Exhaustive information for Strongs Number: 1519

Word info for εἰς

Root: εἰς
Strongs Number: 1519
Transliteration: [eis]
Phonetics: ice
Etymology: A primary preposition
Parts of Speech: prep.
Twot:
Sense: into, unto, to, towards, for, among (more info)

Outline of Biblical Usage:


   1 into, unto, to, towards, for, among.
   Additional Information: Wigram’s frequency count is 1770 not 1773.
   “For” (as used in Acts 2:38 “for the forgiveness …”) could have two meanings.
   If you saw a poster saying “Jesse James wanted for robbery”, “for” could mean Jesse is wanted so he can commit a robbery, or is wanted because he has committed a robbery.
   The later sense is the correct one.
   So too in this passage, the word “for” signifies an action in the past.
   Otherwise, it would violate the entire tenor of the NT teaching on salvation by grace and not by works.
   

Frequency in the Books

Words from the Root of G1519

εἰς, Εἰς, ‹εἰς›, ‹εἰς, εἴς

All words for strongs number G1519 :

Word Occurance
εἰς 1490
Εἰς 19
‹εἰς 2
‹εἰς› 1
εἴς 1

How strongs number G1519 is translated (KJV)

English Occurance
into 492
to 475
for 143
in 132
unto 55
toward 38
on 24
at 22
against 14
in order 13
upon 13
among 12
as 11
so as 8
as to 6
of 3
by 2
about 2
for [us] 2
so as for 2
unto [the] 2
[is] to 2
over 2
into [the] 2
in order for 2
in [the] 2
the 2
on [the] 2
to [the] 2
with regard to 1
in regard to 1
for the purpose of 1
[enters] into 1
so that 1
to result in 1
in respect to 1
to [her] 1
for [his] 1
to this 1
for [myself] 1
onto 1
until 1
[will be] for 1
accordingly 1
to the 1
on [him] 1
[is] for 1
[was] unto 1
for this 1
for the 1
back 1
and 1
for [the] 1
for what 1
[are] for 1

