The Meaning of Colossians 3:4 Explained

Colossians 3:4

KJV: When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall ye also appear with him in glory.

YLT: when the Christ -- our life -- may be manifested, then also we with him shall be manifested in glory.

Darby: When the Christ is manifested who is our life, then shall ye also be manifested with him in glory.

ASV: When Christ, who is our life, shall be manifested, then shall ye also with him be manifested in glory.

What does Colossians 3:4 Mean?

Verse Meaning

"Whenever" indicates that a revelation of Christ in the future is certain, but its time is unknown. The Greek word phaneroo ("revealed") stresses the open display of Christ at His coming. This is probably a reference to the Rapture. When He is revealed to us then, our lives will no longer be hidden in Him but revealed for what they are in our glorification. The Rapture will be a glorious revelation of Him to us and us in our glorified state. Now our eternal life is hidden ( Colossians 3:3), but then it will be manifest.
"In Colossians . . . there is an emphasis on realized eschatology. Within the "already-not yet" tension the stress falls upon the former, called forth by the circumstances of the letter.... The "already" of salvation needed to be asserted repeatedly over against those who were interested in the heavenly realm but who had false notions about it, believing it could be reached by legalistic observances, knowledge, visionary experiences and the like.. .
"But if the "already" pole received the emphasis, the "not yet" of salvation still needed to be mentioned, and here in Colossians 3:4 we find a clear future reference." [1]
In view of this prospect the Colossians and we need not pursue another system that claims to provide more than we have in Christ. God has provided all we need for acceptance with Him and godly living in Christ. All we need to do is act on the implications of these truths, which Paul proceeded to help his readers do.

Context Summary

Colossians 3:1-11 - Seeking The "things That Are Above"
Let us repeat the glorious truth, which was doubtless the heart of Paul's teaching, that our old nature has been nailed in Christ to the Cross, and laid in the grave; and that our real self, the second Adam, has entered the new world of resurrection. We belong to the world on the threshold of which Jesus said, "Touch me not, for I am not yet ascended." We must guard against the defiling touch of the world, of sin, and of the old self-life. We stand between two worlds, each solicits us: let us yield to the influences that pull us upward, and not to those that anchor us to this sinful and vain world. Our eternal blessedness has begun, let us walk in it.
In Christ we profess to have put off the old man, i.e., the habits of our former life, Colossians 3:9; now let us actually do so, in the power of the Holy Spirit. We profess to have put on the risen Christ, Colossians 3:10; now let us don the attire and habits of the new man. Too many Christians resemble Lazarus, quickened from his death-sleep, but still arrayed in grave-clothes. Too few array themselves in the radiant beauty of the risen Lord, which is the common heritage of all who believe in Him, whatever their rank or nationality. [source]

Chapter Summary: Colossians 3

1  He shows where we should seek Christ
5  He exhorts to holiness;
10  to put off the old self, and put on Christ;
12  exhorting to charity, humility,
18  and other duties

Greek Commentary for Colossians 3:4

When Christ shall be manifested [οταν ο Χριστος πανερωτηι]
Indefinite temporal clause with οταν — hotan and the first aorist passive subjunctive of πανεροω — phaneroō “whenever Christ is manifested,” a reference to the second coming of Christ as looked for and longed for, but wholly uncertain as to time. See this same verb used of the second coming in 1 John 3:2. [source]
Ye also together with him [και υμεις συν αυτωι]
That is the joy of this blessed hope. He repeats the verb about us πανερωτησεστε — phanerōthēsesthe (future passive indicative) and adds εν δοχηι — en doxēi (in glory). Not to respond to this high appeal is to be like Bunyan‘s man with the muck-rake. [source]
Who is our life [ζωὴ]
See on John 1:4. The life is not only with Christ, it is Christ. Compare John 14:6; 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11; 1 John 5:11, 1 John 5:12. For the change of person, our for your, see on Colossians 2:13. [source]
Shall appear [φανερωθῇ]
Rev., correctly, shall be manifested. Compare 1 John 3:2, note. See on Romans 3:21. [source]
In glory []
Compare Romans 8:17. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Colossians 3:4

