The Meaning of Titus 2:13 Explained

Titus 2:13

KJV: Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;

YLT: waiting for the blessed hope and manifestation of the glory of our great God and Saviour Jesus Christ,

Darby: awaiting the blessed hope and appearing of the glory of our great God and Saviour Jesus Christ;

ASV: looking for the blessed hope and appearing of the glory of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;

What does Titus 2:13 Mean?

Study Notes

Saviour
.
salvation
The Heb. and (Greek - ἀλεκτοροφωνία , safety, preservation, healing, and soundness). Salvation is the great inclusive word of the Gospel, gathering into itself all the redemptive acts and processes: as justification, redemption, grace, propitiation, imputation, forgiveness, sanctification, and glorification. Salvation is in three tenses:
(1) The believer has been saved from the guilt and penalty of sin Luke 7:50 ; 1 Corinthians 1:18 ; 2 Corinthians 2:15 ; Ephesians 2:5 ; Ephesians 2:8 ; 2 Timothy 1:9 and is safe.
(2) the believer is being saved from the habit and dominion of sin Romans 6:14 ; Philippians 1:19 ; Philippians 2:12 ; Philippians 2:13 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:13 ; Romans 8:2 ; Galatians 2:19 ; Galatians 2:20 ; 2 Corinthians 3:18 .
(3) The believer is to be saved in the sense of entire conformity to Christ. Romans 13:11 ; Hebrews 10:36 ; 1 Peter 1:5 ; 1 John 3:2 . Salvation is by grace through faith, is a free gift, and wholly without works; Romans 3:27 ; Romans 3:28 ; Romans 4:1-8 ; Romans 6:23 ; Ephesians 2:8 . The divine order is: first salvation, then works; Ephesians 2:9 ; Ephesians 2:10 ; Titus 3:5-8 .

Verse Meaning

The blessed hope of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ"s appearing in glory at the Rapture also motivates the sensitive Christian to honor God by his or her behavior now. [1] The Greek verb prosdechomenoi ("looking for") is in the present tense indicating that this waiting should be our characteristic attitude, always ready to welcome the returning Lord. We do not want to feel ashamed when we meet Him face to face ( 1 John 2:28; 1 John 3:3). In the Greek text one article, "the," introduces both "blessed hope" and "glorious appearing," suggesting that Paul was viewing one event as having two aspects. The blessed hope is the glorious appearing of our Savior.
"In the New Testament hope does not indicate merely what is wished for but what is assured." [2]
"In light of the concept of the imminent coming of Christ and the fact that the New Testament does teach His imminent coming, we can conclude that the Pretribulation Rapture view is the only view of the Rapture of the church that comfortably fits the New Testament teaching of the imminent coming of Christ. It is the only view that can honestly say that Christ could return at any moment, because it alone teaches that Christ will come to rapture the church before the70th week of Daniel 9 or the Tribulation period begins and that nothing else must happen before His return." [3]
"Paul . . . does not ask us to look for the Tribulation, or the Antichrist, or for persecution and martyrdom, or for death, but for the return of Christ. If any of these events must precede the Rapture, then how can we help looking for them rather than the Lord"s coming? Such a view of the coming of the Lord can at best only induce a very general interest in the "blessed hope."" [4]
"The unusual phrase "the great God," found only here in the New Testament, is best accounted for as a Christological application of an Old Testament description of God." [5]
In other words, Paul described the appearing and glory of one Person, our great God and Savior Jesus Christ. This is another of the passages that clearly states that Jesus Christ is God (cf. John 1:1; John 1:18 [6]; John 20:28; Romans 9:5; Hebrews 1:8-13; 2 Peter 1:1; and possibly 1 John 5:20). [7]

Context Summary

Titus 2:9-15 - How We May "adorn The Doctrine"
The servants addressed in this tender and priceless paragraph were household slaves, employed in the most menial drudgery, but they were taught that even they might adorn the Gospel as jewels adorn the brow of beauty. Their holy lives might display and set forth its loveliness. To please one's superiors, in all things so far as our loyalty to Christ permits, is to commend Christ to our households, and win His approval. The grace of God has ever offered salvation, but in Jesus it was brought to our doors. In its first appearance, it came to teach; in its second appearance, it will bring us glory. Have we sat sufficiently long in the school of grace, that our gentle Teacher may instruct us how to live? It must be soberly in regard to ourselves, righteously toward others, and godly toward God. And we cannot realize any one of these unless we resolutely deny ungodliness and worldly lusts. This was the aim and purpose of Jesus in coming to die for us. He wanted to redeem us from all iniquity, purify us as His own, and use us in all manner of good works. It is a solemn question whether that supreme purpose has been realized in our own experience. If not, why not? [source]

Chapter Summary: Titus 2

1  Directions given unto Titus both for his doctrine and life
10  Of the duty of servants, and in general of all Christians

Greek Commentary for Titus 2:13

Looking for [προσδεχομενοι]
Present middle participle of προσδεχομαι — prosdechomai old verb, the one used of Simeon (Luke 2:25) and others (Luke 2:38) who were looking for the Messiah. [source]
The blessed hope and appearing of the glory [την μακαριαν ελπιδα και επιπανειαν της δοχης]
The word επιπανεια — epiphaneia (used by the Greeks of the appearance of the gods, from επιπανησ επιπαινω — epiphanēsεπεπανη — epiphainō) occurs in 2 Timothy 1:10 of the Incarnation of Christ, the first Epiphany (like the verb επιπανεια — epephanē Titus 2:11), but here of the second Epiphany of Christ or the second coming as in 1 Timothy 6:14; 2 Timothy 4:1, 2 Timothy 4:8. In 2 Thessalonians 2:8 both παρουσια — epiphaneia and του μεγαλου τεου και σωτηρος Ιησου Χριστου — parousia (the usual word) occur together of the second coming. Of our great God and Saviour Jesus Christ (τεου — tou megalou theou kai sōtēros Iēsou Christou). This is the necessary meaning of the one article with σωτηρος — theou and Χριστου Ιησου — sōtēros just as in 2 Peter 1:1, 2 Peter 1:11. See Robertson, Grammar, p. 786. Westcott and Hort read Christou Iēsou f0). [source]
Of our great God and Saviour Jesus Christ [τεου]
This is the necessary meaning of the one article with σωτηρος — theou and Χριστου Ιησου — sōtēros just as in 2 Peter 1:1, 2 Peter 1:11. See Robertson, Grammar, p. 786. Westcott and Hort read Christou Iēsou f0). [source]
Looking for [προσδεχόμενοι]
In Pastorals only here. Comp. Mark 15:43; Luke 2:25; Luke 12:36. In this sense not in Paul. Primarily, to receive to one's self, admit, accept. So Luke 15:2; Romans 16:2; Philemon 2:29. That which is accepted in faith, is awaited expectantly. [source]
That blessed hope [τὴν μακαρίαν ἐλπίδα]
The phrase N.T.o Μακάριος blessedvery often in the Gospels. See on Matthew 5:3. In Pastorals, with the exception of this passage, always of God. In Paul, only of men, and so usually in the Gospels. Ἑλπίδα hopethe object of hope. Why the hope is called blessed, appears from 2 Timothy 4:8; Philemon 3:20, etc. Comp. Judges 1:21, and 1 Peter 1:13. [source]
And the glorious appearing [καὶ ἐπιφάνειαν τῆς δόξης]
Καὶ is explanatory, introducing the definition of the character of the thing hoped for. Looking for the object of hope, even the appearing, etc. Glorious appearing is a specimen of the vicious hendiadys by which the force of so many passages has been impaired or destroyed in translation. Rend. appearing of the glory. [source]
Of the great God and our Savior Jesus Christ [τοῦ μεγάλου θεοῦ καὶ σωτῆρος ἡμῶν Χριστοῦ Ἱησοῦ]
For Jesus Christ rend. Christ Jesus. Μέγας greatwith God, N.T.obut often in lxx. According to A.V. two persons are indicated, God and Christ. Revelations with others rend. of our great God and Savior Christ Jesus, thus indicating one person, and asserting the deity of Christ. I adopt the latter, although the arguments and authorities in favor of the two renderings are very evenly balanced. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Titus 2:13