Greek Commentary Search

Matthew 10:9 In your purses [εις τας ζωνας μων]
In your girdles or belts used for carrying money. [source]
Matthew 10:17 To councils [εις συνεδρια]
The local courts of justice in every Jewish town. The word is an old one from Herodotus on for any deliberative body The same word is used for the Sanhedrin in Jerusalem.In their synagogues (εν τοις συναγωγαις αυτων — en tois sunagōgais autōn). Here not merely as the place of assembly for worship, but as an assembly of justice exercising discipline as when the man born blind was cast out of the synagogue (John 9:35). They were now after the exile in every town of any size where Jews were. [source]
Matthew 10:41 In the name of a prophet [εις ονομα προπητου]
“Because he is a prophet” (Moffatt). In an Oxyrhynchus Papyrus 37 (a.d. 49) we find ονοματι ελευτερου — onomati eleutherou in virtue of being free-born. “He that receiveth a prophet from no ulterior motive, but simply qua prophet (ut prophetam, Jer.) would receive a reward in the coming age equal to that of his guest” (McNeile). The use of εις — eis here is to be noted. In reality εις — eis is simply εν — en with the same meaning. It is not proper to say that εις — eis has always to be translated “into.” Besides these examples of εις ονομα — eis onoma in Matthew 10:41 and Matthew 10:42 see note on Matthew 12:41 εις το κηρυγμα Ιωνα — eis to kērugma Iōnā (see Robertson‘s Grammar, p. 593). [source]
Matthew 12:44 Into my house [εις τον οικον μου]
So the demon describes the man in whom he had dwelt. “The demon is ironically represented as implying that he left his victim voluntarily, as a man leaves his house to go for a walk” (McNeile). “Worse than the first” is a proverb. [source]
Matthew 14:23 Into the mountain [εις το ορος]
After the dismissal of the crowd Jesus went up alone into the mountain on the eastern side of the lake to pray as he often did go to the mountains to pray. If ever he needed the Father‘s sympathy, it was now. The masses were wild with enthusiasm and the disciples wholly misunderstood him. The Father alone could offer help now. [source]
Matthew 15:39 The borders of Magadan [εις τα ορια Μαγαδαν]
On the eastern side of the Sea of Galilee and so in Galilee again. Mark terms it Dalmanutha (Mark 8:10). Perhaps after all the same place as Magdala, as most manuscripts have it. [source]
Matthew 19:1 The borders of Judea beyond Jordan [εις τα ορια της Ιουδαιας περαν του Ιορδανου]
This is a curious expression. It apparently means that Jesus left Galilee to go to Judea by way of Perea as the Galileans often did to avoid Samaria. Luke (Luke 17:11) expressly says that he passed through Samaria and Galilee when he left Ephraim in Northern Judea (John 11:54). He was not afraid to pass through the edge of Galilee and down the Jordan Valley in Perea on this last journey to Jerusalem. McNeile is needlessly opposed to the trans-Jordanic or Perean aspect of this phase of Christ‘s work. [source]
Matthew 19:5 The twain shall become one flesh [εσονται οι δυο εις σαρκα μιαν]
This use of εις — eis after ειμι — eimi is an imitation of the Hebrew, though a few examples occur in the older Greek and in the papyri. The frequency of it is due to the Hebrew and here the lxx is a direct translation of the Hebrew idiom. [source]
Matthew 2:8 Sent them to Bethlehem and said [πεμπσας αυτους εις ητλεεμ ειπεν]
Simultaneous aorist participle, “sending said.” They were to “search out accurately” (εχετασατε ακριβως — exetasate akribōs) concerning the child. Then “bring me word, that I also may come and worship him.” The deceit of Herod seemed plausible enough and might have succeeded but for God‘s intervention to protect His Son from the jealous rage of Herod. [source]
Matthew 21:1 Unto Bethphage [εις ετπαγη]
An indeclinable Aramaic name here only in O.T. or N.T. (Mark 11:1; Luke 19:29). It means “house of unripe young figs.” It apparently lay on the eastern slope of Olivet or at the foot of the mountain, a little further from Jerusalem than Bethany. Both Mark and Luke speak of Christ‘s coming “unto Bethphage and Bethany” as if Bethphage was reached first. It is apparently larger than Bethany. [source]
Matthew 21:1 Unto the Mount of Olives [εις το ορος των Ελαιων]
Matthew has thus three instances of εις — eis with Jerusalem, Mount of Olives. Mark and Luke use προς — pros with Mount of Olives, the Mount of Olive trees (ελαιων — elaiōn from ελαια — elaia olive tree), the mountain covered with olive trees. [source]
Matthew 21:2 Into the village that is over against you [εις την κωμην την κατεναντι μων]
Another use of εις — eis If it means “into” as translated, it could be Bethany right across the valley and this is probably the idea. [source]
Matthew 21:17 To Bethany [εις ητανιαν]
House of depression or misery, the Hebrew means. But the home of Martha and Mary and Lazarus there was a house of solace and comfort to Jesus during this week of destiny. He lodged there (ηυλιστη εκει — ēulisthē ekei) whether at the Bethany home or out in the open air. It was a time of crisis for all. [source]
Matthew 21:19 Let there be no fruit from thee henceforward for ever [ου μηκετι σου καρπος γενηται εις τον αιωνα]
Strictly speaking this is a prediction, not a prohibition or wish as in Mark 11:14 (optative παγοι — phagoi). “On you no fruit shall ever grow again” (Weymouth). The double negative ου μη — ou mē with the aorist subjunctive (or future indicative) is the strongest kind of negative prediction. It sometimes amounts to a prohibition like ου — ou and the future indicative (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 926f.). The early figs start in spring before the leaves and develop after the leaves. The main fig crop was early autumn (Mark 11:14). There should have been figs on the tree with the crop of leaves. It was a vivid object lesson. Matthew does not distinguish between the two mornings as Mark does (Mark 11:13, Mark 11:20), but says “immediately” This word is really παρα το χρημα — para to chrēma like our “on the spot” (Thayer). It occurs in the papyri in monetary transactions for immediate cash payment. [source]
Matthew 22:5 One to his own farm [ος μεν εις τον ιδιον αγρον]
(ος μεν εις τον ιδιον αγρον — hos men eis ton idion agron) or field, another to his merchandise (ος δε επι την εμποριαν αυτου — hos de epi tēn emporian autou) only example in the N.T., from εμπορος — emporos merchant, one who travels for traffic (εμπορευομαι — emporeuomai), a drummer. [source]
Matthew 24:16 Flee unto the mountains [πευγετωσαν εις τα ορη]
The mountains east of the Jordan. Eusebius (H.E. iii,5,3) says that the Christians actually fled to Pella at the foot of the mountains about seventeen miles south of the Sea of Galilee. They remembered the warning of Jesus and fled for safety. [source]
Matthew 25:6 Come ye forth to meet him [εχερχεστε εις απαντησιν]
Or, Go out for meeting him, dependent on whether the cry comes from outside the house or inside the house where they were sleeping because of the delay. It was a ceremonial salutation neatly expressed by the Greek phrase. [source]
Matthew 26:3 Unto the court [εις την αυλην]
The atrium or court around which the palace buildings were built. Here in this open court this informal meeting was held. Caiaphas was high priest a.d. 18 to 36. His father-in-law Annas had been high priest a.d. 6 to 15 and was still called high priest by many. [source]
Matthew 26:10 A good work upon me [εργον καλον εις εμε]
A beautiful deed upon Jesus himself. [source]
Matthew 26:21 One of you [εις εχ υμων]
This was a bolt from the blue for all except Judas and he was startled to know that Jesus understood his treacherous bargain. [source]
Matthew 26:51 One of them that were with Jesus [εις των μετα Ιησου]
Like the other Synoptics Matthew conceals the name of Peter, probably for prudential reasons as he was still living before a.d. 68. John writing at the end of the century mentions Peter‘s name (John 18:10). The sword or knife was one of the two that the disciples had (Luke 22:38). Bruce suggests that it was a large knife used in connexion with the paschal feast. Evidently Peter aimed to cut off the man‘s head, not his ear He may have been the leader of the band. His name, Malchus, is also given by John (John 18:10) because Peter was then dead and in no danger. [source]
Matthew 26:71 Into the porch [εις τον πυλωνα]
But Peter was not safe out here, for another maid recognized him and spoke of him as “this fellow” (ουτος — houtos) with a gesture to those out there. [source]
Matthew 27:6 Into the treasury [εις τον κορβαναν]
Josephus (War II. 9, 4) uses this very word for the sacred treasury. Korban is Aramaic for gift So they took the money out and used it for a secular purpose. The rabbis knew how to split hairs about Korban (Mark 7:1-23; Matthew 15:1-20), but they balk at this blood-money. [source]
Matthew 27:27 Into the palace [εις το πραιτωριον]
In Rome the praetorium was the camp of the praetorian (from praetor) guard of soldiers (Philemon 1:13), but in the provinces it was the palace in which the governor resided as in Acts 23:35 in Caesarea. So here in Jerusalem Pilate ordered Jesus and all the band or cohort (ολην την σπειραν — holēn tēn speiran) of soldiers to be led into the palace in front of which the judgment-seat had been placed. The Latin spira was anything rolled into a circle like a twisted ball of thread. These Latin words are natural here in the atmosphere of the court and the military environment. The soldiers were gathered together for the sport of seeing the scourging. These heathen soldiers would also enjoy showing their contempt for the Jews as well as for the condemned man. [source]
Matthew 28:1 Now late on the sabbath as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week [οπσε δε σαββατων τηι επιπωσκουσηι εις μιαν σαββατων]
This careful chronological statement according to Jewish days clearly means that before the sabbath was over, that is before six p.m., this visit by the women was made “to see the sepulchre” They had seen the place of burial on Friday afternoon (Mark 15:47; Matthew 27:61; Luke 23:55). They had rested on the sabbath after preparing spices and ointments for the body of Jesus (Luke 23:56), a sabbath of unutterable sorrow and woe. They will buy other spices after sundown when the new day has dawned and the sabbath is over (Mark 16:1). Both Matthew here and Luke (Luke 23:54) use dawn (επιπωσκω — epiphōskō) for the dawning of the twenty-four hour-day at sunset, not of the dawning of the twelve-hour day at sunrise. The Aramaic used the verb for dawn in both senses. The so-called Gospel of Peter has epiphōskō in the same sense as Matthew and Luke as does a late papyrus. Apparently the Jewish sense of “dawn” is here expressed by this Greek verb. Allen thinks that Matthew misunderstands Mark at this point, but clearly Mark is speaking of sunrise and Matthew of sunset. Why allow only one visit for the anxious women? [source]
Matthew 28:7 He goeth before you into Galilee [προαγει υμας εις την Γαλιλαιαν]
Jesus did appear to the disciples in Galilee on two notable occasions (by the beloved lake, John 21, and on the mountain, Matthew 28:16-20). Probably before the women were permitted to tell this story in full to the disciples who scouted as idle talk (Luke 24:11) their first accounts, Jesus appeared to various disciples in Jerusalem on this first great Sunday. Jesus did not say that he would not see any of them in Jerusalem. He merely made a definite appointment in Galilee which he kept. [source]
Matthew 4:13 Dwelt in Capernaum [Κατωικησεν εις Καπαρναουμ]
He went first to Nazareth, his old home, but was rejected there (Luke 4:16-31). In Capernaum (probably the modern Τελλ μ — Tell Hūm) Jesus was in a large town, one of the centres of Galilean political and commercial life, a fishing mart, where many Gentiles came. Here the message of the kingdom would have a better chance than in Jerusalem with its ecclesiastical prejudices or in Nazareth with its local jealousies. So Jesus “made his home” (κατωικησεν — katōikēsen) here. [source]
Matthew 4:18 Casting a net into the sea [βαλλαντας αμπιβληστρον εις την ταλασσαν]
The word here for net is a casting-net (compare αμπιβαλλω — amphiballō in Mark 1:16, casting on both sides). The net was thrown over the shoulder and spread into a circle In Matthew 4:20 and Matthew 4:21 another word occurs for nets (δικτυα — diktua), a word used for nets of any kind. The large drag-net (σαγηνη — sagēnē) appears in Matthew 13:47. [source]
Matthew 4:24 The report of him went forth into all Syria [απηλτεν η ακοη αυτου εις ολην την Σψριαν]
Rumour (ακοη — akoē) carries things almost like the wireless or radio. The Gentiles all over Syria to the north heard of what was going on in Galilee. The result was inevitable. Jesus had a moving hospital of patients from all over Galilee and Syria. [source]
Matthew 5:1 He went up into the mountain [ανεβη εις το ορος]
Not “a” mountain as the Authorized Version has it. The Greek article is poorly handled in most English versions. We do not know what mountain it was. It was the one there where Jesus and the crowds were. “Delitzsch calls the Mount of Beatitudes the Sinai of the New Testament” (Vincent). He apparently went up to get in closer contact with the disciples, “seeing the multitudes.” Luke (Luke 6:12) says that he went out into the mountain to pray, Mark (Mark 3:13) that he went up and called the twelve. All three purposes are true. Luke adds that after a whole night in prayer and after the choice of the twelve Jesus came down to a level place on the mountain and spoke to the multitudes from Judea to Phoenicia. The crowds are great in both Matthew and in Luke and include disciples and the other crowds. There is no real difficulty in considering the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew and the Sermon on the Plain in Luke as one and the same. See full discussion in my Harmony of the Gospels. [source]
Matthew 6:6 Into thy closet [εις το ταμειον]
The word is a late syncopated form of ταμιειον — tamieion from ταμιας — tamias (steward) and the root ταμ — taṁ from τεμνω — temnō to cut. So it is a store-house, a separate apartment, one‘s private chamber, closet, or “den” where he can withdraw from the world and shut the world out and commune with God. [source]
Matthew 6:13 And bring us not into temptation [και μη εισενεγκηις εις πειρασμον]
“Bring” or “lead” bothers many people. It seems to present God as an active agent in subjecting us to temptation, a thing specifically denied in James 1:13. The word here translated “temptation” That is the idea here. Here we have a “Permissive imperative” as grammarians term it. The idea is then: “Do not allow us to be led into temptation.” There is a way out (1 Corinthians 10:13), but it is a terrible risk. [source]
Matthew 6:34 For the morrow [εις τεν αυριον]
The last resort of the anxious soul when all other fears are allayed. The ghost of tomorrow stalks out with all its hobgoblins of doubt and distrust. [source]
Matthew 8:12 Into the outer darkness [εις το σκοτος το εχωτερον]
Comparative adjective like our “further out,” the darkness outside the limits of the lighted palace, one of the figures for hell or punishment (Matthew 23:13; Matthew 25:30). The repeated article makes it bolder and more impressive, “the darkness the outside,” there where the wailing and gnashing of teeth is heard in the thick blackness of night. [source]
Matthew 8:19 A scribe [εις γραμματευς]
One Yet Jesus deals gently with him. [source]
Mark 1:9 In the Jordan [εις τον Ιορδανην]
So in Mark 1:10, εκ του υδατος — ek tou hudatos out of the water, after the baptism into the Jordan. Mark is as fond of “straightway” (ευτυς — euthus) as Matthew is of “then” (τοτε — tote). [source]
Mark 1:14 Jesus came into Galilee [ηλτεν ο Ιησους εις την Γαλιλαιαν]
Here Mark begins the narrative of the active ministry of Jesus and he is followed by Matthew and Luke. Mark undoubtedly follows the preaching of Peter. But for the Fourth Gospel we should not know of the year of work in various parts of the land (Perea, Galilee, Judea, Samaria) preceding the Galilean ministry. John supplements the Synoptic Gospels at this point as often. The arrest of John had much to do with the departure of Jesus from Judea to Galilee (John 4:1-4). [source]
Mark 1:38 Into the next towns [εις τας εχομενας κωμοπολεις]
It was a surprising decision for Jesus to leave the eager, excited throngs in Capernaum for the country town or village cities without walls or much importance. Only instance of the word in the N.T. Late Greek word. The use of εχομενας — echomenas for next is a classic use meaning clinging to, next to a thing. So in Luke 13:33; Acts 13:44; Acts 20:15; Hebrews 6:9. “D” here has εγγυς — eggus (near). [source]
Mark 1:39 Throughout all Galilee [Εις ολην την Γαλιλαιαν]
The first tour of Galilee by Jesus. We are told little about this great preaching tour. [source]
Mark 1:44 For a testimony unto them [εις μαρτυριον αυτοις]
Without the formal testimony of the priests the people would not receive the leper as officially clean. [source]
Mark 11:1 Unto Bethphage and Bethany [εις ητπαγη και ητανιαν]
Both together as in Luke 19:29, though Matthew 21:1 mentions only Bethphage. See discussion in Matthew for this and the Mount of Olives. [source]
Mark 11:14 No man eat fruit from thee henceforward forever [Μηκετι εις τον αιωνα εκ σου μηδεις καρπον παγοι]
The verb παγοι — phagoi is in the second aorist active optative. It is a wish for the future that in its negative form constitutes a curse upon the tree. Matthew 21:19 has the aorist subjunctive with double negative ου μηκετι γενηται — ou mēketi genētai a very strong negative prediction that amounts to a prohibition. See Matthew. Jesus probably spoke in the Aramaic on this occasion. [source]
Mark 13:13 But he that endureth to the end [ο δε υπομεινας εις τελος]
Note this aorist participle with the future verb. The idea here is true to the etymology of the word, remaining under (υπομενω — hupomenō) until the end. The divisions in families Jesus had predicted before (Luke 12:52.; Luke 14:25.). [source]
Mark 13:16 In the field [εις τον αγρον]
Here Matthew 24:18 has εν τωι αγρωι — en tōi agrōi showing identical use of εις — eis with accusative and εν — en with the locative. [source]
Mark 14:8 She hath anointed my body aforehand for the burying [προελαβεν μυρισαι το σωμα μου εις τον ενταπιασμον]
Literally, “she took beforehand to anoint my body for the burial.” She anticipated the event. This is Christ‘s justification of her noble deed. Matthew 26:12 also speaks of the burial preparation by Mary, using the verb ενταπιασαι — entaphiasai f0). [source]
Mark 14:9 For a memorial of her [εις μνημοσυνον αυτης]
So in Matthew 26:13. There are many mausoleums that crumble to decay. But this monument to Jesus fills the whole world still with its fragrance. What a hint there is here for those who wish to leave permanent memorials. [source]
Mark 14:10 He that was one of the twelve [ο εις των δωδεκα]
Note the article here, “the one of the twelve,” Matthew has only εις — heis “one.” Some have held that Mark here calls Judas the primate among the twelve. Rather he means to call attention to the idea that he was the one of the twelve who did this deed. [source]
Mark 14:20 One of the twelve [εις των δωδεκα]
It is as bad as that. The sign that Jesus gave, the one dipping in the dish with me (ο εμβαπτομενος μετ εμου εις το τρυβλιον — ho embaptomenos met' emou eis to trublion), escaped the notice of all. Jesus gave the sop to Judas who understood perfectly that Jesus knew his purpose. See Matthew 26:21-24 for further details. [source]
Mark 14:47 A certain one [εις τις]
Mark does not tell that it was Peter. Only John 18:10 does that after Peter‘s death. He really tried to kill the man, Malchus by name, as John again tells (John 18:10). Mark does not give the rebuke to Peter by Jesus in Matthew 26:52. [source]
Mark 14:60 Stood up in the midst [αναστας εις μεσον]
Second aorist active participle. For greater solemnity he arose to make up by bluster the lack of evidence. The high priest stepped out into the midst as if to attack Jesus by vehement questions. See notes on Matthew 26:59-68 for details here. [source]
Mark 14:68 Into the porch [εις το προαυλιον]
Only here in the New Testament. Plato uses it of a prelude on a flute. It occurs also in the plural for preparations the day before the wedding. Here it means the vestibule to the court. Matthew 26:71 has πυλωνα — pulōna a common word for gate or front porch. [source]
Mark 16:5 Entering into the tomb [εισελτουσαι εις το μνημειον]
Told also by Luke 24:3, though not by Matthew. [source]
Mark 16:19 Was received up into heaven [ανελημπτη εις τον ουρανον]
First aorist passive indicative. Luke gives the fact of the Ascension twice in Gospel (Luke 24:50.) and Acts 1:9-11. The Ascension in Mark took place after Jesus spoke to the disciples, not in Galilee (Mark 16:15-18), nor on the first or second Sunday evening in Jerusalem. We should not know when it took place nor where but for Luke who locates it on Olivet (Luke 24:50) at the close of the forty days (Acts 1:3) and so after the return from Galilee (Matthew 28:16). [source]
Mark 2:1 Again into Capernaum after some days [παλιν εις Καπαρναουμ δι ημερων]
After the first tour of Galilee when Jesus is back in the city which is now the headquarters for the work in Galilee. The phrase δι ημερων — di' hēmerōn means days coming in between (δια δυο — dia εν οικωι — duo two) the departure and return. [source]
Mark 2:1 In the house [εις οικον]
More exactly, at home, in the home of Peter, now the home of Jesus. Another picture directly from Peter‘s discourse. Some of the manuscripts have here εν — eis oikon illustrating the practical identity in meaning of εις — en and ηκουστη — eis (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 591-6). It was noised (ακουω — ēkousthē). It was heard (first aorist, passive indicative from akouō to hear). People spread the rumour, “He is at home, he is indoors.” [source]
Mark 2:22 But new wine into fresh wineskins [αλλα οινον νεον εις ασκους καινους]
Westcott and Hort bracket this clause as a Western non-interpolation though omitted only in D and some old Latin MSS. It is genuine in Luke 5:38 and may be so here. [source]
Mark 3:3 Stand forth [εγειρε εις το μεσον]
Step into the middle of the room where all can see. It was a bold defiance of the Christ‘s spying enemies. Wycliff rightly puts it: [source]
Mark 3:13 He goeth up into the mountain [αναβαινει εις το ορος]
So Matthew (Matthew 5:1) and Luke (Luke 6:12), “to pray” Luke adds. Historical present so common in Mark‘s vivid narrative. Neither Gospel gives the name of the mountain, assuming it as well known, probably not far from the lake. [source]
Mark 4:15 Sown in them [εσπαρμενον εις αυτους]
Within them, not just among them, “in his heart” (Matt.). [source]
Mark 4:35 Let us go over unto the other side [διελτωμεν εις το περαν]
Hortatory (volitive) subjunctive, second aorist active tense. They were on the western side and a row over to the eastern shore in the evening would be a delightful change and refreshing to the weary Christ. It was the only way to escape the crowds. [source]
Mark 4:37 The waves beat into the boat [τα κυματα επεβαλλεν εις το πλοιον]
Imperfect tense (were beating) vividly picturing the rolling over the sides of the boat “so that the boat was covered with the waves” (Matthew 8:24). Mark has it: “insomuch that the boat was now filling” Graphic description of the plight of the disciples. [source]
Mark 5:14 And in the country [και εις τους αγρους]
Mark adds this to “the city.” In the fields and in the city as the excited men ran they told the tale of the destruction of the hogs. They came to see All the city came out (Matthew), they went out to see (Luke). [source]
Mark 5:19 Go to thy house unto thy friends [υπαγε εις τον οικον σου προς τους σους]
“To thy own folks” rather than “thy friends.” Certainly no people needed the message about Christ more than these people who were begging Jesus to leave. Jesus had greatly blessed this man and so gave him the hardest task of all, to go home and witness there for Christ. In Galilee Jesus had several times forbidden the healed to tell what he had done for them because of the undue excitement and misunderstanding. But here it was different. There was no danger of too much enthusiasm for Christ in this environment. [source]
Mark 5:34 Go in peace [υπαγε εις ειρηνην]
She found sympathy, healing, and pardon for her sins, apparently. Peace here may have more the idea of the Hebrew ιστι υγιης απο της μαστιγος σου — shalōm health of body and soul. So Jesus adds: “Be whole of thy plague” Continue whole and well. [source]
Mark 6:1 Into his own country [εις την πατριδα αυτου]
So Matthew 13:54. There is no real reason for identifying this visit to Nazareth with that recorded in Luke 4:26-31 at the beginning of the Galilean Ministry. He was rejected both times, but it is not incongruous that Jesus should give Nazareth a second chance. It was only natural for Jesus to visit his mother, brothers, and sisters again. Neither Mark nor Matthew mention Nazareth here by name, but it is plain that by πατριδα — patrida the region of Nazareth is meant. He had not lived in Bethlehem since his birth. [source]
Mark 6:11 For a testimony unto them [εις μαρτυριον αυτοις]
Not in Matthew. Luke 9:5 has “for a testimony against them” The dative αυτοις — autois in Mark is the dative of disadvantage and really carries the same idea as επι — epi in Luke. The dramatic figure of shaking out (εκτιναχατε — ektinaxate effective aorist imperative, Mark and Matthew), shaking off (αποτινασσετε — apotinassete present imperative, Luke). [source]
Mark 6:31 Come ye yourselves apart into a desert place and rest awhile [Δευτε υμεις αυτοι κατ ιδιαν εις ερημον τοπον και αναπαυεστε ολιγον]
It was plain that they were over-wrought and excited and needed refreshment This is one of the needed lessons for all preachers and teachers, occasional change and refreshment. Even Jesus felt the need of it. [source]
Mark 6:36 Into the country and villages round about [εις τους κυκλωι αγρους και κωμας]
The fields The villages The other Bethsaida was on the Western side of the lake (Mark 6:45). [source]
Mark 7:17 When he was entered into the house from the multitude [οτε εισηλτεν εις οικον απο του οχλου]
This detail in Mark alone, probably in Peter‘s house in Capernaum. To the crowd Jesus spoke the parable of corban, but the disciples want it interpreted (cf. Mark 4:10., Mark 4:33.). Matthew 15:15 represents Peter as the spokesman as was usually the case. [source]
Mark 7:24 Into the borders of Tyre and Sidon [εις τα ορια Τυρου και Σιδωνος]
The departure from Capernaum was a withdrawal from Galilee, the second of the four withdrawals from Galilee. The first had been to the region of Bethsaida Julias in the territory of Herod Philip. This is into distinctly heathen land. It was not merely the edge of Phoenicia, but into the parts of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21). There was too much excitement among the people, too much bitterness among the Pharisees, too much suspicion on the part of Herod Antipas, too much dulness on the part of the disciples for Jesus to remain in Galilee. [source]
Mark 8:10 Into the parts of Dalmanutha [εις τα μερη Δαλμανουτα]
Matthew 15:39 calls it “the borders of Magadan.” Both names are unknown elsewhere, but apparently the same region of Galilee on the western side of the lake not far from Tiberias. Mark here uses “parts” (μερη — merē) in the same sense as “borders” (ορια — horia) in Mark 7:24 just as Matthew reverses it with “parts” in Matthew 15:21 and “borders” here in Matthew 15:39. Mark has here “with his disciples” (μετα των ματητων αυτου — meta tōn mathētōn autou) only implied in Matthew 15:39. [source]
Mark 8:22 Unto Bethsaida [εις ητσαιδαν]
On the Eastern side not far from the place of the feeding of the five thousand, Bethsaida Julias. Note dramatic presents they come This incident in Mark alone (Mark 8:22-26). [source]
Mark 8:26 To his home [εις οικον αυτου]
A joyful homecoming that. He was not allowed to enter the village and create excitement before Jesus moved on to Caesarea Philippi. [source]
Mark 8:27 Into the villages of Caesarea Philippi [εις τας κωμας Καισαριας της Πιλιππου]
Parts (μερη — merē) Matthew 16:13 has, the Caesarea of Philippi in contrast to the one down on the Mediterranean Sea. Mark means the villages belonging to the district around Caesarea Philippi. This region is on a spur of Mount Hermon in Iturea ruled by Herod Philip so that Jesus is safe from annoyance by Herod Antipas or the Pharisees and Sadducees. Up here on this mountain slope Jesus will have his best opportunity to give the disciples special teaching concerning the crucifixion just a little over six months ahead. So Jesus asked (επηρωτα — epērōtā descriptive imperfect) [source]
Luke 1:39 Into the hill country [εις την ορινην]
Luke uses this adjective twice in this context (here and Luke 1:65) instead of το ορος — to oros the mountains. It is an old word and is in the lxx, but nowhere else in the N.T. The name of the city where Zacharias lived is not given unless Judah here means Juttah (Joshua 15:55). Hebron was the chief city of this part of Judea. [source]
Luke 10:7 Go not from house to house [μη μεταβαινετε εχ οικιας εις οικιαν]
As a habit, μη — mē and the present imperative, and so avoid waste of time with such rounds of invitations as would come. [source]
Luke 10:10 Into the streets thereof [εις τας πλατειας αυτης]
Out of the inhospitable houses into the broad open streets. [source]
Luke 10:38 Received him into her house [υπεδεχατο αυτον εις την οικιαν]
Aorist middle indicative of υποδεχομαι — hupodechomai an old verb to welcome as a guest (in the N.T. only here and Luke 19:6; Acts 17:7; James 2:25). Martha is clearly the mistress of the home and is probably the elder sister. There is no evidence that she was the wife of Simon the leper (John 12:1.). It is curious that in an old cemetery at Bethany the names of Martha, Eleazar, and Simon have been found. [source]
Luke 11:7 In bed [εις τεν κοιτην]
Note use of εις — eis in sense of εν — en Often a whole family would sleep in the same room. [source]
Luke 11:32 At the preaching of Jonah [εις το κηρυγμα Ιωνα]
Note this use of εις — eis as in Matthew 10:41; Matthew 12:41. Luke inserts the words about the Queen of the South (Luke 11:31) in between the discussion of Jonah (Luke 11:29., Luke 11:32). Both Σολομωνος — Solomōnos (Luke 11:31) and Ιωνα — Iōnā (Luke 11:32) are in the ablative case after the comparative πλειον — pleion (more, something more). [source]
Luke 11:33 In a cellar [εις κρυπτην]
A crypt (same word) or hidden place from κρυπτω — kruptō to hide. Late and rare word and here only in the N.T. These other words (lamp, λυχνον — luchnon bushel, μοδιον — modion stand, λυχνιαν — luchnian) have all been discussed previously (see note on Matthew 5:15). [source]
Luke 12:5 Into hell [εις την γεενναν]
See note on Matthew 5:22. Gehenna is a transliteration of τουτον ποβητητε — Gė -Hinnom Valley of Hinnon where the children were thrown on to the red-hot arms of Molech. Josiah (2 Kings 23:10) abolished these abominations and then it was a place for all kinds of refuse which burned ceaselessly and became a symbol of punishment in the other world.This one fear (touton phobēthēte). As above. [source]
Luke 12:10 But unto him that blasphemeth against the Holy Spirit [τωι δε εις το αγιον πνευμα βλασπημησαντι]
This unpardonable sin is given by Mark 3:28.; Matthew 12:31. immediately after the charge that Jesus was in league with Beelzebub. Luke here separates it from the same charge made in Judea (Luke 11:15-20). As frequently said, there is no sound reason for saying that Jesus only spoke his memorable sayings once. Luke apparently finds a different environment here. Note the use of εις — eis here in the sense of “against.” [source]
Luke 12:19 Laid up for many years [κειμενα εις ετη πολλα]
Not in D and some other Latin MSS. The man‘s apostrophe to his “soul” (πσυχη — psuchē) is thoroughly Epicurean, for his soul feeds on his goods. The asyndeton here (take thine ease, eat, drink, be merry) shows his eagerness. Note difference in tenses (αναπαυου — anapauou keep on resting, παγε — phage eat at once, πιε — pie drink thy fill, ευπραινου — euphrainou keep on being merry), first and last presents, the other two aorists. [source]
Luke 12:21 Not rich toward God [μη εις τεον πλουτων]
The only wealth that matters and that lasts. Cf. Luke 16:9; Matthew 6:19. Some MSS. do not have this verse. Westcott and Hort bracket it. [source]
Luke 13:9 And if it bear fruit thenceforth [καν μεν ποιησηι καρπον εις το μελλον]
Aposiopesis, sudden breaking off for effect (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1203). See it also in Mark 11:32; Acts 23:9. Trench (Parables) tells a story like this of intercession for the fig tree for one year more which is widely current among the Arabs today who say that it will certainly bear fruit this time. [source]
Luke 13:11 And could in no wise lift herself up [και μη δυναμενη ανακυπσαι εις το παντελες]
Negative form of the previous statement. Ανακυπσαι — Anakupsai first aorist active infinitive of ανακυπτω — anakuptō Unable to bend herself up or back at all The poor old woman had to come in all bent over. [source]
Luke 13:19 Cast into his own garden [εβαλεν εις κηπον εαυτου]
Different from “earth” (Mark) or “field” (Matthew.)” Κηπος — Kēpos old word for garden, only here in the N.T. and John 19:1, John 19:26; John 19:41.Became a tree (εγενετο εις δενδρον — egeneto eis dendron). Common Hebraism, very frequent in lxx, only in Luke in the N.T., but does appear in Koiné though rare in papyri; this use of εις — eis after words like κατεσκηνωσεν — ginomai It is a translation Hebraism in Luke.Lodged Mark and Matthew have kataskēnoin infinitive of the same verb, to make tent (or nest). [source]
Luke 13:19 Became a tree [εγενετο εις δενδρον]
Common Hebraism, very frequent in lxx, only in Luke in the N.T., but does appear in Koiné though rare in papyri; this use of εις — eis after words like κατεσκηνωσεν — ginomai It is a translation Hebraism in Luke. [source]
Luke 13:22 Journeying on unto Jerusalem [πορειαν ποιουμενος εις Ιεροσολυμα]
Making his way to Jerusalem. Note tenses here of continued action, and distributive use of κατα — kata with cities and villages. This is the second of the journeys to Jerusalem in this later ministry corresponding to that in John 11. [source]
Luke 14:28 Whether he hath wherewith to complete it [ει εχει εις απαρτισμον]
If he has anything for completion of it. Απαρτισμον — Apartismon is a rare and late word (in the papyri and only here in the N.T.). It is from απαρτιζω — apartizō to finish off (απ — ap - and αρτιζω — artizō like our articulate), to make even or square. Cf. εχηρτισμενος — exērtismenos in 2 Timothy 3:17. [source]
Luke 15:17 But when he came to himself [εις εαυτον δε ελτων]
As if he had been far from himself as he was from home. As a matter of fact he had been away, out of his head, and now began to see things as they really were. Plato is quoted by Ackerman (Christian Element in Plato) as thinking of redemption as coming to oneself. [source]
Luke 16:9 That they may receive you into the eternal tabernacles [ινα δεχωνται υμας εις τας αιωνιους σκηνας]
This is the purpose of Christ in giving the advice about their making friends by the use of money. The purpose is that those who have been blessed and helped by the money may give a welcome to their benefactors when they reach heaven. There is no thought here of purchasing an entrance into heaven by the use of money. That idea is wholly foreign to the context. These friends will give a hearty welcome when one gives him mammon here. The wise way to lay up treasure in heaven is to use one‘s money for God here on earth. That will give a cash account there of joyful welcome, not of purchased entrance. [source]
Luke 16:16 Entereth violently into it [εις αυτην βιαζεται]
A corresponding saying occurs in Matthew 11:12 in a very different context. In both the verb βιαζεται — biazetai occurs also, but nowhere else in the N.T. It is present middle here and can be middle or passive in Matthew, which see note. It is rare in late prose. Deissmann (Bible Studies, p. 258) cites an inscription where βιαζομαι — biazomai is reflexive middle and used absolutely. Here the meaning clearly is that everyone forces his way into the kingdom of God, a plea for moral enthusiasm and spiritual passion and energy that some today affect to despise. [source]
Luke 16:22 Into Abraham‘s bosom [εις τον ολπον Αβρααμ]
To be in Abraham‘s bosom is to the Jew to be in Paradise. In John 1:18 the Logos is in the bosom of the Father. Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob are in heaven and welcome those who come (Matthew 8:11; 4 Maccabees 14:17). The beloved disciple reclined on the bosom of Jesus at the last passover (John 13:23) and this fact indicates special favour. So the welcome to Lazarus was unusual.Was buried (εταπη — etaphē). Second aorist (effective) passive of the common verb ταπτω — thaptō Apparently in contrast with the angelic visitation to the beggar. [source]
Luke 18:35 Unto Jericho [εις Ιερειχω]
See note on Matthew 20:29 and note on Mark 10:46 for discussion of the two Jerichos in Mark and Matthew (the old and the new as here). [source]
Luke 19:4 Ran on before [προδραμων εις το εμπροστεν]
Second aorist active participle of προτρεχω — protrechō (defective verb). “Before” occurs twice (προ — pro - and εις το εμπροστεν — eis to emprosthen). [source]
Luke 19:29 Unto Bethphage and Bethany [εις ητπαγη και ητανια]
Both indeclinable forms of the Hebrew or Aramaic names. In Mark 11:1 “Bethany” is inflected regularly. [source]
Luke 2:3 Each to his own city [εκαστος εις την εαυτου πολιν]
A number of papyri in Egypt have the heading enrolment by household Here again Luke is vindicated. Each man went to the town where his family register was kept. [source]
Luke 2:34 Is set for the falling and the rising up of many in Israel [Κειται εις πτωσιν και αναστασιν πολλων εν τωι Ισραηλ]
Present indicative of the old defective verb appearing only in present and imperfect in the N.T. Sometimes it is used as the passive of τιτημι — tithēmi as here. The falling of some and the rising up of others is what is meant. He will be a stumbling-block to some (Isaiah 8:14; Matthew 21:42, Matthew 21:44; Romans 9:33; 1 Peter 2:16.) who love darkness rather than light (John 3:19), he will be the cause of rising for others (Romans 6:4, Romans 6:9; Ephesians 2:6). “Judas despairs, Peter repents: one robber blasphemes, the other confesses” (Plummer). Jesus is the magnet of the ages. He draws some, he repels others. This is true of all epoch-making men to some extent. [source]
Luke 2:39 To their own city Nazareth [εις πολιν εαυτων Ναζαρετ]
See note on Matthew 2:23 about Nazareth. Luke tells nothing of the flight to Egypt and the reason for the return to Nazareth instead of Bethlehem, the place of the birth of Jesus as told in Matthew 2:13-23. But then neither Gospel gives all the details of this period. Luke has also nothing about the visit of the wise men (Matthew 2:1-12) as Matthew tells nothing of the shepherds and of Simeon and Anna (Luke 2:8-28). The two Gospels supplement each other. [source]
Luke 21:13 For a testimony [εις μαρτυριον]
To their loyalty to Christ. Besides, “the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church.” [source]
Luke 22:3 Satan entered into Judas [εισηλτεν εις Ιουδαν]
Ingressive aorist active indicative. Satan was now renewing his attack on Jesus suspended temporarily (Luke 4:13) “until a good chance.” He had come back by the use of Simon Peter (Mark 8:33; Matthew 16:23). The conflict went on and Jesus won ultimate victory (Luke 10:18). Now Satan uses Judas and has success with him for Judas allowed him to come again and again (John 13:27). Judas evidently opened the door to his heart and let Satan in. Then Satan took charge and he became a devil as Jesus said (John 6:70). This surrender to Satan in no way relieves Judas of his moral responsibility. [source]
Luke 22:19 In remembrance of me [εις την εμην αναμνησιν]
Objective use of the possessive pronoun εμην — emēn not the subjective.This do (τουτο ποιειτε — touto poieite). Present active indicative, repetition, keep on doing this. [source]
Luke 22:33 To prison and to death [εις πυλακην και εις τανατον]
Evidently Peter was not flattered by the need of Christ‘s earnest prayers for his welfare and loyalty. Hence this loud boast. [source]
Luke 22:40 Pray that ye enter not into temptation [προσευχεστε μη εισελτειν εις πειρασμον]
“Keep on praying not to enter (ingressive aorist infinitive, not even once) into temptation.” It is real “temptation” here, not just “trial.” Jesus knew the power of temptation and the need of prayer. These words throw a light on the meaning of his language in Matthew 6:13. Jesus repeats this warning in Luke 22:46. [source]
Luke 22:54 Into the high priest‘s house [εις την οικιαν του αρχιερεως]
Luke alone mentions “the house.” Though it is implied in Mark 14:53; Matthew 26:57. [source]
Luke 23:42 In thy kingdom [εις την βασιλειαν σου]
Probably no difference in sense is to be found, for εις — eis and εν — en are essentially the same preposition. He refers to the Messianic rule of Jesus and begs that Jesus will remember him. It is not clear whether he hopes for immediate blessing or only at the judgment. [source]
Luke 3:3 The baptism of repentance unto remission of sins [βαπτισμα μετανοιας εις απεσιν αμαρτιων]
The same phrase as in Mark 1:4, which see note for discussion of these important words. The word remission In medical writers it is used for the relaxing of disease. [source]
Luke 4:26 Unto Zarephath [εις Σαρεπτα]
The modern village Surafend on the coast road between Tyre and Sidon. [source]
Luke 4:35 Had thrown him down in the midst [ριπσαν αυτον εις το μεσον]
First aorist (effective) participle of ριπτω — rhiptō an old verb with violent meaning, to fling, throw, hurl off or down. [source]
Luke 4:38 Into the house of Simon [εις την οικιαν Σιμωνος]
“Peter‘s house” (Matthew 8:14). “The house of Simon and Andrew” (Mark 1:29). Paul‘s reference to Peter‘s wife (1 Corinthians 9:5) is pertinent. They lived together in Capernaum. This house came also to be the Capernaum home of Jesus.Simon‘s wife‘s mother (πεντερα του Σιμωνος — penthera tou Simōnos). The word πεντερα — penthera for mother-in-law is old and well established in usage. Besides the parallel passages (Mark 1:30; Matthew 8:14; Luke 4:38) it occurs in the N.T. only in Luke 12:53. The corresponding word πεντερος — pentheros father-in-law, occurs in John 18:13 alone in the N.T.Was holden with a great fever Periphrastic imperfect passive, the analytical tense accenting the continuous fever, perhaps chronic and certainly severe. Luke employs this verb nine times and only three others in the N.T. (Matthew 4:24 passive with diseases here; 2 Corinthians 5:14 active; Philemon 1:23 passive). In Acts 28:8 the passive “with dysentery” is like the construction here and is a common one in Greek medical writers as in Greek literature generally. Luke uses the passive with “fear,” Luke 8:37, the active for holding the hands over the ears (Acts 7:57) and for pressing one or holding together (Luke 8:45; Luke 19:43; Luke 22:63), the direct middle for holding oneself to preaching (Acts 18:5). It is followed here by the instrumental case. Hobart (Medical Language of Luke, p. 3) quotes Galen as dividing fevers into “great” (μεγαλοι — megaloi) and “small” (σμικροι — smikroi). [source]
Luke 5:4 Put out into the deep [επαναγαγε εις το βατος]
The same double compound verb as in Luke 5:3, only here second aorist active imperative second person singular.Let down (χαλασατε — chalasate). Peter was master of the craft and so he was addressed first. First aorist active imperative second person plural. Here the whole crew are addressed. The verb is the regular nautical term for lowering cargo or boats (Acts 27:17, Acts 27:30). But it was used for lowering anything from a higher place (Mark 2:4; Acts 9:25; 2 Corinthians 11:33). For a catch (εις αγραν — eis agran). This purpose was the startling thing that stirred up Simon. [source]
Luke 5:14 For a testimony unto them [εις μαρτυριον αυτοις]
The use of αυτοις — autois (them) here is “according to sense,” as we say, for it has no antecedent in the context, just to people in general. But this identical phrase with absence of direct reference occurs in Mark and Matthew, pretty good proof of the use of one by the other. Both Matthew 8:4; Luke 5:14 follow Mark 1:44. [source]
Luke 5:19 By what way they might bring him in [ποιας εις ενεγκωσιν αυτον]
Deliberative subjunctive of the direct question retained in the indirect. [source]
Luke 5:19 Into the midst before Jesus [εις το μεσον εμπροστεν του Ιησου]
The four friends had succeeded, probably each holding a rope to a corner of the pallet. It was a moment of triumph over difficulties and surprise to all in the house (Peter‘s apparently, Mark 2:1). [source]
Luke 5:32 To repentance [εις μετανοιαν]
Alone in Luke not genuine in Mark 2:17; Matthew 9:12. Only sinners would need a call to repentance, a change of mind and life. For the moment Jesus accepts the Pharisaic division between “righteous” and “sinners” to score them and to answer their criticism. At the other times he will show that they only pretend to be “righteous” and are “hypocrites” in reality. But Jesus has here blazed the path for all soul-winners. The self-satisfied are the hard ones to win and they often resent efforts to win them to Christ. [source]
Luke 5:17 Out of every village of Galilee and Judea and Jerusalem [δυναμις Κυριου ην εις το ιασται αυτον]
Edersheim (Jewish Social Life) observes that the Jews distinguished Jerusalem as a separate district in Judea. Plummer considers it hyperbole in Luke to use “every village.” But one must recall that Jesus had already made one tour of Galilee which stirred the Pharisees and rabbis to active opposition. Judea had already been aroused and Jerusalem was the headquarters of the definite campaign now organized against Jesus. One must bear in mind that John 4:1-4 shows that Jesus had already left Jerusalem and Judea because of the jealousy of the Pharisees. They are here on purpose to find fault and to make charges against Jesus. One must not forget that there were many kinds of Pharisees and that not all of them were as bad as these legalistic and punctilious hypocrites who deserved the indictment and exposure of Christ in Matthew 23. Paul himself is a specimen of the finer type of Pharisee which, however, developed into the persecuting fanatic till Jesus changed his whole life.The power of the Lord was with him to heal (Κυριου — dunamis Kuriou ēn eis to iāsthai auton). So the best texts. It is neat Greek, but awkward English: “Then was the power of the Lord for the healing as to him (Jesus).” Here δυναμεις — Kuriou refers to Jehovah.Dunamis (dynamite) is one of the common words for “miracles” What Luke means is that Jesus had the power of the Lord God to heal with. He does not mean that this power was intermittent. He simply calls attention to its presence with Jesus on this occasion. [source]
