 1 Samuel 22:6; 1 Samuel 23:19; Isaiah 10:29, etc
Amalekite - Because of their atrocities, God commanded Saul to exterminate the Amalekites (1 Samuel 15:2-3 ). Saul disobeyed, and the Amalekites were not defeated completely until late in the eighth century B
Let Down - 1: καθίημι (Strong's #2524 — Verb — kathiemi — kath-ee'-ay-mee ) "to send," or "let down" (kata, "down," hiemi, "to send"), is translated "to let down," with reference to (a) the paralytic in Luke 5:19 ; (b) Saul of Tarsus, Acts 9:25 ; (c) the great sheet in Peter's vision, Acts 10:11 ; 11:5 . 1 (a); (b) Saul ot Tarsus, Acts 9:25 , "lowering" Abiathar - When Saul ordered the slaughter of Ahimelech and the other priests at Nob, only one person escaped, and that was Ahimelech’s son, Abiathar (1 Samuel 22:18-20). He joined David and the others who were fleeing from Saul, and acted as priest for them (1 Samuel 23:6; 1 Samuel 23:9; 1 Samuel 30:7)
Helkath-Hazzurim - After the battle of Gilboa, so fatal to Saul and his house, David, as divinely directed, took up his residence in Hebron, and was there anointed king over Judah. Among the fugitives from Gilboa was Ish-bosheth, the only surviving son of Saul, whom Abner, Saul's uncle, took across the Jordan to Mahanaim, and there had him proclaimed king. The general result of this battle was that "David waxed stronger and stronger, and the house of Saul waxed weaker and weaker" (2 Samuel 3:1 )
Telaim - ” City in southern Judah where Saul gathered forces to battle the Amalekites (1 Samuel 15:4 )
Ahitub - ...
The father of Zadok, who was made high priest by Saul after the extermination of the family of Ahimelech (1Chronicles 6:7,8; 2 Samuel 8:17 )
Naioth - David took refuge here when he fled from Saul (1 Samuel 19:18,19,22,23 ), and here he passed a few weeks in peace (Compare Psalm 11 )
Saul - Overcome with jealousy, Saul pursued David until he himself was killed in battle by the Philistines
Sela-Hammahlekoth - of Judah, in the wilderness of Maon, where David was on one side of the mountain, Saul on the other. A message announcing a Philistine invasion caused "divisions" in Saul's mind, whether to pursue David still or go after the invaders
Bezek - Place where Saul numbered the army before he slew the Ammonites, 1 Samuel 11:8 , apparently near the centre of Palestine
Adriel - ” Saul's daughter Merab was promised as David's wife but then given to Adriel from Meholah, on the northern River Jordan (1 Samuel 18:19 ). His five sons David gave to the Gibeonites, who hanged them in revenge for unexplained actions Saul had taken against Gibeon (2 Samuel 21:1-9 )
Shaul - Shaul of Rehoboth by the river was one of the kings of Edom (1 Chronicles 1:48-49); Saul in Genesis 36:37
Translation - ' Abner threatened to translate the kingdom from the house of Saul to David
Ahim'Elech -
Son of Ahitub, (1 Samuel 22:11,12 ) and high priest of Nob in the days of Saul. He gave David the shew bread to eat, and the sword of Goliath; and for so doing was put to death, with his whole house, by Saul's order
Gilboa - It is memorable from the defeat of Saul by the Philistines; when his three sons were slain, and he himself died by his own hand, his armour- bearer refusing to kill him, 1 Samuel 31
be'Zek - (Judges 1:3 ) ...
Where Saul numbered the forces of Israel and Judah before going to the relief of Jabesh-gilead
Samuel - Samuel anointed Saul as their first king; and afterwards David, who in due time was to take the place of Saul already, rejected by God. As long as he lived, Samuel exerted a paramount and most beneficial influence in Israel, even over Saul himself. Even after his death the unhappy Saul, forsaken by the God was pleased to cause Samuel to appear, with a prophetic message to the king. The two books comprise the history of Samuel, Saul, and David
Gibeah - Saul had close family connections to the city (1 Chronicles 8:29-33 also connects them with the nearby and similar-sounding Gibeon; see 1Samuel 10:5, 1 Samuel 10:26 ; 1 Samuel 15:34 ; 1 Samuel 23:19 ). If the “hill of God” (1 Samuel 10:5 KJV, NAS, REB) or “Gibeath-elohim” (NRSV) should be translated “Gibeah of God” (NIV) and equated with Gibeah of Saul, then the Philistines controlled the city prior to Saul gaining control. Apparently the Philistines built a fortress there which Saul took over, or Saul constructed his own royal complex, since archaeologists have uncovered a fortress from this period. After Saul's death, the city declined. See Benjamin ; Geba ; Saul
David - ...
Selection as King When Saul failed to meet God's standards for kingship (1Samuel 15:23,1 Samuel 15:35 ; 1 Samuel 16:1 ), God sent Samuel to anoint a replacement from among the sons of Jesse, who lived in Bethlehem (1 Samuel 16:1 ). ...
In Saul's Court David's musical talent, combined with his reputation as a fighter, led one of Saul's servants to recommend David as the person to play the harp for Saul when the evil spirit from God troubled him (1 Samuel 16:18 ). Saul grew to love David and made him armorbearer for the king (1 Samuel 16:21-22 ). Saul tried to persuade David, the youth, from challenging Goliath; but David insisted God would bring victory, which He did. ...
Saul's son Jonathan became David's closest friend (1 Samuel 18:1 ). David became a permanent part of Saul's court, not returning home (1 Samuel 24:21-2219 ). Saul gave David a military commission, which he fulfilled beyond expectations, defeating the Philistines and winning the hearts of the people. This stirred Saul's jealousy (1 Samuel 18:8 ). Moved by the evil spirit from God, Saul tried to kill David with his spear; but God's presence protected David (1 Samuel 18:10-12 ). David eventually earned the right to marry Michal, Saul's daughter, without being killed by the Philistines as Saul had hoped (1 Samuel 18:17-27 ). With the help of Michal and Jonathan, David escaped from Saul and made contact with Samuel, the prophet (1 Samuel 19:18 ). He established relationships with Moab and other groups and gained favor with the people by defeating the Philistines (1 Samuel 22-23 ), but all Saul's efforts to capture him failed. God protected David, and David refused to injure Saul, instead promising not to cut off Saul's family (1618169733_4 ). He also married Ahinoam of Jezreel, but Saul gave Michal, David's first wife, to another man (1 Samuel 25:1 ). ...
After again refusing to kill Saul, the Lord's anointed, David attached himself to Achish, the Philistine king of Gath. Saul finally quit chasing him. Despite the wishes of Achish, the other Philistine leaders would not let David join them in battle against Saul (1 Samuel 29:1 ). ...
King of Judah Hearing of the deaths of Saul and Jonathan, David avenged the murderer of Saul and sang a lament over the fallen (2 Samuel 1:1 ). This led to war with Israel under Saul's son Ishbosheth
Hareth - Thicket, a wood in the mountains of Judah where David hid when pursued by Saul (1 Samuel 22:5 )
Bezek - Where Saul numbered the national forces before relieving Jabesh Gilead from Ammon (1 Samuel 11:8); somewhere near the Jordan valley, within marching distance from Jabesh, 17 miles from Shechem, on the road to Bethshan
Maon - Joshua 15:55, and a district where David hid from Saul, and near which Nabal had possessions
Bezek - 1 Samuel 11:8 , where Saul gathered Israel before advancing on Jahesh-gilead The most likely site in this connexion is the ruin Ibzik , N
Gallim - of Gibeah of Saul (Valentiner)
Attai - Warrior of tribe of Gad who served David in the wilderness as he fled from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:11 )
Ahio - A son of Jeiel, and brother of Kish, the father of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:31 ; 1 Chronicles 9:37 )
Azrikam - Son of Azel, a descendant of Saul
Jeush - A descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:39 )
Abiel - "
The son of Zeror and father of Ner, who was the grandfather of Saul (1 Samuel 14:51 ; 1 Chronicles 8:33 ; 9:39 )
Zoba, Zobah - Saul fought against its kings, and David subdued them; but they were still troublesome in Solomon's time
Doeg - Chief of Saul's herdsmen, an Edomite, who informed Saul of David's being aided by Ahimelech, and who afterwards slew the latter and his house — 85 priests
Rest - In Acts 9:31 , refers to the respite from persecution enjoyed by the Christians in Palestine, after the conversion of Saul of Tarsus, during the last two years of Caligula's short reign, A
do'eg - (fearful ), an Idumean, chief of Saul's herdmen. ) He was at Nob when Ahimelech gave David the sword of Goliath, and not only gave information to Saul, but when others declined the office, himself executed the king's order to destroy the priests of Nob, with their families, to the number of 85 persons, together with all their property
Michal - King Saul's younger daughter (1 Samuel 14:49 ) given to David in marriage for the price of one hundred dead Philistines (1 Samuel 18:20-29 ). (Saul may have thought David would be killed in the attempt). For revenge, Saul gave her to Phaltiel (1 Samuel 25:44 ). Following Saul's death at Gilboa, David made a treaty with Abner, Saul's general
Ziba - Originally a servant or slave of the house of Saul. When Mephibosheth was invited to the court of David, and the possessions of Saul were made over to him, Ziba was instructed with his fifteen sons and twenty servants, to manage the estates for Mephibosheth
Hachilah, the Hill - David and his 600 men lurked in the fastnesses of the hill; but as Saul approached withdrew to the wood (rather the choresh or "village" attached to Ziph below. ) Saul bivouacked by the way or road which passed over or at the side of the hill. Then ensued David's taking of Saul's spear and cruse (1 Samuel 23:14; 1 Samuel 26:13). The "trench" where Saul pitched tent is the flat low plot between steep cliffs, the head of a large wady with water. ...
The "trench" in which Saul lay (1 Samuel 26:5) was the hollow, with a spring and cave in it, still to be seen beneath the crest of the hill
Hareth - ” Forest where David went at advice of Gad, the prophet, as he hid from Saul (1 Samuel 22:5 )
Helkath-Hazzurim - ” Site of “play” (2 Samuel 2:14 ) battle between young warriors of Saul and those of David leading to defeat of Ish-bosheth's army (2 Samuel 2:12-17 )
Lamentation - The first example of this form of poetry is the lament of David over Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:17-27 )
Bezek - ...
...
The place where Saul numbered the forces of Israel and Judah (1 Samuel 11:8 ); somewhere in the centre of the country, near the Jordan valley
Gallim - Saul gave his daughter Michal as wife to a citizen of Gallim after taking her away from David (1 Samuel 25:44 ; compare 2 Samuel 3:14-15 )
Rephaiah - Descendant of Saul (1 Chronicles 9:43 )
Shalishah - A region through which Saul travelled with his servant in search of the lost asses ( 1 Samuel 9:4 )
Merab - The elder daughter of Saul, promised to the slayer of Goliath ( 1 Samuel 17:25 ), and then to David personally as a reward for prowess against the Philistines ( 1 Samuel 18:17 ), but given as wife to Adriel the Meholathite
Saul - The great apostle Paul, whose name was originally Saul may, it is probable, have had his name changed at his conversion on this account: but this, the reader will recollect, is only conjecture
Hachilah - A hill in which David hid, and on which, during his pursuit, Saul pitched his camp, near the wilderness of Ziph
Gilboa - Mountain range where Saul and Jonathan were slain
ad'Nah -
A Manassite who deserted from Saul and joined the fortunes of David on his road to Ziklag from the camp of the Philistines
Keilah - When captured and plundered by a Philistine invasion David came to its rescue, but the inhabitants treacherously plotted with Saul for his betrayal
Rizpah - A concubine of Saul whom Abner was accused for appropriating, as if thereby aiming at the crown
Ziba - A rich steward of Saul, whom David charged with similar duties towards Mephibosheth, son of Jonathan, 2 Samuel 9:2-10
Reph'Aiah - (1 Chronicles 7:2 ) ...
Son of Binea, and descendant of Saul
Phal'ti - (my deliverance ), the son of Laish of Gallim, to whom Saul gave Michal in marriage after his mad jealousy had driven David forth as an outlaw
Hagarenes', ha'Garites - (named after Hagar), a people dwelling to the east of Palestine, with whom the tribes of Reuben made war in the time of Saul
Necromancy - ...
Of course, one clear example of necromancy occurs in the biblical narrative: the story of Saul and the medium of Endor (1 Samuel 28 ). Saul sought the Lord when the Philistines threatened at Shunem. As a result, he turned to a woman known to Saul's court as a "medium. Saul asked her to "bring up" Samuel, presumably from Sheol. When an "old man" comes up, she realizes that the disguised person is the king, Saul. Samuel, the old man who came forth, gives the Lord's answer to Saul's dilemma, an answer proclaimed already in the prophecy to Saul in 1 Samuel 15 . In fact, it is used to confirm God's will for Saul
David - the cave of Adullam, proved of great service to him afterwards in his pursuit by Saul. ...
Ammon and David had a common enemy, Saul (1 Samuel 11); besides David's Moabite great grandmother, Ruth, connected him with Moab, Ammon's kinsmen. Hence, it was most natural to him to repair to Moab and Ammon when pursued by Saul. Saul, the people's choice, having been rejected from being king for disobedience, God manifested His sovereignty by choosing one, the very last thought of by his own family or even by the prophet; not the oldest, but the youngest; not like Saul, taller than the people by head and shoulders, but of moderate stature. (See Saul. ) A yearly sacrificial feast used to be held at Bethlehem, whereat Jesse, as chief landowner, presided with the elders (1 Samuel 16; 1 Samuel 20:6; compare at Saul's selection, 1 Samuel 9:12). But now suddenly at God's command, Samuel, though fearful of Saul's deadly enmity, appears there driving a heifer before him, to offer an extraordinary sacrifice. Simultaneously, the Spirit of Jehovah left Saul and an evil spirit from Jehovah troubled him. The first glimpse we have of David's taste in music and sacred poetry, which afterward appears so preeminent in his psalms, is in his having been chosen as the best minstrel to charm away the evil spirit when it came upon Saul (1 Samuel 16:15-23). ...
Thus, the evil spirit departed, but the good Spirit did not come to Saul; and the result was, when David was driven away, the evil returned worse than ever. David doubtless received further training in the schools of the prophets, who connected their prophesying with the soothing and elevating music of psaltery, tabret, pipe, and harp (1 Samuel 10:5); for he and Samuel (who also feared Saul's wrath for his having anointed David: 2 Samuel 3:13-16) dwelt together in Naioth near Ramah, i. " The portion 1 Samuel 17 - 18:2 has been thought a parenthesis explaining how David became first introduced to Saul. But 1 Samuel 17:12; 1 Samuel 17:15 show that Saul already had David in attendance upon him, for Jesse his father is called "that Ephrathite" (namely, that one spoken of above), and it is said before David's going forth to meet Goliath that "David went and returned from Saul to feed his father's sheep at Bethlehem. " How then shall we account for Saul's question just before the encounter, "Abner, whose son is this youth?" and after it," Whose son art thou, young man?" (1 Samuel 17:55-58. ) Also, is this question consistent with his being already "Saul's armor-bearer and loved greatly" by him (1 Samuel 16:20-21. David merely attended Saul for a time, and returned to tend his father's sheep, where he was when the war broke out in which Goliath was the Philistine champion. Saul's question (1 Samuel 17:55-58), "Whose son art thou?" must therefore imply more than asking the name of David's father. The words (1 Samuel 18:1) "when David made an end of speaking unto Saul, the soul of Jonathan was knit unto the soul of David," imply a lengthened detail of all concerning his father and himself. ...
The battle was at Ephes-Dammim in the boundary hills of Judah; Saul's army on one side of the valley, the Philistines on the other, the brook Elah (i. At this point begins the second era of David's life, his persecution by Saul. That word was spoken by the women, unconscious of the effect of their words while they sang in responsive strains before the king and his champion, "Saul has slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands. Envy moved Saul under the evil spirit to cast his javelin at him, but twice he eluded it. So wisely did he behave, and so manifestly was the Lord with him, that Saul the king was afraid of David his subject; "therefore Saul removed him from him and made him captain over a thousand" (1 Samuel 18:13). Next, after Saul broke his promise of giving Merab his older daughter to be David's wife, by giving her to Adriel instead, Michal, Saul's second daughter, became attached to David. ...
Saul used her as a "snare" that David might fall by the Philistines. The dowry Saul required was 100 foreskins of the Philistines. " But God can raise up friends to His people in their enemy's house; and as Pharaoh's daughter saved Moses, so Saul's son Jonathan and daughter Michal saved David. After having promised in the living Jehovah's name David's safety to Jonathan, and after David had "slain the Philistines with a great slaughter" from which they did not recover until the battle in which Saul fell, Saul hurled his javelin at David with such force that it entered into the wall and then would have killed David in his own house, but that by Michal's help he escaped through a window. ...
How striking a retribution by the righteous God it was, that Saul himself fell by the very enemy by whom he hoped to kill David! How evidently this and kindred cases must have been in David's mind when he wrote of the sinner, "he made a pit and digged it, and is fallen into the ditch which he made" (Psalms 7:15-16); the title of this psalm probably refers to Saul, the black-hearted son of Kish the Benjamite, enigmatically glanced at as "Cush (Ethiopia; compare Jeremiah 13:23; Amos 9:7) the Benjamite. The title states the occasion: "when Saul sent and they watched the house to kill him. " The "bloody men" are Saul and his minions (Psalms 59:2). Saul's "pride" would not brook that David's exploits should be extolled above his; hence flowed the "lying" and malice. His minions, "like a dog returning at evening," thirsting for prey which they had in vain sought throughout the day, came tumultuously besieging David's house "that night" after Saul's vain attempt to destroy him in the day. As David was "watched" by Saul's messengers (1 Samuel 19:11) so David's remedy was, "because of his (Saul's) strength will I wait upon (watch unto, Hebrew) Thee. "...
David, seeing no hope of safety while within Saul's reach, fled to Samuel and dwelt with him at the prophet's school in Naioth. Saul sent messengers to apprehend him; but they and even Saul himself, when he followed, were filled with the spirit of prophecy; and they who came to seize the servant of God joined David in Spirit-taught praises of God; so, God can turn the hearts of His people's foes (Proverbs 16:7; Proverbs 21:1); compare Acts 18:17 with 1 Corinthians 1:1, especially Saul's namesake (Acts 7:58 with Acts 9). ) David, whom neither beast nor giant had shaken from his trust in the Lord, now through temporary unbelief told a lie, which involved the unsuspecting high priest and all his subordinates in one indiscriminate massacre, through Doeg's information to Saul. One gain David derived and Saul lost by his slaughter of the priests; Abiathar, the sole survivor of the line of Ithamar, henceforth attended David, and through him David could always inquire of God, in God's appointed way (Psalms 16:7, in undesigned coincidence with 1 Samuel 23:2; 1 Samuel 23:4; 1 Samuel 23:6; 1 Samuel 23:9; 1 Samuel 30:7-8). Saul on the contrary had bereft himself of those through whom he might have consulted the Lord. The title of Psalm 52 informs us that it was composed in reference to Saul's cruel act on Doeg's officious tale-telling information. The "boaster in mischief, the mighty man" (the very term used of Saul, 2 Samuel 1:19), is not the herdsman Doeg, the ready tool of evil, but the master of hero might in animal courage, Saul. " Saul's "lying and all devouring words" (Psalms 5:3) are, with undesigned coincidence, illustrated by the independent history (1 Samuel 24:9), "wherefore hearest thou men's words, . Behold, David seeketh thy hurt?" Saul's courtiers knew the road to his favor was to malign David. Saul was thus the prime mover of the lying charge. Doeg, for mischief and to curry favor, told the fact; it was Saul who put on it the false construction of treason against David and the innocent priests; compare David's similar language, Psalms 17:3-4. ...
Saul was "the man that made not God his strength, but trusted in the abundance of his riches and strengthened himself in his wickedness" (Psalms 52:7). Singularly prophetic of Saul's own doom are the Words (Psalms 52:5) hinting at his having rooted out Ahimelech's family, "God shall likewise . " Not only Saul, but all his bloody house save Mephibosheth, died by a violent death, by a righteous retribution in kind (1 Samuel 31:6; 2 Samuel 21:1-14; Psalms 18:25-26)
Hereth - ” Forest in which David hid from Saul after settling his parents with the king of Moab (1 Samuel 22:5 )
Horesh - As David hid there from Saul, Jonathan, Saul's son, came out to help him and made a covenant of mutual help (1 Samuel 23:15-18 )
Eliphelet - ...
...
A descendant of king Saul through Jonathan (1 Chronicles 8:39 )
Azel - Descendant of Saul in tribe of Benjamin and father of six sons (1 Chronicles 8:37-38 )
en-Dor - A town of Manasseh in the territory of Issachar ( Joshua 17:11 ); the home of a woman with a familiar spirit consulted by Saul on the eve of the battle of Gilboa ( 1 Samuel 28:1-25 ); and, according to a psalmist ( Psalms 83:10 ), the scene of the rout of Jabin and Sisera
Caves - David and his followers were in a cave in the wilderness of En-gedi, so extensive that they could hide themselves, though Saul came into the same cave
Nahash - A king of the Ammonites, defeated by Saul while besieging Ramothgilead, 1 Samuel 11:1-15
Ziklag - A city of Judah and Simeon, on the borders of the Philistines, Joshua 15:31 ; 19:5 , who held it until the time of Saul, when Achish king of Gath gave it to David
Merab - The eldest daughter of king Saul, was promised to David in marriage, in reward for his victory over Goliath; but was given to Adriel, son of Barzillai the Meholathite, 1 Samuel 14:49 18:17,19
Zuph - (honeycomb ) , The land of, a district at which Saul and his servant arrived after passing through the possessions of Shalisha, of Shalim and of the Benjamites
Michmash - This was the scene of a great battle fought between the army of Saul and the Philistines, who were utterly routed and pursued for some 16 miles towards Philistia as far as the valley of Aijalon. (See Saul
Endor - ...
The good omen associated with the place may have lured Saul to his fatal visit to the witch (1 Samuel 28:7). " Caves abound there, in one of which probably the incantation took place; eight miles, over rugged ground, from the Gilboa heights; so that Saul must have passed the Philistine camp on his way from his own army to the witch, and the way the unhappy king crept round in the darkness may be traced step by step
Jabesh-Gilead - Jabesh-gilead figured prominently in the history of Saul. Later, the men of Jabesh-gilead demonstrated the high regard in which they held Saul by retrieving the bodies of the slain king and his sons from the walls of Beth-shan (1 Samuel 31:11-13 ). David expressed thanks for the brave deed (2 Samuel 2:4-7 ), and eventually removed Saul's bones from Jabesh-gilead (2 Samuel 21:12 )
Saul - (Σαούλ)...
Saul the son of Kish, of the tribe of Benjamin, is mentioned in St. Saul of Tarsus could not fail to be profoundly interested in the career of the great king whose name he bore and to whose tribe he belonged
Stephen - Saul of Tarsus heard Stephen's speech to the Jewish Sanhedrin accusing the Jewish leaders of rejecting God's way as their forefathers had (Acts 6:12-7:53 ). Saul held the clothes of those who stoned Stephen to death; he saw him die a victorious death
Gilboa - ) The scene of the death of Saul and Jonathan (1 Samuel 31:1; 2 Samuel 1:6,21: "ye mountains (for there is not merely one mountain) of Gilboa, let there be no dew, neither rain upon you, nor fields of firstfruit offerings," i. side of the plain at Shunem; Saul on the S
Benjamin - King Saul and Saul of Tarsus were both Benjamites, Philippians 3:5
Bar'Nabas - In (Acts 9:27 ) we find him introducing the newly-converted Saul to the apostles at Jerusalem. Barnabas was sent to Jerusalem, (Acts 11:19-26 ) and went to Tarsus to seek Saul, as one specially raised up to preach to the Gentiles
Paul - His name at the first was Saul; but, as is generally supposed, after his being made an instrument in the hand of God for the conversion of Sergius Paulus, the deputy of Paphos, (see Acts 13:7) he was called Paul. Some have indeed supposed that the change of name was made at his own conversion; but this doth not seem likely, as so long a space had taken place between that period and the time of Sergius Paulus's conversion, during all which the Holy Ghost still called him Saul. See particularly Acts 13:2; where God the Holy Ghost called our apostle by name, Saul; and the manner of expression in which the name of Paul is first spoken of in the Scriptures, seems to imply that it was then only given to him, for afterwards we hear no more of the name of Saul
Nahash - This cruelty aroused the indignation of Saul, who defeated their enemies
Telaim - The place at which Saul concentrated his forces, and numbered his fighting men before his campaign against the Amalekites ( 1 Samuel 15:4 )
Naioth - Thither David fled from Saul, and probably assumed their garb to escape discovery
Jesiah - ” Member of Saul's tribe of Benjamin who joined David at Ziklag as David fled before Saul (1 Chronicles 12:6 )
Lucius of Cyrene - Mentioned with Barnabas, Simeon Niger, Manaen, and Saul, among the prophets and teachers of the church at Antioch (Acts 13:1)
Gibeath-Elohim - It is the site where Saul received the third sign from God that he had been selected king of Israel
Shoftim - "judges"); (a) Succession of Torah authorities and leaders who ruled Israel from the year 2533 from creation (1228 BCE, 17 years after the death of Joshua) to the anointing of Saul as king in 2882 (879 BCE)
Abinadab - A son of Saul slain in the battle of Mt
Agag - King of the Amalekites whom Saul should have killed, but whom he spared
Keilah - He and Abiathar with the ephod took shelter there; but warned by God that the people of the city would deliver him up to Saul, they escaped
Rechab - Son of Rimmon: he and his brother Baanah assassinated Ish-bosheth, son of Saul, for which they were put to death by David
Zobah - A Syrian kingdom, sometimes called Aram Zobah, and also written "Zoba," whose kings made war with Saul, 1 Samuel 14:47; with David, 2 Samuel 8:3; 2 Samuel 10:6; 2 Samuel 10:8; 1 Chronicles 18:5; 1 Chronicles 18:9; and with Solomon, 2 Chronicles 8:3
Socoh or Shochoh - 1 1 Kings 4:10 , a town in the plain of Judah, near Azekah, famous for a battle of David and Saul with the Philistines, 1 Samuel 17:1 ; against whom Rehoboam fortified it, and by whom it was afterwards taken, 2 Chronicles 11:7 28:18
Rehearse - When the words were heard which David spoke, they rehearsed them before Saul
Azmaveth - A descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:36 )
Shewbread - David requested the bread for his hungry men as they fled from King Saul (1 Samuel 21:4-6 )
Archer - Saul was wounded by the Philistine archers (1 Samuel 31:3 )
Adriel - Flock of God, the son of Barzillai, the Meholathite, to whom Saul gave in marriage his daughter Merab (1 Samuel 18:19 )
Nob - The tabernacle seems to have been here in the time of Saul, who, for the alleged favor shown by the high priest Abimelech to David, destroyed the city, which was, however, afterwards rebuilt
Azrikam - Descendant of Saul of tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:38 )
Agag - 1 Samuel 15:1-35 , the king of Amalek, whom Saul defeated and spared; some Gr
Bow - In 2 Samuel 1:18 David's elegy on Saul and Jonathan is called 'The Bow
Ahiezer - He was skilled with both hands and represented Benjamin, the tribe of King Saul, who threatened David (1 Chronicles 12:1-3 )
Ahin'o-am -
The daughter of Ahimaaz and wife of Saul
Jonathan - the son of Saul, a prince of an excellent disposition, and in all varieties of fortune a sincere and steady friend to David
Shewbread - David requested the bread for his hungry men as they fled from King Saul (1 Samuel 21:4-6 )
Nob - But the event for which Nob was most noted in the Scripture annals was a frightful massacre which occurred there in the reign of Saul
Havoc - 1: πορθέω (Strong's #4199 — Verb — portheo — por-theh'-o ) "to destroy, ravage, lay waste," is used of the persecution inflicted by Saul of Tarsus on the church in Jerusalem, Acts 9:21 , and Galatians 1:23 , RV, "made havoc," for AV, "destroyed;" Galatians 1:13 , ditto, for AV, "wasted
Judas - gate into the heart of the city), Saul of Tarsus lodged after his conversion (Acts 9:11)
Abiathar - When Saul sent his emissaries to Nob, to destroy all the priests there, Abiathar, who was young, fled to David in the wilderness, 1 Samuel 22:11-23 , with whom he continued in the character of priest, 1 Samuel 23:9 30:7 . Saul, it would appear, had transferred the dignity of the high priesthood from the line of Ithamar, to which Eli belonged, to that of Eleazar, by conferring the office upon Zadok. Thus there were, at the same time, two high priests in Israel; Abiathar with David, and Zadok with Saul
Becher - From him descended Bechorath, then Zeror, Abiel (Jehiel, 1 Chronicles 9:35), Ner, Kish, Saul. Abiel settled in Gibeon or Gibeah, afterward described as "of Saul" (1 Samuel 11:4; Isaiah 10:29). From Becher came also Sheba, son of Bichri, the rebel against David (2 Samuel 20); also Shimei, son of Gera of Bahurim (2 Samuel 17:5), "of the house of Saul
Gibeah - GIBEATH, a town of Benjamin, among the last next Jerusalem (Joshua 18:28), possibly the "Gibeah of Saul," only that the latter was close to Gibeon and Ramah, five miles N. of Jerusalem, and if Saul's Gibeah were meant we should expect it mentioned with those two towns in Joshua 18:25. "Gibeah of Saul" occurs 1 Samuel 10:26; 1 Samuel 11:4; 1 Samuel 15:34; 2 Samuel 21:6; Isaiah 10:29. , 5:2, section 1) Gabath saoule, 30 stadia from Jerusalem, chosen retributively, as being Saul's residence, for the hanging of his seven sons "before the Lord" (i. Saul was in their front at Michmash, holding also mount Bethel on the N. ...
Jonathan smote the garrison at Geba, and the Philistines in consequence gathering a vast host drove Saul's little army before them out of Bethel and Michmash down the eastern passes to Gilgal near Jericho, in the Jordan valley; took Michmash, Saul's former quarters, and sent out plunderers N. Jonathan however held a force in Gibeah (1 Samuel 14:2) where Saul, Samuel, and Ahiah the priest with the ephod joined him from Gilgal (1 Samuel 13:7). ...
Then followed the gallant stealthy assault of the Philistine garrison by Jonathan and his armor-bearer, the first knowledge of which was conveyed to Saul by his watchmen in Gibeah, who at dawn saw "the multitude melting away and beating down one another. " Saul first called the muster roll to discover the absentees; next he consulted the oracle of God; but when the noise in the Philistine host increased, with irreverent impatience (Isaiah 28:16) he desired the priest to stop the consultation, and put himself at the head of the people who, now that the Philistines fled, flocked to him from all their hiding places in Mount Ephraim
Achish - The Philistine king of Gath with whom David twice took shelter from Saul. The second occasion was when David's heart failed him, and he said, "I shall now perish one day by the hand of Saul
Gibeah - A city of Benjamin, 1 Samuel 13:15 , and the birthplace and residence of Saul king of Israel; whence it is frequently called "Gibeah of Saul," 1 Samuel 11:4 ; 15:34 ; 23:19 ; 26:1 ; 2 Samuel 21:6 ; Isaiah 10:29
Jesse - In the time of Saul, the family of Jesse occupied a humble condition; for David calls himself poor and unimportant (1 Kings 18)
Maon - Here David hid from Saul, and here Nabal had his possessions and his home (1 Samuel 23:24,25 ; 25:2 )
Azmaveth - Son of Jehoadah, descendant of Saul
Doeg - An Edomite, the chief of Saul's herdsmen, "detained before the Lord," probably by a vow, or because it was the sabbath, when David fled to Nob. Doeg afterwards falsely accused Abimelech, the high priest, to Saul; and, when none of the king's guard would execute the ferocious sentence to slay the priests of the Lord, he fell upon them and killed 80 persons, sacking also their city
Abimelech - It was the name also of one of the sons of Gideon, who became a judge of Israel, Judges 9; and of the Jewish high-priest, who gave Goliah's sword, which had been deposited in the tabernacle, and part of the shew bread to David, at the time this prince was flying from Saul, 1 Samuel 21:1
Parlour - In each case, modern translations replace parlor with a term more suitable to the context: (1) inner chambers (NRSV), courts (REB), or rooms (NIV) of the Temple (1 Chronicles 28:11 ); (2) dining hall (REB) or hall (NIV, NRSV) in which Saul shared a sacred meal with Samuel (1 Samuel 9:22 ); (3) the upper room (NIV) or roof chamber (NRSV, REB) of a palace (Judges 3:20 ,Judges 3:20,3:23-25 )
Isshiah - Soldier from Saul's tribe of Benjamin who joined David at Ziklag while he hid from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:6 )
Zobah - 1 Samuel 14:47 , which states that Saul fought against Zobah, is probably based on a confusion with the wars of David
se'Chu - (the watch-tower ), a place mentioned once only -- ( 1 Samuel 19:22 ) --apparently as lying on the route between Saul's residence, Gibeah, and Ramah (Ramathaim-zophim), that of Samuel. Assuming that Saul started from Gibeah (Tuleil el-Ful ), and that Neby Samwil is Ramah, then Bir Nebolla (the well of Neballa) just south of Beeroth, alleged by modern traveller to contain a large pit would be in a suitable position for the great well of Sechu
Bezek - In Bezek Saul numbered the Israelites to rally an army against Nahash the Ammonite and deliver Jabesh-gilead (1 Samuel 11:8 )
Beracah - He joined David's band in Ziklag, when David fled from Saul and joined the Philistines (1 Chronicles 12:3 )
Shunem - Place where Philistines camped against Saul, who, in fear, sought to talk to the dead Samuel through a medium (1 Samuel 28:4 )
Agag - Saul should have killed Agag
Zuph - “Land of Zuph” where Saul was looking for some donkeys (1 Samuel 9:5 )
Engaddi - In the desert of Engaddi David hid when sought by Saul (I Kings, 24) and it was the scene of the slaughter of the hordes of Ammon, Moab, and Edom, who had invaded the Kingdom of Judea in the reign of Josaphat (II Par
Agagite - He was of that race with which Jehovah had sworn to have war for ever, and which Saul was directed to utterly exterminate
Engedi - Engedi was first called Hazazon-tamar, Genesis 14:7; 2 Chronicles 20:2; it was David's hiding-place from Saul, 1 Samuel 23:29; 1 Samuel 24:1; and where David cut off the skirt of Saul's robe, 24:4; its vineyards are mentioned, Song of Solomon 1:14; now called ʾAin Jidy
Ahimelech - He dwelt at Nob, and was the intimate friend of David; on this account he was put to death by Saul, together with all the priests that were with him, except his son Abiathar, who fled to David
Pelethites - These two groups probably were sea peoples who formed a loyalty to David during his days in the Philistine country while evading Saul
Gittith - It probably denotes either a musical instrument or a kind of music derived from Gath, where David sojourned for a time during the persecution of Saul, 1 Samuel 27:1-7
Ishbosheth - Son and successor of Saul. Abner, Saul's kinsman and general so managed that Ishbosheth was acknowledged king at Mahanaim by the greater part of Israel, while David reigned at Hebron over Judah
be'la -
One of the five cities of the plain which was spared at the intercession of Lot, and received the name of Zoar, (Genesis 14:2 ; 19:22 ) [1] ...
Son of Beor, who reigned over Edom in the city of Dinhabah, eight generations before Saul
en'-Dor - It was here that the witch dwelt whom Saul consulted
ma'Chir - (Numbers 32:39 ; 3:15) ...