John 4:42 Not because of thy speaking [ουκετι δια την σην λαλιαν]
“No longer because of thy talk,” good and effective as that was. Λαλια — Lalia (cf. λαλεω — laleō) is talk, talkativeness, mode of speech, one‘s vernacular, used by Jesus of his own speech (John 8:43). We have heard Perfect active indicative of ακουω — akouō their abiding experience. For ourselves Just “ourselves.” The Saviour of the world See Matthew 1:21 for σωτηρ — sōseiused of Jesus by the angel Gabriel. John applies the term sōtēr to Jesus again in 1 John 4:14. Jesus had said to the woman that salvation is of the Jews (John 4:22). He clearly told the Samaritans during these two days that he was the Messiah as he had done to the woman (John 4:26) and explained that to mean Saviour of Samaritans as well as Jews. Sanday thinks that probably John puts this epithet of Saviour in the mouth of the Samaritans, but adds: “At the same time it is possible that such an epithet might be employed by them merely as synonymous with Messiah.” But why “merely”? Was it not natural for these Samaritans who took Jesus as their “Saviour,” Jew as he was, to enlarge the idea to the whole world? Bernard has this amazing statement on John 4:42: “That in the first century Messiah was given the title sōtēr is not proven.” The use of “saviour and god” for Ptolemy in the third century b.c. is well known. “The ample materials collected by Magie show that the full title of honour, Saviour of the world, with which St. John adorns the Master, was bestowed with sundry variations in the Greek expression on Julius Caesar, Augustus, Claudius, Vespasian, Titus, Trajan, Hadrian, and other Emperors in inscriptions in the Hellenistic East” (Deissmann, Light, etc., p. 364). Perhaps Bernard means that the Jews did not call Messiah Saviour. But what of it? The Romans so termed their emperors and the New Testament so calls Christ (Luke 2:11; John 4:42; Acts 5:31; Acts 3:23; Philemon 3:20; Ephesians 5:23; Titus 1:4; Titus 2:13; Titus 3:6; 2 Timothy 1:10; 2 Peter 1:1, 2 Peter 1:11; 2 Peter 2:20; 2 Peter 3:2, 2 Peter 3:18). All these are writings of the first century a.d. The Samaritan villagers rise to the conception that he was the Saviour of the world. [source]
John 4:42 We have heard [ακηκοαμεν]
Perfect active indicative of ακουω — akouō their abiding experience. For ourselves Just “ourselves.” The Saviour of the world See Matthew 1:21 for σωτηρ — sōseiused of Jesus by the angel Gabriel. John applies the term sōtēr to Jesus again in 1 John 4:14. Jesus had said to the woman that salvation is of the Jews (John 4:22). He clearly told the Samaritans during these two days that he was the Messiah as he had done to the woman (John 4:26) and explained that to mean Saviour of Samaritans as well as Jews. Sanday thinks that probably John puts this epithet of Saviour in the mouth of the Samaritans, but adds: “At the same time it is possible that such an epithet might be employed by them merely as synonymous with Messiah.” But why “merely”? Was it not natural for these Samaritans who took Jesus as their “Saviour,” Jew as he was, to enlarge the idea to the whole world? Bernard has this amazing statement on John 4:42: “That in the first century Messiah was given the title sōtēr is not proven.” The use of “saviour and god” for Ptolemy in the third century b.c. is well known. “The ample materials collected by Magie show that the full title of honour, Saviour of the world, with which St. John adorns the Master, was bestowed with sundry variations in the Greek expression on Julius Caesar, Augustus, Claudius, Vespasian, Titus, Trajan, Hadrian, and other Emperors in inscriptions in the Hellenistic East” (Deissmann, Light, etc., p. 364). Perhaps Bernard means that the Jews did not call Messiah Saviour. But what of it? The Romans so termed their emperors and the New Testament so calls Christ (Luke 2:11; John 4:42; Acts 5:31; Acts 3:23; Philemon 3:20; Ephesians 5:23; Titus 1:4; Titus 2:13; Titus 3:6; 2 Timothy 1:10; 2 Peter 1:1, 2 Peter 1:11; 2 Peter 2:20; 2 Peter 3:2, 2 Peter 3:18). All these are writings of the first century a.d. The Samaritan villagers rise to the conception that he was the Saviour of the world. [source]
John 4:42 For ourselves [αυτοι]
Just “ourselves.” The Saviour of the world See Matthew 1:21 for σωτηρ — sōseiused of Jesus by the angel Gabriel. John applies the term sōtēr to Jesus again in 1 John 4:14. Jesus had said to the woman that salvation is of the Jews (John 4:22). He clearly told the Samaritans during these two days that he was the Messiah as he had done to the woman (John 4:26) and explained that to mean Saviour of Samaritans as well as Jews. Sanday thinks that probably John puts this epithet of Saviour in the mouth of the Samaritans, but adds: “At the same time it is possible that such an epithet might be employed by them merely as synonymous with Messiah.” But why “merely”? Was it not natural for these Samaritans who took Jesus as their “Saviour,” Jew as he was, to enlarge the idea to the whole world? Bernard has this amazing statement on John 4:42: “That in the first century Messiah was given the title sōtēr is not proven.” The use of “saviour and god” for Ptolemy in the third century b.c. is well known. “The ample materials collected by Magie show that the full title of honour, Saviour of the world, with which St. John adorns the Master, was bestowed with sundry variations in the Greek expression on Julius Caesar, Augustus, Claudius, Vespasian, Titus, Trajan, Hadrian, and other Emperors in inscriptions in the Hellenistic East” (Deissmann, Light, etc., p. 364). Perhaps Bernard means that the Jews did not call Messiah Saviour. But what of it? The Romans so termed their emperors and the New Testament so calls Christ (Luke 2:11; John 4:42; Acts 5:31; Acts 3:23; Philemon 3:20; Ephesians 5:23; Titus 1:4; Titus 2:13; Titus 3:6; 2 Timothy 1:10; 2 Peter 1:1, 2 Peter 1:11; 2 Peter 2:20; 2 Peter 3:2, 2 Peter 3:18). All these are writings of the first century a.d. The Samaritan villagers rise to the conception that he was the Saviour of the world. [source]
John 4:42 The Saviour of the world [ο σωτηρ του κοσμου]
See Matthew 1:21 for σωτηρ — sōseiused of Jesus by the angel Gabriel. John applies the term sōtēr to Jesus again in 1 John 4:14. Jesus had said to the woman that salvation is of the Jews (John 4:22). He clearly told the Samaritans during these two days that he was the Messiah as he had done to the woman (John 4:26) and explained that to mean Saviour of Samaritans as well as Jews. Sanday thinks that probably John puts this epithet of Saviour in the mouth of the Samaritans, but adds: “At the same time it is possible that such an epithet might be employed by them merely as synonymous with Messiah.” But why “merely”? Was it not natural for these Samaritans who took Jesus as their “Saviour,” Jew as he was, to enlarge the idea to the whole world? Bernard has this amazing statement on John 4:42: “That in the first century Messiah was given the title sōtēr is not proven.” The use of “saviour and god” for Ptolemy in the third century b.c. is well known. “The ample materials collected by Magie show that the full title of honour, Saviour of the world, with which St. John adorns the Master, was bestowed with sundry variations in the Greek expression on Julius Caesar, Augustus, Claudius, Vespasian, Titus, Trajan, Hadrian, and other Emperors in inscriptions in the Hellenistic East” (Deissmann, Light, etc., p. 364). Perhaps Bernard means that the Jews did not call Messiah Saviour. But what of it? The Romans so termed their emperors and the New Testament so calls Christ (Luke 2:11; John 4:42; Acts 5:31; Acts 3:23; Philemon 3:20; Ephesians 5:23; Titus 1:4; Titus 2:13; Titus 3:6; 2 Timothy 1:10; 2 Peter 1:1, 2 Peter 1:11; 2 Peter 2:20; 2 Peter 3:2, 2 Peter 3:18). All these are writings of the first century a.d. The Samaritan villagers rise to the conception that he was the Saviour of the world. [source]
Acts 20:28 With his own blood [δια]
Through the agency of (του τεου — dia) his own blood. Whose blood? If tou theou (Aleph B Vulg.) is correct, as it is, then Jesus is here called “God” who shed his own blood for the flock. It will not do to say that Paul did not call Jesus God, for we have Romans 9:5; Colossians 2:9; Titus 2:13 where he does that very thing, besides Colossians 1:15-20; Philemon 2:5-11. [source]
Acts 24:14 Which these themselves also look for [ην και αυτοι ουτοι προσδεχονται]
Probably with a gesture towards his accusers. He does not treat them all as Sadducees. See note on Titus 2:13 for similar use of the verb (προσδεχομενοι την μακαριαν ελπιδα — prosdechomenoi tēn makarian elpida looking for the happy hope). [source]
Acts 2:20 Before the day of the Lord come, that great and notable day [πριν ελτειν ημεραν κυριου την μεγαλην και επιπανη]
The use of πριν — prin with the infinitive and the accusative of general reference is a regular Greek idiom. The use of the adjectives with the article is also good Greek, though the article is not here repeated as in Acts 1:25. The Day of the Lord is a definite conception without the article. Notable (επιπανη — epiphanē) is the same root as epiphany (επιπανεια — epiphaneia) used of the Second Coming of Christ (2 Thessalonians 2:8; 1 Timothy 6:14; 2 Timothy 4:1; Titus 2:13). It translates here the Hebrew word for “terrible.” In the Epistles the Day of the Lord is applied (Knowling) to the Coming of Christ for judgment (1 Thessalonians 5:2; 1 Corinthians 1:8; 2 Corinthians 1:14; Philemon 1:10). [source]
Acts 20:28 To all the flock [παντι τωι ποιμνιωι]
Contracted form of ποιμενιον ποιμνη — poimenion ̂ poimnē (John 10:16) already in Luke 12:32 and also in Acts 20:29; 1 Peter 5:2, 1 Peter 5:3. Common in old Greek. Hath made (ετετο — etheto). Did make, second aorist middle indicative of τιτημι — tithēmi did appoint. Paul evidently believed that the Holy Spirit calls and appoints ministers. Bishops The same men termed elders in Acts 20:17 which see. To shepherd (ποιμαινειν — poimainein). Present active infinitive of purpose of ποιμαινω — poimainō old verb to feed or tend the flock (ποιμνη ποιμνιον — poimnēποιμην — poimnion), to act as shepherd (βοσκε — poimēn). These ministers are thus in Paul‘s speech called elders (Acts 20:17), bishops (Acts 20:28), and shepherds (Acts 20:28). Jesus had used this very word to Peter (John 21:16, twice την εκκλησιαν του τεου — boske feed, Acts 21:15, Acts 21:17) and Peter will use it in addressing fellow-elders (1 Peter 5:2) with memories, no doubt of the words of Jesus to him. The “elders” were to watch over as “bishops” and “tend and feed as shepherds” the flock. Jesus is termed “the shepherd and bishop of your souls” in 1 Peter 2:25 and “the great Shepherd of the sheep” in Hebrews 13:20. Jesus called himself “the good Shepherd” in John 10:11. The church of God The correct text, not “the church of the Lord” or “the church of the Lord and God” (Robertson, Introduction to Textual Criticism of the N.T., p. 189). He purchased (περιποιεω — periepoiēsato). First aorist middle of περιποιησιν — peripoieō old verb to reserve, to preserve (for or by oneself, in the middle). In the N.T. only in Luke Luke 17:33; Acts 20:28; 1 Timothy 3:13. The substantive δια του αιματος του ιδιου — peripoiēsin (preservation, possession) occurs in 1 Peter 2:9 (“a peculiar people” = a people for a possession) and in Ephesians 1:14. With his own blood Through the agency of (του τεου — dia) his own blood. Whose blood? If tou theou (Aleph B Vulg.) is correct, as it is, then Jesus is here called “God” who shed his own blood for the flock. It will not do to say that Paul did not call Jesus God, for we have Romans 9:5; Colossians 2:9; Titus 2:13 where he does that very thing, besides Colossians 1:15-20; Philemon 2:5-11. [source]
Acts 20:28 Bishops [επισκοπους]
The same men termed elders in Acts 20:17 which see. To shepherd (ποιμαινειν — poimainein). Present active infinitive of purpose of ποιμαινω — poimainō old verb to feed or tend the flock (ποιμνη ποιμνιον — poimnēποιμην — poimnion), to act as shepherd (βοσκε — poimēn). These ministers are thus in Paul‘s speech called elders (Acts 20:17), bishops (Acts 20:28), and shepherds (Acts 20:28). Jesus had used this very word to Peter (John 21:16, twice την εκκλησιαν του τεου — boske feed, Acts 21:15, Acts 21:17) and Peter will use it in addressing fellow-elders (1 Peter 5:2) with memories, no doubt of the words of Jesus to him. The “elders” were to watch over as “bishops” and “tend and feed as shepherds” the flock. Jesus is termed “the shepherd and bishop of your souls” in 1 Peter 2:25 and “the great Shepherd of the sheep” in Hebrews 13:20. Jesus called himself “the good Shepherd” in John 10:11. The church of God The correct text, not “the church of the Lord” or “the church of the Lord and God” (Robertson, Introduction to Textual Criticism of the N.T., p. 189). He purchased (περιποιεω — periepoiēsato). First aorist middle of περιποιησιν — peripoieō old verb to reserve, to preserve (for or by oneself, in the middle). In the N.T. only in Luke Luke 17:33; Acts 20:28; 1 Timothy 3:13. The substantive δια του αιματος του ιδιου — peripoiēsin (preservation, possession) occurs in 1 Peter 2:9 (“a peculiar people” = a people for a possession) and in Ephesians 1:14. With his own blood Through the agency of (του τεου — dia) his own blood. Whose blood? If tou theou (Aleph B Vulg.) is correct, as it is, then Jesus is here called “God” who shed his own blood for the flock. It will not do to say that Paul did not call Jesus God, for we have Romans 9:5; Colossians 2:9; Titus 2:13 where he does that very thing, besides Colossians 1:15-20; Philemon 2:5-11. [source]
Acts 20:28 The church of God [περιεποιησατο]
The correct text, not “the church of the Lord” or “the church of the Lord and God” (Robertson, Introduction to Textual Criticism of the N.T., p. 189). He purchased (περιποιεω — periepoiēsato). First aorist middle of περιποιησιν — peripoieō old verb to reserve, to preserve (for or by oneself, in the middle). In the N.T. only in Luke Luke 17:33; Acts 20:28; 1 Timothy 3:13. The substantive δια του αιματος του ιδιου — peripoiēsin (preservation, possession) occurs in 1 Peter 2:9 (“a peculiar people” = a people for a possession) and in Ephesians 1:14. With his own blood Through the agency of (του τεου — dia) his own blood. Whose blood? If tou theou (Aleph B Vulg.) is correct, as it is, then Jesus is here called “God” who shed his own blood for the flock. It will not do to say that Paul did not call Jesus God, for we have Romans 9:5; Colossians 2:9; Titus 2:13 where he does that very thing, besides Colossians 1:15-20; Philemon 2:5-11. [source]
Acts 24:14 After the Way [κατα την οδον]
This word Paul had already applied to Christianity (Acts 22:4). He prefers it to “sect” Paul claims Christianity to be the real (whole, catholic) Judaism, not a “sect” of it. But he will show that Christianity is not a deviation from Judaism, but the fulfilment of it (Page) as he has already shown in Galatians 3; Romans 9. So serve I the God of our fathers (ουτως λατρευω τωι πατρωιωι τεωι — houtōs latreuō tōi patrōiōi theōi). Paul has not stretched the truth at all. He has confirmed the claim made before the Sanhedrin that he is a spiritual Pharisee in the truest sense (Acts 23:6). He reasserts his faith in all the law and the prophets, holding to the Messianic hope. A curious “heretic” surely! Which these themselves also look for Probably with a gesture towards his accusers. He does not treat them all as Sadducees. See note on Titus 2:13 for similar use of the verb (προσδεχομενοι την μακαριαν ελπιδα — prosdechomenoi tēn makarian elpida looking for the happy hope). [source]
Romans 3:23 The glory of God [τῆς δόξης τοῦ Θεοῦ]
Interpretations vary greatly. The glory of personal righteousness; that righteousness which God judges to be glory; the image of God in man; the glorying or boasting of righteousness before God; the approbation of God; the state of future glory. The dominant meanings of δόξα in classical Greek are notion, opinion, conjecture, repute. See on Revelation 1:6. In biblical usage: 1. Recognition, honor, Philemon 1:11; 1 Peter 1:7. It is joined with τιμή honor 1 Timothy 1:17; Hebrews 2:7, Hebrews 2:9; 2 Peter 1:17. Opposed to ἀτιμὶα dishonor 1 Corinthians 11:14, 1 Corinthians 11:15; 1 Corinthians 15:43; 2 Corinthians 6:8. With ζητέω toseek, 1 Thessalonians 2:6; John 5:44; John 7:18. With λαμβάνω toreceive, John 5:41, John 5:44. With δίδωμι togive, Luke 17:18; John 9:24. In the ascriptive phrase glory be to, Luke 2:14, and ascriptions in the Epistles. Compare Luke 14:10. 2. The glorious appearance which attracts the eye, Matthew 4:8; Luke 4:6; Luke 12:27. Hence parallel with εἰκών image μορφή form ὁμοίωμα likeness εἶδος appearancefigure, Romans 1:23; Psalm 17:15; Numbers 12:8. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The glory of God is used of the aggregate of the divine attributes and coincides with His self-revelation, Exodus 33:22; compare πρόσωπον face Exodus 33:23. Hence the idea is prominent in the redemptive revelation (Isaiah 60:3; Romans 6:4; Romans 5:2). It expresses the form in which God reveals Himself in the economy of salvation (Romans 9:23; 1 Timothy 1:11; Ephesians 1:12). It is the means by which the redemptive work is carried on; for instance, in calling, 2 Peter 1:3; in raising up Christ and believers with Him to newness of life, Romans 6:4; in imparting strength to believers, Ephesians 3:16; Colossians 1:11; as the goal of Christian hope, Romans 5:2; Romans 8:18, Romans 8:21; Titus 2:13. It appears prominently in the work of Christ - the outraying of the Father's glory (Hebrews 1:3), especially in John. See John 1:14; John 2:11, etc. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The sense of the phrase here is: they are coming short of the honor or approbation which God bestows. The point under discussion is the want of righteousness. Unbelievers, or mere legalists, do not approve themselves before God by the righteousness which is of the law. They come short of the approbation which is extended only to those who are justified by faith. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