Luke 6:12 He went out into the mountains to pray [εχελτειν αυτον εις το ορος προσευχασται]
Note εχ — ex - where Mark 3:13 has goeth up Luke alone has “to pray” as he so often notes the habit of prayer in Jesus. [source]
Luke 7:1 Had ended [εις τας ακοας του λαου]
First aorist active indicative. There is here a reference to the conclusion of the Sermon on the Mount, but with nothing concerning the impression produced by the discourse such as is seen in Matthew 7:28. This verse really belongs as the conclusion of Chapter 6, not as the beginning of Chapter 7.In the ears of the people (Ακοη — eis tas akoas tou laou). ακουω — Akoē from akouō to hear, is used of the sense of hearing (1 Corinthians 12:17), the ear with which one hears (Mark 7:35; Hebrews 5:11), the thing heard or the report (Romans 10:16) or oral instruction (Galatians 3:2, Galatians 3:5). Both Matthew 8:5-13; Luke 7:1-10 locate the healing of the centurion‘s servant in Capernaum where Jesus was after the Sermon on the Mount. [source]
Luke 7:30 Rejected for themselves [ητετησαν εις εαυτους]
The first aorist active of ατετεω — atheteō first seen in lxx and Polybius. Occurs in the papyri. These legalistic interpreters of the law refused to admit the need of confession of sin on their part and so set aside the baptism of John. They annulled God‘s purposes of grace so far as they applied to them. [source]
Luke 8:31 Into the abyss [εις την αβυσσον]
Rare old word common in lxx from α — a privative and βατς — bathūs (deep). So bottomless place (supply χωρα — chōra). The deep sea in Genesis 1:2; Genesis 7:11. The common receptacle of the dead in Romans 10:7 and especially the abode of demons as here and Revelation 9:1-11; Revelation 11:7; Revelation 17:8; Revelation 20:1, Revelation 20:3. [source]
Luke 9:5 For a testimony against them [εις μαρτυριον επ αυτους]
Note use of επ αυτους — ep' autous where Mark 6:11 has simply the dative αυτοις — autois (disadvantage), really the same idea. [source]
Luke 9:28 Into the mountain [εις το ορος]
Probably Mount Hermon because we know that Jesus was near Caesarea Philippi when Peter made the confession (Mark 8:27; Matthew 16:13). Hermon is still the glory of Palestine from whose heights one can view the whole of the land. It was a fit place for the Transfiguration.To pray (προσευχασται — proseuxasthai). Peculiar to Luke who so often mentions Christ‘s habit of prayer (cf. Luke 3:21). See also Luke 9:29 “as he was praying” (εν τωι προσευχεσται — en tōi proseuchesthai one of Luke‘s favourite idioms).His countenance was altered Literally, “the appearance of his face became different.” Matthew 17:2 says that “his face did shine as the sun.” Luke does not use the word “transfigured” Literally, And his raiment white radiant. There is no and between “white” and “dazzling.” The participle εχαστραπτων — exastraptōn is from the compound verb meaning to flash The simple verb is common for lightning flashes and bolts, but the compound in the lxx and here alone in the N.T. See note on Mark 9:3 “exceeding white” and the note on Matthew 17:2 “white as the light.” [source]
Luke 9:44 Sink into your ears [Τεστε υμεις εις τα ωτα υμων]
Second aorist imperative middle of τιτημι — tithēmi common verb. “Do you (note emphatic position) yourselves (whatever others do) put into your ears.” No word like “sink” here. The same prediction here as in Mark 9:31 = Matthew 17:22 about the Son of man only without mention of death and resurrection as there. See note on Mark 9:31 for discussion. [source]
Luke 9:51 To go to Jerusalem [του πορευεσται εις Ιερουσαλημ]
Genitive infinitive of purpose. Luke three times mentions Christ making his way to Jerusalem (Luke 9:51; Luke 13:22; Luke 17:11) and John mentions three journeys to Jerusalem during the later ministry (John 7:10; John 11:17; John 12:1). It is natural to take these journeys to be the same in each of these Gospels. Luke does not make definite location of each incident and John merely supplements here and there. But in a broad general way they seem to correspond. [source]
Luke 9:53 Because his face was going to Jerusalem [οτι το προσωπον αυτου ην πορευομενον εις Ιερουσαλημ]
Periphrastic imperfect middle. It was reason enough to the churlish Samaritans. [source]
Luke 9:61 To bid farewell to them that are at my house [αποταχασται τοις εις τον οικον μου]
In itself that was a good thing to do. This first aorist middle infinitive is from αποτασσω — apotassō an old verb, to detach, to separate, to assign as a detachment of soldiers. In the N.T. it only appears in the middle voice with the meaning common in late writers to bid adieu, to separate oneself from others. It is used in Acts 18:18 of Paul taking leave of the believers in Corinth. See also Mark 6:46; 2 Corinthians 2:13. It is thus a formal function and this man meant to go home and set things in order there and then in due time to come and follow Jesus. [source]
Luke 9:62 And looking back [και βλεπων εις τα οπισω]
Looking to the things behind. To do that is fatal as any ploughman knows. The call to turn back is often urgent. Fit (ευτετος — euthetos). From ευ — eu and τιτημι — tithēmi =well-placed, suited for, adapted to. “The first case is that of inconsiderate impulse, the second that of conflicting duties, the third that of a divided mind” (Bruce). [source]
John 1:7 For witness [εις μαρτυριαν]
Old word from μαρτυρεω — martureō (from μαρτυς — martus), both more common in John‘s writings than the rest of the N.T. This the purpose of the Baptist‘s ministry. That he might bear witness Final clause with ινα — hina and aorist active subjunctive of μαρτυρεω — martureō to make clearer εις μαρτυριαν — eis marturian Of the light “Concerning the light.” The light was shining and men with blinded eyes were not seeing the light (John 1:26), blinded by the god of this world still (2 Corinthians 4:4). John had his own eyes opened so that he saw and told what he saw. That is the mission of every preacher of Christ. But he must first have his own eyes opened. That all might believe Final clause with ινα — hina and first aorist active subjunctive of πιστευω — pisteuō ingressive aorist “come to believe.” This is one of John‘s great words (about 100 times), “with nine times the frequency with which it is used by the Synoptists” (Bernard). And yet πιστις — pistis so common in Paul, John uses only in 1 John 5:4 and four times in the Apocalypse where πιστευω — pisteuō does not occur at all. Here it is used absolutely as in John 1:50, etc. Through him As the intermediate agent in winning men to believe in Christ (the Logos) as the Light and the Life of men. This is likewise the purpose of the author of this book (John 1:31). The preacher is merely the herald to point men to Christ. [source]
John 1:11 Unto his own [εις τα ιδια]
Neuter plural, “unto his own things,” the very idiom used in John 19:27 when the Beloved Disciple took the mother of Jesus “to his own home.” The world was “the own home” of the Logos who had made it. See also John 16:32; Acts 21:6. They that were his own In the narrower sense, “his intimates,” “his own family,” “his own friends” as in John 13:1. Jesus later said that a prophet is not without honour save in his own country (Mark 6:4; John 4:44), and the town of Nazareth where he lived rejected him (Luke 4:28.; Matthew 13:58). Probably here οι ιδιοι — hoi idioi means the Jewish people, the chosen people to whom Christ was sent first (Matthew 15:24), but in a wider sense the whole world is included in οι ιδιοι — hoi idioi Conder‘s The Hebrew Tragedy emphasizes the pathos of the situation that the house of Israel refused to welcome the Messiah when he did come, like a larger and sadder Enoch Arden experience. Received him not Second aorist active indicative of παραλαμβανω — paralambanō old verb to take to one‘s side, common verb to welcome, the very verb used by Jesus in John 14:3 of the welcome to his Father‘s house. Cf. κατελαβεν — katelaben in John 1:5. Israel slew the Heir (Hebrews 1:2) when he came, like the wicked husbandmen (Luke 20:14). [source]
John 10:36 Of him whom the Father sanctified and sent into the world [ον ο πατηρ ηγιασεν και απεστειλεν εις τον κοσμον]
Another relative clause with the antecedent Recitative οτι — hoti again before direct quotation. Because I said Causal use of οτι — hoti and regular form ειπον — eipon (cf. ειπα — eipa in John 10:34). I am the Son of God Direct quotation again after ειπον — eipon This Jesus had implied long before as in John 2:16 (my Father) and had said in John 5:18-30 (the Father, the Son), in John 9:35 in some MSS., and virtually in John 10:30. They will make this charge against Jesus before Pilate (John 19:7). Jesus does not use the article here with υιος — huios perhaps (Westcott) fixing attention on the character of Son rather than on the person as in Hebrews 1:2. There is no answer to this question with its arguments. [source]
John 10:42 Many believed on him there [πολλοι επιστευσαν εις αυτον εκει]
See John 1:12; John 2:11 for same idiom. Striking witness to the picture of the Messiah drawn by John. When Jesus came they recognized the original. See John 1:29-34. What about our sermons about Jesus if he were to walk down the aisle in visible form according to A.J. Gordon‘s dream? [source]
John 11:26 Shall never die [ου μη αποτανηι εις τον αιωνα]
Strong double negative ου μη — ou mē with second aorist active subjunctive of αποτνησκω — apothnēskō again (but spiritual death, this time), “shall not die for ever” (eternal death). Believest thou this? (πιστευεις τουτο — pisteueis touto) Sudden test of Martha‘s insight and faith with all the subtle turns of thought involved. [source]
John 11:30 Now Jesus was not yet come into the town [ουπω δε εληλυτει ο Ιησους εις την κωμην]
Explanatory parenthesis with past perfect as in John 11:19. Martha had her interview while he was still coming (John 11:20) and left him (went off, απηλτεν — apēlthen John 11:28) to hurry to Mary with the news. Why Jesus tarried still where he had met Martha we do not know. Westcott says, “as though He would meet the sisters away from the crowd of mourners.” [source]
John 11:52 But that he might also gather together into one [αλλ ινα συναγαγηι εις εν]
Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the second aorist active subjunctive of συναγω — sunagō Caiaphas was thinking only of the Jewish people The explanation and interpretation of John here follow the lead of the words of Jesus about the other sheep and the one flock in John 10:16. That are scattered abroad (διασκορπιζω — ta dieskorpismena). Perfect passive articular participle of εις εν — diaskorpizō late verb (Polybius, lxx) to scatter apart, to winnow grain from chaff, only here in John. The meaning here is not the Diaspora (Jews scattered over the world), but the potential children of God in all lands and all ages that the death of Christ will gather “into one” (eis hen). A glorious idea, but far beyond Caiaphas. [source]
John 12:7 Suffer her to keep it against the day of my burying [Απες αυτην ινα εις την ημεραν του ενταπιασμου μου τηρησηι αυτο]
This reading (ινα — hina tērēsēi purpose clause with τηρεω — hina and first aorist active subjunctive of τετηρεκεν — tēreō) rather than that of the Textus Receptus (just ινα — tetēreken perfect active indicative) is correct. It is supported by Aleph B D L W Theta. The απες — hina can be rendered as above after ενταπιασμος — aphes according to Koiné idiom or more probably: “Let her alone: it was that,” etc. (supplying “it was”). Either makes good sense. The word ενταπιαζω — entaphiasmos is a later and rare substantive from the late verb entaphiazō to prepare for burial (Matthew 26:12; John 19:40), and means preparation for burial. In N.T. only here and Mark 14:8. “Preparation for my burial” is the idea here and in Mark. The idea of Jesus is that Mary had saved this money to use in preparing his body for burial. She is giving him the flowers before the funeral. We can hardly take it that Mary did not use all of the ointment for Mark (Mark 14:3) says that she broke it and yet he adds (Mark 14:8) what John has here. It is a paradox, but Jesus is fond of paradoxes. Mary has kept this precious gift by giving it now beforehand as a preparation for my burial. We really keep what we give to Christ. This is Mary‘s glory that she had some glimmering comprehension of Christ‘s death which none of the disciples possessed. [source]
John 12:36 Believe in the light [πιστευετε εις το πως]
That is, “believe in me as the Messiah” (John 8:12; John 9:5). That ye may become sons of light Purpose clause with ινα — hina and second aorist subject of γινομαι — ginomai to become. They were not “sons of light,” a Hebrew idiom (cf. John 17:12; Luke 16:8 with the contrast), an idiom used by Paul in 1 Thessalonians 5:5; Ephesians 5:8. It is equivalent to “enlightened men” (Bernard) and Jesus called his disciples the light of the world (Matthew 5:14). Hid himself from them Second aorist passive indicative of κρυπτω — kruptō late form (in lxx) for old εκρυπη — ekruphē “was hidden from them,” as in John 8:59. This part of John 12:36 begins a new paragraph. [source]
John 13:22 Looked one on another [εβλεπον εις αλληλους]
Inchoative imperfect of βλεπω — blepō “began to glance at one another in bewilderment” (doubting, απορουμενοι — aporoumenoi present passive participle of απορεω — aporeō to be at a loss, to lose one‘s way, α — a privative and πορος — poros way). They recalled their strife about precedence and Judas betrayed nothing. Concerning whom he spake Indirect question retaining present active indicative λεγει — legei See same on Mark 14:19; note on Matthew 26:22; and note on Luke 22:23. [source]
John 13:8 Thou shalt never wash my feet [ου μη νιπσηις μου τους ποδας εις τον αιωνα]
Strong double negative ου μη — ou mē with first aorist active subjunctive of νιπτω — niptō with εις τον αιωνα — eis ton aiōna (for ever) added and μου — mou (my) made emphatic by position. Peter‘s sudden humility should settle the issue, he felt. If I wash thee not Third-class condition with εαν μη — ean mē (negative). Jesus picks up the challenge of Peter whose act amounted to irreverence and want of confidence. “The first condition of discipleship is self-surrender” (Westcott). So “Jesus, waiting with the basin” (Dods), concludes. Thou hast no part with me Not simply here at the supper with its fellowship, but in the deeper sense of mystic fellowship as Peter was quick to see. Jesus does not make foot-washing essential to spiritual fellowship, but simply tests Peter‘s real pride and mock-humility by this symbol of fellowship. [source]
John 13:27 Then entered Satan into him [τοτε εισηλτεν εις εκεινον ο Σατανας]
The only time the word Satan occurs in the Gospel. As he had done before (John 13:2; Luke 22:3) until Christ considered him a devil (John 6:70). This is the natural outcome of one who plays with the devil. That thou doest, do quickly Aorist active imperative of ποιεω — poieō “Do more quickly what thou art doing.” Ταχειον — Tacheion is comparative of ταχεως — tacheōs (John 11:31) and in N.T. only here, John 20:4; Hebrews 13:19, Hebrews 13:23. See the eagerness of Jesus for the passion in Luke 12:50. [source]
John 15:21 Unto you [εις υμας]
Like the dative υμιν — humin (Textus Receptus) as in the papyri and modern Greek (Robertson, Grammar, p. 594). For my name‘s sake See John 15:20. See this same warning and language in Matthew 10:22; Mark 13:13; Matthew 24:9; Luke 21:17). There is little difference in meaning from ενεκεν μου — heneken mou (Mark 13:9; Luke 21:12). Loyalty to the name of Christ will bring persecution as they will soon know (Acts 5:41; Philemon 1:29; 1 Peter 4:14). About the world‘s ignorance of God see Luke 23:34; Acts 3:17; John 16:3. [source]
John 16:9 Because they believe not on me [οτι ου πιστευουσιν εις εμε]
Without this conviction by the Paraclete such men actually have a pride of intellectual superiority in refusing to believe on Jesus. [source]
John 17:23 That they may be perfected into one [ινα ωσιν τετελειωμενοι εις εν]
Purpose clause again with ινα — hina (nineteen times in this prayer, this the fifteenth) with the periphrastic perfect passive subjunctive of τελειοω — teleioō (John 17:4), permanent state, with εις εν — eis hen (into one) as the goal and final result. That the world may know Present active subjunctive of γινωσκω — ginōskō with ινα — hina like the present tense of πιστευω — pisteuō in John 17:21, “that the world may keep on knowing” with the same pregnant phrase “that thou me didst send” Timeless aorist, but love shown by sending Christ (John 3:16) and illustrated and proven by the way Christians love one another. [source]
John 18:11 Into the sheath [εις την τηκην]
Old word from τιτημι — tithēmi to put for box or sheath, only here in N.T. In Matthew 26:52 Christ‘s warning is given. The cup Metaphor for Christ‘s death, used already in reply to request of James and John (Mark 10:39; Matthew 20:22) and in the agony in Gethsemane before Judas came (Mark 14:36; Matthew 26:39; Luke 22:42), which is not given by John. The case of το ποτηριον — to potērion is the suspended nominative for note αυτο — auto (it) referring to it. Shall I not drink? Second aorist active subjunctive of πινω — pinō with the double negative ου μη — ou mē in a question expecting the affirmative answer. Abbott takes it as an exclamation and compares John 6:37; Mark 14:25. [source]
John 19:27 Unto his own home [εις τα ιδια]
See this same idiom and sense in John 1:11; John 16:32; Acts 21:6. John had a lodging in Jerusalem, whether a house or not, and the mother of Jesus lived with him there. [source]
John 2:12 He went down to Capernaum [κατεβη εις Καπαρναουμ αυτος]
Second aorist active indicative of καταβαινω — katabainō Cana was on higher ground. This brief stay (not many days, ου πολλας ημερας — ou pollas hēmeras) in this important city (Tell Hum) on the north shore of Galilee was with Christ‘s mother, brothers (apparently friendly at first) and the six disciples, all in the fresh glow of the glory manifested at Cana. Surely Mary‘s heart was full. [source]
John 20:14 She turned herself back [εστραπη εις τα οπισω]
Second aorist passive indicative of στρεπω — strephō in an intransitive and almost reflective sense. In the disappearance of the aorist middle before the aorist passive see Robertson, Grammar, p.817. See also στραπεισα — strapheisa (second aorist passive participle) in John 20:16. On εις τα οπισω — eis ta opisō see John 6:66; John 18:6. Standing Second perfect active (intransitive) of ιστημι — histēmi Instinctively Mary felt the presence of some one behind her. Was Present active indicative retained in indirect discourse after ηιδει — ēidei (knew). [source]
John 21:6 The right side [εις τα δεχια μερη]
Jesus knew where the fish were. For “net” Imperfect active picturing the disciples tugging at the net. [source]
John 3:24 For John had not yet been cast into prison [ουπω γαρ ην βεβλημενος εις την πυλακην Ιωανης]
Periphrastic past perfect indicative of βαλλω — ballō explaining (γαρ — gar) why John was still baptizing, the reason for the imprisonment having been given by Luke (Luke 3:19.). [source]
John 5:29 Unto the resurrection of life [εις αναστασιν ζωης]
Αναστασις — Anastasis is an old word (Aeschylus) from ανιστημι — anistēmi to raise up, to arise. This combination occurs nowhere else in the N.T. nor does “the resurrection of judgment” Only there note both articles. Here without the articles it can mean “to a resurrection of life” and “to a resurrection of judgment,” though the result is practically the same. There are two resurrections as to result, one to life, one to judgment. See both in Daniel 12:2. [source]
John 6:3 Into the mountain [εις το ορος]
From the level of the Jordan valley up into the high hill on the eastern side. Mark (Mark 6:46) and Matthew (Matthew 14:23) mention that after the miracle Jesus went further up into the mountain to pray. Sat Imperfect middle of κατημαι — kathēmai was sitting, a picture of repose. [source]
John 6:8 One of [εις εκ]
So in John 12:4; John 13:23; Mark 13:1 without εκ — ek Simon Peter‘s brother So described in John 1:40. The great distinction of Andrew was precisely this that he brought Simon to Christ. Philip and Andrew appear together again in John 12:20-22, but in the Synoptics he is distinguished only in Mark 13:3. In the Muratorian Fragment Andrew received the revelation for John to write the Fourth Gospel. [source]
John 6:70 And one of you is a devil [και εχ υμων εις διαβολος εστιν]
Jesus does not say that Judas was a devil when he chose him, but that he is one now. In John 13:2, John 13:27 John speaks of the devil entering Judas. How soon the plan to betray Jesus first entered the heart of Judas we do not know (John 12:4). One wonders if the words of Jesus here did not cut Judas to the quick. [source]
John 7:5 For even his brethren did not believe on him [ουδε γαρ οι αδελποι αυτου επιστευον εις αυτον]
Literally, “For not even were his brothers believing on him.” Imperfect tense of πιστευω — pisteuō with sad picture of the persistent refusal of the brothers of Jesus to believe in his Messianic assumptions, after the two rejections in Capernaum (Luke 4:16-31; Mark 6:1-6; Matthew 13:54-58), and also after the blasphemous accusation of being in league with Beelzebub when the mother and brothers came to take Jesus home (Mark 3:31-35; Matthew 12:46-50; Luke 8:19-21). The brothers here are sarcastic. [source]
John 7:8 Go ye up to the feast [υμεις αναβητε εις την εορτην]
The emphatic word by position is υμεις — humeis (ye) in contrast with εγω — egō (I). Second aorist active imperative of αναβαινω — anabainō old and common verb for going up to the feast (John 2:13) or anywhere. Take your own advice (John 7:3). I go not up yet So Westcott and Hort after B W L (Neutral) while ου — ou (not) is read by Aleph D, African Latin, Vulgate, Coptic (Western). Some of the early Greek Fathers were puzzled over the reading ουκ — ouk (I go not up) as contradictory to John 7:10 wherein it is stated that Jesus did go up. Almost certainly ουκ — ouk (not) is correct and is not really contradictory when one notes in John 7:10 that the manner of Christ‘s going up is precisely the opposite of the advice of the brothers in John 7:3, John 7:4. “Not yet” One may think, if he will, that Jesus changed his plans after these words, but that is unnecessary. He simply refused to fall in with his brothers‘ sneering proposal for a grand Messianic procession with the caravan on the way to the feast. He will do that on the journey to the last passover. [source]
John 7:38 He that believeth on me [ο πιστευων εις εμε]
Nominative absolute as is not uncommon. The scripture No precise passage can be quoted, though similar idea in several (Isaiah 55:1; Isaiah 58:11; Zechariah 13:1; Zechariah 14:8; Ezekiel 47:1; Joel 3:18). Chrysostom confines it to Isaiah 28:16 by punctuation (only the nominative absolute as the Scripture). Out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water Some ancient Western writers connect πινετω — pinetō of John 7:37 with ο πιστευων — ho pisteuōn in John 7:38. By this arrangement αυτου — autou (his) with κοιλιας — koilias is made to refer to Christ, not to the believer. Burney argues that κοιλια — koilia is a mistranslation of the Aramaic (fountain, not belly) and that the reference is to Ezekiel 47:1. C.C. Torrey refers to Zechariah 14:8. But the Eastern writers refer αυτου — autou (his) to the believer who not only quenches in Christ his own thirst, but becomes a source of new streams for others (John 4:14). It is a difficult question and Westcott finally changed his view and held αυτου — autou to refer to Christ. ευσουσιν — Reusousin is future active indicative of ρεω — reō old verb, to flow, here only in the N.T. [source]
John 7:48 Hath any of the rulers believed on him? [Μη τις εκ των αρχοντων επιστευσεν εις αυτον]
Negative answer sharply expected. First aorist active indicative of πιστευω — pisteuō “Did any one of the rulers believe on him?” “What right have subordinates to have a mind of their own?” (Dods). These police were employed by the temple authorities (rulers). “Power was slipping through their fingers” (Dods) and that was the secret of their hostility to Jesus. Or of the Pharisees A wider circle and the most orthodox of all. [source]
John 8:30 Many believed on him [πολλοι επιστευσαν εις αυτον]
Ingressive aorist active indicative, came to believe, nominally at any rate, as in John 2:23. But the tension was keen and Jesus proceeded to test the faith of these new believers from among the Pharisees. [source]
John 9:39 For judgment [εις κριμα]
The Father had sent the Son for this purpose (John 3:17). This world He is engaged in that very work by this miracle. They which see not The spiritually blind as well as the physically blind (Luke 4:18; Isaiah 42:18). Purpose clause with ινα — hina and present active subjunctive βλεπωσιν — blepōsin (may keep on seeing). This man now sees physically and spiritually. And that they which see may become blind Another part of God‘s purpose, seen in Matthew 11:25; Luke 10:21, is the curse on those who blaspheme and reject the Son. Note ingressive aorist middle subjunctive of γινομαι — ginomai and predicate nominative. οι βλεποντες — Hoi blepontes are those who profess to see like these Pharisees, but are really blind. Blind guides they were (Matthew 23:16). Complacent satisfaction with their dim light. [source]
Acts 1:13 Into the upper chamber [εις το υπερωιον]
The upstairs or upper room It is possible, even probable, that this is the “large upper room” (ανωγεον μεγα — anōgeon mega) of Mark 14:15; Luke 22:12. The Vulgate has coenaculum for both words. The word is used in the N.T. only in Acts. It was in a private house as in Luke 22:11 and not in the temple as Luke 24:53 might imply, “continually” (δια παντος — dia pantos) these words probably meaning on proper occasions. [source]
Acts 1:25 To his own place [εις τον τοπον τον ιδιον]
A bold and picturesque description of the destiny of Judas worthy of Dante‘s Inferno. There is no doubt in Peter‘s mind of the destiny of Judas nor of his own guilt. He made ready his own berth and went to it. [source]
Acts 11:8 Came into my mouth [εισηλτεν εις το στομα μου]
Instead of επαγον — ephagon (I ate) in Acts 10:14. Different phrase for the same idea. [source]
Acts 11:12 We entered into the man‘s house [εισηλτομεν εις τον οικον του ανδρος]
Peter confesses it, but shows that the other six went in also. He avoids mention of Cornelius‘s name and office. [source]
Acts 11:22 Came to the ears [ηκουστη εις τα ωτα]
First aorist passive indicative of ακουω — akouō was heard in the ears. [source]
Acts 12:4 He put him in prison [ετετο εις πυλακην]
Second aorist middle indicative of τιτημι — tithēmi common verb. This is the third imprisonment of Peter (Acts 4:3; Acts 5:18). To four quaternions of soldiers (τεσσαρσιν τετραδιοις στρατιωτων — tessarsin tetradiois stratiōtōn). Four soldiers in each quaternion (τετραδιον — tetradion from τετρας — tetras four), two on the inside with the prisoner (chained to him) and two on the outside, in shifts of six hours each, sixteen soldiers in all, the usual Roman custom. Probably Agrippa had heard of Peter‘s previous escape (Acts 5:19) and so took no chances for connivance of the jailors. After the passover The passover feast of eight days. “The stricter Jews regarded it as a profanation to put a person to death during a religious festival” (Hackett). So Agrippa is more scrupulous than the Sanhedrin was about Jesus. To bring him forth (αναγαγειν αυτον — anagagein auton). Second aorist active infinitive of αναγω — anagō to lead up, old verb, used literally here. Peter was in the inner prison or lower ward and so would be led up to the judgment seat where Herod Agrippa would sit (cf. John 19:13). To the people Ethical dative, in the presence of and for the pleasure of the Jewish people. [source]
Acts 12:10 Unto the iron gate that leadeth into the city [επι την πυλην την σιδηραν την περουσαν εις την πολιν]
Note the triple use of the article (the gate the iron one the one leading into the city). For this resumptive use of the article see Robertson, Grammar, pp. 762, 764. This iron gate may have opened from a court out into the street and effectually barred escape. [source]
Acts 13:22 To be [εις]
As or for, Greek idiom like the Hebrew ανδρα κατα την καρδιαν μου — le common in the lxx. A man after my heart (τεληματα — andra kata tēn kardian mou). The words quoted by Paul as a direct saying of God are a combination of Psalm 89:20, Psalm 89:21; 1 Samuel 13:14 (the word of the Lord to Samuel about David). Knowling thinks that this free and rather loose quotation of the substance argues for the genuineness of the report of Paul‘s sermon. Hackett observes that the commendation of David is not absolute, but, as compared with the disobedient Saul, he was a man who did God‘s will in spite of the gross sin of which he repented (Ps 51). Note “wills” (thelēmata), plural, of God. [source]
Acts 13:34 Now no more to return to corruption [μηκετι μελλοντα υποστρεπειν εις διαπτοραν]
No longer about to return as Lazarus did. Jesus did not die again and so is the first fruits of the resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:23; Romans 6:9). [source]
Acts 13:42 The next Sabbath [εις το μεταχυ σαββατον]
Late use (Josephus, Plutarch, etc.) of μεταχυ — metaxu Note use of εις — eis for “on” or “by.” [source]
Acts 13:46 Lo, we turn to the Gentiles [ιδου στρεπομετα εις τα ετνη]
It is a crisis Στρεπομετα — Strephometha is probably the direct middle (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 806-08) though the aorist passive εστραπην — estraphēn is so used also (Acts 7:39). It is a dramatic moment as Paul and Barnabas turn from the Jews to the Gentiles, a prophecy of the future history of Christianity. In Romans 9-11 Paul will discuss at length the rejection of Christ by the Jews and the calling of the Gentiles to be the real (the spiritual) Israel. [source]
Acts 13:48 As many as were ordained to eternal life [οσοι ησαν τεταγμενοι εις ζωην αιωνιον]
Periphrastic past perfect passive indicative of τασσω — tassō a military term to place in orderly arrangement. The word “ordain” is not the best translation here. “Appointed,” as Hackett shows, is better. The Jews here had voluntarily rejected the word of God. On the other side were those Gentiles who gladly accepted what the Jews had rejected, not all the Gentiles. Why these Gentiles here ranged themselves on God‘s side as opposed to the Jews Luke does not tell us. This verse does not solve the vexed problem of divine sovereignty and human free agency. There is no evidence that Luke had in mind an absolutum decretum of personal salvation. Paul had shown that God‘s plan extended to and included Gentiles. Certainly the Spirit of God does move upon the human heart to which some respond, as here, while others push him away. [source]
Acts 13:51 Unto Iconium [εις Ικονιον]
About 45 miles southeast from Antioch in Pisidia, at the foot of the Taurus mountains. At various times it was reckoned also in Pisidia or Phrygia as well as Lycaonia, Phrygian in population and distinguished by Luke (Acts 14:6) from Lystra and Derbe, cities of Lycaonia. As compared with Antioch (a Roman colony) it was a native Phrygian town. When the province of Galatia was divided, Iconium became the capital of Lycaonia and eclipsed Antioch in Pisidia. Strictly speaking at this time Lystra and Derbe were cities of Lycaonia-Galatica while Iconium was in Phrygia-Galatica (all three in the Roman Province of Galatia). It was at the meeting place of several Roman roads and on the highway from east to west. It is still a large town Konieh with 30,000 population. [source]
Acts 14:21 They returned to Lystra and to Iconium, and to Antioch [υπεστρεπσαν εις την Λυστραν και εις Ικονιον και εις Αντιοχειαν]
Derbe was the frontier city of the Roman empire. The quickest way to return to Antioch in Syria would have been by the Cilician Gates or by the pass over Matthew. Taurus by which Paul and Silas will come to Derbe in the second tour (Acts 15:41-16:1), but difficult to travel in winter. But it was necessary to revisit the churches in Lystra, Iconium, Antioch in Pisidia and to see that they were able to withstand persecution. Paul was a Roman citizen though he had not made use of this privilege as yet for his own protection. Against mob violence it would count for little, but he did not hesitate. Paul had been stoned in Lystra, threatened in Iconium, expelled in Antioch. He shows his wisdom in conserving his work. [source]
Acts 14:23 On whom they had believed [εις ον πεπιστευκεισαν]
Past perfect indicative (without augment) of πιστευω — pisteuō They had “trusted” in Jesus (2 Timothy 1:12) and Paul now “entrusts” them to him with confidence. It was a solemn and serious occasion in each instance as it always is to set apart men for the ministry. These men may not have been ideal men for this service, but they were the only ones available and they were chosen from the actual membership in each instance, men who knew local conditions and problems. [source]
Acts 14:26 They sailed away to Antioch [απεπλευσαν εις Αντιοχειαν]
Effective aorist active indicative of αποπλεω — apopleō to sail off. They had been gone some eighteen months. [source]
Acts 16:1 And he came also to Derbe and Lystra [κατηντησεν δε και εις Δερβην και εις Λυστραν]
First aorist active of κατανταω — katantaō late verb to come down to, to arrive at. He struck Derbe first of the places in the first tour which was the last city reached then. [source]
Acts 16:7 They assayed to go into Bithynia [επειραζον εις την ιτυνιαν πορευτηναι]
Conative imperfect of πειραζω — peirazō and ingressive aorist passive infinitive of πορευομαι — poreuomai Now Bithynia is northeast of Mysia and north of Galatia (province). Clearly Luke means to say that Paul had, when hindered by the Holy Spirit from going west into Asia, gone north so as to come in front of Bithynia. This journey would take him directly through Phrygia and the North Galatian country (the real Gauls or Celts). This is, to my mind, the strongest argument for the North Galatian view in these Acts 16:6, Acts 16:7. The grammar and the topography bring Paul right up to Bithynia (north of the old Galatia). It is Acts 16:6, Acts 16:7 that make me pause before accepting the plausible arguments of Ramsay for the South Galatian theory. In itself the problem is nothing like so important or so determinative as he makes it. But shall we smash Luke‘s grammar to pieces to bolster up a theory of criticism? And the Spirit of Jesus suffered them not (και ουκ ειασεν αυτους το πνευμα Ιησου — kai ouk eiasen autous to pneuma Iēsou). The same Spirit who in Acts 16:6 had forbidden going into Asia now closed the door into Bithynia. This expression occurs nowhere else, but we have the spirit of Christ (Romans 8:9) and the Spirit of Jesus Christ (Philemon 1:19). Ειασεν — Eiasen is first aorist active indicative of εαω — eaō old verb to allow. [source]
Acts 16:8 To Troas [εις Τροιαδα]
This city, named Alexandria Troas after Alexander the Great, was the seaport of Mysia, though a Roman colony and not counted as part of either Asia or Bithynia. New Ilium, on the site of the old Troy, was four miles farther north. It was the place to take ship for Philippi. Twice again Paul will be here (2 Corinthians 2:12; Acts 20:6). [source]
Acts 16:12 To Philippi [εις Πιλιππους]
The plural like Ατηναι — Athēnai (Athens) is probably due to separate sections of the city united (Winer-Moulton, Grammar, p. 220). The city (ancient name Krenides or Wells) was renamed after himself by Philip, the father of Alexander the Great. It was situated about a mile east of the small stream Gangites which flows into the river Strymon some thirty miles away. In this valley the Battle of Philippi was fought b.c. 42 between the Second Triumvirate (Octavius, Antonius, Lepidus) and Brutus and Cassius. In memory of the victory Octavius made it a colony (κολωνια — kolōnia) with all the privileges of Roman citizenship, such as freedom from scourging, freedom from arrest save in extreme cases, and the right of appeal to the emperor. This Latin word occurs here alone in the N.T. Octavius planted here a colony of Roman veterans with farms attached, a military outpost and a miniature of Rome itself. The language was Latin. Here Paul is face to face with the Roman power and empire in a new sense. He was a new Alexander, come from Asia to conquer Europe for Christ, a new Caesar to build the Kingdom of Christ on the work of Alexander and Caesar. One need not think that Paul was conscious of all that was involved in destiny for the world. Philippi was on the Egnatian Way, one of the great Roman roads, that ran from here to Dyrrachium on the shores of the Adriatic, a road that linked the east with the west. [source]
Acts 16:19 Into the marketplace [εις την αγοραν]
Into the Roman forum near which would be the courts of law as in our courthouse square, as in Acts 17:17. Marketing went on also (Mark 7:4), when the crowds collect (Mark 6:56), from αγειρω — ageirō to collect or gather. Unto the rulers (επι τους αρχοντας — epi tous archontas). General Greek term for “the magistrates.” [source]
Acts 16:24 Into the inner prison [εις την εσωτεραν πυλακην]
The comparative form from the adverb εσω — esō (within), Ionic and old Attic for εισω — eisō In the lxx, but in the N.T. only here and Hebrews 6:19. The Roman public prisons had a vestibule and outer prison and behind this the inner prison, a veritable dungeon with no light or air save what came through the door when open. One has only to picture modern cells in our jails, the dungeons in feudal castles, London prisons before the time of Howard, to appreciate the horrors of an inner prison cell in a Roman provincial town of the first century a.d. [source]
Acts 16:24 In the stocks [εις το χυλον]
Χυλον — Xulon from χυω — xuō to scrape or plane, is used for a piece of wood whether a cross or gibbet (Acts 5:30; Acts 10:39; Acts 13:29; Galatians 3:13; 1 Peter 2:24) or a log or timber with five holes (four for the wrists and ankles and one for the neck) or two for the feet as here, χυλοπεδη — xulopedē Latin vervus, to shackle the feet stretched apart (Job 33:11). This torment was practiced in Sparta, Athens, Rome, and Adonirom Judson suffered it in Burmah. Χυλον — Xulon is also used in the N.T. for stick or staff (Matthew 26:47) and even a tree (Luke 23:31). Tertullian said of Christians in the stocks: Nihil crus sentit in vervo, quum animus in caelo esto4 (Nothing the limb feels in the stocks when the mind is in heaven). [source]
Acts 16:37 Have cast us into prison [εβαλαν εις πυλακην]
Second aorist active indicative of βαλλω — ballō old verb, with first aorist ending as often in the Koiné This was the climax, treating them as criminals. And now privily (και νυν λατραι — kai nun lathrāi). Paul balances their recent conduct with the former. Nay verily, but No indeed! It is the use of γεαρα — gar so common in answers As a public acknowledgment that they had wronged and mistreated Paul and Silas. Let them come themselves and lead us out (εχαγω — exagagetōsan third person plural second aorist active imperative of exagō). It was a bitter pill to the proud praetors. [source]
Acts 17:1 To Thessalonica [εις Τεσσαλονικην]
There was a synagogue here in this great commercial city, still an important city called Saloniki, of 70,000 population. It was originally called Therma, at the head of the Thermaic Gulf. Cassander renamed it Thessalonica after his wife, the sister of Alexander the Great. It was the capital of the second of the four divisions of Macedonia and finally the capital of the whole province. It shared with Corinth and Ephesus the commerce of the Aegean. One synagogue shows that even in this commercial city the Jews were not very numerous. As a political centre it ranked with Antioch in Syria and Caesarea in Palestine. It was a strategic centre for the spread of the gospel as Paul later said for it sounded (echoed) forth from Thessalonica throughout Macedonia and Achaia (1 Thessalonians 1:8). [source]
Acts 17:10 Into the synagogue of the Jews [εις την συναγωγην των Ιουδαιων]
Paul‘s usual custom and he lost no time about it. Enough Jews here to have a synagogue. [source]
Acts 18:1 To Corinth [εις Κοριντον]
Mummius had captured and destroyed Corinth b.c. 146. It was restored by Julius Caesar b.c. 46 as a boom town and made a colony. It was now the capital of the province of Achaia and the chief commercial city of Greece with a cosmopolitan population. It was only fifty miles from Athens. The summit of Acrocorinthus was 1,800 feet high and the ports of Cenchreae and Lechaeum and the Isthmus across which ships were hauled gave it command of the trade routes between Asia and Rome. The temple of Aphrodite on the Acrocorinthus had a thousand consecrated prostitutes and the very name to Corinthianize meant immorality. Not the Parthenon with Athene faced Paul in Corinth, but a worse situation. Naturally many Jews were in such a mart of trade. Philippi, Thessalonica, Beroea, Athens, all had brought anxiety to Paul. What could he expect in licentious Corinth? [source]
Acts 18:19 To Ephesus [εις Επεσον]
This great city on the Cayster, the capital of the Province of Asia, the home of the worship of Diana (Artemis) with a wonderful temple, Paul at last had reached, though forbidden to come on the way out on this tour (Acts 16:6). Here Paul will spend three years after his return from Jerusalem. He left them there (κακεινους κατελιπεν αυτου — kakeinous katelipen autou). That is, Priscilla and Aquila he left (second aorist active indicative) here (αυτου — autou). But Luke mentions the departure by way of anticipation before he actually went away (Acts 18:21). But he himself Paul again the leading person in the narrative. On this occasion he may have gone alone into the synagogue. He reasoned (διελεχατο — dielexato). Luke‘s favourite word for Paul‘s synagogue discourses (Acts 17:2, Acts 17:17; Acts 18:4 which see) as also Acts 19:8, Acts 19:9. [source]
Acts 19:3 Into what [εις τι]
More properly, [source]
Acts 19:4 That they should believe on him that should come after him, that is on Jesus [εις τον ερχομενον μετ αυτον ινα πιστευσωσιν τουτ εστιν εις τον Ιησουν]
Note the emphatic prolepsis of ινα πιστευσωσιν — eis ton erchomenon met' auton before hina pisteusōsin with which it is construed. This is John‘s identical phrase, “the one coming after me” as seen in Mark 1:7; Matthew 3:11; Luke 3:16; John 1:15. It is not clear that these “disciples” believed in a Messiah, least of all in Jesus. They were wholly unprepared for the baptism of John. Paul does not mean to say that John‘s baptism was inadequate, but he simply explains what John really taught and so what his baptism signified. [source]
Acts 19:22 He himself stayed in Asia for a while [αυτος επεσχεν χρονον εις την Ασιαν]
Literally, He himself had additional time in Asia. Second aorist active indicative of επεχω — epechō old and common idiom, only here in the N.T. in this sense and the verb only in Luke and Paul. The reason for Paul‘s delay is given by him in 1 Corinthians 16:8., the great door wide open in Ephesus. Here again Luke and Paul supplement each other. Pentecost came towards the end of May and May was the month of the festival of Artemis (Diana) when great multitudes would come to Ephesus. But he did not remain till Pentecost as both Luke and Paul make plain. [source]
Acts 19:27 Come into disrepute [εις απελεγμον ελτειν]
Not in the old writers, but in lxx and Koiné. Literally, reputation, exposure, censure, rejection after examination, and so disrepute. Their business of making gods would lose caste as the liquor trade (still called the trade in England) has done in our day. They felt this keenly and so Demetrius names it first. They felt it in their pockets. Of the great goddess Artemis (της μεγαλης τεας Αρτεμιδος — tēs megalēs theas Artemidos). She was generally known as the Great (η Μεγαλη — hē Megalē). An inscription found at Ephesus calls her “the greatest god” (η μεγιστη τεος — hē megistē theos). The priests were eunuchs and there were virgin priestesses and a lower order of slaves known as temple-sweepers (νεωκοροι — neōkoroi Acts 19:35). They had wild orgiastic exercises that were disgraceful with their Corybantic processions and revelries. Be made of no account Be reckoned as nothing, first aorist passive infinitive of λογιζομαι — logizomai and εις — eis Should even be deposed of her magnificence (μελλειν τε και καταιρεισται της μεγαλειοτητος αυτης — mellein te kai kathaireisthai tēs megaleiotētos autēs). Note the present infinitive after μελλειν — mellein ablative case (so best MSS.) after καταιρεω — kathaireō to take down, to depose, to deprive of. The word μεγαλειοτης — megaleiotēs occurs also in Luke 9:43 (the majesty of God) and in 2 Peter 1:16 of the transfiguration of Christ. It is already in the lxx and Deissmann (Light from the Ancient East, p. 363) thinks that the word runs parallel with terms used in the emperor-cult. All Asia and the world ολη ̔ἠ Ασια και ̔ἠ οικουμενη — holē ‛hē' Asia kai ‛hē' oikoumenā See note on Acts 11:28 for same use of οικουμενη — oikoumenā An exaggeration, to be sure, but Pausanias says that no deity was more widely worshipped. Temples of Artemis have been found in Spain and Gaul. Multitudo errantium non efficit veritatem (Bengel). Even today heathenism has more followers than Christianity. To think that all this splendour was being set at naught by one man and a despised Jew at that! [source]
Acts 19:27 Be made of no account [εις ουτεν λογιστηναι]