John 21:1 Shewed [ἐφανέρωσεν]
This rendering might easily convey merely the sense of appearing; but its meaning is much deeper. Occurring frequently in the New Testament, it is used most frequently of God and Christ, or of men in their relation to these. Thus, of Christ in person while upon earth (Mark 16:12, Mark 16:14; John 1:31; John 2:11; 1 Peter 1:20; 1 John 1:2). Of the works of Christ (John 2:11; John 9:3; 1 John 3:5). Of Christ in redemption (1 John 3:5). Of Christ in His second coming (1 John 2:28). Of Christ in glory (1 John 3:2; Colossians 3:4). It is used of God. Of His revelation to men of the knowledge of Himself (Romans 1:19). Of His manifestation in Christ (1 Timothy 3:16). Of His righteousness (Romans 3:21). Of His love (1 John 4:9). It is used of men. As epistles manifesting the character and spirit of Christ (2 Corinthians 3:3; 2 Corinthians 5:11). In the judgment (2 Corinthians 5:10). In all these cases the appearing is not merely an appeal to sense, but is addressed to spiritual perception, and contemplates a moral and spiritual effect. It is the setting forth of the law or will or character of God; of the person or work of Christ; of the character or deeds of men, with a view to the disclosure of their quality and to the producing of a moral impression. Rev., manifested. [source]
John 14:6 The life []
Not only life in the future world. He is “the principle and source of life in its temporal development and future consummation, so that whoever has not received Him into himself by faith, has become a prey to spiritual and eternal death” (Meyer). “He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life.” Compare Colossians 3:4; John 6:50, John 6:51; John 11:25, John 11:26. “I am the way, the truth, and the life. Without the way there is no going; without the truth there is no knowing; without the life there is no living. I am the way which thou shouldst pursue; the truth which thou shouldst believe; the life which thou shouldst hope for” (Thomas a Kempis, “Imitation of Christ,” iii., 56). On ζωή , life, see on John 1:4. [source]
John 21:1 Manifested himself [επανεροσεν εαυτον]
First aorist active indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō with the reflexive pronoun (cf. John 7:4; John 13:4). For the passive see John 1:31; John 21:14. Jesus was only seen during the forty days now and then (Acts 1:3), ten instances being recorded. The word πανεροω — phaneroō is often used of Christ on earth (John 1:31; John 2:11; 1 Peter 1:20; 1 John 1:2), of his works (John 3:5), of the second coming (1 John 2:28), of Christ in glory (Colossians 3:4; 1 John 3:2). At By or upon. Of Tiberias As in John 6:1 instead of the usual “Sea of Galilee.” Tiberias, the capital city of Galilee, gave this epithet to the Sea of Galilee. This is not the appearance in Galilee prearranged by Jesus (Mark 16:7; Matthew 28:7, Matthew 28:16). [source]
Romans 8:19 Waiteth for [απεκδεχεται]
See note on 1 Corinthians 1:7; Galatians 5:5 for this rare word (possibly formed by Paul, Milligan). “To wait it out” (Thayer). The revealing of the sons of God (την αποκαλυπσιν των υιων του τεου — tēn apokalupsin tōn huiōn tou theou). Cf. 1 John 3:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:8; Colossians 3:4. This mystical sympathy of physical nature with the work of grace is beyond the comprehension of most of us. But who can disprove it? [source]
Romans 8:19 The revealing of the sons of God [την αποκαλυπσιν των υιων του τεου]
Cf. 1 John 3:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:8; Colossians 3:4. This mystical sympathy of physical nature with the work of grace is beyond the comprehension of most of us. But who can disprove it? [source]
2 Corinthians 3:18 The same image [τὴν αὐτὴν εἰκόνα]
See on Revelation 13:14. Compare especially 1 John 3:2; also Romans 8:29; John 17:24; Colossians 3:4; Romans 8:17; 1 Corinthians 15:48-53. [source]