Romans 9:5 Christ [ο Χριστος]
The Messiah. As concerning the flesh (το κατα σαρκα — to kata sarka). Accusative of general reference, “as to the according to the flesh.” Paul limits the descent of Jesus from the Jews to his human side as he did in Romans 1:3. Who is over all, God blessed for ever A clear statement of the deity of Christ following the remark about his humanity. This is the natural and the obvious way of punctuating the sentence. To make a full stop after σαρκα — sarka (or colon) and start a new sentence for the doxology is very abrupt and awkward. See note on Acts 20:28 and note on Titus 2:13 for Paul‘s use of τεος — theos applied to Jesus Christ. [source]
Romans 9:5 Who is over all, God blessed for ever [ο ον επι παντων τεος ευλογητος]
A clear statement of the deity of Christ following the remark about his humanity. This is the natural and the obvious way of punctuating the sentence. To make a full stop after σαρκα — sarka (or colon) and start a new sentence for the doxology is very abrupt and awkward. See note on Acts 20:28 and note on Titus 2:13 for Paul‘s use of τεος — theos applied to Jesus Christ. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:7 Waiting for the revelation [απεκδεχομενους την αποκαλυπσιν]
This double compound is late and rare outside of Paul (1 Corinthians 1:7; Galatians 5:5; Romans 8:19, Romans 8:23, Romans 8:25; Philemon 3:20), 1 Peter 3:20; Hebrews 9:28. It is an eager expectancy of the second coming of Christ here termed revelation like the eagerness in προσδεχομενοι — prosdechomenoi in Titus 2:13 for the same event. “As if that attitude of expectation were the highest posture that can be attained here by the Christian” (F.W. Robertson). [source]
1 Corinthians 8:6 Of whom [εχ ου]
As the source (εχ — ex) of the universe (τα παντα — ta panta as in Romans 11:36; Colossians 1:16.) and also our goal is God (εις αυτον — eis auton) as in Romans 11:36 where δι αυτου — di' autou is added whereas here δι ου — di' hou (through whom) and δι αυτου — di' autou (through him) point to Jesus Christ as the intermediate agent in creation as in Colossians 1:15-20; John 1:3. Here Paul calls Jesus Lord (Κυριος — Kurios) and not God (τεος — theos), though he does apply that word to him in Romans 9:5; Titus 2:13; Colossians 2:9; Acts 20:28. [source]
1 Corinthians 8:6 God [τεος]
(τεος — theos), though he does apply that word to him in Romans 9:5; Titus 2:13; Colossians 2:9; Acts 20:28. [source]
Galatians 5:5 The hope of righteousness [ἐπίδα δικαιοσύνης]
Hope for the object of hope, as Romans 8:24; Colossians 1:5; Hebrews 6:18; Titus 2:13. The phrase means that good which righteousness causes us to hope for. Comp. hope of the calling (Ephesians 1:18; Ephesians 4:4): hope of the gospel (Colossians 1:23). [source]
Colossians 1:5 For the hope [διὰ τὴν ἐλπίδα]
The A.V. connects with we give thanks (Colossians 1:3). But the two are too far apart, and Paul's introductory thanksgiving is habitually grounded on the spiritual condition of his readers, not on something objective. See Romans 1:8; 1 Corinthians 1:4; Ephesians 1:15. Better connect with what immediately precedes, love which ye have, and render as Rev., because of the hope, etc. Faith works by love, and the ground of their love is found in the hope set before them. Compare Romans 8:24. The motive is subordinate, but legitimate. “The hope laid up in heaven is not the deepest reason or motive for faith and love, but both are made more vivid when it is strong. It is not the light at which their lamps are lit, but it is the odorous oil which feeds their flame” (Maclaren). Hope. See on 1 Peter 1:3. In the New Testament the word signifies both the sentiment of hope and the thing hoped for. Here the latter. Compare Titus 2:13; Galatians 5:5; Hebrews 6:18; also Romans 8:24, where both meanings appear. Lightfoot observes that the sense oscillates between the subjective feeling and the objective realization. The combination of faith, hope, and love is a favorite one with Paul. See 1 Thessalonians 1:3; 1 Corinthians 13:13; Romans 5:1-5; Romans 12:6-12. [source]
1 Thessalonians 2:12 Worthy of God [ἀξίως θεοῦ]
Better worthily. For ἀξίως comp. lxx, Wisd. 7:15; 16:1; Luke href="/desk/?q=lu+6:20&sr=1">Luke 6:20. Δόξα gloryis not used in N.T. in its primary, classical sense of opinion or notion. It signifies reputation, John 12:43; Romans 2:7, Romans 2:10: brightness or splendor, Acts 22:11; Romans 9:4; 1 Corinthians 15:40. Glory of God expresses the sum total of the divine perfections. The idea is prominent in redemptive revelation: see Isaiah 60:1; Romans 5:2; Romans 6:4. It expresses the form in which God reveals himself in the economy of salvation: see Romans 9:23; Ephesians 1:12; 1 Timothy 1:11. It is the means by which the redemptive work is carried on: see 2 Peter 1:3; Romans 6:4; Ephesians 3:16; Colossians 1:11. It is the goal of Christian hope: see Romans 5:2; Romans 8:18, Romans 8:21; Titus 2:13. [source]
1 Thessalonians 1:3 Labour of love [του κοπου της αγαπης]
Note article with both substantives. Here again του κοπου — tou kopou is the genitive the object of μνημονευοντες — mnēmoneuontes while της αγαπης — tēs agapēs is the descriptive genitive characterizing the “labour” or “toil” more exactly. Κοπος — Kopos is from κοπτω — koptō to cut, to lash, to beat the bread, to toil. In Revelation 14:13 the distinction is drawn between κοπου — kopou (toil) from which the saints rest and εργα — erga (works, activities) which follow with them into heaven. So here it is the labour that love prompts, assuming gladly the toil. Αγαπη — Agapē is one of the great words of the N.T. (Milligan) and no certain example has yet been found in the early papyri or the inscriptions. It occurs in the Septuagint in the higher sense as with the sensuous associations. The Epistle of Aristeas calls love The New Testament never uses the word ερως — erōs (lust). Patience of hope (της υπομονης της ελπιδος — tēs hupomonēs tēs elpidos). Note the two articles again and the descriptive genitive της ελπιδος — tēs elpidos It is patience marked by hope, “the endurance inspired by hope” (Frame), yes, and sustained by hope in spite of delays and set-backs. υπομονη — Hupomonē is an old word (υπο μενω — hupoαγαπη — menō to remain under), but it “has come like εργου κοποσ υπομονη — agapē to be closely associated with a distinctively Christian virtue” (Milligan). The same order as here του Κυριου ημων Ιησου Χριστου — ergouελπιδος — koposεμπροστεν του τεου και πατρος ημων — hupomone4) appears in Revelation 2:2 and Lightfoot considers it” an ascending scale as practical proofs of self-sacrifice.” The church in Thessalonica was not old, but already they were called upon to exercise the sanctifying grace of hope (Denney). In our Lord Jesus Christ The objective genitive with Εμπροστεν — elpidos (hope) and so translated by “in” here (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 499f.). Jesus is the object of this hope, the hope of his second coming which is still open to us. Note “Lord Jesus Christ” as in 1 Thessalonians 1:1. Before our God and Father (emprosthen tou theou kai patros hēmōn). The one article with both substantives precisely as in Galatians 1:4, not “before God and our Father,” both article and possessive genitive going with both substantives as in 2 Peter 1:1, 2 Peter 1:11; Titus 2:13 (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 785f.). The phrase is probably connected with elpidos Emprosthen in the N.T. occurs only of place, but it is common in the papyri of time. The picture here is the day of judgment when all shall appear before God. [source]
1 Thessalonians 1:3 Before our God and Father [emprosthen tou theou kai patros hēmōn)]
The one article with both substantives precisely as in Galatians 1:4, not “before God and our Father,” both article and possessive genitive going with both substantives as in 2 Peter 1:1, 2 Peter 1:11; Titus 2:13 (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 785f.). The phrase is probably connected with elpidos Emprosthen in the N.T. occurs only of place, but it is common in the papyri of time. The picture here is the day of judgment when all shall appear before God. [source]
1 Thessalonians 1:3 Without ceasing [αδιαλειπτως]
Double compound adverb of the Koiné{[28928]}š (Polybius, Diodorus, Strabo, papyri) from the verbal adjective αδιαλειπτος — ȧdiȧleiptos In the N.T. alone by Paul and always connected with prayer. Milligan prefers to connect this adverb (amphibolous in position) with the preceding participle ποιουμενοι — poioumenoi rather than with μνημονευοντες — mnēmoneuontes as Revised Version and Westcott and Hort rightly do. Your work of faith (υμων του εργου της πιστεως — humōn tou ergou tēs pisteōs). Note article with both εργου — ergou and πιστεως — pisteōs (correlation of the article, both abstract substantives). Εργου — Ergou is genitive case the object of μνημονευοντες — mnēmoneuontes as is common with verbs of emotion (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 508f.), though the accusative κοπον — kopon occurs in 1 Thessalonians 2:9 according to common Greek idiom allowing either case. Εργου — Ergou is the general term for work or business, employment, task. Note two genitives with εργου — ergou υμων — Humōn is the usual possessive genitive, your work, while της πιστεως — tēs pisteōs is the descriptive genitive, marked by, characterized by, faith, “the activity that faith inspires” (Frame). It is interesting to note this sharp conjunction of these two words by Paul. We are justified by faith, but faith produces works (Romans 6-8) as the Baptist taught and as Jesus taught and as James does in James 2. Labour of love Note article with both substantives. Here again του κοπου — tou kopou is the genitive the object of μνημονευοντες — mnēmoneuontes while της αγαπης — tēs agapēs is the descriptive genitive characterizing the “labour” or “toil” more exactly. Κοπος — Kopos is from κοπτω — koptō to cut, to lash, to beat the bread, to toil. In Revelation 14:13 the distinction is drawn between κοπου — kopou (toil) from which the saints rest and εργα — erga (works, activities) which follow with them into heaven. So here it is the labour that love prompts, assuming gladly the toil. Αγαπη — Agapē is one of the great words of the N.T. (Milligan) and no certain example has yet been found in the early papyri or the inscriptions. It occurs in the Septuagint in the higher sense as with the sensuous