The son of Ammiel, a powerful sheikh of one of the transjordanic tribes, who rendered essential service to the cause of Saul and of David successively
Exorcist, - (Matthew 12:27 ; Acts 19:13 ) David, by playing skillfully on a harp, procured the temporary departure of the evil spirit which troubled Saul
Michal - Rivulet, or who as God?, the younger of Saul's two daughters by his wife Ahinoam (1 Samuel 14:49,50 ). She showed her affection for him by promoting his escape to Naioth when Saul sought his life (1 Samuel 19:12-17 . She remained childless, and thus the races of David and Saul were not mixed
Rizpah - Coal; hot stone, the daughter of Aiah, and one of Saul's concubines. This calamity was sent "for Saul and for his bloody house, because he slew the Gibeonites. " David inquired of the Gibeonites what satisfaction they demanded, and was answered that nothing would compensate for the wrong Saul had done to them but the death of seven of Saul's sons. ), Saul's eldest daughter, whom she bore to Adriel
Shammah - Third son of Jesse, present when Samuel sought a successor to Saul ( 1 Samuel 16:9 ); with Saul in the battlefield when David visited the camp ( 1 Samuel 17:13 )
Gibeah - City of Benjamin, the native place of Saul. The same city is called 'GIBEAHOF BENJAMIN,'1 Samuel 13:2,15,16 ; 1 Samuel 14:16 ; and 'GIBEAH OF Saul,' 1 mi'Chal - (who is like God? ), the younger of Saul's two daughters, ( 1 Samuel 14:49 ) who married David. (1 Samuel 19:11-17 ) When the rupture between Saul and David had become open and incurable, she was married to another man, Phalti or Phaltiel of Gallim. (2 Samuel 6:20-23 ) Her name appears, (2 Samuel 21:8 ) as the mother of five of the grandchildren of Saul
Agag - The last one mentioned in Scripture was "hewed in pieces" by Samuel, before the Lord, because Saul had sinfully spared him and the flocks and herds, when ordered utterly to exterminate them
Gedor - A Benjamite, an ancestor of king Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:31 ; 1 Chronicles 9:37 )
Flea - David at the cave of Adullam thus addressed his persecutor Saul (1 Samuel 24:14 ): "After whom is the king of Israel come out? after whom dost thou pursue? after a dead dog, after a flea?" He thus speaks of himself as the poor, contemptible object of the monarch's pursuit, a "worthy object truly for an expedition of the king of Israel with his picked troops!" This insect is in Eastern language the popular emblem of insignificance
Endor - To Endor, Saul resorted to consult one reputed to be a witch on the eve of his last engagement with the Philistines (1 Samuel 28:7 )
Ahimaaz -
The father Ahinoam, the wife of Saul (1Samuel 14:50)
Elasah - Descendant of Saul and Jonathan in tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:37 ); spelled Eleasah in English translations
Keilah - David rescued the city from a Philistine attack but later withdrew fearing the populace would hand him over to Saul (1 Samuel 23:1-13 )
Nob - Because the priest Ahimelech gave aid to the fugitive David (1 Samuel 21:1-9 ), Saul exterminated 85 of the priests of Nob (1 Samuel 22:9-23 )
Kish - The father of Saul the first king of Israel ( 1 Samuel 9:1 ; 1 Samuel 10:21 ; 1 Samuel 14:51 , Acts 13:21 )
Altaschith - " He used the same "destroy not" in 1 Samuel 26:9, to Abishai, who urged him to slay Saul when in his power
Achish - princes refused to let David take part in the final campaign against Saul
Beheading - Ishbosheth was beheaded by his murderers that his head might be carried to David, 2 Samuel 4:7,8 ; as Goliath's head had been carried to Saul
Abner - ” The chief military officer for King Saul and Saul's uncle (Samuel 26:14-154 ). At Saul's death, he supported Ish-bosheth, Saul's son (2 Samuel 2:8 ) until Ish-bosheth accused him of treason for taking one of Saul's concubines (2 Samuel 3:7-8 )
Nob - It was visited by David when he fled from Saul, and he and his followers ate the hallowed bread
Mephibosheth - Saul had a son of this name, and so had Jonathan his son, (2 Samuel 4:4 and 2 Samuel 21:8-9) His name signifies reproach from the mouth, from Pe, a mouth—and Bosh, shame
Kish - Son of Abiel a Benjamite and father of Saul, king of Israel
Ish-bo'Sheth - (man of shame ) the youngest of Saul's four sons, and his legitimate successor. The wars and negotiations with David were entirely carried on by Abner (2 Samuel 2:12 ; 3:6,12 ) The death of Abner deprived the house of Saul of its last remaining support
Ziklag - a city of the Philistines, first assigned to the tribe of Judah, and afterward to that of Simeon, Joshua 15:31 ; Joshua 19:5 ; but it does not appear that the Philistines were ever driven out; as, when David fled into their country from Saul, Achish gave the city to him, 1 Samuel 27:5-6
Eleazar - In the reigns of Saul and David, it was restored to the line of Eleazar, and so continued till after the captivity
Gilboa - In this vicinity Saul, and Jonathan were defeated by the Philistines, and died, 1 Samuel 28:4,25
Gilbo'a - ( 1 Samuel 28:4 ) with 1 Samuel 29:1 It is mentioned in Scripture only in connection with one event in Israelitish history, the defeat and death of Saul and Jonathan by the Philistines
az'Rikam - (1 Chronicles 3:23 ) ...
Eldest son of Azel, and descendant of Saul
Armaged'Don - ( Revelation 16:16 ) The scene of the struggle of good and evil is suggested by that battle-field, the plain of Esdraelon, which was famous for two great victories, of Barak over the Canaanites and of Gideon over the Midianites; and for two great disasters, the deaths of Saul and Josiah
Reho'Both - ...
The city of a certain Saul or Shaul, one of the early kings of the Edomites
Minstrel - The Hebrew word in (2 Kings 3:15 ) properly signifies a player upon a stringed instruments like the harp or kinnor [1], whatever its precise character may have been, on which David played before Saul, (1 Samuel 16:16 ; 18:10 ; 19:9 ) and which the harlots of the great cities used to carry with them as they walked, to attract notice
Paul Apprehended of Christ Jesus - THE first time we see Saul of Tarsus he is silently consenting to Stephen's death. That a young zealot of Saul's temperament should be content to sit still that day, and merely keep the clothes of the witnesses who stoned Stephen, makes us wonder what it meant. But, beginning with his silent consent to the death of Stephen, Saul soon went on to plan and to perpetrate the most dreadful deeds on his own account. "As for Saul, he made havoc of the Church, entering into every house, and haling men and women, committed them to prison. " And thus it was that Saul actually went to the high priest in Jerusalem, and desired of him letters to Damascus, to the synagogues, that if he found any of this way, whether they were men or women, he might bring them bound to Jerusalem. Thine arrows are sharp in the hearts of the King's enemies, whereby the people fall under Thee!...
And thus it was that, as Saul journeyed, and came near Damascus, suddenly there shone down upon him a great light from heaven. And he fell to the earth, and heard a voice saying to him, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou Me? His eyes were as a flame of fire, and His voice as the sound of many waters. And Saul arose from the earth, and they led him by the hand, and brought him into Damascus. And Ananias entered the house where Saul lay, and putting his hands on him, he said, Brother Saul, the Lord, even Jesus, that appeared unto thee on the way as thou camest, hath sent me, that thou mightest receive thy sight, and be filled with the Holy Ghost. Saul of Tarsus, I baptize thee in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. And there was great joy in the presence of the angels of God over the conversion and the baptism of Saul of Tarsus. ...
Now it is the suddenness of Saul's conversion that is the first thing arresting about it to us. Some conversions are as sudden, and as unexpected, and as complete, as Saul's conversion was; and some are slowness itself. But look at Saul. ...
But not only had Saul no sense of sin to prepare him for his conversion: he had no preparation and no fitness for his conversion, of any kind whatsoever. Read his thrice-told story, and see if there is any lesson plainer, or more pointed to you in it all, than just the unexpectedness, the unpreparedness, and the completeness on the spot, of Saul's conversion. Yes, it is just the absolute sovereignty, startling suddenness, total unpreparedness, entire undeservingness, and glorious completeness, of Saul's conversion that, all taken together, make it such a study, and, in some respects, such a model conversion, to you and to me. Saul got his conversion out of that overthrow on the way to Damascus, while all his companions only got some bodily bruises from their fall, and the complete upsetting of their errand out of it. The temple officers had each his own story to tell when they returned without any prisoners to Jerusalem: only, none of them needed to be led by the hand into Damascus, and none of them were baptized by Ananias, but Saul only. One will be Saul over again, and those who are sitting beside him will be Saul's companions over again. One will go straight home after this service, and will never all his days have Saul's sudden and unexpected conversion out of his mind, such a divine pattern is it to be of his own conversion. ' The mark of Saul's conversion that silenced Ananias was this, that Saul had been three days and three nights in fasting and in prayer without ceasing. Behold he prayeth, said Christ, proud of the completeness and the success of His conversion of Saul. Has Jesus Christ, with His eyes like a flame of fire, set that secret mark on your conversion and on mine? Does He point you out to His ministering angels and sympathising saints in heaven tonight, as He pointed out Saul to Ananias? How does your conversion stand the test of secret prayer? Behold, he prayeth! said Christ
Gibeonites - Saul, upon an occasion not recorded, had slain some of the Gibeonites, and it apparently had been passed over and forgotten; but God could not allow the oath of His people to be violated; He therefore brought a famine on the land. They claimed that as it was Saul who had sought to destroy them from remaining in any of the coasts of Israel, seven of his descendants should be given to them
Aphek - Philistine armies including David and his men gathered in Aphek to fight Saul. Eventually the Philistines defeated Israel, bringing death to Saul and Jonathan
Endor - a city in the tribe of Manasseh, where the witch resided whom Saul consulted a little before the battle of Gilboa, Joshua 17:11 ; 1 Samuel 28:13 . That many such oracles existed in Canaan, is evident from the number which Saul himself is said to have suppressed; and such a one, with its Pythia, was this at Endor
Aphek - Philistine armies including David and his men gathered in Aphek to fight Saul. Eventually the Philistines defeated Israel, bringing death to Saul and Jonathan
Barnabas - ’ His kindly introduction of Saul to the Christians at Jerusalem disarmed their fears ( Acts 9:27 ); his broad sympathies made him quick to recognize the work of grace amongst the Greeks at Antioch ( Acts 11:23 ), and to discern the fitness of his gifted friend for that important sphere of service ( Acts 11:25 f. After a year’s fellowship in work at Antioch, Barnabas and Saul were appointed to convey ‘the relief’ sent thence to the brethren in Judæa ( Acts 11:30 ). ...
The church at Antioch solemnly dedicated Barnabas and Saul to missionary service (Acts 13:1 f
Mephibosheth - Son of Jonathan, the son of Saul. When David came into power he inquired if there were any of Saul's descendants to whom he could show the kindness of God for Jonathan's sake, and Mephibosheth was found. All that had been Saul's possessions were given to Mephibosheth under the care of Ziba as his servant, and Mephibosheth was made to sit at the king's table continually. " When Saul's descendants were required for a recompense to the Gibeonites David spared Mephibosheth for Jonathan's sake, nor was he mentioned when the king died. Son of Saul and Rizpah: he and his brother Armoni were among the seven given up to death, on account of the famine that God brought upon the land because Saul's sin against the Gibeonites had not been atoned for. Rizpah protected the bodies by day and by night, until David caused their remains to be buried with those of Saul and Jonathan
Zelzah - In 1 Samuel 10:2 tells Saul that he will find ‘two men by Rachel’s sepulchre in the border of Benjamin at Zelzah
Paran - Here, long afterwards, David found refuge from Saul (1 Samuel 25:1,4 )
Dagon - This was the idol that fell to pieces before the ark of Israel, and it was in its temple subsequently that the Philistines hung the head of Saul
Jezreel, Fountain of - Where Saul encamped before the battle of Gilboa (1 Samuel 29:1 )
Jahaziel - Benjaminite military hero who supported David against Saul, also of the tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 12:4 )
Minstrel - Music was often so used to prepare the frame for spiritual influences (1 Samuel 10:5-11) and to soothe an evil spirit of excitement, as when David played to calm Saul
Ner - Son of Jehiel, father of Kish, grandfather of Saul; also father of Ner, Saul's uncle (1 Chronicles 8:33; 1 Samuel 14:50)
Micah - Descendant of King Saul (1 Chronicles 8:34-35 ; 1 Chronicles 9:40-44 ); at 2 Samuel 9:12 , the KJV used the form Micha
Havilah - The river Pison (see Eden [1]) is said to compass the land of Havilah ( Genesis 2:11-12 ), and it formed one of the limits of the region occupied by the sons of Ishmael ( Genesis 25:18 ) in which also Saul smote the Amalekites ( 1 Samuel 15:8 )
Ziph - The wilderness of Ziph was one of the refuges of David when fleeing from Saul ( 1 Samuel 23:14-15 ; 1 Samuel 23:24 ; 1 Samuel 26:2 bis )
Michal - The second daughter of Saul, 1 Samuel 14:49, and the wife of David
Lucius - Christian prophet and/or teacher from Cyrene who helped lead church at Antioch to set apart Saul and Barnabas for missionary service (Acts 13:1 )
Barzillai - 1 Samuel 18:19 ]'>[1], the daughter of Saul
Obeisance, do - Saul did obeisance before Samuel's ghost (1 Samuel 28:14 )
Harp - It was used by David to drive away the evil spirit from Saul, 1 Samuel 16:23 and it is the only musical instrument referred to symbolically as being in heaven
Zoba(h) - ” First Saul (1 Samuel 14:47 ), then David (2 Samuel 8:3 ) fought the kings of Zobah
Jeiel - An ancestor of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:29 , supplied in RV Adullam - It is frequently mentioned in the history of Saul and David; and is chiefly memorable from the cave in its neighbourhood, where David retired from Achish, king of Gath, when he was joined by the distressed and discontented, to the number of four hundred, over whom he became captain, 1 Samuel 22:1
Mahanaim - Mahanaim was the seat of the kingdom of Ishbosheth, after the death of Saul, 2 Samuel 2:9 ; 2 Samuel 2:12
Abinadab - One of the eight sons of Jesse, and one of the three of Ins sons who followed Saul in battle. One of Saul's sons who was slain at the battle of Gilboa
Samuel, Judge - In his old age he appointed his sons judges over Israel, but they displeased the ancients, who asked him for a king, and the Lord told him to anoint Saul (1 Kings 8)
Shimel - A Benjamite kinsman of Saul, who insulted king David when fleeing before Absalom, and humbled himself on David's return
Kenites - Saul spared them, when sent to destroy the Amalekites among whom they dwelt, Numbers 24:20,21 ; 1 Samuel 15:6
Bethshan (Bethshean) - The town was still hostile to Israel in the time of Saul (1 Samuel 31:10-12), but by the time of Solomon it was firmly under Israelite control (1 Kings 4:12)
Abner - ) Son of Ner, who was the brother of Kish, the father of Saul (1 Chronicles 9:36). Made commander in chief by his cousin Saul. Introduced David to Saul, after Goliath's death (1 Samuel 14:51; 1 Samuel 17:55; 1 Samuel 17:57). With Saul at Hachilah (1 Samuel 26:8-14). At Saul's death he upheld the dynasty in Ishbosheth's person, mainly owing to the paramount influence of the tribe Ephraim, which was jealous of Judah. ...
David's thanks to the men of Jabesh Gilead for the burial of Saul and his sons imply that no prince of Saul's line as yet had claimed the throne. Abner, presuming on his position as the only remaining stay of Ishbosbeth, was tempted to take the late king Saul's concubine wife, Rizpah
Nahash -
King of the Ammonites in the time of Saul. The inhabitants of Jabesh-Gilead having been exposed to great danger from Nahash, sent messengers to Gibeah to inform Saul of their extremity
Urim And Thummim - Saul sought the spirit of Samuel through a witch because God would not answer Saul through Urim or dreams or prophets (1 Samuel 28:6-25 )
Mark, John - After Barnabas and Saul completed a relief mission to Jerusalem, they took Mark with them when they returned to Antioch (Acts 12:25 ). When Barnabas and Saul went as missionaries, they took Mark to help (Acts 13:5 )
Ananias - Disciple at Damascus, who, being instructed by the Lord, found out Saul and laid his hands upon him that he might receive sight and be filled with the Holy Spirit. Ananias had naturally hesitated because of the character of the man he was to visit; but the Lord revealed to him that the persecuting Saul was a chosen vessel to Him to bear His name
Jabesh-Gilead - This city was afterwards taken by Nahash, king of the Ammonites, but was delivered by Saul, the newly-elected king of Israel. In gratitude for this deliverance, forty years after this, the men of Jabesh-Gilead took down the bodies of Saul and of his three sons from the walls of Beth-shan, and after burning them, buried the bones under a tree near the city (1 Samuel 31:11-13 )
Abinadab - Son of King Saul killed by Philistines in battle of Mount Gilboa (1 Samuel 31:2 )
Host - ...
Saul was the first to form a standing army (1 Samuel 13:2 ; 24:2 )
War - In the days of Saul and David the people of Israel engaged in many wars with the nations around, and after the division of the kingdom into two they often warred with each other
Kiriath-Jearim - It is chiefly remembered because during the time of Saul and David the ark of the covenant rested there for twenty years (1 Samuel 7:1-2; 2 Samuel 6:2; for maps see BENJAMIN; JUDAH, TRIBE AND KINGDOM)
Elkanah - A Benjaminite warrior who deserted Saul and joined David (1 Chronicles 12:6 )
Maon - David took refuge from Saul in the wilderness to the east of Maon (1 Samuel 23:24-25 )
Ziba - ” Servant of Saul. David, either uncertain whom to believe or else desiring to leave no strong rivals, divided Saul's property between Ziba and Mephibosheth
Ish-Bosheth - Son and successor of Saul, who was persuaded by Abner to go up to Mahanaim and assume the government while David reigned at Hebron, 2 Samuel 2:8; 2 Samuel 2:11; and all Israel except Judah acknowledged him as kins
Gad, the Prophet - He was with David when he fled from Saul, and gave him counsel
Michmas, Michmash - It was where Jonathan smote the garrison of the Philistines, when the victory might have been greater had not Saul distressed the people by his forbidding them to take food until the evening
Doeg - An Edomite, overseer of Saul's flocks. At Nob he witnessed the relief kindly furnished to David when fleeing from Saul, by Ahimelech the high priest, and carried a malicious and distorted report of it to his master
Jasher - We have only two specimens from the book, (1) the words of Joshua which he spake to the Lord at the crisis of the battle of Beth-horon (Joshua 10:12,13 ); and (2) "the Song of the Bow," that beautiful and touching mournful elegy which David composed on the occasion of the death of Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:18-27 )
Rehoboth - City in the East, 'by the river,' from whence one named Saul, or Shaul, became an early king of Edom
Teraphim - In order to deceive the guards sent by Saul to seize David, Michal his wife prepared one of the household teraphim, putting on it the goat's-hair cap worn by sleepers and invalids, and laid it in a bed, covering it with a mantle. "Perhaps," says Bishop Wordsworth, "Saul, forsaken by God and possessed by the evil spirit, had resorted to teraphim (as he afterwards resorted to witchcraft); and God overruled evil for good, and made his very teraphim (by the hand of his own daughter) to be an instrument for David's escape
Jozabad - Man from Gederah in tribe of Benjamin who joined David as he fled from King Saul (1 Chronicles 12:4 ). Two men of tribe of Manasseh who joined David at Ziklag as he fled from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:20 )
Engedi - When David was fleeing from Saul, he hid in the area of Engedi (1 Samuel 23:29 ). Saul was in a cave near Engedi when David cut off a piece of his robe but spared his life (1 Samuel 24:1 )
Sons of the Prophets - The “company of prophets” (1Samuel 10:5,1 Samuel 10:10 ; 1 Samuel 19:20 ) are groups of prophets whose charismatic spirit involved Saul in prophecy (1 Samuel 10:10 ) and, later, both Saul and his messengers (1 Samuel 19:20 )
ab'Ner -
Son of Ner, who was the brother of Kish, (1 Chronicles 9:36 ) the father of Saul. ) Abner, therefore, was Saul's first cousin, and was made by him commander-in-chief of his army. (1 Samuel 14:51 ; 17:57 ; 26:5-14 ) After the death of Saul David was proclaimed king of Judah; and some time subsequently Abner proclaimed Ish-bosheth, Saul's son, king of Israel. (1 Chronicles 2:16 ) Abner had married Rizpah, Saul's concubine, and this, according to the views of Oriental courts, might be so interpreted as to imply a design upon the throne
zo'ba, - (station ), the name of a portion of Syria which formed a separate kingdom in the time of the Jewish monarchs Saul, David and Solomon. We first hear of Zobah in the time of Saul, when we find it mentioned as a separate country, governed apparently by a number of kings who owned no common head or chief
da'Vid - His life may be divided into three portions:
His youth before his introduction to the court of Saul; ...
His relations with Saul; ...
His reign. (1 Samuel 17:40-51 ) ...
Relations with Saul. Saul inquired his parentage, and took him finally to his court. Unfortunately David's fame proved the foundation of that unhappy jealousy of Saul towards him which, mingling with the king's constitutional malady, poisoned his whole future relations to David. His position in Saul's court seems to have been first armor-bearer, ( 1 Samuel 16:21 ; 18:2 ) then captain over a thousand, (1 Samuel 18:13 ) and finally, on his marriage with Michal, the king's second daughter, he was raised to the high office of captain of the king's body-guard, second only, if not equal, to Abner, the captain of the host, and Jonathan, the heir apparent. David was not chiefly known for his successful exploits against the Philistines, by one of which he won his wife, and rove back the Philistine power with a blow from which it only rallied at the disastrous close of Saul's reign. He also still performed from time to time the office of minstrel; but the successive attempts of Saul upon his life convinced him that he was in constant danger. He had two faithful allies, however, in the court --the son of Saul, his friend Jonathan, and the daughter of Saul, his wife Michal. He secures an important ally in Abiathar, (1 Samuel 23:6 ) his band of 400 at Adullam soon increased to 600, (1 Samuel 23:13 ) he is hunted by Saul from place to place like a partridge. (1 Samuel 25:42,43 ) Finally comes the new of the battle of Gilboa and the death of Saul and Jonathan. Of these the first (the three-years famine) introduces us to the last notices of David's relations with the house of Saul, already referred to. " (2 Samuel 12:10 ) The outrage on his daughter Tamar, the murder of his eldest son Amnon, and then the revolt of his best-beloved Absalom, brought on the crisis which once more sent him forth as wanderer, as in the days when he fled from Saul
Nadab - A Benjamite, one of the family from which Saul descended
Benjamin, Tribe of - Later, the first King of Israel, Saul, was chosen from the tribe of Benjamin (1 Kings 9)
Bethshan - After the battle of Mount Gilboa, the Philistines took the body of Saul, and hung it against the wall of Bethshan, 1 Samuel 31:10
Kish - Saul's father, son of Abiel, of Benjamin, brother of Abner (1 Samuel 9:1-21; 1 Samuel 14:51). 1 Chronicles 8:33 passes over many intermediate links between Saul and Ner, the son of Abi (the father) of Gibeon. A descendant of Benjamin, of the family of Gibeon, distinct from Saul's father (1 Chronicles 8:30)
Machir - He clung to the house of Saul as long as possible, and afterwards victualled David’s men when that king was fleeing from Ahsalom ( 2 Samuel 9:5 ; 2 Samuel 17:27 )
Magic - The most remarkable instance is that of Saul and the sorceress of Endor
Professor - as Saul, Jehu, Judas, Demas, the foolish virgins, &c
Geba - Apparently while Saul was king the Philistines had a garrison there, which Jonathan smote
Abigail - She showed wonderful faith in recognising the counsels of God as resting upon David, and called him 'lord' whilst in rejection and being hunted by Saul
ja'Besh - It is first mentioned in (Judges 21:8-14 ) Being attacked subsequently by Nahash the Ammonite, it gave Saul an opportunity of displaying his prowess in its defence
Armageddon - For an exposition of the apostle's meaning, the reader must be referred to commentaries; it will be sufficient here to say that there is an allusion to that great battle-field where Barak and Gideon conquered, Judges 4:1-24; Judges 5:19; Judges 6:33; Judges 7:1-25; where Saul and Josiah fell, 1 Samuel 29:1; 1 Samuel 31:1-13; 2 Samuel 4:4; 2 Chronicles 35:20-24; the plain of Esdraelon, on the southern border of which Megiddo stood
Tribe of Benjamin - Later, the first King of Israel, Saul, was chosen from the tribe of Benjamin (1 Kings 9)
Kiss - The expression, "Kiss the Son," Psalm 2:12 , may be illustrated by 1 Samuel 10:1 , where king Saul receives the kiss of allegiance from Samuel
Eliph'Elet - (2 Samuel 23:34 ) ...
Son of Eshek, a descendant of King Saul through Jonathan
Abishai - With his brothers Joab and Asahel, Abishai joined David during David’s flight from Saul
Jabesh (1) - Subsequently it recovered itself, and being threatened by the Ammonite king, Nabash, with the excision of its citizens' right eyes as a reproach upon Israel, was rescued by Saul. David, in generous forgetfulness of his own wrongs from Saul, blessed them for their kindness to their master, praying the Lord to requite it, and promising to requite it as if it were a kindness to himself (2 Samuel 2:5-6); afterwards he removed the bones to the sepulchre of Saul's father Kish at Zelah (2 Samuel 21:13-14)
Kenites - When Saul was sent to destroy the Amalekites, the Kenites, who had joined them, perhaps by compulsion, were ordered to depart from them, that they might not share in their fate; and the reason assigned was, that they "showed kindness to the children of Israel when they came up out of Egypt," 1 Samuel 15:6 . After Saul the Kenites are not mentioned; but they subsisted, being mingled among the Edomites and other nations of Arabia Petraea
Abner - was the uncle of king Saul, and the general of his army. After Saul's death, he made Ishbosheth king; and for seven years supported the family of Saul, in opposition to David; but in most of his skirmishes came off with loss. ...
Not long after, Abner, taking it highly amiss for Ishbosheth to charge him with lewd behaviour toward Rizpah, Saul's concubine, vowed that he would quickly transfer the whole kingdom into the hands of David
Abner - Son of Ner, who was the brother of Kish, 1 Samuel 2:15-32 the father of Saul. ) Abner, therefore, was Saul's first cousin, and was made by him commander-in-chief of his army. ...
After the death of Saul David was proclaimed king of Judah; and some time subsequently Abner proclaimed Ish-bosheth, Saul's son, king of Israel. Perhaps he now had some idea of seizing the Israelitish throne for himself; for he appropriated a woman of Saul's harem, which Ish-bosheth interpreted as an overt act of rebellion
New Moon - It appears that even from the time of Saul, they made on this day a sort of family entertainment; since David ought then to have been at the king's table and Saul took his absence amiss, 1 Samuel 20:5,18
Persecution - Saul of Tarsus was the moving spirit in this matter, until, on his road to Damascus to proceed against the Christians there, ‘Christ’s foe became His soldier. ’ The conversion of Saul seems to have stayed the persecution
Maon - of Jeshimon, at the hill of Hachilah, David narrowly escaped Saul through the Ziphites' treachery (1 Samuel 23:19; 1 Samuel 23:24-25). Saul was on one side of the mountain, David on the other, when a message announcing a Philistine invasion called Saul away; the rock that separated the pursuer and the pursued was called "Sela-hammahlekoth," the rock of divisions
Barnabas - When the disciples at Jerusalem were afraid of Saul, it was Barnabas who introduced him to the apostles. " He then sought Saul and brought him to Antioch, where they laboured a whole year. Antioch became a centre, from whence the gospel went forth to the Gentiles; it was there that the Holy Ghost said, "Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them," and from thence they started on what is called Paul's first missionary journey
Jon'Athan, - that is, "the gift of Jehovah, " the eldest son of King Saul. (1 Samuel 14:24 ) which Saul invoked on any one who ate before the evening, tasted the honey which lay on the ground. Saul would have sacrificed him; but the people interposed in behalf of the hero of that great day, and Jonathan was saved. Their last meeting was in and forest of Ziph, during Saul's pursuit of David
Michal - Saul's younger daughter. Saul had promised David the elder, but gave her to Adriel. ) Meanwhile, Michal loved David; and Saul on hearing of it from his attendants made it a trap for David (1 Samuel 18:21), saying, "thou shalt be my son in law in a second way," and requiring, instead of the dowry paid to the father according to Eastern usage, 100 Philistines' foreskins. The courtiers, by Saul's secret instructions, urged on David, who at first shrank from again subjecting himself to the king's caprice. David killed 200 Philistines, and Saul gave him Michal. She proved a true hearted wife, and saved her husband from Saul's messengers sent to slay him in the morning. ...
The title of Psalms 59:9, "because of his (the enemy's) strength"; see Psalms 59:12 on Saul's "pride" roused to jealousy of David's fame, and Saul's "lying" accusation of treason against David. Saul's "wandering up and down" for help, when he sought the Endor witch, was the retribution in kind for his wandering up and down persecuting David (Psalms 59:14-15). Thus, time was allowed for his escape to Samuel; and when Saul, impatient of waiting until he should come forth in the morning, sent messengers in the evening to take him, she first said he was sick; then on their return, with Saul's command to see and bring him in the bed, her trick was detected and Saul upbraided her; but she said she was constrained by David's threats. After Saul's death Michal and her husband went with the rest of the family to the E. ...
His ardor for her was certainly at first the same, as his keenness to claim her proves; but she alienated him from her forever by her cutting sneer when, after dancing with all his might before Jehovah, in a thin ephod with short-shoulder dress, as representative of the priestly nation, stripped of royal robes in the presence of the great King, "he returned to bless his household"; instead of pious and affectionate congratulations at the bringing up of Jehovah's ark to Zion, already "despising him in her heart" she came out to meet him, and said in bitter irony, "how glorious was the king of Israel today, who uncovered himself today in the eyes of the handmaids of his servants, as one of the vain fellows shamelessly uncovered himself!"...
Michal had teraphim (1 Samuel 19:13), but like Saul she had no regard for Jehovah's ark (1 Chronicles 13:3), and was offended at the king because in pious enthusiasm he humbled himself to the level of the priests and nation before Jehovah. Saul's pride and disregard of Jehovah caused his rejection, as now the same sins cause the rejection of Michal; just as, on the contrary, David's humility and piety toward Jehovah brought him honor before Jehovah
Jonathan -
Eldest son of Saul and friend of David, noted for his bravery against the Philistines (1 Kings 13; 14), his loyalty to David, and his glorious death on Mount Gelboe (1 Kings 31; 2 Kings 19)
Shephatiah - Benjaminite who deserted Saul to join David's army at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12:5 )
Abishai - He went with him alone to the tent of Saul, 1 Samuel 26:7-11 ; and was a leader in the war with Ish-bosheth, 2 Samuel 2
Beth-Shean - The bodies of Saul and his sons were fastened to its walls
Hagarene - " ...
...
In the reign of Saul a great war was waged between the trans-Jordanic tribes and the Hagarites (1 Chronicles 5 ), who were overcome in battle
Keilah - David rescued it from the attack of the Philistines (1 Samuel 23:1-8 ); but the inhabitants proving unfaithful to him, in that they sought to deliver him up to Saul (13), he and his men "departed from Keilah, and went whithersoever they could go
Clemency - David, king of Israel, appears in no instance greater or more amiable than in sparing the life of his persecutor Saul, when it was in his power
Abinadab - He was with Saul in the campaign against the Philistines in which Goliath was slain (1Samuel 17:13). ...
One of Saul's sons, who peristed with his father in the battle of Gilboa (1Samuel 31:2; 1Chronicles 10:2)
Engedi - David resorted to the strongholds at this place when pursued by Saul. David out off the skirt of Saul's robe, but would not allow his men to injure him
Jonathan - Saul's son, David's dear friend, (1 Samuel 18:1) His death, with that of Saul, gave birth to one of the most poetical as well as devout elegies the world ever knew
Flea - " David likens himself to this insect; importing that while it would cost Saul much pains to catch him, he would obtain but very little advantage from it
Achish - The second time Achish treated David kindly, gave him Ziklag, and took him to the campaign against Saul, but was persuaded by his officers to send him home again
Kenite - Saul and David spared them in their raids on Amalek on account of their former kindness
ge'ba - During the wars of the earlier part of the reign of Saul, Geba was held as a garrison by the Philistines, (1 Samuel 13:3 ) but they were ejected by Jonathan
Gath - It also became well known as the place where David took refuge from Saul (1 Samuel 21:10-15; 1 Samuel 27)
King, Kingship - From the time of Joshua to the time of Saul, the judges led Israel. ...
The first national leader was Saul. Saul was anointed as the nagid over Israel—that is, as a national military leader—and not king in the technical sense. The Hebrew term for king is melek and is never used of Saul. Saul was a charismatic leader much in the mold of the judges. Saul established no central government or bureaucracy, had no court or standing army, and his seat at Gibeah was a fortress and not a palace. ...
The significant thing about Saul's leadership is that for the first time after settlement in Canaan, Israel had a permanent national military leader. A prophet designated him king just as the judges and Saul had been designated before him. Unlike Saul, David was able to fuse the tribes of Israel together into a nation who owed allegiance to the crown, to establish and maintain a court, and to establish a standing army. Because of his charismatic personality, David was able to effect the union of the northern and southern tribes (something Saul was apparently unable to do). Saul's court was simple and did not require extensive financial support (1 Samuel 22:6 ), while David depended on spoils of war (2 Samuel 8:1-14 )
Samuel - He gives name to the two books commemorating the first foundation of the kingdom under Saul, and its firm establishment in David's person and line. The king was but Jehovah's vicegerent holding office only on condition of loyalty to his Liege above; Israel, under the unfaithful Saul, at Nilboa by Bitter experience learned what a vain defense is a king reflecting their own unbelieving carnalism. Samuel duly anointed Saul by God's direction, and after Saul's victory over Nahash renewed the kingdom at Gilgal; here he appealed to the people as to his own past integrity in office, in times when bribery was too prevalent. Also bold witness for God's law, which as prophet he represented, even before Saul when transgressing it. Saul's sin lay not in his usurping the priest's office, but in disobedience to God as represented by His prophet (1 Samuel 10:8; 1 Samuel 13:8; 1 Samuel 13:15, on which occasion Samuel enunciated the eternal principle, "to obey is better than sacrifice," i. ) Samuel tore himself from Saul, who desired his prophetic countenance before the people; his rending the garment symbolized the rending of Saul's kingdom from him. ...
Samuel saw Saul no more, yet grieved for one whose self-incurred doom he could no longer avert, until Jehovah expostulated "how long wilt thou mourn for Saul, seeing I have rejected him?" (1 Samuel 16:1, compare Psalms 139:21-22). Tender sympathy never led Samuel to give Saul public sanction; but now he is called on to anoint another in Saul's room, and to be of one mind with God in all that God does. Then Saul, by sending messengers to take him from Samuel's very presence, virtually insulted the prophet, but was himself brought under the power of the Spirit
David - When the Lord, because of the ungodly conduct of Saul, had determined to choose another king, Samuel was directed to go to Bethlehem: and from the sons of Jesse anoint another as king over Israel. When Saul, afflicted now with that black spirit of melancholy which his sins had justly brought upon him, might, it was thought, be soothed by a minstrel's music, David took his harp to the palace; and his music calmed Saul's distemper; and Saul was gratified and became attached to his skilful attendant. In 1 Samuel 16:21 it is said that Saul made David his armor-hearer. For it then would have been strange if neither Saul nor any one about his person had recognized David when he came, as we find in the next chapter, to accept Goliath's challenge. And so all sorts of devices have been contrived to get the history into chronological order; some imagining that the fight with the Philistine was before David was attached to Saul as the minstrel. David offers to engage Goliath; but Saul doubts whether the young man was equal to such a perilous encounter; and David of course makes no allusion to his having previously stood before the king. Had it come out then that he was but the minstrel, the discovery would have been enough to prevent his being allowed the combat: he tells, therefore, how he killed the lion and the bear; and his evident enthusiasm wrings a consent from Saul that he shall go to battle. Saul accordingly arms him—not with his own personal armor, as some have not very wisely supposed: the stalwart king would have known better than to encumber the stripling with his own coat of mail—but with weapons—plenty were no doubt in the royal tent—more suited to his size. With these, however, unaccustomed as he was to such harness (an additional proof that he had never yet been Saul's armor-bearer), David refuses to go. Then Abner was willing to appear as a patron, and took the conqueror to Saul. Saul loves him, and makes him his armor-bearer, and sends a second message to Jesse, 1 Samuel 16:22, which, if not explained in this way, would seem unnecessary. After he had married Saul's younger daughter Michal, instead of the elder Merab, who had been promised him, Saul, further enraged by David's increasing credit with the nation, and understanding, it is likely, by this time, that the young Bethlehemite was the chosen of the Lord, to whom the kingdom was to be transferred, sent to arrest him in his house. Convinced by an interview with Jonathan that Saul's enmity was no mere transient passion, 1 Samuel 20:1-42, David went to Nob, where his duplicity cost the high priest his life, and thence to Achish, king of Gath, where, to escape the jealousy of the Philistines, he simulated madness. To this period, belong the circumstances narrated in the concluding chapters of the first book of Samuel—the adventure with Nabal, and David's marriage with Abigail; his twice sparing Saul's life; perhaps the battle for the water of the well of Bethlehem, 1 Chronicles 11:15-19; and also the residence with Achish, who gave him Ziklag. He returned, therefore, to Ziklag, to find it plundered and burnt However, he recovered what was lost, and obtained greater spoil, which he politicly sent to his friends in Judah, and, on the news of Saul's defeat and death just after, he repaired, by God's direction, to Hebron, and was anointed king. He reigned as yet over only a part of the nation: for Abner established Ish-bosheth, Saul's son, on the west of the Jordan, and over Israel generally. But gradually the tribes were flocking to David, 1 Chronicles 12:23-40; and Saul's house was weakening as he was strengthened; till at length Abner himself came with a proposal to transfer to him the whole kingdom
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - "...
Saul's violation of his covenantal responsibilities as king quickly led to his rejection by the word of the Lord through Samuel (chaps. ...
Samuel is then sent to anoint David as king, in place of Saul (chap. Subsequent narratives describe the progressive deterioration of Saul's reign, while at the same time depicting David's gradual rise to the throne (1Sam. Note, for example, when Saul's forces were closing in on David in their effort to capture him and "a messenger came to Saul saying, Come quickly! The Philistines are raiding the land. ' Then Saul broke off his pursuit of David" (1 Samuel 23:26-28 ). God was sovereignly ordering events to protect David from the designs of Saul. When Saul disobeyed the Lord's command to completely destroy the Amalekites and their cattle, and then attempted to justify himself by shifting the blame to his soldiers and arguing that his troops had kept some of the better cattle for sacrifices, the Lord said, "Because you have rejected the word of the Lord, he has rejected you as king" (1 Samuel 15:23 ). , Eli, who is held responsible for the evils practiced at the tabernacle during the time of his priesthood [1] Saul, who is held responsible for his rejection of the Word of the Lord [2] David, who is held responsible for his actions in the incident with Bathsheba [3]). After Samuel had anointed Saul privately (1 Samuel 9:1-10:16 ), he called all Israel to an assembly at Mizpah (1 Samuel 10:17-27 ), where he supervised the public selection of Saul by lot and then clearly defined the role and responsibilities of the king in Israel. After Saul led Israel to victory over the Ammonites (1 Samuel 11:1-13 ) Samuel called for an assembly at Gilgal, where he presided in the inauguration of Saul's reign at a public ceremony of covenant renewal (1 Samuel 11:14-12:25 ). ...