Be reckoned as nothing, first aorist passive infinitive of λογιζομαι — logizomai and εις — eis Should even be deposed of her magnificence (μελλειν τε και καταιρεισται της μεγαλειοτητος αυτης — mellein te kai kathaireisthai tēs megaleiotētos autēs). Note the present infinitive after μελλειν — mellein ablative case (so best MSS.) after καταιρεω — kathaireō to take down, to depose, to deprive of. The word μεγαλειοτης — megaleiotēs occurs also in Luke 9:43 (the majesty of God) and in 2 Peter 1:16 of the transfiguration of Christ. It is already in the lxx and Deissmann (Light from the Ancient East, p. 363) thinks that the word runs parallel with terms used in the emperor-cult. All Asia and the world ολη ̔ἠ Ασια και ̔ἠ οικουμενη — holē ‛hē' Asia kai ‛hē' oikoumenā See note on Acts 11:28 for same use of οικουμενη — oikoumenā An exaggeration, to be sure, but Pausanias says that no deity was more widely worshipped. Temples of Artemis have been found in Spain and Gaul. Multitudo errantium non efficit veritatem (Bengel). Even today heathenism has more followers than Christianity. To think that all this splendour was being set at naught by one man and a despised Jew at that! [source]
Acts 19:29 Into the theatre [εις το τεατρον]
A place for seeing The theatre (amphitheatre) at Ephesus can still be traced in the ruins (Wood, Ephesus) and shows that it was of enormous size capable of seating fifty-six thousand persons (some estimate it only 24, 500). It was the place for large public gatherings of any sort out of doors like our football and baseball parks. In particular, gladiatorial shows were held in these theatres. [source]
Acts 19:30 And when Paul was minded to enter in unto the people [Παυλου δε βουλομενου εισελτειν εις τον δημον]
Genitive absolute. Plainly Paul wanted to face the howling mob, whether it was the occasion pictured in 2 Corinthians 1:9 or not. “St. Paul was not the man to leave his comrades in the lurch” (Knowling). [source]
Acts 2:25 Concerning him [εις αυτον]
Peter interprets Psalm 16:8-11 as written by David and with reference to the Messiah. There is but one speaker in this Psalm and both Peter here and Paul in Acts 13:36 make it the Messiah. David is giving his own experience which is typical of the Messiah (Knowling). [source]
Acts 2:27 In Hades [εις αιδην]
Hades is the unseen world, Hebrew Sheol, but here it is viewed as death itself “considered as a rapacious destroyer” (Hackett). It does not mean the place of punishment, though both heaven and the place of torment are in Hades (Luke 16:23). “Death and Hades are strictly parallel terms: he who is dead is in Hades” (Page). The use of εις — eis here=εν — en is common enough. The Textus Receptus here reads εις αιδου — eis Hāidou (genitive case) like the Attic idiom with δομον — domon (abode) understood. “Hades” in English is not translation, but transliteration. The phrase in the Apostles‘ Creed, “descended into hell” is from this passage in Acts (Hades, not Gehenna). The English word “hell” is Anglo-Saxon from ελαν — helan to hide, and was used in the Authorized Version to translate both Hades as here and Gehenna as in Matthew 5:22. [source]
Acts 2:39 To all that are afar off [πασιν τοις εις μακραν]
The rabbis so used it. [source]
Acts 20:1 Departed for to go into Macedonia [εχηλτεν πορευεσται εις Μακεδονιαν]
Both verbs, single act and then process. Luke here condenses what was probably a whole year of Paul‘s life and work as we gather from II Corinthians, one of Paul‘s “weighty and powerful” letters as his enemies called them (2 Corinthians 10:10). “This epistle more than any other is a revelation of S. Paul‘s own heart: it is his spiritual autobiography and apologia pro vita sua.” [source]
Acts 20:2 Into Greece [εις την ελλαδα]
That is, Achaia (Acts 18:12; Acts 19:21), and particularly Corinth, whither he had at last come again after repeated attempts, pauses, and delays (2 Corinthians 13:1). Now at last the coast was clear and Paul apparently had an open door in Corinth during these three months, so completely had Titus at last done away with the opposition of the Judaizers there. [source]
Acts 20:3 As he was about to set sail for Syria [μελλοντι αναγεσται εις την Συριαν]
The participle μελλοντι — mellonti agrees in case (dative) with αυτωι — autōi For the sense of intending see also Acts 19:13. Αναγεσται — Anagesthai (present middle infinitive) is the common word for putting out to sea (going up, they said, from land) as in Acts 13:13. [source]
Acts 20:14 To Mitylene [εις Μιτυληνην]
The capital of Lesbos about thirty miles from Assos, an easy day‘s sailing. [source]
Acts 20:15 We touched at Samos [παρεβαλομεν εις Σαμον]
Second aorist active of παραβαλλω — paraballō to throw alongside, to cross over, to put in by. So Thucydides III. 32. Only here in the N.T. though in Textus Receptus in Mark 4:30. The word parable (παραβολη — parabolē) is from this verb. The Textus Receptus adds here και μειναντες εν Τρογυλλιωι — kai meinantes en Trogulliōi (and remaining at Trogyllium), but clearly not genuine. In passing from Chios to Samos they sailed past Ephesus to save time for Pentecost in Jerusalem (Acts 20:16), if in control of the ship, or because the captain allowed Paul to have his way. The island of Samos is still further down the coast below Chios. It is not stated whether a stop was made here or not. [source]
Acts 20:21 Repentance toward God [την εις τεον μετανοιαν]
These two elements run through the Epistle to the Romans which Paul had recently written and sent from Corinth. These two elements appear in all Paul‘s preaching whether “to Jews or Gentiles, to philosophers at Athens or to peasants at Lystra, he preached repentance toward God and faith toward the Lord Jesus” (Knowling). [source]
Acts 20:21 and faith toward our Lord Jesus [και πιστιν εις τον κυριον ημων Ιησουν]
These two elements run through the Epistle to the Romans which Paul had recently written and sent from Corinth. These two elements appear in all Paul‘s preaching whether “to Jews or Gentiles, to philosophers at Athens or to peasants at Lystra, he preached repentance toward God and faith toward the Lord Jesus” (Knowling). [source]
Acts 21:1 Unto Rhodes [εις την οδον]
Called the island of roses. The sun shone most days and made roses luxuriant. The great colossus which represented the sun, one of the seven wonders of the world, was prostrate at this time. The island was at the entrance to the Aegean Sea and had a great university, especially for rhetoric and oratory. There was great commerce also. Unto Patara (εις Παταρα — eis Patara). A seaport on the Lycian coast on the left bank of the Xanthus. It once had an oracle of Apollo which rivalled that at Delphi. This was the course taken by hundreds of ships every season. [source]
Acts 21:1 Unto Patara [εις Παταρα]
A seaport on the Lycian coast on the left bank of the Xanthus. It once had an oracle of Apollo which rivalled that at Delphi. This was the course taken by hundreds of ships every season. [source]
Acts 21:2 Crossing over unto Phoenicia [διαπερων εις Ποινικην]
Neuter singular accusative (agreeing with πλοιον — ploion) present active participle of διαπεραω — diaperaō old verb to go between Second aorist active participle of επιβαινω — epibainō f0). [source]
Acts 21:1 Unto Cos [εις την Κο]
Standing today, about forty nautical miles south from Miletus, island famous as the birthplace of Hippocrates and Apelles with a great medical school. Great trading place with many Jews. The next day (τηι εχης — tēi hexēs). Locative case with ημεραι — hēmerāi (day) understood. The adverb εχης — hexēs is from εχω — echō (future εχω — hexō) and means successively or in order. This is another one of Luke‘s ways of saying “on the next day” (cf. three others in Acts 20:15). Unto Rhodes Called the island of roses. The sun shone most days and made roses luxuriant. The great colossus which represented the sun, one of the seven wonders of the world, was prostrate at this time. The island was at the entrance to the Aegean Sea and had a great university, especially for rhetoric and oratory. There was great commerce also. Unto Patara (εις Παταρα — eis Patara). A seaport on the Lycian coast on the left bank of the Xanthus. It once had an oracle of Apollo which rivalled that at Delphi. This was the course taken by hundreds of ships every season. [source]
Acts 21:3 Landed at Tyre [κατηλτομεν εις Τυρον]
Came down to Tyre. Then a free city of Syria in honour of its former greatness (cf. the long siege by Alexander the Great). There (εκεισε — ekeise). Thither, literally. Only one other instance in N.T., Acts 22:5 which may be pertinent = εκει — ekei (there). Was to unlade Periphrastic imperfect middle of αποπορτιζω — apophortizō late verb from απο — apo and πορτος — phortos load, but here only in the N.T. Literally, “For thither the boat was unloading her cargo,” a sort of “customary” or “progressive” imperfect (Robertson, Grammar, p. 884). Burden (γομον — gomon). Cargo, old word, from γεμω — gemō to be full. Only here and Revelation 18:11. in N.T. Probably a grain or fruit ship. It took seven days here to unload and reload. [source]
Acts 21:4 That he should not set foot in Jerusalem [μη επιβαινειν εις Ιεροσολυμα]
Indirect command with μη — mē and the present active infinitive, not to keep on going to Jerusalem (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1046). In spite of this warning Paul felt it his duty as before (Acts 20:22) to go on. Evidently Paul interpreted the action of the Holy Spirit as information and warning although the disciples at Tyre gave it the form of a prohibition. Duty called louder than warning to Paul even if both were the calls of God. [source]
Acts 21:6 Home again [εις τα ιδια]
To their own places as of the Beloved Disciple in John 19:27 and of Jesus in John 1:11. This idiom in the papyri also. [source]
Acts 21:8 Unto Caesarea [εις Καισαριαν]
Apparently by land as the voyage Caesarea is the political capital of Judea under the Romans where the procurators lived and a city of importance, built by Herod the Great and named in honour of Augustus. It had a magnificent harbour built Most of the inhabitants were Greeks. This is the third time that we have seen Paul in Caesarea, on his journey from Jerusalem to Tarsus (Acts 9:30), on his return from Antioch at the close of the second mission tour (Acts 18:22) and now. The best MSS. omit οι περι Παυλου — hoi peri Paulou (we that were of Paul‘s company) a phrase like that in Acts 13:13. Into the house of Philip the evangelist (εις τον οικον Πιλιππου του ευαγγελιστου — eis ton oikon Philippou tou euaggelistou). Second in the list of the seven (Acts 6:5) after Stephen and that fact mentioned here. By this title he is distinguished from “Philip the apostle,” one of the twelve. His evangelistic work followed the death of Stephen (Acts 8) in Samaria, Philistia, with his home in Caesarea. The word “evangelizing” (ευηγγελιζετο — euēggelizeto) was used of him in Acts 8:40. The earliest of the three N.T. examples of the word “evangelist” (Acts 21:8; Ephesians 4:11; 2 Timothy 4:5). Apparently a word used to describe one who told the gospel story as Philip did and may have been used of him first of all as John was termed “the baptizer” (ο βαπτιζων — ho baptizn Mark 1:4), then “the Baptist” (ο βαπτιστης — ho baptistēs Matthew 3:1). It is found on an inscription in one of the Greek islands of uncertain date and was used in ecclesiastical writers of later times on the Four Gospels as we do. As used here the meaning is a travelling missionary who “gospelized” communities. This is probably Paul‘s idea in 2 Timothy 4:5. In Ephesians 4:11 the word seems to describe a special class of ministers just as we have them today. Men have different gifts and Philip had this of evangelizing as Paul was doing who is the chief evangelist. The ideal minister today combines the gifts of evangelist, herald, teacher, shepherd. “We abode with him” Constative aorist active indicative. Παρ αυτωι — Par autōi (by his side) is a neat idiom for “at his house.” What a joyful time Paul had in conversation with Philip. He could learn from him much of value about the early days of the gospel in Jerusalem. And Luke could, and probably did, take notes from Philip and his daughters about the beginnings of Christian history. It is generally supposed that the “we” sections of Acts represent a travel document by Luke (notes made by him as he journeyed from Troas to Rome). Those who deny the Lukan authorship of the whole book usually admit this. So we may suppose that Luke is already gathering data for future use. If so, these were precious days for him. [source]
Acts 21:8 Into the house of Philip the evangelist [εις τον οικον Πιλιππου του ευαγγελιστου]
Second in the list of the seven (Acts 6:5) after Stephen and that fact mentioned here. By this title he is distinguished from “Philip the apostle,” one of the twelve. His evangelistic work followed the death of Stephen (Acts 8) in Samaria, Philistia, with his home in Caesarea. The word “evangelizing” Apparently a word used to describe one who told the gospel story as Philip did and may have been used of him first of all as John was termed “the baptizer” It is found on an inscription in one of the Greek islands of uncertain date and was used in ecclesiastical writers of later times on the Four Gospels as we do. As used here the meaning is a travelling missionary who “gospelized” communities. This is probably Paul‘s idea in 2 Timothy 4:5. In Ephesians 4:11 the word seems to describe a special class of ministers just as we have them today. Men have different gifts and Philip had this of evangelizing as Paul was doing who is the chief evangelist. The ideal minister today combines the gifts of evangelist, herald, teacher, shepherd. “ [source]
Acts 21:26 Went into the temple [εισηιει εις το ιερον]
Imperfect active of εισειμι — eiseimi as in Acts 21:18 which see. Went on into the temple, descriptive imperfect. Paul joined the four men in their vow of separation. Declaring (διαγγελλων — diaggellōn). To the priests what day he would report the fulfilment of the vow. The priests would desire notice of the sacrifice. This verb only used by Luke in N.T. except Romans 11:17 (quotation from the lxx). It is not necessary to assume that the vows of each of the five expired on the same day (Rackham). Until the offering was offered for every one of them This use of εως ου — heōs hou (like εως — heōs alone) with the first aorist passive indicative προσηνεχτη — prosēnechthē of προσπερω — prospherō to offer, contemplates the final result (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 974f.) and is probably the statement of Luke added to Paul‘s announcement. He probably went into the temple one day for each of the brethren and one for himself. The question arises whether Paul acted wisely or unwisely in agreeing to the suggestion of James. What he did was in perfect harmony with his principle of accommodation in 1 Corinthians 9:20 when no principle was involved. It is charged that here on this occasion Paul was unduly influenced by considerations of expediency and was willing for the Jewish Christians to believe him more of a Jew than was true in order to placate the situation in Jerusalem. Furneaux calls it a compromise and a failure. I do not so see it. To say that is to obscure the whole complex situation. What Paul did was not for the purpose of conciliating his opponents, the Judaizers, who had diligently spread falsehoods about him in Jerusalem as in Corinth. It was solely to break the power of these “false apostles” over the thousands in Jerusalem who have been deluded by Paul‘s accusers. So far as the evidence goes that thing was accomplished. In the trouble that comes in Jerusalem and Caesarea the Judaizers cut no figure at all. The Jewish Christians do not appear in Paul‘s behalf, but there was no opportunity for them to do so. The explosion that came on the last day of Paul‘s appearance in the temple was wholly disconnected from his offerings for the four brethren and himself. It must be remembered that Paul had many kinds of enemies. The attack on him by these Jews from Asia had no connexion whatever with the slanders of the Judaizers about Paul‘s alleged teachings that Jewish Christians in the dispersion should depart from the Mosaic law. That slander was put to rest forever by his following the advice of James and justifies the wisdom of that advice and Paul‘s conduct about it. [source]
Acts 21:28 And moreover also he brought Greeks also into the temple [ετι τε και ελληνας εισηγαγεν εις το ιερον]
Note the three particles Worse than his teaching This he had a right to do if they only went into the court of the Gentiles. But these Jews mean to imply that Paul had brought Greeks beyond this court into the court of Israel. An inscription was found by Clermont-Ganneau in Greek built into the walls of a mosque on the Via Dolorosa that was on the wall dividing the court of Israel from the court of the Gentiles. Death was the penalty to any Gentile who crossed over into the Court of Israel (The Athenaeum, July, 1871). [source]
Acts 21:34 Into the castle [εις την παρεμβολην]
Koiné{[28928]}š word from παρεμβαλλω — paremballō to cast in by the side of, to assign soldiers a place, to encamp (see note on Luke 19:43). So παρεμβολη — parembolē comes to mean an interpolation, then an army drawn up (Hebrews 11:34), but mainly an encampment (Hebrews 13:11, Hebrews 13:13), frequent in Polybius and lxx. So here barracks of the Roman soldiers in the tower of Antonia as in Acts 21:37; Acts 21:22: Acts 21:24; Acts 23:10, Acts 23:16, Acts 23:32. [source]
Acts 22:7 Unto the ground [εις το εδαπος]
Old word, here alone in N.T. So the verb εδαπιζω — edaphizō is in Luke 19:44 alone in the N.T. A voice saying (πωνης λεγουσης — phōnēs legousēs). Genitive after ηκουσα — ēkousa though in Acts 26:14 the accusative is used after ηκουσα — ēkousa as in Acts 22:14 after ακουσαι — akousai either being allowable. See note on Acts 9:7 for discussion of the difference in case. Saul‘s name repeated each time (Acts 9:4; Acts 22:7; Acts 26:14). Same question also in each report: “Why persecuted thou me?” (Τι με διωκεισ — Ti me diōkeiṡ). These piercing words stuck in Paul‘s mind. [source]
Acts 22:10 Into Damascus [εις Δαμασκον]
In Acts 9:6 simply “into the city” (εις την πολιν — eis tēn polin). [source]
Acts 22:13 I looked up on him [αναβλεπσα εις αυτον]
First aorist active indicative and same word as αναβλεπσον — anablepson (Receive thy sight). Hence here the verb means as the margin of the Revised Version has it: “I received my sight and looked upon him.” For “look up” see note on John 9:11. [source]
Acts 22:21 I will send thee forth far hence unto the Gentiles [Εγω εις ετνη μακραν εχαποστελω σε]
Future active of the double This is a repetition by Jesus of the call given in Damascus through Ananias (Acts 9:15). Paul had up till now avoided the word Gentiles, but at last it had to come, “the fatal word” (Farrar). [source]
Acts 25:20 Whether he would go to Jerusalem [ει βουλοιτο πορευεσται εις Ιεροσολυμα]
Optative in indirect question after ελεγον — elegon (asked or said) imperfect active, though the present indicative could have been retained with change of person: “Dost thou wish, etc.,” See Robertson, Grammar, pp. 1031, 1044. This is the question put to Paul in Acts 25:9 though τελεις — theleis is there used. [source]
Acts 25:13 Arrived at Caesarea [κατηντησαν εις Καισαριαν]
Came down (first aorist active of κατανταω — katantaō) to Caesarea from Jerusalem. And saluted Festus (ασπασαμενοι τον Πηστον — aspasamenoi ton Phēston). The Textus Receptus has ασπασομενοι — aspasomenoi the future participle, but the correct text is the aorist middle participle ασπασαμενοι — aspasamenoi which cannot possibly mean subsequent action as given in the Canterbury Revision “and saluted.” It can only mean contemporaneous (simultaneous) action “saluting” or antecedent action like the margin “having saluted.” But antecedent action is not possible here, so that simultaneous action is the only alternative. It is to be noted that the salutation synchronized with the arrival in Caesarea (note κατα — kata down, the effective aorist tense), not with the departure from Jerusalem, nor with the whole journey. Rightly understood the aorist participle here gives no trouble at all (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 861-3). [source]
Acts 25:21 For the decision of the emperor [εις την του Σεβαστου διαγνωσιν]
Διαγνωσιν — Diagnōsin (cf. διαγνωσομαι — diagnōsomai Acts 24:22, I will determine) is the regular word for a legal examination In the N.T. only here, Acts 25:25; Acts 27:1 (of the legion). It was more imposing than “Caesar” which was originally a family name (always official in the N.T.) and it fell in with the tendency toward emperor-worship which later played such a large part in Roman life and which Christians opposed so bitterly. China is having a revival of this idea in the insistence on bowing three times to the picture of Sun-Yat-Sen. Till I should send him to Caesar (εως αν αναπεμπσω αυτον προς Καισαρα — heōs an anapempsō auton pros Kaisara). Here αναπεμπσω — anapempsō can be either future indicative or first aorist subjunctive (identical in first person singular), aorist subjunctive the usual construction with εως — heōs for future time (Robertson, Grammar, p. 876). Literally, “send up” (ανα — ana) to a superior (the emperor). Common in this sense in the papyri and Koiné{[28928]}š writers. Here “Caesar” is used as the title of Nero instead of “Augustus” as Κυριος — Kurios (Lord) occurs in Acts 25:26. [source]
Acts 25:23 Into the place of hearing [εις το ακροατηριον]
From ακροαομαι — akroaomai (to be a hearer) and, like the Latin auditorium, in Roman law means the place set aside for hearing, and deciding cases. Here only in the N.T. Late word, several times in Plutarch and other Koiné{[28928]}š writers. The hearing was “semi-official” (Page) as is seen in Acts 25:26. [source]
Acts 26:11 Even unto foreign cities [και εις εχω πολεις]
We know of Damascus, and Paul evidently planned to go to other cities outside of Palestine and may even have done so before the fateful journey to Damascus. [source]
Acts 26:18 Sanctified by faith in me [ηγιασμενοις πιστει τηι εις εμε]
Perfect passive participle of αγιαζω — hagiazō instrumental case of πιστει — pistei article before εις εμε — eis eme (“by faith, that in me”). These important words of Jesus to Paul give his justification to this cultured audience for his response to the command of Jesus. This was the turning point in Paul‘s career and it was a step forward and upward. [source]
Acts 26:24 Thy much learning doth turn thee to madness [τα πολλα σε γραμματα εις μανιαν περιτρεπει]
“Is turning thee round.” Old verb περιτρεπω — peritrepō but only here in N.T. Festus thought that Paul‘s “much learning” (=“many letters,” cf. John 7:15 of Jesus) of the Hebrew Scriptures to which he had referred was turning his head to madness (wheels in his head) and he was going mad right before them all. The old word μανια — mania (our mania, frenzy, cf. maniac) occurs here only in N.T. Note unusual position of σε — se between πολλα — polla and γραμματα — grammata (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 418, 420) [source]
Acts 27:5 We came to Myra of Lycia [κατηλταμεν εις Μυρρα της Λυκιας]
Literally, “We came down.” This town was two and a half miles from the coast of Lycia. The port Andriace had a fine harbour and did a large grain business. No disciples are mentioned here nor at Lasea, Melita, Syracuse, Rhegium. [source]
Acts 27:6 Sailing for Italy [πλεον εις την Ιταλιαν]
This was the opportunity for which Lysias had been looking. So he put (ενεβιβασεν — enebibasen first aorist active of εμβιβαζω — embibazō to cause to enter. Cf. επιβαντες — epibantes in Acts 27:2) prisoners and soldiers on board. This was a ship of Alexandria bound for Rome, a grain ship (38) out of its course because of the wind. Such grain ships usually carried passengers. [source]
Acts 27:12 If by any means they could reach Phoenix and winter there [ει πως δυναιντο καταντησαντες εις Ποινικα παραχειμασαι]
The optative δυναιντο — dunainto (present middle of δυναμαι — dunamai) here with ει — ei is a condition of the fourth class with the notion of purpose implied and indirect discourse (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1021). “We vote for going on the chance that we may be able” (Page). Phoenix is the town of palms (John 12:13), the modern Lutro, the only town in Crete on the southern coast with a harbour fit for wintering, though Wordsworth and Page argue for Phineka which suits Luke‘s description better. The verb παραχειμαζω — paracheimazō to winter, is from παρα — para and χειμων — cheimōn (see also Acts 28:11). Used in several Koiné{[28928]}š writers. [source]
Acts 27:40 They left them in the sea [ειων εις την ταλασσαν]
Imperfect active of εαω — eaō either descriptive or inchoative. They let the anchors go and the ropes fell down into the sea. At the same time loosing the bands of the rudders (αμα ανεντες τας ζευκτηριας των πηδαλιων — hama anentes tas zeuktērias tōn pēdaliōn). On the use of αμα — hama with the participle, old Greek idiom see Robertson, Grammar, p. 1139. The second aorist active participle of ανιημι — aniēmi to relax, loosen up. Old verb, in N.T. Acts 16:26; Acts 27:40; Ephesians 6:9; Hebrews 13:5. Thayer notes that ζευκτηριας — zeuktērias (bands) occurs nowhere else, but several papyri use it of yokes and waterwheels (Moulton and Milligan‘s Vocabulary). The word for rudders (πηδαλιον — pēdalion) is an old one (from πηδον — pēdon the blade of an oar), but in the N.T. only here and James 3:4. Page notes that the ancient ships had a pair of paddle rudders like those of the early northmen, one on each quarter. The paddle rudders had been fastened while the ship was anchored. Hoisting up the foresail to the wind Supply αυραι — aurāi (breeze) after πνεουσηι — pneousēi (blowing). It is not clear what “sail” is meant by “αρτεμωνα — artemōna No other example in Greek is known, though the scholiast to Juvenal XII. 68 explains ςελο προρα συο — velo prora suo by artemone solo. Hence “foresail” is probably correct. They made for the beach (κατειχον εις τον αιγιαλον — kateichon eis ton aigialon). Imperfect active of κατεχω — katechō to hold down, perhaps inchoative. “They began to hold the ship steadily for the beach.” [source]
Acts 27:40 They made for the beach [κατειχον εις τον αιγιαλον]
Imperfect active of κατεχω — katechō to hold down, perhaps inchoative. “They began to hold the ship steadily for the beach.” [source]
Acts 28:12 At Syracuse [εις Συρακουσας]
The chief city of Sicily and eighty miles from Malta. Perhaps open weather and a southerly wind helped them across. Here it was that Alcibiades wrecked the power and glory of Athens. Why the ship spent three days we do not know. [source]
Acts 28:13 To Puteoli [εις Ποτιολους]
It was 182 miles from Rhegium and would require 26 hours (Page). It was eight miles northwest from Neapolis (Naples) and the chief port of Rome, the regular harbour for the Alexandrian ships from Rome. Portions of the great mole are said to be still visible. [source]
Acts 28:14 And so we came to Rome [και ουτως εις την ομην ηλταμεν]
So at last. Luke is exultant as Page observes: Paulus Romae captivus: triumphus unicus. It is the climax of the book of Acts (Acts 19:21; Acts 23:11), but not the close of Paul‘s career. Page rightly remarks that a new paragraph should begin with Acts 28:15, for brethren came from Rome and this part of the journey is touched with the flavour of that incident. The great event is that Paul reached Rome, but not as he had once hoped (Romans 15:22-29). [source]
Acts 28:15 To meet us [εις απαντησιν ημιν]
Idiomatic phrase, “for meeting with us” (associative instrumental case). Koiné{[28928]}š word απαντησις — apantōsis from verb απανταω — apantaō to meet, in N.T. only here; Matthew 25:6; 1 Thessalonians 4:17. Use after neisn rather than infinitive like a translation Hebraism (Robertson, Grammar, p. 91). As far as the Market of Appius (εις — achri Appiou Phorou). The Forum of Appius, 90 miles from Puteoli, 40 from Rome, on the great Appian Way. The Censor Appius Claudius had constructed this part of the road, b.c. 312. Paul probably struck the Appian Way at Capua. Portions of this great stone highway are still in use. If one wishes to tread where Paul trod, he can do it here. Appii Forum had a bad reputation, the haunt of thieves, thugs, and swindlers. What would this motley crowd think of Paul chained to a soldier? Three Taverns Genitive case after Τριων Ταβερνων — achri like αχρι — Appiou Phorou About 30 miles from Rome. Tres Tabernae. Whom (Αππιου Πορου — hous). Two groups of the disciples came (one Gentile, one Jewish, Rackham thinks), one to Appii Forum, the other to Three Taverns. It was a joyous time and Julius would not interfere. Took courage The old substantive ελαβε ταρσος — tharsos is here alone in the N.T. Jesus himself had exhorted Paul to be of good courage Paul had passed through enough to cause depression, whether he was depressed or not, but he deeply appreciated this kindly sympathy. [source]
Acts 28:15 As far as the Market of Appius [εις]
The Forum of Appius, 90 miles from Puteoli, 40 from Rome, on the great Appian Way. The Censor Appius Claudius had constructed this part of the road, b.c. 312. Paul probably struck the Appian Way at Capua. Portions of this great stone highway are still in use. If one wishes to tread where Paul trod, he can do it here. Appii Forum had a bad reputation, the haunt of thieves, thugs, and swindlers. What would this motley crowd think of Paul chained to a soldier? [source]
Acts 28:17 Yet was I delivered prisoner from Jerusalem into the hands of the Romans [δεσμιος εχ Ιεροσολυμων παρεδοτην εις τας χειρας των ομαιων]
This condensed statement does not explain how he “was delivered,” for in fact the Jews were trying to kill him when Lysias rescued him from the mob (Acts 22:27 -36). The Jews were responsible for his being in the hands of the Romans, though they had hoped to kill him first. [source]
Acts 4:3 In ward [εις τηρησιν]
Probably in one of the chambers of the temple. In safe keeping (from τηρεω — tēreō to guard). Old word, in the N.T. only here and Acts 5:18; 1 Corinthians 7:19. So in papyri. [source]
Acts 4:30 To heal [εις ιασιν]
For healing. See Acts 4:22. And that signs and wonders may be done (και σημεια και τερατα γινεσται — kai sēmeia kai terata ginesthai). Either to be taken as in the same construction as εκτεινειν — ekteinein with εν τωι — en tōi as Revised Version has it here or to be treated as subordinate purpose to εν τωι εκτεινειν — en tōi ekteinein (as Knowling, Page, Wendt, Hackett). The latter most likely true. They ask for a visible sign or proof that God has heard this prayer for courage to be faithful even unto death. [source]
Acts 4:32 Not one of them [ουδε εις]
More emphatic than ουδεις — oudeis “not even one.” Common (κοινα — Koinéa). In the use of their property, not in the possession as Luke proceeds to explain. The word κοινος — Koinéos is kin to συν — sun (together with)=χυν — xun (Epic) and so χυνοσκοινος — xunoŝKoinéos See this word already in Acts 2:44. The idea of unclean (Acts 10:15) is a later development from the original notion of common to all. [source]
Acts 5:15 Into the streets [εις τας πλατειας]
Supply οδους — hodous (ways), into the broad ways. On beds and couches (επι κλιναριων και κραβαττων — epi klinariōn kai krabattōn). Little beds (κλιναρια — klinaria diminutive of κλινη — klinē) and camp beds or pallets (See note on Mark 2:4, Mark 2:9, Mark 2:11). As Peter came by Genitive absolute with present middle participle. At the least his shadow might overshadow (καν η σκια επισκιασει — kan hē skia episkiasei). Future active indicative with ινα — hina (common with οπως — hopōs in ancient Greek) and καν — kan (crasis for και εαν — kai ean =even if), even if only the shadow. The word for shadow (σκια — skia like our “sky”) is repeated in the verb and preserved in our “overshadow.” There was, of course, no virtue or power in Peter‘s shadow. That was faith with superstition, of course, just as similar cases in the Gospels occur (Matthew 9:20; Mark 6:56; John 9:5) and the use of Paul‘s handkerchief (Acts 19:12). God honours even superstitious faith if it is real faith in him. Few people are wholly devoid of superstition. [source]
Acts 5:21 To the prison house [εις το δεσμωτηριον]
See also Acts 5:22, Acts 5:23, Acts 5:25. This from δεσμος — desmos bond, and τηρεω — tēreō to keep, place where bound men are kept. [source]
Acts 6:11 Blasphemous words against Moses and God [βλασπημα εις Μωυσην και τον τεον]
The punishment for blasphemy was stoning to death. See note on Matthew 12:31 for discussion of the word βλασπημια βλασπημεω βλασπημος — blasphēmiaβλαπτω — blasphēmeōπημη — blasphēmos all in the N.T. from βλαχ — blaptō to harm, and πημη — phēmē speech, harmful speech, or blax stupid, and phēmē But the charge against Stephen was untrue. Please note that Moses is here placed before God and practically on a par with God in the matter of blasphemy. The purpose of this charge is to stir the prejudices of the people in the matter of Jewish rights and privileges. It is the Pharisees who are conducting this attack on Stephen while the Sadducees had led them against Peter and John. The position of Stephen is critical in the extreme for the Sadducees will not help him as Gamaliel did the apostles. [source]
Acts 7:4 Wherein ye now dwell [εις ην υμεις νυν κατοικειτε]
Note εις — eis in the sense of εν — en as often. Note also emphatic use of υμεις — humeis (ye) and now (νυν — nun). [source]
Acts 7:5 In possession [εις κατασχεσιν]
Late word, in lxx, and in N.T. only here and Acts 7:45. From κατεχω — katechō to hold back, then to hold fast (or down), to possess. It was fulfilled in the descendants of Abraham. [source]
Acts 7:16 They were carried over unto Shechem [μετετετησαν εις Συχεμ]
First aorist passive of μετατιτημι — metatithēmi only here in the N.T. in this sense of changing places. Jacob was buried in the cave of Machpelah (Genesis 50:13). The O.T. does not say where the sons of Jacob were buried save that Joseph was buried in Shechem (Joshua 24:32). Possibly only “our fathers” without Jacob is the subject of “were carried.” [source]
Acts 7:19 To the end they might not live [εις το μη ζωογονεισται]
Purpose with εις — eis and the articular infinitive (present middle). This compound verb is from ζωογονος — zōogonos (from ζωος — zōos alive, and γενω — genō to bear) and is used by late writers and the lxx. It is three times in the N.T. (here, Luke 17:33; 1 Timothy 6:13) in the sense to preserve alive. [source]
Acts 7:21 Nourished him for her own son [ανετρεπσατο αυτον εαυτηι εις υιον]
Literally, “she nursed him up for herself (εαυτηι — heautēi besides middle voice) as a son.” This use of εις — eis =as occurs in the old Greek, but is very common in the lxx as a translation of the Hebrew le. The tradition is that she designed Moses for the throne as the Pharaoh had no son (Josephus, Ant. ii. 9, 7). [source]
Acts 7:53 As it was ordained by angels [εις διαταγας αγγελων]
About angels, see note on Acts 7:38. Διαταγη — Diatagē (from διατασσω — diatassō to arrange, appoint) occurs in late Greek, lxx, inscriptions, papyri, Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East, pp. 89ff., and in N.T. only here and Romans 13:2. At (or as) the appointment of angels (cf. Matthew 10:41; Matthew 12:41 for this use of εις — eis). And kept it not (και ουκ επυλαχατε — kai ouk ephulaxate). Like a whipcracker these words cut to the quick. They gloried in possessing the law and openly violated it (Romans 2:23). [source]
Acts 8:5 To the city of Samaria [εις την πολιν της Σαμαριας]
Genitive of apposition. Samaria is the name of the city here. This is the first instance cited of the expansion noted in Acts 8:4. Jesus had an early and fruitful ministry in Samaria (John 4), though the twelve were forbidden to go into a Samaritan city during the third tour of Galilee (Matthew 10:5), a temporary prohibition withdrawn before Jesus ascended on high (Acts 1:8). Proclaimed (εκηρυσσεν — ekērussen). Imperfect active, began to preach and kept on at it. Note ευαγγελιζομενοι — euaggelizomenoi in Acts 8:4 of missionaries of good news (Page) while εκηρυσσεν — ekērussen here presents the preacher as a herald. He is also a teacher (διδασκαλος — didaskalos) like Jesus. Luke probably obtained valuable information from Philip and his daughters about these early days when in his home in Caesarea (Acts 21:8). [source]
Acts 8:16 Into the name [εις το ονομα]
Better, in the name (See note on Acts 2:38). [source]
Acts 8:20 Perish with thee [συν σοι ειη εις απωλειαν]
Literally, Be with thee for destruction. Optative for a future wish. The use of εις — eis with the accusative in the predicate is especially common in the lxx. The wish reveals Peter‘s indignation at the base offer of Simon. Peter was no grafter to accept money for spiritual power. He spurned the temptation. The natural meaning of Peter‘s language is that Simon was on the road to destruction. It is a warning and almost a curse on him, though Acts 8:22 shows that there was still room for repentance. [source]
Acts 8:23 In the gall of bitterness [εις χολην πικριας]
Old word from χολας — cholas either from χεω — cheō to pour, or χλοη — chloē yellowish green, bile or gall. In the N.T. only in Matthew 27:34 and here. In lxx in sense of wormwood as well as bile. See Deuteronomy 29:18 and Deuteronomy 32:32; Lamentations 3:15; and Job 16:14. “Gall and bitterness” in Deuteronomy 29:18. Here the gall is described by the genitive πικριας — pikrias as consisting in “bitterness.” In Hebrews 12:15 “a root of bitterness,” a bitter root. This word πικρια — pikria in the N.T. only here and Hebrews 12:15; Romans 3:14; Ephesians 4:31. The “bond of iniquity” Peter describes Simon‘s offer as poison and a chain. [source]
Acts 9:2 To Damascus [εις Δαμασκον]
As if no disciples of importance (outside the apostles in Jerusalem) were left in Judea. Damascus at this time may have been under the rule of Aretas of Arabia (tributary to Rome) as it certainly was a couple of years later when Saul escaped in a basket (2 Corinthians 11:32). This old city is the most enduring in the history of the world (Knowling). It is some 150 miles Northeast from Jerusalem and watered by the river Abana from Anti-Lebanon. Here the Jews were strong in numbers (10,000 butchered by Nero later) and here some disciples had found refuge from Saul‘s persecution in Judea and still worshipped in the synagogues. Paul‘s language in Acts 26:11 seems to mean that Damascus is merely one of other “foreign cities” to which he carried the persecution. [source]
Romans 1:5 Unto obedience of faith [εις υπακοην πιστεως]
Subjective genitive as in Romans 16:26, the obedience which springs from faith (the act of assent or surrender). [source]
Romans 1:11 To the end ye may be established [εις το στηριχτηναι υμας]
Final clause (common in Paul) with εις το — eis to and the first aorist passive infinitive of στηριζω — stērizō for which verb see Luke 22:32; 1 Thessalonians 3:3, 1 Thessalonians 3:13. [source]
Romans 1:20 That they may be without excuse [εις το ειναι αυτους αναπολογητους]
More likely, “so that they are without excuse.” The use of εις το — eis to and the infinitive (with accusative of general reference) for result like ωστε — hōste is reasonably clear in the N.T. (Moulton, Prolegomena, p. 219; Robertson, Grammar, p. 1003). Αναπολογητους — Anapologētous is another verbal with αν — an from απολογεομαι — apologeomai Old word, in N.T. only here and Romans 2:1 (“inexcusable” here). [source]
Romans 1:26 Unto vile passions [εις πατη ατιμιας]
Unto passions of dishonour. Πατος — Pathos old word from πασχω — paschō to experience, originally meant any feeling whether good or bad, but in N.T. always in bad sense as here, 1 Thessalonians 4:5; Colossians 3:5 (only N.T. examples). [source]
Romans 1:28 Unto a reprobate mind [εις αδοκιμον νουν]
Play on ουκ εδοκιμασαν — ouk edokimasan They rejected God and God rejected their mental attitude and gave them over (Romans 1:24, Romans 1:26, Romans 1:28). See this adjective already in 1 Corinthians 9:27; 2 Corinthians 13:5-7. Like an old abandoned building, the home of bats and snakes, left “to do those things which are not fitting” (ποιειν τα μη κατηκοντα — poiein ta mē kathēkonta), like the night clubs of modern cities, the dives and dens of the underworld, without God and in the darkness of unrestrained animal impulses. This was a technical term with Stoics (2 Maccabees 6:4). [source]
Romans 10:7 Into the abyss [εις την αβυσσον]
See note on Luke 8:31 for this old Greek word (α — a privative and βυσσος — bussos) bottomless like sea (Psalm 106:26), our abyss. In Revelation 9:1 it is the place of torment. Paul seems to refer to Hades or Sheol (Acts 2:27, Acts 2:31), the other world to which Christ went after death. [source]
Romans 11:9 A snare [εις παγιδα]
From πηγνυμι — pēgnumi to make fast, old word for snares for birds and beasts. See Luke 21:35. Εις — Eis in predicate with γινομαι — ginomai is a translation-Hebraism. [source]
Romans 11:9 A trap [εις τηραν]
Old word for hunting of wild beasts, then a trap. Only here in N.T. A stumbling-block (εις σκανδαλον — eis skandalon). A third word for trap, snare, trap-stick or trigger over which they fall. See note on 1 Corinthians 1:23; Romans 9:33. A recompense Late word from double compound verb ανταποδιδωμι — antapodidōmi to repay (both αντι — anti and απο — apo). Ancient Greeks used ανταποδοσις — antapodosis In lxx and Didache. In N.T. only here (bad sense) and Luke 14:12 (good sense). [source]
Romans 11:9 A stumbling-block [εις σκανδαλον]
A third word for trap, snare, trap-stick or trigger over which they fall. See note on 1 Corinthians 1:23; Romans 9:33. [source]
Romans 11:9 A recompense [εις ανταποδομα]
Late word from double compound verb ανταποδιδωμι — antapodidōmi to repay (both αντι — anti and απο — apo). Ancient Greeks used ανταποδοσις — antapodosis In lxx and Didache. In N.T. only here (bad sense) and Luke 14:12 (good sense). [source]
Romans 11:11 For to provoke them to jealousy [εις το παραζηλωσαι]
Purpose expressed by εις — eis and the articular infinitive, first aorist active, of παραζηλοω — parazēloō for which verb see note on 1 Corinthians 10:22. As an historical fact Paul turned to the Gentiles when the Jews rejected his message (Acts 13:45.; Acts 28:28, etc.). The riches of the world (πλουτος κοσμου — ploutos kosmou). See note on Romans 10:12. Their loss So perhaps in 1 Corinthians 6:7, but in Isaiah 31:8 defeat is the idea. Perhaps so here. Fulness (πληρωμα — plērōma). Perhaps “completion,” though the word from πληροω — plēroō to fill, has a variety of senses, that with which anything is filled (1 Corinthians 10:26, 1 Corinthians 10:28), that which is filled (Ephesians 1:23). How much more? Argument a fortiori as in Romans 11:24. Romans 11:25 illustrates the point. [source]
Romans 11:36 Goal [εις]
For ever (εις τους αιωνας — eis tous aiōnas). “For the ages.” Alford terms this doxology in Romans 11:33-36 “the sublimest apostrophe existing even in the pages of inspiration itself.” [source]
Romans 11:36 For ever [εις τους αιωνας]
“For the ages.” Alford terms this doxology in Romans 11:33-36 “the sublimest apostrophe existing even in the pages of inspiration itself.” [source]
Romans 12:2 That ye may prove [εις το δοκιμαζειν]
Infinitive of purpose with εις το — eis to “to test” what is God‘s will, “the good and acceptable and perfect” (το αγατον και ευαρεστον και τελειον — to agathon kai euareston kai teleion). [source]
Romans 12:5 And severally [το δε κατ εις]
A difficult late idiom where the preposition κατ — kath' So εις κατ εις — heis kath' heis (Mark 14:19) and in Modern Greek κατεις — katheis as a distributive pronoun. But we have κατ ενα — kath' hena in 1 Corinthians 14:31. The use of the neuter article here το — to with κατ εις — kath' heis is probably the accusative of general reference, “as to each one.” [source]
Romans 13:14 To fulfil the lusts thereof [εις επιτυμιας]
“For lusts.” No verb. [source]
Romans 14:1 Yet not to doubtful disputations [μη εις διακρισεις διαλογισμων]
“Not for decisions of opinions.” Note δια — dia (between, two or δυο — duo) in both words. Discriminations between doubts or hesitations. For διακρισις — diakrisis see note on 1 Corinthians 12:10; Hebrews 5:14 (only N.T. examples). For διαλογισμος — dialogismos see note on Luke 2:35; on Luke 24:38; and note on Philemon 2:14. The “strong” brother is not called upon to settle all the scruples of the “weak” brother. But each takes it on himself to do it. [source]
Romans 15:2 For that which is good [εις το αγατον]
“For the good.” As in Romans 14:16, Romans 14:19. Not to please men just for popular favours, but for their benefit. [source]
Romans 15:4 For our learning [εις την ημετεραν διδασκαλιαν]
“For the instruction of us.” Objective sense of possessive pronoun ημετερος — hēmeteros See Matthew 15:9 and note on 2 Timothy 3:16 for διδασκαλιαν — didaskalian (from διδασκω — didaskō to teach). We might have hope (την ελπιδα εχωμεν — tēn elpida echōmen). Present active subjunctive of εχω — echō with ινα — hina in final clause, “that we might keep on having hope.” One of the blessed uses of the Scriptures. [source]
Romans 15:8 That he might confirm [εις το βεβαιωσαι]
Purpose clause with εις το — eis to and the infinitive βεβαιωσαι — bebaiōsai (first aorist active of βεβαιοω — bebaioō to make stand). The promises given unto the fathers (τας επαγγελιας των πατερων — tas epaggelias tōn paterōn). No “given” in the Greek, just the objective genitive, “the promises to the fathers.” See note on Romans 9:4, Romans 9:5. [source]
Romans 15:13 That ye may abound [εις το περισσευειν υμας]
Purpose clause with εις το — eis to as in Romans 15:8, with περισσευειν — perisseuein (present active infinitive of περισσευω — perisseuō with accusative of general reference, υμας — humas). This verse gathers up the points in the preceding quotations. [source]
Romans 15:16 That I should be [εις το ειναι με]
The εις το — eis to idiom with the infinitive again (Romans 15:8, Romans 15:13). [source]
Romans 15:24 Into Spain [εις την Σπανιαν]
It was a Roman province with many Jews in it. The Greek name was Ιβερια — Iberia the Latin Hispania. The Textus Receptus adds here ελευσομαι προς υμας — eleusomai pros humas (I shall come to you), but it is not in Aleph A B C D and is not genuine. Without it we have a parenthesis (or anacoluthon) through the rest of Romans 15:24. In my journey (διαπορευομενος — diaporeuomenos). Present middle participle, “passing through.” Paul planned only a brief stay in Rome since a strong church already existed there. To be brought on my way thitherward “To be sent forward there.” First aorist passive infinitive of προπεμπω — propempō common word for escorting one on a journey (1 Corinthians 16:6, 1 Corinthians 16:11; 2 Corinthians 1:16; Titus 3:13; 2 John 1:6). If first in some measure I shall have been satisfied with your company (εαν υμων προτων απο μερους εμπληστω — ean humōn protōn apo merous emplēsthō). Condition of third class with εαν — ean and first aorist passive subjunctive of εμπιμπλημι — empimplēmi old verb, to fill up, to satisfy, to take one‘s fill. See Luke 6:25. Literally, “if I first in part be filled with you” (get my fill of you). delicate compliment for the Roman church. [source]