associations. The Epistle of Aristeas calls love The New Testament never uses the word ερως — erōs (lust). Patience of hope (της υπομονης της ελπιδος — tēs hupomonēs tēs elpidos). Note the two articles again and the descriptive genitive της ελπιδος — tēs elpidos It is patience marked by hope, “the endurance inspired by hope” (Frame), yes, and sustained by hope in spite of delays and set-backs. υπομονη — Hupomonē is an old word (υπο μενω — hupoαγαπη — menō to remain under), but it “has come like εργου κοποσ υπομονη — agapē to be closely associated with a distinctively Christian virtue” (Milligan). The same order as here του Κυριου ημων Ιησου Χριστου — ergouελπιδος — koposεμπροστεν του τεου και πατρος ημων — hupomone4) appears in Revelation 2:2 and Lightfoot considers it” an ascending scale as practical proofs of self-sacrifice.” The church in Thessalonica was not old, but already they were called upon to exercise the sanctifying grace of hope (Denney). In our Lord Jesus Christ The objective genitive with Εμπροστεν — elpidos (hope) and so translated by “in” here (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 499f.). Jesus is the object of this hope, the hope of his second coming which is still open to us. Note “Lord Jesus Christ” as in 1 Thessalonians 1:1. Before our God and Father (emprosthen tou theou kai patros hēmōn). The one article with both substantives precisely as in Galatians 1:4, not “before God and our Father,” both article and possessive genitive going with both substantives as in 2 Peter 1:1, 2 Peter 1:11; Titus 2:13 (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 785f.). The phrase is probably connected with elpidos Emprosthen in the N.T. occurs only of place, but it is common in the papyri of time. The picture here is the day of judgment when all shall appear before God. [source]
1 Thessalonians 1:3 In our Lord Jesus Christ [ελπιδος]
The objective genitive with Εμπροστεν — elpidos (hope) and so translated by “in” here (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 499f.). Jesus is the object of this hope, the hope of his second coming which is still open to us. Note “Lord Jesus Christ” as in 1 Thessalonians 1:1. Before our God and Father (emprosthen tou theou kai patros hēmōn). The one article with both substantives precisely as in Galatians 1:4, not “before God and our Father,” both article and possessive genitive going with both substantives as in 2 Peter 1:1, 2 Peter 1:11; Titus 2:13 (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 785f.). The phrase is probably connected with elpidos Emprosthen in the N.T. occurs only of place, but it is common in the papyri of time. The picture here is the day of judgment when all shall appear before God. [source]
1 Thessalonians 3:11 And our Lord Jesus [και ο Κυριος ημων Ιησους]
Separate article here with Ιησους — Iēsous In Titus 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1 only one article (not two) treating “our God and Saviour Jesus Christ” as one just like “our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ” in 2 Peter 1:11; 2 Peter 2:20; 2 Peter 3:18. Direct our way (κατευτυναι την οδον ημων — kateuthunai tēn hodon hēmōn). First aorist optative (acute accent on penult, not circumflex first aorist active infinitive) of κατευτυνω — kateuthunō old verb to make straight path. Singular verb also, though both God and Christ mentioned as subject (unity in the Godhead). Apart from μη γενοιτο — mē genoito (may it not come to pass) the optative in a wish of the third person is found in N.T. only in 1 Thessalonians 3:11, 1 Thessalonians 3:12; 1 Thessalonians 5:23; 2 Thessalonians 2:17; 2 Thessalonians 3:5, 2 Thessalonians 3:16; Romans 15:5, Romans 15:13. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:8 With the brightness [τῇ ἐπιφανείᾳ]
See on 1 Timothy 6:14. Rev., correctly, manifestation. See lxx, Esther 5:1; Amos 5:22; 3 Maccabees 2:9. In class. (but late) of deities appearing to a worshipper (Plut. Themistocles, 30): of the sudden appearance of an enemy (Polyb. i. 54,2): of a manifestation of Providence (Diod. Sic. i. 15): of the heathen gods assuming shape and appearing in order to work mischief (Just. Mart. Apol. i. 5). In N.T. of the parousia. See 1Timothy href="/desk/?q=1ti+6:14&sr=1">1 Timothy 6:14; 2 Timothy 1:10; 2 Timothy 4:1, 2 Timothy 4:8; Titus 2:13. In 2 Timothy 1:10, of Christ's historical manifestation. So ἐπιφαίνω , Titus 2:11; Titus 3:4. Only here in Paul. [source]
2 Thessalonians 1:12 The name [το ονομα]
The Old Testament (lxx) uses ονομα — onoma embodying the revealed character of Jehovah. So here the Name of our Lord Jesus means the Messiahship and Lordship of Jesus. The common Greek idiom of ονομα — onoma for title or dignity as in the papyri (Milligan) is not quite this idiom. The papyri also give examples of ονομα — onoma for person as in O.T. and Acts 1:15 (Deissmann, Bible Studies, pp. 196ff.). In you, and ye in him (εν υμιν και υμεις εν αυτωι — en huminκατα την χαριν — kai humeis en autōi). This reciprocal glorying is Pauline, but it is also like Christ‘s figure of the vine and the branches in John 15:1-11. According to the grace Not merely standard, but also aim (Robertson, Grammar, p. 609). Of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ (τεου — tou theou hēmōn kai kuriou Iēsou Christou). Here strict syntax requires, since there is only one article with κυριου — theou and Κυριος — kuriou that one person be meant, Jesus Christ, as is certainly true in Titus 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1 (Robertson, Grammar, p.786). This otherwise conclusive syntactical argument, admitted by Schmiedel, is weakened a bit by the fact that σωτηρ — Kurios is often employed as a proper name without the article, a thing not true of εν τηι βασιλειαι του Χριστου και τεου — sōtēr in Titus 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1. So in Ephesians 5:5 τεος — en tēi basileiāi tou Christou kai theou the natural meaning is in the Kingdom of Christ and God regarded as one, but here again Κυριος — theos like Kurios often occurs as a proper name without the article. So it has to be admitted that here Paul may mean “according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ,” though he may also mean “according to the grace of our God and Lord, Jesus Christ.” [source]
2 Thessalonians 1:12 Name []
of our Lord Jesus means the Messiahship and Lordship of Jesus. The common Greek idiom of ονομα — onoma for title or dignity as in the papyri (Milligan) is not quite this idiom. The papyri also give examples of ονομα — onoma for person as in O.T. and Acts 1:15 (Deissmann, Bible Studies, pp. 196ff.). In you, and ye in him (εν υμιν και υμεις εν αυτωι — en huminκατα την χαριν — kai humeis en autōi). This reciprocal glorying is Pauline, but it is also like Christ‘s figure of the vine and the branches in John 15:1-11. According to the grace Not merely standard, but also aim (Robertson, Grammar, p. 609). Of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ (τεου — tou theou hēmōn kai kuriou Iēsou Christou). Here strict syntax requires, since there is only one article with κυριου — theou and Κυριος — kuriou that one person be meant, Jesus Christ, as is certainly true in Titus 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1 (Robertson, Grammar, p.786). This otherwise conclusive syntactical argument, admitted by Schmiedel, is weakened a bit by the fact that σωτηρ — Kurios is often employed as a proper name without the article, a thing not true of εν τηι βασιλειαι του Χριστου και τεου — sōtēr in Titus 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1. So in Ephesians 5:5 τεος — en tēi basileiāi tou Christou kai theou the natural meaning is in the Kingdom of Christ and God regarded as one, but here again Κυριος — theos like Kurios often occurs as a proper name without the article. So it has to be admitted that here Paul may mean “according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ,” though he may also mean “according to the grace of our God and Lord, Jesus Christ.” [source]
2 Thessalonians 1:12 According to the grace [του τεου ημων και κυριου Ιησου Χριστου]
Not merely standard, but also aim (Robertson, Grammar, p. 609). Of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ (τεου — tou theou hēmōn kai kuriou Iēsou Christou). Here strict syntax requires, since there is only one article with κυριου — theou and Κυριος — kuriou that one person be meant, Jesus Christ, as is certainly true in Titus 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1 (Robertson, Grammar, p.786). This otherwise conclusive syntactical argument, admitted by Schmiedel, is weakened a bit by the fact that σωτηρ — Kurios is often employed as a proper name without the article, a thing not true of εν τηι βασιλειαι του Χριστου και τεου — sōtēr in Titus 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1. So in Ephesians 5:5 τεος — en tēi basileiāi tou Christou kai theou the natural meaning is in the Kingdom of Christ and God regarded as one, but here again Κυριος — theos like Kurios often occurs as a proper name without the article. So it has to be admitted that here Paul may mean “according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ,” though he may also mean “according to the grace of our God and Lord, Jesus Christ.” [source]
2 Thessalonians 1:12 Of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ [τεου]
Here strict syntax requires, since there is only one article with κυριου — theou and Κυριος — kuriou that one person be meant, Jesus Christ, as is certainly true in Titus 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1 (Robertson, Grammar, p.786). This otherwise conclusive syntactical argument, admitted by Schmiedel, is weakened a bit by the fact that σωτηρ — Kurios is often employed as a proper name without the article, a thing not true of εν τηι βασιλειαι του Χριστου και τεου — sōtēr in Titus 2:13; 2 Peter 1:1. So in Ephesians 5:5 τεος — en tēi basileiāi tou Christou kai theou the natural meaning is in the Kingdom of Christ and God regarded as one, but here again Κυριος — theos like Kurios often occurs as a proper name without the article. So it has to be admitted that here Paul may mean “according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ,” though he may also mean “according to the grace of our God and Lord, Jesus Christ.” [source]
1 Timothy 1:11 The glorious gospel of the blessed God [τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τῆς δόξης τοῦ μακαρίου θεοῦ]