Third, the kingship of Saul failed to correspond to the covenant ideal (1 Samuel 13-31 ). Saul quickly demonstrated that he was not prepared to submit to the requirements of a covenantal kingship. When the Philistines gathered to attack Israel, Saul did not wait for Samuel as he had been instructed, but offered a sacrifice himself. Later, after being instructed by Samuel to utterly destroy the Amalekites and everything that belonged to them, Saul disobeyed the word of the prophet and spared their king, Agag, as well as the best of the plunder from the battle (1 Samuel 15:9,18 ). So Saul rebelled against the Lord (v. ...
In view of this promise it is surprising that David, like Saul before him, is not presented in the narratives of 2Samuel as a king whose reign perfectly conforms to the covenantal ideal. Yet while God had rejected Saul and judged him severely, the Lord was merciful to David and promised him an eternal dynasty. Saul made excuses and tried to justify his actions (1 Samuel 13:12 ; 15:15,21 , 24 ). ...
Perhaps the key to understanding the difference between David and Saul is found in 2 Samuel 22:21-32 where David says "I have kept the ways of the Lord" and "I have not turned away from his decrees. Samuel's prophetic authority was used by the Lord in the anointing of Saul as Israel's first king (1 Samuel 9:1-10:16 ). This requirement of subordination to the word of the prophet was clearly spelled out at Saul's inauguration when Samuel told the king and the people that he would continue to teach them "the way that is good and right" (1 Samuel 12:23 ). When Saul disobeyed the word of the Lord given by Samuel, he was confronted by Samuel and rejected as king (1 Samuel 13,15 ). The Lord then sent Samuel to anoint David to replace Saul as king (1 Samuel 16 ). In addition to the narratives that focus primarily on Samuel, Saul, and David there are a group of narratives in 1-2Samuel that focus on the ark of the covenant (1 Samuel 4-6 ; 2 Samuel 6 ). ...
The ark remained in obscurity during the reign of Saul. " In the remainder of 1-2Samuel the expression "the anointed of the Lord" is applied frequently to both Saul and David (1 Samuel 2:35 ; 12:3,5 ; 16:6 ; 24:6,10 ; 26:9,11 , 16,23 ; 2 Samuel 1:14,16 , 21 ; 19:21 ; 22:51 ; 23:1 ). To say that Saul and David were the "anointed of the Lord" became equivalent to saying they occupied the office of king in Israel
Nahash - Saul, enraged at this cruel demand, summoned all Israel, slew, and dispersed the Ammonite host. So successful had he been in his marauding campaigns that he self confidently thought it impossible any Israelite army could rescue Jabesh Gilead; so he gave them the seven days' respite they craved, the result of which was their deliverance, and his defeat by Saul. ...
Nahash the younger would naturally help David in his wanderings from the face of Saul, their common foe
Samuel, Second Book of - David lamented over the death of Saul, and did not seek to grasp the kingdom immediately. ...
Abner, Saul's captain, made Ish-bosheth, Saul's son, king at Mahanaim; but he was not, as Saul had been, God's anointed. Abner, taking affront at the rebuke of Ish-bosheth concerning Rizpah, Saul's concubine, revolted to David; but as he had previously killed Asahel, Joab's brother, in one of the wars, Joab treacherously slew him, doubtless as much out of jealousy as to avenge the death of his brother. Two of Saul's captains then killed Ish-bosheth, and brought his head to David, but David only condemned them to lose their own lives for their wickedness. He then graciously showed kindness to the house of Saul in the person of Mephibosheth, son of Jonathan: though lame on both his feet, he sat continually at the king's table. For three years God sent a famine, for He had a controversy with Saul's house because Saul had slain the Gibeonites, to whom Israel had sworn protection. David sought to make reparation, and the Gibeonites asked that seven of the descendants of Saul should be given them, and they would hang them up before the Lord. Rizpah, the mother of some of them, defended the bodies day and night, until David buried them with the remains of Saul and his sons
Jezreel, Valley of - Two centuries after this the Israelites were here defeated by the Philistines, and Saul and Jonathan, with the flower of the army of Israel, fell (1 Samuel 31:1-6 )
Carmel - King Saul set up a monument after he defeated the Amalekites there (1 Samuel 15:12 )
Shunem, Shunammites - The Philistines camped at Shunem while fighting with Saul (1 Samuel 28:4 )
Socoh, Soco, Shocho - Philistines gathered to battle Saul there (1 Samuel 17:1 )
Oak - Saul and his sons were buried under an oak tree, 1 Chronicles 10:12
Hell - While Saul and hell cross'd his strong fate in vain
Abisha'i, - He was his companion in the desperate night expedition to the camp of Saul
Samuel - A great prophet, the last judge of Israel before the monarchy, which he introduced by anointing Saul
Barzillai - Of Meholah in Simeon; father of Adriel, who married Merab, the daughter of Saul, 1 Samuel 18:19 2 Samuel 21:8 ...
2
Michal - The younger of Saul's two daughters, in love with David, and whom Saul reluctantly gave to him in marriage, 2 Samuel 3:12-21 18:20-29
Havilah - From the statement in 1 Samuel 15:7 , that "Saul smote the Amalekites from Havilah unto Shurm that is over against Egypt," it would seen to have been somewhere in the north-western part of Arabia; since, from the circumstances of this campaign, we cannot well suppose that it extended over a great tract of country
na'Hash -
King of the Ammonites who dictated to the inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead that cruel alternative of the loss of their right eyes or slavery which roused the swift wrath of Saul, and caused the destruction of the Ammonite force
am'Alekites, - (Numbers 14:45 ) Saul undertook an expedition against them
Ben'Jamin, the Tribe of - After the struggles and contests which followed the death of Saul, the history of Benjamin becomes merged in that of the southern kingdom
Gib'Eonites, the, - (Joshua 9:23,27 ) Saul appears to have broken this covenant, and in a fit of enthusiasm or patriotism to have killed some and devised a general massacre of the rest. (2 Samuel 21:1,2,5 ) This was expiated many years after by giving up seven men of Saul's descendants to the Gibeonites, who hung them or crucified them "before Jehovah" --as a kind of sacrifice-- in Gibeah, Saul's own town
Gibeah - ...
Gibeah was also the home town of Saul, Israel’s first king. In spite of Benjamin’s being the smallest tribe in Israel (1 Samuel 9:21), Gibeah became the administrative centre of Saul’s kingdom (1 Samuel 10:26; 1 Samuel 11:4; 1 Samuel 14:16; 1 Samuel 15:34; 1 Samuel 22:6; 1 Samuel 23:19; 1 Samuel 26:1)
Engedi - It was in the cave of Engedi that David had it in his power to kill Saul, 1 Samuel 24. The spot where this transaction took place, was a cavern in the rock, sufficiently large to contain in its recesses the whole of David's men, six hundred in number, unperceived by Saul when he entered
Music - David's harp quieted the disturbed state of Sauls mind. When Saul sent messengers to seize David, the melody of the prophets so affected their minds that they joined the chorus. Yea, Saul himself felt the contagion, and for the moment his passion of anger subsided
Jonathan - In the early days of Saul’s kingship, the Israelite army consisted of two main divisions, one under the command of Saul, the other under the command of his eldest son, Jonathan (1 Samuel 13:2; 1 Samuel 14:49). ...
When David became a member of Saul’s court and then of his army, he and Jonathan became close friends (1 Samuel 18:1-4). David’s victories stirred up Saul’s jealousy and hatred, but Jonathan defended him and intervened on his behalf. ...
Unknown to Jonathan, Saul renewed his attacks on David (1 Samuel 19:8-11). When Jonathan heard about this, he determined to find out Saul’s real intentions towards David (1 Samuel 20:1-23)
Reconciliation - In 1 Samuel 29:4 (yithratseh zeh 'el 'adonaayw ), "wherewith should this man (David) reconcile himself to his master (Saul)?" the anger to be laid aside was not David's to Saul, but Saul's to David; "reconcile himself to Saul" therefore means to induce Saul to be reconciled to him and take him back to his favor
Samuel - Samuel warned Israel of the dangers of a monarchy—forced labor, seizure of property, taxation (1 Samuel 8:10-18 )—before anointing Saul as Israel's first king (1 Samuel 10:1 ). ...
Samuel's relations with Saul highlight the conditional nature of kingship in Israel. Saul's presumption in offering burnt sacrifice before battle with the Philistines (1 Samuel 13:8-15 ) and his disregard of God's command to leave no survivors among the Amalekites or their flocks (1 Samuel 15:1 ) occasioned Samuel's declaration of God's rejection of Saul's kingship. Obeying God's call to anoint another king amounted to treason in Saul's eyes, and Samuel had concerns for his life. Later when Saul sought David's life, David took refuge with Samuel and his band of prophets at Ramah (1 Samuel 19:18-24 ). It also left Saul without access to God's word
David - David is here represented as having been designated by Jahweh as Saul’s successor; Samuel is sent to Bethlehem to anoint him; all the seven sons of Jesse pass before the prophet, but the Spirit does not move him to anoint any of them; in perplexity he asks the father if he has any more children, whereupon the youngest is produced, and Samuel anoints him. This was clearly so in the case of Saul, who had the reputation of being a ‘mighty man of valour’ ( 1 Samuel 9:2 ); and in the parallel case of the anointing of one to be king while the throne was still occupied, viz. In this second account, the servants of Saul recommend that the king should send for someone who is a ‘cunning player on the harp,’ in order that by means of music the mental disorder from which he is suffering may be allayed. The son of Jesse is proposed, and forthwith sent for; when Saul is again attacked by the malady said to be occasioned by ‘an evil spirit from the Lord’ David plays upon the harp, and Saul ‘is refreshed’ in spirit. In this account David is represented as a grown man, for it is said that Saul made him his armour-bearer. He communicates his purpose to Saul, who at first discourages him, but on seeing his firmness and confidence arms him and bids him go forth in the name of Jahweh. But secondly, it had the effect of arousing Saul’s envy; a not wholly unnatural feeling, considering the estimation in which David was held by the people in consequence of his victory; the adage assuredly one of the most ancient authentic fragments of the history of the time ...
‘Saul hath slain his thousands,...
And David his ten thousands’...
was not flattering to one who had, in days gone by, been Israel’s foremost warrior. For the present, however, Saul conceals his real feelings (1 Samuel 18:10-11 are evidently out of place), intending to rid himself of David in such a way that no blame would seem to attach itself to him. In fulfilment of his promise to the slayer of Goliath, he expresses his intention of giving his daughter Michal to David for his wife; but as David brings no dowry, according to Hebrew custom, Saul lays upon him conditions of a scandalous character ( 1 Samuel 18:25-26 ), hoping that, in attempting to fulfil them, David may lose his life. A further attempt to be rid of David is frustrated by Jonathan ( 1 Samuel 19:1-7 ), and at last Saul himself tries to kill him by throwing a javelin at him whilst playing on his harp; again he fails, for David nimbly avoids the javelin, and escapes to his own house. Thither Saul sends men to kill him, but with the help of his wife he again escapes, and flees to Ramah to seek counsel from Samuel. On Samuel’s advice, apparently, he goes to Jonathan by stealth to see if there is any possibility of a reconciliation with the king; Jonathan does his best, but in vain ( 1 Samuel 20:1-42 ), and David realizes that his life will be in danger so long as he is anywhere within reach of Saul or his emissaries. We can do no more here than enumerate briefly the various localities in which David sought refuge from Saul’s vindictiveness, pointing out at the same time the more important episodes of his outlaw life. ...
David flies first of all to Nob , the priestly city; his stay here is, however, of short duration, for he is seen by Doeg, one of Saul’s followers. On his return he is advised by the prophet Gad (doubtless because he had found out that Saul had received information of David’s whereabouts) to leave the stronghold; he therefore takes refuge in the forest of Hereth . In the meantime Saul’s spies discover the whereabouts of the fugitive, and David, fearing that the men of Keilah will deliver him up to his enemy, escapes with his followers to the hill-country in the wilderness of Ziph . A very vigorous pursuit is now undertaken by Saul, who seems determined to catch the elusive fugitive, and the chase is carried on among the wilds of Ziph, Maon , and Engedi . ]'>[1] It is during these wanderings that Saul falls into the power of David, but is magnanimously spared. At one time there seemed to be some hope of reconciliation between Saul and David ( 1 Samuel 26:24-25 ), but evidently this was short-lived, for soon afterwards David escapes once more, and comes with six hundred followers to the court of Achish, king of Gath. In the meantime the war between Israel and the Philistines ends disastrously for the former, and Saul and Jonathan are slain. In spite of his evident desire to make peace with the followers of Saul ( 2 Samuel 9:1-13 ), it was but natural that a vigorous attempt should be made to uphold the dynasty of the late king, at all events in Israel, as distinct from Judah (see Ishbosheth). It is therefore just what we should expect when we read that ‘there was long war between the house of Saul and the house of David’ ( 2 Samuel 3:1 )
Hebrew (Descendent of Eber) - After the death of Saul (1 Samuel 29:1 ), the term “Hebrew” does not appear in the historical books, pointing possibly to a distinction between Hebrew as an ethnic term and Israel and/or Judah as a religious and political term for the people of the covenant and of God's nation
Jerimoth - Warrior of Saul's tribe Benjamin who joined David as he fled from Saul at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12:5 )
Gath - David fled from Saul to Achish, king of Gath (1 Samuel 21:10 ; 27:2-4 ; Psalm 56 ), and his connection with it will account for the words in 2 Samuel 1:20
Hanun - David had in his outlawry by Saul received kindness from Nahash; naturally, as Nahash was (1 Samuel 11) Saul's enemy and neighbour of Moab with which David's descent from the Moabitess Ruth connected him
Ahitub - Son of Phinehas and grandson of Ell, the father of Ahimelech or Ahijah, the priest who was put to death by Saul ( 1 Samuel 14:3 ; 1 Samuel 22:9 ; 1 Samuel 22:20 )
Hind - The Psalmist is using this as a type of the ability which GOD gave him of avoiding King Saul, and other dangerous enemies
Abdon - The second of these was an ancestor of King Saul
Aphek - Where the Philistines encamped when Saul and Jonathan were killed
Rend, Tear - Samuel used qâra‛ figuratively when he said to Saul: “The Lord hath rent the kingdom of Israel from thee this day …” ( Silas - Paul; and after Saul and Barnabas had parted, on account of John Mark, Acts 15:37-41 , Silas followed St
Breath, Breathe - , "to breathe in, or on," is used in Acts 9:1 , indicating that threatening and slaughter were, so to speak, the elements from which Saul drew and expelled his breath
Partridge - David likened his life as a fugitive from Saul to a hunted partridge (1 Samuel 26:20 )
Eli'el - (1 Chronicles 11:47 ) ...
One of the Gadite heroes who came across Jordan to David when he was in the wilderness of Judah hiding from Saul
King - Accordingly Saul the Benjamite was anointed by Samuel ( 1 Samuel 10:1 ), and appointed by popular acclamation ( 1 Samuel 10:24 , 1 Samuel 11:14 ). The exploits of Saul and his sons against the Ammonites ( 1 Samuel 11:11 ff. ) showed the value of the kingly office; and when Saul and his sons fell on Mt. Saul on Mt. Thus Saul sacrifices in Samuel’s absence ( 1Sa 13:9-11 ; 1 Samuel 14:33 ff. Although Saul was chosen by the people and David invited by the elders of Judah to be king, yet Saul himself regarded it as the natural thing that Jonathan should succeed him ( 1 Samuel 20:30 ff. Saul, even after his election, resided on his ancestral estate, and came forth only as necessity called him (cf. The early kings, Saul and David, do not seem to have subjected the people to heavy taxation. Saul’s primitive court would be supported by his ancestral estate and by the booty taken from the enemy, perhaps along with presents, more or less compulsory, from his friends or subjects ( 1 Samuel 10:27 ; 1 Samuel 16:20 ). It is not quite certain whether anything of the nature of a land tax or property tax existed, though something of this kind may be referred to in the reward promised by Saul to the slayer of Goliath ( 1 Samuel 17:25 ); and it may have been the tenth mentioned in 1 Samuel 8:15 ; 1 Samuel 8:17
Herdsman - Both David and Saul came from "following the herd" to occupy the throne (1 Samuel 9 ; 11:5 ; Psalm 78:70 )
Ashtoreth - There was a temple of this goddess among the Philistines in the time of Saul (1 Samuel 31:10 )
Esh-Baal - ” Son of Saul, the first king of Israel (1 Chronicles 8:33 ; 1 Chronicles 9:39 ). 1 Samuel 14:49 lists Ishui or Ishvi as Saul's son, possibly another way of respelling the name to avoid Baal. In Saul's day “baal” may have been a title applied to Yahweh indicating, “He is Lord or Master. ” Otherwise, Saul's name for his son would seem to indicate some devotion to the Canaanite god Baal at the period in his life when he named the son. Saul's son Jonathan named his son Merib-baal
Shunem - Two resting-places, a little village in the tribe of Issachar, to the north of Jezreel and south of Mount Gilboa (Joshua 19:18 ), where the Philistines encamped when they came against Saul (1 Samuel 28:4 ), and where Elisha was hospitably entertained by a rich woman of the place
Beeroth - Ishbosheth's army captains came from Beeroth (2 Samuel 4:2 ), whose citizens had fled to Gittaim when Israel, possibly under Saul, conquered Beeroth (2 Samuel 4:3 ). Compare 2 Samuel 21:1-9 for Saul's dealing with the Gibeonites
Silas, Silvanus - (ssi' luhss, ssihl vay' nuhss) Apparently, the Greek and Latin form of same name, possibly derived from Aramaic or Hebrew name Saul
Overflow - David had that experience during the years that Saul persecuted him
Gedor - A town of Benjamin, to which belonged Jeroham, father of Joelah and Zebadiah, who "of Saul's brethren of Benjamite" joined David at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12:7). Ancestor of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:31; 1 Chronicles 9:37)
Judges (2) - , from 18 or 20 years after the death of Joshua to the time of Saul
Zimri - Descendant of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:36 )
Hanan - The youngest son of Azel, a descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:38 = 1 Chronicles 9:44 )
Abishai - Abishai was the only one who accompanied David when he went to the camp of Saul and took the spear and the cruse of water from Saul's bolster (1 Samuel 26:5-12 )
Ammiel - Father of Machir, in whose house Mephibosheth, son of Jonathan and grandson of Saul, lived after the death of his father and grandfather
Michal - Younger daughter of Saul, and wife of David
Necromancer - " (Leviticus 20:6) The woman at Endor practised this art, and made Saul in his horrors of mind, a dupe to her delusion
lu'Cius - ...
Lucius of Cyrene is first mentioned in the New Testament in company with Barnabas, Simeon called Niger, Manaen and Saul, who are described as prophets and teachers of the church at Antioch
Ziph - When pursued by Saul, David hid himself "in the wilderness of Ziph
Gath - Here David sought a refuge form Saul, 1 Samuel 21:10 27:2-7
en'-Gedi - It was immediately after an assault upon the "Amorites that dwelt in Hazezon-tamar," that the five Mesopotamian kings were attacked by the rulers of the plain of Sodom. 2 Chronicles 20:2 Saul was told that David was in the "wilderness of Engedi;" and he took "three thousand men, and went to seek David and his men upon the rocks of the wild goats
Eli'ab - " (1 Chronicles 15:18,20 ; 16:5 ) ...
One of the warlike Gadite leaders who came over to David when he was in the wilderness taking refuge from Saul
Ish-Bosheth - Man of shame or humiliation, the youngest of Saul's four sons, and the only one who survived him (2 Samuel 24-4 ). Through the influence of Abner, Saul's cousin, he was acknowledged as successor to the throne of Saul, and ruled over all Israel, except the tribe of Judah (over whom David was king), for two years, having Mahanaim, on the east of Jordan, as his capital (2 Samuel 2:9 )
Israel - ...
After the death of Saul the ten tribes arrogated to themselves this name, as if they were the whole nation (2 Samuel 2:9,10,17,28 ; 3:10,17 ; 19:40-43 ), and the kings of the ten tribes were called "kings of Israel," while the kings of the two tribes were called "kings of Judah
Pillar - The "place" set up by Saul (1 Samuel 15:12 ) is explained by St, Jerome to be a trophy
Gibeon - When Saul broke the treaty and murdered some of the Gibeonites, his sons were executed in ‘blood for blood’ justice (2 Samuel 21:1-9)
Jonath Elem Rechokim, Upon - He was sojourning among the "far off" Philistine "strangers," to whose king Achish at Gath he fled from Saul (1 Samuel 21:13-14). Saul's "wresting his words" into treason is alluded to, Psalms 56:5; his vain attempt by iniquitous persecution to escape his foretold doom, Psalms 56:7
Snare - ...
1 Samuel 28:9 (a) The witch thought that these strange men were trying to catch her in a trap so they could have her killed by Saul. She did not know that Saul himself was seeking her help
Mephib'Osheth - (exterminating the idol ), the name borne by two members of the family of Saul --his son and his grandson.
Saul's son by Rizpah the daughter of Aiah, his concubine. ...
The son of Jonathan, grandson of Saul and nephew of the preceding; called also Merib-baal
Abiathar - Abiathar was the only one of all the sons of Ahimelech the high priest who escaped the slaughter inflicted upon his father's house by Saul, in revenge for his having inquired of the Lord for David and given him the shewbread to eat. He adhered to David in his wanderings while pursued by Saul; he was with him while he reigned in Hebron, and afterwards in Jerusalem
Gib'e-ah - We next meet with Glbeah of Benjamin during the Philistine wars of Saul and Jonathan. It is, however, almost without doubt identical with ...
Gibeah of Saul. This is not mentioned as Saul's city till after his anointing, (1 Samuel 10:26 ) when is said to have gone "home" to Gibeah
Rama - Not far from Gibeah of Saul (1 Samuel 22:6; Hosea 5:8; Isaiah 10:28-32). The city where Samuel anointed Saul (1 Samuel 9-10) was probably not Samuel's own city Rama, for the city of Saul's anointing was near Rachel's sepulchre adjoining Bethlehem (1 Samuel 10:2), whereas Mount Ephraim wherein was Ramathaim Zophim did not reach so far S. Near Neby Samwil, the probable site of Samuel's Rama, is the well of Sechu to which Saul came on his way to Rama, now "Samuel's fountain" near Beit Isku
Armour - Saul armed David with his 'armour,' 1 Samuel 17:38 , but the word used is also translated 'clothes,' etc. , and it may refer to Saul's warrior-dress. Saul put on David a 'HELMET of brass. Saul put on David a 'Coat of Mail,' shiryon
Amalek, Amalekites - A tribe which roamed, from the days of the Exodus till the time of king Saul, over the region from the southern boundary of Judah to the Egyptian frontier and the peninsula of Sinai. King Saul attempted to shatter their force, and captured their king, whom Samuel afterwards slew ( 1 Samuel 15:1-35 ). Although Saul is said to have taken much spoil, the Amalekites were still there for David to raid during that part of Saul’s reign when David was an outlaw ( 1 Samuel 27:8 )
Antioch - In Antioch the believers were first called Christians (Acts 11:26 ), and it was to Antioch that Barnabas fetched Saul (Paul) from Tarsus so that they could teach this mixed congregation of Jewish and Gentile followers of the Lord. The church at Antioch felt the leading of the Holy Spirit to set aside Barnabas and Saul for what was the first organized mission work (Acts 13:1-3 ). Barnabas and Saul left for Seleucia (also known as Pieria, Antioch's Mediterranean seaport) to begin their preaching
Jonathan - Son of Saul and friend of David. Desiring to follow up the victory, Saul inquired of God but received no reply, therefore lots were cast to discover why God would not answer — the lot fell on Jonathan and his father said he must die; but the army rescued him. He afterwards sheltered David from the malice of Saul, and gave proof of his love in that though he was heir to the throne, he agreed that David should be king, and he would be next to him
Hanan - Descendant of Saul in tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:38 )
Jashar, Book of - ( b ) 2 Samuel 1:19-27 ; in this case the quotation is a much longer one, consisting of David’s lamentation over Saul and Jonathan
Shekel - A zuza, or quarter of a shekel, was given by Saul to Samuel (1 Samuel 9:8 )
Agag - Saul's sparing the Agag of his time (1 Samuel 15:32) contrary to God's command, both then and from the first (Exodus 17:14; Deuteronomy 25:17-19), because of Amalek's having intercepted Israel in the desert, so as to defeat the purpose of God Himself concerning His people, entailed on Saul loss of his throne and life
Beth-Aven - Saul defeated the Philistines here after God used his son Jonathan to start the victory (1 Samuel 14:23 )
Michmash - Michmash served as a staging area, first for Saul (1 Samuel 13:2 ) and then for the Philistine army as they prepared to fight
Nahash - Saul, newly designated as Israel’s future king, was ploughing in the fields when the news was brought to him. Probably this is the Nahash who was kind to Saul’s enemy David ( 2 Samuel 10:2 , 1 Chronicles 19:1 ), and whos son Shobi ( 2 Samuel 17:27 ) brought supplies to David a Mahanaim
Achish -
The king with whom David sought refuge when he fled from Saul (1Samuel 21:10-15)
Muth-Labben - Saul slain by the Philistines by whom he had sought to slay David, and receiving the last thrust from one of the Amalekites whom he ought to have destroyed, and Nabal ("fool") dying after his selfish surfeit when churlishly he had refused aught to David's men who had guarded him and his, are instances of the death of such world-wise "fools" (1 Samuel 25:26; 1 Samuel 25:38; 2 Samuel 3:33; Psalms 14:1)
Bahurim - David demanded Ishbosheth, Saul's son, send back Michal, Saul's daughter and David's wife. When David fled from his son Absalom, a kinsman of Saul named Shimei met him at Bahurim, cursed him, and threw stones at his party
Skirt - David cut off one of these corners of Saul's robe to show he meant Saul no harm (1Samuel 24:4, 1 Samuel 24:11 )
Beth-Shean, Beth-Shan - Here the Philistines dishonoured the bodies of Saul and his sons ( 1 Samuel 31:7 ff
Ziph (1) - On both occasions the Ziphites discovered him to Saul
Jesse - After David was compelled to leave the court of Saul, he took his father and his mother into the country of Moab, and there they disappear from the records of Scripture, b
Jehiel - Father of Gibeon, ancestor of Saul
Nahash - Saul raised an army and the Ammonites were defeated
Forty - ...
Saul reigned forty years and was deposed as a failure
Partridge - David, when pursued by Saul, compares himself to a partridge hunted on the mountains
Prophets, Sons of the - The 'company of prophets' with psaltery, tabret, pipe, and harp, whom Saul met, were probably sons of the prophets
Samuel - He was an eminent inspired prophet, historian, and the seventeenth and last Judge of Israel; and died in the ninety-eighth year of his age, two years before Saul, A
Abishai - He went with him alone to the tent of Saul, 1 Samuel 26:6-12, and was a leader in the war with Ish-bosheth, 2 Samuel 2:18; 2 Samuel 2:24, in the war with the Edomites, 1 Chronicles 18:12-13, and with the Syrians and Ammonites
Amalek - Saul destroyed them as a nation, 1 Samuel 15:2-33, and David utterly routed them
Aphek - A place near Jezreel, in Issachar, where the Philistines were, before defeating Saul, 1 Samuel 29:1, and cannot be identified with No
Scarlet - It is assigned as a merit of Saul, that he clothed the daughters of Israel in scarlet, 2 Samuel 1:24
Mizpah or Mizpeh - Here Samuel sacrificed and judged, and here Saul was designated as king, 1 Samuel 7:5-16 10:17
ha'Nan - (1 Chronicles 8:23 ) ...
The last of the six sons of Azel, a descendant of Saul
Anani'as - ...
A Jewish disciple at Damascus, (Acts 9:10-17 ) of high repute, (Acts 22:12 ) who sought out Saul during the period of blindness which followed his conversion, and announced to him his future commission as a preacher of the gospel
Jesse - (On his removal to Moab in David's flight from Saul see DAVID, also see ABIGAIL on Jesse's connection with her and Joab, Abishai and Asahel, and Zeruiah
Barnabas - He introduced Saul of Tarsus to the Jerusalem church (Acts 9:26-27 ). He became the leader to the work and secured Saul as his assistant
Philistines - When Saul was king he was in fear of them, and they were enabled to enter his dominions, and in a battle Saul and his sons lost their lives
Gilgal - At this same place, the people met to confirm the kingdom to Saul, 1 Samuel 11:14-15 . It was at Gilgal, too, that Saul incurred the divine displeasure, in offering sacrifice before Samuel arrived, 1 Samuel xiii; and there also it was that he received the sentence of his rejection for disobeying the divine command, and sparing the king of Amalek with the spoils which he had reserved, 1 Samuel 15
Jonathan - THY LOVE TO ME WAS WONDERFUL, PASSING THE LOVE OF WOMEN...
JONATHAN was the eldest son of Saul, and he was thus the heir-apparent to the throne of Israel. But the piety, the humility, the generosity, the absolutely Christ-like loyalty, tenderness, self-forgetfulness, and self-sacrifice of Jonathan-all that the son had drawn from some far higher source than from his fast-falling father Saul. But for his father's great and disastrous transgressions, Jonathan would soon have been the second king of Israel; second in succession to Saul, but second to no king that ever sat on a throne in those great qualities of mind and heart and character that give stability to a throne and add lustre to a crown. Jonathan had stood beside his father Saul, and had been a spectator of the never-to-be-forgotten scene. And when Saul sent for David and talked with him, Jonathan's heart went out to David, and the soul of Jonathan was knit to the soul of David, and Jonathan loved David as his own soul. And from that day on till the day when David sang his splendid elegy over Saul and over Jonathan his son, the mutual love of Jonathan and David is described all along in words of such warmth and such beauty that there is nothing like them in literature again, if we leave out the love of Christ. Jonathan, as being the elder man, had for long been looking and longing for a soul like David's soul to which his own soul might be knit; and before the sun set that day the son of Saul had found in the son of Jesse a soul after his own soul, and he was at rest. But when I read again and again and again that Jonathan loved David as his own soul, till I come down to David's splendid hyperbolical elegy over the slaughter of Saul and Jonathan; and then, when I go back and read Jonathan's whole dealing with David in the light of that golden chain of hyperboles, I stop, and think, and say to myself that there must be much more here than stands on the surface. How happy is that son who can love and honour and open all his heart to his father and mother in the Lord! But how unhappy if not! Jonathan loved Saul his father with a noble, devoted, loyal, and truly filial love. But all the time Saul had a son at his side whose deep and pure and holy heart he could neither understand, nor value, nor satisfy. Saul had begotten a son in Jonathan who was as much greater and better than himself as heaven is greater and better than earth; I might almost say than hell. The son and heir of Saul stripped himself naked for the sake of his sworn friend. ...
'And it was told Saul. And Saul sought David every day. And David saw that Saul was come out to seek his life. And Jonathan, Saul's son, arose and went to David into the wood, and strengthened David's hand in God. Here is Jonathan's defence and shield, this: 'And Saul's son arose and went to David in the wood, and strengthened his hand in God
David - ...
The women's song in praise of David raised the jealousy of Saul, who had more sense of his own importance than care for the Lord's people. ...
The love of Jonathan and David is beautiful, but Jonathan could not protect David from the hatred of Saul, and David resorted to the priest, who gave him the hallowed bread. But the enemy was not inactive, Doeg the Edomite informed Saul of how Ahimelech the priest had helped David, which led Saul to employ even Doeg to slay the family of Ahimelech. Now the Ziphites or Ziphim engaged to aid Saul to capture David. He twice saved Saul's life, for he would not allow his followers to slay the Lord's anointed. He could wait God's time for deliverance, yet, alas, his faith failed him, and at length he said in his heart, "I shall now perish one day by the hand of Saul," 1 Samuel 27:1 , and he fled to the Philistines: strange place for David! The Philistines prepared for war with Israel, and apparently David would have joined them, but he was prevented by some of the lords of the Philistines objecting to him, and he was sent back. Both Saul and Jonathan were slain in the contest that followed. Ish-bosheth, son of Saul, was afterwards chosen king by the other tribes. David showed grace to Mephibosheth, a descendant of Saul, and brought him to his table; typical of the grace that will in the futurebe shown to the remnant that own their Messiah. "...
David is a remarkable type of Christ: when he was hunted by Saul, he foreshadowed Christ in His rejection; and when on the throne he was a type of Christ as a man of war, putting down His enemies previous to His peaceful reign in the millennium, typified in Solomon
Care - In 1 Samuel 10:2 , when Samuel anoints Saul as king, a series of signs are predicted by Samuel to prove God's favor on Saul, culminating in the indwelling of God's Spirit. The first sign is that two men will say to Saul, "The donkeys that you went to seek are found, and now your father has stopped worrying about them and is worrying about you" (NRSV)
Jonathan - The eldest son of Saul; he appears, in the first instance, as a brave and successful leader in battle. The popularity of Jonathan is well illustrated by the fact that the people prevented Saul from carrying out a vow which would have cost Jonathan his life ( 1 Samuel 14:24-46 ). The implicit trust which Saul placed in Jonathan is seen in the words of the latter in 1 Samuel 20:2 : ‘Behold my father doeth nothing either great or small, but that he discloseth it unto me
Judges - In Hebrew Shophetim, were the rulers, chiefs, or leaders of Israel, from Joshua to Saul. Fifteen judges are named in the Bible, beginning with Othniel, some twenty years after Joshua, and continuing till the coronation of Saul. ...
The time from Othniel to Saul, according to the received chronology, it is about 310 years
David - David was sent for, and the prophet immediately recognized him as the chosen of God, chosen to succeed Saul, who was now departing from the ways of God, on the throne of the kingdom. David went back again to his shepherd life, but "the Spirit of the Lord came upon David from that day forward," and "the Spirit of the Lord departed from Saul" (1 Samuel 16:13,14 ). ...
Not long after this David was sent for to soothe with his harp the troubled spirit of Saul, who suffered from a strange melancholy dejection. He played before the king so skilfully that Saul was greatly cheered, and began to entertain great affection for the young shepherd. ...
David's popularity consequent on this heroic exploit awakened Saul's jealousy (1 Samuel 18:6-16 ), which he showed in various ways. The deep-laid plots of the enraged king, who could not fail to observe that David "prospered exceedingly," all proved futile, and only endeared the young hero the more to the people, and very specially to Jonathan, Saul's son, between whom and David a life-long warm friendship was formed. To escape from the vengeance of Saul, David fled to Ramah (1 Samuel 19:12-18 ) to Samuel, who received him, and he dwelt among the sons of the prophets, who were there under Samuel's training. This place was only 3 miles from the residence of Saul, who soon discovered whither the fugitive had gone, and tried ineffectually to bring him back. ...
In his rage at the failure of all his efforts to seize David, Saul gave orders for the massacre of the entire priestly family at Nob, "persons who wore a linen ephod", to the number of eighty-five persons, who were put to death by Doeg the Edomite. ...
Hearing that Keilah, a town on the western frontier, was harassed by the Philistines, David with his men relieved it (1 Samuel 23:1-14 ); and then, for fear of Saul, he fled to the strongholds in the "hill country" of Judah. Saul continued his pursuit of David, who narrowly escaped from him at this time, and fled to the crags and ravines of Engedi, on the western shore of the Dead Sea (1 Samuel 23:29 ). Here Saul, who still pursued him with his army, narrowly escaped, through the generous forbearance of David, and was greatly affected by what David had done for him. ...
Saul again went forth (1 Samuel 26 ) in pursuit of David, who had hid himself "in the hill Hachilah, which is before Jeshimon," in the wilderness of Ziph, and was a second time spared through his forbearance. Harassed by the necessity of moving from place to place through fear of Saul, David once more sought refuge among the Philistines (1 Samuel 27 ). ...
Achish summoned David with his men to join his army against Saul; but the lords of the Philistines were suspicious of David's loyalty, and therefore he was sent back to Ziklag, which he found to his dismay may had been pillaged and burnt during his brief absence. On his return to Ziklag tidings reached him of Saul's death (2 Samuel 1 ). An Amalekite brought Saul's crown and bracelet and laid them at his feet. David and his men rent their clothes and mourned for Saul, who had been defeated in battle near Mount Gilboa. David composed a beautiful elegy, the most beautiful of all extant Hebrew odes, a "lamentation over Saul and over Jonathan his son" (2 Samuel 1:18-27 ). It bore the title of "The Bow," and was to be taught to the children, that the memory of Saul and Jonathan might be preserved among them. Abner took Ish-bosheth, Saul's only remaining son, over the Jordan to Mahanaim, and there crowned him as king
Jonathan - Saul's oldest son. About 30 when first introduced, commanding a thousand at Gibeah (1 Samuel 13:2; compare 2 Samuel 2:8; 2 Samuel 2:10, which shows that Ishbosheth his younger brother was 40 at Saul's death). Dutifully devoted to his father, whose constant companion he was (1 Samuel 18:1-40; 1 Samuel 20:25), yet true to his bosom friend David, whose modest:, youthful beauty, and heroic bravery won his whole heart at their first meeting after Goliath's fall, against whom nevertheless Saul cherished such deadly spite. ...