Romans 15:26 For the poor among the saints [εις τους πτωχους των αγιων]
Partitive genitive. Not all there were poor, but Acts 4:32-5:11; Acts 6:1-6; Acts 11:29.; Galatians 2:10 prove that many were. [source]
Romans 16:26 Unto obedience of faith [εις υπακοην της πιστεως]
See note on Romans 1:5. Made known unto all the nations (εις παντα τα ετνη γνωριστεντος — eis panta ta ethnē gnōristhentos). First aorist passive participle of γνωριζω — gnōrizō still the genitive case agreeing with μυστηριου — mustēriou in Romans 16:25. [source]
Romans 16:26 Made known unto all the nations [εις παντα τα ετνη γνωριστεντος]
First aorist passive participle of γνωριζω — gnōrizō still the genitive case agreeing with μυστηριου — mustēriou in Romans 16:25. [source]
Romans 2:26 For [εις]
As often in N.T. [source]
Romans 3:10 There is none righteous, no, not one [ουκ εστιν δικαιος ουδε εις]
“There is not a righteous man, not even one.” This sentence is like a motto for all the rest, a summary for what follows. [source]
Romans 3:26 That he might himself be [εις το ειναι αυτον]
Purpose with εις — eis to and the infinitive ειναι — einai and the accusative of general reference. [source]
Romans 3:25 To show his righteousness [εις ενδειχιν της δικαιοσυνης αυτου]
See note on 2 Corinthians 8:24. “For showing of his righteousness,” the God-kind of righteousness. God could not let sin go as if a mere slip. God demanded the atonement and provided it. Because of the passing over (δια την παρεσιν — dia tēn paresin). Late word from παριημι — pariēmi to let go, to relax. In Dionysius Hal., Xenophon, papyri (Deissmann, Bible Studies, p. 266) for remission of punishment, especially for debt, as distinct from απεσις — aphesis (remission). Done aforetime Second perfect active genitive participle of προγινομαι — proginomai The sins before the coming of Christ (Acts 14:16; Acts 17:30; Hebrews 9:15). Forbearance (ανοχηι — anochēi). Holding back of God as in Romans 2:4. In this sense Christ tasted death for every man (Hebrews 2:9). [source]
Romans 3:30 If so be that God is one [ειπερ εις ο τεος]
Correct text rather than επειπερ — epeiper It means “if on the whole.” “By a species of rhetorical politeness it is used of that about which there is no doubt” (Thayer. Cf. 1 Corinthians 8:5; 1 Corinthians 15:15; Romans 8:9. [source]
Romans 4:3 It was reckoned unto him for righteousness [ελογιστη εις δικαιοσυνην]
First aorist passive indicative of λογιζομαι — logizomai old and common verb to set down accounts (literally or metaphorically). It was set down on the credit side of the ledger “for” (εις — eis as often) righteousness. What was set down? His believing God (επιστευσεν τωι τεωι — episteusen tōi theōi). [source]
Romans 4:11 That he might be [εις το ειναι αυτον]
This idiom may be God‘s purpose (contemplated result) as in εις το λογιστηναι — eis to logisthēnai below, or even actual result (so that he was) as in Romans 1:20. [source]
Romans 4:16 To the end that [εις το ειναι]
Purpose again as in Romans 4:11. [source]
Romans 4:18 To the end that he might become [εις το γενεσται αυτον]
Purpose clause again with εις — eis to and the infinitive as in Romans 4:11-16. [source]
Romans 5:12 Sin entered into the world [η αμαρτια εις τον κοσμον εισηλτεν]
Personification of sin and represented as coming from the outside into the world of humanity. Paul does not discuss the origin of evil beyond this fact. There are some today who deny the fact of sin at all and who call it merely “an error of mortal mind” (a notion) while others regard it as merely an animal inheritance devoid of ethical quality. [source]
Romans 5:12 And so death passed unto all men [και ουτως εις παντας αντρωπους διηλτεν]
Note use of διερχομαι — dierchomai rather than εισερχομαι — eiserchomai just before, second aorist active indicative in both instances. By “death” in Genesis 2:17; Genesis 3:19 physical death is meant, but in Romans 5:17, Romans 5:21 eternal death is Paul‘s idea and that lurks constantly behind physical death with Paul. For that all sinned (επ ωι παντες ημαρτον — Ephesians' hōi pantes hēmarton). Constative (summary) aorist active indicative of αμαρτανω — hamartanō gathering up in this one tense the history of the race (committed sin). The transmission from Adam became facts of experience. In the old Greek επ ωι — Ephesians' hōi usually meant “on condition that,” but “because” in N.T. (Robertson, Grammar, p. 963). [source]
Romans 6:3 Were baptized into Christ [εβαπτιστημεν εις Χριστον]
First aorist passive indicative of βαπτιζω — baptizō Better, “were baptized unto Christ or in Christ.” The translation “into” makes Paul say that the union with Christ was brought to pass by means of baptism, which is not his idea, for Paul was not a sacramentarian. Εις — Eis is at bottom the same word as εν — en Baptism is the public proclamation of one‘s inward spiritual relation to Christ attained before the baptism. See note on Galatians 3:27 where it is like putting on an outward garment or uniform. [source]
Romans 6:4 We were buried therefore with him by means of baptism unto death [συνεταπημεν ουν αυτωι δια του βαπτισματος εις τον τανατον]
Second aorist passive indicative of συνταπτω — sunthaptō old verb to bury together with, in N.T. only here and Colossians 2:12. With associative instrumental case (αυτωι — autōi) and “by means of baptism unto death” as in Romans 6:3. [source]
Romans 6:12 That ye should obey [εις το υπακουειν]
With a view to obeying. [source]
Romans 6:17 To that form of doctrine whereunto ye were delivered [εις ον παρεδοτητε τυπον διδαχης]
Incorporation of the antecedent (τυπον διδαχης — tupon didachēs) into the relative clause: “to which form of doctrine ye were delivered.” See note on Romans 5:14 for τυπον — tupon It is hardly proper to take “form” here to refer to Paul‘s gospel (Romans 2:16), possibly an allusion to the symbolism of baptism which was the outward sign of the separation. [source]
Romans 6:19 Servants to righteousness [εις αγιασμον]
Repeats the idea of Romans 6:18. [source]
Romans 6:22 Ye have your fruit unto sanctification [εχετε τον καρπον υμων εις αγιασμον]
Freedom from sin and slavery to God bring permanent fruit that leads to sanctification. [source]
Romans 7:4 That we should be joined to another [εις το γενεσται ετερωι]
Purpose clause with εις το — eis to and the infinitive. First mention of the saints as wedded to Christ as their Husband occurs in 1 Corinthians 6:13; Galatians 4:26. See further Ephesians 5:22-33. That we might bring forth fruit unto God (ινα καρποπορησωμεν τωι τεωι — hina karpophorēsōmen tōi theōi). He changes the metaphor to that of the tree used in Romans 6:22. [source]
Romans 7:5 To bring forth fruit unto death [εις το καρποπορησαι τωι τανατωι]
Purpose clause again. Vivid picture of the seeds of sin working for death. [source]
Romans 7:10 This I found unto death [ευρετη μοιαυτη εις τανατον]
Literally, “the commandment the one for (meant for) life, this was found for me unto death.” First aorist (effective) passive indicative of ευρισκω — heuriskō to find, not active as the English has it. It turned out so for me (ethical dative). [source]
Romans 8:18 To us-ward [εις ημας]
We shall be included in the radiance of the coming glory which will put in the shadow the present sufferings. Precisely the same idiom here with μελλουσαν δοχαν — mellousan doxan (aorist passive infinitive of αποκαλυπτηναι — apokaluphthēnai) occurs in Galatians 3:23 with μελλουσαν πιστιν — mellousan pistin which see. [source]
Romans 8:29 That he might be [εις το ειναι αυτον]
Common idiom for purpose. First born among many brethren (πρωτοτοκον εν πολλοις αδελποις — prōtotokon en pollois adelphois). Christ is “first born” of all creation (Colossians 1:15), but here he is “first born from the dead” (Colossians 1:18), the Eldest Brother in this family of God‘s sons, though “Son” in a sense not true of us. [source]
Romans 9:22 Unto destruction [εις απωλειαν]
Endless perdition (Matthew 7:13; 2 Thessalonians 2:3; Philemon 3:19), not annihilation. [source]
Romans 9:31 Did not arrive at that law [εις νομον ουκ επτασεν]
First aorist active indicative of πτανω — phthanō old verb to anticipate (1 Thessalonians 4:15), now just to arrive as here and 2 Corinthians 10:14. The word “that” is not in the Greek. Legal righteousness Israel failed to reach, because to do that one had to keep perfectly all the law. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:9 Into the fellowship [εις κοινωνιαν]
Old word from κοινωνος — Koinéōnos partner for partnership, participation as here and 2 Corinthians 13:13.; Philemon 2:1; Philemon 3:10. Then it means fellowship or intimacy as in Acts 2:42; Galatians 2:9; 2 Corinthians 6:14; 1 John 1:3, 1 John 1:7. And particularly as shown by contribution as in 2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:13; Philemon 1:5. It is high fellowship with Christ both here and hereafter. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:13 Were ye baptized into the name of Paul? [εις το ονομα Παυλου εβαπτιστητε]
It is unnecessary to say into for εις — eis rather than in since εις — eis is the same preposition originally as εν — en and both are used with βαπτιζω — baptizō as in Acts 8:16; Acts 10:48 with no difference in idea (Robertson, Grammar, p. 592). Paul evidently knows the idea in Matthew 28:19 and scouts the notion of being put on a par with Christ or the Trinity. He is no rival of Christ. This use of ονομα — onoma for the person is not only in the lxx, but the papyri, ostraca, and inscriptions give numerous examples of the name of the king or the god for the power and authority of the king or god (Deissmann, Bible Studies, pp. 146ff., 196ff.; Light from the Ancient East, p. 121). [source]
1 Corinthians 10:2 Were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea [παντες εις τον Μωυσην εβαπτισαντο εν τηι νεπεληι και εν τηι ταλασσηι]
The picture is plain enough. The mystic cloud covered the people while the sea rose in walls on each side of them as they marched across. B K L P read εβαπτισαντο — ebaptisanto (causative first aorist middle, got themselves baptized) while Aleph A C D have εβαπτιστησαν — ebaptisthēsan (first aorist passive, were baptized). The immersion was complete for all of them in the sea around them and the cloud over them. Moses was their leader then as Christ is now and so Paul uses εις — eis concerning the relation of the Israelites to Moses as he does of our baptism in relation to Christ (Galatians 3:27). [source]
1 Corinthians 10:6 To the intent we should not lust after [εις το μη ειναι ημας επιτυμητας]
Purpose expressed by εις — eis with the articular infinitive το ειναι — to einai and the accusative of general reference with επιτυμητας — epithumētas (lusters) in the predicate. [source]
1 Corinthians 10:17 One bread [εις αρτος]
One loaf. [source]
1 Corinthians 10:31 To the glory of God [εις δοχαν τεου]
This is the ruling motive in the Christian‘s life, not just having his own way about whims and preferences.sa120 [source]
1 Corinthians 11:17 For the better [εις το κρεισσον]
Neuter articular comparative of κρατυς — kratus but used as comparative of καλος — kalos good. Attic form κρειττον — kreitton [source]
1 Corinthians 11:17 For the worse [εις το ησσον]
Old comparative from ηκα — hēka softly, used as comparative of κακος — kakos bad. In N.T. only here and 2 Corinthians 12:15. [source]
1 Corinthians 11:24 In remembrance of me [εις την εμην αναμνησιν]
The objective use of the possessive pronoun εμην — emēn Not my remembrance of you, but your remembrance of me. Αναμνησις — Anamnēsis from αναμιμνησκω — anamimnēskō to remind or to recall, is an old word, but only here in N.T. save Luke 22:19 which see. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:13 Were we all baptized into one body [ημεις παντες εις εν σωμα εβαπτιστημεν]
First aorist passive indicative of βαπτιζω — baptizō and so a reference to a definite past event with each of them of different races, nations, classes, when each of them put on the outward badge of service to Christ, the symbol of the inward changes already wrought in them by the Holy Spirit (Galatians 3:27; Romans 6:2.). [source]
1 Corinthians 14:9 Ye will be speaking into the air [εσεστε εις αερα λαλουντες]
Periphrastic future indicative (linear action). Cf. αερα δερων — aera derōn (beating the air) in 1 Corinthians 9:26. Cf. our talking to the wind. This was before the days of radio. [source]
1 Corinthians 14:22 For a sign [εις σημειον]
Like the Hebrew and occasional Koiné{[28928]}š idiom also. [source]
1 Corinthians 15:45 Became a living soul [εγενετο εις πσυχην ζωσαν]
Hebraistic use of εις — eis in predicate from lxx. God breathed a soul (πσυχη — psuchē) into “the first man.” [source]
1 Corinthians 15:45 The last Adam became a life-giving spirit [ο εσχατος Αδαμ εις πνευμα ζωοποιουν]
Supply εγενετο — egeneto (became). Christ is the crown of humanity and has power to give us the new body. In Romans 5:12-19 Paul calls Christ the Second Adam. [source]
1 Corinthians 16:1 Now concerning the collection for the saints [περι δε της λογιας της εις τους αγιους]
Paul has discussed all the problems raised by the Corinthians. Now he has on his own heart the collection for the saints in Jerusalem (see chapters 2 Corinthians 8; 2 Corinthians 9:1-15). This word λογια — logia (or εια — ̇eia) is now known to be derived from a late verb λογευω — logeuō to collect, recently found in papyri and inscriptions (Deissmann, Bible Studies, p. 143). The word λογια — logia is chiefly found in papyri, ostraca, and inscriptions that tell of religious collections for a god or a temple (Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East, p. 105). The introduction of this topic may seem sudden, but the Corinthians were behind with their part of it. They may even have asked further about it. Paul feels no conflict between discussion of the resurrection and the collection. [source]
1 Corinthians 2:7 Unto our glory [εις δοχαν ημων]
“The glory of inward enlightenment as well as of outward exaltation” (Lightfoot). [source]
1 Corinthians 4:3 It is a very small thing [εις ελαχιστον εστιν]
This predicate use of εις — eis is like the Hebrew, but it occurs also in the papyri. The superlative ελαχιστον — elachiston is elative, very little, not the true superlative, least. “It counts for very little with me.” That I should be judged of you (ινα υπ υμων ανακριτω — hina huph' humōn anakrithō). Same use of ινα — hina as in 1 Corinthians 4:2. For the verb (first aorist passive subjunctive of ανακρινω — anakrinō) see note on 1 Corinthians 2:14. Paul does not despise public opinion, but he denies “the competency of the tribunal” in Corinth (Robertson and Plummer) to pass on his credentials with Christ as his Lord. Or of man‘s judgement Or “by human day,” in contrast to the Lord‘s Day (der Tag) in 1 Corinthians 3:13. “That is the tribunal which the Apostle recognizes; a human tribunal he does not care to satisfy” (Robertson and Plummer). Yea, I judge not mine own self (αλλ ουδε εμαυτον ανακρινω — all' oude emauton anakrinō). Αλλα — Alla here is confirmatory, not adversative. “I have often wondered how it is that every man sets less value on his own opinion of himself than on the opinion of others” (M. Aurelius, xii. 4. Translated by Robertson and Plummer). Paul does not even set himself up as judge of himself. [source]
1 Corinthians 5:5 For the destruction of the flesh [εις ολετρον της σαρκος]
Both for physical suffering as in the case of Job (Job 2:6) and for conquest of the fleshly sins, remedial punishment. That the spirit may be saved (ινα το πνευμα σωτηι — hina to pneuma sōthēi). The ultimate purpose of the expulsion as discipline. Note the use of το πνευμα — to pneuma in contrast with σαρχ — sarx as the seat of personality (cf. 1 Corinthians 3:15). Paul‘s motive is not merely vindictive, but the reformation of the offender who is not named here nor in 2 Corinthians 2:5-11 if the same man is meant, which is very doubtful. The final salvation of the man in the day of Christ is the goal and this is to be attained not by condoning his sin. [source]
1 Corinthians 8:4 No God but one [ουδεις τεος ει μη εις]
This Christians held as firmly as Jews. The worship of Jesus as God‘s Son and the Holy Spirit does not recognize three Gods, but one God in three Persons. It was the worship of Mary the Mother of Jesus that gave Mahomet his cry: “Allah is One.” The cosmos, the ordered universe, can only be ruled by one God (Romans 1:20). [source]
1 Corinthians 8:6 Yet to us there is one God, the Father [αλλ ημιν εις τεος ο πατηρ]
B omits αλλ — all' here, but the sense calls for it anyhow in this apodosis, a strong antithesis to the protasis (even if at least, και ειπερ — kai eiper). [source]
1 Corinthians 6:18 sins against his own body [εις το ιδιον σωμα αμαρτανει]
(εις το ιδιον σωμα αμαρτανει — eis to idion sōma hamartanei) in a sense not true of other dreadful sins. The fornicator takes his body which belongs to Christ and unites it with a harlot. In fornication the body is the instrument of sin and becomes the subject of the damage wrought. In another sense fornication brings on one‘s own body the two most terrible bodily diseases that are still incurable (gonorrhea and syphilis) that curse one‘s own body and transmit the curse to the third and fourth generation. Apart from the high view given here by Paul of the relation of the body to the Lord no possible father or mother has the right to lay the hand of such terrible diseases and disaster on their children and children‘s children. The moral and physical rottenness wrought by immorality defy one‘s imagination. [source]
1 Corinthians 8:12 Ye sin against Christ [εις Χριστον αμαρτανετε]
That fact they were overlooking. Jesus had said to Saul that he was persecuting him when he persecuted his disciples (Acts 9:5). One may wonder if Paul knew the words of Jesus in Matthew 25:40, “ye did it unto me.” [source]
1 Corinthians 8:13 I will eat no flesh for evermore [ου μη παγω κρεα εις τον αιωνα]
The strong double negative ου μη — ou mē with the second aorist subjunctive. Here Paul has flesh (κρεα — krea) with direct reference to the flesh offered to idols. Old word, but in N.T. only here and Romans 14:21. This is Paul‘s principle of love (1 Corinthians 8:2) applied to the matter of eating meats offered to idols. Paul had rather be a vegetarian than to lead his weak brother to do what he considered sin. There are many questions of casuistry today that can only be handled wisely by Paul‘s ideal of love. [source]
1 Corinthians 9:18 So as not to use to the full [εις το μη καταχρησασται]
Εις το — Eis to for purpose with articular infinitive and perfective use of κατα — kata (as in 1 Corinthians 7:31) with χρησασται — chrēsasthai (first aorist middle infinitive). [source]
2 Corinthians 1:4 Wherewith [εις το δυνασται ημας παρακαλειν]
Genitive case of the relative attracted to that of the antecedent εις — paraklēseōs The case of the relative here could have been either the accusative ης — hēn with the passive verb retained as in Mark 10:38 or the instrumental παρακλησεως — hēi Either is perfectly good Greek (cf. Ephesians 1:6; Ephesians 4:1). Personal experience of God‘s comfort is necessary before we can pass it on to others. [source]
2 Corinthians 1:5 Abound unto us [περισσευει εις ημας]
Overflow unto us so that we suffer like sufferings and become fellow sufferers with Christ (2 Corinthians 4:10.; Romans 8:17; Philemon 3:10; Colossians 1:24). Through Christ (δια του Χριστου — dia tou Christou). The overflow (περισσευει — perisseuei) of comfort comes also through Christ. Is Paul thinking of how some of the Jewish Christians in Corinth have become reconciled with him through Christ? Partnership with Christ in suffering brings partnership in glory also (Romans 8:17; 1 Peter 4:13). [source]
2 Corinthians 1:10 On whom we have set our hope [εις ον ηλπικαμεν]
Perfect active indicative of ελπιζω — elpizō We still have that hope, emphasized by ετι ρυσεται — eti rusetai (he will still deliver). [source]
2 Corinthians 10:13 Beyond our measure [εις τα αμετρα]
“Into the unmeasured things,” “the illimitable.” Old word, here only in N.T. [source]
2 Corinthians 10:16 Even unto the parts beyond you [εις τα υπερεκεινα υμων]
Compound adverb (υπερ εκεινα — huperτα ετοιμα — ekeina beyond those places) used as preposition. Found only here and in ecclesiastical writers. [source]
2 Corinthians 11:10 No man shall stop me of this glorying [η καυχησις αυτη ου πραγησεται εις εμε]
More exactly, “This glorying shall not be fenced in as regards me.” Second future passive of πρασσω — phrassō to fence in, to stop, to block in. Old verb, only here in N.T. [source]
2 Corinthians 12:4 Into Paradise [εις παραδεισον]
See note on Luke 23:43 for this interesting word. Paul apparently uses paradise as the equivalent of the third heaven in 2 Corinthians 12:2. Some Jews (Book of the Secrets of Enoch, chapter viii) make Paradise in the third heaven. The rabbis had various ideas (two heavens, three, seven). We need not commit Paul to any “celestial gradation” (Vincent). [source]
2 Corinthians 12:6 Of me [εις εμε]
To my credit, almost like dative (cf. εν εμοι — en emoi in 1 Corinthians 14:11). [source]
2 Corinthians 13:2 If I come again [εαν ελτω εις το παλιν]
Condition of third class. The use of παλιν — palin of itself suits the idea that Paul had not yet made the second visit as it means simply “again” or “back,” but in Matthew 26:44 we find παλιν εκ τριτου — palin ek tritou (again a third time) and so it is not decisive. [source]
2 Corinthians 2:12 To Troas [εις την Τρωιαδα]
Luke does not mention this stop at Troas on the way from Ephesus to Macedonia (Acts 20:1.), though he does mention two other visits there (Acts 16:8; Acts 20:6). [source]
2 Corinthians 2:16 From death unto death [εκ τανατου εις τανατον]
From one evil condition to another. Some people are actually hardened by preaching. [source]
2 Corinthians 4:11 Are alway delivered unto death [εις τανατον παραδιδομετα]
This explains 2 Corinthians 4:10. [source]
2 Corinthians 4:17 More and more exceedingly [κατ υπερβολην εις υπερβολην]
Like piling Pelion on Ossa, “according to excess unto excess.” See note on 1 Corinthians 12:31. Eternal weight of glory (aiōnion baros doxēs). Careful balancing of words in contrast (affliction vs. glory, lightness vs. weight, for the moment vs. eternal). [source]
2 Corinthians 5:14 One died for all [εις υπερ παντων απετανεν]
This is the central tenet in Paul‘s theology and Christology. υπερ — Huper (over) here is used in the sense of substitution as in John 11:50; Galatians 3:13, death in behalf so that the rest will not have to die. This use of υπερ — huper is common in the papyri (Robertson, Grammar, p. 631). In fact, υπερ — huper in this sense is more usual in Greek than αντι προ — antiαρα οι παντες απετανον — pro or any other preposition. Therefore all died (αρα — ara hoi pantes apethanon). Logical conclusion (ara corresponding), the one died for the all and so the all died when he did, all the spiritual death possible for those for whom Christ died. This is Paul‘s gospel, clear-cut, our hope today. [source]
2 Corinthians 6:1 In vain [εις κενον]
Into emptiness. The plan of God, the work of Christ on the Cross, the pleas of the ambassador may all be nullified by the recipient of the message. [source]
2 Corinthians 7:3 To die together and live together [εις το συναποτανειν και συνζηιν]
“For the dying together (second aorist ingressive active infinitive of συναποτνησκω — sunapothnēskō) and living together (present active infinitive).” One article (το — to) with both infinitives. You are in our hearts to share death and life. [source]
2 Corinthians 7:9 Unto repentance [εις μετανοιαν]
Note the sharp difference here between “sorrow” In God‘s way. “God‘s way as opposed to man‘s way and the devil‘s way” (Plummer). It was not mere sorrow, but a change in their attitude that counted. That ye might suffer loss by us in nothing Purpose clause with ινα — hina and first aorist passive subjunctive of ζημιοω — zēmioō old verb to suffer damage. See Matthew 16:26. This was God‘s intention and so he overruled their sorrow to good. [source]
2 Corinthians 7:10 Worketh repentance unto salvation a repentance without regret [μετανοιαν εις σωτηριαν αμεταμελητον εργαζεται]
This clause alone should have prevented the confusion between mere “sorrow” It agrees with μετανοιαν — metanoian not σωτηριαν — sōtērian But the sorrow of the world (η δε του κοσμου λυπη — hē de tou kosmou lupē). In contrast, the kind of sorrow that the world has, grief “for failure, not for sin” (Bernard), for the results as seen in Cain, Esau (his tears!), and Judas (remorse, μετεμελητη — metemelēthē). Works out (perfective use of κατ — kaṫ) death in the end. [source]
2 Corinthians 8:6 Insomuch that we exhorted Titus [εις το παρακαλεσαι ημας Τιτον]
Use of εις το — eis to and the infinitive for result with accusative of general reference See Robertson, Grammar, p. 1003. [source]
2 Corinthians 8:24 In the face of the churches [εις προσωπον των εκκλησιων]
A great host is pictured as watching how the Corinthians will treat these duly accredited agents in the collection (Titus and the other two brethren). It requires courage to stand by such representatives of great causes before stingy saints. [source]
Galatians 1:6 Unto a different gospel [εις ετερον ευαγγελιον]
See note on 2 Corinthians 11:4 for distinction between allo and heteron as here. It is not here or there a mere difference in emphasis or spirit as in Philemon 1:18 so long as Christ is preached. These men as in 2 Corinthians 11:4 preach “another Jesus” and a “different gospel” and so have fallen away from grace and have done away with Christ (Galatians 5:4). Hence the vehemence of Paul‘s words. [source]
Galatians 1:17 Into Arabia [εις Αραβιαν]
This visit to Arabia has to come between the two visits to Damascus which are not distinguished in Acts 9:22. In Acts 9:23 Luke does speak of “considerable days” and so we must place the visit to Arabia between Acts 9:22, Acts 9:23. [source]
Galatians 1:21 Into the region of Syria and Cilicia [εις τα κλιματα της Σψριας και της Κιλικιας]
This statement agrees with the record in Acts 9:30. On κλιματα — klimata see note on 2 Corinthians 11:10. Paul was not idle, but at work in Tarsus and the surrounding country. [source]
Galatians 2:2 Lest by any means I should be running or had run in vain [μη πως εις κενον τρεχω η εδραμον]
Negative purpose with the present subjunctive There are plenty of classical parallels. See also 1 Thessalonians 3:5 for both together again. [source]
Galatians 2:8 He that wrought for Peter unto the apostleship of the circumcision [ο γαρ ενεργησας Πετρωι εις αποστολην της περιτομης]
Paul here definitely recognizes Peter‘s leadership (apostleship, αποστολην — apostolēn late word, already in Acts 1:25; 1 Corinthians 9:2) to the Jews and asserts that Peter acknowledges his apostleship to the Gentiles. This is a complete answer to the Judaizers who denied the genuineness of Paul‘s apostleship because he was not one of the twelve. [source]
Galatians 3:6 It was reckoned unto him for righteousness [ελογιστη εις δικαιοσυνην]
First aorist passive indicative of λογιζομαι — logizomai See note on 1 Corinthians 13:5 for this old word. He quotes Genesis 15:6 and uses it at length in Romans 4:3. to prove that the faith of Abraham was reckoned “for” Paul and James are discussing different episodes in the life of Abraham. Both are correct. [source]
Galatians 3:14 That upon the Gentiles [ινα εις τα ετνη]
Final clause (ινα — hina and γενηται — genētai aorist middle subjunctive). [source]
Galatians 3:20 But God is one [ο δε τεος εις εστιν]
There was no middleman between God and Abraham. He made the promise directly to Abraham. Over 400 interpretations of this verse have been made! [source]
Galatians 3:24 Our tutor unto Christ [παιδαγωγος υμων εις Χριστον]
See note on 1 Corinthians 4:15 for the only other N.T. example of this old and common word for the slave employed in Greek and Roman families of the better class in charge of the boy from about six to sixteen. The paedagogue watched his behaviour at home and attended him when he went away from home as to school. Christ is our Schoolmaster and the law as paedagogue kept watch over us till we came to Christ. [source]
Galatians 3:27 Were baptized into Christ [εις Χριστον εβαπτιστητε]
First aorist passive indicative of βαπτιζω — baptizō Better, “were baptized unto Christ” in reference to Christ. [source]
Galatians 3:28 One man [εις]
No word for “man” in the Greek, and yet εις — heis is masculine, not neuter εν — hen “One moral personality” (Vincent). The point is that “in Christ Jesus” race or national distinctions (“neither Jew nor Greek”) do not exist, class differences (“neither bond nor free,” no proletarianism and no capitalism) vanish, sex rivalry (“no male and female”) disappears. This radical statement marks out the path along which Christianity was to come in the sphere (εν — en) and spirit and power of Christ. Candour compels one to confess that this goal has not yet been fully attained. But we are on the road and there is no hope on any way than on “the Jesus Road.” [source]
Galatians 4:11 Lest by any means I have bestowed labour upon you in vain [μη πως εικηι κεκοπιακα εις υμας]
Usual construction after a verb of fearing about what has actually happened A fear about the future would be expressed by the subjunctive. Paul fears that the worst has happened. [source]
Ephesians 1:5 Unto adoption as sons [εις υιοτεσιαν]
For this interesting word see note on Galatians 4:5 (included with discussion of Galatians 4:4). Also see Romans 8:15; Romans 9:4. Unto himself (εις αυτον — eis auton). Unto God. According to the good pleasure of his will Here ευδοκιαν — eudokian means purpose like βουλην — boulēn in Ephesians 1:11 rather than benevolence (good pleasure). Note the preposition κατα — kata here for standard. [source]
Ephesians 1:5 Unto himself [εις αυτον]
Unto God. [source]
Ephesians 1:6 To the praise [εις επαινον]
Note the prepositions in this sentence. [source]
Ephesians 1:10 Unto a dispensation of the fulness of the times [εις οικονομιαν του πληρωματος των καιρων]
See note on Colossians 1:25 for οικονομιαν — oikonomian In Galatians 4:4 “the fulness of the time” Cf. Mark 1:15; Hebrews 1:1. On πληρωμα — plērōma see also Romans 11:26; Ephesians 3:19; Ephesians 4:13. [source]
Ephesians 1:12 To the end that we should be [εις το ειναι ημας]
Final clause with εις — eis to and the infinitive ειναι — einai (see the mere infinitive ειναι — einai in Ephesians 1:4) and the accusative of general reference. [source]
Ephesians 1:15 And which ye shew toward all the saints [και την εις παντας τους αγιους]
The words “ye show” do not occur in the Greek. The Textus Receptus has τεν αγαπην — ten agapēn (the love) before την — tēn supported by D G K L Syr., Lat., Copt., but Aleph A B P Origen do not have the word αγαπην — agapēn It could have been omitted, but is probably not genuine. The use of the article referring to πιστιν — pistin and the change from εν — en to εις — eis probably justifies the translation “which ye shew toward.” [source]
Ephesians 1:18 That ye may know [εις το ειδεναι]
Final use of εις το — eis to and the infinitive (second perfect of οιδα — oida) as in Ephesians 1:12. Note three indirect questions after ειδεναι — eidenai (what the hope τις η ελπις — tis hē elpis what the riches τις ο πλουτος — tis ho ploutos and what the surpassing greatness και τι το υπερβαλλον μεγετος — kai ti to huperballon megethos). When the Holy Spirit opens the eyes of the heart, one will be able to see all these great truths. In the saints (εν τοις αγιοις — en tois hagiois). Our riches is in God, God‘s is in his saints. [source]
Ephesians 2:15 One new man [εις ενα καινον αντρωπον]
Into one fresh man (Colossians 3:9-11) “in himself” Thus alone is it possible. [source]
Ephesians 2:21 Into a holy temple [εις ναον αγιον]
The whole structure with all the οικοδομαι — oikodomai Another metaphor for the Kingdom of God with which compare Peter‘s “spiritual house” (οικος πνευματικος — oikos pneumatikos) in which each is a living stone being built in (1 Peter 2:5). [source]
Ephesians 2:22 For a habitation [εις κατοικητηριον]
Late word (lxx), in N.T. only here and Revelation 18:2. From κατοικεω — katoikeō to dwell, as Ephesians 3:17. Possibly each of us is meant here to be the “habitation of God in the Spirit” and all together growing (αυχει — auxei) “into a holy temple in the Lord,” a noble conception of the brotherhood in Christ. [source]
Ephesians 3:19 That ye may be filled with all the fulness of God [ινα πληρωτητε εις παν το πληρωμα του τεου]
Final clause again (third use of ινα — hina in the sentence) with first aorist passive subjunctive of πληροω — plēroō and the use of εις — eis after it. One hesitates to comment on this sublime climax in Paul‘s prayer, the ultimate goal for followers of Christ in harmony with the injunction in Matthew 5:48 to be perfect (τελειοι — teleioi) as our heavenly Father is perfect. There is nothing that any one can add to these words. One can turn to Romans 8:29 again for our final likeness to God in Christ. [source]
Ephesians 4:5 One Lord [εις Κυριος]
The Lord Jesus Christ and he alone (no series of aeons). [source]
Ephesians 4:6 One God and Father of all [εις τεος και πατηρ παντων]
Not a separate God for each nation or religion. One God for all men. See here the Trinity again (Father, Jesus, Holy Spirit). [source]
Ephesians 4:9 Into the lower parts of the earth [εις τα κατωτερα της γης]
If the αναβας — anabas is the Ascension of Christ, then the καταβας — katabas would be the Descent (Incarnation) to earth and της γης — tēs gēs would be the genitive of apposition. What follows in Ephesians 4:10 argues for this view. Otherwise one must think of the death of Christ (the descent into Hades of Acts 2:31). [source]
Ephesians 4:12 Unto the building up [εις οικοδομην]
See note on Ephesians 2:21. This is the ultimate goal in all these varied gifts, “building up.” [source]
Ephesians 4:13 Unto the measure of the stature [εις μετρον ηλικιας]
So apparently ηλικια — hēlikia here as in Luke 2:52, not age (John 9:21). Boys rejoice in gaining the height of a man. But Paul adds to this idea “the fulness of Christ” (του πληρωματος του Χριστου — tou plērōmatos tou Christou), like “the fulness of God” in Ephesians 3:19. And yet some actually profess to be “perfect” with a standard like this to measure by! No pastor has finished his work when the sheep fall so far short of the goal. [source]
Ephesians 4:13 Unto the unity of the faith [εις την ενοτητα της πιστεως]
“Unto oneness of faith” (of trust) in Christ (Ephesians 4:3) which the Gnostics were disturbing. And of the knowledge of the Son of God (και της επιγνωσεως του υιου του τεου — kai tēs epignōseōs tou huiou tou theou). Three genitives in a chain dependent also on την ενοτητα — tēn henotēta “the oneness of full (επι — epi̇) knowledge of the Son of God,” in opposition to the Gnostic vagaries. Unto a full-grown man Same figure as in Ephesians 2:15 and τελειος — teleios in sense of adult as opposed to νηπιοι — nēpioi (infants) in Ephesians 4:14. Unto the measure of the stature (εις μετρον ηλικιας — eis metron hēlikias). So apparently ηλικια — hēlikia here as in Luke 2:52, not age (John 9:21). Boys rejoice in gaining the height of a man. But Paul adds to this idea “the fulness of Christ” (του πληρωματος του Χριστου — tou plērōmatos tou Christou), like “the fulness of God” in Ephesians 3:19. And yet some actually profess to be “perfect” with a standard like this to measure by! No pastor has finished his work when the sheep fall so far short of the goal. [source]
Ephesians 4:13 Unto a full-grown man [εις ανδρα τελειον]
Same figure as in Ephesians 2:15 and τελειος — teleios in sense of adult as opposed to νηπιοι — nēpioi (infants) in Ephesians 4:14. Unto the measure of the stature (εις μετρον ηλικιας — eis metron hēlikias). So apparently ηλικια — hēlikia here as in Luke 2:52, not age (John 9:21). Boys rejoice in gaining the height of a man. But Paul adds to this idea “the fulness of Christ” (του πληρωματος του Χριστου — tou plērōmatos tou Christou), like “the fulness of God” in Ephesians 3:19. And yet some actually profess to be “perfect” with a standard like this to measure by! No pastor has finished his work when the sheep fall so far short of the goal. [source]
Ephesians 4:15 May grow into him [αυχησωμεν εις αυτον]
Supply ινα — hina and then note the final use of the first aorist active subjunctive. It is the metaphor of Ephesians 4:13 (the full-grown man). We are the body and Christ is the Head. We are to grow up to his stature. [source]
Ephesians 4:16 Unto the building up of itself [εις οικοδομην εαυτου]
Modern knowledge of cell life in the human body greatly strengthens the force of Paul‘s metaphor. This is the way the body grows by cooperation under the control of the head and all “in love” (εν αγαπηι — en agapēi). [source]
Ephesians 4:19 To work all uncleanness [εις εργασιαν ακαταρσιας πασης]
Perhaps prostitution, “for a trading (or work) in all uncleanness.” Certainly Corinth and Ephesus could qualify for this charge. [source]
Ephesians 4:32 Be ye kind to one another [γινεστε εις αλληλους χρηστοι]
Present middle imperative of γινομαι — ginomai “keep on becoming kind (χρηστος — chrēstos used of God in Romans 2:4) toward one another.” See notes on Colossians 3:12. [source]
Ephesians 5:2 For an odour of a sweet smell [εις οσμην ευωδιας]
Same words in Philemon 4:18 from Leviticus 4:31 (of the expiatory offering). Paul often presents Christ‘s death as a propitiation (Romans 3:25) as in 1 John 2:2. [source]
Ephesians 5:32 In regard of Christ and of the church [εις Χριστον και εισ την εκκλησιαν]
“With reference to Christ and the church.” That is all that εις — eis here means. [source]
Philippians 1:5 In furtherance of the gospel [εις το ευαγγελιον]
“For the gospel.” From the first day until now (απο της πρωτης ημερας αχρι του νυν — apo tēs prōtēs hēmeras achri tou nun). As when in Thessalonica (Phlippians 4:15.), in Corinth (Acts 18:5; 2 Corinthians 11:7-10), and now in Rome. [source]
Philippians 1:10 So that ye may [εις το υμας]
Either purpose or result (εις το — eis to plus infinitive as in Romans 1:11, Romans 1:20; Romans 3:26, etc.). [source]
Philippians 1:12 Unto the progress [εις προκοπην]
Late word from προκοπτω — prokoptō common verb, to cut or strike forward, but this late substantive does not occur in classical Greek. It is a technical term in Stoic philosophy for “progress toward wisdom” and it appears also in the papyri and the lxx. In N.T. only here, Phlippians 1:25; 1 Timothy 4:15. [source]
Philippians 1:19 To my salvation [εις σωτηριαν]
For his release from prison as he strongly hopes to see them again (Phlippians 1:26). Lightfoot takes the word to be Paul‘s eternal salvation and it must be confessed that Phlippians 1:20 (the close of this sentence) does suit that idea best. Can it be that Paul carried both conceptions in the word here? Supply (επιχορηγιας — epichorēgias). Late and rare word (one example in inscription of first century a.d.). In N.T. only here and Ephesians 4:16. From the late verb επιχορηγεω — epichorēgeō (double compound, επι χοροσ ηγεομαι — epichoroshēgeomai to furnish supply for the chorus) which see in 2 Corinthians 9:10; Galatians 3:5. [source]
Philippians 1:23 To depart [εις το αναλυσαι]
Purpose clause, εις το — eis to and the aorist active infinitive αναλυσαι — analusai old compound verb, to unloose (as threads), to break up, to return (Luke 12:36, only other N.T. example), to break up camp (Polybius), to weigh anchor and put out to sea, to depart (often in old Greek and papyri). Cf. καταλυω — kataluō in 2 Corinthians 5:1 for tearing down the tent. [source]
Philippians 2:22 In furtherance of [εις]
See note on Phlippians 1:5 for this use of εις — eis f0). [source]
Philippians 3:14 Unto the prize [εις το βραβειον]
Late word (Menander and inscriptions) from βραβευς — brabeus (umpire who awards the prize). In N.T. only here and 1 Corinthians 9:24. Of the high calling (της ανω κλησεως — tēs anō klēseōs). Literally, “of the upward calling.” The goal continually moves forward as we press on, but yet never out of sight. [source]
Philippians 4:15 In the matter [εις λογον]
“As to an account.” No other church opened an account with Paul. [source]
Colossians 1:10 Unto all pleasing [εις πασαν αρεσκιαν]
In order to please God in all things (1 Thessalonians 4:1). Αρεσκια — Areskia is late word from αρεσκευω — areskeuō to be complaisant (Polybius, Plutarch) and usually in bad sense (obsequiousness). Only here in N.T., but in good sense. It occurs in the good sense in the papyri and inscriptions. [source]
Colossians 1:12 To be partakers [εις μεριδα]
“For a share in.” Old word for share or portion (from μερος — meros) as in Acts 8:21; Acts 16:12; 2 Corinthians 6:15 (the only other N.T. examples). Of the inheritance (του κληρου — tou klērou). “Of the lot,” “for a share of the lot.” Old word. First a pebble or piece of wood used in casting lots (Acts 1:26), then the allotted portion or inheritance as here (Acts 8:21). Cf. Heb 3:7-4:11. In light Taken with μεριδα — merida (portion) “situated in the kingdom of light” (Lightfoot). [source]
Colossians 1:16 And unto him [και εις αυτον]
This is the only remaining step to take and Paul takes it (1 Corinthians 15:28) See note on Ephesians 1:10 for similar use of εν αυτωι — en autōi of Christ and in Colossians 1:19, Colossians 1:20 again we have εν αυτωι δι αυτου εις αυτον — en autōiclass="normal greek">δι ον — di' autouclass="normal greek">δι ου — eis auton used of Christ. See note on Hebrews 2:10 for τα παντα — di' hon (because of whom) and εχ αυτου και δι αυτου και εις αυτον τα παντα — di' hou (by means of whom) applied to God concerning the universe In Romans 11:35 we find εν — ex autou kai di' autou kai eis auton ta panta referring to God. But Paul does not use δια — ex in this connection of Christ, but only εις — en εχ — dia and δια — eis See the same distinction preserved in 1 Corinthians 8:6 (ex of God, dia of Christ). [source]
Colossians 1:29 Whereunto [εις ο]
That is “to present every man perfect in Christ.” [source]
Colossians 2:2 Unto all riches [εις παν πλουτος]
Probably some distinction intended between εν — en (in love as the sphere) and εις — eis (unto as the goal). [source]
Colossians 2:2 That they may know [εις επιγνωσιν]
“Unto full knowledge.” This use of επιγνωσις — epignōsis (full, additional knowledge) is Paul‘s reply to the Gnostics with the limited and perverted γνωσις — gnōsis (knowledge). [source]
Colossians 2:22 Are to perish with the using [εστιν εις πτοραν τηι αποχρησει]
Literally, “are for perishing in the using.” Πτορα — Phthora (from πτειρω — phtheirō) is old word for decay, decomposition. Αποχρησις — Apochrēsis (from αποχραομαι — apochraomai to use to the full, to use up), late and rare word (in Plutarch), here only in N.T. Either locative case here or instrumental. These material things all perish in the use of them. [source]
Colossians 3:9 Lie not to another [μη πσευδεστε εις αλληλους]
Lying It means either “stop lying” or “do not have the habit of lying.” [source]
Colossians 3:10 Unto knowledge [εις επιγνωσιν]
“Unto full (additional) knowledge,” one of the keywords in this Epistle. After the image (κατ εικονα — kat' eikona). An allusion to Genesis 1:26, Genesis 1:28. The restoration of the image of God in us is gradual and progressive (2 Corinthians 3:18), but will be complete in the final result (Romans 8:29; 1 John 3:2). [source]
1 Thessalonians 1:5 Came unto you [εγενητη εις υμας]
First aorist passive indicative of γινομαι — ginomai in practically same sense as εγενετο — egeneto (second aorist middle indicative as in the late Greek generally). So also εις υμας — eis humās like the Koiné{[28928]}š is little more than the dative υμιν — humin (Robertson, Grammar, p. 594). [source]
1 Thessalonians 2:12 To the end that [εις το]
Final use of εις — eis and the articular infinitive, common idiom in the papyri and Paul uses εις — eis to and the infinitive fifty times (see again in 1 Thessalonians 3:2), some final, some sub-final, some result (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 989-91). [source]
1 Thessalonians 2:16 To fill up their sins alway [εις το αναπληρωσαι αυτων τας αμαρτιας παντοτε]
Another example of εις το — eis to and the infinitive as in 1 Thessalonians 2:12. It may either be God‘s conceived plan to allow the Jews to go on and fill up (αναπληρωσαι — anaplērōsai note ανα — ana fill up full, old verb) or it may be the natural result from the continual (παντοτε — pantote) sins of the Jews. [source]
1 Thessalonians 3:3 hereunto [εις τουτο]
(εις τουτο — eis touto) to be beguiled by tribulations. We must resist. [source]
1 Thessalonians 3:5 That I might know [εις το γνωναι]
Paul‘s common idiom (1 Thessalonians 3:2), εις το — eis to and the infinitive of purpose (second aorist ingressive active of γινωσκω — ginōskō come to know). [source]
1 Thessalonians 3:13 To the end he may stablish [εις το στηριχαι]
Another example of εις — eis and the articular infinitive of purpose. Same idiom in 1 Thessalonians 3:2. From στηριζω — stērizō from στηριγχ — stērigx a support. [source]
1 Thessalonians 4:9 To love one another [εις το αγαπαιν αλληλους]
Another example of εις το — eis to and the infinitive. Only those taught of God keep on loving one another, love neighbours and even enemies as Jesus taught (Matthew 5:44). Note the use of αγαπαω — agapaō not πιλεω — phileō f0). [source]
1 Thessalonians 4:17 To meet the Lord in the air [εις απαντησιν του Κυριου εις αερα]
This special Greek idiom is common in the lxx like the Hebrew, but Polybius has it also and it occurs in the papyri (Moulton, Proleg., p. 14, n. 3). This rapture of the saints (both risen and changed) is a glorious climax to Paul‘s argument of consolation. And so (και ουτως — kai houtōs). This is the outcome, to be forever with the Lord, whether with a return to earth or with an immediate departure for heaven Paul does not say. To be with Christ is the chief hope of Paul‘s life (1 Thessalonians 5:10; Philemon 1:23; Colossians 3:4; 2 Corinthians 5:8). [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:9 But unto the obtaining of salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ [αλλα εις περιποιησιν σωτηριας δια του Κυριου ημων Ιησου Χριστου]