More correctly, the gospel of the glory, etc. The phrase as a whole has no parallel in N.T. The nearest approach to it is 2 Corinthians 4:4. Gospel of God is a Pauline phrase; but μακάριος blessedis not used of God by Paul, is not used of God by Paul, nor elsewhere outside of the pastorals, where it occurs twice, here and 1 Timothy 6:15. For blessed is not used of God by Paul, nor elsewhere outside of the Pastorals, where it occurs twice, here and 1 Timothy 6:15. For blessed see on Matthew 5:3. The appearing of the glory of God in Jesus Christ is the contents of the gospel. Comp. Titus 2:13. [source]
1 Timothy 1:1 Our Savior [σωτῆρος ἡμῶν]
Comp. Luke 1:47; Judges 1:25. oP. Six times in the Pastorals. Used of both God and Christ (see Titus 1:3, Titus 1:4; Titus 2:10, Titus 2:13; Titus 3:4, Titus 3:6). The saving of men appears as God's direct will and act, 1 Timothy 2:4; Titus 3:5; 2 Timothy 1:9as Christ's work, 1 Timothy 1:15, comp. 2 Timothy 2:10. In lxx σωτὴρ occurs twenty times, and in all but two instances, of God. [source]
1 Timothy 6:14 Appearing [ἐπιφανείας]
See on 2 Thessalonians 2:8. In the Books of Maccabees it is used to describe appearances and interventions of God for the aid of his people. See 3:24; 14:15; 15:27; 3 Maccabees 5:8,51. In 2Timothy href="/desk/?q=2ti+4:18&sr=1">2 Timothy 4:18, and Titus 2:13, it denotes, as here, the second coming of Christ. In 2 Timothy 1:10, his historical manifestation, for which also the verb ἐπιφαίνειν is used, Titus 2:11; Titus 3:4. for the Lord is second advent Paul commonly uses παρουσία presenceonce the verb φανεροῦν tomake manifest (Colossians 3:4), and once ἀποκάλυψις revelation(2 Thessalonians 1:7). It is quite possible that the word ἐπιφάνεια , so characteristic of these Epistles, grew out of the Gnostic vocabulary, in which it was used of the sudden appearing of the hitherto concealed heavenly aeon, Christ. This they compared to a sudden light from heaven; and Christ, who thus appeared, though only docetically, without an actual fleshly body, was styled σωτὴρ savioralthough his oneness with the God of creation was denied. The Creator and the Redeemer were not the same, but were rather opposed. Christ was only a factor of a great cosmological process of development. As Neander observes: “The distinctive aim of the Gnostics was to apprehend the appearance of Christ and the new creation proceeding from him in their connection with the evolution of the whole universe.” [source]
1 Timothy 1:11 Of the blessed God [του μακαριου τεου]
Applied to God only here and 1 Timothy 6:15, but in Titus 2:13 μακαριος — makarios occurs with ελπις — elpis (hope) of the “epiphany of our great God and Saviour Jesus Christ.” [source]
1 Timothy 6:14 Without spot [ασπιλον]
Late adjective In inscription and papyri. Without reproach (ανεπιλημπτον — anepilēmpton). See note on 1 Timothy 3:2; 1 Timothy 5:7. Until the appearing “Until the epiphany” (the second epiphany or coming of Christ). Late word in inscriptions for important event like the epiphany of Caligula, in the papyri as a medical term. In 2 Thessalonians 2:8 we have both επιπανεια — epiphaneia and παρουσια — parousia See note on Titus 2:13; 2 Timothy 1:10; 2 Timothy 4:1, 2 Timothy 4:8. [source]
1 Timothy 6:14 Until the appearing [μεχρι της επιπανειας]
“Until the epiphany” (the second epiphany or coming of Christ). Late word in inscriptions for important event like the epiphany of Caligula, in the papyri as a medical term. In 2 Thessalonians 2:8 we have both επιπανεια — epiphaneia and παρουσια — parousia See note on Titus 2:13; 2 Timothy 1:10; 2 Timothy 4:1, 2 Timothy 4:8. [source]
1 Timothy 1:1 Of God our Saviour [τεου σωτηρος ημων]
Genitive case with επιταγην — epitagēn In the lxx σωτηρ — sōtēr (old word from σωζω — sōzō for agent in saving, applied to deities, princes, kings, etc.) occurs 20 times, all but two to God. The Romans called the emperor “Saviour God.” In the N.T. the designation of God as Saviour is peculiar to Luke 1:47; Judges 1:25; 1 Timothy 1:3; 1 Timothy 2:3; 1 Timothy 4:10; Titus 1:3; Titus 2:10; Titus 3:4. In the other Epistles Paul uses it of Christ (Philemon 3:20; Ephesians 5:23) as in 2 Timothy 1:10. In 2 Peter 1:1 we have “our God and Saviour Jesus Christ” as in Titus 2:13. Our hope (της ελπιδος ημων — tēs elpidos hēmōn). Like Colossians 1:27. More than the author and object of hope, “its very substance and foundation” (Ellicott). [source]
2 Timothy 4:1 Who shall judge [του μελλοντος κρινειν]
“The one going or about to judge” (regular idiom with μελλω — mellō). The quick and the dead “Living and dead.” See 1 Thessalonians 4:16. And by his appearing (και την επιπανειαν — kai tēn epiphaneian). Accusative of conjuration (verbs of swearing), after διαμαρτυρομαι — diamarturomai as is βασιλειαν — basileian (by his kingdom). See note on 1 Thessalonians 5:27. For επιπανειαν — epiphaneian see note on 1 Thessalonians 1:10; Titus 2:13; 1 Timothy 6:14; 2 Thessalonians 2:8. [source]
2 Timothy 4:1 And by his appearing [και την επιπανειαν]
Accusative of conjuration (verbs of swearing), after διαμαρτυρομαι — diamarturomai as is βασιλειαν — basileian (by his kingdom). See note on 1 Thessalonians 5:27. For επιπανειαν — epiphaneian see note on 1 Thessalonians 1:10; Titus 2:13; 1 Timothy 6:14; 2 Thessalonians 2:8. [source]
2 Timothy 1:10 By the appearing [δια της επιπανειας]
Only here of the Incarnation (except the verb, Titus 2:11; Titus 3:4), but for the second coming see note on Titus 2:13. Who abolished death (καταργησαντος μεν τον τανατον — katargēsantos men ton thanaton). First aorist active participle of καταργεω — katargeō the very phrase in 1 Corinthians 15:26; Hebrews 2:14. Brought to light First aorist active participle of πωτιζω — phōtizō literary Koiné{[28928]}š word for which see note on 1 Corinthians 4:5; Ephesians 1:18, to turn the light on. Life and incorruption (ζωην και απταρσιαν — zōēn kai aphtharsian). The opposite of τανατος — thanatos “life and immortality” (unchangeable life). [source]
Titus 1:3 In the message [εν κηρυγματι]
See note on 1 Corinthians 1:21; 1 Corinthians 2:4 for this word, the human proclamation (preaching) of God‘s word. Wherewith I was intrusted (ο επιστευτην — ho episteuthēn). Accusative relative ο — ho retained with the first aorist passive indicative of πιστευω — pisteuō as in 1 Timothy 1:11. See note on 1 Timothy 2:7. Of God our Saviour In Titus 1:4 he applies the words “του σωτηρος ημων — tou sōtēros hēmōn ” to Christ. In Titus 2:13 he applies both τεου — theou and σωτηρος — sōtēros to Christ. [source]
Titus 1:3 Of God our Saviour [του σωτηρος ημων τεου]
In Titus 1:4 he applies the words “του σωτηρος ημων — tou sōtēros hēmōn ” to Christ. In Titus 2:13 he applies both τεου — theou and σωτηρος — sōtēros to Christ. [source]
2 Peter 1:1 Servant and apostle [δουλος και αποστολος]
Like Romans 1:1; Titus 1:1.To them that have obtained (τοις λαχουσιν — tois lachousin). Dative plural articular participle second aorist active of λαγχανω — lagchanō old verb, to obtain by lot (Luke 1:9), here with the accusative (πιστιν — pistin) as in Acts 1:17.Like precious Late compound adjective Associative-instrumental case after ισοτιμον — isotimon Equal to τηι ημων — tēi hēmōn (the faith of us).In the righteousness Definite because of the preposition εν — en and the following genitive even though anarthrous. The O.T. sense of δικαιοσυνη — dikaiosunē applied to God (Romans 1:17) and here to Christ.Of our God and Saviour Jesus Christ (του τεου ημων και σωτηρος Ιησου Χριστου — tou theou hēmōn kai sōtēros Iēsou Christou). So the one article (του — tou) with τεου — theou and σωτηρος — sōtēros requires precisely as with του κυριου ημων και σωτηρος Ιησου Χριστου — tou kuriou hēmōn kai sōtēros Iēsou Christou (of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ), one person, not two, in 2 Peter 1:11 as in 2 Peter 2:20; 2 Peter 3:2, 2 Peter 3:18. So in 1 Peter 1:3 we have ο τεος και πατηρ — ho theos kai patēr (the God and Father), one person, not two. The grammar is uniform and inevitable (Robertson, Grammar, p. 786), as even Schmiedel (Winer-Schmiedel, Grammatik, p. 158) admits: “Grammar demands that one person be meant.” Moulton (Prol., p. 84) cites papyri examples of like usage of τεος — theos for the Roman emperors. See the same idiom in Titus 2:13. The use of τεος — theos by Peter as a predicate with Jesus Christ no more disproves the Petrine authorship of this Epistle than a like use in John 1:1 disproves the Johannine authorship of the Fourth Gospel and the same use in Titus 2:13 disproves the genuineness of Titus. Peter had heard Thomas call Jesus God (John 20:28) and he himself had called him the Son of God (Matthew 16:16). [source]
2 Peter 1:1 Like precious [ισοτιμον]
Late compound adjective Associative-instrumental case after ισοτιμον — isotimon Equal to τηι ημων — tēi hēmōn (the faith of us).In the righteousness Definite because of the preposition εν — en and the following genitive even though anarthrous. The O.T. sense of δικαιοσυνη — dikaiosunē applied to God (Romans 1:17) and here to Christ.Of our God and Saviour Jesus Christ (του τεου ημων και σωτηρος Ιησου Χριστου — tou theou hēmōn kai sōtēros Iēsou Christou). So the one article (του — tou) with τεου — theou and σωτηρος — sōtēros requires precisely as with του κυριου ημων και σωτηρος Ιησου Χριστου — tou kuriou hēmōn kai sōtēros Iēsou Christou (of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ), one person, not two, in 2 Peter 1:11 as in 2 Peter 2:20; 2 Peter 3:2, 2 Peter 3:18. So in 1 Peter 1:3 we have ο τεος και πατηρ — ho theos kai patēr (the God and Father), one person, not two. The grammar is uniform and inevitable (Robertson, Grammar, p. 786), as even Schmiedel (Winer-Schmiedel, Grammatik, p. 158) admits: “Grammar demands that one person be meant.” Moulton (Prol., p. 84) cites papyri examples of like usage of τεος — theos for the Roman emperors. See the same idiom in Titus 2:13. The use of τεος — theos by Peter as a predicate with Jesus Christ no more disproves the Petrine authorship of this Epistle than a like use in John 1:1 disproves the Johannine authorship of the Fourth Gospel and the same use in Titus 2:13 disproves the genuineness of Titus. Peter had heard Thomas call Jesus God (John 20:28) and he himself had called him the Son of God (Matthew 16:16). [source]
2 Peter 1:1 In the righteousness [εν δικαιοσυνηι]