2 Corinthians 3:18 Are transformed [μεταμορποω]
Present passive (are being transformed) of metamorphoō late verb and in papyri. See note on Matthew 17:2; Mark 9:2 where it is translated “transfigured.” It is the word used for heathen mythological metamorphoses. Into the same image (tēn autēn eikona). Accusative retained with passive verb την αυτην εικονα — metamorphoumetha Into the likeness of God in Christ (1 Corinthians 15:48-53; Romans 8:17, Romans 8:29; Colossians 3:4; 1 John 3:2). As from the Lord the Spirit More likely, “as from the Spirit of the Lord.” [source]
2 Corinthians 3:18 Into the same image [tēn autēn eikona)]
Accusative retained with passive verb την αυτην εικονα — metamorphoumetha Into the likeness of God in Christ (1 Corinthians 15:48-53; Romans 8:17, Romans 8:29; Colossians 3:4; 1 John 3:2). [source]
2 Corinthians 3:18 With unveiled face [ανακεκαλυμμενωι προσωπωι]
Instrumental case of manner. Unlike and like Moses. Reflecting as in a mirror (κατοπτριζομενοι — katoptrizomenoi). Present middle participle of κατοπτριζω — katoptrizō late verb from κατοπτρον — katoptron mirror (κατα οπτρον — kataεγκατοπτρισασται εις το υδωρ — optron a thing to see with). In Philo (Legis Alleg. iii. 33) the word means beholding as in a mirror and that idea suits also the figure in 1 Corinthians 13:12. There is an inscription of third century b.c. with μεταμορπουμετα — egkatoptrisasthai eis to hudōr to look at one‘s reflection in the water. Plutarch uses the active for mirroring or reflecting and Chrysostom takes it so here. Either makes good sense. The point that Paul is making is that we shall not lose the glory as Moses did. But that is true if we keep on beholding or keep on reflecting (present tense). Only here in N.T. Are transformed Present passive (are being transformed) of metamorphoō late verb and in papyri. See note on Matthew 17:2; Mark 9:2 where it is translated “transfigured.” It is the word used for heathen mythological metamorphoses. Into the same image (tēn autēn eikona). Accusative retained with passive verb την αυτην εικονα — metamorphoumetha Into the likeness of God in Christ (1 Corinthians 15:48-53; Romans 8:17, Romans 8:29; Colossians 3:4; 1 John 3:2). As from the Lord the Spirit More likely, “as from the Spirit of the Lord.” [source]
Philippians 3:10 The power of His resurrection [τὴν δύναμιν τῆς ἀναστάσεως αὐτοῦ]
Power of His resurrection and fellowship of His sufferings furnish two specific points further defining the knowledge of Him. By the power of Christ's resurrection is meant the power which it exerts over believers. Here, more especially, according to the context, in assuring their present justification, and its outcome in their final glorification. See Romans 4:24, Romans 4:25; Romans 8:11, Romans 8:30; 1 Corinthians 15:17; Colossians 3:4; Phlippians 3:21. [source]
Philippians 1:21 Gain []
As consummating the union with Christ. Compare Colossians 3:4; 2 Corinthians 5:1-8.“Declare unto him if the light wherewithBlossoms your substance shall remain with you Eternally the same that it is now,-DIVIDER-
And if it do remain, say in what manner,-DIVIDER-
After ye are again made visible,-DIVIDER-
It can be that it injure not your sight. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
As by a greater gladness urged and drawn-DIVIDER-
They who are dancing in a ring sometimes-DIVIDER-
Uplift their voices and their motions quicken;-DIVIDER-
So, at that orison devout and prompt,-DIVIDER-
The holy circles a new joy displayed-DIVIDER-
In their revolving and their wondrous song. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Who so lamenteth him that here we die-DIVIDER-
That we may live above, has never there-DIVIDER-
Seen the refreshment of the eternal rain.”Dante, “Paradiso,” 14, 13-27. [source]