Knowing also God's revealed will to exalt David to Saul's forfeited throne, Jonathan bowed to it with pious submission. " He privately intimated to David his father's resolve to kill him (1 Samuel 19:2); but at the intercession of Jonathan (1 Samuel 19:4-6) Saul for the present gave up his design, saying "as the Lord liveth, he shall not be slain. In vain he remonstrated with Saul in David's behalf; his father actually hurled a javelin at himself. Saul and he had but 600 men in Gibeah, who were without sword and spear (the Philistines having taken away all their smiths); many Israelites had fled beyond Jordan. As Jonathan had provoked this aggravation of Philistine tyranny in concert with Saul, so Jonathan determined alone to deliver Israel (1 Samuel 14). Saul, by his rash curse on any who should eat that day until the foe should be overthrown, retarded his own aim through weakening his people, involved them in violating the law by flying ravenously on the spoil at evening and eating flesh with the blood, and bound himself to put to death for tasting honey, and so receiving refreshment, his own beloved son, from which he was rescued only by the people's interposition. ...
Jonathan holds the chief place in David's touching elegy, "the bow song" (the song on Jonathan famed for the bow) on his death with Saul and his two brothers in the battle of Gilboa (1 Samuel 31). Jonathan's pious and filial self devotion appears in his readiness (like Isaac) to die at his father's command because of the rash adjuration of the latter; type of the Son of God, volunteering to die for us because Adam by eating the forbidden fruit had his "eyes opened" (Genesis 3; 1 Samuel 14:27; 1 Samuel 14:43); again in his continuing to the last faithful to Saul, though his father had attempted his life, and though he knew that his father's kingdom was doomed to fall and David to succeed
David - He was "the Lord's anointed," chosen by God to be king of Israel instead of Saul, and consecrated to that office by the venerable prophet Samuel long before he actually came to the throne, 1 Samuel 16:1-13 , for which God prepared him by the gift of his Spirit, and a long course of vicissitudes and dangers. He succeeded in relieving from time to time the mind of king Saul, oppressed by a spirit of melancholy and remorse, and became a favorite attendant; but on the breaking out of war with the Philistines he seems to have been released, and to have returned to take care of his father's flock. The jealousy of Saul, however, at length drove him to seek refuge in the wilderness of Judea; where he soon gathered a band of six hundred men, whom he kept in perfect control and employed only against the enemies of the land. He was still pursued by Saul with implacable hostility; and as he would not lift his hand against his king, though he often had him in his power, he at length judged it best to retire into the land of the Philistines. Here he was generously received; but had found the difficulties of his position such as he could not honorably meet, when the death of Saul and Jonathon opened the way for him to the promised throne. His wisdom and energy consolidated the Jewish kingdom; and his warlike skill enabled him not only to resist with success the assaults of invaders, but to extend the bounds of the kingdom over the whole territory promised in prophecy-from the Red sea and Egypt to the Euphrates, Genesis 15:18 Joshua 1:3
Jezrael - Saul, conquered by the Philistines, died there (1 Kings 31)
Jezrahel - Saul, conquered by the Philistines, died there (1 Kings 31)
Jezreel - Saul, conquered by the Philistines, died there (1 Kings 31)
Judah - The crown passed from the tribe of Benjamin, of which Saul and his sons were, to that of Judah, which was David's tribe, and the tribe of the kings, his successors, until the Babylonish captivity
Jashobeam - ” Warrior of Saul's tribe of Benjamin who supported David at Ziklag as he fled from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:6 )
Ziklag - Two days after his return from this expedition, David received tidings of the disastrous battle of Gilboa and of the death of Saul (2 Samuel 1:1-16 )
Hagarenes - Fell by the hand of Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh, in the time of Saul; these occupied their tents and land in eastern Gilead (1 Chronicles 5:10; 1 Chronicles 5:18-20)
Rechabites - Saul also showed kindness to the Kenites (1 Samuel 15:6 )
Women - Rebekah, Genesis 24:64-65; Rachel, Genesis 29:11; Sarah, Genesis 12:14-19; Miriam led a band of women with triumphant song, Exodus 15:20-21; so Jephthah's daughter, Judges 11:34; the maidens of Shiloh, Judges 21:21; the women meeting Saul and David after victory; 1 Samuel 18:6-7; Hannah, 1 Samuel 2:1; Deborah, Judges 4 and Judges 5; Huldah, 2 Kings 22:14; Noadiah, Nehemiah 6:14; Anna, Luke 2:36
Rizpah - Saul's concubine, mother of Arboni and Mephibosheth. Ishbosheth suspected Abner of intercourse, with Rizpah at Mahanaim, which in Eastern ideas was tantamount to aspiring to succeed to Saul's throne (2 Samuel 3:7). Her famous act was (2 Samuel 21:8-11) her watching against bird and beast of prey the hung up corpses of her two sons and five kinsmen on the sacred hill of Gibeah, with which Saul had been so closely connected (1 Samuel 11:4), from the beginning of barley harvest, the sacred Passover season, until the fall of the early rain in October, without tent to screen her from the scorching sun all day and the saturating dews at night, and with only her black widow's sackcloth to rest upon, keeping her from the rocky ground
Baana - A captain of Ishbosheth's army after Saul died and Abner deserted to David and was killed by Joab
Aphek - The place of the Philistines' encampment before the Israelites' defeat in which Eli's sons were killed and the ark was taken (1 Samuel 4); also before the battle in which Saul was slain (1 Samuel 29); on the Philistines' high road to Jezreel
Goliath - In the time of Saul, the Philistines, having attacked the Israelites, encamped in a valley between Socho and Azeca
Caiaphas - "Like Saul, he was a prophet in spite of himself
Gilgal - Samuel judged, and Saul was made king there; 1 Samuel 7:16; 1 Samuel 10:8; 1 Samuel 11:14-15; at Gilgal the people gathered for war; there Agag was hewn in pieces
Despise - Although God had chosen Saul to be king, Saul’s response caused a change in God’s attitude: “Because thou hast rejected the word of the Lord, he hath also rejected thee from being king” ( Ahi'ah -
Son of Ahitub, grandson of Phinehas and great-grandson of Eli, succeeded his father as high priest in the reign of Saul
Ananias - A Jewish disciple at Damascus, Acts 9:10-17, of high repute, Acts 22:12, who sought out Saul during the period of blindness and dejection which, followed his conversion, and announced to him his future commission as a preacher of the gospel
Beth-Shean, or Beth-Shan - The dead body of Saul was fastened to its walls, 1 Samuel 31:10,12 ; 2 Samuel 21:12 ; 1 Kings 4:12
Jes'se - (1 Samuel 16:11 ; 17:34,35 ) After David's rupture with Saul he took his father and his mother into the country of Moab and deposited them with the king, and there they disappear from our view in the records of Scripture
Benjamin - The same determined spirit, but in a better cause, appears in their resisting Saul, their own kinsman's, appeal to them to betray David's movements (1 Samuel 22:7-18). Moreover Ehud, judge and deliverer of Israel from Eglon of Moab, was of Benjamin; also Saul and Jonathan, whose prowess was famed (2 Samuel 1:18-19; 2 Samuel 1:23). Similarly in Moses' prophecy (Deuteronomy 33:12), "Benjamin, the beloved of the Lord (attached to David = beloved after Saul's dynasty fell), shall dwell in safety by Him; the Lord shall cover him all the day long;" implying a longer continuance to Benjamin than to the other tribes. ...
This choice of Jerusalem as the seat of the ark and David's place of residence formed a strong He between Judah and Benjamin, though Saul's connection with the latter had previously made the Benjamites, as a tribe, slow to recognize David as king (1 Chronicles 12:29; 2 Samuel 2:8-9). ...
David was connected with Saul of Benjamin by marriage with his daughter, and therefore, feeling the political importance of the connection, made it a preliminary of his league with Abner that Michal should be restored to him, though Phaltiel had her heart (2 Samuel 3:13-16). " Up these western passes the Philistines advanced against Saul in the beginning of his reign, and drove him to Gilgal in the Arabah, occupying from Michmash to Ajalon. Down them they were driven again by Saul and Jonathan. high in the nation, and to lead them to acquiesce in the choice of Saul as king, though belonging to "the smallest of the tribes of Israel" (1 Samuel 9:21). After Saul's and then Ishbosheth's death, Benjamin sent 3,000 men to Hebron to confirm the kingdom to David (1 Chronicles 12:23; 1 Chronicles 12:29; 2 Samuel 5:3), Abner having declared for him. lion indicate that Saul's party among the Benjamites, even after his dynasty had ceased, cherished the old grudge against David. The genealogy of Kish and Saul, traced to a late date, brings us down to a Kish, father of Mordecai, the savior of the Jewish nation from Haman's intended destruction (Esther 2:5). ...
The royal name reappears in Saul of Tarsus, whose glory was that he belonged to "the tribe of Benjamin" (Romans 11:1; Philippians 3:5. ) His full sense of that honor appears in his reference to his forefather," Saul the son of Cis, a man of the tribe of Benjamin" (Acts 13:21
Nob - The high priest Ahimelech's residence in Saul's time, near Anathoth and Gibeah of Saul. ) The scene of Saul's murder of the priests and smiting of the townspeople, on Doeg's information that Ahimelech had given David shewbread (1 Samuel 20:1-19; 1 Samuel 21:1-9; 1 Samuel 22:9-19). "The hill of God" (1 Samuel 10:5; 1 Samuel 10:10), where the Spirit came on Saul on his way from Bethlehem after Samuel's anointing, was probably Nob, the seat then of the tabernacle, and meaning "prophecy
Lots - In the Old Testament Saul was chosen as Israel's first king through the use of lots (1 Samuel 10:20-24 ). Saul called for the casting of lots to determine who sinned during his day-long battle with the Philistines
Concise Chronological Table of Bible History - ...
1258-1095...
The Judges—to Samuel and...
Saul. ...
1095...
Saul
Benjamin - Later the tribe gave to united Israel its first king, Saul of Gibeah. Benjamin, under Sheba, a kinsman of Saul, led in the revolt against David when the quarrel provoked by David’s partisanship broke out between Judah and the northern tribes ( 2 Samuel 20:1 ff. From the first the tribe was loyal to the house of Saul and violently opposed to David (cf. Besides Saul and Jeremiah, St
Ananias - By the Lord's direction in a vision, he sought out Saul in his blindness and foodlessness for three days after Jesus' appearing to him; putting hands on Saul, Ananias was the Lord's instrument of restoring his sight, and conveying to him the Holy Spirit, that he might be "a chosen vessel to bear Jesus' name before the Gentiles, and kings and Israel, as a witness unto all men of what he had seen and heard, suffering as well as doing great things for His name's sake. " How striking that Ananias, whom Saul would have seized for prison and death, should be the instrument of giving him light and life
Philistines - But these conquests must have been ill maintained, since under the judges, at the time of Saul, and at the beginning of the reign of David, the Philistines had their own kings and lords. Their state was divided into five little principalities, at the head of each of which was a "lord," namely, Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Gath, and Ekron-and they oppressed Israel during the government of the high-priest Eli, that of Samuel, and during the reign of Saul, for about one hundred and twenty years. Shaamgar, Samson, Samuel, and Saul opposed them, and were victorious over them with great slaughter, at various times, but did not destroy their power, Judges 3:14 1 Samuel 4:1-22 7:1-17 14:1-52 31:1-13
Barzillai - of Rogelim, whose friendship David probably made during his flight from Saul in that trans-Jordanic region
Jezreel - The valley was important militarily as a battle site for Deborah (Judges 4-5 ), Gideon (Judges 6-7 ), Saul (2 Samuel 4:1 ), Jehu (2 Kings 9-10 ), and Josiah (2 Kings 22:1 )
Amalekite - Saul finally desolated their territory and destroyed their power (1 Samuel 14:48 ; 15:3 ), and David recovered booty from them (1 Samuel 30:18-20 )
Ahijah - ...
Son of Ahitub (1Samuel 14:3,18), Ichabod's brother; the same probably as Ahimelech, who was high priest at Nob in the reign of Saul (1Samuel 22:11)
Kiss - So Samuel after anointing Saul kissed him (1 Samuel 10:1)
Havilah - Saul defeated the Amalekites from “Havilah as you go to Shur, which is east of Egypt” (1 Samuel 15:7 NAS), a description whose meaning Bible students continue to debate
Mephibosheth - A son of Saul, who with six other members of Saul's household, was delivered by David to the Gibeonites to be hanged. This was in retaliation for Saul's earlier slaughter of a band of Gibeonites (2 Samuel 21:1-9 )
Benjamin - Saul, Israel's first king, was a Benjamite
Adjuration - So Saul adjured the people not to eat until evening (1 Samuel 14:24-28)
Ziklag - On returning to his base following Philistia's refusal to allow him to fight with them against Saul, David found the town had been raided and burned by the Amalekites and his family taken hostage
Thirst - He could not get to Jerusalem because of the armies of Saul
Ziklag - A list is given of the warriors who resorted to David at Ziklag while Saul was yet alive, and therefore while David was in rejection by the nation
Gibeon - ) And we find in their farther history, (2 Samuel 21:1-6) that the Lord took part with them when Saul would have destroyed them, and even sent a judgment upon Israel on their account
Compel - 1: ἀναγκάζω (Strong's #315 — Verb — anankazo — an-ang-kad'-zo ) denotes "to put constraint upon (from ananke, 'necessity'), to constrain," whether by threat, entreaty, force or persuasion; Christ "constrained" the disciples to get into a boat, Matthew 14:22 ; Mark 6:45 ; the servants of the man who made a great supper were to constrain people to come in, Luke 14:23 (RV, "constrain"); Saul of Tarsus "strove" to make saints blaspheme, Acts 26:11 , RV (AV, "compelled"); Titus, though a Greek, was not "compelled" to be circumcised, Galatians 2:3 , as Galatian converts were, Galatians 6:12 , RV; Peter was "compelling" Gentiles to live as Jews, Galatians 2:14 ; Paul was "constrained" to appeal to Caesar, Acts 28:19 , and was "compelled" by the church at Corinth to become foolish in speaking of himself, 2 Corinthians 12:11
Chronology of the New Testament - ...
Conversion of Saul. ...
Saul's escape from Jerusalem
Jonathan - The eldest son of Saul, and one of the loveliest characters in Old Testament history. The narrative of his brilliant exploit in Michmash, 1 Samuel 13:1-14:52 , illustrates his pious faith, his bravery, (see also 1 Samuel 13:3 ) and the favor borne him by the people, who would not suffer him to be put to death in consequence of Saul's foolish vow
Mich'Mas - (hidden ), a town which is known to us almost solely by its connection with the Philistine war of Saul and Jonathan
Gath - Saul came down from the hills by the road from Jerusalem to Gaza, which passes near Shocoh, and encountered the Philistines near the bend in the valley. Saul was on the E
Anoint - Thus, David refused to harm Saul because Saul was “the Lord’s anointed” ( Thigh - The thigh was among the portions of the sacrifice going to the priests (Leviticus 7:32-34 ; Leviticus 10:14 ; compare 1 Samuel 9:24 where Samuel honored Saul with this portion
Engedi - To the wilderness near this town David fled for fear of Saul (Joshua 15:62 ; 1 Samuel 23:29 )
Minister - Ηufretes is a greater man's "personal attendant" (literally, the rower under the steersman) or subordinate in waiting, as Mark was to Saul and Barnabas (Acts 13:5); also (Luke 1:2; Acts 26:16) interchanged with diakonos (1 Corinthians 4:1; 1 Corinthians 3:5), both applied to Paul
Mahanaim - Here Abner made Ish-bosheth, son of Saul, king ( 2 Samuel 2:8 ), and here David took refuge from his rebel son Absalom ( 2 Samuel 17:24-27 ; 2 Samuel 19:32 )
Eliab - A Gadite leader who joined David in the wilderness in his flight from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:9)
Matthew - His original name was Levi, Mark 2:14; Luke 5:27; Matthew 27:7-8 which, like that of Simon and of Saul, was changed on his being called to the apostleship
Gamaliel - Saul his pupil was a leading persecutor when Stephen opposed Pharisaism; and probably Gamaliel would not altogether disapprove of his zeal in such a cause, though his own tendency was to leave the claims of Christianity to be tested by time
Achish - "I shall now perish one day by the hand of Saul, there is nothing better for me than that I should speedily escape into the land of the Philistines," said David
Ahijah - He brought the ark of God to Saul (1 Samuel 4:18 )
Confound - ...
Saul confounded the Jews at Damascus
John - In the latter passage the form Jônâs may be a contraction for Jôançs , or possibly Peter’s father had two names, as in the case of Saul Paul
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
1095...
Saul,...
Reigned 40 years
a'Phek - ...
The scene of another encampment of the Philistines, before an encounter not less disastrous than that just named, --the defeat and death of Saul
Cush - Others think it is Saul
Jehu - His home was Anathoth, in the tribal territory of David's opponent Saul
Bow - The use of the bow in war had long been common among the Jews, Genesis 48:22 ; and to "teach them the bow," is by some supposed to mean, teach them by some supposed to mean, teach them the song of THE BOW, the lamentation over Saul and Jonathan, which follows; so called from the mention of the weapon in Genesis 48:22 , as the first four books in the Bible take their title in Hebrew from the first word in each
Paul, Conversion of Saint - We find him described by two names, Saul and Paul, thefirst being Hebrew, relating to his Jewish origin and the otherLatin, assumed by him, as some think, at his conversion, as an actof humility, styling himself less than the least of all saints
Amalekites - Saul was commanded to destroy them completely, but although he won a notable victory, he failed to carry out the task fully (1 Samuel 15:1-33)
Persecution - ...
This persecution came first from the Sadducees (Acts 4:1-3; Acts 5:17; Acts 5:27-28), then from the Pharisees, whose fiery leader was the young Saul of Tarsus (Acts 7:58-60; Acts 8:1-3; Acts 9:4; Galatians 1:13; Philippians 3:6). When Saul the persecutor was converted to Paul the Christian preacher, he himself was persecuted by the Jews, violently and unceasingly (Acts 9:15-16; Acts 14:19-20; Acts 16:22-24; Matthew 5:44; 2 Corinthians 11:23-25)
Samuel, Books of, - The books of Samuel commence with the history of Eli and Samuel, and contain all account of the establishment of the Hebrew monarchy and of the reigns of Saul and David, with the exception of the last days of the latter monarch which are related in the beginning of the books of Kings, of which those of Samuel form the previous portion. This results from the passage in (1 Samuel 27:6 ) wherein it is said of David, "Then Achish gave him Ziklag that day wherefore Ziklag pertaineth unto the kings of Judah to this day:" for neither Saul, David nor Solomon is in a single instance called king of Judah simply
Gibeonites - Saul in his zeal for Israel where God sanctioned it not, though wanting in zeal against Israel's foe Amalek (1 Samuel 15:18-20) where God commanded it, sought to slay them, probably (2 Samuel 21) in the dark closing period of his reign seeking to atone for his deficiency as to Amalek and to win the divine favor and popularity with his people by this mis-timed and misplaced zeal. The three years' famine, the Lord's answer when consulted as to the cause, that it was "for Saul and his bloody house because he slew the Gibeonites," and after the execution of Saul's seven (seven, the sacred number, denotes the performance of a work of God) sons "the Lord being entreated for the hind," prove that David did not contrive or eagerly fall in with this device for ridding himself of the remainder of Saul's royal line. Nay, he showed by the honorable burial he gave their remains, and by sparing Mephibosheth, that he entertained no such feeling, nor had he by this time anything to fear from Saul's family
Teeth - ...
Psalm 57:4 (a) At the time David wrote this portion, he was in danger of his life, was hiding in a cave from King Saul, and was in bitterness of spirit because of the enmity of his king. The teeth refer both to the words of Saul, and to his wicked plans and action. Saul was intent on destroying David
Paul as a Student - But Saul's father was not one of the eminent men of Tarsus. And thus it was that Saul his son was far better acquainted with the workshops of Tarsus than with its schools or its colleges. Saul of Tarsus was not born with the silver spoon in his mouth any more than was Jesus of Nazareth, his future Master. '...
Saul of Tarsus, like Timothy of Lystra, from a child knew the Holy Scriptures. But there is one possibility in Saul's student days in Jerusalem that makes our hearts beat fast in our bosoms to think of it. ...
Now the first instruction, as I think, intended to us out of Saul's student days is this-that the finest minds in every generation should study for the Christian ministry. Perhaps the very finest mind that had been born among men since the beginning of the world entered on the study of Old Testament theology when Saul of Tarsus sat down at Gamaliel's feet. And all Saul's fine and fast maturing mind will soon be needed now. With what a hunger for his books, and with what heavenward vows and oaths of work, young Saul would set out from Tarsus to Jerusalem! Our own best students come up to our divinity seats with thrilling and thanksgiving hearts, and it is only they who have such hearts who can at all enter into Saul's mind and heart and imagination as he descended Olivet and entered Jerusalem and saw his name set down at last on Gamaliel's roll of the sons of the prophets. Gamaliel would have no trouble with Saul, unless it was to supply him with books, and to answer his questions. 'In all my experience I never had a scholar like Saul of Tarsus,' Gamaliel would often afterwards say. And Saul's class-fellows would tell all their days what a help and what a protection it was to be beside Saul. " And young Saul of Tarsus would be just another David Elistone in Gamaliel's school. And you Edinburgh students of divinity must be as industrious and as successful as ever Saul was in Jerusalem, or little Elistone in St. For you have far better teachers, and a far better subject, and a far better prospect, than ever Saul had. "...
...
But, all the time-and it startles and staggers us to hear it-Saul was living in ignorance and in unbelief
Dagon - Nevertheless the Philistines, later, displayed the head of Saul as a trophy in the temple of Dagon (1 Chronicles 10:10 )
Obadiah - ...
...
A descendant of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:38 )
Samuel, Books of - It contains (1) the history of Eli (1-4); (2) the history of Samuel (5-12); (3) the history of Saul, and of David in exile (13-31)
Election of Grace - , Abraham, Jacob, Saul, David, Solomon, were all chosen by God for the positions they held; so also were the apostles
Kirjath Jearim - in Kirjath Jearim, the forest town, where it lay neglected under Saul after its restoration by the Philistines (1 Samuel 6:21; 1 Samuel 7:1; 2 Samuel 6:2-3-4)
Manaen - One of the teachers and prophets at Antioch when Saul and Barnabas were "separated" to missionary work, A
Worship - Thus, David “bowed” himself before Saul ( Hill, Hill-Country - ‘Gibeah of Saul,’ ‘of Phinehas,’ ‘of the foreskins,’ ‘of Moreh,’ ‘of Hachilah,’ ‘of Ammah,’ ‘of Gareb,’ and ‘of Elohim
Envy - Examples abound in the Bible, such as are suggested by the relations between Cain and Abel, Jacob and Esau, Rachel and Leah, Joseph and his brothers, Saul and David, Haman and Mordecai, the elder brother and the prodigal son, the Roman evangelists of Philippians 1:15 and the Apostle Paul, and many others
Ishbosheth - The fourth son of Saul; on the death of his father and three brothers on Mt
Jonathan - A son of Saul, 1 Chronicles 8:33 distinguished for his lovely character. His brilliant exploit in Michmash, 1 Samuel 13:1-23; 1 Samuel 14:1-52, illustrates his pious faith, his bravery, see also 1 Samuel 13:3, when he was about 30 years old, and his favor with the people, who would not suffer him to be put to death for violating Saul's foolish vow
Abishai - Thus, when David proposed to Ahimelech the Hittite and Abishai the perilous visit to Saul's camp, Abishai instantly volunteered, reckless of personal danger. We find the consistency of character maintained throughout the history; the same spirit prompting the request at Hachilah," Let me smite Saul" (1 Samuel 26:8), as subsequently at Bahurim, when Shimei cursed David, prompted his exclamation "Why should this dead dog curse my Lord the king? let me take off his head" (2 Samuel 21:15-1719)
Jesse - On this occasion he sends David to the Israelite camp with provisions for his brothers; this was destined to be a long separation between Jesse and his son, for after David’s victory over the Philistine giant he entered definitely into Saul’s service. , in which Samuel is sent to Bethlehem to anoint David; and 1 Samuel 16:18 , in which Jesse’s son is sent for to play the harp before Saul
Ambush - Saul apparently used similar tactics against the Amalekites (1 Samuel 15:5 )
Ahimaaz - Father of Ahinoam, wife of Saul
Spirit - In 1 Samuel 16:14 ; 1 Samuel 18:10 ; 1 Samuel 19:9 , it is said that an evil spirit from the Lord troubled Saul: and we have also the expression unclean spirits
Hart - In 2 Samuel 1:19 , Saul is denominated "the roe of Israel;" and in the eighteenth verse of the ensuing chapter, we are told that "Asahel was as light of foot as a wild roe:" a phraseology perfectly synonymous with the epithet swift-footed, which Homer has so frequently bestowed upon his hero Achilles
Gilgal - Here the tabernacle rested, until its removal to Shiloh; here also, according to the prevalent opinion, Samuel offered sacrifices, and held his court as a judge of Israel; and here Saul was crowned, 1 Samuel 7:16 10:8 11:15 1 Samuel 13:7-9 15:33
Abner - When Saul, the first king of Israel, established his administration, he appointed his cousin Abner as commander-in-chief of his army (1 Samuel 14:50-51). David served under Abner as a loyal officer (1 Samuel 18:5), but later Abner led Saul’s troops in trying to capture the fleeing, yet innocent, David (1 Samuel 26:5; 1 Samuel 26:14-15). ...
After Saul’s death, Abner appointed Saul’s son Ishbosheth as king in opposition to David (2 Samuel 2:8)
Quartus - ), and Saul before his baptism was called ‘brother Saul’ by a Christian, Ananias (Acts 9:17)
Beth-Shean - After the defeat of Saul and the Israelite army by the Philistines (ca. ), the bodies of Saul and his sons were hung on the walls of Beth-shean, where a temple to the Ashtaroth was located
Neomenia - It appears that even from the time of Saul they made, on this day, a sort of family entertainment, since David ought then to have been at the king's table; and Saul took his absence amiss, 1 Samuel 20:5 ; 1 Samuel 20:18
Benjamin - But the Benjamites never showed much attachment to Saul or his family. The name reappears with Saul of Tarsus, whose glory was that he belonged to "the tribe of Benjamin
Barnabas - It was he who took Saul after his conversion, when the other disciples were afraid of him, and "brought him to the apostles, and declared unto them how he had seen the Lord in the way," etc. The book of Acts does not tell us why Barnabas knew Saul better than the rest. )...
Instead of narrow Jewish jealousy at "God s grace" being extended to non-Judaized Gentiles, being "full of the Holy Spirit," be was "glad," and sought Saul as one specially commissioned to evangelize the Gentiles (Acts 26:17; Acts 22:17-21). Loving sympathy with others, freedom from narrowness and suspicion, and largeness of heart characterized him in his frank trustfulness toward the late persecutor but now converted Saul, and toward those converted from pagandom without any transitional stage of Judaism
Amalekites - " Saul's failure to carry out God's purpose of their utter destruction (1 Samuel 15) brought destruction on Saul himself (1 Samuel 28:18), and, by a striking retribution in kind, by an Amalekites (2 Samuel 1:2-10). ), "Beginning of the pagan (was) Amalek, and its end (shall be) destruction" (even to the perishing, under Saul, David, and finally Hezekiah, 1 Chronicles 4:42-43). ...
They then still retained their spite against Israel, for we read (1 Samuel 14:48), "Saul smote the Amalekites and delivered Israel out of the hands of them that spoiled them. " That the Israelites might perceive they were but the executioners of God's sentence, they were forbidden to take the spoil Saul's taking of it to gratify the people and himself, under the pretext of "sacrifice," was the very thing which betrayed the spirit of disobedience, to his ruin
Amalekites - The Israelites had scarcely passed the Red sea, when the Amelikites attacked them in the desert of Rephidim, and slew those who, through fatigue or weakness, lagged behind; and for this unprovoked assault on the people of God, the doom of extermination was passed upon them, Exodus 17:8-16 . They came again into conflict with a part of the Israelites on the border of the promised land, Numbers 14:45 ; and after 400 years, Saul attacked and destroyed them at the command of the Lord, 1 Samuel 15:1-35
Medium - The transformation of Saul from one who expelled mediums (1 Samuel 28:3 ) to one who consulted a medium at En-dor (1 Samuel 28:8-19 ) graphically illustrates his fall. Saul's success in quickly locating a medium (1 Samuel 28:8 ) points both to the popularity of the practice of consulting the dead and the difficulty of eradicating it
Shunem - A border town of Issachar ( Joshua 19:18 ), and the camping-ground of the Philistines before Saul’s last battle ( 1 Samuel 28:4 ). It is on the north of the Valley of Jezreel, and opposite to Gilboa, where Saul was encamped; the situation suits the scene of the battle well
Refuge - David wrote this Psalm while he was in a cave fleeing from Saul
Ephesdammim - The site of Saul's battle with the Philistines and Goliath was at the bend of the valley, where the Jerusalem road down which probably Saul came crosses the valley, at Ephesdammim, between Socoh (Shuweikeh) and Azekah (El-Azek)
Nob - , David passes Nob, which has become ‘the city of priests’ after the destruction of Shiloh, on his way from Saul (in Gibeah, wh
Cherethims - Saul had "footmen" (runners) as his guard (1 Samuel 22:17); so Rehoboam (2 Samuel 20:23)
Kenites - ...
The Kenites lived among the Amalekites during the time of Saul
Esdraelon - Saul here fought his last battle with the Philistines ( 1Sa 28:1-25 ; 1 Samuel 29:1-11 ; 1 Samuel 30:1-31 ; 1 Samuel 31:1-13 )
Manaen - Luke prefaces his account of the Church of Jerusalem (Acts 1-5) by giving a list of the apostles who were its chiefs and leaders (1:23), so he prefaces his account of the Church of Antioch, and the missionary activity of which it was the centre, by a list of the most noted prophets and teachers who were connected with it: they were Barnabas, and Symeon called Niger, and Lucius the Cyrenian, and Manaen, the foster-brother of Herod the tetrarch, and Saul (13:1)
Ahijah - ]'>[1] Ahiah ), a priest, son of Ahitub, who had charge of the oracular ephod and consulted it for Saul [2]
Inquire - Inquire for Saul of Tarsus
Ananias - A ‘devout man according to the law’ at Damascus, a disciple who instructed and baptized Saul of Tarsus after his conversion, restoring to him his sight by imposition of hands; he had been warned by the Lord in a vision ( Acts 9:10 ff; Acts 22:12 ff
Empty - The sword of Saul returned not empty
Partridge - So Saul sought, by surprising David in his haunts from time to time, at last to destroy him
Abiathar - He escaped from the slaughter of the priests executed by Doeg at the command of Saul, 1 Samuel 22:18,20
Judges - The judges which governed in Israel were, from the death of Joshua until the Israelites demanded a king over them, and Saul was appointed, a period of about three hundred and thirty-nine years
Scatter - Thus, when Saul defeated the Ammonites, “they which remained were scattered, so that two of them were not left together” ( Gilgal - Saul was both crowned and rejected as king at Gilgal (1 Samuel 11:14-15 ; 1 Samuel 13:14-15 ). See Beth-gilgal ; Elisha ; Joshua ; Samuel ; Saul
Ishbosheth - ) Youngest of Saul's four sons, and his successor according to eastern usage, though Mephibosheth (whose name was similarly changed from Meribbaal), son of his oldest brother Jonathan, was alive. His charge against Abner of connection with his father Saul's concubine Rizpah was, in eastern usage, tantamount to a charge of treasonously aspiring to the throne (2 Samuel 3:7; compare 1 Kings 2:13-22). Two sons of Rimmon of Beeroth, formerly a Canaanite city leagued with Gibeon (Joshua 9:17), Baana and Rechab, captains of marauding "bands" which used to make raids on Judah (2 Samuel 3:22; 2 Samuel 4:2), took this opportunity of revenging Saul's slaughter of their kinsmen the Gibeonites (2 Samuel 21) on Ishbosheth. ...
Presenting it to David, as though it would be a welcome gift because Saul the father had been David's "enemy who sought his life," and suppressing mention of their own murderous treachery, they with hypocritical profanation of God's name said: "Behold . the Lord hath avenged my lord the king this day of Saul and his seed
Har-Magedon - The primary reference, no doubt, would be to Israel’s victory ‘by the waters of Megiddo’ over the kings of Canaan (Judges 5:19), which might be taken as typical of the triumph of God and His Kingdom over the hostile world-powers; but the defeat and death of Saul and Jonathan at the eastern extremity of the plain (1 Samuel 31:1), the disastrous struggle of Josiah on the same field against Pharaohnecoh (2 Kings 23:29, 2 Chronicles 35:22), and Zechariah’s reference to ‘the mourning of Hadadrimmon in the valley of Megiddon’ (Zechariah 12:11), would heighten the suggestion of a great day of overthrow and destruction. Against this, however, must be set the statements that Barak with his 10,000 men ‘went down from mount Tabor’ to meet Sisera (Judges 4:14), that Zebulun and Naphtali ‘jeoparded their lives unto the death in the high places of the field’ (Judges 5:18), and that Saul and Jonathan fell ‘in mount Gilboa’ (1 Samuel 31:1; 1 Samuel 31:8; cf
Mephibosheth - Mephibosheth, the future king of Israel, was only five years old when Jonathan his father, and Saul his grandfather, both fell in the same battle on Mount Gilboa, and with their fall their family fell from the throne. David sits in the throne of Saul and Jonathan and Mephibosheth, and his enemies are all subdued round about David. In his remembrance of God's great mercies, and in the magnanimity of his heart, David often called Saul and Jonathan to mind. And David said, Is there yet any that is left of the house of Saul, that I may show him kindness for Jonathan's sake? And there was of the house of Saul a servant whose name was Ziba. And the king said, Is there not yet any of the house of Saul, that I may show the kindness of God to him? And Ziba said unto the king, Jonathan hath yet a son, which is lame on his feet. And David said unto him, Fear not, for I will surely show thee kindness for Jonathan, thy father's sake, and will restore thee all the lands of Saul thy father, and thou shalt eat bread at my table continually. And Mephibosheth also, the son of Saul, came down to meet the king. And the king spared Mephibosheth, the son of Jonathan, the son of Saul, because of the Lord's oath that was between them, between David and Jonathan the son of Saul
King - ), "make us a king to judge us like all the nations," evidently is molded after Deuteronomy 17:14; so Samuel's language in presenting Saul to the people (1 Samuel 10:24) as "him whom the Lord hath chosen" alludes to Moses' direction (Deuteronomy 17:15), "thou shalt in any wise set him king over thee whom the Lord thy God shall choose. Saul was elected by the divine oracle from an obscure family, so that all saw his authority was held solely at God's pleasure. Despotic murders were committed as that of the 85 priests at Nob, besides the other inhabitants, by Saul (1 Samuel 22:18-19); but mostly the kings observed forms of law. Saul, failing herein, forfeited his throne; he usurped the place of God's will: "we inquired not at the ark in the days of Saul" (1 Chronicles 13:3)
Mephibosheth - Saul's son by Rizpah (2 Samuel 21:8); "crucified" (yaqah ; not talah , which would mean "hanged up") with six others before Jehovah by the Gibeonites to avert the famine; from barley harvest until the rains of October the bodies remained exposed to the sun (compare Numbers 25:4), but watched by Rizpah's pious care, and finally were committed to Kish's sepulchre. Saul's grandson, son of Jonathan. ) When Saul and Jonathan fell at Gilboa Mephibosheth was but five years old. He had been for a considerable time living in obscurity with Machir in Lodebar beyond Jordan, near Mahanaim, his uncle Ishbosheth's seat of government, when David through Ziba heard of him, and for the sake of Jonathan, and his promise respecting Jonathan's seed (1 Samuel 20:15; 1 Samuel 20:42), restored to him all the land of Saul and admitted him to eat bread at his table at Jerusalem continually. )...
Ziba, from being a menial of Saul's house, had managed to become master himself of 20 servants; with these and his 15 sons he, by David's command, tilled the land for Mephibosheth, for though Mephibosheth was henceforth David's guest, and needed no provision, he had a son Micha (1 Samuel 9; 1 Chronicles 8:34-35) and a retinue to maintain as a prince. His deformity, added to the depression of Saul's family, produced in him an abject fear and characteristic humility which are expressed in a manner sad to read of when one remembers the bygone greatness of Saul's house. It is a retribution in kind that the representative of Saul's family now calls himself before David by the contemptuous title which once David in self abasement used before Saul, "dead dog" (2 Samuel 9:8; 1 Samuel 24:14). ...
Mephibosheth typifies man once son of the King; then having lost his right by the fall, as Mephibosheth did by Saul's and Jonathan's death at Gilboa. Bearing a name of reproach like Mephibosheth, instead of his name of innocence; banished to the outskirts of the moral wilderness, like Mephibosheth in Lodebar; liable to perish by the sword of justice, as Saul's other sons (2 Samuel 21); paralyzed by original sin, as Mephibosheth lamed from infancy in both feet; invited by the Lord and Savior, after having spoiled principalities, to sit down at the royal table (Matthew 8:11; Revelation 19:7; Revelation 19:9), as Mephibosheth was by David after conquering all his foes, on the ground of the everlasting covenant (Jeremiah 31:3); as David regarded Mephibosheth because of his covenant with Jonathan (1 Samuel 20:15; 1 Samuel 20:42)
Bar-Jesus - 275, 239-240), and finds a proof of double authorship in the use of the two names ‘Saul who is also called Paul. Amongst Jewish surroundings Paul’s Jewish name ‘Saul’ was used naturally; but ‘by a marvellous stroke of historic brevity’ (Ramsay, 83) the author sets forth by a formula how in the court of the Roman governor, when the Apostle challenged the system represented by Bar-Jesus, he stood forth as Paul the Roman citizen, a freeborn member of that Greek-Roman world to which he carried his universal gospel. From the Jewish point of view the encounter was between Saul the Jewish teacher and Bar-Jesus the Jewish prophet
Kings, Books of - 1Kings treats: the life of Samuel, last of the judges; the foundation of the monarchy; and the first king, Saul
Kenites - Others remained in the far south, for when Saul was going to smite the Amalekites he warned the Kenites, for their own safety, to depart from among them, because they had befriended Israel when they came from Egypt
Engedi - Abounding in caves on the road to Jerusalem where David found Saul
Boaz - ...