Definite because of the preposition εν — en and the following genitive even though anarthrous. The O.T. sense of δικαιοσυνη — dikaiosunē applied to God (Romans 1:17) and here to Christ.Of our God and Saviour Jesus Christ (του τεου ημων και σωτηρος Ιησου Χριστου — tou theou hēmōn kai sōtēros Iēsou Christou). So the one article (του — tou) with τεου — theou and σωτηρος — sōtēros requires precisely as with του κυριου ημων και σωτηρος Ιησου Χριστου — tou kuriou hēmōn kai sōtēros Iēsou Christou (of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ), one person, not two, in 2 Peter 1:11 as in 2 Peter 2:20; 2 Peter 3:2, 2 Peter 3:18. So in 1 Peter 1:3 we have ο τεος και πατηρ — ho theos kai patēr (the God and Father), one person, not two. The grammar is uniform and inevitable (Robertson, Grammar, p. 786), as even Schmiedel (Winer-Schmiedel, Grammatik, p. 158) admits: “Grammar demands that one person be meant.” Moulton (Prol., p. 84) cites papyri examples of like usage of τεος — theos for the Roman emperors. See the same idiom in Titus 2:13. The use of τεος — theos by Peter as a predicate with Jesus Christ no more disproves the Petrine authorship of this Epistle than a like use in John 1:1 disproves the Johannine authorship of the Fourth Gospel and the same use in Titus 2:13 disproves the genuineness of Titus. Peter had heard Thomas call Jesus God (John 20:28) and he himself had called him the Son of God (Matthew 16:16). [source]
2 Peter 1:1 Of our God and Saviour Jesus Christ [του τεου ημων και σωτηρος Ιησου Χριστου]
So the one article (του — tou) with τεου — theou and σωτηρος — sōtēros requires precisely as with του κυριου ημων και σωτηρος Ιησου Χριστου — tou kuriou hēmōn kai sōtēros Iēsou Christou (of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ), one person, not two, in 2 Peter 1:11 as in 2 Peter 2:20; 2 Peter 3:2, 2 Peter 3:18. So in 1 Peter 1:3 we have ο τεος και πατηρ — ho theos kai patēr (the God and Father), one person, not two. The grammar is uniform and inevitable (Robertson, Grammar, p. 786), as even Schmiedel (Winer-Schmiedel, Grammatik, p. 158) admits: “Grammar demands that one person be meant.” Moulton (Prol., p. 84) cites papyri examples of like usage of τεος — theos for the Roman emperors. See the same idiom in Titus 2:13. The use of τεος — theos by Peter as a predicate with Jesus Christ no more disproves the Petrine authorship of this Epistle than a like use in John 1:1 disproves the Johannine authorship of the Fourth Gospel and the same use in Titus 2:13 disproves the genuineness of Titus. Peter had heard Thomas call Jesus God (John 20:28) and he himself had called him the Son of God (Matthew 16:16). [source]
Jude 1:21 Looking for [προσδεχομενοι]
Present middle participle of προσδεχομαι — prosdechomai the very form in Titus 2:13. The same idea in προσδοκωντες — prosdokōntes in 2 Peter 3:14. [source]
Revelation 1:1 The Revelation [ἀποκάλυψις]
The Greek word is transcribed in Apocalypse. The word occurs only once in the Gospels, Luke 2:32, where to lighten should be rendered for revelation. It is used there of our Lord, as a light to dispel the darkness under which the heathen were veiled. It occurs thirteen times in Paul's writings, and three times in first Peter. It is used in the following senses: (a.) The unveiling of something hidden, which gives light and knowledge to those who behold it. See Luke 2:32(above). Christianity itself is the revelation of a mystery (Romans 16:25). The participation of the Gentiles in the privileges of the new covenant was made known by revelation (Ephesians 3:3). Paul received the Gospel which he preached by revelation (Galatians 1:12), and went up to Jerusalem by revelation (Galatians 2:2). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(b.) Christian insight into spiritual truth. Paul asks for Christians the spirit of revelation (Ephesians 1:17). Peculiar manifestations of the general gift of revelation are given in Christian assemblies (1 Corinthians 14:6, 1 Corinthians 14:26). Special revelations are granted to Paul (2 Corinthians 12:1, 2 Corinthians 12:7). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(c.) The second coming of the Lord (1 Peter 1:7, 1 Peter 1:13; 2 Thessalonians 1:7; 1 Corinthians 1:7) in which His glory shall be revealed (1 Peter 4:13), His righteous judgment made known (Romans 2:5), and His children revealed in full majesty (Romans 8:19). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The kindred verb ἀποκαλύπτω is used in similar connections. Following the categories given above,-DIVIDER-
(a.) Galatians 1:16; Galatians 3:23; Ephesians 3:5; 1 Peter 1:12. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(b.) Matthew 11:25, Matthew 11:27; Matthew 16:17; Luke 10:21, Luke 10:22; 1 Corinthians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 14:30; Philemon 3:15. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(c.) Matthew 10:26; Luke 2:35; Luke 12:2; Luke 17:30; Romans 1:17, Romans 1:18; Romans 8:18; 1 Corinthians 3:13; 2 Thessalonians 2:3, 2 Thessalonians 2:6, 2 Thessalonians 2:8; 1 Peter 1:5; 1 Peter 5:1. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The word is compounded with ἀπό fromand καλύπτω tocover. Hence, to remove the cover from anything; to unveil. So of Balaam, the Lord opened or unveiled his eyes ( ἀπεκάλυψεν τοὺς ὀφθαλμοὺς : Numbers 22:31, Sept.). So Boaz to Naomi's kinsman: “I thought to advertise thee:” Rev., “disclose it unto thee” ( ἀποκαλύψω τὸ οὖς σου : Rth 4:4 , Sept.). Lit., I will uncover thine ear. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The noun ἀποκάλυψις revelationoccurs only once in the Septuagint (1 Samuel 20:30), in the physical sense of uncovering. The verb is found in the Septuagint in Daniel 2:19, Daniel 2:22, Daniel 2:28. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In classical Greek, the verb is used by Herodotus (i., 119) of uncovering the head; and by Plato: thus, “reveal ( ἀποκαλύψας ) to me the power of Rhetoric” (“Gorgias,” 460): “Uncover your chest and back” (“Protagoras,” 352). Both the verb and the noun occur in Plutarch; the latter of uncovering the body, of waters, and of an error. The religious sense, however, is unknown to heathenism. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The following words should be compared with this: Ὀπτασία avision (Luke 1:22; Acts 26:19; 2 Corinthians 12:1). Ὅραμα avision (Matthew 17:9; Acts 9:10; Acts 16:9). Ὅρασις avision (Acts 2:17; Revelation 9:17. Of visible form, Revelation 4:3). These three cannot be accurately distinguished. They all denote the thing seen or shown, without anything to show whether it is understood or not. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
As distinguished from these, ἀποκάλυψις includes, along with the thing shown or seen, its interpretation or unveiling. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Ἐπιφάνεια appearing(hence our epiphany ), is used in profane Greek of the appearance of a higher power in order to aid men. In the New Testament by Paul only, and always of the second appearing of Christ in glory, except in 2 Timothy 1:10, where it signifies His first appearing in the flesh. See 2 Thessalonians 2:8; 1 Timothy 6:14; Titus 2:13. As distinguished from this, ἀπολάλυψις is the more comprehensive word. An apocalypse may include several ἐπιφάνειαι appearingsThe appearings are the media of the revealings. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Φανέρωσις manifestationonly twice in the New Testament; 1 Corinthians 12:7; 2 Corinthians 4:2. The kindred verb φανερόω tomake manifest, is of frequent occurrence. See on John 21:1. It is not easy, if possible, to show that this word has a less dignified sense than ἀποκάλυψις . The verb φανερόω is used of both the first and the second appearing of our Lord (1 Timothy 3:16; 1 John 1:2; 1 Peter 1:20; Colossians 3:4; 1 Peter 5:4). See also John 2:11; John 21:1. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Some distinguish between φανέρωσις as an external manifestation, to the senses, but single and isolated; while ἀποκάλυψις is an inward and abiding disclosure. According to these, the Apocalypse or unveiling, precedes and produces the φανέρωσις or manifestation. The Apocalypse contemplates the thing revealed; the manifestation, the persons to whom it is revealed. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The Revelation here is the unveiling of the divine mysteries.Of Jesus ChristNot the manifestation or disclosure of Jesus Christ, but the revelation given by Him.To shew ( δεῖξαι )Frequent in Revelation (Revelation 4:1; Revelation 17:1; Revelation 21:9; Revelation 22:1). Construe with ἔδωκεν gavegave him to shew. Compare “I will give him to sit” (Revelation 3:21): “It was given to hurt” (Revelation 7:2): “It was given him to do;” (A.V. “had power to do;” Revelation 13:14).Servants ( δούλοις )Properly, bond-servants. See on Matthew 20:26; see on Mark 9:35.Must ( δεῖ )As the decree of the absolute and infallible God.Shortly come to pass ( γενέσθαι ἐν τάχει )For the phrase ἐν τάχει shortlysee Luke 18:8, where yet long delay is implied. Expressions like this must be understood, not according to human measurement of time, but rather as in 2 Peter 3:8. The idea is, before long, as time is computed by God. The aorist infinitive γενέσθαι is not begin to come to pass, but denotes a complete fulfilment: must shortly come to pass in their entirety. He sent ( ἀποστείλας )See on Matthew 10:2, Matthew 10:16.Signified ( ἐσήμανεν )From σῆμα asign. Hence, literally, give a sign or token. The verb occurs outside of John's writings only in Acts 11:28; Acts 25:27. See John 12:33; John 18:32; John 21:19. This is its only occurrence in Revelation. The word is appropriate to the symbolic character of the revelation, and so in John 12:33, where Christ predicts the mode of His death in a figure. Compare sign, Revelation 12:1.Angel ( ἀγγέλου )Strictly, a messenger. See Matthew 11:10; Luke 8:24; Luke 9:52. Compare the mediating angel in the visions of Daniel and Zechariah (Daniel 8:15, Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21; Daniel 10:10; Zechariah 1:19). See on John 1:51.ServantDesignating the prophetic office. See Isaiah 59:5; Amos 3:7; compare Revelation 19:10; Revelation 22:9.JohnJohn does not name himself in the Gospel or in the Epistles. Here “we are dealing with prophecy, and prophecy requires the guarantee of the individual who is inspired to utter it” (Milligan). Compare Daniel 8:1; Daniel 9:2. [source]