The difficult word here is περιποιησιν — peripoiēsin which may be passive, God‘s possession as in 1 Peter 2:9, or active, obtaining, as in 2 Thessalonians 2:14. The latter is probably the idea here. We are to keep awake so as to fulfil God‘s purpose (ετετο — etheto appointed, second aorist middle indicative of τιτημι — tithēmi) in calling us. That is our hope of final victory (salvation in this sense). [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:11 Build each other up [οικοδομειτε εις τον ενα]
Literally, build ye, one the one (εις — heis nominative in partitive apposition with unexpressed υμεις — humeis subject of οικοδομειτε — oikodomeite Then τον ενα — ton hena the accusative in partitive apposition with the unexpressed εαυτους — heautous or αλληλους — allēlous See the same idiom in 1 Corinthians 4:6 one in behalf of the one, εις υπερ του ενος — heis huper tou henos Build is a favourite Pauline metaphor. [source]
2 Thessalonians 1:5 To the end that you may be counted worthy [εις το καταχιωτηναι υμας]
Another example of εις το — eis to for purpose with first aorist passive infinitive from καταχιοω — kataxioō old verb, with accusative of general reference υμας — humas and followed by the genitive της βασιλειας — tēs basileias (kingdom of God). See note on 1 Thessalonians 2:12 for kingdom of God. For which ye also suffer (υπερ ης και πασχετε — huper hēs kai paschete). Ye also as well as we and the present tense means that it is still going on. [source]
2 Thessalonians 1:11 To which end [εις ο]
So Colossians 1:29. Probably purpose with reference to the contents of 2 Thessalonians 1:5-10. We have had the Thanksgiving (2 Thessalonians 1:3-10) in a long, complicated, but rich period or sentence. Now he makes a brief Prayer (2 Thessalonians 1:11-12) that God will fulfil all their hopes and endeavours. Paul and his colleagues can still pray for them though no longer with them (Moffatt). [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:2 To the end that [εις το]
One of Paul‘s favourite idioms for purpose, εις το — eis to and the infinitive. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:6 To the end that [εις το]
Another example of εις το — eis to and the infinitive for purpose. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:4 So that he sitteth in the temple of God [ωστε αυτον εις τον ναον του τεου κατισαι]
Another example of the infinitive with ωστε — hōste for result. Caius Caligula had made a desperate attempt to have his statue set up for worship in the Temple in Jerusalem. This incident may lie behind Paul‘s language here. Setting himself forth as God (αποδεικνυντα εαυτον οτι εστιν τεος — apodeiknunta heauton hoti estin theos). Present active participle (μι — mi form) of αποδεικνυμι — apodeiknumi agreeing in case with αυτον — auton showing himself that he is God. Caligula claimed to be God. Moffatt doubts if Paul is identifying this deception with the imperial cultus at this stage. Lightfoot thinks that the deification of the Roman emperor supplied Paul‘s language here. Wetstein notes a coin of Julius with τεος — theos on one side and Τεσσαλονικεων — Thessalonikeōn on the other. In 1 John 2:18 we are told of “many antichrists” some of whom had already come. Hence it is not clear that Paul has in mind only one individual or even individuals at all rather than evil principles, for in 2 Thessalonians 2:6 he speaks of το κατεχον — to katechon (that which restraineth) while in 2 Thessalonians 2:7 it is ο κατεχων — ho katechōn (the one that restraineth). Frame argues for a combination of Belial and Antichrist as the explanation of Paul‘s language. But the whole subject is left by Paul in such a vague form that we can hardly hope to clear it up. It is possible that his own preaching while with them gave his readers a clue that we do not possess. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:10 That they might be saved [εις το σωτηναι αυτους]
First aorist passive infinitive of σωζω — sōzō with εις το — eis to again, epexegetic purpose of the truth if they had heeded it. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:11 That they should believe a lie [εις το πιστευσαι αυτους τωι πσευδει]
Note εις το — eis to again and τωι πσευδει — tōi pseudei (the lie, the falsehood already described), a contemplated result. Note Romans 1:25 “who changed the truth of God into the lie.” [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:13 Unto salvation [εις σωτηριαν]
The ultimate goal, final salvation. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:14 Whereunto [εις ο]
The goal, that is the final salvation Through our gospel God called the Thessalonians through Paul‘s preaching as he calls men now through the heralds of the Cross as God chose (cf. 1 Thessalonians 2:12; 1 Thessalonians 5:24). [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:14 To the obtaining [εις περιποιησιν]
Probably correct translation rather than possession. See note on 1 Thessalonians 5:9, there of salvation, here of glory (the shekinah glory of Jesus). [source]
2 Thessalonians 3:5 Into the love of God [εις την αγαπην του τεου]
Either subjective or objective genitive makes sense and Lightfoot pleads for both, “not only as an objective attribute of deity, but as a ruling principle in our hearts,” holding that it is “seldom possible to separate the one from the other.” Most scholars take it here as subjective, the characteristic of God. Into the patience of Christ (εις την υπομνην του Χριστου — eis tēn hupomnēn tou Christou). There is the same ambiguity here, though the subjective idea, the patience shown by Christ, is the one usually accepted rather than “the patient waiting for Christ” (objective genitive). [source]
2 Thessalonians 3:5 Into the patience of Christ [εις την υπομνην του Χριστου]
There is the same ambiguity here, though the subjective idea, the patience shown by Christ, is the one usually accepted rather than “the patient waiting for Christ” (objective genitive). [source]
1 Timothy 1:12 Appointing me to his service [τεμενος εις διακονιαν]
Second aorist middle participle. Pauline phrase and atmosphere (Acts 20:24; 1 Corinthians 3:5; 1 Corinthians 12:18, 1 Corinthians 12:28; 2 Corinthians 3:6; 2 Corinthians 4:1; Colossians 1:23; Ephesians 3:7; 1 Timothy 4:6; 2 Timothy 4:5, 2 Timothy 4:11). [source]
1 Timothy 1:17 For ever and ever [εις τους αιωνας των αιωνων]
“Unto the ages of ages.” Cf. Ephesians 3:21 “of the age of the ages.” [source]
1 Timothy 2:4 To the knowledge [εις επιγνωσιν]
“The full knowledge” as in Colossians 1:6; Ephesians 4:13 (ten times in Paul). See note on 2 Timothy 3:7 for the whole phrase “full knowledge of the truth” Paul is anxious as in Colossians and Ephesians that the Gnostics may not lead the people astray. They need the full intellectual apprehension of Christianity. [source]
1 Timothy 2:5 One God [εις τεος]
Regular Pauline argument for a universal gospel (Galatians 3:20; Romans 3:30; Ephesians 4:6). [source]
1 Timothy 2:5 One mediator [εις μεσιτης]
Late word (Polybius, Philo) from μεσος — mesos (middle), a middle man. In N.T. only here, Galatians 3:20; Hebrews 8:6; Hebrews 9:15; Hebrews 12:24. Between God and men (τεου και αντρωπων — theou kai anthrōpōn). Ablative case (though objective genitive may explain it) after μεσιτης — mesitēs (notion of separation) as in Romans 10:12; Hebrews 5:14. Himself man No “himself” (αυτος — autos) in the Greek. [source]
1 Timothy 2:7 For which [εις ο]
The testimony of Jesus in his self-surrender (1 Timothy 2:6). See εις ο — eis ho in 2 Timothy 1:11. [source]
1 Timothy 4:3 To be received [εις μεταλημπσιν]
“For reception.” Old word, only here in N.T. By them that believe and know (τοις πιστοις και επεγνωκοσι — tois pistois kai epegnōkosi). Dative case, “for the believers and those who (one article unites closely) have known fully” (perfect active participle of επιγινωσκω — epiginōskō), a Pauline use of the word (Colossians 1:6). [source]
1 Timothy 4:10 To this end [εις τουτο]
The godliness (ευσεβεια — eusebeia) of 1 Timothy 4:8. See 2 Corinthians 6:10 as Paul‘s own commentary. [source]
1 Timothy 5:24 Going before unto judgment [προαγουσαι εις κρισιν]
See 1 Timothy 1:18 for προαγω — proagō The sins are so plain that they receive instant condemnation. And some men also they follow after (τισιν δε και επακολουτουσιν — tisin de kai epakolouthousin). Associative instrumental case τισιν — tisin with επακολουτουσιν — epakolouthousin for which verb see 1 Timothy 5:10, “dog their steps” (Parry) like 1 Peter 2:21, not clearly manifest at first, but come out plainly at last. How true that is of secret sins. [source]
1 Timothy 6:9 Fall into [εμπιπτουσιν εις]
See note on 1 Timothy 3:6 for εν εις — en -παγιδα — eis and note on 1 Timothy 3:7 for ανοητους — pagida (snare). Foolish (βλαβερας — anoētous). See Galatians 3:1, Galatians 3:3. Hurtful Old adjective from βυτιζουσιν — blaptō to injure, here alone in N.T. Drown (βυτος — buthizousin). Late word (literary Koiné{[28928]}š) from εις ολετρον και απωλειαν — buthos (bottom), to drag to the bottom. In N.T. only here and Luke 5:7 (of the boat). Drown in the lusts with the issue “in destruction and perdition” (ολετρος — eis olethron kai apōleian). Not annihilation, but eternal punishment. The combination only here, but for απωλεια — olethros see note on 1 Thessalonians 5:3; 2 Thessalonians 1:9; 1 Corinthians 5:5 and for apōleia see note on 2 Thessalonians 2:3; Philemon 3:19. [source]
1 Timothy 6:17 Richly all things to enjoy [παντα πλουσιως εις απολαυσιν]
“A lavish emphasis to the generosity of God” (Parry). Απολαυσις — Apolausis is old word from απολαυω — apolauō to enjoy, in N.T. only here and Hebrews 11:25. [source]
2 Timothy 1:11 For which [εις ο]
For the gospel. See note on 1 Timothy 2:7 for this verse. [source]
2 Timothy 1:12 Against that day [εις εκεινην την ημεραν]
The day of Christ‘s second coming. See also 2 Timothy 1:18; 2 Timothy 4:8; 2 Thessalonians 1:10, and often in the Gospels. Elsewhere, the day of the Lord (1 Thessalonians 5:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:2; 1 Corinthians 1:8; 2 Corinthians 1:14), the day of Christ or Jesus Christ (Philemon 1:6, Philemon 1:10; Philemon 2:16), the day (1 Thessalonians 5:4; 1 Corinthians 3:13; Romans 13:12), the day of redemption (Ephesians 4:20), the day of judgment (Romans 2:5, Romans 2:16). [source]
2 Timothy 2:25 Unto the knowledge of the truth [εις επιγνωσιν αλητειας]
Paul‘s word “full knowledge” (1 Corinthians 1:9). [source]
2 Timothy 3:7 Never able to come to the knowledge of the truth [μηδεποτε εις επιγνωσιν αλητειας ελτειν δυναμενα]
Pathetic picture of these hypnotized women without intellectual power to cut through the fog of words and, though always learning scraps of things, they never come into the full knowledge (επιγνωσιν — epignōsin) of the truth in Christ. And yet they even pride themselves on belonging to the intelligentsia! [source]
2 Timothy 4:10 Titus to Dalmatia [Τιτος εις Δαλματιαν]
Titus had been asked to rejoin Paul in Nicopolis where he was to winter, probably the winter previous to this one (Titus 3:12). He came and has been with Paul. [source]
2 Timothy 4:12 Tychicus I sent to Ephesus [Τυχικον απεστειλα εις Επεσον]
Perhaps Paul had sent him on before he came to Rome. He may have been still on the way to Ephesus. [source]
2 Timothy 4:18 Unto his heavenly kingdom [εις την βασιλειαν αυτου την επουρανιον]
The future life of glory as in 1 Corinthians 15:24, 1 Corinthians 15:50. He will save No verb in the Greek. Paul‘s final doxology, his Swan Song, to Christ as in Romans 9:5; Romans 16:27. [source]
Titus 3:12 To Nicopolis [εις Νικοπολιν]
Probably in Epirus, a good place for work in Dalmatia (2 Timothy 4:10). I have determined (κεκρικα — kekrika). Perfect active indicative. I have decided. To winter there First aorist active infinitive of παραχειμαζω — paracheimazō a literary Koiné{[28928]}š word for which see note on Acts 27:12; note on 1 Corinthians 16:6. [source]
Philemon 1:5 And towards all the saints [και εις παντας τους αγιους]
He spoke of “thy love and faith” (σου την αγαπην και την πιστιν — sou tēn agapēn kai tēn pistin) “towards the Lord Jesus” (προς τον Κυριον Ιησουν — pros ton Kurion Iēsoun) and by a sort of momentum (Vincent) he carries both words over to the saints, though it can be explained as chiasm (Galatians 4:4) also. [source]
Hebrews 10:5 When he cometh into the world [εισερχομενος εις τον κοσμον]
Reference to the Incarnation of Christ who is represented as quoting Psalm 40:7-9 which is quoted. The text of the lxx is followed in the main which differs from the Hebrew chiefly in having σωμα — sōma (body) rather than ωτια — ōtia (ears). The lxx translation has not altered the sense of the Psalm, “that there was a sacrifice which answered to the will of God as no animal sacrifice could” (Moffatt). So the writer of Hebrews “argues that the Son‘s offering of himself is the true and final offering for sin, because it is the sacrifice, which, according to prophecy, God desired to be made” (Davidson). A body didst thou prepare for me First aorist middle indicative second person singular of καταρτιζω — katartizō to make ready, equip. Using σωμα — sōma (body) for ωτια — ōtia (ears) does not change the sense, for the ears were the point of contact with God‘s will. [source]
Hebrews 10:24 To provoke [εις παροχυσμον]
Our very word “paroxysm,” from παροχυνω — paroxunō Unto love and good works (agapēs kai kalōn ergōn). Objective genitive. So Paul seeks to stir up the Corinthians by the example of the Macedonians (2 Corinthians 8:1-7). [source]
Hebrews 11:11 To conceive seed [εις καταβολην σπερματος]
For deposit of seed. See Hebrews 4:3 for καταβολη — katabolē Past age Beyond Sarah herself Even Sarah, old as she was, believed God who had promised. Hence she received power. [source]
Hebrews 12:2 Looking unto [απορωντες εις]
Present active participle of αποραω — aphoraō old verb to look away, “looking away to Jesus.” In N.T. only here and Philemon 2:23. Fix your eyes on Jesus, after a glance at “the cloud of witnesses,” for he is the goal. Cf. Moses in Hebrews 11:26 The author See Hebrews 2:10 for this word. “The pioneer of personal faith” (Moffatt). Perfecter A word apparently coined by the writer from τελειοω — teleioō as it has been found nowhere else. Vulgate has consummator. For the joy Answering to, in exchange for (Hebrews 12:16), at the end of the race lay the joy “set before him” The cross at his time brought only shame (most shameful of deaths, “yea, the death of the cross” Philemon 2:8). But Jesus despised that, in spite of the momentary shrinking from it, and did his Father‘s will by submitting to it. Hath sat down Perfect active indicative of κατιζω — kathizō and still is there (Hebrews 1:3). [source]
Hebrews 13:8 Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today, yea and forever [Ιησους Χριστος εχτες και σημερον ο αυτος και εις τους αιωνας]
There is no copula in the Greek. Vincent insists that εστιν — estin be supplied between Ιησους — Iēsous and Χριστος — Christos “Jesus is Christ,” but it more naturally comes after Χριστος — Christos as the Revised Version has it. The old adverb εχτες — echthes is rare in the N.T. (John 4:52; Acts 7:28; Hebrews 13:8). Here it refers to the days of Christ‘s flesh (Hebrews 2:3; Hebrews 5:7) and to the recent work of the leaders (Hebrews 13:7). “Today” Hence the peril of apostasy from the only hope of man. [source]
James 1:18 That we should be [εις το ειναι ημας]
Purpose clause εις το — eis to and the infinitive ειναι — einai with the accusative of general reference ημας — hēmās (as to us).A kind of first-fruits (απαρχην τινα — aparchēn tina). “Some first-fruits” (old word from απαρχομαι — aparchomai), of Christians of that age. See Romans 16:5. [source]
James 1:19 Swift to hear [ταχυς εις το ακουσαι]
For this use of εις το — eis to with the infinitive after an adjective see 1 Thessalonians 4:9. For εις το — eis to after adjectives see Romans 16:19. The picture points to listening to the word of truth (James 1:18) and is aimed against violent and disputatious speech (James 3:1-12). The Greek moralists often urge a quick and attentive ear.Slow to speak (βραδυς εις το λαλησαι — bradus eis to lalēsai). Same construction and same ingressive aorist active infinitive, slow to begin speaking, not slow while speaking.Slow to anger He drops the infinitive here, but he probably means that slowness to speak up when angry will tend to curb the anger. [source]
James 1:19 Slow to speak [βραδυς εις το λαλησαι]
Same construction and same ingressive aorist active infinitive, slow to begin speaking, not slow while speaking. [source]
James 1:19 Slow to anger [βραδυς εις οργην]
He drops the infinitive here, but he probably means that slowness to speak up when angry will tend to curb the anger. [source]
James 2:6 Before the judgment-seats [εις κριτηρια]
“To courts of justice” as in 1 Corinthians 6:2, 1 Corinthians 6:4 (only other N.T. examples). Common in the papyri in this sense. From κρινω — krinō to judge, κριτης — kritēs (judge), place where judgment is given. [source]
James 2:19 Thou believest that God is one [συ πιστευεις οτι εις τεος εστιν]
James goes on with his reply and takes up mere creed apart from works, belief that God exists (there is one God), a fundamental doctrine, but that is not belief or trust in God. It may be mere creed. [source]
James 3:3 That they may obey us [εις το πειτεσται αυτους ημιν]
Present middle infinitive of πειτω — peithō with εις το — eis to as a purpose clause with the dative ημιν — hēmin after πειτεσται — peithesthai and αυτους — autous the accusative of general reference. [source]
James 4:12 One only [εις]
No “only” in the Greek, but εις — heis here excludes all others but God. [source]
James 4:13 Into this city [εις τηνδε την πολιν]
Old demonstrative οδε — hode rare in N.T. (Luke 10:39) save in neuter plural ταδε — tade (these things Acts 21:11). One would point out the city on the map (Mayor) as he made the proposal (we will go, πορευσομετα — poreusometha). [source]
James 5:3 For a testimony [εις μαρτυριον]
Common idiom as in Matthew 8:4 (use of εις — eis with accusative in predicate). [source]
1 Peter 1:2 Unto obedience [εις υπακοην]
Obedience (from υπακουω — hupakouō to hear under, to hearken) to the Lord Jesus as in 1 Peter 1:22 “to the truth,” result of “the sanctification.” [source]
1 Peter 1:3 Unto a living hope [εις ελπιδα ζωσαν]
Peter is fond of the word “living” (present active participle of ζαω — zaō) as in 1 Peter 1:23; 1 Peter 2:4, 1 Peter 2:5, 1 Peter 2:24; 1 Peter 4:5, 1 Peter 4:6. The Pharisees cherished the hope of the resurrection (Acts 23:6), but the resurrection of Jesus gave it proof and permanence (1 Corinthians 15:14, 1 Corinthians 15:17). It is no longer a dead hope like dead faith (James 2:17, James 2:26). This revival of hope was wrought “by the resurrection of Jesus Christ” Hope rose up with Christ from the dead, though the disciples (Peter included) were slow at first to believe it. [source]
1 Peter 1:4 Unto an inheritance [εις κληρονομιαν]
Old word (from κληρονομος — klēronomos heir) for the property received by the heir (Matthew 21:38), here a picture of the blessedness in store for us pilgrims (Galatians 3:18). [source]
1 Peter 1:4 For you [εις υμας]
More graphic than the mere dative. [source]
1 Peter 1:5 Unto a salvation [εις σωτηριαν]
Deliverance is the goal Prepared awaiting God‘s will (Galatians 3:23; Romans 8:18).To be revealed First aorist passive infinitive of αποκαλυπτω — apokaluptō to unveil. Cf. Colossians 3:4 for πανεροω — phaneroō (to manifest) in this sense.In the last time (εν καιρωι εσχατωι — en kairōi eschatōi). This precise phrase nowhere else, but similar ones in John 6:39; Acts 2:17; James 5:3; 2 Timothy 3:1; 2 Peter 3:3; Hebrews 1:2; Judges 1:18; 1 John 2:18. Hort translates it here “in a season of extremity,” but it is usually taken to refer to the Day of Judgment. That day no one knows, Jesus said. [source]
1 Peter 1:7 Unto praise and glory and honour [εις επαινον και δοχαν και τιμην]
Here probably both to God and man in the result. Cf. Matthew 5:11.; Romans 2:7, Romans 2:10; 1 Timothy 1:17. [source]
1 Peter 1:10 Of the grace that should come unto you [περι της εις υμας χαριτος]
“Concerning the for you grace” (meant for you). [source]
1 Peter 1:11 What time or what manner of time [εις τινα η ποιον καιρον]
Proper sense of ποιος — poios (qualitative interrogative) kept here as in 1 Corinthians 15:35, Romans 3:27, though it is losing its distinctive sense from τις — tis (Acts 23:34). The prophets knew what they prophesied, but not at what time the Messianic prophecies would be fulfilled.The Spirit of Christ which was in them (το εν αυτοις πνευμα Χριστου — to en autois pneuma Christou). Peter definitely asserts here that the Spirit of Jesus Christ (the Messiah) was in the Old Testament prophets, the Holy Spirit called the Spirit of Christ and the Spirit of God (Romans 8:9), who spoke to the prophets as he would speak to the apostles (John 16:14).Did point unto Imperfect active of δηλοω — dēloō to make plain, “did keep on pointing to,” though they did not clearly perceive the time.When it testified beforehand (προμαρτυρομενον — promarturomenon). Present middle participle of προμαρτυρομαι — promarturomai a late compound unknown elsewhere save in a writer of the fourteenth century (Theodorus Mech.) and now in a papyrus of the eighth. It is neuter here because πνευμα — pneuma is neuter, but this grammatical gender should not be retained as “it” in English, but should be rendered “he” (and so as to Acts 8:15). Here we have predictive prophecy concerning the Messiah, though some modern critics fail to find predictions of the Messiah in the Old Testament.The sufferings of Christ “The sufferings for (destined for) Christ” like the use of εις — eis in 1 Peter 1:10 “The after these things (sufferings) glories.” The plural of δοχα — doxa is rare, but occurs in Exodus 15:11; Hosea 9:11. The glories of Christ followed the sufferings as in 1 Peter 4:13; 1 Peter 5:1, 1 Peter 5:6. [source]
1 Peter 1:11 The sufferings of Christ [τα εις Χριστον πατηματα]
“The sufferings for (destined for) Christ” like the use of εις — eis in 1 Peter 1:10 “The after these things (sufferings) glories.” The plural of δοχα — doxa is rare, but occurs in Exodus 15:11; Hosea 9:11. The glories of Christ followed the sufferings as in 1 Peter 4:13; 1 Peter 5:1, 1 Peter 5:6. [source]
1 Peter 1:21 Who through him are believers in God [τους δι αυτου πιστους εις τεον]
Accusative case in apposition with υμας — humās (you), “the through him (that is Christ as in 1 Peter 1:8; Acts 3:16) believers (πιστους — pistous correct text of A B) in God.” [source]
1 Peter 1:21 So that your faith and hope might be in God [ωστε την πιστιν υμων και ελπιδα εις τεον]
ωστε — Hōste with the infinitive Hence here result (so that is) is more probable than design. [source]
1 Peter 2:5 To be a holy priesthood [εις ιερατευμα αγιον]
Late word (from ιερατευω — hierateuō to serve as priest, Luke 1:8 alone in N.T.), in lxx (Exodus 19:6), in N.T. only here and 1 Peter 2:9, either the office of priest (Hort) or an order or body of priests. At any rate, Peter has the same idea of Revelation 1:6 (ιερεις — hiereis priests) that all believers are priests (Hebrews 4:16) and can approach God directly. [source]
1 Peter 2:7 Was made the head of the corner [εγενητη εις κεπαλην γωνιας]
This verse is from Psalm 118:22 with evident allusion to Isaiah 28:16 See Matthew 21:42; Mark 12:10; Luke 20:17, where Jesus himself quotes Psalm 118:22 and applies the rejection of the stone by the builders Here he quotes it again to the same purpose. [source]
1 Peter 2:8 Whereunto also they were appointed [εις ο και ετετησαν]
First aorist passive indicative of τιτημι — tithēmi See this idiom in 1 Timothy 2:7. “Their disobedience is not ordained, the penalty of their disobedience is” (Bigg). They rebelled against God and paid the penalty. [source]
1 Peter 2:9 A holy nation [λαος εις περιποιησιν]
Also from Exodus 19:6, but here applied, not to the national Israel, but to the spiritual Israel of believers (both Jews and Gentiles).A people for God‘s own possession (λαος περιουσιος — laos eis peripoiēsin). The idea here occurs in Exodus 19:5; Deuteronomy 7:6; Deuteronomy 14:2; Deuteronomy 26:18, where we have εις περιποιησιν — laos periousios as in Titus 2:14 (alone in the N.T.), and in Malachi 3:17 we find Περιουσιος λαος — eis peripoiēsin (for a possession). περιποιησις — Periousios laos is a people over and above the others and περιεποιησατο — peripoiēsis is a possession in a special sense (Ephesians 1:14). See Paul‘s use of οπως εχαγγειλητε — periepoiēsato in Acts 20:28. The old rendering, “a peculiar people,” had this idea of possession, for “peculiar” is from pecus (Latin for flock).That ye may shew forth Purpose clause with ινα — hopōs rather than εχαγγελλω — hina with the first aorist active subjunctive of τας αρετας — exaggellō old verb, to tell out, here alone in N.T.The excellencies (τα μεγαλεια του τεου — tas aretas). From Isaiah 43:21. Old word for any preeminence (moral, intellectual, military), often for “virtue,” but not in that sense in the O.T. or the N.T. The word has the sense of moral worth in 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5; Philemon 4:8; and the Apocrypha. In Isaiah (here quoted) it means praise and glory to God. So also Isaiah 42:12. See Acts 2:11 σκοτους — ta megaleia tou theou (the mighty works of God).Darkness Heathenism.His marvellous light (ταυμαστον — to thaumaston autou phōs). Christianity. For ταυμαζω — thaumaston (from thaumazō) see Matthew 21:42. For the change from heathenism to Christianity see Colossians 1:12; Ephesians 5:8-14. [source]
1 Peter 2:14 For vengeance on evil-doers [εις εκδικησιν κακοποιων]
Objective genitive with εκδικησιν — ekdikēsin for which see Luke 18:7. [source]
1 Peter 2:21 For hereunto were ye called [εις τουτο γαρ εκλητητε]
First aorist indicative of καλεω — kaleō to call. They were called to suffer without flinching (Hort), if need be. [source]
1 Peter 3:7 To the end that your prayers be not hindered [εις το μη εγκοπτεσται τας προσευχας υμων]
Purpose clause with εις το — eis to and the present passive infinitive (with negative μη — mē) of εγκοπτω — egkoptō to cut in, to interrupt, late verb (Polybius), as in Romans 15:22, etc. Very vivid to us now with our telephones and radios when people cut in on us. Προσευχας — Proseuchas (prayers) is the accusative of general reference. Husbands surely have here cause to consider why their prayers are not answered. [source]
1 Peter 3:9 For hereunto were ye called [εις τουτο]
See note on 1 Peter 2:21 for this verb and use of ινα ευλογιαν κληρονομησητε — eis touto (pointing to the preceding argument).That ye should inherit a blessing (ινα — hina eulogian klēronomēsēte). Purpose clause with κληρονομεω — hina and the first aorist active subjunctive of klēronomeō a plain reference to Esau, who wanted “to inherit the blessing” (Hebrews 12:17) after he had sold his birthright. Christians are the new Israel (both Gentiles and Jews) and are the spiritual descendants of Isaac (Galatians 4:22.). [source]
1 Peter 4:2 That ye no longer should live [εις το μηκετι βιωσαι]
Purpose clause with εις το — eis to (negative μη — mē) and the first aorist (for the Attic second aorist βιωναι — biōnai) active infinitive of βιοω — bioō old verb, to spend a life (from βιος — bios course of life, Luke 8:14), here only in N.T. [source]
1 Peter 3:21 But the interrogation of a good conscience toward God [αλλα συνειδησεως αγατης επερωτημα εις τεον]
Old word from επερωταω — eperōtaō (to question as in Mark 9:32; Matthew 16:1), here only in N.T. In ancient Greek it never means answer, but only inquiry. The inscriptions of the age of the Antonines use it of the Senate‘s approval after inquiry. That may be the sense here, that is, avowal of consecration to God after inquiry, having repented and turned to God and now making this public proclamation of that fact by means of baptism (the symbol of the previous inward change of heart). Thus taken, it matters little whether εις τεον — eis theon (toward God) be taken with επερωτημα — eperōtēma or συνειδησεως — suneidēseōs the resurrection of Jesus Christ For baptism is a symbolic picture of the resurrection of Christ as well as of our own spiritual renewal (Romans 6:2-6). See 1 Peter 1:3 for regeneration made possible by the resurrection of Jesus. [source]
1 Peter 4:4 Into the same excess of riot [εις την αυτην της ασωτιας αναχυσιν]
Αναχυσιν — Anachusin (from αναχεω — anacheō to pour forth) is a late and rare word, our overflowing, here only in N.T. Ασωτιας — Asōtias is the character of an abandoned man Present active participle of βλασπημεω — blasphēmeō as in Luke 22:65. “The Christians were compelled to stand aloof from all the social pleasures of the world, and the Gentiles bitterly resented their puritanism, regarding them as the enemies of all joy, and therefore of the human race” (Bigg). [source]
1 Peter 4:7 Be sober unto prayer [νηπσατε εις προσευχας]
First aorist (ingressive of νηπω — nēphō (see 1 Peter 1:13) and plural προσευχας — proseuchas (prayers). Cf. Ephesians 6:18. [source]
1 Peter 5:12 Stand ye fast therein [εις ην στητε]
“In which (grace) take your stand” (ingressive aorist active imperative of ιστημι — histēmi). [source]
2 Peter 1:11 Into the eternal kingdom [εις την αιωνιον βασιλειαν]
The believer‘s inheritance of 1 Peter 1:4 is here termed kingdom, but “eternal” Curiously again in the Stratonicea inscription we find της αιωνιου αρχης — tēs aiōniou archēs (of the eternal rule) applied to “the lords of Rome.” But this is the spiritual reign of God in men‘s hearts here on earth (1 Peter 2:9) and in heaven.Of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ (του κυριου ημων και σωτηρος Ιησου Χριστου — tou kuriou hēmōn kai sōtēros Iēsou Christou). For which idiom see note on 2 Peter 1:1. [source]
2 Peter 2:12 To be taken [εις αλωσιν]
“For capture” (old substantive, from αλοω — haloō here only in N.T.). [source]
2 Peter 2:22 To wallowing [εις κυλισμον]
“To rolling.” Late and rare word (from κυλιω — kuliō Mark 9:20), here only in N.T.In the mire (βορβορου — borborou). Objective genitive, old word for dung, mire, here only in N.T. J. Rendel Harris (Story of Ahikar, p. LXVII) tells of a story about a hog that went to the bath with people of quality, but on coming out saw a stinking drain and went and rolled himself in it. [source]
2 Peter 3:7 Against [εις]
Unto. As in 2 Peter 2:4, 2 Peter 2:9 and see 1 Peter 1:4 for the inheritance reserved for the saints of God. [source]
2 Peter 3:9 To youward [εις υμας]
Προς — Pros rather than εις — eis after μακροτυμει — makrothumei in 1 Thessalonians 5:14 and επι — epi in James 5:7, etc. [source]
2 Peter 3:18 For ever [εις ημεραν αιωνος]
“Unto the day of eternity.” So Sirach 18:9f. One of the various ways of expressing eternity by the use of αιων — aiōn So εις τον αιωνα — eis ton aiōna in John 6:5; John 12:34. [source]
1 John 5:8 Agree in one [εις το εν εισιν]
“Are for the one thing,” to bring us to faith in Jesus as the Incarnate Son of God, the very purpose for which John wrote his Gospel (John 20:31). [source]
1 John 5:10 Believeth on [πιστευων εις]
John draws a distinction between “not believing God” See the same distinction less clearly drawn in John 6:30. See also εις την μαρτυριαν — eis tēn marturian after πεπιστευκεν — pepisteuken in this same verse and John 2:23. [source]
1 John 5:13 Unto you that believe on [τοις πιστευουσιν εις]
Dative of the articular present active participle of πιστευω — pisteuō and εις — eis as in 1 John 5:10. For this use of ονομα — onoma (name) with πιστευω — pisteuō see 1 John 3:23; John 2:23. [source]
Jude 1:4 Unto this condemnation [εις τουτο το κριμα]
See 2 Peter 2:3 for κριμα — krima and εκπαλαι — ekpalai Παλαι — Palai here apparently alludes to Judges 1:14, Judges 1:15 (Enoch). [source]
Jude 1:13 For ever [εις αιωνα]
The rest of the relative clause exactly as in 2 Peter 2:17. [source]
Jude 1:25 For ever more [εις παντας τους αιωνας]
“Unto all the ages.” All the future. As complete a statement of eternity as can be made in human language. [source]
Revelation 1:11 Write in a book [γραπσον εις βιβλιον]
First aorist active imperative of γραπω — graphō for instantaneous action. The commission covers the whole series of visions which all grow out of this first vision of the Risen Christ. [source]
Revelation 1:18 Forevermore [εις τους αιωνας των αιωνων]
“Unto the ages of the ages,” a stronger expression of eternity even than in Revelation 1:6. [source]
Revelation 10:5 To heaven [εις τον ουρανον]
Toward heaven, the customary gesture in taking a solemn oath (Genesis 14:22; Deuteronomy 32:40; Daniel 12:7). [source]
Revelation 11:6 Into blood [εις αιμα]
As already stated in Revelation 8:8 about the third trumpet and now again here.To smite (παταχαι — pataxai). First aorist active infinitive of πατασσω — patassō used here with εχουσιαν εχουσιν — exousian echousin (they have power), as is στρεπειν — strephein (to turn).With every plague In 1 Kings 4:8, but with reference to the plagues in Egypt.As often as they shall desire (οσακις εαν τελησωσιν — hosakis ean thelēsōsin). Indefinite temporal clause with οσακις — hosakis and modal εαν — ean (= αν — an) and the first aorist active subjunctive of τελω — thelō “as often as they will.” [source]
Revelation 11:9 To be laid in a tomb [τετηναι εις μνημα]
First aorist passive of τιτημι — tithēmi to place. Μνημα — Mnēma (old word from μιμνησκω — mimnēskō to remind) is a memorial, a monument, a sepulchre, a tomb (Mark 5:3). “In a country where burial regularly took place on the day of death the time of exposure and indignity would be regarded long” (Beckwith). See Tobit 1:18ff. [source]
Revelation 12:6 Fled into the wilderness [επυγεν εις την ερημον]
Second aorist active indicative of πευγω — pheugō Here, of course, not Mary, but “the ideal woman” (God‘s people) of the preceding verses, who fled under persecution of the dragon. God‘s people do not at once share the rapture of Christ, but the dragon is unable to destroy them completely. The phrases used here seem to be reminiscent of Deuteronomy 8:2. (wanderings of Israel in the wilderness), 1 Kings 17:2. and 1 Kings 19:3. (Elijah‘s flight), 1 Macc. 2:29 (flight of the Jews from Antiochus Epiphanes), Matthew 2:13 (flight of Joseph and Mary to Egypt), Mark 13:14 (the flight of Christians at the destruction of Jerusalem). [source]
Revelation 12:9 He was cast down to the earth [εβλητη εις την γην]
Effective aorist repeated from the beginning of the verse. “The earth was no new sphere of Satan‘s working” (Swete).Were cast down (εβλητησαν — eblēthēsan). Triple use of the same verb applied to Satan‘s minions. The expulsion is complete. [source]
Revelation 13:6 For blasphemies [εις βλασπημιας]
“For the purpose of blasphemies.” [source]
Revelation 13:10 If any man is for captivity [ει τις εις αιχμαλωσιαν]
Condition of first class, but with no copula (εστιν — estin) expressed. For αιχμαλωσιαν — aichmalōsian (from αιχμαλωτος — aichmalōtos captive) see Ephesians 4:8, only other N.T. example. Apparently John means this as a warning to the Christians not to resist force with force, but to accept captivity as he had done as a means of grace. Cf. Jeremiah 15:2. The text is not certain, however. [source]
Revelation 14:19 Into the winepress the great winepress [εις την ληνον τον μεγαν]
Ληνος — Lēnos is either feminine as in Revelation 14:20; Revelation 19:15, or masculine sometimes in ancient Greek. Here we have both genders, a solecism frequent in the Apocalypse (Revelation 21:14 το τειχος εχων — to teichos echōn). See Matthew 21:33. For this metaphor of God s wrath see Revelation 14:10; Revelation 15:1, Revelation 15:7; Revelation 16:1, Revelation 16:19; Revelation 19:15. [source]
Revelation 16:2 Into the earth [εις την γην]
This same use of εις — eis after εχεχεεν — execheen in Revelation 16:3, Revelation 16:4.It became (εγενετο — egeneto). “There came” (second aorist middle indicative of γινομαι — ginomai).A noisome and grievous sore “Bad and malignant sore.” ελκος — Helkos is old word for a suppurated wound (Latin ulcus), here, Revelation 16:11; Luke 16:21. See the sixth Egyptian plague (Exodus 9:10; Deuteronomy 28:27, Deuteronomy 28:35) and Job 2:7. The magicians were attacked in Egypt and the worshippers of Caesar here (Revelation 13:17; Revelation 14:9, Revelation 14:11; Revelation 19:20). [source]
Revelation 16:3 Into the sea [εις την ταλασσαν]
Like the first Egyptian plague (Exodus 7:12 -41) though only the Nile affected then. [source]
Revelation 16:4 Into the rivers and the fountains of waters [εις τους ποταμους και τας πηγας των υδατων]
See Revelation 8:10 for this phrase. Contamination of the fresh-water supply by blood follows that of the sea. Complete again. [source]
Revelation 16:14 Unto the war of the great day of God, the Almighty [εις τον πολεμον της ημερας της μεγαλης του τεου του παντοκρατορος]
Some take this to be war between nations, like Mark 13:8, but it is more likely war against God (Psalm 2:2) and probably the battle pictured in Revelation 17:14; Revelation 19:19. Cf. 2 Peter 3:12, “the day of God,” his reckoning with the nations. See Joel 2:11; Joel 3:4. Paul uses “that day” for the day of the Lord Jesus (the Parousia) as in 1 Thessalonians 5:2; 2 Thessalonians 1:10; 2 Thessalonians 2:2; 1 Corinthians 1:8; 2 Corinthians 1:14; Philemon 1:6; Philemon 2:16; 2 Timothy 1:12, 2 Timothy 1:18; 2 Timothy 4:8. [source]
Revelation 16:19 Was divided into three parts [εγενετο εις τρια μερη]
“Came into three parts” In Revelation 11:3 a tenth part of the city fell. Babylon (Rome) is meant (Revelation 17:18). [source]
Revelation 17:3 Into a wilderness [εις ερημον]
In Isaiah 21:1 there is το οραμα της ερημου — to horama tēs erēmou (the vision of the deserted one, Babylon), and in Isaiah 14:23 Babylon is called ερημον — erēmon John may here picture this to be the fate of Rome or it may be that he himself, in the wilderness (desert) this side of Babylon, sees her fate. In Revelation 21:10 he sees the New Jerusalem from a high mountain. [source]
Revelation 17:8 And to go into perdition [και εις απωλειαν υπαγει]
So (and he goes into perdition) the best MSS. read rather than the infinitive υπαγειν — hupagein Most interpreters see here an allusion to the “Nero redivivus ” expectancy realized in Domitian, who was ruling when John wrote and who was called Nero redivivus. [source]
Revelation 17:10 The one is [ο εις εστιν]
The one when this vision is dated. [source]
Revelation 17:11 And he goeth unto perdition [και εις απωλειαν υπαγει]
As in Revelation 17:8. “Domitian was assassinated (September 18, 96), after a terrible struggle with his murderers. The tyrant‘s end was a symbol of the end to which the Beast which he personated was hastening” (Swete). Cf. Revelation 19:11-21. [source]
Revelation 18:21 A strong angel [εις αγγελος ισχυρος]
Here εις — heis = a, just an indefinite article, not “one” as a numeral. [source]
Revelation 19:17 Unto the great supper of God [εις το δειπνον το μεγα του τεου]
The habits of vultures are described by Christ in Matthew 24:28. This is a bold and powerful picture of the battlefield after the victory of the Messiah, “a sacrificial feast spread on God‘s table for all the vultures of the sky” (Swete). Is this battle the same as that of Har Magedon (Revelation 16:16) and that of Gog and Magog (Revelation 20:8.) mentioned after the thousand years? The language in Revelation 20:8. seems like this derived from Ezekiel 39:17., and “in the Apocalypse priority in the order of sequence does not always imply priority in time” (Swete). There seems no way to decide this point save that the end seems to be at hand. [source]
Revelation 19:20 Into the lake of fire [εις την λιμνην του πυρος]
Genitive πυρος — puros describes this λιμνην — limnēn (lake, cf. Luke 5:1) as it does γεεννα — gehenna in Matthew 5:22. See also Revelation 20:10; Revelation 21:8. It is a different figure from the “abyss” in Revelation 9:1; Revelation 20:1. This is the final abode of Satan, the beast, the false prophet, and wicked men. [source]
Revelation 2:22 Into a bed [εις κλινην]
“A bed of sickness in contrast with the bed of adultery” (Beckwith).Them that commit adultery with her (τους μοιχευοντας μετ αυτης — tous moicheuontas met' autēs). Present active articular participle accusative plural of μοιχευω — moicheuō The actual paramours of the woman Jezebel, guilty of both πορνεια — porneia (fornication, Revelation 2:21) and μοιχεια — moicheia (adultery), works of Jezebel of old and of this Jezebel. There may be also an allusion to the spiritual adultery (2 Corinthians 11:2) towards God and Christ as of old (Jeremiah 3:8; Jeremiah 5:7; Ezekiel 16:22).Except they repent Condition of first class with εαν μη — ean mē and the future active indicative of μετανοεω — metanoeō put in this vivid form rather than the aorist subjunctive Αυτης — Autēs (her) correct rather than αυτων — autōn (their). Jezebel was chiefly responsible. [source]
Revelation 20:3 Into the abyss [εις την αβυσσον]
The one in Revelation 9:1. and the one spoken of by the legion of demons in Luke 8:31 under the charge of the angel of the abyss (Apollyon, Revelation 9:11) who is either Satan himself or a kindred power. “Already he has been cast out of Heaven (Revelation 12:9), now he is cast out of the earth, and returns to his own place” (Swete). [source]
Revelation 20:8 To gather them together to the war [συναγαγειν αυτους εις τον πολεμον]
Second aorist active infinitive of purpose of συναγω — sunagō a congenial task for Satan after his confinement. See Revelation 16:14 for this very phrase and also Revelation 17:14; Revelation 19:19.Of whom (ωναυτων — hōn- ως η αμμος της ταλασσης — autōn). Pleonasm or redundant pronoun as in Revelation 3:8 and often (of whom - of them).As the sand of the sea Already in Revelation 13:1. Clearly then the millennium, whatever it is, does not mean a period when Satan has no following on earth, for this vast host rallies at once to his standard. [source]
Revelation 20:10 Into the lake of fire and brimstone [εις την λιμνην του πυρος και τειου]
As in Revelation 19:20 with the two beasts, as he adds, “where are also the beast and the false prophet” Return to the prophetic future of Revelation 20:7, Revelation 20:8. For βασανιζω — basanizō see Revelation 9:5; Revelation 14:10. For “day and night” (ημερας και νυκτος — hēmeras kai nuktos) see Revelation 4:8; Revelation 7:15; Revelation 12:10; Revelation 14:11. For “for ever and ever” (εις τους αιωνας τον αιωνων — eis tous aiōnas ton aiōnōn) see Revelation 1:6, Revelation 1:18; Revelation 4:9, Revelation 4:10; Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:12; Revelation 10:6; Revelation 11:15, etc. The devil was cast down from heaven (Revelation 12:9), then imprisoned (Revelation 20:2.), now he received his final doom. [source]
Revelation 21:9 One of the seven angels [εις εκ των επτα αγγελων]
As in Revelation 17:1 with the same introduction when the angel made the announcement about the harlot city (Babylon), so here the description of the heavenly city, the New Jerusalem, is given by one of the same group of angels who had the seven bowls. Thus the νυμπη — numphē (Bride) is placed in sharp contrast with the πορνη — pornē (Harlot). The New Jerusalem was briefly presented in Revelation 21:2, but now is pictured at length (21:9-22:5) in a nearer and clearer vision. [source]
Revelation 21:21 Each one [ανα εις εκαστος]
Distributive use of ανα — ana but with the nominative (used as adverb, not preposition) rather than the accusative (as a preposition) as appears also in Mark 14:19; John 8:9; with κατα — kata in Romans 12:5, “a barbaric construction” according to Charles.Street (πλατεια — plateia). For which word (broad way, οδος — hodos understood) see Matthew 6:5, here the singular, but includes all the streets.Transparent Old word (from δια — dia through, αυγη — augē ray, shining through), here alone in N.T. [source]
Revelation 21:27 There shall in no wise enter into it [ου μη εισελτηι εις αυτην]
Double negative again with the second aorist active subjunctive of εισερχομαι — eiserchomai with εις — eis repeated. Like Isaiah 52:1; Ezekiel 44:9. [source]
Revelation 5:5 One of the elders [εις εκ των πρεσβυτερων]
“One from among the elders” of Revelation 4:4, Revelation 4:10 No particular reason for one elder as the agent over another (Revelation 7:13). [source]
Revelation 6:15 Hid themselves in the caves and in the rocks of the mountains [εκρυπσαν εαυτους εις τα σπηλαια και εις τας πετρας των ορεων]
Based on Isaiah 2:10, Isaiah 2:18. First aorist active indicative of κρυπτω — kruptō with the reflexive pronoun. For the old word σπηλαιον — spēlaion see Matthew 21:13; Hebrews 11:38. Ορεων — Oreōn is the uncontracted Ionic form (for ορων — orōn) of the genitive plural of ορος — oros (mountain). [source]
Revelation 8:11 Became wormwood [εγενετο εις απσιντον]
This use of εις — eis in the predicate with γινομαι — ginomai is common in the lxx and the N.T. (Revelation 16:19; John 16:20; Acts 5:36).Of the waters (εκ των υδατων — ek tōn hudatōn). As a result of (εκ — ek) the use of the poisoned waters.Were made bitter First aorist passive indicative of πικραινω — pikrainō Old verb (from πικρος — pikros bitter), as in Revelation 10:9. In a metaphorical sense to embitter in Colossians 3:19. [source]
Revelation 9:7 Prepared for war [ητοιμασμενοις εις πολεμον]
Perfect passive participle of ετοιμαζω — hetoimazō This imagery of war-horses is like that in Joel 2:4. “The likeness of a locust to a horse, especially to a horse equipped with armour, is so striking that the insect is named in German heupferd (hay horse), and in Italian cavalett a little horse” (Vincent). [source]
Revelation 9:9 As the sound of chariots, of many horses rushing to war [ως πωνη αρματων ιππων πολλων τρεχοντων εις πολεμον]
Both metaphors here, the clatter and clangour of the chariot wheels and the prancing of the horses are found in Joel 2:4. Τρεχοντων — Trechontōn is present active predicate participle of τρεχω — trechō to run. Cf. 2 Kings 7:6; Jeremiah 47:3. [source]
Revelation 9:15 For the hour and day and month and year [εις την ωραν και ημεραν και μηνα και ενιαυτον]
For this use of εις — eis with ητοιμασμενον — hētoimasmenon see 2 Timothy 2:21. All preparation over, the angels are waiting for the signal to begin. [source]