David's descent from Ruth the Moabitess accounts for the intimacy of David with the king of Moab, so that it was with him he left his father and mother in his flight from Saul (1 Samuel 22:3-5); an undesigned coincidence between the books of Samuel and Ruth, a mark of genuineness (compare Psalms 27:10)
Kenites - Saul bade them depart from the Amalekites (1 Samuel 15:6 ) when, in obedience to the divine commission, he was about to "smite Amalek
Booty - In the ease of Amalek the very cattle Saul was commanded to destroy (1 Samuel 15:2-3)
Beth-Horon - The Philistines sent one unit of their army the way of Beth-horon to attack Saul and Jonathan (1 Samuel 13:18 )
Gad - Prophet who advised David as he fled from Saul (1 Samuel 22:5 ) and who brought God's options for punishment after David took a census of Israel (2 Samuel 24:11-14 )
lo-Debar - ” After Saul and Jonathan had been defeated on Mount Gibeon (1 Samuel 31:1-13 ), Mephibosheth, Jonathan's lame son (2 Samuel 4:4 ) took refuge with Machir in the city of Lo-Debar (2 Samuel 9:4 )—a city of Gad located in the eastern part of Gilead just south of the Sea of Chinnereth (Galilee)
Azekah - Near it, the Philistines lined up their forces for battle against Saul (1 Samuel 17:1 ), resulting in the David and Goliath confrontation
Fight - ...
Saul took the kingdom over Israel, and fought against all his enemies on every side
Zimri - Jehoadah's son; sprung from Saul (1 Chronicles 8:36; 1 Chronicles 9:42)
Pharisees - Probably such men as Gamaliel, Nicodemus, and Saul were men of a different stamp, though all needed the regenerating power of grace to give them what they professed to seek
Idumaeans - The Edomites were conquered by Saul in the early part of his reign, 1 Samuel 14:47, and by David likewise, 2 Samuel 8:14; but at the instigation of Hadad they revolted against Solomon
Abiathar - All except Abiathar were massacred by Saul ( 1 Samuel 22:20 )
lo-Debar - ” After Saul and Jonathan had been defeated on Mount Gibeon (1 Samuel 31:1-13 ), Mephibosheth, Jonathan's lame son (2 Samuel 4:4 ) took refuge with Machir in the city of Lo-Debar (2 Samuel 9:4 )—a city of Gad located in the eastern part of Gilead just south of the Sea of Chinnereth (Galilee)
Herd - (Genesis 47:6 ; 1 Samuel 11:5 ; 1 Chronicles 27:29 ; 28:1 ) Saul himself resumed it in the interval of his cares as king, also Doeg was certainly high in his confidence (1 Samuel 21:7 ) Pharaoh made some of Joseph's brethren "rulers over his cattle
Esdra-e'Lon - This is the "valley of Jezreel" proper --the battle-field on which Gideon triumphed, and Saul and Jonathan were overthrown
Spirit - When Samuel, the last of the judges, anointed Saul, Israel's first king, he told Saul that the Spirit of the Lord would come upon him. The result was that Saul prophesied and was changed into a different person (1 Samuel 10:6 ). Later, the Spirit departed from Saul (1 Samuel 16:14 )
Ammonites - In desperation, the Jabeshites sent messengers to Saul at Gibeah for help. Saul organized an army, hurried to Jabesh, and lifted the siege. Consequently, the Jabeshites were strong supporters of Saul in later years (1 Samuel 11:1 ; 1 Samuel 31:11-13 ). The Ammonite king Saul defeated at Jabesh was Nahash
Paul - Here Saul was born, and here he spent his youth, doubtless enjoying the best education his native city could afford. ...
His preliminary education having been completed, Saul was sent, when about thirteen years of age probably, to the great Jewish school of sacred learning at Jerusalem as a student of the law. Persecution arose against Stephen and the followers of Christ generally, in which Saul of Tarsus took a prominent part. As he and his companions rode on, suddenly at mid-day a brilliant light shone round them, and Saul was laid prostrate in terror on the ground, a voice sounding in his ears, "Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me?" The risen Saviour was there, clothed in the vesture of his glorified humanity. Ananias, a disciple living in Damascus, was informed by a vision of the change that had happened to Saul, and was sent to him to open his eyes and admit him by baptism into the Christian church (9:11-16). ), who had been sent from Jerusalem to superintend the work at Antioch, found it too much for him, and remembering Saul, he set out to Tarsus to seek for him. ...
The church at Antioch now proposed to send out missionaries to the Gentiles, and Saul and Barnabas, with John Mark as their attendant, were chosen for this work. Here at Paphos, Sergius Paulus, the Roman proconsul, was converted, and now Saul took the lead, and was ever afterwards called Paul
Obadiah - A descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:38 ), who lived, to judge from his position in the genealogy, about b
Shimei - ...
...
A Benjamite of the house of Saul, who stoned and cursed David when he reached Bahurim in his flight from Jerusalem on the occasion of the rebellion of Absalom (2 Samuel 16:5-13 )
Army - Saul had an army of 3,000 select warriors (1 Samuel 13:2 ; 14:52 ; 24:2 )
Johanan - Member of Saul's tribe of Benjamin who joined David at Ziklag when he fled from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:4 )
Araunah - Probably he made his friendship when fleeing before Saul, when also he made that of Uriah the Hittite, Ittai the Gittite, etc
Bethshean - Hence the latter fastened Saul's body to the wall of Bethshean, and put his armor in the house of Ashtaroth (1 Samuel 31:10; 1 Samuel 31:12). ...
The men of Jabesh Gilead stole the bones of Saul and Jonathan and Saul's other two sons from the wall in "the street" or open space before the gate of Bethshean (2 Samuel 21:12
Barley - Barley harvest was a note of time; as when it is said Rizpah, the afflicted widow of Saul, watched over her seven sons' bodies "from the beginning of barley harvest until water dropped upon them out of heaven" (2 Samuel 21:9-10), i
Gilgal - To this place, as to a central sanctuary, all Israel gathered to renew their allegiance to Saul (11:14)
Backsliding - We should consider the awful instances of apostacy, as Saul, Judas, Demas, &c; the many warnings we have of it, Matthew 24:13
Mourning - Seven days for Saul, which may have been an abridged period in the time of national danger
Shimei - Relative of King Saul who cursed and opposed David as he fled from Absalom (2 Samuel 16:1 )
Idumaea - dux ), and by a non-hereditary monarchy whose records belonged to a period anterior to the time of Saul ( Genesis 36:31-39 , 1 Chronicles 1:43-54 )
Herd - Saul himself had herded cattle, and Doeg his chief herdsman was high in his favor (1 Samuel 11:5; 1 Samuel 21:7)
Murder - Glenn Saul...
...
Oak - So Saul (1 Samuel 31:13)
Presents - (2 Kings 18:31) And it is marked with peculiar emphasis's in the slights put upon Saul at his election, that they brought him no presents
Music, Musicians, Musical Instruments - When Moses sang the song of triumph at the Red Sea, Miriam answered with a tabret in her hand; and Samuel told Saul that he would meet a company of prophets with a psaltery, a tabret, a pipe, and a harp
Punishment - It appears that those who sinned at Baal-peor were first slain, and then hanged or impaled: Numbers 25:4,5 ; the word is yaqa, and for hanging is used only here and in 2 Samuel 21:6,9,13 , when the seven descendants of Saul were 'hung up to the Lord,' which may also signify being impaled
Abigail - Nabal held a feast for his sheep shearers while David was hiding from Saul in the wilderness of Paran
Beating - In Acts 5:40; Acts 22:19 when δέρω (‘to scourge, so as to flay off the skin’) is thus translated, the allusion is to the Jewish mode of castigation, inflicted with a leathern scourge, in the former instance by the authority of the supreme Sanhedrin at Jerusalem, in the latter by that of the rulers of the synagogues, or local Sanhedrins, at the instigation of Saul. In the case of Sosthenes, the assault, apparently by members of the Greek lower order, entailed no danger to the life or limb of the victim
Anoint - David would not harm King Saul because of the anointing the king had received (1 Samuel 24:6 )
Kings, First And Second Book of - They do not give the commencement of the kingdom under Saul, nor the history of David, but begin with the reign of Solomon
Left, Remain - 9:1: “Is there yet any that is left of the house of Saul …?” The remnant idea is reflected in Ephod - David consulted the “ephod” to learn whether the people of Keilah would betray him to Saul ( Nakedness - Saul continued naked among the prophets; that is, having only his under garments on
Acts of the Apostles, - Then the preparation of Saul of Tarsus for the work to be done, the progress, in his hand, of that work, his journeyings, preachings and perils, his stripes and imprisonments, his testifying in Jerusalem and being brought to testify in Rome, --these are the subjects of the latter half of the book, of which the great central figure is the apostle Paul
Partridge - " Precisely in this manner Saul hunted David, coming hastily upon him, putting him up incessantly, in hopes that at length his strength and resources would fail, and he would become an easy prey to his pursuer
Concubine - Saul had at least one concubine, named Rizpah (2 Samuel 3:7 ; 2 Samuel 21:11 )
Burial, Sepulchres - In no instance, save that of Saul and his sons, were the bodies burned; and even then the bones were interred, and re-exhumed for solemn entombment
Ahijah - In Saul's later years, probably after the slaughter of the priests at Nob the ark was neglected as a means of consulting Jehovah. Saul's irreverent haste of spirit appears in his breaking off in the midst of consulting God through Ahijah with the ark and ephod, because he was impatient to encounter the Philistines whose approach he discerned by the tumult. Saul ought to have had the conscientiousness which would have led him never to take such an oath, rather than the scrupulosity which condemned the people and Jonathan instead of himself. No answer having been given, owing to Jonathan's sin of ignorance for which Saul was to blame, Saul's wish was defeated. As Ahijah is evidently equates to Ahimelech the son of Ahitub (unless he was his brother), this will account for a coldness springing up on Saul's part toward Ahijah and his family, which culminated in the cruel slaughter of them at Nob on the ground of treasonous concert with David (1 Samuel 21)
Hero - David, who had proven himself as a warrior, attracted “heroes” to his band while he was being pursued by Saul (2 Sam. Saul came from such a family ( Esther, Theology of - Although the Amalekite king Agag was captured, Saul spared him (he was ultimately slain by Samuel); thus his descendant Haman survived to contend with the Jews. ) Likewise, the mention of Kish (the father of Saul) at the end of Mordecai's genealogy (2:5) shows that he was descended from the mortal enemy of the Agagites. Mordecai would thus fulfill the command of God to Saul
Paul - Though of purest Hebrew blood (Philippians 3:5), "circumcised the eighth day, of the stock of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, (bearing the name of the eminent man of that tribe, king Saul), an Hebrew of the Hebrew," yet his birthplace was the Gentile Tarsus. He possessed the Roman citizenship from birth (Acts 22:28), and hence, when he commenced ministering among Gentiles, he preferred to be known by his Roman name Paul rather than by his Hebrew name Saul. Gamaliel had counseled toleration (Acts 5:34-39); but his teaching of strict pharisaic legalism produced in Saul's ardent spirit persecuting zeal against opponents, "concerning zeal persecuting the church" (Acts 15:7-11). Among the synagogue disputants with Stephen were men "of Cilcia" (Acts 6:9), probably including Saul; at all events it was at his feet, while be was yet "a young man," that the witnesses, stoning the martyr, laid down their clothes (Acts 6:9; Acts 7:58; Deuteronomy 17:7). "Saul was consenting unto his death" (Acts 6; 7); but we can hardly doubt that his better feelings must have had some misgiving in witnessing Stephen's countenance beaming as an angel's, and in hearing his loving prayer for his murderers. ...
At midday a light shone upon him and his company, exceeding the brightness of the sun; he and all with him fell to the earth (Acts 26:14; in Acts 9:7 "stood speechless," namely, they soon rose, and when he at length rose they were standing speechless with wonder), "hearing" the sound of a "voice," but not understanding (compare 1 Corinthians 14:2 margin) the articulate speech which Paul heard (Acts 22:9, "they heard not the voice of Him that spoke") in Hebrew (Acts 17:24-29), cf6 "Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou Me?" (in the person of My brethren, Matthew 25:40). Saul trembling (as the jailer afterward before him, Acts 16:30-31) said, "Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?" the usual question at first awakening (Luke 3:10), but here with the additional sense of unreserved surrender of himself to the Lord's guidance (Acts 9:5). ...
The Lord might act directly, but He chooses to employ ministerial instruments; such was Ananias whom He sent to Saul, after he had been three days without sight and neither eating nor drinking, in the house of Judas (probably a Christian to whose house he had himself led, rather than to his former co-religionists). "...
Saul directly, on his conversion "preached Christ in the synagogues that He is the Son of God," to the astonishment of his hearers (Acts 9:20-21); then followed his retirement to Arabia for a considerable part of the whole "three years" between his conversion and his visit to Jerusalem. )...
Desiring a helper he fetched Saul from Tarsus to Antioch, and for a whole year they laboured together, and in leaving for Jerusalem (Paul's second visit there, not mentioned in Galatians, being for a special object and for but "few days," Acts 11:30; Acts 12:25) brought with them a token of brotherly love, a contribution for the brethren in Judaea during the famine which was foretold by Agabus and came on under Claudius Caesar (Acts 22:14; A. Here (Acts 13) while their minds were dwelling on the extraordinary accession of Gentile converts, "as they ministered to the Lord and fasted, the Holy Spirit said, "Separate Me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them," namely, to labors among the Gentiles, such as was the specimen already given at Antioch, in which these two had taken such an efficient part. "...
In going forth on his first missionary journey he was subordinate to Barnabas; but after preaching the word in Cyprus, where in the Lord's name he had smitten with blindness Elymas the sorcerer (even as he had tried to blind spiritually the governor), and when Sergius Paulus who had sent for Barnabas and Saul believed, he thenceforth under the name Paul takes the lead. Luke marks the transition point between Saul's past ministrations to Jews and his new ministry among Gentiles, which was henceforth to be his special work, by his Gentile designation, borne from infancy but now first regularly applied to him, Paul
Paul - ) Up to the time of his going forth as an avowed preacher of Christ to the Gentiles, the apostle was known by the name of Saul. There was a goat's-hair cloth called cilicium manufactured in Cilicia, and largely used for tents, Saul's trade was probably that of making tents of this hair cloth. Saul was yet "a young man," (Acts 7:58 ) when the Church experienced that sudden expansion which was connected with the ordaining of the seven appointed to serve tables, and with the special power and inspiration of Stephen. " We naturally think of Saul as having been one of these, when we find him afterward keeping the clothes of those suborned witnesses who, according to the law, (17:7) were the first to cast stones at Stephen. "Saul," says the sacred writer significantly "was consenting unto his death. " Saul's conversion . " Saul naturally turned his thoughts to Damascus. The sudden light from heaven; the voice of Jesus speaking with authority to his persecutor; Saul struck to the ground, blinded, overcome; the three-days suspense; the coming of Ananias as a messenger of the Lord and Saul's baptism, --these were the leading features at the great event, and in these we must look for the chief significance of the conversion. 37-40, and that Saul, not thinking it necessary to procure authority to teach from the apostles that were before him, went after his conversion to Arabia, and returned from thence to us. According to the former, the Jews lay in wait for Saul, intending to kill him, and watched the gates of the city that he might not escape from them. Having escaped from Damascus, Saul betook himself to Jerusalem (A. " Barnabas' introduction removed the fears of the apostles, and Saul "was with them coming in and going out at Jerusalem. As the work grew under his hands, he felt the need of help, went himself to Tarsus to seek Saul, and succeeded in bringing him to Antioch. " All this time Saul was subordinate to Barnabas. Something of direct expectation seems to be implied in what is said of the leaders of the Church at Antioch, that they were "ministering to the Lord and fasting," when the Holy Ghost spoke to them: "Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them. --As soon as Barnabas and Saul reached Cyprus they began to "announce the word of God," but at first they delivered their message in the synagogues of the Jews only. Saul's name was now changed to Paul, and he began to take precedence of Barnabas. Here again, as in Pisidian Antioch, the envy of the Jews was excited, and the mob assaulted the house of Jason with whom Paul and Silas were staying as guests, and, not finding them, dragged Jason himself and some other brethren before the magistrates
Samuel, Books of - : Samuel and Saul, 1 Samuel 1:1-28 ; 1 Samuel 2:1-36 ; 1 Samuel 3:1-21 ; 1Sa 4:1-22 ; 1 Samuel 5:1-12 ; 1 Samuel 6:1-21 ; 1 Samuel 7:1-17 ; 1Sa 8:1-22 ; 1 Samuel 9:1-27 ; 1 Samuel 10:1-27 ; 1 Samuel 11:1-15 ; 1 Samuel 12:1-25 ; 1 Samuel 13:1-23 ; 1 Samuel 14:1-52 ; 1 Samuel 15:1-35 ; II. is made up of three sections: (1) The childhood and youth of Samuel, to the downfall of Eli’s house and the captivity of the Ark ( 1 Samuel 1:1 to 1 Samuel 7:1 ); (2) Samuel’s career as Judge, including his defeat of the Philistines, his anointing of Saul, and his farewell address ( 1 Samuel 7:2-12 ); (3) Saul’s reign till his rejection ( 1 Samuel 13:1-23 ; 1 Samuel 14:1-52 ; 1 Samuel 15:1-35 ). likewise includes three sections: (1) David at Saul’s Court ( 1 Samuel 16:1 to 1 Samuel 21:1 ); (2) David as a fugitive outlaw ( 1 Samuel 21:2 - 2 Samuel 1:1-27 ); (3) David as king in Hebron ( 1 Samuel 14:1-46 to 2 Samuel 5:3 ). In illustration of this last point we may cite ( a ) the three accounts of Saul’s choice as king given in 1 Samuel 9:1-27 ; 1Sa 10:1-27 ; 1 Samuel 11:1-15 ; ( b ) the two accounts of David’s introduction to Saul in 1 Samuel 16:17 ff; 1 Samuel 17:55 ff. ; ( d ) the double rejection of Saul in 1 Samuel 13:7-15 ; 1 Samuel 15:1-35 ; ( e ) the two accounts of David’s flight to Achish in 1 Samuel 21:10 ff; 1 Samuel 27:1 ff. ; ( f ) the two narratives of David sparing Saul’s life in 2 Samuel 24:1-222 ff; 1 Samuel 26:1 ff. one of the most marked examples of a doublet; ( g ) the differing descriptions of the death of Saul given in 1 Samuel 31:1-13 and 2 Samuel 1:1-27 ; ( h ) the varying traditions of Absalom’s family found in 1 Samuel 1:1-5 ff; 2 Samuel 18:18 ; ( i ) the inconsistency of 1 Samuel 7:13 f
Judge - This is the name given to those rulers who presided over the affairs of the Israelites during the interval between the death of Joshua and the accession of Saul (Judges 2:18 ), a period of general anarchy and confusion
Geba - This is evidently the base camp for Saul and Jonathan in their fight with the Philistines (1 Samuel 13:16-14:18 ), though the Hebrew texts and modern translations confuse Geba and Gibeah here
Jasher - A book alluded to only in Joshua 10:13 as containing Joshua's, miracle of commanding the sun and the moon to stand still; Numbers 21:27-305 as containing David's elegy over Saul and Jonathan, entitled the "bow" song, celebrating Jonathan famous for the bow (compare 2 Samuel 1:22 and Psalm 60), a national song to be "taught'" to the people (not "he bade them teach the children of Judah (the use of) the bow"): Deuteronomy 31:19
Mizpah - Israel’s first king, Saul, who was from the tribe of Benjamin, was publicly declared king in Mizpah (1 Samuel 10:17-24; for map see BENJAMIN)
Cush - He is described as a Benjamite, and was probably a follower of Saul who opposed David
Mordecai - Saul was told to utterly destroy them, even to the asses
Mizpah, Mizpeh - It was the city to which Samuel gathered the people, as 'to the Lord,' and where he judged Israel, and where also he presented Saul to them as their king
Prophecy, Prophet - God's power came at times upon individuals who were not recognised as prophets, and they prophesied, as for instance Saul in 1 Samuel 10:10,11
Cave - ), an immense natural cavern, where David hid himself from Saul (1 Samuel 22:1,2 ). , the "Fountain of the Kid", where David cut off the skirt of Saul's robe (24:4)
Caesarea - From this place Saul sailed for his native Tarsus when forced to flee from Jerusalem (9:30), and here he landed when returning from his second missionary journey (18:22)
Zebulun - Of those who rallied round David on the death of Saul were 50,000 of this tribe, expert in war, who could keep rank, not of double heart
Micah - Son of Merib-baal, or Mephibosheth, the grandson of Saul
Precious - 26:21: “Then said Saul, I have sinned: return, my son David: for I will no more do thee harm, because my soul was precious in thine eyes this day
Touch - ...
Sometimes nâga‛ is used figuratively in the sense of emotional involvement: “And Saul also went home to Gibeah; and there went with him a band of men, whose hearts God had touched” ( Dancing - Thus, it will be recollected, "the women came out of all the cities of Israel, singing and dancing, to meet King Saul, with tabrets, with joy, and with instruments of music," when he returned in triumph from the slaughter of the Philistines
Magician - It was such sort of people that Saul extirpated out of the land of Israel, 1 Samuel 28:3
Chariots of War - The Philistines, in the war carried on by them against Saul, had thirty thousand chariots and six thousand horsemen, 1 Samuel 13:5
Gad - GAD, a prophet, David's friend, who followed him when persecuted by Saul. The first time we find him with this prince is when he fled into the land of Moab, 1 Samuel 22:5 , to secure his father and mother in the first year of Saul's persecution
Laying on - the verb epitithemi in Acts 6:6 , on the appointment of the seven, and in the case of Barnabas and Saul, Acts 13:3 ; also in Acts 19:6 ; (c) in Hebrews 6:2 , the doctrine of the "laying" on of hands refers to the act enjoined upon an Israelite in connection, e
Gad - David's friend, who followed him when persecuted by Saul, and was often sent with a divine message to David, 1 Samuel 22:5 2 Samuel 24:11-19 1 Chronicles 21:9-19 2 Chronicles 29:25
Saul - ...
Saul was also the Hebrew name of the apostle Paul
Murder - Nothing is said especially in the law respecting selfmurder, and only the cases of Saul, Ahithophel, and Judas are described in the Bible, 1 Samuel 31:4 2 Samuel 17:23 Acts 1:18
Gil'Gal - ( Joshua 5:10 ) Here Samuel was judge, and Saul was made king
ga'za - ( Joshua 10:41 ; 11:22 ; 13:3 ) It was assigned to the tribe of Judah, (Joshua 15:47 ) and that tribe did obtain possession of it, (Judges 1:18 ) but did not hold it long, (Judges 3:3 ; 13:1 ) and apparently it continued through the time of Samuel, Saul and David to be a Philistine city
Zebulun - Of those who rallied round David on the death of Saul were 50,000 of this tribe, expert in war, who could keep rank, not of double heart
Age - From the Exodus to Saul, 774 years. From Saul to Cyrus, 583 years
King, Kings - ...
The Israelites had no kings till Saul; having been governed, first by elders, as in Egypt; then by rulers of God's appointment, as Moses and Joshua; then by judges, as Othniel, Ehud, Gideon, Samuel; and lastly by kings, as Saul, David, Solomon
David - In Samuel the writer forges a contrast between Saul and David, "a man after his [1] own heart" (1 Samuel 13:14 ). In his first role as king, David acquires the kingdom and assures his tenure in office (the accounts about David and Saul, the rebellions of Absalom and Sheba) and founds a dynasty (the birth of Solomon, the rebellion of Adonijah, the elimination of other contenders and factions). Sexuality is a motif in the accounts of the sin with Bathsheba, the death of the child from an adulterous union, one son's rape of a daughter, the competition for the father's bedmate Abishag, Uriah's refusal to visit his wife, the seizure of David's concubines, and the childlessness of Saul's daughter Michal. Violence and political intrigue are interspersed in the accounts of David's wars, Saul's attempts on David's life, the violence of Joab and his brothers, the murder of Uriah, fratricide among David's sons, the slaughter of the helpless Absalom, and David's plans for the deaths of his enemies soon after his own death. For example, the king who will not seize the kingdom from Saul (2 Samuel 2-5 ) is nevertheless willing to seize a woman who is the object of his desire (Bathsheba); she who is seemingly passive in her seduction will later seize the kingdom for Solomon. The Chronicler does not report the rival kingdom in the hands of a descendant of Saul during David's seven years at Hebron or David's negotiations for rule over the northern tribes. David's sins do not seem that much greater than Saul's. How is it that David can be described by the narrator as "a man after his [1] own heart" (1 Samuel 13:14 )? Israel had looked at Saul's height and build— there was no one like him among all the people (1 Samuel 10:24 ); although God had chosen Saul, he knew what was in his heart. David's heart was such that he would face Goliath virtually unarmed and would triumph through his faith, while Saul cowered in his tent (1 Samuel 17 )
Ananias - A Christian disciple who dwelt in Damascus, and to whom Christ appeared in a vision telling him to go to Saul of Tarsus, who was praying and had Seen in a vision a man named Ananias coming in and laying his hands on him that he might receive his sight (Acts 9:10-17). On hearing this command, Ananias, Knowing the reputation of Saul as a persecutor, expressed reluctance, but was assured that the persecutor was a chosen messenger of Christ to bear His name to the Gentiles and kings and the children of Israel. Thus encouraged, Ananias went and laid his hands on Saul, who received his sight and was baptized
Divination - Saul's disobedience and rebellion against God's will led him, though zealous to extirpate witches so long as God's law did not interfere with his impatient self-will, at last to consult the witch of Endor; Samuel's words as to his disobedience in the case of Amalek proving prophetic, "rebellion is as the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is as iniquity and idolatry" (1 Samuel 15:23; compare 1 Samuel 28:3-20). ...
"So Saul died for his transgression (Hebrew shuffling evasion of obedience) . Saul's request, "bring me him up whom I shall name," explains the previous "divine (qacomi ) unto me by the familiar spirit. " The witch's recognizing Saul as soon as Samuel appeared proves that her art was not mere jugglery: "Why hast thou deceived me? for thou art Saul"; she was in a state of clairvoyance. She tells Saul, "I saw gods (a supernatural being) ascending out of the earth . ...
Saul apparently did not see Samuel's person, but recognized the "mantle. " Saul's inconsistency is convicted by Samuel: "wherefore then dost thou ask of me, seeing the Lord is departed from thee, and is become thine enemy?" If God was departed from him he should have been the more afraid to increase Jehovah's displeasure by breaking the laws in consulting the dead, as if they were less under God's control than the living
David - The following is an abstract of his history: He was chosen of God to be king of Israel, and at his command was anointed to this dignity by the hands of Samuel, a venerable prophet, in the room of Saul; who had been rejected for his disobedience to the divine orders, in feloniously seizing, to his own use, the prey of an enemy, which God, the supreme King of Israel, had devoted to destruction. By his skill in music, he relieved Saul under a melancholy indisposition that had seized him, was highly beloved by his royal master, and made one of his guards. But Saul's jealousy returned by a fresh victory David gained over the Philistines; who, finding the king was determined to seek his life, retired from court, and was dismissed in peace by Jonathan, after a solemn renewal of their friendship, to provide for his own safety. In this state of banishment, there resorted to him companies of men, who were uneasy in their circumstances, oppressed by their creditors, or discontented with Saul's tyrannical government, to the number of six hundred men. Upon the death of Saul, he cut off the Amalekite who came to make a merit of having slain him; and by the immediate direction of God, who had promised him the succession, went up to Hebron, where, on a free election, he was anointed king over the house of Judah; and after about a seven years' contest, he was unanimously chosen king by all the tribes of Israel, "according to the word of the Lord by Samuel. After this, when obliged, by the command of God, to give up some of Saul's family to justice, for the murder of the Gibeonites, he spared Mephibosheth, Micah, and his family, the male descendants of Saul and Jonathan, who alone could have any pretence to dispute the crown with him, and surrendered only Saul's bastard children, and those of his daughter by Adriel, who had no right or possible claim to the throne, and could never give him any uneasiness in the possession of it; and thus showed his inviolable regard for his oaths, his tenderness to Saul, and the warmth of his gratitude and friendship to Jonathan
Arms - This was a part of the military provision made by Uzziah for his vast army, 2 Chronicles 26:14 ; and long before the time of that king, the helmets of Saul and of the Philistine champion were of the same metal, 1 Samuel 17:38 . The breastplate worn by the unhappy Saul, when he perished in battle, is supposed to have been of flax, or cotton, woven very close and thick, 2 Samuel 1:9 , marginal rendering. David, a man of arms, who composed this beautiful elegy on the death of Saul, felt how disgraceful a thing it was for soldiers to quit their shields in the field. When David had, in a solemn manner, lamented the death of King Saul, he gave orders for teaching the young men the use of the bow, 1 Samuel 1:18 , that they might be as expert as the Philistines, by whose bows and arrows Saul and his army were slain
Ordination - In the investigation the following passages, which have, or may be thought to have, a bearing on the subject, will be specially considered: Acts 1:24 (appointment of Matthias) Acts 6:6 (appointment of the Seven) Acts 13:3 (mission of Barnabas and Saul) Acts 14:23 (appointment of presbyters); 1 Timothy 4:14, 2 Timothy 1:6 (Timothy’s ordination); 1 Timothy 5:22 (?), Titus 1:5 (ordinations by Timothy and Titus). Whatever was the significance of the ceremony in Acts 13:1-3 (see below, 8), the choice of Barnabas and Saul was made by the Holy Ghost-no doubt through the utterance of a Christian prophet. The disciples also used laying on of hands in healing (Mark 16:18; Acts 9:12; Acts 9:17, referring probably to the restoration of Saul’s sight: see below, 8; Acts 28:8). ...
Laying on of hands is explicitly mentioned in Acts 6:6 (the Seven) 13:3 (mission of Barnabas and Saul; see 8), 1 Timothy 4:14 and 2 Timothy 1:6 (ordination of Timothy), and in 1 Timothy 5:22, if that refers to ordination (see below). we read that fasting preceded the solemn mission of Barnabas and Saul. The mission of Barnabas and Saul from Antioch. Was it an ordination, or a ‘dismission service’? Was it the appointment of Barnabas and Saul to the apostolate? We read that certain ‘prophets and teachers’ were at Antioch-Barnabas, Symcon, Lucius, Manaen, Saul. ‘As they ministered (λειτουργούντων) to the Lord, and fasted, the Holy Ghost said, Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them. This was after the return of Barnabas and Saul from Jerusalem, whither they had gone to take the alms of the Church at Antioch (Acts 11:30, Acts 12:25). ] prayed and laid hands on Barnabas and Saul, and sent them away. It is the view of some that this was an ‘ordination’ of Barnabas and Saul to the apostleship (so, e
Crown - The same Hebrew word so rendered (ne'zer) denotes the diadem worn by Saul in battle (2 Samuel 1:10 ), and also that which was used at the coronation of Joash (2 Kings 11:12 )
Sheba - A "son of Bichri," of the family of Becher, the son of Benjamin, and thus of the stem from which Saul was descended (2 Samuel 20:1-22 )
Mourn - For Jacob it was seventy days (Genesis 50:3 ); for Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ) and Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ) thirty days; and for Saul only seven days (1 Samuel 31:13 )
Jonathan - ...
...
The eldest son of king Saul, and the bosom friend of David. The affection that evidently subsisted between him and his father was interrupted by the growth of Saul's insanity
Ammonite - They were again signally defeated by Saul (1 Samuel 11:11 )
Armageddon - Deborah and Barak defeated Sisera and his Canaanite army there (Judges 4-5 ), Gideon drove off the Midianites and Amalekites (Judges 6 ), Saul and the army of Israel were defeated because of their failure to trust in God (1 Samuel 31 ), and the Egyptian army under Pharaoh Neco killed Josiah, king of Judah (2 Kings 23:29 )
Shimei - Son of Gera, a Benjamite, of the house of Saul: he cursed David, calling him 'a man of Belial,' and threw stones and dust at him, when he was hastening from Jerusalem at the rebellion of Absalom; but made submission on David's return, and was not then punished
Abiathar - He survived the slaughter of the priests at Nob and fled to David, hiding in the cave of Adullam from King Saul (1 Samuel 22:1 )
Alien - The alien could become a soldier, as did the Amalekite who killed Saul (2 Samuel 1:13 )
Gibeon - The circumstances of the destruction of part of the Gibeonites by Saul ( 2 Samuel 21:1 ) are unknown
Arabah - The wilderness of Judah encompassing the eastern slopes of the mountains of Judah with little rain, deep canyons, and steep cliffs where David hid from Saul (1 Samuel 23:24-25 )
Field - The entirety of one’s cultivated or pasture land is called his “field”: “And the king [2] said unto him [3], Why speakest thou any more of thy matters? I have said, Thou and Ziba divide the land [4]” ( Chronicles - These genealogies occupy the first nine chapters, and in the tenth is recorded the death of Saul
Stephen - The witnesses laid down their clothes at the feet of a young man called Saul, afterward St
Mount Paran - ) Here David found a refuge, in after-ages from the persecution of Saul
Alien - The alien could become a soldier, as did the Amalekite who killed Saul (2 Samuel 1:13 )
Obadi'ah - ) ...
One of the six sons of Azel, a descendant of Saul
Phil'ip the Evangelist - The persecution of which Saul was the leader must have stopped the "daily ministrations" of the Church
Magic, Magicians - (Numbers 22:7 ) Saul consulted the witch of Endor
Judges, Book of, - ...
Reign of Saul (including perhaps Samuel)
Abiathar - ) The only son of Ahimelech, the high priest, who escaped the slaughter committed by Saul at Nob, on Doeg's information that Ahimelech had inquired of the Lord for David, and given him the shewbread and the sword of Goliath (1 Samuel 22). It is an instance of God's retributive justice that Saul's murder of the priests deprived him thenceforth of their services in inquiring of the Lord (1 Chronicles 13:3); step by step he sank, until, bereft of legitimate means of obtaining divine counsel, he resorted to the illicit course of consulting the witch of Endor, and so filled the measure of his iniquity and brought on himself destruction (1 Chronicles 10:13). ...
Perhaps Zadok was appointed high priest by Saul after the slaughter of Ahimelech. Zadok had joined David in Hebron after Saul's death, with 22 captains of his father's house (1 Chronicles 12:28)
Samuel, Books of - See 1 Samuel 1-3 ), the Ark (1 Samuel 4:1-7:1 ), the Rise of Kingship (1 Samuel 9:1-11:15 ), Battles of Saul (1 Samuel 13-15 ), the History of David's Rise to Power (1Samuel 16:141 Samuel 13:1-2360 ), and the Succession to the Throne of David (2 Samuel 9-20 ; 1 Kings 1-2 ). Saul showed God's threats could be soon realized (1 Samuel 13:13-14 ). Anger on one side does not require anger from the other as David's reactions to Saul continually show, summarized in 1 Samuel 24:17 : “Thou art more righteous than I: for thou has rewarded me good, whereas I have rewarded thee evil. ” David neither planned the demise of Saul and his family nor rewarded those who did (2 Samuel 4:9-12 )
Triumphs - But the song which the women of Israel chanted when they went out to meet Saul and his victorious army, after the death of Goliath, and the discomfiture of the Philistines, possesses somewhat of a different character, turning chiefly on the valorous exploits of Saul and the youthful champion of Israel: "And it came to pass, as they came, when David was returned from the slaughter of the Philistine, that the women came out of all the cities of Israel, singing and dancing, to meet King Saul with tabrets, with joy, and with instruments of music: and the women answered one another as they played, and said, Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands," 1 Samuel 18:6-7
Ammon, Ammonites - Later, Nahash, their king, oppressed the town of Jabesh in Gilead, and it was the victory which delivered this city from the Ammonites that made Saul Israel’s king ( 1 Samuel 11:1-15 ). Saul and Nahash thus became enemies. When David succeeded Saul in power, Hanun, the son of Nahash, provoked him to war, with the result that Rabbah, the Ammonite capital, was stormed and taken, the Ammonites were reduced to vassalage, and terrible vengeance was wreaked upon them ( 2 Samuel 10:1-19 ; 2 Samuel 11:1-27 ; 2 Samuel 12:1-31 )
Chronicles, Books of - Though he traces the history of the nation from the time of its first king, Saul, to the time of the captivity in Babylon, he mentions Saul only briefly and says little about the northern kingdom. ...
After dealing very briefly with the reign of Saul (9:35-10:14), the Chronicler deals at length with the reign of David, beginning with David’s rise to power (11:1-12:40)
Hunt - Saul hunted David (1 Samuel 24:11 )
Benjamin - ) ...
The first king of the Jews was Saul, a Benjamite
Michmash - ) The Philistines swarmed up from their seacoast plain, and occupied Michmash so that Saul had to retire to Gilgal near Jericho
Forest - David withdrew to the forest of Hareth in the mountains of Judah to avoid the fury of Saul (1 Samuel 22:5 )
Trance - Balsam "fell" (into a trance is not in the Hebrew) overpowered by the divine inspiration, as Saul (1 Samuel 19:24) "lay down naked (stripped of his outer royal robes) all that day and all that night. " God's word in Balaam's and Saul's dusts acted on an alien will and therefore overpowered the bodily energies by which that will ordinarily worked
Way (2) - Saul ‘desired of the high priest letters to Damascus to the synagogues, that if he found any that were of the Way, he might bring them bound unto Jerusalem
Naked (And Forms) - ...