Revelation 22:20 Yea: I come quickly [Ναι ερχομαι ταχυ]
Affirmation again of the promise in Revelation 22:7, Revelation 22:12. On Αμην ερχου Κυριε Ιησου — Nai (Yes) see Revelation 1:7 for the Lord‘s assent to the call. Then John expresses his absolute belief in the Lord‘s promise: “Amen: come, Lord Jesus” On Ιησου — Amēn see Revelation 1:7. On Μαρανα τα — erchou see Revelation 22:17. Note Kurie with Iēsou As in 1 Corinthians 12:3; Philemon 2:11. For Paul‘s confidence in the deity of Christ and the certainty of his second coming see Titus 2:13; 2 Timothy 4:8. Marana tha (1 Corinthians 16:22). [source]
Revelation 7:10 Salvation [η σωτηρια]
As in Revelation 12:10; Revelation 19:1. Nominative absolute. Salvation here is regarded as an accomplished act on the part of those coming out of the great tribulation (Revelation 7:14) and the praise for it is given to God Both God and Christ are thus called σωτηρ — sōtēr as in the Pastoral Epistles, as to God (1 Timothy 1:1; 1 Timothy 2:3; Titus 1:3; Titus 3:4) and to Christ (Titus 1:4; Titus 2:13; Titus 3:6). For η σωτηρια — hē sōtēria see John 4:22; Acts 4:12; Judges 1:3. [source]
Revelation 7:10 With a great voice [πωνηι μεγαληι]
As in Revelation 6:10; Revelation 7:2. “The polyglott multitude shouts its praises as with one voice” (Swete).Salvation (η σωτηρια — hē sōtēria). As in Revelation 12:10; Revelation 19:1. Nominative absolute. Salvation here is regarded as an accomplished act on the part of those coming out of the great tribulation (Revelation 7:14) and the praise for it is given to God (τωι τεωι — tōi theōi dative case) and to the Lamb (τωι αρνιωι — tōi arniōi dative also). Both God and Christ are thus called σωτηρ — sōtēr as in the Pastoral Epistles, as to God (1 Timothy 1:1; 1 Timothy 2:3; Titus 1:3; Titus 3:4) and to Christ (Titus 1:4; Titus 2:13; Titus 3:6). For η σωτηρια — hē sōtēria see John 4:22; Acts 4:12; Judges 1:3. [source]