Colossians 2:13 Having forgiven us [χαρισάμενος ἡμῖν]
Freely ( χάρις gracefree gift ), as Luke 7:42; 2 Corinthians 2:7, 2 Corinthians 2:10; Colossians 3:13. Note the change of pronoun from you to us, believers generally, embracing himself. This change from the second to the first person, or, vice versa, is common in Paul's writings. See Colossians 1:10-13; Colossians 3:3, Colossians 3:4; Ephesians 2:2, Ephesians 2:3, Ephesians 2:13, Ephesians 2:14; Ephesians 4:31, Ephesians 4:32. [source]
1 Thessalonians 4:17 To meet the Lord in the air [εις απαντησιν του Κυριου εις αερα]
This special Greek idiom is common in the lxx like the Hebrew, but Polybius has it also and it occurs in the papyri (Moulton, Proleg., p. 14, n. 3). This rapture of the saints (both risen and changed) is a glorious climax to Paul‘s argument of consolation. And so (και ουτως — kai houtōs). This is the outcome, to be forever with the Lord, whether with a return to earth or with an immediate departure for heaven Paul does not say. To be with Christ is the chief hope of Paul‘s life (1 Thessalonians 5:10; Philemon 1:23; Colossians 3:4; 2 Corinthians 5:8). [source]
1 Thessalonians 4:17 And so [και ουτως]
This is the outcome, to be forever with the Lord, whether with a return to earth or with an immediate departure for heaven Paul does not say. To be with Christ is the chief hope of Paul‘s life (1 Thessalonians 5:10; Philemon 1:23; Colossians 3:4; 2 Corinthians 5:8). [source]
1 Thessalonians 4:17 Together with them [αμα συν αυτοις]
Note both αμα — hama (at the same time) and συν — sun (together with) with the associative instrumental case αυτοις — autois (the risen saints). Shall be caught up (αρπαγησομετα — harpagēsometha). Second future passive indicative of αρπαζω — harpazō old verb to seize, to carry off like Latin rapio. To meet the Lord in the air This special Greek idiom is common in the lxx like the Hebrew, but Polybius has it also and it occurs in the papyri (Moulton, Proleg., p. 14, n. 3). This rapture of the saints (both risen and changed) is a glorious climax to Paul‘s argument of consolation. And so (και ουτως — kai houtōs). This is the outcome, to be forever with the Lord, whether with a return to earth or with an immediate departure for heaven Paul does not say. To be with Christ is the chief hope of Paul‘s life (1 Thessalonians 5:10; Philemon 1:23; Colossians 3:4; 2 Corinthians 5:8). [source]
1 Timothy 6:14 Appearing [ἐπιφανείας]
See on 2 Thessalonians 2:8. In the Books of Maccabees it is used to describe appearances and interventions of God for the aid of his people. See 3:24; 14:15; 15:27; 3 Maccabees 5:8,51. In 2Timothy href="/desk/?q=2ti+4:18&sr=1">2 Timothy 4:18, and Titus 2:13, it denotes, as here, the second coming of Christ. In 2 Timothy 1:10, his historical manifestation, for which also the verb ἐπιφαίνειν is used, Titus 2:11; Titus 3:4. for the Lord is second advent Paul commonly uses παρουσία presenceonce the verb φανεροῦν tomake manifest (Colossians 3:4), and once ἀποκάλυψις revelation(2 Thessalonians 1:7). It is quite possible that the word ἐπιφάνεια , so characteristic of these Epistles, grew out of the Gnostic vocabulary, in which it was used of the sudden appearing of the hitherto concealed heavenly aeon, Christ. This they compared to a sudden light from heaven; and Christ, who thus appeared, though only docetically, without an actual fleshly body, was styled σωτὴρ savioralthough his oneness with the God of creation was denied. The Creator and the Redeemer were not the same, but were rather opposed. Christ was only a factor of a great cosmological process of development. As Neander observes: “The distinctive aim of the Gnostics was to apprehend the appearance of Christ and the new creation proceeding from him in their connection with the evolution of the whole universe.” [source]