1 Samuel 20:30 (b) Saul is accusing Jonathan of insulting his mother, and denying his birthright privileges by his loyalty to David
Holy Ghost, Holy Spirit - "The Holy Ghost said , Separate me Barnabas and Saul," etc
Army - Saul first established a standing, professional army in Israel (1 Samuel 13:2 ), at first leading it himself with his son but then appointing a professional commander (1 Samuel 17:55 )
Caiaphas - He is probably the high priest referred to in Acts 5:17-21; Acts 5:27; Acts 7:1; Acts 9:1 who imprisoned Peter and John, presided at the trial of Stephen, caused the persecution recorded in Acts 8, and gave Saul of Tarsus letters to Damascus to apprehend the Christians there
Stephen - It is at this juncture that Saul, who was destined to carry on the ministry of the gospel of the glory of Christ, is brought into view
Gibeah - It was the home of Israel’s first king ( 1 Samuel 10:26 ), and was known as ‘Gibeah of Saul’ ( 1 Samuel 11:4 , Isaiah 10:29 ); probably identical with ‘Gibeah of God’ ( 1 Samuel 10:5 RVm Reign - This verb can be used of the assumption of a kingly reign, or of “beginning to reign”: “Saul reigned one year; and when he had reigned two years over Israel …” ( Dreams - Saul, before the battle of Gilboa, consulted a woman who had a familiar spirit, "because the Lord would not answer him by dreams, nor by prophets," 1 Samuel 28:6-7
Moabites - ...
At times, as in the days of Ruth, there was peace between them and Israel; but a state of hostility was far more common, as in the time of Eglon, Judges 3:12-30 ; of Saul, 1 Samuel 14:47 ; of David, 2 Samuel 8:2,12 ; of Joram and Jeroboam, 2 Kings 3:13,20 14:25
Gid'Eon - (Judges 8:29-31 ) It is not improbable that, like Saul, he owed a part of his popularity to his princely appearance
e'Dom, Idumae'a - They were then attacked and defeated by Saul, (1 Samuel 14:47 ) and some forty years later by David
Laying on of Hands - The case of Ananias and Saul ( Acts 9:17 ) further proves that the laying on of hands for this purpose was not a peculiar Apostolic prerogative. The ‘prophets and teachers’ of the Church at Antioch ‘separated’ Barnabas and Saul for their missionary work by laying their hands on them with fasting and prayer ( Acts 13:3 )
Strength - When used in such contexts, the word may be translated “valiant”: “And there was sore war against the Philistines all the days of Saul: and when Saul saw any strong man, or any valiant man, he took him unto him” ( New Testament - Saul "a young man" Acts 7:58-60 ...
Great persecution, disciples scattered except the apostles Acts 8:1-4 ...
36 Conversion of Saul (three years before...
his flight from Damascus
King, Kingship - Saul, David, and Solomon were kings who ruled over a united Israelite kingdom. Later, after Saul was chosen by lot, Samuel said, "Do you see the man the Lord has chosen?" The issue here is not whether kingship in itself was right or wrong for Israel. Samuel then inaugurated the reign of Saul, Israel's first king, in the context of a renewal of the covenant with Yahweh (1 Samuel 11:14-12:25 ). ...
Unfortunately Saul fell far short of living up to the requirements of his office. David grievously sinned in the matter of Bathsheba (2 Samuel 11,12 ), but in contrast to Saul when Nathan, the prophet, confronted him, he repented and sought the Lord's forgiveness (2 Samuel 12:13 ; Psalm 51 )
Armour - Saul threw a javelin at David (1 Samuel 19:9,10 ), and so virtually absolved him from his allegiance
Sign - Gideon asks for and receives a sign that it is Jehovah who speaks with him ( Judges 6:17 ), and Saul also receives signs to confirm the words of Samuel ( 1 Samuel 10:7 )
Stephen - But the most prominent fruit of the martyrdom, doubtless, was the conversion of Saul of Tarsus, who was present ( Acts 7:58 , Isaiah 8:1 ), and of whom, as is generally acknowledged, Stephen was in his preaching the forerunner
Keilah - ) Saul too looked to God, as if His providence had "delivered" David to him by David's entering a town with "gates and bars," Saul's hope was presumption, for God would never be the minister to gratuitous and murderous malice. Its strength, as a key to the hill country of Judah, is implied in the "armies" of the Philistines, and in Saul's calling "all the people together to go down to Keilah
Damascus - ...
This city is memorable as the scene of Saul's conversion (Acts 9:1-25 ). The street called "Straight," in which Judas lived, in whose house Saul was found by Ananias, is known by the name Sultany, or "Queen's Street
Divination - The land of Canaan was divided by lot (Numbers 26:55,56 ); Achan's guilt was detected (Joshua 7:16-19 ), Saul was elected king (1 Samuel 10:20,21 ), and Matthias chosen to the apostleship, by the solem lot (Acts 1:26 )
Mizpah - Here Saul was elected king
Way - ’ Saul, if he finds at Damascus ‘any that were of the Way’ (ἐάν τινας εὕρῃ τῆς ὁδοῦ ὄντας), is to bring them to Jerusalem (Acts 9:2)
Dog - Their dismal howlings at night are alluded to in Psalms 59:6; Psalms 59:14-15; "they return at evening, they make a noise like a dog, and go round about the city"; perhaps in allusion to Saul's agents thirsting for David's blood coming to Michal's house at evening, and to the retribution on Saul in kind, when he who had made David a wanderer himself wandered about seeking vainly for help against the Philistines, and went at last by night to the witch of Endor
Carmel - Here Saul set up a memorial of his conquest of the Amalekites ( 1 Samuel 15:12 ), and here Nabal ( 1 Samuel 25:2 ) and Uzziah ( 2 Chronicles 26:10 AV Judges - The fact probably is that the Deuteronomic legislators, on theocratic grounds, called those rulers ‘judges’ who were actually kings in the same sense as Saul was; fundamentally there was no difference between the two, but nominally a difference was implied
Antioch - From Antioch their charity was sent by the hands of Barnabas and Saul to the brethren at Jerusalem suffering in the famine
Fire (Kindle) - ...
Psalm 57:4 (a) The wrath and the hatred of Saul and his army is thus described by David
Consent - ...
And Saul was consenting to Stephens death
Amalek, Amalekites - Saul, as anointed king over the Lord's people, was bidden to destroy them utterly, but failed to answer to the Lord's vindication of His people: it was Samuel who cut Agag their king to pieces
City - …”...
‛Iyr can signify not only a “village consisting of permanent houses” but also one in a permanent place, even though the dwellings are tents: “And Saul came to a city of Amalek, and laid wait in the valley” ( Sufficiency - In other places this phrase (day preceded by min) signifies “as often as”: “Then the princes of the Philistines went forth: and it came to pass, after [6] they went forth, that David behaved himself more wisely than all the servants of Saul …” ( Ear - The Lord reveals His words to the “ears” of his prophets: “Now the Lord had told Samuel in his ear a day before Saul came, saying …” ( Caves - At Engedi, in particular, there was a cave so large, that David, with six hundred men, hid themselves in the sides of it, and Saul entered the mouth of the cave without perceiving that any one was there, 1 Samuel 24
Witch And Wizard - He that fears God needs fear nothing else; while he that, like king Saul, departs from God, finds help and comfort nowhere
Servant - The subject of a king as the servents of David or of Saul
Samuel - At length, however, referring the matter to God, he acceded to their desires, and anointed Saul (q. ...
The remainder of his life he spent in retirement at Ramah, only occasionally and in special circumstances appearing again in public (1 Samuel 1315,15 ) with communications from God to king Saul. 16) to go to Bethlehem and anoint David, the son of Jesse, as king over Israel instead of Saul
Chronology of the Biblical Period - , when Saul was made king. The length of his reign is uncertain, 1 Samuel 13:1 reads, “Son of a year was Saul in his ruling, and two years he ruled over Israel. ...
SIGNIFICANT DATES IN OLD TESTAMENT BIBLE HISTORY...
Periods of History...
Critical...
Traditional...
Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob)...
1700-1500...
2000...
Exodus...
1290...
1450...
Conquest...
1250...
1400...
Judges...
1200-1025...
1360-1025...
Kings...
...
...
Kings of United Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Saul...
1025-1005...
1020-1004...
David...
1005-965...
1004-965...
Solomon...
965-925...
965-931...
Kings of the Divided Kingdom...
Judah...
Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Rehoboam...
...
924-907...
931-913...
...
Jeroboam...
924-903...
926-909...
Abijam (Abijah)...
...
907-906...
913-910...
Asa...
...
905-874...
910-869...
...
Nadab...
903-902...
909-908...
...
Baasha...
902-886...
908-886...
...
Elah...
886-885...
886-885...
...
Zimri...
885...
885...
...
(Tibni, 1 Kings 16:21 )...
885-881...
885-880...
...
Omri...
885-873...
885-874...
Jehoshaphat...
...
874-850...
873-848...
...
Ahab...
873-851...
874-853...
...
Ahaziah...
851-849...
853-852...
Jehoram (Joram)...
...
850-843...
853-841...
...
Jehoram...
849-843...
852-841...
Ahaziah...
...
843...
841...
Athaliah...
...
843-837...
841-835...
...
Jehu...
843-816...
841-814...
Joash (Jehoash)...
...
837-796...
835-796...
...
Jehoahaz...
816-800...
814-798...
Amaziah...
...
798-767...
796-767...
...
Joash (Jehoash)...
800-785...
798-782...
Uzziah (Azariah)...
...
791-740...
792-740...
...
Jeroboam II...
785-745...
793-753...
Jotham...
...
750-742...
750-732...
...
Zechariah...
745...
753-752...
...
Shallum...
745...
752...
...
Menahem...
745-736...
752-742...
Jehoahaz I (Ahaz)...
...
742-727...
735-715...
...
Pekahiah...
736-735...
742-740...
...
Pekah...
735-732...
752-732...
...
Hoshea...
732-723...
732-723...
Hezekiah...
...
727-698...
715-686...
...
Fall of Samaria ...
722 ...
723/722 ...
Manasseh...
...
697-642...
696-642...
Amon...
...
642-640...
642-640...
Josiah...
...
639-606...
640-609...
Jehoahaz II...
...
609...
609...
Jehoiakim...
...
608-598...
609-597...
Jehoiachin...
...
598-597...
597...
Zedekiah...
...
597-586...
597-586...
Fall of Jerusalem ...
...
586 ...
586 ...
BABYLONIAN EXILE AND RESTORATION UNDER PERSIAN RULE...
Jehoiachin and leaders exiled to Babylon including Ezekiel...
597...
Jerusalem destroyed, remaining leaders exiled to Babylon...
586...
Gedaliah set over Judea...
58...
Gedaliah assassinated...
581 (?)...
Jeremiah taken with other Judeans to Egypt...
581 (?)...
Judeans deported to Babylon...
581...
Cyrus, king of Persia...
559-530...
Babylon captured...
539...
Edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel...
538...
Temple restoration begun but quickly halted...
538...
Cambysses, king of Persia...
530-522...
Darius, king of Persia...
522-486...
Haggai and Zechariah lead rebuilding of Temple...
520-515...
Temple completed and rededicated...
515...
Xerxes, king of Persia...
486-465...
Artaxerxes I, king of Persia...
465-424...
Ezra returns to Jerusalem and teaches the law...
458...
Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem and rebuilds the walls...
445...
NOTE: Overlapping dates of kings such as between Uzziah and Jotham result from coregencies, that is, a father installing his son as king during the father's lifetime and allowing the son to exercise royal power
Samuel - When he came back from heaven to rebuke Saul for his sins, and to announce to that bad king his fast-approaching end, Samuel had still the very same mantle on. ' 'Tell me,' said Saul on one occasion to a stranger he met, 'where the Seer's house is. ' And, not only in Saul's heart, but in God's heart also. And then when Saul became king, Samuel was compelled to retire into obscurity, and become of no reputation. But, that struggle over, Saul had no such loyal and faithful friend as Samuel the deposed judge. As far as Samuel is concerned Saul and his kingdom shall not only have fair play; but they shall have all Samuel's influence with God and with man. And I do not know that history, either sacred or profane, holds out a better example of this large-hearted, public-spirited wisdom than Samuel the deposed judge, and now the chief counsellor of Saul. Saul, in spite of all that Samuel could do, was soon to become a complete shipwreck. But the throne was destined to stand long after Saul was cast out of it; and Samuel is determined to do his very best to secure it that Saul's successors shall have around them and over their people a class of men who, if not indeed prophets,-Samuel cannot secure that-the wind bloweth where it listeth,-yet Samuel can and will secure that there shall be an estate of learned and earnest-minded men, who shall watch over the religion and the morals of the people, in the prophetical spirit and in the prophetical name
Chronicles, Theology of - ...
The main historical principle or pattern is established in the discussion of the reigns of the first three kings: Saul, David, and Solomon (1Chron. A brief negative portrayal of Saul stands in contrast to the positive portrayals of David and Solomon. Saul died and his kingdom was turned over to David, because Saul sought advice through a medium, the witch of Endor (cf. ...
Having demonstrated the historical pattern of Yahweh's interaction with Israel through material on Saul, David, and Solomon, Chronicles portrays the subsequent kings of Judah in quick succession (2 Chronicles 10-36 )
Cush - "Cush was probably a follower of Saul, the head of his tribe, and had sought the friendship of David for the purpose of 'rewarding evil to him that was at peace with him
Ephraim, the Tribe of - Joshua the first conqueror, Gideon the greatest of the judges, and Saul the first king, belonged to one or other of the three tribes
Sam'Uel - After Saul was rejected by God, Samuel anointed David in his place and Samuel became the spiritual father of the psalmist-king
Eldad - They probably declared God's will in extempore hymns of praise; so Saul, 1 Samuel 10:11
Murder - The sovereign assumed the power of executing or pardoning murderers (2 Samuel 1:15-16, David and the Amalekite slayer of Saul; 2 Samuel 13:39; 2 Samuel 14:7-11, David in respect to Anmon and Absalom; 1 Kings 2:34, Solomon and Joab)
Work - The mission entrusted to Saul and Barnabas is described as ‘the work’ to which they received a vocation from the Holy Spirit (Acts 13:2; Acts 14:26)
Prayer - A cry to God is the mark of a soul truly turning to Him: "Behold, he prayeth," was said of Saul of Tarsus
Anointing - Kings were anointed: Saul, David, Solomon, Joash, Jehu, and Hazael are examples
Andronicus - they had become Christians before the conversion of Saul
Baptism - Among the instances of baptism mentioned in apostolic times are: 3000 at Pentecost, Acts 2:41, men and women, including Simon the Sorcerer at Samaria; the Ethiopian Eunuch, 8:12, 13, 38; Saul; Cornelius and his Gentile company, 10:47; Lydia and "her household," 16:15; the Philippian jailer "and all his," 16:33; and "the household of Stephanas," 1 Corinthians 1:16
Urim And Thummim - The latter runs thus: ‘And Saul said, O J″ Army - Saul had 3000 picked men (1 Samuel 13:2; 1 Samuel 14:52; 1 Samuel 24:2). ...
A "captain of the host," or commander in chief, led the army in time of war; as Abner under Saul, Joab under David
Holy Spirit, the - He "came upon" Saul (1 Samuel 10:10) and "upon David," and then "the Spirit of Jehovah departed from Saul" (1 Samuel 16:13-14). Acts 13:1-2, the Holy Spirit said, "Separate Me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them
Mizpah - ...
...
A town of Moab to which David removed his parents for safety during his persecution by Saul (1 Samuel 22:3 )
House - The 'parlour' where Samuel entertained Saul would be one of such rooms
Esdraelon - Saul and Jonathan died at the hands of the Philistines in the Valley of Jezreel (1Samuel 29:1,1 Samuel 29:11 ; 1 Samuel 31:1-7 )
Apostle - Saul of Tarsus was afterwards added to their number (Acts 9:3-20 ; 20:4 ; 26:15-18 ; 1 Timothy 1:12 ; 2:7 ; 2 Timothy 1:11 )
Symbol - How could one obviously under a divine curse possibly be Messiah? Only when the risen Lord appeared to Saul did he realize that what appeared to be a curse had been transformed into a source of the greatest blessing
Trance - " (Numbers 24:4 ) Saul, in like manner, when the wild chant of the prophets stirred the old depths of feeling, himself also "prophesied" and "fell down" --most, if not all, of his kingly clothing being thrown off in the ecstasy of the moment --"all that day and all that night
Mizpah, Mizpeh - See 1 Samuel 22:3-5 ) when Saul sought his life
Hebrew - It may be remarked how Saul king of Israel had lost the sense of this when he said "Let the Hebrews hear
Choose - ” Another noun, bâchı̂yr is used 13 times, always of the Lord’s “chosen ones”: “Saul, whom the Lord did choose” ( Consume - ” David tells Jonathan that if Saul is very angry, “be sure that evil is determined by him” ( Jezreel - In this valley, below and east of Zerin, is the copious "fountain of Jezreel," near which Saul perished, 1 Samuel 29:1 31:1 ...
2. Battles were fought here in the later periods of the Romans, and of the Crusaders; and in our own century, near mount Tabor, fifteen hundred French under General Kleber sustained the assault of twenty-five thousand Turks for half a day, and were succored by Napoleon
Pharisees - Saul of Tarsus was a Pharisee of the strictest sect, Acts 26:5 Galatians 1:14
Baal (1) - Thus Saul, a zealous worshipper of Jahweh, names (1 Chronicles 8:33 ) one of his sons Eshbaal , and one of David’s heroes is called ( 1 Chronicles 12:5 ) Bealiah (‘J″ Burial - ...
Only two cases of burning the bodies of the dead occur in Scripture: the mangled remains of Saul and his sons, 1 Samuel 31:12 , and the victims of some plague, Amos 6:10
Bread - ...
1 Samuel 10:3 (c) Probably in this passage the Lord is referring to King Saul, that all his needs will be met by the Father, the Son and the Spirit which are represented by the three loaves. Certainly three loaves were more than Saul could eat at one meal, and he would have enough left over for future needs
Judges, Book of - | Ibzan Judges 12:9 7...
Judges 13 :1 40 | Elon Judges 12:11 10...
From Mizpeh | Abdon Judges 12:14 8...
(1 Samuel 7:12,13 ) |...
to the anointing of Saul 9 |...
Saul (in the former part of which Samuel was judge) Acts 13:21 40...
David 1 Kings 2:11 40...
Solomon's fourth year 1 Kings 6:1 3...
492...
Deduct for parts of years being reckoned as full years 12...
480...
Shimei - AND DAVID SAID, LET HIM ALONE, LET HIM CURSE...
SHIMEI was a reptile of the royal house of Saul. The Lord hath returned upon thee all the blood of the house of Saul. Shimei knew as well as you do that David had never shed a single drop of Saul's blood. So far from that, David's men were astonished and offended at David that he had let Saul go scot-free again and again when he had him in his power. Shimei had everything to expect from Saul, and he knew that he had nothing to expect from David; and, therefore, David was a bloody man and a son of Belial. David had nothing to do with the fall of Saul on Mount Gilboa; but the fall of Uriah in the front of the battle before Rabbah was ever before David, and never more so than it was that day as he crossed the Kedron, and passed through Gethsemane, and descended upon Bahurim
War - ...
Under Saul and David the same motives prevailed to undertake war; and to these were added a farther motive, of making a conquest of such provinces as God had promised to his people. When Saul, at the beginning of his reign, was reformed of the cruel proposal that the Ammonites had made to the men of the city of Jabesh-Gilead, he cut in pieces the oxen belonging to his plough, and sent them through the country, saying, "Whosoever cometh not forth after Saul and Samuel, to the relief of Jabesh-Gilead, so shall it be done unto his oxen," 1 Samuel 11:7 . When David, Jesse's younger son, stayed behind to look after his father's flocks while his elder brothers went to the wars along with Saul, Jesse sent David to carry provisions to his brothers, 1 Samuel 17:13 . We suppose that this way of making war prevailed also under Joshua, the Judges, Saul, David at the beginning of his reign, the kings of Judah and Israel who were successors to Rehoboam and Jeroboam, and under the Maccabees, till the time of Simon Maccabaeus, prince and high priest of the Jews, who had mercenary troops, that is, soldiers who received pay, 1Ma_14:32
Death, Mortality - Deceased Samuel told Saul he and his sons would be with him the next day (1 Samuel 28:19 ). He could not have meant they would all be buried together the next day since Saul's headless body was buried in Jabesh Gilead some time after his death (1 Samuel 31:9-11 ). ...
Samuel was buried in his house at Ramah (1 Samuel 25:1 ); but in 28:13,15, he comes up from the earth to Saul at Endor protesting that he has been disturbed. The intense emotional reaction of Saul and the medium, as well as their remarks about Samuel, indicate that they believed they had actually seen his departed spirit. The only victims of suicide in the Old Testament were men (Ahithophel and Saul) who were faced with imminent, unavoidable death anyway
Shimei, Shimeites - The personage of this designation, of whom the historian has given us some details, is a Benjamite of the clan of Saul
Zechariah - Brother of Ner and uncle of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 9:37 ); called Zecher in 1 Chronicles 8:31
Lot - Thus the lot was used at the division of the land of Canaan among the serveral tribes (Numbers 26:55 ; 34:13 ), at the detection of Achan (Joshua 7:14,18 ), the election of Saul to be king (1 Samuel 10:20,21 ), the distribution of the priestly offices of the temple service (1 Chronicles 24:3,5,19 ; Luke 1:9 ), and over the two goats at the feast of Atonement (Leviticus 16:8 )
Kenites - ) Hence Saul in a friendly spirit warned them to leave the Amalekites whom he was about to destroy (1 Samuel 15:6), and David sent presents to them, having previously pretended to Achish that he had invaded their southern border (1 Samuel 27:10; 1 Samuel 30:29)
Urim And Thummim - " Urim is alone in Numbers 27:21; 1 Samuel 28:6 Saul is answered neither by dreams nor by Urim
Mourning - Jabesh Gileadites for Saul fasted seven days (1 Samuel 31:13); David for Abner with fasting, rent clothes, and sackcloth, and with an elegy (2 Samuel 3:81-89)
Kenites - When Saul, many years later, attacked the Amalekites, he bade the Kenites separate themselves from them, on the ground that they had shown kindness to Israel at the time of the Exodus ( 1 Samuel 15:6 , alluding doubtless to Hobab’s guidance, Numbers 10:29-32 )
Grove - Some trees are specially-noted: the tamarisk (eeshel ) under which Saul abode in Gibeah (1 Samuel 22:6); the terebinth in Shechem under which Joshua, after writing the law of God, set up (Joshua 24:26) a great stone as a witness; the palm tree of Deborah (Judges 4:5); the terebinth of enchantments (Judges 9:37 margin, (See MEONENIM); of wanderers (Judges 6:11, (See ZAANAIM)); 1 Samuel 14:2, "a pomegranate tree in Migron" (1 Samuel 10:3)
Bethel - Apparently the tabernacle was pitched at Shiloh near Bethel, for Israel went there to inquire of God, and Samuel told Saul that he should meet three men "going up to God to Beth-el
Burial - Joshua 7:24-25, the mangled remains of Saul and his sons, 1 Samuel 31:12, and perhaps the victims of some plague, Amos 6:10
Hebron - David, after the death of Saul, fixed the seat of his government there, 2 Samuel 2:2-5
Artaxerxes - Some Persian historians assert that the mother of Artaxerxes was a Jewess, of the tribe of Benjamin, and family of Saul; and that the most beloved of his wives was of the tribe of Judah, and race of Solomon, by Rehoboam, king of Judah
Gibeon - Nevertheless, Saul destroyed a great number of them, 2 Samuel 21:1 ; but God, in the reign of David, sent a great famine, which lasted three years, A. 1021; and the prophets told David that this calamity would continue while Saul's cruelty remained un-avenged. They answered, "Seven of Saul's sons we will put to death, to avenge the blood of our brethren
Anoint - As far as we are informed, however, unction, as a sign of investiture with the royal authority, was bestowed only upon Saul and David, and subsequently upon Solomon and Joash, who ascended the throne under such circumstances, that there was danger of their right to the succession being forcibly disputed, 1 Samuel 10:24 ; 2 Samuel 2:4 ; 2 Samuel 5:1-3 ; 1 Chronicles 11:1-2 ; 2 Kings 11:12-20 ; 2 Chronicles 23:1-21
Mordecai - was the son of Jair, of the race of Saul, and a chief of the tribe of Benjamin
Lot - Among the Jews lots were used with the expectation that God would so control them as to give a right direction to them, as in the choice of the apostle Matthias, Acts 1:26, and in the cases of Saul and Jonathan, and Jonah and his companions to determine who had offended God
Ramah - The chief difficulty is found in the account of Saul's first visit to Samuel, 1 Samuel 9:4-12 10:2 . Accordingly, if we suppose this interview took place at Arimathea, we seem obliged to suppose another Rachel's sepulchre between it and Gibeah; or if "Rachel's sepulchre" was at Bethlehem, to infer that the city where Saul actually found Samuel, and at which the prophet had only that day arrived, 1 Samuel 9:10 , was not his usual residence, but some place south or south-west of Bethlehem, only visited by him at intervals in his annual circuits as judge
Abimelech - David, in fleeing from Saul, had looked for safety in Gath, but when Achish was warned that David could be an Israelite spy, he decided to kill him
Repentance - He repented that He had made man on the earth, and that He had set up Saul as king of Israel
Damascus - The weakness of Zobah encouraged Rezon to organize a renegade band, much as David had in opposing Saul (1 Samuel 22:2 ). Thus Saul went to Damascus to determine if any Christian believers were attached to the synagogues there so that he might persecute them (Acts 9:1 ). Thus the Damascus Road became the sight of Saul's conversion experience and Damascus the sight of his introduction to the church
Moab And the Moabite Stone - Saul is reported to have fought against the Moabites (1 Samuel 14:47 ). David, a descendant of the Moabitess Ruth according to the biblical genealogies (Ruth 4:18-22 ), placed his parents under the protection of the king of Moab while he was on the run from Saul (1 Samuel 22:3-4 )
Samuel, the Books of - ...
That the composer used various existing materials appears from the distinct, but not irreconcilable, accounts of Saul's first acquaintance with David (1 Samuel 16:14-23; 1 Samuel 17:55-58), also of Saul's death (1 Samuel 31:2-6; 1 Samuel 31:8-13; 2 Samuel 1:2-12), also of the origin of the proverb "is Saul also among the prophets?" (1 Samuel 10:9-12; 1 Samuel 19:22-24). The only book quoted is the Book of Jasher ("the upright", namely, "nation"), 2 Samuel 1:18, the bow song or elegy over Saul and Jonathan; once elsewhere (Joshua 10:13). An undesigned coincidence confirming both occurs between 1 Chronicles 10:12 (which omits notice of the burning), the men of Jabesh Gilead "buried Saul's and his son's bones," and 1 Samuel 31:12, "they burnt the bodies"; the bones in fragments alone remained after the burning. Samuel contains, but Chronicles omit, David's kindness to Mephibosheth (2 Samuel 9); the story of Bathsheba (2 Samuel 11; 12); Absalom's rebellion (2 Samuel 13); the Gibeonites hanging Saul's seven sons (2 Samuel 21); the war with the Philistines (2 Samuel 21:15-17); David's song (2 Samuel 22), and last words (2 Samuel 23)
Seek - 18:10- 11), Saul went to the witch of Endor “to inquire of” her, which in this instance meant that she was to call up the spirit of the dead prophet Samuel ( Saul went to the witch of Endor as a last resort, saying, “Seek out for me a woman who is a medium, that I may go to her and inquire of her” ( Acts of the Apostles - ...
In the meantime Saul had been converted, and immediately preached that Jesus was the Son of God. Barnabas and Saul are separated to the work by the Holy Spirit, and with John Mark take a missionary journey
Urim And Thummim - Thus prepared, he presented himself before the Lord to ask counsel on public matters, not in the inner sanctuary, which he presumed not to enter, except on the great day of national atonement, but without the veil, with his face toward the ark of the covenant, inside; and behind him, at some distance, without the sanctuary, stood Joshua, the judge, or person who wanted the response, which seems to have been given with an audible voice from within the veil, Numbers 27:21 , as in the case of Joshua 6:6-15 ; of the Israelites during the civil war with Benjamin, Judges 20:27-28 ; on the appointment of Saul to be king, when he hid himself, 1 Samuel 10:22-24 ; of David, 1 Samuel 22:10 ; 1 Samuel 23:2-12 ; 1 Samuel 30:8 ; 2 Samuel 5:23-24 ; of Saul, 1 Samuel 28:6
Philistines - ...
When Saul became king the Philistines tried to break his power, but were defeated through the bravery of Jonathan (1 Samuel 13:1-23 ; 1 Samuel 14:1-52 ). Saul did not permanently check their progress, however, as by the end of his reign the whole of the rich plain of Jezreel was in their possession, including the city of Bethshean at its eastern end ( 1 Samuel 31:10 )
Philis'Tines - (1 Samuel 8:20 ) Saul threw off the yoke; and the Philistines were defeated with great slaughter at Geba. The battle on this occasion proved disastrous to the Israelites; Saul himself perished, and the Philistines penetrated across the Jordan and occupied the, forsaken cities
Hebron - ...
After the death of Saul, David settled in the city (2 Samuel 2:3 ) and made it his capital during the seven years he ruled only Judah (1 Kings 2:11 )
Ark of the Covenant - It was afterwards, in the reign of Saul, at Nob
Vengeance - Such a view characterizing the Old Testament as absolute demand for vengeance overlooks Joseph's forgiving his brothers (Genesis 45:1-4 ) and David's sparing the lives of Saul (1 Samuel 26 ) and later Saul's family (2 Samuel 9:9-13 )
Compassion - It is found, however, in a mother's attitude toward her son (1 Kings 3:26 ), a princess's reaction to an abandoned child (Exodus 2:6 ), and the Ziphites' treatment of Saul (1 Samuel 23:21 )
Joseph - ‘John whose surname was Marcus’ (Acts 12:12; Acts 12:25), and ‘Saul, who is also Paulus’ (Acts 13:9)
Elect, Elected, Election - , "eclogue"), then, "that which is chosen;" in Acts 9:15 , said of the "choice" of God of Saul of Tarsus, the phrase is, lit
Dance - But the women glorifying Saul and David, having no leader, "answered one another
Family - ” Saul argued that since he belonged to the least of the “clans,” he had no right to the kingship ( Favor - Although David was badly out of favor with Saul, even the Philistines realized how quickly David could have regained that favor through his military skill (1 Samuel 29:4 )
Judas - His house was in the Straight Street, and Saul of Tarsus lodged there after his conversion
Rain - ...
2 Samuel 23:4 (c) In this statement we see a real comparison between the reign of Saul, which was full of sorrow and bitterness, and the reign of David which was to bring such refreshing blessing from Heaven to the people
Ashkelon - It appears that Judah did take the city (Judges 1:18 ), but it belonged to the Philistines in the Samson account (Judges 14:19 ) and under Saul and David (1 Samuel 6:17 ; 2 Samuel 1:20 )
Pillars - In 1 Samuel 15:12, "Saul set him up a (not 'place' but) monument," literally, hand, probably a pillar (Genesis 28:18; Genesis 35:14)
Feet - The clothes of the ‘witnesses’ who stoned Stephen were laid at the feet of Saul, already prominent against the new sect (Acts 7:58)
Ammon, Ammonites, Children of Ammon - In the early days of Saul's reign they besieged Jabesh-gilead, and would only make peace on the condition that the right eyes of the inhabitants should be thrust out, in order that it might be a reproach on Israel; but Saul hastened to their aid, and routed the Ammonites
Shepherd - At Hebron the people said to David: “Also in time past, when Saul was king over us, thou wast he that leddest out and broughtest in Israel: and the Lord said to thee, Thou shalt feed my people Israel, and thou shalt be a captain over Israel” ( Wing - Saul tore the edge (kânâph; KJV, “skirt”) of Samuel’s robe ( Crown - The Amalekite who valued himself on killing Saul, brought this prince's crown unto David, 2 Samuel 1:10
Bottle - This word is also used to denote the bottle in which Jesse sent wine by David to Saul, 1 Samuel 16:20
Baptism, Baptist, Baptize - " ...
In Acts 22:16 it is used in the Middle Voice, in the command given to Saul of Tarsus, "arise and be baptize," the significance of the Middle Voice form being "get thyself baptized
Horse - In the reign of Saul, it would appear, that horse breeding had not yet been introduced into Arabia; for, in a war with some of the Arabian nations, the Israelites got plunder in camels, sheep, and asses, but no horses
Carmel - On this mountain Saul, returning from his expedition against Amalek, erected a trophy; and here Nabal the Carmelite, Abigail's husband, dwelt, 1 Samuel 15:12,25
Watch - Saul also sent messengers to Davids house to watch him, and to slay him
Kings, First And Second Books of, - The history therefore comprehends the whole time of the Israelitish monarchy, exclusive of the reigns of Saul and David
Wash - ...
4: ἀπολούω (Strong's #628 — Verb — apolouo — ap-ol-oo'-o ) "to wash off or away," is used in the Middle Voice, metaphorically, "to wash oneself," in Acts 22:16 , where the command to Saul of Tarsus to "wash away" his sins indicates that by his public confession, he would testify to the removal of his sins, and to the complete change from his past life; this "washing away" was not in itself the actual remission of his sins, which had taken place at his conversion; the Middle Voice implies his own particular interest in the act (as with the preceding verb "baptize," lit
Joab - It seems that Joab and his brothers were among the several hundred people who joined David during his flight from Saul. )...
In the two-year civil war that followed Saul’s death, Joab quickly established himself as David’s military leader (2 Samuel 2:28). When Saul’s former commander, Abner, defected to David, Joab saw him as a threat and murdered him. In response to David’s declaration that he wanted to take Jerusalem from its Canaanite inhabitants, Joab led a victorious assault on the city and was rewarded by being appointed commander-in-chief of the Israelite army (1 Chronicles 11:6; 1 Chronicles 18:15)
Libertines - Was there a synagogue in Jerusalem of which it is more likely that Saul of Tarsus had been a member or a leader than that which Cilician Jews frequented? The Apostle had, in the days of his unbelief, been one of the bitterest opponents of the Christian movement, and the part he had taken in St. ...
Among the older expositors, Bengel (Gnomon of NT) strongly maintains that the whole description of Acts 6:9 is that of one flourishing synagogue, composed of Europeans, Africans, and Asiatics, to which Saul belonged
Music - We have in Scripture canticles of joy, of thanksgiving, of praise, of mourning; also mournful elegies or songs, as those of David on the death of Saul and Abner, and the Lamentations of Jeremiah on the destruction of Jerusalem; so, too, songs of victory, triumph, and gratulation, as that which Moses sung after passing the Red Sea, that of Deborah and Barak, and others. David, who had great skill in music, soothed the perturbed spirit of Saul by playing on the harp, 1 Samuel 16:16,23 ; and when he was himself established on the throneseeing that the Levites were not employed, as formerly, in carrying the boards, veils, and vessels of the tabernacle, its abode being fixed at Jerusalem-appointed a great part of them to sing and to play on instruments in the temple, 1 Chronicles 25:1-31
David - ...
Early progress...
After the failure of Saul as king, God directed Samuel to the young man David, whom Samuel marked out to be Israel’s next king (1 Samuel 13:14; 1 Samuel 15:28; 1618169734_4). ...
David’s introduction to Saul’s court was as one whose music relaxed the king’s troubled nerves (1 Samuel 16:16). After his victory over the Philistines’ champion fighter, he became Saul’s armour-bearer and full-time court musician (1 Samuel 16:21; 1 Samuel 17:50; 1 Samuel 18:2). At this time a close friendship began to develop between David and Saul’s son Jonathan. David’s successes in battle won him promotion, but further successes and growing popularity so stirred up Saul’s jealousy against him that Saul tried to kill him (1 Samuel 18:5-11)
Chronicles, i - ...
(i) 1Ch 1:1-54 ; 1 Chronicles 2:1-55 ; 1 Chronicles 3:1-24 ; 1 Chronicles 4:1-43 ; 1Ch 5:1-26 ; 1 Chronicles 6:1-81 ; 1 Chronicles 7:1-40 ; 1 Chronicles 8:1-40 ; 1 Chronicles 9:1-44 , Adam to the death of Saul. ...
(ii) 1Ch 10:1-14 ; 1 Chronicles 11:1-47 ; 1 Chronicles 12:1-40 ; 1 Chronicles 13:1-14 ; 1 Chronicles 14:1-17 ; 1 Chronicles 15:1-29 ; 1 Chronicles 16:1-43 ; 1 Chronicles 17:1-27 ; 1 Chronicles 18:1-17 ; 1 Chronicles 19:1-19 ; 1 Chronicles 20:1-8 ; 1 Chronicles 21:1-30 ; 1Ch 22:1-19 ; 1 Chronicles 23:1-32 ; 1 Chronicles 24:1-31 ; 1 Chronicles 25:1-31 ; 1 Chronicles 26:1-32 ; 1 Chronicles 27:1-34 ; 1 Chronicles 28:1-21 ; 1 Chronicles 29:1-30 , from the death of Saul to the accession of Solomon. The whole career of Samuel; the reign of Saul, except its close; the struggle David had to establish himself on the throne; the story of Uriah and Bathsheba; the story of Amnon and Tamar; Absalom’s rebellion and David’s flight; the characteristically Oriental intrigues attending Solomon’s accession; his alliances with foreign women and his idolatries in later life; his struggle against disaffection and rebellion; practically the entire history of the Northern Kingdom; all these sections are omitted, with the view of suppressing what might be held to be discreditable to the religious heroes
Philistim - But these conquests of Joshua must have been ill maintained, since, under the Judges, under Saul, and at the beginning of the reign of King David, the Philistines had their kings, and their lords, whom they called Sazenim; since their state was divided into five little kingdoms, or satrapies; and since they oppressed the Israelites during the government of the high priest Eli, and of Samuel, and during the reign of Saul, for about a hundred and twenty years, from A. True it is, that Shamgar, Samson, Samuel, and Saul, opposed them, and killed some of their people, but did not reduce their power
Burial - " ...