Greek Commentary Content Search

Matthew 10:41 In the name of a prophet [εις ονομα προπητου]
“Because he is a prophet” (Moffatt). In an Oxyrhynchus Papyrus 37 (a.d. 49) we find ονοματι ελευτερου — onomati eleutherou in virtue of being free-born. “He that receiveth a prophet from no ulterior motive, but simply qua prophet (ut prophetam, Jer.) would receive a reward in the coming age equal to that of his guest” (McNeile). The use of εις — eis here is to be noted. In reality εις — eis is simply εν — en with the same meaning. It is not proper to say that εις — eis has always to be translated “into.” Besides these examples of εις ονομα — eis onoma in Matthew 10:41 and Matthew 10:42 see note on Matthew 12:41 εις το κηρυγμα Ιωνα — eis to kērugma Iōnā (see Robertson‘s Grammar, p. 593). [source]
Matthew 19:5 The twain shall become one flesh [εσονται οι δυο εις σαρκα μιαν]
This use of εις — eis after ειμι — eimi is an imitation of the Hebrew, though a few examples occur in the older Greek and in the papyri. The frequency of it is due to the Hebrew and here the lxx is a direct translation of the Hebrew idiom. [source]
Matthew 21:1 Unto the Mount of Olives [εις το ορος των Ελαιων]
Matthew has thus three instances of εις — eis with Jerusalem, Mount of Olives. Mark and Luke use προς — pros with Mount of Olives, the Mount of Olive trees (ελαιων — elaiōn from ελαια — elaia olive tree), the mountain covered with olive trees. [source]
Matthew 21:2 Into the village that is over against you [εις την κωμην την κατεναντι μων]
Another use of εις — eis If it means “into” as translated, it could be Bethany right across the valley and this is probably the idea. [source]
Matthew 22:5 One to his own farm [ος μεν εις τον ιδιον αγρον]
(ος μεν εις τον ιδιον αγρον — hos men eis ton idion agron) or field, another to his merchandise (ος δε επι την εμποριαν αυτου — hos de epi tēn emporian autou) only example in the N.T., from εμπορος — emporos merchant, one who travels for traffic (εμπορευομαι — emporeuomai), a drummer. [source]
Mark 13:16 In the field [εις τον αγρον]
Here Matthew 24:18 has εν τωι αγρωι — en tōi agrōi showing identical use of εις — eis with accusative and εν — en with the locative. [source]
Mark 14:10 He that was one of the twelve [ο εις των δωδεκα]
Note the article here, “the one of the twelve,” Matthew has only εις — heis “one.” Some have held that Mark here calls Judas the primate among the twelve. Rather he means to call attention to the idea that he was the one of the twelve who did this deed. [source]
Mark 14:20 One of the twelve [εις των δωδεκα]
It is as bad as that. The sign that Jesus gave, the one dipping in the dish with me (ο εμβαπτομενος μετ εμου εις το τρυβλιον — ho embaptomenos met' emou eis to trublion), escaped the notice of all. Jesus gave the sop to Judas who understood perfectly that Jesus knew his purpose. See Matthew 26:21-24 for further details. [source]
Mark 2:1 In the house [εις οικον]
More exactly, at home, in the home of Peter, now the home of Jesus. Another picture directly from Peter‘s discourse. Some of the manuscripts have here εν — eis oikon illustrating the practical identity in meaning of εις — en and ηκουστη — eis (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 591-6). It was noised (ακουω — ēkousthē). It was heard (first aorist, passive indicative from akouō to hear). People spread the rumour, “He is at home, he is indoors.” [source]
Luke 11:7 In bed [εις τεν κοιτην]
Note use of εις — eis in sense of εν — en Often a whole family would sleep in the same room. [source]
Luke 11:32 At the preaching of Jonah [εις το κηρυγμα Ιωνα]
Note this use of εις — eis as in Matthew 10:41; Matthew 12:41. Luke inserts the words about the Queen of the South (Luke 11:31) in between the discussion of Jonah (Luke 11:29., Luke 11:32). Both Σολομωνος — Solomōnos (Luke 11:31) and Ιωνα — Iōnā (Luke 11:32) are in the ablative case after the comparative πλειον — pleion (more, something more). [source]
Luke 12:10 But unto him that blasphemeth against the Holy Spirit [τωι δε εις το αγιον πνευμα βλασπημησαντι]
This unpardonable sin is given by Mark 3:28.; Matthew 12:31. immediately after the charge that Jesus was in league with Beelzebub. Luke here separates it from the same charge made in Judea (Luke 11:15-20). As frequently said, there is no sound reason for saying that Jesus only spoke his memorable sayings once. Luke apparently finds a different environment here. Note the use of εις — eis here in the sense of “against.” [source]
Luke 13:19 Cast into his own garden [εβαλεν εις κηπον εαυτου]
Different from “earth” (Mark) or “field” (Matthew.)” Κηπος — Kēpos old word for garden, only here in the N.T. and John 19:1, John 19:26; John 19:41.Became a tree (εγενετο εις δενδρον — egeneto eis dendron). Common Hebraism, very frequent in lxx, only in Luke in the N.T., but does appear in Koiné though rare in papyri; this use of εις — eis after words like κατεσκηνωσεν — ginomai It is a translation Hebraism in Luke.Lodged Mark and Matthew have kataskēnoin infinitive of the same verb, to make tent (or nest). [source]
Luke 13:19 Became a tree [εγενετο εις δενδρον]
Common Hebraism, very frequent in lxx, only in Luke in the N.T., but does appear in Koiné though rare in papyri; this use of εις — eis after words like κατεσκηνωσεν — ginomai It is a translation Hebraism in Luke. [source]
Luke 19:4 Ran on before [προδραμων εις το εμπροστεν]
Second aorist active participle of προτρεχω — protrechō (defective verb). “Before” occurs twice (προ — pro - and εις το εμπροστεν — eis to emprosthen). [source]
Luke 23:42 In thy kingdom [εις την βασιλειαν σου]
Probably no difference in sense is to be found, for εις — eis and εν — en are essentially the same preposition. He refers to the Messianic rule of Jesus and begs that Jesus will remember him. It is not clear whether he hopes for immediate blessing or only at the judgment. [source]
Luke 5:4 Put out into the deep [επαναγαγε εις το βατος]
The same double compound verb as in Luke 5:3, only here second aorist active imperative second person singular.Let down (χαλασατε — chalasate). Peter was master of the craft and so he was addressed first. First aorist active imperative second person plural. Here the whole crew are addressed. The verb is the regular nautical term for lowering cargo or boats (Acts 27:17, Acts 27:30). But it was used for lowering anything from a higher place (Mark 2:4; Acts 9:25; 2 Corinthians 11:33). For a catch (εις αγραν — eis agran). This purpose was the startling thing that stirred up Simon. [source]
Luke 5:17 Out of every village of Galilee and Judea and Jerusalem [δυναμις Κυριου ην εις το ιασται αυτον]
Edersheim (Jewish Social Life) observes that the Jews distinguished Jerusalem as a separate district in Judea. Plummer considers it hyperbole in Luke to use “every village.” But one must recall that Jesus had already made one tour of Galilee which stirred the Pharisees and rabbis to active opposition. Judea had already been aroused and Jerusalem was the headquarters of the definite campaign now organized against Jesus. One must bear in mind that John 4:1-4 shows that Jesus had already left Jerusalem and Judea because of the jealousy of the Pharisees. They are here on purpose to find fault and to make charges against Jesus. One must not forget that there were many kinds of Pharisees and that not all of them were as bad as these legalistic and punctilious hypocrites who deserved the indictment and exposure of Christ in Matthew 23. Paul himself is a specimen of the finer type of Pharisee which, however, developed into the persecuting fanatic till Jesus changed his whole life.The power of the Lord was with him to heal (Κυριου — dunamis Kuriou ēn eis to iāsthai auton). So the best texts. It is neat Greek, but awkward English: “Then was the power of the Lord for the healing as to him (Jesus).” Here δυναμεις — Kuriou refers to Jehovah.Dunamis (dynamite) is one of the common words for “miracles” What Luke means is that Jesus had the power of the Lord God to heal with. He does not mean that this power was intermittent. He simply calls attention to its presence with Jesus on this occasion. [source]
John 11:26 Shall never die [ου μη αποτανηι εις τον αιωνα]
Strong double negative ου μη — ou mē with second aorist active subjunctive of αποτνησκω — apothnēskō again (but spiritual death, this time), “shall not die for ever” (eternal death). Believest thou this? (πιστευεις τουτο — pisteueis touto) Sudden test of Martha‘s insight and faith with all the subtle turns of thought involved. [source]
John 17:23 That they may be perfected into one [ινα ωσιν τετελειωμενοι εις εν]
Purpose clause again with ινα — hina (nineteen times in this prayer, this the fifteenth) with the periphrastic perfect passive subjunctive of τελειοω — teleioō (John 17:4), permanent state, with εις εν — eis hen (into one) as the goal and final result. That the world may know Present active subjunctive of γινωσκω — ginōskō with ινα — hina like the present tense of πιστευω — pisteuō in John 17:21, “that the world may keep on knowing” with the same pregnant phrase “that thou me didst send” Timeless aorist, but love shown by sending Christ (John 3:16) and illustrated and proven by the way Christians love one another. [source]
John 20:14 She turned herself back [εστραπη εις τα οπισω]
Second aorist passive indicative of στρεπω — strephō in an intransitive and almost reflective sense. In the disappearance of the aorist middle before the aorist passive see Robertson, Grammar, p.817. See also στραπεισα — strapheisa (second aorist passive participle) in John 20:16. On εις τα οπισω — eis ta opisō see John 6:66; John 18:6. Standing Second perfect active (intransitive) of ιστημι — histēmi Instinctively Mary felt the presence of some one behind her. Was Present active indicative retained in indirect discourse after ηιδει — ēidei (knew). [source]
John 1:7 For witness [εις μαρτυριαν]
Old word from μαρτυρεω — martureō (from μαρτυς — martus), both more common in John‘s writings than the rest of the N.T. This the purpose of the Baptist‘s ministry. That he might bear witness Final clause with ινα — hina and aorist active subjunctive of μαρτυρεω — martureō to make clearer εις μαρτυριαν — eis marturian Of the light “Concerning the light.” The light was shining and men with blinded eyes were not seeing the light (John 1:26), blinded by the god of this world still (2 Corinthians 4:4). John had his own eyes opened so that he saw and told what he saw. That is the mission of every preacher of Christ. But he must first have his own eyes opened. That all might believe Final clause with ινα — hina and first aorist active subjunctive of πιστευω — pisteuō ingressive aorist “come to believe.” This is one of John‘s great words (about 100 times), “with nine times the frequency with which it is used by the Synoptists” (Bernard). And yet πιστις — pistis so common in Paul, John uses only in 1 John 5:4 and four times in the Apocalypse where πιστευω — pisteuō does not occur at all. Here it is used absolutely as in John 1:50, etc. Through him As the intermediate agent in winning men to believe in Christ (the Logos) as the Light and the Life of men. This is likewise the purpose of the author of this book (John 1:31). The preacher is merely the herald to point men to Christ. [source]
John 11:52 But that he might also gather together into one [αλλ ινα συναγαγηι εις εν]
Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the second aorist active subjunctive of συναγω — sunagō Caiaphas was thinking only of the Jewish people The explanation and interpretation of John here follow the lead of the words of Jesus about the other sheep and the one flock in John 10:16. That are scattered abroad (διασκορπιζω — ta dieskorpismena). Perfect passive articular participle of εις εν — diaskorpizō late verb (Polybius, lxx) to scatter apart, to winnow grain from chaff, only here in John. The meaning here is not the Diaspora (Jews scattered over the world), but the potential children of God in all lands and all ages that the death of Christ will gather “into one” (eis hen). A glorious idea, but far beyond Caiaphas. [source]
John 13:8 Thou shalt never wash my feet [ου μη νιπσηις μου τους ποδας εις τον αιωνα]
Strong double negative ου μη — ou mē with first aorist active subjunctive of νιπτω — niptō with εις τον αιωνα — eis ton aiōna (for ever) added and μου — mou (my) made emphatic by position. Peter‘s sudden humility should settle the issue, he felt. If I wash thee not Third-class condition with εαν μη — ean mē (negative). Jesus picks up the challenge of Peter whose act amounted to irreverence and want of confidence. “The first condition of discipleship is self-surrender” (Westcott). So “Jesus, waiting with the basin” (Dods), concludes. Thou hast no part with me Not simply here at the supper with its fellowship, but in the deeper sense of mystic fellowship as Peter was quick to see. Jesus does not make foot-washing essential to spiritual fellowship, but simply tests Peter‘s real pride and mock-humility by this symbol of fellowship. [source]
John 7:8 Go ye up to the feast [υμεις αναβητε εις την εορτην]
The emphatic word by position is υμεις — humeis (ye) in contrast with εγω — egō (I). Second aorist active imperative of αναβαινω — anabainō old and common verb for going up to the feast (John 2:13) or anywhere. Take your own advice (John 7:3). I go not up yet So Westcott and Hort after B W L (Neutral) while ου — ou (not) is read by Aleph D, African Latin, Vulgate, Coptic (Western). Some of the early Greek Fathers were puzzled over the reading ουκ — ouk (I go not up) as contradictory to John 7:10 wherein it is stated that Jesus did go up. Almost certainly ουκ — ouk (not) is correct and is not really contradictory when one notes in John 7:10 that the manner of Christ‘s going up is precisely the opposite of the advice of the brothers in John 7:3, John 7:4. “Not yet” One may think, if he will, that Jesus changed his plans after these words, but that is unnecessary. He simply refused to fall in with his brothers‘ sneering proposal for a grand Messianic procession with the caravan on the way to the feast. He will do that on the journey to the last passover. [source]
Acts 13:42 The next Sabbath [εις το μεταχυ σαββατον]
Late use (Josephus, Plutarch, etc.) of μεταχυ — metaxu Note use of εις — eis for “on” or “by.” [source]
Acts 16:24 Into the inner prison [εις την εσωτεραν πυλακην]
The comparative form from the adverb εσω — esō (within), Ionic and old Attic for εισω — eisō In the lxx, but in the N.T. only here and Hebrews 6:19. The Roman public prisons had a vestibule and outer prison and behind this the inner prison, a veritable dungeon with no light or air save what came through the door when open. One has only to picture modern cells in our jails, the dungeons in feudal castles, London prisons before the time of Howard, to appreciate the horrors of an inner prison cell in a Roman provincial town of the first century a.d. [source]
Acts 19:27 Come into disrepute [εις απελεγμον ελτειν]
Not in the old writers, but in lxx and Koiné. Literally, reputation, exposure, censure, rejection after examination, and so disrepute. Their business of making gods would lose caste as the liquor trade (still called the trade in England) has done in our day. They felt this keenly and so Demetrius names it first. They felt it in their pockets. Of the great goddess Artemis (της μεγαλης τεας Αρτεμιδος — tēs megalēs theas Artemidos). She was generally known as the Great (η Μεγαλη — hē Megalē). An inscription found at Ephesus calls her “the greatest god” (η μεγιστη τεος — hē megistē theos). The priests were eunuchs and there were virgin priestesses and a lower order of slaves known as temple-sweepers (νεωκοροι — neōkoroi Acts 19:35). They had wild orgiastic exercises that were disgraceful with their Corybantic processions and revelries. Be made of no account Be reckoned as nothing, first aorist passive infinitive of λογιζομαι — logizomai and εις — eis Should even be deposed of her magnificence (μελλειν τε και καταιρεισται της μεγαλειοτητος αυτης — mellein te kai kathaireisthai tēs megaleiotētos autēs). Note the present infinitive after μελλειν — mellein ablative case (so best MSS.) after καταιρεω — kathaireō to take down, to depose, to deprive of. The word μεγαλειοτης — megaleiotēs occurs also in Luke 9:43 (the majesty of God) and in 2 Peter 1:16 of the transfiguration of Christ. It is already in the lxx and Deissmann (Light from the Ancient East, p. 363) thinks that the word runs parallel with terms used in the emperor-cult. All Asia and the world ολη ̔ἠ Ασια και ̔ἠ οικουμενη — holē ‛hē' Asia kai ‛hē' oikoumenā See note on Acts 11:28 for same use of οικουμενη — oikoumenā An exaggeration, to be sure, but Pausanias says that no deity was more widely worshipped. Temples of Artemis have been found in Spain and Gaul. Multitudo errantium non efficit veritatem (Bengel). Even today heathenism has more followers than Christianity. To think that all this splendour was being set at naught by one man and a despised Jew at that! [source]
Acts 19:27 Be made of no account [εις ουτεν λογιστηναι]
Be reckoned as nothing, first aorist passive infinitive of λογιζομαι — logizomai and εις — eis Should even be deposed of her magnificence (μελλειν τε και καταιρεισται της μεγαλειοτητος αυτης — mellein te kai kathaireisthai tēs megaleiotētos autēs). Note the present infinitive after μελλειν — mellein ablative case (so best MSS.) after καταιρεω — kathaireō to take down, to depose, to deprive of. The word μεγαλειοτης — megaleiotēs occurs also in Luke 9:43 (the majesty of God) and in 2 Peter 1:16 of the transfiguration of Christ. It is already in the lxx and Deissmann (Light from the Ancient East, p. 363) thinks that the word runs parallel with terms used in the emperor-cult. All Asia and the world ολη ̔ἠ Ασια και ̔ἠ οικουμενη — holē ‛hē' Asia kai ‛hē' oikoumenā See note on Acts 11:28 for same use of οικουμενη — oikoumenā An exaggeration, to be sure, but Pausanias says that no deity was more widely worshipped. Temples of Artemis have been found in Spain and Gaul. Multitudo errantium non efficit veritatem (Bengel). Even today heathenism has more followers than Christianity. To think that all this splendour was being set at naught by one man and a despised Jew at that! [source]
Acts 2:27 In Hades [εις αιδην]
Hades is the unseen world, Hebrew Sheol, but here it is viewed as death itself “considered as a rapacious destroyer” (Hackett). It does not mean the place of punishment, though both heaven and the place of torment are in Hades (Luke 16:23). “Death and Hades are strictly parallel terms: he who is dead is in Hades” (Page). The use of εις — eis here=εν — en is common enough. The Textus Receptus here reads εις αιδου — eis Hāidou (genitive case) like the Attic idiom with δομον — domon (abode) understood. “Hades” in English is not translation, but transliteration. The phrase in the Apostles‘ Creed, “descended into hell” is from this passage in Acts (Hades, not Gehenna). The English word “hell” is Anglo-Saxon from ελαν — helan to hide, and was used in the Authorized Version to translate both Hades as here and Gehenna as in Matthew 5:22. [source]
Acts 21:1 Unto Rhodes [εις την οδον]
Called the island of roses. The sun shone most days and made roses luxuriant. The great colossus which represented the sun, one of the seven wonders of the world, was prostrate at this time. The island was at the entrance to the Aegean Sea and had a great university, especially for rhetoric and oratory. There was great commerce also. Unto Patara (εις Παταρα — eis Patara). A seaport on the Lycian coast on the left bank of the Xanthus. It once had an oracle of Apollo which rivalled that at Delphi. This was the course taken by hundreds of ships every season. [source]
Acts 22:7 Unto the ground [εις το εδαπος]
Old word, here alone in N.T. So the verb εδαπιζω — edaphizō is in Luke 19:44 alone in the N.T. A voice saying (πωνης λεγουσης — phōnēs legousēs). Genitive after ηκουσα — ēkousa though in Acts 26:14 the accusative is used after ηκουσα — ēkousa as in Acts 22:14 after ακουσαι — akousai either being allowable. See note on Acts 9:7 for discussion of the difference in case. Saul‘s name repeated each time (Acts 9:4; Acts 22:7; Acts 26:14). Same question also in each report: “Why persecuted thou me?” (Τι με διωκεισ — Ti me diōkeiṡ). These piercing words stuck in Paul‘s mind. [source]
Acts 22:10 Into Damascus [εις Δαμασκον]
In Acts 9:6 simply “into the city” (εις την πολιν — eis tēn polin). [source]
Acts 25:20 Whether he would go to Jerusalem [ει βουλοιτο πορευεσται εις Ιεροσολυμα]
Optative in indirect question after ελεγον — elegon (asked or said) imperfect active, though the present indicative could have been retained with change of person: “Dost thou wish, etc.,” See Robertson, Grammar, pp. 1031, 1044. This is the question put to Paul in Acts 25:9 though τελεις — theleis is there used. [source]
Acts 21:1 Unto Cos [εις την Κο]
Standing today, about forty nautical miles south from Miletus, island famous as the birthplace of Hippocrates and Apelles with a great medical school. Great trading place with many Jews. The next day (τηι εχης — tēi hexēs). Locative case with ημεραι — hēmerāi (day) understood. The adverb εχης — hexēs is from εχω — echō (future εχω — hexō) and means successively or in order. This is another one of Luke‘s ways of saying “on the next day” (cf. three others in Acts 20:15). Unto Rhodes Called the island of roses. The sun shone most days and made roses luxuriant. The great colossus which represented the sun, one of the seven wonders of the world, was prostrate at this time. The island was at the entrance to the Aegean Sea and had a great university, especially for rhetoric and oratory. There was great commerce also. Unto Patara (εις Παταρα — eis Patara). A seaport on the Lycian coast on the left bank of the Xanthus. It once had an oracle of Apollo which rivalled that at Delphi. This was the course taken by hundreds of ships every season. [source]
Acts 21:3 Landed at Tyre [κατηλτομεν εις Τυρον]
Came down to Tyre. Then a free city of Syria in honour of its former greatness (cf. the long siege by Alexander the Great). There (εκεισε — ekeise). Thither, literally. Only one other instance in N.T., Acts 22:5 which may be pertinent = εκει — ekei (there). Was to unlade Periphrastic imperfect middle of αποπορτιζω — apophortizō late verb from απο — apo and πορτος — phortos load, but here only in the N.T. Literally, “For thither the boat was unloading her cargo,” a sort of “customary” or “progressive” imperfect (Robertson, Grammar, p. 884). Burden (γομον — gomon). Cargo, old word, from γεμω — gemō to be full. Only here and Revelation 18:11. in N.T. Probably a grain or fruit ship. It took seven days here to unload and reload. [source]
Acts 21:8 Unto Caesarea [εις Καισαριαν]
Apparently by land as the voyage Caesarea is the political capital of Judea under the Romans where the procurators lived and a city of importance, built by Herod the Great and named in honour of Augustus. It had a magnificent harbour built Most of the inhabitants were Greeks. This is the third time that we have seen Paul in Caesarea, on his journey from Jerusalem to Tarsus (Acts 9:30), on his return from Antioch at the close of the second mission tour (Acts 18:22) and now. The best MSS. omit οι περι Παυλου — hoi peri Paulou (we that were of Paul‘s company) a phrase like that in Acts 13:13. Into the house of Philip the evangelist (εις τον οικον Πιλιππου του ευαγγελιστου — eis ton oikon Philippou tou euaggelistou). Second in the list of the seven (Acts 6:5) after Stephen and that fact mentioned here. By this title he is distinguished from “Philip the apostle,” one of the twelve. His evangelistic work followed the death of Stephen (Acts 8) in Samaria, Philistia, with his home in Caesarea. The word “evangelizing” (ευηγγελιζετο — euēggelizeto) was used of him in Acts 8:40. The earliest of the three N.T. examples of the word “evangelist” (Acts 21:8; Ephesians 4:11; 2 Timothy 4:5). Apparently a word used to describe one who told the gospel story as Philip did and may have been used of him first of all as John was termed “the baptizer” (ο βαπτιζων — ho baptizn Mark 1:4), then “the Baptist” (ο βαπτιστης — ho baptistēs Matthew 3:1). It is found on an inscription in one of the Greek islands of uncertain date and was used in ecclesiastical writers of later times on the Four Gospels as we do. As used here the meaning is a travelling missionary who “gospelized” communities. This is probably Paul‘s idea in 2 Timothy 4:5. In Ephesians 4:11 the word seems to describe a special class of ministers just as we have them today. Men have different gifts and Philip had this of evangelizing as Paul was doing who is the chief evangelist. The ideal minister today combines the gifts of evangelist, herald, teacher, shepherd. “We abode with him” Constative aorist active indicative. Παρ αυτωι — Par autōi (by his side) is a neat idiom for “at his house.” What a joyful time Paul had in conversation with Philip. He could learn from him much of value about the early days of the gospel in Jerusalem. And Luke could, and probably did, take notes from Philip and his daughters about the beginnings of Christian history. It is generally supposed that the “we” sections of Acts represent a travel document by Luke (notes made by him as he journeyed from Troas to Rome). Those who deny the Lukan authorship of the whole book usually admit this. So we may suppose that Luke is already gathering data for future use. If so, these were precious days for him. [source]
Acts 26:18 Sanctified by faith in me [ηγιασμενοις πιστει τηι εις εμε]
Perfect passive participle of αγιαζω — hagiazō instrumental case of πιστει — pistei article before εις εμε — eis eme (“by faith, that in me”). These important words of Jesus to Paul give his justification to this cultured audience for his response to the command of Jesus. This was the turning point in Paul‘s career and it was a step forward and upward. [source]
Acts 21:26 Went into the temple [εισηιει εις το ιερον]
Imperfect active of εισειμι — eiseimi as in Acts 21:18 which see. Went on into the temple, descriptive imperfect. Paul joined the four men in their vow of separation. Declaring (διαγγελλων — diaggellōn). To the priests what day he would report the fulfilment of the vow. The priests would desire notice of the sacrifice. This verb only used by Luke in N.T. except Romans 11:17 (quotation from the lxx). It is not necessary to assume that the vows of each of the five expired on the same day (Rackham). Until the offering was offered for every one of them This use of εως ου — heōs hou (like εως — heōs alone) with the first aorist passive indicative προσηνεχτη — prosēnechthē of προσπερω — prospherō to offer, contemplates the final result (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 974f.) and is probably the statement of Luke added to Paul‘s announcement. He probably went into the temple one day for each of the brethren and one for himself. The question arises whether Paul acted wisely or unwisely in agreeing to the suggestion of James. What he did was in perfect harmony with his principle of accommodation in 1 Corinthians 9:20 when no principle was involved. It is charged that here on this occasion Paul was unduly influenced by considerations of expediency and was willing for the Jewish Christians to believe him more of a Jew than was true in order to placate the situation in Jerusalem. Furneaux calls it a compromise and a failure. I do not so see it. To say that is to obscure the whole complex situation. What Paul did was not for the purpose of conciliating his opponents, the Judaizers, who had diligently spread falsehoods about him in Jerusalem as in Corinth. It was solely to break the power of these “false apostles” over the thousands in Jerusalem who have been deluded by Paul‘s accusers. So far as the evidence goes that thing was accomplished. In the trouble that comes in Jerusalem and Caesarea the Judaizers cut no figure at all. The Jewish Christians do not appear in Paul‘s behalf, but there was no opportunity for them to do so. The explosion that came on the last day of Paul‘s appearance in the temple was wholly disconnected from his offerings for the four brethren and himself. It must be remembered that Paul had many kinds of enemies. The attack on him by these Jews from Asia had no connexion whatever with the slanders of the Judaizers about Paul‘s alleged teachings that Jewish Christians in the dispersion should depart from the Mosaic law. That slander was put to rest forever by his following the advice of James and justifies the wisdom of that advice and Paul‘s conduct about it. [source]
Acts 4:32 Not one of them [ουδε εις]
More emphatic than ουδεις — oudeis “not even one.” Common (κοινα — Koinéa). In the use of their property, not in the possession as Luke proceeds to explain. The word κοινος — Koinéos is kin to συν — sun (together with)=χυν — xun (Epic) and so χυνοσκοινος — xunoŝKoinéos See this word already in Acts 2:44. The idea of unclean (Acts 10:15) is a later development from the original notion of common to all. [source]
Acts 7:4 Wherein ye now dwell [εις ην υμεις νυν κατοικειτε]
Note εις — eis in the sense of εν — en as often. Note also emphatic use of υμεις — humeis (ye) and now (νυν — nun). [source]
Acts 7:19 To the end they might not live [εις το μη ζωογονεισται]
Purpose with εις — eis and the articular infinitive (present middle). This compound verb is from ζωογονος — zōogonos (from ζωος — zōos alive, and γενω — genō to bear) and is used by late writers and the lxx. It is three times in the N.T. (here, Luke 17:33; 1 Timothy 6:13) in the sense to preserve alive. [source]
Acts 7:21 Nourished him for her own son [ανετρεπσατο αυτον εαυτηι εις υιον]
Literally, “she nursed him up for herself (εαυτηι — heautēi besides middle voice) as a son.” This use of εις — eis =as occurs in the old Greek, but is very common in the lxx as a translation of the Hebrew le. The tradition is that she designed Moses for the throne as the Pharaoh had no son (Josephus, Ant. ii. 9, 7). [source]
Acts 7:53 As it was ordained by angels [εις διαταγας αγγελων]
About angels, see note on Acts 7:38. Διαταγη — Diatagē (from διατασσω — diatassō to arrange, appoint) occurs in late Greek, lxx, inscriptions, papyri, Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East, pp. 89ff., and in N.T. only here and Romans 13:2. At (or as) the appointment of angels (cf. Matthew 10:41; Matthew 12:41 for this use of εις — eis). And kept it not (και ουκ επυλαχατε — kai ouk ephulaxate). Like a whipcracker these words cut to the quick. They gloried in possessing the law and openly violated it (Romans 2:23). [source]
Acts 8:20 Perish with thee [συν σοι ειη εις απωλειαν]
Literally, Be with thee for destruction. Optative for a future wish. The use of εις — eis with the accusative in the predicate is especially common in the lxx. The wish reveals Peter‘s indignation at the base offer of Simon. Peter was no grafter to accept money for spiritual power. He spurned the temptation. The natural meaning of Peter‘s language is that Simon was on the road to destruction. It is a warning and almost a curse on him, though Acts 8:22 shows that there was still room for repentance. [source]
Acts 27:40 They left them in the sea [ειων εις την ταλασσαν]
Imperfect active of εαω — eaō either descriptive or inchoative. They let the anchors go and the ropes fell down into the sea. At the same time loosing the bands of the rudders (αμα ανεντες τας ζευκτηριας των πηδαλιων — hama anentes tas zeuktērias tōn pēdaliōn). On the use of αμα — hama with the participle, old Greek idiom see Robertson, Grammar, p. 1139. The second aorist active participle of ανιημι — aniēmi to relax, loosen up. Old verb, in N.T. Acts 16:26; Acts 27:40; Ephesians 6:9; Hebrews 13:5. Thayer notes that ζευκτηριας — zeuktērias (bands) occurs nowhere else, but several papyri use it of yokes and waterwheels (Moulton and Milligan‘s Vocabulary). The word for rudders (πηδαλιον — pēdalion) is an old one (from πηδον — pēdon the blade of an oar), but in the N.T. only here and James 3:4. Page notes that the ancient ships had a pair of paddle rudders like those of the early northmen, one on each quarter. The paddle rudders had been fastened while the ship was anchored. Hoisting up the foresail to the wind Supply αυραι — aurāi (breeze) after πνεουσηι — pneousēi (blowing). It is not clear what “sail” is meant by “αρτεμωνα — artemōna No other example in Greek is known, though the scholiast to Juvenal XII. 68 explains ςελο προρα συο — velo prora suo by artemone solo. Hence “foresail” is probably correct. They made for the beach (κατειχον εις τον αιγιαλον — kateichon eis ton aigialon). Imperfect active of κατεχω — katechō to hold down, perhaps inchoative. “They began to hold the ship steadily for the beach.” [source]
Acts 28:15 To meet us [εις απαντησιν ημιν]
Idiomatic phrase, “for meeting with us” (associative instrumental case). Koiné{[28928]}š word απαντησις — apantōsis from verb απανταω — apantaō to meet, in N.T. only here; Matthew 25:6; 1 Thessalonians 4:17. Use after neisn rather than infinitive like a translation Hebraism (Robertson, Grammar, p. 91). As far as the Market of Appius (εις — achri Appiou Phorou). The Forum of Appius, 90 miles from Puteoli, 40 from Rome, on the great Appian Way. The Censor Appius Claudius had constructed this part of the road, b.c. 312. Paul probably struck the Appian Way at Capua. Portions of this great stone highway are still in use. If one wishes to tread where Paul trod, he can do it here. Appii Forum had a bad reputation, the haunt of thieves, thugs, and swindlers. What would this motley crowd think of Paul chained to a soldier? Three Taverns Genitive case after Τριων Ταβερνων — achri like αχρι — Appiou Phorou About 30 miles from Rome. Tres Tabernae. Whom (Αππιου Πορου — hous). Two groups of the disciples came (one Gentile, one Jewish, Rackham thinks), one to Appii Forum, the other to Three Taverns. It was a joyous time and Julius would not interfere. Took courage The old substantive ελαβε ταρσος — tharsos is here alone in the N.T. Jesus himself had exhorted Paul to be of good courage Paul had passed through enough to cause depression, whether he was depressed or not, but he deeply appreciated this kindly sympathy. [source]
Romans 1:11 To the end ye may be established [εις το στηριχτηναι υμας]
Final clause (common in Paul) with εις το — eis to and the first aorist passive infinitive of στηριζω — stērizō for which verb see Luke 22:32; 1 Thessalonians 3:3, 1 Thessalonians 3:13. [source]
Romans 1:20 That they may be without excuse [εις το ειναι αυτους αναπολογητους]
More likely, “so that they are without excuse.” The use of εις το — eis to and the infinitive (with accusative of general reference) for result like ωστε — hōste is reasonably clear in the N.T. (Moulton, Prolegomena, p. 219; Robertson, Grammar, p. 1003). Αναπολογητους — Anapologētous is another verbal with αν — an from απολογεομαι — apologeomai Old word, in N.T. only here and Romans 2:1 (“inexcusable” here). [source]
Romans 11:9 A snare [εις παγιδα]
From πηγνυμι — pēgnumi to make fast, old word for snares for birds and beasts. See Luke 21:35. Εις — Eis in predicate with γινομαι — ginomai is a translation-Hebraism. [source]
Romans 11:9 A trap [εις τηραν]
Old word for hunting of wild beasts, then a trap. Only here in N.T. A stumbling-block (εις σκανδαλον — eis skandalon). A third word for trap, snare, trap-stick or trigger over which they fall. See note on 1 Corinthians 1:23; Romans 9:33. A recompense Late word from double compound verb ανταποδιδωμι — antapodidōmi to repay (both αντι — anti and απο — apo). Ancient Greeks used ανταποδοσις — antapodosis In lxx and Didache. In N.T. only here (bad sense) and Luke 14:12 (good sense). [source]
Romans 11:36 Goal [εις]
For ever (εις τους αιωνας — eis tous aiōnas). “For the ages.” Alford terms this doxology in Romans 11:33-36 “the sublimest apostrophe existing even in the pages of inspiration itself.” [source]
Romans 11:11 For to provoke them to jealousy [εις το παραζηλωσαι]
Purpose expressed by εις — eis and the articular infinitive, first aorist active, of παραζηλοω — parazēloō for which verb see note on 1 Corinthians 10:22. As an historical fact Paul turned to the Gentiles when the Jews rejected his message (Acts 13:45.; Acts 28:28, etc.). The riches of the world (πλουτος κοσμου — ploutos kosmou). See note on Romans 10:12. Their loss So perhaps in 1 Corinthians 6:7, but in Isaiah 31:8 defeat is the idea. Perhaps so here. Fulness (πληρωμα — plērōma). Perhaps “completion,” though the word from πληροω — plēroō to fill, has a variety of senses, that with which anything is filled (1 Corinthians 10:26, 1 Corinthians 10:28), that which is filled (Ephesians 1:23). How much more? Argument a fortiori as in Romans 11:24. Romans 11:25 illustrates the point. [source]
Romans 12:2 That ye may prove [εις το δοκιμαζειν]
Infinitive of purpose with εις το — eis to “to test” what is God‘s will, “the good and acceptable and perfect” (το αγατον και ευαρεστον και τελειον — to agathon kai euareston kai teleion). [source]
Romans 12:5 And severally [το δε κατ εις]
A difficult late idiom where the preposition κατ — kath' So εις κατ εις — heis kath' heis (Mark 14:19) and in Modern Greek κατεις — katheis as a distributive pronoun. But we have κατ ενα — kath' hena in 1 Corinthians 14:31. The use of the neuter article here το — to with κατ εις — kath' heis is probably the accusative of general reference, “as to each one.” [source]
Romans 15:8 That he might confirm [εις το βεβαιωσαι]
Purpose clause with εις το — eis to and the infinitive βεβαιωσαι — bebaiōsai (first aorist active of βεβαιοω — bebaioō to make stand). The promises given unto the fathers (τας επαγγελιας των πατερων — tas epaggelias tōn paterōn). No “given” in the Greek, just the objective genitive, “the promises to the fathers.” See note on Romans 9:4, Romans 9:5. [source]
Romans 15:13 That ye may abound [εις το περισσευειν υμας]
Purpose clause with εις το — eis to as in Romans 15:8, with περισσευειν — perisseuein (present active infinitive of περισσευω — perisseuō with accusative of general reference, υμας — humas). This verse gathers up the points in the preceding quotations. [source]
Romans 15:16 That I should be [εις το ειναι με]
The εις το — eis to idiom with the infinitive again (Romans 15:8, Romans 15:13). [source]
Romans 16:26 Unto obedience of faith [εις υπακοην της πιστεως]
See note on Romans 1:5. Made known unto all the nations (εις παντα τα ετνη γνωριστεντος — eis panta ta ethnē gnōristhentos). First aorist passive participle of γνωριζω — gnōrizō still the genitive case agreeing with μυστηριου — mustēriou in Romans 16:25. [source]
Romans 3:26 That he might himself be [εις το ειναι αυτον]
Purpose with εις — eis to and the infinitive ειναι — einai and the accusative of general reference. [source]
Romans 4:3 It was reckoned unto him for righteousness [ελογιστη εις δικαιοσυνην]
First aorist passive indicative of λογιζομαι — logizomai old and common verb to set down accounts (literally or metaphorically). It was set down on the credit side of the ledger “for” (εις — eis as often) righteousness. What was set down? His believing God (επιστευσεν τωι τεωι — episteusen tōi theōi). [source]
Romans 4:11 That he might be [εις το ειναι αυτον]
This idiom may be God‘s purpose (contemplated result) as in εις το λογιστηναι — eis to logisthēnai below, or even actual result (so that he was) as in Romans 1:20. [source]
Romans 4:18 To the end that he might become [εις το γενεσται αυτον]
Purpose clause again with εις — eis to and the infinitive as in Romans 4:11-16. [source]
Romans 6:3 Were baptized into Christ [εβαπτιστημεν εις Χριστον]
First aorist passive indicative of βαπτιζω — baptizō Better, “were baptized unto Christ or in Christ.” The translation “into” makes Paul say that the union with Christ was brought to pass by means of baptism, which is not his idea, for Paul was not a sacramentarian. Εις — Eis is at bottom the same word as εν — en Baptism is the public proclamation of one‘s inward spiritual relation to Christ attained before the baptism. See note on Galatians 3:27 where it is like putting on an outward garment or uniform. [source]
Romans 5:12 And so death passed unto all men [και ουτως εις παντας αντρωπους διηλτεν]
Note use of διερχομαι — dierchomai rather than εισερχομαι — eiserchomai just before, second aorist active indicative in both instances. By “death” in Genesis 2:17; Genesis 3:19 physical death is meant, but in Romans 5:17, Romans 5:21 eternal death is Paul‘s idea and that lurks constantly behind physical death with Paul. For that all sinned (επ ωι παντες ημαρτον — Ephesians' hōi pantes hēmarton). Constative (summary) aorist active indicative of αμαρτανω — hamartanō gathering up in this one tense the history of the race (committed sin). The transmission from Adam became facts of experience. In the old Greek επ ωι — Ephesians' hōi usually meant “on condition that,” but “because” in N.T. (Robertson, Grammar, p. 963). [source]
Romans 7:4 That we should be joined to another [εις το γενεσται ετερωι]
Purpose clause with εις το — eis to and the infinitive. First mention of the saints as wedded to Christ as their Husband occurs in 1 Corinthians 6:13; Galatians 4:26. See further Ephesians 5:22-33. That we might bring forth fruit unto God (ινα καρποπορησωμεν τωι τεωι — hina karpophorēsōmen tōi theōi). He changes the metaphor to that of the tree used in Romans 6:22. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:13 Were ye baptized into the name of Paul? [εις το ονομα Παυλου εβαπτιστητε]
It is unnecessary to say into for εις — eis rather than in since εις — eis is the same preposition originally as εν — en and both are used with βαπτιζω — baptizō as in Acts 8:16; Acts 10:48 with no difference in idea (Robertson, Grammar, p. 592). Paul evidently knows the idea in Matthew 28:19 and scouts the notion of being put on a par with Christ or the Trinity. He is no rival of Christ. This use of ονομα — onoma for the person is not only in the lxx, but the papyri, ostraca, and inscriptions give numerous examples of the name of the king or the god for the power and authority of the king or god (Deissmann, Bible Studies, pp. 146ff., 196ff.; Light from the Ancient East, p. 121). [source]
1 Corinthians 10:6 To the intent we should not lust after [εις το μη ειναι ημας επιτυμητας]
Purpose expressed by εις — eis with the articular infinitive το ειναι — to einai and the accusative of general reference with επιτυμητας — epithumētas (lusters) in the predicate. [source]
1 Corinthians 10:2 Were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea [παντες εις τον Μωυσην εβαπτισαντο εν τηι νεπεληι και εν τηι ταλασσηι]
The picture is plain enough. The mystic cloud covered the people while the sea rose in walls on each side of them as they marched across. B K L P read εβαπτισαντο — ebaptisanto (causative first aorist middle, got themselves baptized) while Aleph A C D have εβαπτιστησαν — ebaptisthēsan (first aorist passive, were baptized). The immersion was complete for all of them in the sea around them and the cloud over them. Moses was their leader then as Christ is now and so Paul uses εις — eis concerning the relation of the Israelites to Moses as he does of our baptism in relation to Christ (Galatians 3:27). [source]
1 Corinthians 15:45 Became a living soul [εγενετο εις πσυχην ζωσαν]
Hebraistic use of εις — eis in predicate from lxx. God breathed a soul (πσυχη — psuchē) into “the first man.” [source]
1 Corinthians 4:3 It is a very small thing [εις ελαχιστον εστιν]
This predicate use of εις — eis is like the Hebrew, but it occurs also in the papyri. The superlative ελαχιστον — elachiston is elative, very little, not the true superlative, least. “It counts for very little with me.” That I should be judged of you (ινα υπ υμων ανακριτω — hina huph' humōn anakrithō). Same use of ινα — hina as in 1 Corinthians 4:2. For the verb (first aorist passive subjunctive of ανακρινω — anakrinō) see note on 1 Corinthians 2:14. Paul does not despise public opinion, but he denies “the competency of the tribunal” in Corinth (Robertson and Plummer) to pass on his credentials with Christ as his Lord. Or of man‘s judgement Or “by human day,” in contrast to the Lord‘s Day (der Tag) in 1 Corinthians 3:13. “That is the tribunal which the Apostle recognizes; a human tribunal he does not care to satisfy” (Robertson and Plummer). Yea, I judge not mine own self (αλλ ουδε εμαυτον ανακρινω — all' oude emauton anakrinō). Αλλα — Alla here is confirmatory, not adversative. “I have often wondered how it is that every man sets less value on his own opinion of himself than on the opinion of others” (M. Aurelius, xii. 4. Translated by Robertson and Plummer). Paul does not even set himself up as judge of himself. [source]
1 Corinthians 9:18 So as not to use to the full [εις το μη καταχρησασται]
Εις το — Eis to for purpose with articular infinitive and perfective use of κατα — kata (as in 1 Corinthians 7:31) with χρησασται — chrēsasthai (first aorist middle infinitive). [source]
1 Corinthians 6:18 sins against his own body [εις το ιδιον σωμα αμαρτανει]
(εις το ιδιον σωμα αμαρτανει — eis to idion sōma hamartanei) in a sense not true of other dreadful sins. The fornicator takes his body which belongs to Christ and unites it with a harlot. In fornication the body is the instrument of sin and becomes the subject of the damage wrought. In another sense fornication brings on one‘s own body the two most terrible bodily diseases that are still incurable (gonorrhea and syphilis) that curse one‘s own body and transmit the curse to the third and fourth generation. Apart from the high view given here by Paul of the relation of the body to the Lord no possible father or mother has the right to lay the hand of such terrible diseases and disaster on their children and children‘s children. The moral and physical rottenness wrought by immorality defy one‘s imagination. [source]
2 Corinthians 1:4 Wherewith [εις το δυνασται ημας παρακαλειν]
Genitive case of the relative attracted to that of the antecedent εις — paraklēseōs The case of the relative here could have been either the accusative ης — hēn with the passive verb retained as in Mark 10:38 or the instrumental παρακλησεως — hēi Either is perfectly good Greek (cf. Ephesians 1:6; Ephesians 4:1). Personal experience of God‘s comfort is necessary before we can pass it on to others. [source]
2 Corinthians 8:6 Insomuch that we exhorted Titus [εις το παρακαλεσαι ημας Τιτον]
Use of εις το — eis to and the infinitive for result with accusative of general reference See Robertson, Grammar, p. 1003. [source]
Galatians 3:28 One man [εις]
No word for “man” in the Greek, and yet εις — heis is masculine, not neuter εν — hen “One moral personality” (Vincent). The point is that “in Christ Jesus” race or national distinctions (“neither Jew nor Greek”) do not exist, class differences (“neither bond nor free,” no proletarianism and no capitalism) vanish, sex rivalry (“no male and female”) disappears. This radical statement marks out the path along which Christianity was to come in the sphere (εν — en) and spirit and power of Christ. Candour compels one to confess that this goal has not yet been fully attained. But we are on the road and there is no hope on any way than on “the Jesus Road.” [source]
Ephesians 1:5 Unto adoption as sons [εις υιοτεσιαν]
For this interesting word see note on Galatians 4:5 (included with discussion of Galatians 4:4). Also see Romans 8:15; Romans 9:4. Unto himself (εις αυτον — eis auton). Unto God. According to the good pleasure of his will Here ευδοκιαν — eudokian means purpose like βουλην — boulēn in Ephesians 1:11 rather than benevolence (good pleasure). Note the preposition κατα — kata here for standard. [source]
Ephesians 1:12 To the end that we should be [εις το ειναι ημας]
Final clause with εις — eis to and the infinitive ειναι — einai (see the mere infinitive ειναι — einai in Ephesians 1:4) and the accusative of general reference. [source]
Ephesians 1:15 And which ye shew toward all the saints [και την εις παντας τους αγιους]
The words “ye show” do not occur in the Greek. The Textus Receptus has τεν αγαπην — ten agapēn (the love) before την — tēn supported by D G K L Syr., Lat., Copt., but Aleph A B P Origen do not have the word αγαπην — agapēn It could have been omitted, but is probably not genuine. The use of the article referring to πιστιν — pistin and the change from εν — en to εις — eis probably justifies the translation “which ye shew toward.” [source]
Ephesians 1:18 That ye may know [εις το ειδεναι]
Final use of εις το — eis to and the infinitive (second perfect of οιδα — oida) as in Ephesians 1:12. Note three indirect questions after ειδεναι — eidenai (what the hope τις η ελπις — tis hē elpis what the riches τις ο πλουτος — tis ho ploutos and what the surpassing greatness και τι το υπερβαλλον μεγετος — kai ti to huperballon megethos). When the Holy Spirit opens the eyes of the heart, one will be able to see all these great truths. In the saints (εν τοις αγιοις — en tois hagiois). Our riches is in God, God‘s is in his saints. [source]
Ephesians 3:19 That ye may be filled with all the fulness of God [ινα πληρωτητε εις παν το πληρωμα του τεου]
Final clause again (third use of ινα — hina in the sentence) with first aorist passive subjunctive of πληροω — plēroō and the use of εις — eis after it. One hesitates to comment on this sublime climax in Paul‘s prayer, the ultimate goal for followers of Christ in harmony with the injunction in Matthew 5:48 to be perfect (τελειοι — teleioi) as our heavenly Father is perfect. There is nothing that any one can add to these words. One can turn to Romans 8:29 again for our final likeness to God in Christ. [source]
Ephesians 4:13 Unto the unity of the faith [εις την ενοτητα της πιστεως]
“Unto oneness of faith” (of trust) in Christ (Ephesians 4:3) which the Gnostics were disturbing. And of the knowledge of the Son of God (και της επιγνωσεως του υιου του τεου — kai tēs epignōseōs tou huiou tou theou). Three genitives in a chain dependent also on την ενοτητα — tēn henotēta “the oneness of full (επι — epi̇) knowledge of the Son of God,” in opposition to the Gnostic vagaries. Unto a full-grown man Same figure as in Ephesians 2:15 and τελειος — teleios in sense of adult as opposed to νηπιοι — nēpioi (infants) in Ephesians 4:14. Unto the measure of the stature (εις μετρον ηλικιας — eis metron hēlikias). So apparently ηλικια — hēlikia here as in Luke 2:52, not age (John 9:21). Boys rejoice in gaining the height of a man. But Paul adds to this idea “the fulness of Christ” (του πληρωματος του Χριστου — tou plērōmatos tou Christou), like “the fulness of God” in Ephesians 3:19. And yet some actually profess to be “perfect” with a standard like this to measure by! No pastor has finished his work when the sheep fall so far short of the goal. [source]
Ephesians 4:13 Unto a full-grown man [εις ανδρα τελειον]
Same figure as in Ephesians 2:15 and τελειος — teleios in sense of adult as opposed to νηπιοι — nēpioi (infants) in Ephesians 4:14. Unto the measure of the stature (εις μετρον ηλικιας — eis metron hēlikias). So apparently ηλικια — hēlikia here as in Luke 2:52, not age (John 9:21). Boys rejoice in gaining the height of a man. But Paul adds to this idea “the fulness of Christ” (του πληρωματος του Χριστου — tou plērōmatos tou Christou), like “the fulness of God” in Ephesians 3:19. And yet some actually profess to be “perfect” with a standard like this to measure by! No pastor has finished his work when the sheep fall so far short of the goal. [source]
Ephesians 5:32 In regard of Christ and of the church [εις Χριστον και εισ την εκκλησιαν]
“With reference to Christ and the church.” That is all that εις — eis here means. [source]
Philippians 1:10 So that ye may [εις το υμας]
Either purpose or result (εις το — eis to plus infinitive as in Romans 1:11, Romans 1:20; Romans 3:26, etc.). [source]
Philippians 1:23 To depart [εις το αναλυσαι]
Purpose clause, εις το — eis to and the aorist active infinitive αναλυσαι — analusai old compound verb, to unloose (as threads), to break up, to return (Luke 12:36, only other N.T. example), to break up camp (Polybius), to weigh anchor and put out to sea, to depart (often in old Greek and papyri). Cf. καταλυω — kataluō in 2 Corinthians 5:1 for tearing down the tent. [source]
Philippians 2:22 In furtherance of [εις]
See note on Phlippians 1:5 for this use of εις — eis f0). [source]
Colossians 2:2 Unto all riches [εις παν πλουτος]
Probably some distinction intended between εν — en (in love as the sphere) and εις — eis (unto as the goal). [source]
Colossians 1:16 And unto him [και εις αυτον]
This is the only remaining step to take and Paul takes it (1 Corinthians 15:28) See note on Ephesians 1:10 for similar use of εν αυτωι — en autōi of Christ and in Colossians 1:19, Colossians 1:20 again we have εν αυτωι δι αυτου εις αυτον — en autōiclass="normal greek">δι ον — di' autouclass="normal greek">δι ου — eis auton used of Christ. See note on Hebrews 2:10 for τα παντα — di' hon (because of whom) and εχ αυτου και δι αυτου και εις αυτον τα παντα — di' hou (by means of whom) applied to God concerning the universe In Romans 11:35 we find εν — ex autou kai di' autou kai eis auton ta panta referring to God. But Paul does not use δια — ex in this connection of Christ, but only εις — en εχ — dia and δια — eis See the same distinction preserved in 1 Corinthians 8:6 (ex of God, dia of Christ). [source]
1 Thessalonians 1:5 Came unto you [εγενητη εις υμας]
First aorist passive indicative of γινομαι — ginomai in practically same sense as εγενετο — egeneto (second aorist middle indicative as in the late Greek generally). So also εις υμας — eis humās like the Koiné{[28928]}š is little more than the dative υμιν — humin (Robertson, Grammar, p. 594). [source]
1 Thessalonians 2:12 To the end that [εις το]
Final use of εις — eis and the articular infinitive, common idiom in the papyri and Paul uses εις — eis to and the infinitive fifty times (see again in 1 Thessalonians 3:2), some final, some sub-final, some result (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 989-91). [source]
1 Thessalonians 2:16 To fill up their sins alway [εις το αναπληρωσαι αυτων τας αμαρτιας παντοτε]
Another example of εις το — eis to and the infinitive as in 1 Thessalonians 2:12. It may either be God‘s conceived plan to allow the Jews to go on and fill up (αναπληρωσαι — anaplērōsai note ανα — ana fill up full, old verb) or it may be the natural result from the continual (παντοτε — pantote) sins of the Jews. [source]
1 Thessalonians 3:3 hereunto [εις τουτο]
(εις τουτο — eis touto) to be beguiled by tribulations. We must resist. [source]
1 Thessalonians 3:5 That I might know [εις το γνωναι]
Paul‘s common idiom (1 Thessalonians 3:2), εις το — eis to and the infinitive of purpose (second aorist ingressive active of γινωσκω — ginōskō come to know). [source]
1 Thessalonians 3:13 To the end he may stablish [εις το στηριχαι]
Another example of εις — eis and the articular infinitive of purpose. Same idiom in 1 Thessalonians 3:2. From στηριζω — stērizō from στηριγχ — stērigx a support. [source]
1 Thessalonians 4:9 To love one another [εις το αγαπαιν αλληλους]
Another example of εις το — eis to and the infinitive. Only those taught of God keep on loving one another, love neighbours and even enemies as Jesus taught (Matthew 5:44). Note the use of αγαπαω — agapaō not πιλεω — phileō f0). [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:11 Build each other up [οικοδομειτε εις τον ενα]
Literally, build ye, one the one (εις — heis nominative in partitive apposition with unexpressed υμεις — humeis subject of οικοδομειτε — oikodomeite Then τον ενα — ton hena the accusative in partitive apposition with the unexpressed εαυτους — heautous or αλληλους — allēlous See the same idiom in 1 Corinthians 4:6 one in behalf of the one, εις υπερ του ενος — heis huper tou henos Build is a favourite Pauline metaphor. [source]
2 Thessalonians 1:5 To the end that you may be counted worthy [εις το καταχιωτηναι υμας]
Another example of εις το — eis to for purpose with first aorist passive infinitive from καταχιοω — kataxioō old verb, with accusative of general reference υμας — humas and followed by the genitive της βασιλειας — tēs basileias (kingdom of God). See note on 1 Thessalonians 2:12 for kingdom of God. For which ye also suffer (υπερ ης και πασχετε — huper hēs kai paschete). Ye also as well as we and the present tense means that it is still going on. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:2 To the end that [εις το]
One of Paul‘s favourite idioms for purpose, εις το — eis to and the infinitive. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:6 To the end that [εις το]
Another example of εις το — eis to and the infinitive for purpose. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:10 That they might be saved [εις το σωτηναι αυτους]
First aorist passive infinitive of σωζω — sōzō with εις το — eis to again, epexegetic purpose of the truth if they had heeded it. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:11 That they should believe a lie [εις το πιστευσαι αυτους τωι πσευδει]
Note εις το — eis to again and τωι πσευδει — tōi pseudei (the lie, the falsehood already described), a contemplated result. Note Romans 1:25 “who changed the truth of God into the lie.” [source]
2 Thessalonians 3:5 Into the love of God [εις την αγαπην του τεου]
Either subjective or objective genitive makes sense and Lightfoot pleads for both, “not only as an objective attribute of deity, but as a ruling principle in our hearts,” holding that it is “seldom possible to separate the one from the other.” Most scholars take it here as subjective, the characteristic of God. Into the patience of Christ (εις την υπομνην του Χριστου — eis tēn hupomnēn tou Christou). There is the same ambiguity here, though the subjective idea, the patience shown by Christ, is the one usually accepted rather than “the patient waiting for Christ” (objective genitive). [source]
1 Timothy 2:7 For which [εις ο]
The testimony of Jesus in his self-surrender (1 Timothy 2:6). See εις ο — eis ho in 2 Timothy 1:11. [source]
1 Timothy 6:9 Fall into [εμπιπτουσιν εις]
See note on 1 Timothy 3:6 for εν εις — en -παγιδα — eis and note on 1 Timothy 3:7 for ανοητους — pagida (snare). Foolish (βλαβερας — anoētous). See Galatians 3:1, Galatians 3:3. Hurtful Old adjective from βυτιζουσιν — blaptō to injure, here alone in N.T. Drown (βυτος — buthizousin). Late word (literary Koiné{[28928]}š) from εις ολετρον και απωλειαν — buthos (bottom), to drag to the bottom. In N.T. only here and Luke 5:7 (of the boat). Drown in the lusts with the issue “in destruction and perdition” (ολετρος — eis olethron kai apōleian). Not annihilation, but eternal punishment. The combination only here, but for απωλεια — olethros see note on 1 Thessalonians 5:3; 2 Thessalonians 1:9; 1 Corinthians 5:5 and for apōleia see note on 2 Thessalonians 2:3; Philemon 3:19. [source]
James 1:18 That we should be [εις το ειναι ημας]
Purpose clause εις το — eis to and the infinitive ειναι — einai with the accusative of general reference ημας — hēmās (as to us).A kind of first-fruits (απαρχην τινα — aparchēn tina). “Some first-fruits” (old word from απαρχομαι — aparchomai), of Christians of that age. See Romans 16:5. [source]
James 1:19 Swift to hear [ταχυς εις το ακουσαι]
For this use of εις το — eis to with the infinitive after an adjective see 1 Thessalonians 4:9. For εις το — eis to after adjectives see Romans 16:19. The picture points to listening to the word of truth (James 1:18) and is aimed against violent and disputatious speech (James 3:1-12). The Greek moralists often urge a quick and attentive ear.Slow to speak (βραδυς εις το λαλησαι — bradus eis to lalēsai). Same construction and same ingressive aorist active infinitive, slow to begin speaking, not slow while speaking.Slow to anger He drops the infinitive here, but he probably means that slowness to speak up when angry will tend to curb the anger. [source]
James 3:3 That they may obey us [εις το πειτεσται αυτους ημιν]
Present middle infinitive of πειτω — peithō with εις το — eis to as a purpose clause with the dative ημιν — hēmin after πειτεσται — peithesthai and αυτους — autous the accusative of general reference. [source]
James 4:12 One only [εις]
No “only” in the Greek, but εις — heis here excludes all others but God. [source]
James 5:3 For a testimony [εις μαρτυριον]
Common idiom as in Matthew 8:4 (use of εις — eis with accusative in predicate). [source]
1 Peter 1:11 The sufferings of Christ [τα εις Χριστον πατηματα]
“The sufferings for (destined for) Christ” like the use of εις — eis in 1 Peter 1:10 “The after these things (sufferings) glories.” The plural of δοχα — doxa is rare, but occurs in Exodus 15:11; Hosea 9:11. The glories of Christ followed the sufferings as in 1 Peter 4:13; 1 Peter 5:1, 1 Peter 5:6. [source]
1 Peter 2:5 To be a holy priesthood [εις ιερατευμα αγιον]
Late word (from ιερατευω — hierateuō to serve as priest, Luke 1:8 alone in N.T.), in lxx (Exodus 19:6), in N.T. only here and 1 Peter 2:9, either the office of priest (Hort) or an order or body of priests. At any rate, Peter has the same idea of Revelation 1:6 (ιερεις — hiereis priests) that all believers are priests (Hebrews 4:16) and can approach God directly. [source]
1 Peter 1:11 What time or what manner of time [εις τινα η ποιον καιρον]
Proper sense of ποιος — poios (qualitative interrogative) kept here as in 1 Corinthians 15:35, Romans 3:27, though it is losing its distinctive sense from τις — tis (Acts 23:34). The prophets knew what they prophesied, but not at what time the Messianic prophecies would be fulfilled.The Spirit of Christ which was in them (το εν αυτοις πνευμα Χριστου — to en autois pneuma Christou). Peter definitely asserts here that the Spirit of Jesus Christ (the Messiah) was in the Old Testament prophets, the Holy Spirit called the Spirit of Christ and the Spirit of God (Romans 8:9), who spoke to the prophets as he would speak to the apostles (John 16:14).Did point unto Imperfect active of δηλοω — dēloō to make plain, “did keep on pointing to,” though they did not clearly perceive the time.When it testified beforehand (προμαρτυρομενον — promarturomenon). Present middle participle of προμαρτυρομαι — promarturomai a late compound unknown elsewhere save in a writer of the fourteenth century (Theodorus Mech.) and now in a papyrus of the eighth. It is neuter here because πνευμα — pneuma is neuter, but this grammatical gender should not be retained as “it” in English, but should be rendered “he” (and so as to Acts 8:15). Here we have predictive prophecy concerning the Messiah, though some modern critics fail to find predictions of the Messiah in the Old Testament.The sufferings of Christ “The sufferings for (destined for) Christ” like the use of εις — eis in 1 Peter 1:10 “The after these things (sufferings) glories.” The plural of δοχα — doxa is rare, but occurs in Exodus 15:11; Hosea 9:11. The glories of Christ followed the sufferings as in 1 Peter 4:13; 1 Peter 5:1, 1 Peter 5:6. [source]
1 Peter 3:7 To the end that your prayers be not hindered [εις το μη εγκοπτεσται τας προσευχας υμων]
Purpose clause with εις το — eis to and the present passive infinitive (with negative μη — mē) of εγκοπτω — egkoptō to cut in, to interrupt, late verb (Polybius), as in Romans 15:22, etc. Very vivid to us now with our telephones and radios when people cut in on us. Προσευχας — Proseuchas (prayers) is the accusative of general reference. Husbands surely have here cause to consider why their prayers are not answered. [source]
1 Peter 2:9 A holy nation [λαος εις περιποιησιν]
Also from Exodus 19:6, but here applied, not to the national Israel, but to the spiritual Israel of believers (both Jews and Gentiles).A people for God‘s own possession (λαος περιουσιος — laos eis peripoiēsin). The idea here occurs in Exodus 19:5; Deuteronomy 7:6; Deuteronomy 14:2; Deuteronomy 26:18, where we have εις περιποιησιν — laos periousios as in Titus 2:14 (alone in the N.T.), and in Malachi 3:17 we find Περιουσιος λαος — eis peripoiēsin (for a possession). περιποιησις — Periousios laos is a people over and above the others and περιεποιησατο — peripoiēsis is a possession in a special sense (Ephesians 1:14). See Paul‘s use of οπως εχαγγειλητε — periepoiēsato in Acts 20:28. The old rendering, “a peculiar people,” had this idea of possession, for “peculiar” is from pecus (Latin for flock).That ye may shew forth Purpose clause with ινα — hopōs rather than εχαγγελλω — hina with the first aorist active subjunctive of τας αρετας — exaggellō old verb, to tell out, here alone in N.T.The excellencies (τα μεγαλεια του τεου — tas aretas). From Isaiah 43:21. Old word for any preeminence (moral, intellectual, military), often for “virtue,” but not in that sense in the O.T. or the N.T. The word has the sense of moral worth in 2 Peter 1:3, 2 Peter 1:5; Philemon 4:8; and the Apocrypha. In Isaiah (here quoted) it means praise and glory to God. So also Isaiah 42:12. See Acts 2:11 σκοτους — ta megaleia tou theou (the mighty works of God).Darkness Heathenism.His marvellous light (ταυμαστον — to thaumaston autou phōs). Christianity. For ταυμαζω — thaumaston (from thaumazō) see Matthew 21:42. For the change from heathenism to Christianity see Colossians 1:12; Ephesians 5:8-14. [source]
1 Peter 4:2 That ye no longer should live [εις το μηκετι βιωσαι]
Purpose clause with εις το — eis to (negative μη — mē) and the first aorist (for the Attic second aorist βιωναι — biōnai) active infinitive of βιοω — bioō old verb, to spend a life (from βιος — bios course of life, Luke 8:14), here only in N.T. [source]
1 Peter 3:21 But the interrogation of a good conscience toward God [αλλα συνειδησεως αγατης επερωτημα εις τεον]
Old word from επερωταω — eperōtaō (to question as in Mark 9:32; Matthew 16:1), here only in N.T. In ancient Greek it never means answer, but only inquiry. The inscriptions of the age of the Antonines use it of the Senate‘s approval after inquiry. That may be the sense here, that is, avowal of consecration to God after inquiry, having repented and turned to God and now making this public proclamation of that fact by means of baptism (the symbol of the previous inward change of heart). Thus taken, it matters little whether εις τεον — eis theon (toward God) be taken with επερωτημα — eperōtēma or συνειδησεως — suneidēseōs the resurrection of Jesus Christ For baptism is a symbolic picture of the resurrection of Christ as well as of our own spiritual renewal (Romans 6:2-6). See 1 Peter 1:3 for regeneration made possible by the resurrection of Jesus. [source]
2 Peter 3:9 To youward [εις υμας]
Προς — Pros rather than εις — eis after μακροτυμει — makrothumei in 1 Thessalonians 5:14 and επι — epi in James 5:7, etc. [source]
2 Peter 3:18 For ever [εις ημεραν αιωνος]
“Unto the day of eternity.” So Sirach 18:9f. One of the various ways of expressing eternity by the use of αιων — aiōn So εις τον αιωνα — eis ton aiōna in John 6:5; John 12:34. [source]
1 John 5:10 Believeth on [πιστευων εις]
John draws a distinction between “not believing God” See the same distinction less clearly drawn in John 6:30. See also εις την μαρτυριαν — eis tēn marturian after πεπιστευκεν — pepisteuken in this same verse and John 2:23. [source]
1 John 5:13 Unto you that believe on [τοις πιστευουσιν εις]
Dative of the articular present active participle of πιστευω — pisteuō and εις — eis as in 1 John 5:10. For this use of ονομα — onoma (name) with πιστευω — pisteuō see 1 John 3:23; John 2:23. [source]
Revelation 16:2 Into the earth [εις την γην]
This same use of εις — eis after εχεχεεν — execheen in Revelation 16:3, Revelation 16:4.It became (εγενετο — egeneto). “There came” (second aorist middle indicative of γινομαι — ginomai).A noisome and grievous sore “Bad and malignant sore.” ελκος — Helkos is old word for a suppurated wound (Latin ulcus), here, Revelation 16:11; Luke 16:21. See the sixth Egyptian plague (Exodus 9:10; Deuteronomy 28:27, Deuteronomy 28:35) and Job 2:7. The magicians were attacked in Egypt and the worshippers of Caesar here (Revelation 13:17; Revelation 14:9, Revelation 14:11; Revelation 19:20). [source]
Revelation 18:21 A strong angel [εις αγγελος ισχυρος]
Here εις — heis = a, just an indefinite article, not “one” as a numeral. [source]
Revelation 21:27 There shall in no wise enter into it [ου μη εισελτηι εις αυτην]
Double negative again with the second aorist active subjunctive of εισερχομαι — eiserchomai with εις — eis repeated. Like Isaiah 52:1; Ezekiel 44:9. [source]
Revelation 20:10 Into the lake of fire and brimstone [εις την λιμνην του πυρος και τειου]
As in Revelation 19:20 with the two beasts, as he adds, “where are also the beast and the false prophet” Return to the prophetic future of Revelation 20:7, Revelation 20:8. For βασανιζω — basanizō see Revelation 9:5; Revelation 14:10. For “day and night” (ημερας και νυκτος — hēmeras kai nuktos) see Revelation 4:8; Revelation 7:15; Revelation 12:10; Revelation 14:11. For “for ever and ever” (εις τους αιωνας τον αιωνων — eis tous aiōnas ton aiōnōn) see Revelation 1:6, Revelation 1:18; Revelation 4:9, Revelation 4:10; Revelation 5:13; Revelation 7:12; Revelation 10:6; Revelation 11:15, etc. The devil was cast down from heaven (Revelation 12:9), then imprisoned (Revelation 20:2.), now he received his final doom. [source]
Revelation 8:11 Became wormwood [εγενετο εις απσιντον]
This use of εις — eis in the predicate with γινομαι — ginomai is common in the lxx and the N.T. (Revelation 16:19; John 16:20; Acts 5:36).Of the waters (εκ των υδατων — ek tōn hudatōn). As a result of (εκ — ek) the use of the poisoned waters.Were made bitter First aorist passive indicative of πικραινω — pikrainō Old verb (from πικρος — pikros bitter), as in Revelation 10:9. In a metaphorical sense to embitter in Colossians 3:19. [source]
Revelation 9:15 For the hour and day and month and year [εις την ωραν και ημεραν και μηνα και ενιαυτον]
For this use of εις — eis with ητοιμασμενον — hētoimasmenon see 2 Timothy 2:21. All preparation over, the angels are waiting for the signal to begin. [source]