1 Timothy 3:16 Was manifest [ἐφανερώθη]
More correctly, was manifested. The verb is used John 1:2; Hebrews 9:26; 1 Peter 1:20; 1 John 3:5, 1 John 3:8, of the historical manifestation of Christ; and of the future coming of Christ in Colossians 3:4; 1 Peter 5:4; 1 John 3:2. [source]
1 Timothy 3:16 Was manifested [επανερωτη]
First aorist passive indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō to manifest. Here used to describe the incarnation The verb is used by Paul elsewhere of the incarnation (Romans 16:26; Colossians 1:26) as well as of the second coming (Colossians 3:4). [source]
1 Timothy 3:16 Great [μεγα]
See note on Ephesians 5:32. “A great mystery.” The mystery of godliness (το της ευσεβειας μυστηριον — to tēs eusebeias mustērion). See 1 Timothy 3:9 “the mystery of the faith,” and 1 Timothy 2:2 for ευσεβεια — eusebeia Here the phrase explains “a pillar and stay of the truth” (1 Timothy 3:15). See in particular 1 Corinthians 1:27. “The revealed secret of true religion, the mystery of Christianity, the Person of Christ” (Lock). He who The correct text, not τεος — theos (God) the reading of the Textus Receptus (Syrian text) nor ο — ho (neuter relative, agreeing with μυστηριον — mustērion) the reading of the Western documents. Westcott and Hort print this relative clause as a fragment of a Christian hymn (like Ephesians 5:14) in six strophes. That is probably correct. At any rate ος — hos (who) is correct and there is asyndeton (no connective) in the verbs. Christ, to whom ος — hos refers, is the mystery (Colossians 1:27; Colossians 2:2). Was manifested (επανερωτη — ephanerōthē). First aorist passive indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō to manifest. Here used to describe the incarnation (εν σαρκι — en sarki) of Christ (an answer also to the Docetic Gnostics). The verb is used by Paul elsewhere of the incarnation (Romans 16:26; Colossians 1:26) as well as of the second coming (Colossians 3:4). Justified in the spirit First aorist passive indicative of δικαιοω — dikaioō to declare righteous, to vindicate. Christ was vindicated in his own spirit (Hebrews 9:14) before men by overcoming death and rising from the dead (Romans 1:3.). Seen of angels (ωπτη αγγελοις — ōphthē aggelois). First aorist passive indicative of οραω — horaō to see, with either the instrumental or the dative case of angels (αγγελοις — aggelois). The words were probably suggested by the appearance of Jesus (ωπτη — ōphthē the usual form for the resurrection appearances of Christ) of the angels at the tomb and at the ascension of Christ. See note on Philemon 2:10; 1 Peter 3:22 for the appearance of Jesus to the angels in heaven at the ascension. Some would take “angels” here to be “messengers” (the women). Preached among the nations First aorist passive indicative of κηρυσσω — kērussō to proclaim. The word ετνος — ethnos may mean “all creation” (Colossians 1:23) and not just Gentiles as distinct from Jews. Paul had done more of this heralding of Christ among the Gentiles than any one else. It was his glory (Ephesians 3:1, Ephesians 3:8). Cf. 1 Timothy 2:7. Believed on in the world (επιστευτη εν κοσμωι — episteuthē en kosmōi). First aorist indicative passive again of πιστευω — pisteuō to believe (2 Thessalonians 1:10). Cf. 1 Timothy 1:15; 2 Corinthians 5:19. Received up in glory First aorist passive again (six verbs in the same voice and tense in succession, a rhythmic arrangement like a hymn). Cf. Romans 8:29. This time the verb is αναλαμβανω — analambanō the verb used of the ascension (Acts 1:11, Acts 1:22, which see). In a wonderful way this stanza of a hymn presents the outline of the life of Christ. [source]