In connection with the burial of Saul and his three sons we meet for the first time with the practice of burning the dead (1 Samuel 31:11-13 )
Shewbread (2) - In David’s flight from Saul he had come to Nob, to Ahimelech the priest
Gibeon - Saul's family seems to have had some connections to Gibeon (1 Chronicles 8:29-33 ; 1 Chronicles 9:35-39 ). Discovering that Saul had broken the covenant by killing some of the Gibeonites, David gave seven of Saul's male descendants to the people of Gibeon who then put the seven to death ( 2 Samuel 21:1-9 )
Beer-Sheba - Samuel's sons Joel and Abiah were unfair judges in Beer-sheba right before the monarchy began with Saul (1 Samuel 8:1-3 )
Laying on of Hands - Similarly the prophets and teachers of the church at Antioch laid their hands on Saul and Barnabas in order to "separate" them for their ground-breaking mission work (Acts 13:3 )
Ammon - Previously to David, Jephthah and Saul had sorely punished them (Judges 11:33; 1 Samuel 11:11; 1 Samuel 14:47)
Army - Until the time of the kings this natural or tribal organisation seems to have been usual, but in the time of Saul there was a body guard, 1 Samuel 13:2 , and a captain of the host, 1 Samuel 17:55
Avenge - Hence the Lord’s people commit their case to Him, as David: “The Lord judge between me and thee [1], and the Lord avenge me of thee: but mine hand shall not be upon thee” ( Gilgal - It was here that Saul was made king, 1 Samuel 11:14,15 ; and here he offered sacrifices, and Samuel hewed Agag in pieces
Right Hand - ...
Fourth, this word is used to mean “south,” since the south is on one’s “right” when he faces eastward: “Then came up the Ziphites to Saul to Gibeah, saying, Doth not David hide himself with us in strongholds in the wood, in the hill of Hachilah, which is on the south of Jeshimon?” ( Sacrifice - Samuel the prophet rebuked Saul with the familiar words: “Hath the Lord as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the Lord? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the fat of rams” ( Rephidim - This unprovoked aggression of the Amalekites drew down upon them from the Lord the sentence of "war from generation to generation," between them and the Israelites, and of final extermination, which was commanded go be written or registered in a book, for a memorial to Joshua and his successors, the judges and kings of Israel, and was carried into execution by Saul, 1 Samuel 15:8 , by David, 1 Samuel 30:17 , and finally accomplished by the Simeonites in Hezekiah's reign, Exodus 17:8-13 ; Deuteronomy 25:17 ; 1 Chronicles 4:43
Edom, Edomites - ...
During the monarchy Saul is said to have fought the Edomites (1 Samuel 14:47 ); David conquered Edom and put garrisons in the country ( 2 Samuel 8:13-14 ); Edom regained its independence under Solomon ( 1 Kings 11:14-22 ); Jehoshaphat a century later reconquered Edom (cf
Presbytery - On the other hand, it may have been no more than a commendation of Timothy to the grace of God for strength and guidance in his new work as a missionary, analogous thus to the action of the prophets and teachers of Antioch in the case of Barnabas and Saul ( Acts 13:1-3 )
mo'ab - He committed his parents to the protection of the king of Moab, when hard pressed by Saul
Mourning - ( Genesis 50:10 ) Seven days for Saul, which may have been an abridged period in the time of national danger
Apostle - Barnabas and Saul were selected for this purpose, and constituted in an extraordinary manner Apostles of the Gentiles, or uncircumcision. Saul also, since his conversion had preached as a superior prophet, about seven years to the Jews only, and about two years more to the Jews and devout Gentiles. Saul had been converted, and had hitherto preached chiefly on Gentile ground; and he had joined with Barnabas in teaching devout Gentiles for a whole year, at Antioch in Syria; by all which previous steps they were regularly conducted to the last gradation, or the conversion of the idolatrous Gentiles. Some have supposed that Saul saw the person of Jesus, when he was converted, near the city of Damascus; but others, who conceive from the history of this event, that this could not have been the case, as he was instantly struck blind, are of opinion that the season, when his Apostolic qualification and commission were completed, was that mentioned by himself, ...
Acts 22:17 , when he returned to Jerusalem the second time after his conversion, saw the Lord Jesus Christ in person, and received the command to go quickly out of Jerusalem, that he might be sent unto the Gentiles
Moab - )...
Saul fought Moab successfully, himself also a Benjamite (1 Samuel 14:47). David moved away to Moab the land of his ancestry, fleeing from Saul, his and Moab's enemy, and committed to the king his father and mother (1 Samuel 22:3-4). Probably some act of perfidy of Moab, as the murder or treacherous delivering of his parents to Saul, caused David 20 years afterward to slay two thirds of the people, and make bondmen and tributaries of the rest (2 Samuel 8:2; in this war Benaiah slew two lion-like men, 2 Samuel 23:20; compare also Psalms 60:8, "Moab is my washpot"; yet among David's heroes was "Ithmah the Moabite," 1 Chronicles 11:22; 1 Chronicles 11:46), fulfilling Balaam's prophecy, Numbers 24:17; Numbers 24:19; "out of Jacob shall come he that shall destroy him that remaineth of Ar" (Hebrew, namely, of Moab)
Esau - Tears are shed at times by the most hardened; failing to repent when so softened for the moment, they hardly ever do so afterward (1 Samuel 24:16-17, Saul: contrast David, Psalms 56:8). But Saul and David conquered the Edomites (1 Samuel 14:47; 2 Samuel 8:14), and they were, excepting revolts, subject to Judah until Ahaz' reign; then they threw off the yoke (2 Kings 16:6; 2 Chronicles 28:7)
Lie, Lying - Some, like Saul, have forfeited their right to know all the truth as demonstrated by past actions and the willingness, as Saul had, to commit murder if all the truth be known
Joshua, the Book of - The Gibeonites were in Joshua's time (Joshua 9:27) "hewers of wood and drawers of water" for the sanctuary "even unto this day," but Saul set aside the covenant and tried to destroy them; so that the book of Joshua was before Saul
Paul the Apostle - The future Apostle is first made known to us under the name Saul ( Acts 7:58 ). But while Saul was his Jewish name, he must, as a Roman citizen, have had three Roman names. But here the case is different; we never read of Saul-Paul. The journey to Damascus was the great turning-point of Saul’s life ( Acts 9:3 ff. When approaching Damascus he saw a strong light, and Jesus appearing to him (so explicitly 1 Corinthians 9:1 ), saying, ‘Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me?’ The voice was unintelligible to his companions ( Acts 22:9 ), though they saw the light ( ib . Saul was blinded by the vision and led into Damascus, where he was instructed and baptized by one Ananias
Biblical Chronology - The kingdom was established probably, 1038, in which case Saul reigned from 1038-1011; David from 1011-971; and Solomon from 971-929
Babylon, Kingdom of - After the death of Esarhaddon, Saul-sumyukin, the viceroy of Babylonia, revolted against his brother the Assyrian king, and the revolt was suppressed with difficulty
Fool, Foolishness, And Folly - Nabal and Saul represent this kind of intentional and malicious folly toward David (1 Samuel 25:25 ; 1 Samuel 26:21 )
Gath - One of the most interesting bits of information is that at one point while Saul was in pursuit of David, David found sanctuary with Achish, the king of Gath, and perhaps became a vassal of the Philistines (1 Samuel 27:1-7 )
Vote - It is very doubtful whether Saul was a member of the Sanhedrin
Religion - … Here Ἰουδαϊσμός denotes Jewish partisanship, and accurately describes the bitter party spirit which prompted Saul to take the lead in the martyrdom of Stephen and the persecution of the Church, … He advanced beyond his fellows in sectarian prejudice and persecuting zeal’ (F
Lie, Lying - The fatuity of Ahab’s conduct, and its fatal consequences, are detailed in the light of this conception (1 Kings 22:1-53 ), while, with a still more unequivocal directness, Samuel is said to have been counselled by God to deceive Saul ( 1 Samuel 16:1 f
Burial - David mourned for the deaths of Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:17-27 ), and Jeremiah lamented the death of Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:25 )
Anoint - 1 Samuel 10:1,6: King Saul
Oath - Compare Judges 19:29; 1 Samuel 11:7, where a similar slaughter of the oxen of any who should not follow Saul is symbolized
Ishmael - Son of Azel, a descendant of Saul
Choice - And by an almost insensible gradation the use of the word passes on to such instances as the choice of Saul, ‘a chosen vessel’ (Acts 9:15), ‘the Christ of God, his chosen’ (Luke 23:35; cf
Army - The first step towards a more permanent arrangement was taken by Saul in his operations against the Philistines ( 1 Samuel 13:2 ; cf
Manasseh - He is often held up as a trophy of God's marvellous grace in Old Testament times, as Saul of Tarsus and the thief on the cross are given under the New Testament dispensation
High - When used of a man, gâbôhha means “tall”: Saul was “higher than any of the people” ( Go Away, Leave - “To uncover someone’s ears” is to tell him something: “Now the day before Saul came, the Lord had revealed [3] to Samuel …” ( Death - Saul declared David to be a “son of death” because he intended to have David killed ( Idumea - Saul was involved in war with them, 1 Samuel 14:47 ; but they continued independent till the time of David, who subdued them, in completion of Isaac's prophecy, that Jacob should rule Esau, Genesis 27:29 2 Samuel 8:14 1 Kings 11:15 1 Chronicles 18:11-13
Arms And Armor - At least four Israelite kings were severely or fatally wounded by enemy arrows: Saul (1 Samuel 31:3 ), Ahab (1 Kings 22:34 ), Joram (2 Kings 9:24 ), and Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:23 ). David faced the javelin while successfully challenging Goliath (1 Samuel 17:6 ) and while peacefully attempting to soothe Saul's spirit. Twice the disturbed Saul hurled his javelin at David (1 Samuel 18:10-11 ; 1 Samuel 19:9-10 ) and even once at his own son Jonathan (1 Samuel 20:33 ). Saul and Goliath wore helmets (1Samuel 17:5,1 Samuel 17:38 ), as did the entire army of Judah, at least in the time of Uzziah (2 Chronicles 26:14 )
Jephthah - Saul, therefore, was guilty of a breach of this law for sparing Agag, the king of the Amalekites, as Samuel reproached him, 1 Samuel 15:23 : and "Samuel hewed Agag in pieces before the Lord," not as a sacrifice, according to Voltaire, but as a criminal, "whose sword had made many women childless. In the Philistine war, Saul adjured the people, and cursed any one that should taste food until the evening. His own son, Jonathan, inadvertently ate a honey comb, not knowing of his father's oath, for which Saul sentenced him to die
Divination - As an example of the meaning of this word we have the woman at Endor whom Saul consulted: she is said to have had a familiar spirit. Saul at once said to the woman, "Bring me him up whom I shall name unto thee. Samuel told Saul that he and his sons on the morrow would be with him
Palestine - ...
From the conquest till the time of Saul, about four hundred years, the people were governed by judges. For a period of one hundred and twenty years the kingdom retained its unity while it was ruled by Saul and David and Solomon
Shewbread - In one of the oldest historical documents preserved in the OT we find, in a passage telling of David’s flight from Saul, the first mention of an offering in the shape of ‘holy bread,’ which was presented to J″ Pharisees - They turned violently against the Christians, and in fact it was a Pharisee, Saul of Tarsus, who led the persecution (Acts 6:13-14; Acts 7:57-58; Acts 8:3; Acts 23:6)
Desert - Saul relieved some of this pressure (1 Samuel 14:48 )
Persecution in the Bible - On an individual level, Saul persecuted David (1 Samuel 19:9-12 ), and Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego were persecuted because they refused to worship the image of the king (Daniel 3:1 )
Mark (John) - John Mark was chosen as companion of Barnahas and Saul when they left Jerusalem for Antioch ( Acts 12:25 the reading of RVm War - The landowners and warriors being the same opposed a powerful barrier to assaults from without and disruption from within. A standing army was introduced under Saul (1 Samuel 13:2; 1 Samuel 14:47-52; 1 Samuel 18:5)
Wilderness - This particular wilderness, sometimes called Jeshimon, became a refuge for David when he fled from Saul, and was the locale of the temptation of Jesus
Spiritual Gifts - Examples of this are: Bezaleel, who was given the gift of craftsmanship (Exodus 31:2-3 ); Othniel, who was equipped to be a judge (Judges 3:9-10 ); Gideon, who was given military skills (Judges 6:34 ); Samson, who was given physical strength (Judges 14:6 ,Judges 14:6,14:19 ); Saul, who was given political skills (1 Samuel 10:6 ); and Micah, who was given prophetic gifts (Micah 3:8 )
Strong, To Be - 25:35); and “… [5] laid hold upon the skirt of his mantle, and it rent” ( Prepare - 20:31 Saul tells Jonathan: “For as long as the son of Jesse liveth upon the ground, thou shalt not be established, nor thy kingdom
Take Away - Saul is spoken of as actually taking the kingdom, apparently by force of arms ( Repent - An instance of this action was in Samuel’s word to Saul, that God took the kingdom from Israel’s first king and intended to give it to another; Samuel declared, “And also the Strength of Israel will not lie nor repent; for he is not a man, that he should repent” (NASB, “change His mind”; Servant - The servants of Pharaoh, of Saul, and of David, were their subjects in general, and their court officers and counselors in particular
Edom - ...
There was some conflict between Israel and Edom during the reign of Saul (1 Samuel 14:47), but in the reign of David Israel conquered Edom and took political control of the country (2 Samuel 8:13-14; 1 Kings 11:15-16)
Jeroboam - And who is to be king after Solomon dies? Thinkest thou ever who is fit to be king? Saul was but the son of Kish. And Solomon eyed Jeroboam as Saul had eyed David, and as we all eye those gifted men who are fast rising to push us out of our seat. And just as David fled to Ramah from the javelin of Saul, so Jeroboam fled to Egypt from the same weapon of Solomon
Church Government - The call of Barnabas and Saul was acknowledged ( Acts 13:8 ) by a commission from the church at Antioch; and if Matthias remained an Apostle, we must suppose that the direct call was represented by some later Divine recognition. Elders at Jerusalem receive the offerings in 44 from Saul and Barnabas
Devil - ” The “Spirit of the Lord departed from Saul, and an evil spirit from the Lord troubled him” ( 1 Samuel 16:14 ). This evil spirit came and went from Saul (1 Samuel 16:23 ; compare 1 Samuel 18:10 ; 1 Samuel 19:9 )
Christian - There a considerable church had been formed by the united labours of Barnabas and Saul. ’ Barnabas then fetched Saul from Tarsus; both laboured in Antioch ‘a whole year’ and taught ‘much people’ (ὄχλον ἱκανόν)
Armour, Arms - Like the spear of the modern Bedouin sheikh, it figures as a symbol of leadership in the case of Saul ( 1 Samuel 22:6 ; 1 Samuel 26:7 ; cf. This detail is not given for Saul’s cuirass ( 1 Samuel 17:38 ). ...
The armourbearer is met with as early as the time of Abimelech ( Judges 9:54 ), and later in connexion with Jonathan, Saul, and Goliath, and with Joab, who had several ( 2 Samuel 18:15 )
Dress - In 1 Samuel 28:14 it is the mantle in which Samuel was enveloped; in 1 Samuel 24:4 it is the "robe" under which Saul slept
Paul - Originally named Saul; first called Paul in Acts 13:9
Head - David cut off Goliath's head and brought it before Saul (1 Samuel 17:51 ). The Philistines cut off Saul's head (1 Samuel 31:9 ), and the sons of Rimmon cut off that of Ish-bosheth (2 Samuel 4:7 )
Irish Martyrs - MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Descent Into Hell (Hades) - There is only the one instance of consulting the dead, when Saul summoned the prophet Samuel through the witch of Endor (1 Samuel 28:3-25 )
Bethlehem - Hence the undesigned propriety appears of David, Ruth's descendant, choosing the king of Moab's house at Mizpeh as the safest retreat for his parents, when he was outlawed by Saul (1 Samuel 22:3-4)
Gibeon - ...
Soon after the death of Absalom and David's restoration to his throne his kingdom was visited by a grievous famine, which was found to be a punishment for Saul's violation (2 Samuel 21:2,5 ) of the covenant with the Gibeonites (Joshua 9:3-27 ). " David afterwards removed the bones of Saul and Jonathan at Jabeshgilead (21:12,13)
Nazareth - It is the designation by which He revealed Himself to Saul (Acts 22:8)
Dreams - Saul complained that “neither by dreams, nor by Urim, nor by prophets” did God answer him ( 1 Samuel 28:6 )
Martyrs, Irish - MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Anger - In biblical history, Saul stands out as the embodiment of sinful rage (see 1 Samuel 19:9-10 ; 20:30-34 )
Laying on of Hands - Fasting, prayer, and the laying on of hands also accompanied the appointment of Barnabas and Saul to their missionary endeavor ( Acts 13:3 )
Sergius Paulus - Sergius Paulus is mentioned in Acts 13:4-12, where he is described as the proconsul in Cyprus, ‘a man of understanding’ who ‘called unto him Barnabas and Saul, and sought to hear the word of God
Loaf - ...
1 Samuel 10:4 (c) In that Saul was given two loaves of the bread, it may indicate that he was to have a double portion now, both as a king and as a prophet
Glory - When the Lord Jesus was revealed to Saul at his conversion, he was blinded by 'the glory of that light,' Acts 22:11 , but only that divine light might shine into his soul
Boldness - In this sense παρρησιάζεσθαι is used of Saul at Damascus and Jerusalem (Acts 9:27 f
Love - 16:21, where we read that Saul “loved [1] greatly
Send - 15:20 Saul told Samuel about the “way which the lord sent” him; here, too, the emphasis is on the initiation of the action
Father - ...
'Âb can be a title of respect, usually applied to an older person, as when David said to Saul: “Moreover, my father, see, yea, see the skirt of thy robe in my hand …” ( Eating - Samuel set a whole quarter of a calf before Saul
Stephen - ...
The members of the council, remembering probably the use of similar language by Jesus when on trial before them (Matthew 26:64), being at all events resolved to treat as blasphemy Stephen's assertion of the divine exaltation of Him whom they had crucified, cried aloud, stopped their ear's (unconsciously realizing Stephen's picture of them: Acts 7:51; Psalms 58:4), ran upon him with one accord (contrast "with one accord," Acts 4:24), and cast him out of the city (as was the custom in order to put out from the midst of them such a pollution: 1 Kings 21:13; Luke 4:29; Hebrews 13:12) and stoned him, all sharing in the execution, the witnesses casting the first stones (Deuteronomy 13:9-10; Deuteronomy 17:7; John 8:7), after having stripped off the outer garments for greater ease in the bloody work, and laid them at the feet of Saul who thereby signified his consent to Stephen's execution (Acts 8:1; Acts 22:20). The forerunner of Paul, whose conversion was the first fruit of his prayer for his murderers; among the pricks of conscience which Saul vainly strove to resist (Acts 9:5) the foremost was remorse at the remembrance of the part he took in the last touching scene of the holy martyr's execution
Education - The pupils sat on the floor at the teacher’s feet, as did Saul at the feet of Gamaliel ( Acts 22:3 ). , who, thirty years later, numbered Saul of Tarsus among his students (Acts 22:3 )
Hebrews - From this time they were governed in the name of Jehovah, by chiefs, judges, or patriarchal rulers, until the time of Samuel; when the government was changed to a monarchy, and Saul anointed king. Saul and David, with all their authority, were not able entirely to suppress such inveterate disorders
Psalms, Book of, - It was then that, victorious at home over the mysterious melancholy of Saul and in the held over the vaunting champion of the Philistine hosts, he sang how from even babes and sucklings God had ordained strength because of his enemies. His next psalms are of a different character; his persecutions at the hands of Saul had commenced
Joab - Early joined David, whose family and relatives were not safe from Saul (1 Samuel 22:3-4; 1 Samuel 26:6). " Abishai is mentioned in David's flight before Saul; but Joab not until after Saul's death
Demon - God also sent an evil spirit to torment Saul. David's attempts to calm Saul by playing the harp (1 Samuel 16:15-16 ) are unsuccessful, as Saul, provoked by the spirit, tries to kill David (1 Samuel 16:14-23 ; 18:10-11 ; 19:9-10 ). Further evidence in favor of the possibility of believers being demonized are the instances of Saul's torment from an evil spirit (1 Samuel 16:14-23 ), the daughter of Abraham being bound by Satan for eighteen years (Luke 13:10-17 ), and Ananias and Sapphira having their hearts "filled by Satan" (Galatians 5:22-23 )
Judges, Theology of - In Gibeah (the hometown of Saul) his party is not shown any hospitality by the native citizens of the town; rather a man from Ephraim finally comes to his aid. The story appears to advocate loyalty from the northern tribes to a family from Bethlehem, rather than to a family from the corrupt Gibeah (Saul and his descendants). This historical account is strongly pro-David and anti-Saul, anticipating the stance of the Book of Samuel and the overall concern of the Deuteronomic historian with God's faithfulness to his promise to David
Intercession - When God rejected Saul, Samuel prayed in grief (1 Samuel 15:11 )
Wealth And Materialism - Glenn Saul...
...
Moab, Moabites - In the prophecy of Isaiah 16 Moab is characteristic of the world in which outcast Israel is hidden: Elimelech and Naomi fled thither from the famine, and David, when Saul was persecuting him, entrusted to their king his father and mother
Famine - as being an age of famine, and at the same time give particular attention to the local famine in Judaea , which involved Barnabas and Saul
Hand - ...
Fourth, since a hand may be held up as a “sign,” yâd can signify a “monument” or “stele”: “… Saul came to Carmel, and, behold, he set him up a place [9], and is gone about, and passed on, and gone down to Gilgal” ( Amalekites - Be this as it may, the Amalekites came on the Israelites, when encamped at that place, little expecting such an assault. Saul destroyed their entire army with the exception of Agag their king; for sparing whom, and permitting the Israelites to take the spoil of their foes, he incurred the displeasure of the Lord, who took the sceptre from him. It is remarkable, that most authors make Saul's pursuit of the Amalekites to commence from the lower Euphrates, instead of from the southern border of the land of Canaan
Baal - The eon of Jehiel, and grandfather of Saul
Proverb - Such a combination at once secured currency to the unpremeditated exclamation, ‘Is Saul also among the prophets?’ ( 1 Samuel 10:11-12 )
Christian - It was in Antioch, and in connexion with the mission of Barnabas and Saul to that city, that the name arose. As these Antiochenes saw Barnabas and Saul standing day by day in the market-place or at the corners of the streets, and proclaiming that the Christ had come and that Jesus was the Christ, they caught up the word without understanding it, and bestowed the name of ‘Christians’ on these preachers and their followers
Shepherds - The only instance in the Old Testament, in which the hired servant is distinguished from the master, or one of his family, occurs in the history of David, where he is said to have left the sheep, על שומר , "in the hand of a keeper," while he went down to visit his brethren, and the armies who were fighting against the Philistines under the banners of Saul, 1 Samuel 17:20 . Doeg, an Edomite, was entrusted with the whole pastoral establishment of Saul, 1 Samuel 21:7
Pharisees - On the other hand, in the case of Stephen we know that Saul the Pharisee ‘was consenting unto his death’ (Acts 8:1). Saul also on his own confession was specially strong in urging persecution (Acts 26:9-11; cf
Mizpah - ") Here Samuel appointed Saul king (1 Kings 10:17-25)
Repentance - He later regretted that he had made Saul the king over Israel (1Samuel 15:11,1 Samuel 15:35 )
Divination And Magic - Saul, the first Hebrew king, is said to have “put away those that had familiar spirits, and the wizards, out of the land” (1 Samuel 28:3 ), but even he later sought out a necromancer (1 Samuel 28:7 )
Ishmael - A son of Azel, a descendant of Saul through Jonathan ( 1 Chronicles 8:38 ; 1 Chronicles 9:44 )
Minister - John Mark ( Acts 13:5 ) was the minister of Barnabas and Saul in the same sense as Joshua was of Moses, he was their attendant and assistant
Ashtoreth - In her temple at Ashkelon, the Philistines hung the armour of Saul ( 1 Samuel 31:10 )
Shimei - Son of Gera, a Benjamite, of Saul's house; at Bahurim, a marked spot on the way from the Jordan valley to Jerusalem, just within Benjamin; to this point Phaltiel followed Michal (2 Samuel 3:16). When David, fleeing from Absalom, reached the edge of the valley, between the road and Shimei's house, Shimei ran along the ridge over against the road, cursing and throwing stones and dust at him and his mighty men still as he went; and saying, "Come out, come out, thou bloody man and thou man of Belial the Lord hath returned upon thee all the blood of the house of Saul (referring to his hanging up Saul's sons for the Gibeonites, 2 Samuel 21, which in time preceded this; also to his general engagement in wars, 1 Chronicles 22:8), and the Lord hath delivered the kingdom into the hand of Absalom thy son, and behold thou art taken in thy mischief because thou art a bloody man" (2 Samuel 16:5-13)
Tabor - Turning a little southward, you have in view the high mountains of Gilboa, fatal to Saul and his sons
Paul the Apostle - ...
Paul, in the New Testament known by his Hebrew name Saul until Acts 13:9 , was apparently educated from boyhood in Jerusalem, not Tarsus (Acts 22:3 ). Hengel goes so far as to assert that it is almost probable that the young Saul even witnessed Jesus' death. Ironically, this multiracial church had been founded by Christians driven out of Palestine by persecutions instigated by Saul of Tarsus (Acts 11:19-21 )
Law - Stephen should have wrought powerfully on the young Pharisee Saul (7:58). Saul probably belonged to the Cilician synagogue, whose members had disputed with St. ...
Even before his conversion Saul must have been sensible of the great alternative which he sets forth in Galatians 2:15-21 : either righteousness is through the Law, and Christ died for nought; or else the Crucified Jesus is truly the Christ, and righteousness is to be attained through faith alone. It need, therefore, occasion no surprise that in his conversion Saul had become convinced of the universality of Christianity, or that thereafter he maintained that the Law was not in a religious sense binding upon either Gentile or Jewish Christians (Galatians 1:2)
House - Translated 1 Samuel 9:26, "about daybreak Samuel called (from below, within the house, up) to Saul upon the top (or roof) of the house (where Saul was sleeping upon the balcony, compare 2 Kings 4:10), Rise up," etc
King, Christ as - Samuel acquiesced to their request, and anointed Saul as their king (1 Samuel 10:1,24-25 ; 11:14-15 ). From the anointing of Saul on, the monarchy developed as a secondary institution alongside the priesthood and temple cult
Tabernacle - The old tabernacle erected by Moses in the wilderness was transferred to Nob (1 Samuel 21:1 ), and after the destruction of that city by Saul (22:9; 1 Chronicles 16:39,40 ), to Gibeon
Circumcision - Thus John the Baptist was circumcised (Luke 1:59 ), as were both Jesus (Luke 2:21 ) and Saul of Tarsus (Philippians 3:5 ), on the eighth day of life, making them accredited members of the covenant people
Devote, Devoted - Saul lost the kingship for his failure to carry out this command (1 Samuel 15:22-23 )
Bread - 20:27, lechem represents an entire meal: “… Saul said unto Jonathan his son, Wherefore cometh not the son of Jesse to meat, neither yesterday, nor today?” Thus, “to make bread” may actually mean “to prepare a meal”: “A feast is made for laughter, and wine maketh merry …” ( Synagogue - Saul went into the synagogues to find and persecute believers in Christ (Acts 9:2 ; Acts 22:19 ; Acts 26:11 ). ...
After Saul's conversion, he immediately preached Christ in the synagogues in Damascus (Acts 9:20 )
Carmel - Saul set
Letter - When Saul went to Damascus to persecute believers, he went armed with letters from the high priest (Acts 9:1-2 ; Acts 22:5 )
Gamaliel - ’ The persecuting zeal of his pupil Saul of Tarsus does not seem to indicate that universal tolerance was part of the systematic teaching of Gamaliel, though a pupil may depart from the views he has been taught
Branch - ( 2 Chronicles 26:16) King Saul tried to be both a priest and a king, and GOD punished him by taking away the Kingdom of Israel from him
Chronology - )...
1095 Saul anointed king: the kingdom begins
Bless - Ruth 2:4); “Saul went out to meet [1], that he might salute him” ( Save - 14:45 yeshû‛âh is used of a human act: “And the people said unto Saul, Shall Jonathan die, who hath wrought this great salvation in Israel?” The word is used infrequently of deliverance and/or help effected by things ( Ananias - " Ananias, therefore, went to the house in which God had revealed unto him that Paul was, and putting his hands on him, said, "Brother Saul, the Lord Jesus who appeared unto thee in the way, hath sent me that thou mightest receive thy sight, and be filled with the Holy Ghost," Acts 9:10-12 , &c
War, Holy War - A case in point would be Saul's requirement that no one could eat until the enemy was completely destroyed (1 Samuel 14:24 ). ...
In 1 Samuel 13,15 Saul felt that the ritual sacrifice was more import than listening to God's word (15:22-23). Saul's keeping back some of the spoil caused him to lose the kingdom (1 Samuel 15:23 ). Early in his career David's military successes incited the wrath of Saul. Women sang of him that he had killed his ten thousands (1 Samuel 18:7 ) while Saul was only given credit for his thousands
Ammonites - In the days of Saul, 1 Samuel 11, B. The inhabitants were inclined to acknowledge Nahash as their sovereign; but he would accept their submission only on condition that every one of them should consent to lose his right eye, and that thus he might fix a lasting reproach upon Israel: but from this humiliating and severe requisition they were delivered by Saul, who vanquished and dispersed the army of Nahash
Guilt - Glenn Saul...
...
Heart - Before Saul became king, God gave him a new heart (1 Samuel 10:9 )
Edom - ...
Both Saul and David conducted warfare with the Edomites—probably frontier wars fought in the “wilderness” area southwest of the Dead Sea (1 Samuel 14:47-48 ; 2 Samuel 8:13-14 )
Philistines, the - Saul not only failed to check their intrusion into Israelite territory but in the end lost his life fighting the Philistines at Mount Giboa (1 Samuel 31:1-13 )
Syria - ...
By the beginning of Israel's monarchy, the kingdom of Zobah held sway in Syria and was encountered by Saul (1 Samuel 14:47 )
Resurrection of Jesus Christ - Paul mentioned last the appearance of the ascended Christ to Paul himself, an obvious reference to Saul's conversion experience (Acts 9:1-9 ). ...
The risen Christ appeared to Stephen (Acts 7:55-56 ), to Saul/Paul (Acts 9:1-6 ), and to John the Seer (Revelation 1:1 )
Gad - In David’s conflicts with Saul, the Gadites and other eastern tribes came to his assistance
Gideon - the Philistine campaign under Saul
Trees - Saul was buried under an oak tree
Keep, Watch, Guard - David, ironically chiding Abner for not protecting Saul, says: “Art not thou a valiant man? and who is like to thee in Israel? wherefore then hast thou not kept thy lord the king?” ( Altar - The altar which Moses enjoined Joshua to build on Mount Ebal, was to be of unpolished stones, Deuteronomy 27:5 ; Joshua 8:31 ; and it is very probable that such were those built by Samuel, Saul, and David
Idol, Idolatry - ...
During the times of Samuel, Saul, and David, the worship of God seems to have been preserved pure in Israel
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - ...
The major confrontation between Ashtoreth and Yahweh took place during the days of Eli, Samuel, and Saul. ...
Dagon haunted the reigns of both Saul and David
Patricius, or Saint Patrick - Down, and landed at the mouth of the Slaney, which flows into the upper waters of the Lough, within a few miles of the church of Saul, a spot successfully identified by Mr. There he made his first convert Dichu, the local chief, and founded his first church in a barn which Dichu gave him, whence the name Sabhall (Celtic for barn) or Saul, which has ever since continued to be a Christian place of worship (cf
War - From the days of Saul and David, with their long struggle against the Philistines, war became the affair of the whole nation, leading, also, to the establishment of a standing army, or at least of the nucleus of one (see Army)
Prophesy - 10:6, where Saul is told by Samuel that when he meets a certain band of ecstatic prophets, he too will “prophesy with them, and … be turned into another man
Solomon - After this he executed Shimei, a relative of Saul who had always been hostile to the house of David (1 Kings 2:36-46; cf
Arms - ...
The SPEAR (chanith ), Saul's regular companion (appropriate to his own stately height), at his head when sleeping, in his hand when gathering his soldiers, his leaning staff when dying (1 Samuel 26:7; 1 Samuel 22:6; 2 Samuel 1:6). In the beginning of Saul's reign the Philistines had reduced Israel so as that "no smith was found throughout all the land of Israel; for the Philistines said, Lest the Hebrew make them swords or spears; so in the day of battle there was neither sword nor spear found in the hand of any of the people but with Saul and with Jonathan" (1 Samuel 13:19-22)
Book(s) - ...
The Book of Jashar (or Upright) A book quoted twice in the Old Testament: Joshua's poetic address to the sun and the moon (Joshua 10:12-13 ) and David's lament for Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:17-27 )
Judas Iscariot - It is no whit a greater mystery that Jesus should have chosen Judas with clear prescience of the issue, than that God should have made Saul king, knowing what the end would be
Kill, Killing - Gideon destroyed Peniel and its people when they refused his aid (Judges 8:17 ); Saul thought about killing Samuel (1 Samuel 16:2 ), and was successful in having the priests of Nob slain (1 Samuel 22:17 ); Jezebel killed the prophets of Yahweh (1 Kings 18:13 ; cf. Accidental manslaughter could result from a sudden shove or unintentional throwing of an object (Numbers 35:22 ), the dropping of a stone or random missile (Numbers 35:22-23 ), a fall from a roof with no rail (Deuteronomy 22:8 ), or assault by a killer who was not lying in wait (Exodus 21:12-13 )
Manaen (2) - We last catch sight of Manaen in that hallowed gathering when he and his fellows in the ministry willingly surrendered their two ablest men, Barnabas and Saul, for the evangelization of the world
Stephen - Saul, then a young man, presided at the stoning and gave hearty assent and approval to his death (Acts 7:60, Acts 8:1)
Good - 19:4, ṭôb describes the way Jonathan spoke about David: “And Jonathan spake good of David unto Saul his father, and said unto him, Let not the king sin against his servant, against David; because he hath not sinned against thee, and because his works have been [4] very good
Magnify - 26:24 when David said to Saul: “And, behold, as thy life was much set by this day in mine eyes, so let my life be much set by in the eyes of the Lord, and let him deliver me out of all tribulation
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - The very earliest legislation enacts that witchcraft shall be punished by death ( Exodus 22:18 [3]); and we read that Saul put to death ‘those that had familiar spirits and the wizards ’ ( 1 Samuel 28:3 ). This occurs in the arrangements for the conquest of Canaan ( Judges 1:1 ), in the campaign against the Benjamites ( Judges 20:27 ), in David’s uncertainty after the death of Saul ( 2 Samuel 2:1 ), and in war ( 2 Samuel 5:19 ; 2 Samuel 5:23 ). (5) In selecting men for special duties : the election of Saul ( 1 Samuel 10:20 ), the choice of the men to attack Gibeah ( Judges 20:9 ), the division of duties among the priests ( 1 Chronicles 24:5 )
Evil - ...
Saul's Evil Spirit . The evil spirit from Yahweh that plagued Saul (1 Samuel 16:14-16,23 ; 18:10 ; 19:9 ) may be considered as a spirit (disposition) sent by God that eventually destroyed Saul. The spirit, then, was God's instrument of judgment on Saul because of his rebellious attitude
Meals - Saul and his mess-mates sat upon ‘seats’ ( 1 Samuel 20:25 ), the precise form of which is not specified, as did Solomon and the high officials of his court ( 1 Kings 10:5 , where the queen of Sheba admires the ‘sitting,’ i. During the course of the dinner those whom the host wished to single out for special distinction would receive, as a mark of favour, some dainty portion, such as Samuel had reserved for Saul ( 1 Samuel 9:23 )
Jews - Samuel succeeded in effecting a union among the tribes, which was further strengthened when a kingdom was established and Saul was chosen as ita first king. In the course of the 13th century the Jews were exiled from France and England, and in the 14th, severe laws were passed against them and bloody assaults made on them in France (where they had been readmitted), in Spain, Germany, and Bohemia
Moab, Moabites - Saul fought with the Moabites’ (1 Samuel 14:47 ), but with what result we do not know
Apostle - This period ends with Acts 13:1-5, when Barnabas and Saul were separated by the Holy Spirit unto missionary work
Tarsus - ...
We have not the means of accurately measuring the effect of such an intellectual environment on ‘Saul of Tarsus’ during his formative years
Destroy, Destroyer, Destruction, Destructive - ...
Note: Portheo, "to ruin by laying waste, to make havock of," is translated "destroyed" in Acts 9:21 , of the attacks upon the church in Jerusalem by Saul of Tarsus; "wasted," in Galatians 1:13 , with reference to the same; "destroyed" in Galatians 1:23 , where "the faith" is put by metonymy (one thing being put for another associated with it), for those who held the faith
Paul - ...