1513 Verses with G1519

Matthew 2:1
Literal: - Now Jesus having been born in Bethlehem - of Judea [the] days of Herod the king behold Magi from [the] east arrived in Jerusalem
KJV: Now  when Jesus  was born  in  Bethlehem  of Judaea  in  the days  of Herod  the king,  behold,  there came  wise men  from  the east  to  Jerusalem, 

Matthew 2:8
Literal: And having sent them to Bethlehem he said Having gone search carefully for the Child when then You shall have found [Him] bring word back to me so that I also having come may worship Him
KJV: And  he sent  them  to  Bethlehem,  and said,  Go  and search  diligently  for  the young child;  and  when  ye have found  word again,  that  I may come  and worship  him  also. 

Matthew 2:11
Literal: And having come into the house they found the Child with Mary the mother of Him having fallen down they worshiped Him having opened the treasures of them they offered to Him gifts gold frankincense myrrh
KJV: And  when they were come  into  the house,  the young child  with  Mary  his  mother,  and  fell down,  and worshipped  him:  and  when they had opened  their  treasures,  they presented  unto him  gifts;  gold,  and  frankincense,  and  myrrh. 

Matthew 2:12
Literal: And having been divinely warned in a dream not to return to Herod by another route they withdrew into the country of them
KJV: And  being warned of God  in  a dream  not  return  to  Herod,  they departed  into  their own  country  another  way. 

Matthew 2:13
Literal: Having withdrawn then of them behold an angel of [the] Lord appears in a dream - to Joseph saying Having arisen take the Child and the mother of Him flee into Egypt remain there until - I should tell you is about for Herod to seek - to destroy Him
KJV: And  when they  were departed,  behold,  the angel  of the Lord  appeareth  to Joseph  in  a dream,  saying,  Arise,  and take  the young child  and  his  mother,  and  flee  into  Egypt,  and  there  until  word:  for  Herod  will  seek  the young child  to destroy  him. 

Matthew 2:14
Literal: - And having arisen he took the Child and the mother of Him by night withdrew into Egypt
KJV: When  he arose,  he took  the young child  and  his  mother  by night,  and  departed  into  Egypt: 

Matthew 2:20
Literal: saying Having arisen take the Child and the mother of Him go into [the] land of Israel they have died for those seeking life of the Child
KJV: Saying,  Arise,  and take  the young child  and  his  mother,  and  go  into  the land  of Israel:  for  they are dead  which  sought  the young child's  life. 

Matthew 2:21
Literal: - And having arisen he took the Child and the mother of Him came into [the] land of Israel
KJV: And  he arose,  and took  the young child  and  his  mother,  and  into  the land  of Israel. 

Matthew 2:22
Literal: Having heard now that Archelaus reigns over - Judea in place of the father of him Herod he was afraid there to go having been divinely warned in a dream he withdrew into the district of Galilee
KJV: But  when he heard  that  Archelaus  did reign  Judaea  in the room  of his  father  Herod,  he was afraid  to go  thither:  notwithstanding,  being warned of God  in  a dream,  he turned aside  into  the parts  of Galilee: 

Matthew 2:23
Literal: and having come he dwelt in a city being called Nazareth so that it should be fulfilled that having been spoken through the prophets that A Nazarene He will be called
KJV: And  he came  and dwelt  in  a city  called  Nazareth:  that  it might be fulfilled  which  by  the prophets,  He shall be called  a Nazarene. 

Matthew 3:10
Literal: Already now the ax to the root of the trees is applied every therefore tree not producing fruit good is cut down and into [the] fire is thrown
KJV: And  now  also  the axe  is laid  unto  the root  of the trees:  therefore  every  tree  not  forth  good  fruit  is hewn down,  and  cast  into  the fire. 

Matthew 3:11
Literal: I indeed you baptize with water to repentance - but after me is coming mightier than I He of whom not I am fit the sandals to carry He you will baptize [the] Spirit Holy and with fire
KJV: indeed  baptize  with  water  unto  repentance:  but  he that cometh  after  mightier than  whose  shoes  I am  not  worthy  to bear:  he  shall baptize  with  the Holy  Ghost,  and  with fire: 

Matthew 3:12
Literal: whose - winnowing fork [is] in the hand of Him and He will clear the threshing floor will gather the wheat into barn the but chaff He will burn up with fire unquenchable
KJV: Whose  fan  is in  his  hand,  and  he will throughly purge  his  floor,  and  gather  his  wheat  into  the garner;  but  he will burn up  the chaff  with unquenchable  fire. 

Matthew 4:1
Literal: Then - Jesus was led up into the wilderness by the Spirit to be tempted the devil
KJV: Then  was Jesus  led up  of  the Spirit  into  the wilderness  to be tempted  of  the devil. 

Matthew 4:5
Literal: Then takes Him the devil to the holy city and sets upon the pinnacle of the temple
KJV: Then  the devil  him  up  into  the holy  city,  and  setteth  him  on  a pinnacle  of the temple, 

Matthew 4:8
Literal: Again takes Him the devil to a mountain high exceedingly and shows to Him all the kingdoms of the world the glory of them
KJV: Again,  the devil  him  up  into  an exceeding  high  mountain,  and  sheweth  him  all  the kingdoms  of the world,  and  the glory  of them; 

Matthew 4:12
Literal: Having heard now that John had been delivered up He withdrew into - Galilee
KJV: Now  had heard  that  John  was cast into prison,  he departed  into  Galilee; 

Matthew 4:13
Literal: And having left - Nazareth having come he dwelt at Capernaum which [is] on the sea-side in [the] region of Zebulun Naphtali
KJV: And  leaving  Nazareth,  he came  and dwelt  in  Capernaum,  which  is upon the sea coast,  in  the borders  of Zabulon  and  Nephthalim: 

Matthew 4:18
Literal: Walking now beside the Sea - of Galilee He saw two brothers Simon - called Peter and Andrew the brother of him casting a net into they were for fishermen
KJV: And  walking  by  the sea  of Galilee,  two  brethren,  Simon  called  Peter,  and  Andrew  his  brother,  casting  a net  into  the sea:  for  fishers. 

Matthew 4:24
Literal: And went out the news of Him into all - Syria they brought to Him all the sick having various diseases pains oppressing and being possessed by demons being epileptics paralytics He healed them
KJV: And  his  fame  went  throughout  all  Syria:  and  they brought  unto him  all  sick  people  that were taken with  divers  diseases  and  torments,  and  those which were possessed with devils,  and  those which were lunatick,  and  those that had the palsy;  and  he healed  them. 

Matthew 5:1
Literal: Having seen then the crowds He went up on the mountain and having sat down of Him came to Him the disciples
KJV: And  the multitudes,  he went up  into  a mountain:  and  when he  was set,  his  disciples  came  unto him: 

Matthew 5:13
Literal: You are the salt of the earth if however becomes tasteless with what will it be salted For nothing it is potent any longer if not having been cast out to be trampled upon by - men
KJV: the salt  of the earth:  but  if  the salt  have lost his savour,  wherewith  shall it be salted?  it is thenceforth  good  for  nothing,  to be cast  out,  to be trodden under foot  of  men. 

Matthew 5:20
Literal: I say for to you that if not shall abound your - righteousness above [that] of the scribes and Pharisees no shall you enter into the kingdom heavens
KJV: For  I say  That  righteousness  shall exceed  the righteousness of the scribes  and  Pharisees,  enter  into  the kingdom  of heaven. 

Matthew 5:22
Literal: I however say to you that everyone - being angry with the brother of him liable will be to the judgment whoever now - shall say to Raca to the Sanhedrin Fool to the hell - of fire
KJV: But  say  That  whosoever  is angry  with his  brother  in danger  of the judgment:  and  whosoever  shall say  to his  brother,  Raca,  in danger  of the council:  but  whosoever  shall say,  Thou fool,  in danger  of  hell  fire. 

Matthew 5:25
Literal: Be agreeing with accuser of you quickly while which you are with him on the way lest ever you deliver the accuser to the judge and judge officer into prison you will be cast
KJV: adversary  quickly,  whiles  in  the way  with  him;  the adversary  deliver  to the judge,  and  the judge  deliver  to the officer,  and  thou be cast  into  prison. 

Matthew 5:29
Literal: If now the eye of you - right causes to stumble you pluck out it and cast [it] from you it is better indeed for you that should perish one of the members not all the body should be cast into hell
KJV: And  if  right  eye  offend  it  out,  and  cast  it from  for  it is profitable  that  one  members  should perish,  and  not  whole  body  should be cast  into  hell. 

Matthew 5:30
Literal: And if the right of you hand causes to stumble you cut off it cast [it] from you it is better indeed for you that should perish one of the members not all the body into hell should depart
KJV: And  if  right  hand  offend  it  off,  and  cast  it from  for  it is profitable  that  one  members  should perish,  and  not  whole  body  should be cast  into  hell. 

Matthew 5:35
Literal: nor by the earth because [the] footstool it is of the feet of Him by Jerusalem [the] city it is of the great King
KJV: Nor  by  the earth;  for  his  footstool:  neither  by  Jerusalem;  for  the city  of the great  King. 

Matthew 5:39
Literal: I however say to you not to resist the evil [person] Instead whoever you shall strike on the right cheek of you turn to him also other
KJV: But  say  That ye resist  not  evil:  but  whosoever  shall smite  right  cheek,  turn  to him  the other  also. 

Matthew 6:6
Literal: You however when you pray enter into the room of you and having shut the door pray to Father the [One] in - secret the Father the [One] seeing will reward you
KJV: But  thou,  when  thou prayest,  enter  into  closet,  and  when thou hast shut  door,  pray  Father  which  is in  secret;  and  Father  which  seeth  in  secret  shall reward  openly. 

Matthew 6:13
Literal: And not lead us into temptation but deliver from - evil For yours is the kingdom power glory for the ages Amen
KJV: And  lead  not  into  temptation,  but  deliver  from  evil:  For  the kingdom,  and  the power,  and  the glory,  for  ever.  Amen. 

Matthew 6:26
Literal: Look at the birds of the air that not they sow nor do they reap do they gather into barns and the Father of you - Heavenly feeds them Not you much are more valuable than they
KJV: Behold  the fowls  of the air:  for  they sow  not,  neither  do they reap,  nor  gather  into  barns;  yet  heavenly  Father  feedeth  them.  not  much  better than  they? 

Matthew 6:30
Literal: If however the grass of the field today being [here] and tomorrow into the furnace being thrown - God thus clothes [will He] not much more you O [you] of little faith
KJV: Wherefore,  if  God  so  clothe  the grass  of the field,  which to day  and  to morrow  is cast  into  the oven,  shall he not  much  more  O ye of little faith? 

Matthew 6:34
Literal: Not therefore be anxious about things tomorrow - for will be anxious about itself Sufficient to the day [is] the trouble of it
KJV: therefore  no  thought  for  the morrow:  for  the morrow  shall take thought  for the things  of itself.  Sufficient  unto the day  is the evil  thereof. 

Matthew 7:13
Literal: Enter through the narrow gate For wide [is] the gate and broad way - leading to - destruction many are those entering through it
KJV: Enter ye in  at  the strait  gate:  for  wide  is the gate,  and  broad  is the way,  that leadeth  to  destruction,  and  many  which  go in  thereat: 

Matthew 7:14
Literal: For small [is] the gate and compressed way - leading to - life few are those finding it
KJV: Because  strait  is the gate,  and  narrow  is the way,  which  leadeth  unto  life,  and  few  that find  it. 

Matthew 7:19
Literal: Every tree not producing fruit good is cut down and into fire is thrown
KJV: Every  tree  not  forth  good  fruit  is hewn down,  and  cast  into  the fire. 

Matthew 7:21
Literal: Not everyone - saying to Me Lord will enter into the kingdom of the heavens but the [one] doing the will the Father of Me who [is] in the heavens
KJV: Not  every one  that saith  Lord,  shall enter  into  the kingdom  of heaven;  but  he that doeth  the will  Father  which is in  heaven. 

Matthew 8:4
Literal: And says to him - Jesus See that no one you tell But go yourself show to the priest offer the gift that commanded Moses for a testimony to them
KJV: And  Jesus  saith  unto him,  See  thou tell  no man;  but  go thy way,  shew  thyself  to the priest,  and  offer  the gift  that  Moses  commanded,  for  a testimony  unto them. 

Matthew 8:5
Literal: Having entered now He into Capernaum came to Him a centurion imploring Him
KJV: And  was entered  into  Capernaum,  there came  unto him  a centurion,  beseeching  him, 

Matthew 8:12
Literal: the however sons of the kingdom will be cast out into the darkness outer there will be the weeping and gnashing of the teeth
KJV: But  the children  of the kingdom  shall be cast out  into  outer  darkness:  there  weeping  and  gnashing  of teeth. 

Matthew 8:14
Literal: And having come - Jesus to the house of Peter He saw mother-in-law of him lying sick fevering
KJV: And  when Jesus  was come  into  Peter's  house,  his  wife's mother  laid,  and  sick of a fever. 

Matthew 8:18
Literal: Having seen now - Jesus a great crowd around Him He commanded to depart to the other side
KJV: Now  when Jesus  great  multitudes  about  him,  he gave commandment  to depart  unto  the other side. 

Matthew 8:23
Literal: And having entered He into the boat followed Him the disciples of Him
KJV: And  when he  was entered  into  a ship,  his  disciples  followed  him. 

Matthew 8:28
Literal: And having come He to the other side the region of the Gadarenes met Him two being possessed by demons out of the tombs coming forth violent extremely so that not was able anyone to pass by the way that
KJV: And  when he  was come  to  the other side  into  the country  there met  him  two  possessed with devils,  coming  out of  the tombs,  exceeding  fierce,  so that  no  man  might  pass  by  that  way. 

Matthew 8:31
Literal: - And the demons were begging Him saying If You cast out us send away into the herd - of pigs
KJV: So  the devils  besought  him,  saying,  If  out,  into  the herd  of swine. 

Matthew 8:32
Literal: And He said to them Go - And having gone out they went away into the pigs behold rushed all the herd down the steep bank the sea perished in the waters
KJV: And  he said  unto them,  Go.  And  when they were come out,  they went  into  the herd  of swine:  and,  behold,  the whole  herd  of swine  ran violently  down  a steep place  into  the sea,  and  perished  in  the waters. 

Matthew 8:33
Literal: Those now feeding [them] fled and having gone away into the city they related everything including the [matter] of those being possessed by demons
KJV: And  they that kept  them fled,  and  went their ways  into  the city,  and told  every thing,  and  what was befallen to the possessed of the devils. 

Matthew 8:34
Literal: And behold all the city went out to meet - Jesus having seen Him they begged [Him] that He would depart from the region of them
KJV: And,  behold,  the whole  city  came out  to  Jesus:  and  him,  they besought  him that  he would depart  out of  their  coasts. 

Matthew 9:1
Literal: And having entered into a boat He passed over came to the own city
KJV: And  he entered  into  a ship,  and passed over,  and  came  into  his own  city. 

Matthew 9:6
Literal: So that however you may know that authority has the Son - of Man on the earth to forgive sins Then He says to the paralytic Having arisen take up your - mat and go to the house of you
KJV: But  that  ye may know  that  the Son  of man  hath  power  on  earth  to forgive  sins,  (then  saith he  to the sick of the palsy,)  Arise,  take up  bed,  and  go  unto  house. 

Matthew 9:7
Literal: And having arisen he went away to the house of him
KJV: And  he arose,  and departed  to  his  house. 

Matthew 9:17
Literal: Nor pour they wine new into wineskins old if now lest are burst the wineskins and the wine is poured out wineskins are destroyed But they pour new both are preserved
KJV: Neither  do men put  new  wine  into  old  bottles:  else  the bottles  break,  and  the wine  runneth out,  and  the bottles  perish:  but  they put  new  wine  into  new  bottles,  and  both  are preserved. 

Matthew 9:23
Literal: And having come - Jesus into the house of the ruler having seen the flute players the crowd making a commotion
KJV: And  when Jesus  came  into  the ruler's  house,  and  the minstrels  and  the people  making a noise, 

Matthew 9:26
Literal: And went out the report this into all the land that
KJV: And  the fame  hereof  went abroad  into  all  that  land. 

Matthew 9:28
Literal: Having come now into the house came to Him the blind [men] and says to them - Jesus Believe you that I am able this to do They say Yes Lord
KJV: And  when he was come  into  the house,  the blind men  came  to him:  and  Jesus  saith  unto them,  Believe ye  that  I am able  to do  They said  unto him,  Yea,  Lord. 

Matthew 9:38
Literal: Beseech therefore the Lord of the harvest that He might send out workmen into the harvest of Him
KJV: Pray ye  therefore  the Lord  of the harvest,  that  he will send forth  labourers  into  his  harvest. 

Matthew 10:5
Literal: These - twelve sent forth - Jesus having instructed them saying Into [the] way of the Gentiles not go off and any city of [the] Samaritans enter
KJV: twelve  Jesus  sent forth,  and commanded  them,  saying,  Go  not  into  the way  of the Gentiles,  and  into  any city  of the Samaritans  enter ye  not: 

Matthew 10:9
Literal: Neither take along gold nor silver copper in the belts of you
KJV: Provide  neither  gold,  nor  silver,  nor  brass  in  purses, 

Matthew 10:10
Literal: nor provision-bag for [the] way nor two tunics sandals a staff worthy [is] for the workman of the provisions of him
KJV: Nor  scrip  for  your journey,  neither  two  coats,  neither  shoes,  nor  yet staves:  for  the workman  worthy  of his  meat. 

Matthew 10:11
Literal: Into whatever now - city or village you enter inquire who in it worthy is and there remain until you go forth
KJV: And  into  whatsoever  city  or  town  ye shall enter,  enquire  who  in  it  worthy;  and there  abide  till  ye go thence. 

Matthew 10:12
Literal: Entering now into the house greet it
KJV: And  when ye come  into  an house,  salute  it. 

Matthew 10:17
Literal: Beware however of - men they will deliver for you into courts and in the synagogues of them they will flog
KJV: But  beware  of  men:  for  up  to  the councils,  and  they will scourge  in  their  synagogues; 

Matthew 10:18
Literal: and before governors also kings you will be brought on account of Me for a testimony to them to the Gentiles
KJV: And  ye shall be brought  before  governors  and  kings  for my  for  a testimony  against them  and  the Gentiles. 

Matthew 10:21
Literal: Will deliver up now brother brother to death and father child will rise up children against parents will put to death them
KJV: And  the brother  shall deliver up  the brother  to  death,  and  the father  the child:  and  the children  shall rise up  against  their parents,  and  them  to be put to death. 

Matthew 10:22
Literal: And you will be hated by all on account of the name of Me the [one] however having endured to [the] end he will be saved
KJV: And  be hated  of  all  men for  name's sake:  but  he that  endureth  to  the end  shall be saved. 

Matthew 10:23
Literal: Whenever then they persecute you in the city one flee to the next Truly for I say to you no not shall you have completed the cities of Israel until - be come the Son Man
KJV: But  when  they persecute  in  city,  flee ye  into  for  verily  I say  have gone over  the cities  of Israel,  till  the Son  of man  be  come. 

Matthew 10:27
Literal: What I tell you in the darkness speak the light and in the ear you hear proclaim upon the housetops
KJV: What  I tell  in  darkness,  that speak ye  in  light:  and  what  ye hear  in  the ear,  that preach ye  upon  the housetops. 

Matthew 10:41
Literal: The [one] receiving a prophet in [the] name of a prophet [the] reward will receive and a righteous [man] of a righteous [man] the reward
KJV: He that receiveth  a prophet  in  the name  of a prophet  shall receive  a prophet's  reward;  and  he that receiveth  a righteous man  in  the name  of a righteous man  shall receive  a righteous man's  reward. 

Matthew 10:42
Literal: And whoever - shall give to drink one the little ones of these a cup of cold [water] only in [the] name of a disciple truly I say to you no not shall he lose the reward of him
KJV: And  whosoever  shall give to drink  unto one  little ones  a cup  of cold  water only  in  the name  of a disciple,  verily  I say  lose  his  reward. 

Matthew 11:7
Literal: As these now were going away began - Jesus to speak to the crowds concerning John What went you out into the wilderness to see A reed by [the] wind shaken
KJV: And  they departed,  Jesus  began  to say  unto the multitudes  concerning  John,  What  went ye  out into  the wilderness  to see?  A reed  shaken  with  the wind? 

Matthew 12:4
Literal: how he entered into the house - of God and the loaves of the presentation they ate which not lawful it was for him to eat nor for those with him if not for the priests only
KJV: How  he entered into  the house  of God,  and  did eat  the shewbread,  which  not  lawful  for him  to eat,  neither for  them which  were with him,  only  for the priests? 

Matthew 12:9
Literal: And having departed from there He went into the synagogue of them
KJV: And  when he was departed  thence,  he went  into  their  synagogue: 

Matthew 12:11
Literal: - And He said to them What will there be among you man who will have sheep one and if falls it on the Sabbaths into a pit not will he take hold of it will raise [it] up
KJV: And  he said  unto them,  What  man  among  that  shall have  one  sheep,  and  if  fall  into  a pit  on the sabbath day,  not  lay hold  on it,  and  lift it out? 

Matthew 12:18
Literal: Behold the servant of Me whom I have chosen beloved in has found delight the soul I will put the Spirit upon Him and justice to the Gentiles He will proclaim
KJV: Behold  servant,  whom  I have chosen;  beloved,  in  whom  soul  is well pleased:  I will put  spirit  upon  him,  and  he shall shew  judgment  to the Gentiles. 

Matthew 12:20
Literal: A reed bruised not He will break and a wick smoldering He will quench until - He leads to victory - justice
KJV: A bruised  reed  not  break,  and  smoking  flax  not  quench,  till  he send forth  judgment  unto  victory. 

Matthew 12:29
Literal: Or how is able anyone to enter into the house of the strong [man] and the goods of him to plunder if not first he bind the strong [man] then he will plunder
KJV: Or  else how  can  one  enter  into  a strong man's  house,  and  spoil  his  goods,  he first  bind  the strong man?  and  then  he will spoil  his  house. 

Matthew 12:41
Literal: The men of Nineveh will stand up in the judgment with the generation this and will condemn it for they repented at the preaching of Jonah behold greater than Jonah here
KJV: The men  of Nineveh  shall rise  in  judgment  with  generation,  and  shall condemn  it:  because  they repented  at  the preaching  of Jonas;  and,  behold,  a greater than  Jonas  is here. 

Matthew 12:44
Literal: Then it says To the house of me I will return from where I came out And having come it finds [it] being unoccupied and swept put in order
KJV: Then  he saith,  I will return  into  house  from whence  I came out;  and  when he is come,  he findeth  it empty,  swept,  and  garnished. 

Matthew 13:2
Literal: And were gathered together to Him crowds great so that He into a boat having entered sat down all the crowd on the shore stood
KJV: And  great  multitudes  were gathered together  unto  him,  so that  he  went  into  a ship,  and sat;  and  the whole  multitude  stood  on  the shore. 

Matthew 13:22
Literal: That which now among the thorns having been sown this is the [one] the word hearing and the care - present age of this deceit of riches choke unfruitful it becomes
KJV: He also  that received seed  among  the thorns  he that  heareth  the word;  and  the care  world,  and  the deceitfulness  of riches,  choke  the word,  and  he becometh  unfruitful. 

Matthew 13:30
Literal: Allow to grow together both until the harvest and in the time of the I will say to the harvesters Gather first the weeds bind them into bundles in order - to burn them - and the wheat gather together the barn of me
KJV: Let  both  grow together  the harvest:  and  in  the time  of harvest  I will say  to the reapers,  Gather ye together  first  the tares,  and  bind  them  in  bundles  to  burn  them:  but  gather  the wheat  into  barn. 

Matthew 13:33
Literal: Another parable spoke He to them Like is the kingdom of the heavens to leaven which having taken a woman hid in of flour measures three until of it was leavened all
KJV: Another  parable  spake he  unto them;  The kingdom  of heaven  like  unto leaven,  which  a woman  took,  and hid  in  three  measures  of meal,  till  the whole  was  leavened. 

Matthew 13:36
Literal: Then having dismissed the crowds He went into the house And came to Him the disciples of Him saying Explain to us parable of the weeds of the field
KJV: Then  the multitude  away,  and went  into  the house:  and  his  disciples  came  unto him,  saying,  the parable  of the tares  of the field. 

Matthew 13:42
Literal: and they will cast them into the furnace of the fire there will be the weeping gnashing of teeth
KJV: And  shall cast  them  into  a furnace  of fire:  there  wailing  and  gnashing  of teeth. 

Matthew 13:47
Literal: Again like is the kingdom of the heavens a dragnet having been cast into the sea and of every kind having gathered together
KJV: Again,  the kingdom  of heaven  like  unto a net,  that was cast  into  the sea,  and  gathered  of  every  kind: 

Matthew 13:48
Literal: which when it was filled having drawn up on the shore and having sat down they collected the good into vessels and bad out they cast
KJV: Which,  when  it was full,  they drew  to  shore,  and  sat down,  and gathered  the good  into  vessels,  but  cast  the bad  away. 

Matthew 13:50
Literal: and will cast them into the furnace of the fire There will be the weeping gnashing of the teeth
KJV: And  shall cast  them  into  the furnace  of fire:  there  wailing  and  gnashing  of teeth. 

Matthew 13:54
Literal: And having come into the region His [own] He was teaching them in the synagogue of them so that are astonished they are saying From where to this [man] the wisdom this the miraculous powers
KJV: And  when he was come  into  his own  country,  he taught  them  in  their  synagogue,  insomuch that  they  were astonished,  and  said,  Whence  this  wisdom,  and  these mighty works? 

Matthew 14:13
Literal: Having heard now - Jesus withdrew from there by boat to a secluded place apart Himself And having heard [of it] the crowds followed Him on foot from the towns
KJV: When  Jesus  heard  of it, he departed  thence  by  ship  into  a desert  place  apart:  and  when the people  had heard  thereof, they followed  him  on foot  out of  the cities. 

Matthew 14:15
Literal: Evening now having come came to Him the disciples saying Desolate is this place and the time already is gone by Dismiss therefore the crowds that having gone into the villages they might buy for themselves food
KJV: And  when it was  evening,  his  disciples  came  to him,  saying,  a desert  place,  and  the time  is now  past;  the multitude  away,  that  they may go  into  the villages,  and buy  themselves  victuals. 

Matthew 14:19
Literal: And having commanded the crowds to sit down on the grass having taken five loaves two fish having looked up to - heaven He spoke a blessing having broken He gave to the disciples - and the disciples crowds
KJV: And  he commanded  the multitude  to sit down  on  the grass,  and  took  the five  loaves,  and  the two  fishes,  and looking up  to  heaven,  he blessed,  and  brake,  and gave  the loaves  to his disciples,  and  the disciples  to the multitude. 

Matthew 14:22
Literal: And immediately He compelled the disciples to enter into the boat to go before Him to other side until that He would have dismissed crowds
KJV: And  straightway  constrained  his  disciples  to get  into  a ship,  and  to go before  him  unto  the other side,  while  the multitudes  away. 

Matthew 14:23
Literal: And having dismissed the crowds He went up on the mountain by Himself to pray Evening now having arrived alone He was there
KJV: And  the multitudes  away,  he went up  into  a mountain  apart  to pray:  and  when the evening  was come,  there  alone. 

Matthew 14:31
Literal: Immediately now - Jesus having stretched out the hand took hold of him and says to him [You] of little faith of why did you doubt
KJV: And  immediately  Jesus  stretched forth  his hand,  and caught  him,  and  said  unto him,  O thou of little faith,  wherefore  didst thou doubt? 

Matthew 14:32
Literal: And having entered they into the boat ceased the wind
KJV: And  when they  into  the ship,  the wind  ceased. 

Matthew 14:34
Literal: And having crossed over they came to the land of Gennesaret
KJV: And  when they were gone over,  they came  into  the land  of Gennesaret. 

Matthew 14:35
Literal: And having recognized Him the men the place of that sent to all the surrounding region that brought to Him all those sick being
KJV: And  when the men  of that  place  had knowledge  of him,  they sent out  into  all  that  country round about,  and  brought  unto him  all  that were  diseased; 

Matthew 15:11
Literal: Not what is entering into the mouth defiles the man but that going forth out of the mouth this
KJV: Not  that which goeth  into  the mouth  defileth  a man;  but  that which cometh  out of  the mouth,  defileth  a man. 

Matthew 15:14
Literal: Leave them Blind they are guides of the blind Blind now blind if they lead both into a pit will fall
KJV: them  alone:  blind  leaders  of the blind.  And  if  the blind  lead  the blind,  both  shall fall  into  the ditch. 

Matthew 15:17
Literal: Not yet understand you that everything - entering into the mouth the stomach goes and [the] sewer is cast out
KJV: understand,  that  whatsoever  entereth in  at  the mouth  goeth  into  the belly,  and  is cast out  into  the draught? 

Matthew 15:21
Literal: And having gone forth from there - Jesus withdrew to the district of Tyre Sidon
KJV: Then  Jesus  went  thence,  and departed  into  the coasts  of Tyre  and  Sidon. 

Matthew 15:24
Literal: - And answering He said Not I was sent if not to the sheep - being lost of [the] house of Israel
KJV: But  he answered  and said,  not  sent  unto  the lost  sheep  of the house  of Israel. 

Matthew 15:29
Literal: And having departed from there - Jesus went along the Sea - of Galilee having gone up on the mountain He was sitting there
KJV: And  Jesus  departed  from thence,  and came  nigh unto  the sea  of Galilee;  and  went up  into  a mountain,  and sat down  there. 

Matthew 15:39
Literal: And having dismissed the crowds He entered into the boat came to the region of Magadan
KJV: And  he sent away  the multitude,  and took  ship,  and  came  into  the coasts  of Magdala. 

Matthew 16:5
Literal: And having come the disciples to the other side they forgot bread to take
KJV: And  disciples  were come  to  the other side,  they had forgotten  to take  bread. 

Matthew 16:13
Literal: Having come then - Jesus into the district of Caesarea - Philippi He was questioning the disciples of Him saying Whom do pronounce - men to be the Son of man
KJV: When  Jesus  came  into  the coasts  of Caesarea  Philippi,  he asked  his  disciples,  saying,  Whom  do men  say  the Son  of man 

Matthew 16:21
Literal: From that time began - Jesus Christ to show to the disciples of Him that it is necessary for Him to Jerusalem to go away and many things to suffer the elders chief priests scribes to be killed on the third day to be raised
KJV: From  that time forth  began  Jesus  to shew  unto his  disciples,  how that  he  must  go  unto  Jerusalem,  and  suffer  many things  of  the elders  and  chief priests  and  scribes,  and  be killed,  and  be raised again  the third  day. 

Matthew 17:1
Literal: And after days six takes with [Him] - Jesus - Peter James John the brother of him brings up them into a mountain high by themselves
KJV: And  after  six  days  Jesus  taketh  Peter,  James,  and  John  his  brother,  and  them  up  into  an high  mountain  apart, 

Matthew 17:15
Literal: and saying Lord have mercy on my - son for he is epileptic miserably suffers often for he falls into the fire water
KJV: Lord,  have mercy  son:  for  he is lunatick,  and  sore  vexed:  for  ofttimes  he falleth  into  the fire,  and  oft  into  the water. 

Matthew 17:22
Literal: Were abiding now they in - Galilee said to them - Jesus Is about the Son - of Man to be betrayed into