1 Timothy 3:16 He who [ος]
The correct text, not τεος — theos (God) the reading of the Textus Receptus (Syrian text) nor ο — ho (neuter relative, agreeing with μυστηριον — mustērion) the reading of the Western documents. Westcott and Hort print this relative clause as a fragment of a Christian hymn (like Ephesians 5:14) in six strophes. That is probably correct. At any rate ος — hos (who) is correct and there is asyndeton (no connective) in the verbs. Christ, to whom ος — hos refers, is the mystery (Colossians 1:27; Colossians 2:2). Was manifested (επανερωτη — ephanerōthē). First aorist passive indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō to manifest. Here used to describe the incarnation (εν σαρκι — en sarki) of Christ (an answer also to the Docetic Gnostics). The verb is used by Paul elsewhere of the incarnation (Romans 16:26; Colossians 1:26) as well as of the second coming (Colossians 3:4). Justified in the spirit First aorist passive indicative of δικαιοω — dikaioō to declare righteous, to vindicate. Christ was vindicated in his own spirit (Hebrews 9:14) before men by overcoming death and rising from the dead (Romans 1:3.). Seen of angels (ωπτη αγγελοις — ōphthē aggelois). First aorist passive indicative of οραω — horaō to see, with either the instrumental or the dative case of angels (αγγελοις — aggelois). The words were probably suggested by the appearance of Jesus (ωπτη — ōphthē the usual form for the resurrection appearances of Christ) of the angels at the tomb and at the ascension of Christ. See note on Philemon 2:10; 1 Peter 3:22 for the appearance of Jesus to the angels in heaven at the ascension. Some would take “angels” here to be “messengers” (the women). Preached among the nations First aorist passive indicative of κηρυσσω — kērussō to proclaim. The word ετνος — ethnos may mean “all creation” (Colossians 1:23) and not just Gentiles as distinct from Jews. Paul had done more of this heralding of Christ among the Gentiles than any one else. It was his glory (Ephesians 3:1, Ephesians 3:8). Cf. 1 Timothy 2:7. Believed on in the world (επιστευτη εν κοσμωι — episteuthē en kosmōi). First aorist indicative passive again of πιστευω — pisteuō to believe (2 Thessalonians 1:10). Cf. 1 Timothy 1:15; 2 Corinthians 5:19. Received up in glory First aorist passive again (six verbs in the same voice and tense in succession, a rhythmic arrangement like a hymn). Cf. Romans 8:29. This time the verb is αναλαμβανω — analambanō the verb used of the ascension (Acts 1:11, Acts 1:22, which see). In a wonderful way this stanza of a hymn presents the outline of the life of Christ. [source]
2 Timothy 1:1 Of life which is in Christ Jesus []
The phrase promise of life only here and 1 Timothy 4:8. oP. Life in Christ is a Pauline thought. See Romans 8:2; 2 Corinthians 4:10; Romans 6:2-14; Galatians 2:19, Galatians 2:20; Colossians 3:4; Philemon 1:21. It is also a Johannine thought; see John 1:4; John 3:15; John 6:25; John 14:6; 1 John 5:11. [source]
2 Timothy 1:10 But hath now been manifested [πανερωτεισαν δε νυν]
First aorist passive participle of πανεροω — phaneroō agreeing with χαριν — charin See Titus 1:3; Colossians 1:26; Colossians 3:4 for πανεροω — phaneroō and the contrast made. [source]
1 Peter 1:5 Are guarded [προυρουμενους]