Background and conversion...
Paul’s original name was Saul
Education in Bible Times - Saul of Tarsus received such advanced theological training “at the feet of Gamaliel” in Jerusalem (Acts 22:3 )
Sign - Such signs often authenticated God's special call (of Moses, Exodus 3:12 ; Exodus 4:8 ; of Gideon, Judges 6:17 ; of Saul, 1 Samuel 10:2-9 )
Head, Headship - Saul was head and shoulders above everyone else (1 Samuel 9:2 )
Repentance - ...
The use of the Hebrew word naham [ Genesis 6:6-7 ); the Lord "relented" and turned away his threat of disaster (Exodus 32:14 ); he was "grieved" at having made Saul king, and deposed him (1 Samuel 15:11,26 )
Numbers as Symbols - Saul, David, Solomon, and Jehoash were each tested by a reign of forty years
Call, Called, Calling - Of this OT meaning examples in the NT are our Lord’s call of His apostles (Matthew 4:21), the Spirit’s call of Barnabas and Saul (Acts 13:2), the call of the High Priest of the old dispensation (Hebrews 5:4), where a Divine call to special service is given and accepted
Gather - The entire story makes it quite clear that David was not seeking to set up a force rivaling Saul’s. All Israel could be “summoned” or “gathered” for battle (as a militia); thus “… Saul gathered all Israel together, and they pitched in Gilboa” ( Pharisees - Of this number was Saul of Tarsus; but as a body, their attachment to traditions, their passionate expectation of deliverance from the Roman yoke by the Messiah, and the splendour of his civil reign, their pride, and above all their vices, sufficiently account for that unconquerable unbelief which had possessed their minds as to the claims of Christ, and their resistance to the evidence of his miracles
Paul - The distinguished "apostle of the Gentiles;" also called Saul, a Hebrew name
Music, Instruments, Dancing - Emotions that might be limited by the restriction of prose, expressed themselves through the poetry of music as seen in David's moving lament at the death of Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:19-27 ). ” David's reputation for valor spread through the singing of women's voices: “Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands” ( 1 Samuel 18:7 )
Baptism - , Acts 8:16 (Samaritans, men and women, and Simon), Acts 8:36; Acts 8:38 (the Ethiopian eunuch), Acts 9:18; Acts 22:16 (Saul), Acts 10:47 f. And no instruction that can be properly so called is mentioned in the case of Saul (Acts 9:18; Acts 22:16), or the Philippian jailer (Acts 18:8; note ‘immediately’), or the twelve Ephesians (Acts 19:5)
Heman - Saul also in his day had sought out a seer. Only, the seer that Saul sought out was a seer who could see stolen sheep on the mountains a hundred miles away
Conversion - The Book of Acts records a number of individual conversions, the most notable of which are the Ethiopian eunuch (Acts 8:1 ), Saul of Tarsus (Acts 9:1 ), and Cornelius (Acts 10:1 )
Go - And the man went among men for an old man in the days of Saul
Fall, Fallen, Falling, Fell - ...
B — 2: ἀποπίπτω (Strong's #634 — Verb — apopipto — ap-op-ip'-to ) "to fall from" (apo, "from"), is used in Acts 9:18 , of the scales which "fell" from the eyes of Saul of Tarsus
Jewels, Jewelry - Not only women wore bracelets (Genesis 24:47 ); King Saul was wearing one when he died in battle (2 Samuel 1:10 )
Appear, Appearance - Luke recounts that the Lord Jesus appeared to Saul (Acts 9:17 ) for the purpose of appointing him to bear witness to the Gentiles (Acts 26:16 )
War - ...
With the appointment of Saul as Israel’s first king, a regular army was established (1 Samuel 11:6-8; 1 Samuel 13:2; 1 Samuel 17:2). ...
Siege was a common part of warfare, and was often considered essential if an aggressor failed to take a city in a surprise attack or head-on assault
Cross - The worshippers of Baal-peor, and the king of Ai were hung up alive; as were also the descendants of Saul, who were put into the hands of the Gibeonites, 2 Samuel 21:9
Bishop - 44) they receive the offerings from Barnabas and Saul; in Acts 15:6 (a
Persecution - Examples in the Old Testament include Abel, who offered a better sacrifice than Cain (Genesis 4:4-10 ; Hebrews 11:4 ); Lot, also a "righteous man who was distressed by the filthy lives of lawless men" (2 Peter 2:7 ) who rejected him and who "kept bringing pressure on [3] and moved forward to break down the door" of his house in Sodom (Genesis 19:9 ); Elijah, who spoke against the prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:25-40 ) and against the idolatry of Israel (1 Kings 18:16-21 ), and was persecuted by Jezebel for his godly stand (1 Kings 19:1-3 ); David, who conducted himself in a godly manner despite the machinations and pursuit of Saul (1 Samuel 9-27:1 ); Jeremiah, who spoke God's message of condemnation against Judah for her sins and the coming judgment against her to be brought by the Babylonians (Jeremiah 9:11,13-16 ; 21:3-7 ; 25:1-14 ), had his message rejected (Jeremiah 36-37 ), was beaten (Jeremiah 37:15 ), and finally dropped into a muddy cistern (Jeremiah 38:6-13 )
Friend, Friendship - Jonathan's loyalty to David runs deeper than his loyalty to his father Saul or his own ambitions (1 Samuel 18:1-4 ; 20:14-17 )
Mark (John) - ‘Saul-Paul’; see CIG Paul - He is first introduced to us as a young man, by name Saul, at whose feet the witnesses who stoned Stephen laid their clothes
Poetry - Hence several odes of the highest order are not included: Moses' songs (Exodus 15; 30), Deborah's (Judges 5), Hannah's (1 Samuel 2), Hezekiah's (Isaiah 38:9-20), Habakkuk's (Habakkuk 3), and even David's dirge over Saul and Jonathan
Priest - See also the case of Saul, 1 Samuel 13:7-14
King - This sort of activity continued into the reign of Israel’s first king, Saul (1 Samuel 10:6; 1 Samuel 10:10; 1 Samuel 11:6), but the next king, David, was the last of the Spirit-gifted leaders (1 Samuel 16:13-14)
Roads And Travel - We are not informed as to the way in which Barnabas and Saul journeyed from Antioch to Jerusalem (Acts 11:30), but there is little doubt that Saul was fetched from Tarsus to Antioch (Acts 11:25) by the coast-road passing within the bend between Asia Minor and the province of Syria. It was probably along the southern coast of the island of Cyprus that Barnabas and Saul journeyed between Salamis and Paphos
Education - If he was to become a Rabbi, he would continue his studies in the Law, and, as Saul of Tarsus did, betake himself to some famous teacher and sit at his feet as a disciple. Jesus Himself was the carpenter (Mark 6:3), and Saul of Tarsus, the scholar of Gamaliel, was a tent-maker (Acts 18:3). The idea that Barnabas of Cyprus and Saul of Tarsus had met in early life at the university of Tarsus is by no means fanciful, and it was to his education at Tarsus that St
Paul - 1-35) Paul's Jewish name was Saul, given at birth after his father or some near kin, or even after the famous Old Testament King Saul, who like Paul was from the tribe of Benjamin
Court Systems - Saul's death sentences on Jonathan (1 Samuel 14:39 ) and the priests at Nob (1 Samuel 22:6-23 ) were not accepted by the people. Unlike Saul, David and Solomon were able to exercise authority to execute or spare persons who represented a threat to their reigns (2 Samuel 1:1-16 ; 2 Samuel 4:1-12 ; 2 Samuel 19:16-23 ; 2 Samuel 21:1-14 ; 1 Kings 2:19-46 )
Messiah - Israelite kings were particularly hailed as Yahweh's anointed compare ( Judges 9:8 ), beginning with Saul (1 Samuel 9-10 NIV) and especially referring to David (Jeremiah 33:14-1873 1 Samuel 16:13 ; see 2 Samuel 2:4 ; 2 Samuel 5:3 ) and Solomon (1 Kings 1:39 )
Dress - Those stripped of every garment but this are termed "naked," it being but a partial covering, our "undress": 1 Samuel 19:24 Saul to imitate the prophets; David (2 Samuel 6:20); Peter (John 21:7); Isaiah 20:2, the prophet's undress being a silent monition to repentance
Issachar - Two hundred "heads" (not as KJV "bands," for it is roshee not giduwdim ) of Issachar came to Hebron to help in "turning the kingdom of Saul to David"; they were "men that had understanding of the times, to know what Israel ought to do
Law, Ten Commandments, Torah - Glenn Saul...
...
Glory (2) - With this passage should be compared the visions of Stephen in Acts 7:55; of Saul of Tarsus (Acts 9:3; Acts 22:6-11; Acts 26:13), and of St
Genealogy - According to their genealogical divisions they encamped, marched, made offerings, and selected the spies; hereby Achan was detected, and Saul chosen as king; hereby Canaan was allotted
Philistia - They were skilled as smiths in Saul's days; at the beginning of his reign they had so subjugated Israel as to forbid them to have any smith. The effort to deliver the nation from the Philistines was continued unsuccessfully under Eli (1 Samuel 4), successfully under Samuel (1 Samuel 7:9-14); Saul (Israel's desire for a king was that he might lead them in war: 1 Samuel 8:20), 1 Samuel 8:1 Samuel 13; 14; 17; David (after the disaster at Gilboa: 1 Samuel 31), 2 Samuel 5:17-25, when they dared to penetrate even to the valley of Rephaim, S
Armies - David increased the standing army, which Saul had introduced
Eagle - ...
In the affecting lamentation of David over Saul and Jonathan, their impetuous and rapid career is described in forcible terms: "They were swifter than eagles; they were stronger than lions," 2 Samuel 1:23
Kings, the Books of - Thus, Samuel by His direction anointed Saul and David to reign over His people; Nathan announced God's promise that David's throne and seed should be forever (2 Samuel 7); then when he sinned Nathan remounted his punishment, and upon his repentance immediate forgiveness (2 Samuel 12); similarly, Gad (2 Samuel 24). I will be his Father and lie shall be My son; if he commit iniquity I will chasten him with the rod of men, and with the stripes of the children of men; but My mercy shall not depart away from him, as I took it from Saul" (2 Samuel 7:12-17)
Lamentations - David's lament over Jonathan and Saul, also that over Abner, are the earliest specimens of sacred elegy (2 Samuel 1:17-27; 1618169734_62)
Vessels And Utensils - Saul may have used one of these ( 1618169734_73 NRSV, “jar”), but the same Hebrew word ( 1 Kings 17:14 ) can refer to the smaller juglet
Land (of Israel) - This is demonstrated by the account of Saul swearing his men to an oath when they fought the Philistines (1 Samuel 14:25-26 )
Redeem - 14:45 indicates that money is not intrinsic in the word; Saul is determined to execute Jonathan for his involuntary transgression, but “… the people rescued Jonathan, that he died not. 21:3, David asks the Gibeonites, “… And wherewith shall I make the atonement, that ye may bless the inheritance of the Lord?” He receives in answer the advice to hang seven of Saul’s sons in compensation
Reconciliation - " When the Philistines suspected that David would appease the anger of Saul, by becoming their adversary, they said, "Wherewith should he reconcile himself to his master? Should it not be with the heads of these men?" not, surely, How shall he remove his own anger against his master? but, how shall he remove his master's anger against him? How shall he restore himself to his master's favour? "If thou bring thy gift to the altar, and there rememberest that thy brother hath aught against thee," not, that thou hast aught against thy brother, "first be reconciled to thy brother; that is, appease and conciliate him; so that the words, in fact, import, "See that thy brother be reconciled to thee," since that which goes before is, not that he hath done thee an injury, but thou him
Government - Nevertheless, he allowed Samuel to anoint Saul as Israel's first "king" (Saul was really a charismatic leader rather than a pagan type of king)
Holy Spirit - Saul's "ravings" in 1 Samuel 19:20-23 ; 10:6,10 ; 11:6 ; for David, see 2 Samuel 23:2 ). When Saul no longer remains God's choice for the throne, the Spirit leaves him and comes upon David instead (1 Samuel 16:13-14 ). From Pentecost on, however, the Spirit becomes a permanent possession of God's people, yet believers may still be repeatedly "filled" in order to speak courageously for Christ (the 120 Acts 2:4 ; Peter 4:8; all Jerusalem believers 4:31; Saul 9:17; 13:9)
Priests And Levites - It is curious that, according to 1 Samuel 9:6 part of one of the earliest sources of the book, Saul did not appear, at the time of searching for his father’s asses, to have even heard of Samuel’s existence. But the robe is also the common name for the upper garment, and is used of that worn by Jonathan and Saul ( 1 Samuel 18:4 ; 1 Samuel 24:4 ). In addition to the priests of the local sanctuaries, we find in 1 Samuel 21:1-15 ; 1 Samuel 22:1-23 an account of a settlement of priests at Nob under Ahimelech, all of whom except Abiathar his son were put to death by Doeg at Saul’s command
Oracles - Saul, the first king of Israel, was chosen through an oracle (1 Samuel 10:20-24 )
High Priest - Saul suspected the priesthood of conspiracy with David and exterminated the priestly family of Ahimelech (1 Samuel 22:9-19 )
Samson - None the less, his exploits would be secretly welcomed as directed against the common foe, and remembering that Judges 17:1-13 ; Judges 18:1-31 ; Judges 19:1-30 ; Judges 20:1-48 ; Judges 21:1-25 is an appendix, we see how the narrative paves the way for the more defined efforts of Saul and David in 1Samuel to shake off the foreign yoke
Slave, Slavery - The prosperous retainer of Saul has 20 servants ( 2 Samuel 9:10 )
Captivity - All we know is, some blended with the Jews, as Anna of Asher (Luke 2:36), Saul or Paul of Benjamin (Philippians 3:5); some with the Samaritans (Isaiah 11:12-135; John 4:12); many, staying in their land of exile, founded colonies in the E
Edom - Edom was among the enemies on the frontier from whom Saul at the beginning of his reign delivered Israel (1 Samuel 14:47)
Wilderness (2) - That wilderness was the refuge of David when persecuted by Saul (1 Samuel 22-26); he knew it from the time of his youth, having, when a boy, followed there the herds of his father (Matthew 14:13-21,; 1 Samuel 17:15; 1 Samuel 17:34)
Preach, Proclaim - Here it is the converted Saul who proclaims Jesus as the Son of God in the synagogues of Damascus. Again the great response and the plot against Saul's life by the Jews point to the public nature of the proclamation
End - In one instance, 'ephes is used expressing the “non-existence” of a person or thing and is translated “not” or “no”: “Is there not yet any of the house of Saul, that I may show the kindness of God unto him?” ( Pre-Eminence - Would it not be natural for Saul, with his great conscientiousness, zeal for God, and hope of attaining to the promise made to the fathers (Acts 26:7), to conclude immediately that the Lord had again visited His people, and that the august Person who appeared to him was none other than Jehovah Himself (cf
Missions - ‘Chronology of the NT’]'>[4]) the faith of Christ had spread to Damascus, and had gained such hold there, that Saul was sent thither by the Sanhedrin to bring ‘any of the Way,’ whom he might find, bound to Jerusalem (Acts 9:2). ); and when tidings of these things came to the Church at Jerusalem, they sent forth Barnabas to visit and help them (which he did by finding Saul of Tarsus, Acts 11:19-26)
Dates - And since from Galatians 1:17 it is clear that Saul returned to Damascus as a Christian leader after a period of three years spent in Arabia, and the flight from Damascus (2 Corinthians 11:32) cannot be identified with any later event than this visit, his conversion must have taken place not later than 36, and perhaps several years earlier. ’ This relief came ‘by the hand of Barnabas and Saul
Acts of the Apostles (2) - As the heavenly Christ says to Saul, ‘I am Jesus of Nazareth whom thou persecutest’ (Acts 22:8), so to the writer of the Acts ‘the Christ’ and ‘Jesus’ constitute an inseparable unity. This tradition says nothing about the necessary change whereby this fleshly body that rose from the grave was transformed into the glorified heavenly body that appeared to Saul of Tarsus in kingly splendour
Mark, the Gospel According to - The Roman supplanted the Jewish name, as Paul did Saul
Mercy, Merciful - Also like racham , it expresses itself in action: Rahab delivered the spies; Jonathan protected David from Saul
Government - We should not necessarily consider the tribe to be overly large, but more as rather small and isolated groups, especially before Saul and David
Name, Names - ‘Saul, who is called Paul’ ( Acts 13:9 ), is a typical case
Simeon - Five hundred Simeonites undertook a second expedition under four chiefs, sons of Shimei, against the remnant of Amalek that had escaped from Saul and David (1 Samuel 14:48; 1 Samuel 15:7; 2 Samuel 8:12) to the mountains of Idumea; they smote them utterly, and dwelt in their place, and were there at the date of the composition of 1 Chronicles, i
Biblical Theology - As a prophet, one especially called and enabled by God to speak on his behalf, it falls to him to appoint Israel's first earthly king, Saul. From the time of Saul (ca
Gospels (2) - When we read (Acts 13:2), ‘The Holy Ghost said, Separate me Barnabas and Saul,’ etc. In any case, it is unreasonable to question that Saul the persecutor needed some instruction or study before he could ‘proclaim Jesus, that he is the Son of God
Balaam - The same name (omitting the last part, -am, of Balaam), Bela, (and he also "son of Beor," front baar , to "burn up,) occurs among the Edomites connected with Midian by a victory recorded in Genesis 36:32-37; also with the "river" Euphrates through Saul of Rehoboth which was on it, king of Edom
Festivals - This festival provided the occasion for King Saul to stage a state banquet and for the family of David to offer a special annual sacrifice (1Samuel 20:5-6,1Samuel 20:24,1 Samuel 20:29 )
the Penitent Thief - But David had only Saul to overthrow, whereas Barabbas had Cæsar
Ordination - The separation of Saul and Barnabas, say they, was an ordination to missionary work, including the administration of sacraments to the converted Heathen, as well as public instruction, Acts 13:1 ; Acts 13:3
Martyr - In Acts Rome is the power which protects Christians against Jewish assault (Acts 25:10); in the Apocalypse Rome is drunk with the blood of the saints (Revelation 17:6). In the Jewish persecution Saul is said to have entered into every house (Acts 8:3), and to have searched every synagogue for Christians
the Man Who Took a Rain of Mustard Seed And Sowed it in His Field - And, then, what a seed of the same kind was the call of the twelve disciples, and the conversion of Saul of Tarsus, and the conversion of Augustine, and the conversion of Luther, and Wesley, and Chalmers, and General Booth
Antioch - Church sent Barnabas to assist, who, finding that more help was needed, sought out and fetched Saul from Tarsus
Idolatry - ...
Under the government of Samuel, Saul, and David, there was little or no idolatry in Israel
Houses - Rahab concealed the spies on the roof, with the stalks of flax which she had laid in order to dry, Joshua 2:6 ; the king of Israel, according to the custom of his country, rose from his bed, and walked upon the roof of his house, to enjoy the refreshing breezes of the evening, 2 Samuel 11:2 ; upon the top of the house the prophet conversed with Saul, about the gracious designs of God, respecting him and his family, 1 Samuel 9:25 ; to the same place Peter retired to offer up his devotions, Acts 10:9 ; and in the feast of tabernacles, under the government of Nehemiah, booths were erected, as well upon the terraces of their houses, as in their courts, and in the streets of the city, Nehemiah 8:16
Chronicles, Books of - God's replacing rebellious Saul with David (1 Chronicles 10:1-14 )...
B
House - ...
The flat roof of oriental houses often afford a place of retirement and meditation; here Samuel communed with Saul, 1 Samuel 9:25 ; and from / 1 Samuel 9:26 , they would seem also to have slept there, as is still common in the East, 2 Samuel 11:2 Daniel 4:30
Baptism - , Acts 8:16 (Samaritans, men and women, and Simon), Acts 8:36; Acts 8:38 (the Ethiopian eunuch), Acts 9:18; Acts 22:16 (Saul), Acts 10:47 f
Prophecy Prophet Prophetess - Prophets are mentioned in the Acts-Agabus (Acts 11:28; Acts 21:10), Symeon Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, and Manaen, in addition to Barnabas and Saul (Acts 13:1), and Judas and Silas (Acts 15:32)
Jews - Saul was their first sovereign, under whose reign they had perpetual struggles with the Ammonites, Moabites, and Philistines. After about seven years' struggling between the eleven tribes that clave to Ishbosheth, the son of Saul, and the tribe of Judah, which erected themselves into a kingdom under David, David became sole monarch
Cross, Crucifixion - Saul was decapitated and his body displayed on a wall by the Philistines (1 Samuel 31:9-10 ), and the “hanging” of Esther 2:23 ; Esther 5:14 may mean impalement (compare Ezra 6:11 )
Bible, Authority of the - Indeed, is not the implication of "Thus says the Lord" that those other sayings recorded by the prophet fall short of divine authority? Should not the quoted speech of Jesus of Nazareth be taken to have an authority to which the letters of Saul of Tarsus could never aspire?...
As it happens, the Scriptures themselves tell another story
High Place, Sanctuary - The normal situation of a high place relative to the city whose sanctuary it was is very clearly brought out in the account of the meeting of Samuel and Saul at Ramah ( 1 Samuel 9:13-25 )
Music And Musical Instruments - Amos ( Amos 6:5 ) speaks of music performed at feasts, and in 1 Samuel 18:6 we read of its use in Saul’s time in connexion with processions. The nebel is first mentioned in 1 Samuel 10:5 , as used by the prophets who went to meet Saul
Baptism - Saul was baptized by Ananias ( Acts 9:17 ) in accordance with instructions recorded by himself ( Acts 22:16 ), and that he might ‘be filled with the Holy Ghost
Mission - Samuel communicated to Saul his positive mission of deliverance, which took the form of punishment of the Amalekites (15:18,20)
Lots - As the king was the official representative of Jahweh, Saul was chosen by lot (1 Samuel 10:19-21)
Church Government - During the service, the Spirit (through one of the prophets) says: ‘Since you desire to know (δή), separate for me Barnabas and Saul,’ who were present
Paul in Arabia - Jesus of Nazareth appeared to Saul the persecutor, as He had already appeared to Mary Magdalene, and to the ten disciples, and to Thomas
the Mother of Zebedee's Children - It is the same evil eye, with the same javelin in it, that Saul threw at David
Prayer - Prayer for individuals is rarer: Hannah (1 Samuel 1:12), Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:2), Samuel for Saul (1 Samuel 15:11; 1 Samuel 15:35)
Exorcism - David by music expelled the evil spirit from Saul (1 Samuel 16:14-23), though, when the spirit came mightily, he failed (1 Samuel 19:9; Jos. Luke 8:29), and, leaping on the exorcists, the man assaulted them and drove them out of the house stripped and wounded (Acts 19:13-16)
Apostle - Greatly as Saul of Tarsus differed from the Twelve in some things, he was entirely at one with them respecting fundamental facts
Barzillai - From within the walls of his lofty keep in far-off Gilead, Barzillai had watched the ways of God with His people Israel in the south country all through the days of Eli, and Samuel, and Saul, and David, and Joah, and Jonathan, and Mephibosheth, and Absalom, and his humble heart and his hospitable house had always been open to the oppressed, and to the persecuted, and to the poor
James the Lord's Brother - " He was seen of James somewhere, and to somewhat of the same result, that He was seen of Saul at the gate of Damascus
Priest - Saul himself offered a burnt-offering to the Lord, perhaps as being king of Israel, 1 Samuel 13:9-10
Covenant - David, who occupied the position of power and authority in the agreement, demanded that Abner also produce Saul's daughter who David had married earlier. Saul delivered them, leading to affirmation of Saul's kingship (1 Samuel 11:1 )
Mediation Mediator - Immediately on his conversion Saul ‘proclaimed Jesus, that he is the Son of God’ (Acts 9:20)
Elect, Election - Specific kings were also pointed out, such as Saul (1 Samuel 9:15-17 ), David (1 Samuel 16:1-12 ), and Solomon (1 Chronicles 28:5-7 ; 2 Chronicles 1:8-10 )
James - 40, introduced Saul, three years subsequently to his conversion in A
Tombs - So also the burning of Saul, when his body was hastily rescued from the Philistines. There is an innermost sarcophagus chamber in which two sarcophagi were found, one of which is now in the Louvre, deposited by DeSaulcy
the Ethiopian Eunuch - ...
Was it the eunuch's own serious instincts, I wonder, that led him to the fifty-third of Isaiah? Or had he heard that profound and perplexing chapter disputed over by Stephen and Saul in one of the synagogues of Jerusalem? I cannot tell
Peter - But Peter, remarkable and outstanding man as he was, had neither the natural ability nor the educational advantages of Saul of Tarsus
Acts - In Acts 9:4 (NIV), Jesus spoke directly to Saul and asked, “Why do you persecute me?” Later, in the same chapter, Peter could say directly to Aeneas, “Jesus Christ heals you” ( Acts 9:34 NIV)
Pentateuch - So Joshua (Joshua 8:30-31), Saul (Deuteronomy 48:61), David (2 Samuel 24:25), Solomon (1618169734_13), and the people (1 Kings 3:2) sacrificed through the priest
Jeroboam - Samuel anointed David in Saul's reign; yet David, even when God had put Saul his deadly foe in his power, would not lay violent hands on the Lord's anointed, but waited patiently God's way and time for raising him to the throne
Sin - On the other hand, there is little reference to this sin during the reigns of Saul and David, and, in spite of the weaknesses of character displayed by the former, the historian pictures for us a great advance in national vigour and growth under these kings and their successors in the Southern Kingdom
Insects - In both instances David stressed the difference in stature between Saul and himself, avoiding a confrontation with the king
Eschatology - The Hebrew Scriptures do not give us any considerable material for elaborating a theory as to life in Sheol, but from the warnings against necromancers, as well as from the story of Saul and the witch of Endor ( 1 Samuel 28:3-18 ), it is clear that, alongside of the Jehovistic religion as found in the literature of the Hebrews, there was a popular belief in continued existence and conscious life of the spirits of men after death, as well as in the possibility of recalling such spirits from Sheol by some form of incantation
Philip: Deacon And Evangelist - ' And thus it was that the banishment of Philip from Jerusalem was the salvation of Samaria, and thus it was also that the martyrdom of Stephen was the conversion of Saul
Paul as an Evangelical Mystic - Saul of Tarsus just said as he lay among his horse's feet,-Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do? and from that moment the thing was done
Michal, Saul's Daughter - SHE DESPISED HIM IN HER HEART...
NEVER, surely, were man and wife more unequally yoked together than was David, the man after God's own heart, with Michal, Saul's daughter. And, sad to say, it was the very greatness of the day to David that made it such a day of death to Michal, Saul's daughter. Michal, Saul's daughter, died that day of a strange disease-a deep distaste at the things that were her husband's greatest delight. No ambitious woman, and least of all Saul's royal-hearted daughter, could have seen assembled Israel that day without being swept into sympathy with the scene. Nay, he would have needed to have got her heart while she was yet Saul's daughter in Saul's palace. Michal thought of her royal father Saul that day, and despised David
Palestine - These passes have witnessed the conflicts between Saul and the Philistines, the Maccabees and the Syrians, the Jews and the Romans, Richard I and Saladin
Dress - It is the robe of Saul the skirt (lit
Poetry - The finest example is that of David over Saul and Jonathan ( 2 Samuel 1:17 ff
Lots - As the king was the official representative of Jahweh, Saul was chosen by lot (1 Samuel 10:19-21)
Presence (2) - Even those who followed hard after it, like Saul of Tarsus and the rich young ruler, thirsted only the more for the living God (Mark 10:17, cf
Trade And Commerce - In Saul’s days, according to 1 Samuel 13:18 , there were no Israelitish smiths a fact there explained as due to the tyrannical precautions of the Philistines; but perhaps we should infer that the Israelites had as yet learned no crafts, since even in Solomon’s time we find that artificers had to be imported for the building of the royal edifices. The place of industry had to be supplied by raiding, and Saul himself is praised for having stripped the finery of his enemies’ women to put it on his own ( 2 Samuel 1:24 )
Church - At Jerusalem Saul receives the right hand of fellowship and recognition from the pillar Apostles ( Galatians 2:9 )
Number - There were two great lights; men frequently had two wives (Lamech, Jacob, Elkanah); two sons (Abraham, Isaac, Joseph); two daughters (Lot, Laban, Saul)
Diseases - King Saul became mentally unstable, and it is of interest that he gained some help from music (1 Samuel 16:23 ), a form of therapy that has proved to be beneficial in some cases of mental illness
Tribes of Israel, the - The second judge, Ehud (Judges 5:14 ), and the first king, Saul (1 Samuel 9:15-17 ; 1 Samuel 10:1 ), came from the tribe of Benjamin
Canaan, History And Religion of - Saul assuredly did not struggle to eliminate Baalism, and he even named a son Eshbaal (“man of Baal,” 1 Chronicles 8:33 )
Jeremiah, Theology of - Already clear in the exchanges of Samuel and Saul centuries earlier is the understanding that the call to be a prophet includes confronting public leaders
Influence - And this growth of personality is what we see even in the brief records of the NT: Simon becomes Peter; Levi, Matthew; Bartholomew, Nathanael; Joseph, Barnabas; and Saul, Paul
Language of Christ - That the ascended Christ should have spoken to Saul in Aramaic is unintelligible except on the supposition that that had been the language which He had spoken when on earth, and that it was the prevailing language of Palestine
Collection - The agents (διὰ χειρός) employed on this occasion for bringing relief (εἰς διακονίαν) were Barnabas and Saul
David - in His Races - David held back his bad passions at Saul, and at Shimei, and at Joab, occasion after occasion, till we were almost worshipping David
Ahithophel - And Nathan said to David, Thus saith the Lord God of Israel, I anointed thee king over Israel, and I delivered thee out of the hand of Saul
Christ, Christology - Notable examples were priests (Exodus 29:7 ) and kings in Israel from the time of Saul onward (1 Samuel 10-16 )
Pre-Existence of Christ - -‘Even as a Jew, Saul believed the Messiah to be already in existence’ (H
Israel, History of - ...
Saul (1020-1000) was Israel's first king, although he often acted more as a Judge. ...
Job recounts the difficulties experienced by Job through loss of loved ones, deprivation of material goods, and an assault upon his physical health
Christ, Christology - For the kingly office Samuel anointed Saul and said, "Has not the Lord anointed you leader over his inheritance?" (1 Samuel 10:1 ). After Saul's failure, the Lord commanded Samuel to anoint David: "So Samuel took the horn of oil and anointed him in the presence of his brothers, and from that day on the Spirit of the Lord came upon David in power" (1 Samuel 16:13 )
Idol - Saul lost his throne, Achan his life, and Hiel his family, for retaining or restoring anything of a people doomed for idolatry (1 Samuel 15; Joshua 7; 1 Kings 16:34)
Faith - Saul, a Jew whose persecution of the Christians was based on this premise (Acts 22:3-5 ), after meeting the risen Christ becomes a Paul who with opened eyes receives the Holy Spirit and preaches that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God (Acts 9 ; Galatians 1:23 )
Restoration - They are reinforced by the human love for its own kind, which at its highest finds voice in Browning (Saul):...
‘Would I fain in my impotent yearning do all for this man,...
And dare doubt He alone shall not help him, who yet alone can?’...
And on these rests the conviction that ‘faith in the exceeding grandeur of reality shall never be confounded’ (Sir O
Prayer - This set of convictions is particularly a prophetic emphasis in the Old Testament, beginning as early as Samuel's intercession for Saul, which leads to the conclusion that prayer must result in obedience (1 Samuel 7:12,15 ; 15:22-23 )
Christ, Christology - It is ‘Jesus’ whom Stephen sees standing at the right hand of God (Acts 7:55), and ‘Jesus’ who speaks to Saul from heaven
Woman - David's first wife, Michal, aids his escape from Saul (1 Samuel 19:9-17 )
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - ...
In the Old Testament Israel's leaders—Abraham (Genesis 18:19 ), Moses and Aaron (Psalm 105:26 ; 106:23 ), priests and Levites (Deuteronomy 2:5 ), Saul (1 Samuel 10:24 ), David (1 Kings 8:16 ; 2 Chronicles 6:6 ; Psalm 89:3 ), and the Servant of the Lord (Isaiah 42:1 ; 43:10)— ;are said to be chosen by God
Sin - Saul magnified his sins by repenting superficially at best (1 Samuel 13:11-12 ; 15:13-21 ; 24:16-21 )
Barnabas, Epistle of - He may even have had the career of Saul previous to his call to the apostleship mainly in view
Assumption of Moses - the fifteen judges, and the three kings, Saul, David, and Solomon) by chiefs and kings, and for nineteen years (the nineteen kings of Israel) the ten tribes shall break away
Sin - The word may also refer to “punishment for iniquity”: “And Saul sware to her by the Lord, saying, As the Lord liveth, there shall no punishment happen to thee for this thing” ( Prayer - So it was said of Saul of Tarsus, "Behold, he prayeth!" He prayed in fact then for the first time; but that was in consequence of the illumination of his mind as to his spiritual danger, effected by the miracle on the way to Damascus, and the grace of God which accompanied the miracle
Government of the Hebrews - In consequence of the fact, that Saul did not choose at all times to obey the commands of God, the kingdom was taken from him, and given to another, 1 Samuel 13:5-14 ; 1 Samuel 15:1-31
Law of Moses - (21:1-9) (5) Assault to be punished by lex talionis , or damages. By the summary jurisdiction of the king, see ( 1 Samuel 22:11-19 ) (Saul); (2 Samuel 12:1-5 ; 14:4-11 ; 1 Kings 3:16-28 ) which extended even to the deposition of the high priest
Jerusalem - The two royal tribes met in Jerusalem David showed his sense of the importance of the alliance with Saul of Benjamin by making Michal's restoration the condition of his league with Abner (2 Samuel 3:13). David at last took the hitherto impregnable stronghold, which was therefore called "the city of David" (Joab being the first in the assault, 2 Chronicles 14:12-136), and built his palace there
Acts of the Apostles - Paul to make Christianity the religion of the Roman Empire (see § 7 ; henceforward the author calls Saul of Tarsus by his Roman name, one which he must have borne all along, for the purposes of his Roman citizenship); the Council of Jerusalem, the vindication of Pauline teaching by the Church; the call to Macedonia, not as being a passing from one continent to another, for the Romans had not this geographical idea, nor yet as a passing over to a strange people, but partly as a step forwards in the great plan, the entering into a new Roman province, and especially the association for the first time with the author (§ 3 ); the residence at Corinth, the great city on the Roman highway to the East, where Gallio’s action paved the way for the appeal to Cæsar; and the apprehension at Jerusalem
Childhood - The education of Jesus was just that of the great mass of the people: unlike Saul of Tarsus, no bêth ha-Midrâsh, or college of Scribes, received Him as a student (‘Whence hath this man these things?’ Mark 6:2; cf
Judgment Damnation - For His rejection of Saul and His surrender of Israel into the hand of the Philistines the older tradition knew no reason
Judges (1) - It may well be questioned whether the title of this book was originally ‘Judges,’ for it is difficult to see where the difference lies, fundamentally, between the ‘judges’ on the one hand, and Joshua and Saul on the other; in the case of each the main and central duty is to act as leader against the foes of certain tribes
Mediator - Stephen direct to Him his dying prayer, and Saul declare that He is the Son of God (Acts 9:20)
Psalms - ...
(1) such as is directly religious is included in the psalter, therefore not David's dirge over Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:17-27)
Book - And there can be no doubt that David's elegy upon Saul and Jonathan, 2 Samuel 1:18 , is called קשת or the bow, in conformity with this peculiarity of taste
Old Testament (i. Christ as Fulfilment of) - If thou see the ass of him that hateth thee lying under his burden, and wouldest forbear to help him, thou shalt surely help with him’; 1 Samuel 24:4-8 the example of David in sparing the life of Saul when he had him in his power; also the similar instance of Elisha in sparing the Syrians (2 Kings 6:22); Psalms 7:5 b (4b) ‘Yea, I have delivered him that without cause was mine adversary
Sacrifice (2) - Nor is it that the mind of the Pharisaic Saul has led him to the contemplation of the Cross because of his close study of the OT ritual
Josephus - For six weeks he withstood with great skill and daring the Roman assault upon Jotapata, a fortress commanding the line of approach from Ptolemais, and then played his part with such address that, falling into the hands of the Romans as the last survivor of the siege, he caught the personal notice of Vespasian by means of a prophecy. the reigns of Saul and David respectively; VIII-X
Church - Paul? What was it that turned Saul the persecutor of the Church into Paul the apostle of Jesus Christ? It was the indelible conviction that Jesus was the Messiah, and that He had risen from the dead and conversed with him on the road to Damascus, that converted and ever afterwards controlled St
Paul - The author narrates with extraordinary conciseness, a striking instance being where the name ‘Saul’ is exchanged for ‘Paul’ without a word of explanation (Acts 13:13); and, when the traveller duplicates a journey, the second notice is of the briefest possible description
Possession - Condemned by the Deuteronomic legislation, they were banished by Saul, patronized by Manasseh, and much sought after by the Egyptians. _ At other times Jahweh employed a subsidiary spirit like the Satan (Job 2:7) or some other of his messengers,_ Saul’s case is instructive
Clementine Literature - When the apostles are on the point of success the disputation is broken off by a tumult raised by an unnamed enemy, who is unmistakably Saul, who flings James down the temple steps, leaving him for dead, and disperses the assembly
Preaching Christ - ‘Saul confounded the Jews that dwelt in Damascus, proving that this is the Christ’ (Acts 9:22)