What do the individual words in Titus 2:13 mean?

awaiting the blessed hope and [the] appearing of the glory of the great God Savior of us Christ Jesus
προσδεχόμενοι τὴν μακαρίαν ἐλπίδα καὶ ἐπιφάνειαν τῆς δόξης τοῦ μεγάλου Θεοῦ Σωτῆρος ἡμῶν Χριστοῦ Ἰησοῦ

προσδεχόμενοι  awaiting 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Middle or Passive, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: προσδέχομαι  
Sense: to receive to one’s self, to admit, to give access to one’s self.
μακαρίαν  blessed 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: μακάριος  
Sense: blessed, happy.
ἐλπίδα  hope 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: ἐλπίς  
Sense: expectation of evil, fear.
ἐπιφάνειαν  [the]  appearing 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: ἐπιφάνεια  
Sense: an appearing, appearance.
τῆς  of  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
δόξης  glory 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: δόξα  
Sense: opinion, judgment, view.
τοῦ  of  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
μεγάλου  great 
Parse: Adjective, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: μέγας  
Sense: great.
Θεοῦ  God 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: θεός  
Sense: a god or goddess, a general name of deities or divinities.
Σωτῆρος  Savior 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: σωτήρ  
Sense: saviour, deliverer, preserver.
ἡμῶν  of  us 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive 1st Person Plural
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
Χριστοῦ  Christ 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: Χριστός  
Sense: Christ was the Messiah, the Son of God.
Ἰησοῦ  Jesus 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: Ἰησοῦς  
Sense: Joshua was the famous captain of the Israelites, Moses’ successor.