Present (continuous process) passive articular Intermediate agency (δια — dia), the immediate being (εν — en in, by) God‘s power.Unto a salvation Deliverance is the goal Prepared awaiting God‘s will (Galatians 3:23; Romans 8:18).To be revealed First aorist passive infinitive of αποκαλυπτω — apokaluptō to unveil. Cf. Colossians 3:4 for πανεροω — phaneroō (to manifest) in this sense.In the last time (εν καιρωι εσχατωι — en kairōi eschatōi). This precise phrase nowhere else, but similar ones in John 6:39; Acts 2:17; James 5:3; 2 Timothy 3:1; 2 Peter 3:3; Hebrews 1:2; Judges 1:18; 1 John 2:18. Hort translates it here “in a season of extremity,” but it is usually taken to refer to the Day of Judgment. That day no one knows, Jesus said. [source]
1 Peter 1:5 Unto a salvation [εις σωτηριαν]
Deliverance is the goal Prepared awaiting God‘s will (Galatians 3:23; Romans 8:18).To be revealed First aorist passive infinitive of αποκαλυπτω — apokaluptō to unveil. Cf. Colossians 3:4 for πανεροω — phaneroō (to manifest) in this sense.In the last time (εν καιρωι εσχατωι — en kairōi eschatōi). This precise phrase nowhere else, but similar ones in John 6:39; Acts 2:17; James 5:3; 2 Timothy 3:1; 2 Peter 3:3; Hebrews 1:2; Judges 1:18; 1 John 2:18. Hort translates it here “in a season of extremity,” but it is usually taken to refer to the Day of Judgment. That day no one knows, Jesus said. [source]
1 Peter 1:5 To be revealed [αποκαλυπτηναι]
First aorist passive infinitive of αποκαλυπτω — apokaluptō to unveil. Cf. Colossians 3:4 for πανεροω — phaneroō (to manifest) in this sense.In the last time (εν καιρωι εσχατωι — en kairōi eschatōi). This precise phrase nowhere else, but similar ones in John 6:39; Acts 2:17; James 5:3; 2 Timothy 3:1; 2 Peter 3:3; Hebrews 1:2; Judges 1:18; 1 John 2:18. Hort translates it here “in a season of extremity,” but it is usually taken to refer to the Day of Judgment. That day no one knows, Jesus said. [source]
1 John 5:12 Hath life [ἔχει τὴν ζωὴν]
More strictly, as Rev., the life; i.e., the life which God gave (1 John 5:11). See on John 16:22. Compare Christ who is our life (Colossians 3:4). [source]
1 John 2:19 That they might be made manifest [ινα πανερωτωσιν]
Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the first aorist passive subjunctive of πανεροω — phaneroō for which verb see John 21:1; Colossians 3:4. See 2 Corinthians 3:3 for the personal construction with οτι — hoti as here.They all are not (ουκ εισιν παντες — ouk eisin pantes). Not just some, but all, as in 1 John 2:21; 1 John 3:5. These antichrists are thus revealed in their true light. [source]
1 John 1:2 Was manifested [επανερωτη]
First aorist passive indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō to make known what already exists, whether invisible (B. Weiss) or visible, “intellectual or sensible” (Brooke). In Colossians 3:4 Paul employs it of the second coming of Christ. 1 John 1:2 here is an important parenthesis, a mark of John‘s style as in John 1:15. By the parenthesis John heaps reassurance upon his previous statement of the reality of the Incarnation by the use of εωρακαμεν — heōrakamen (as in 1 John 1:1) with the assertion of the validity of his “witness” (μαρτυρουμεν — marturoumen) and “message” (απαγγελλομεν — apaggellomen), both present active indicatives (literary plurals), απαγγελλω — apaggellō being the public proclamation of the great news (John 16:25). [source]
1 John 2:19 For if they had been of us [ει γαρ εχ ημων ησαν]
Condition of second class with ει — ei and imperfect tense (no aorist for ειμι — eimi).They would have continued (μεμενηκεισαν αν — memenēkeisan an). Past perfect of μενω — menō to remain, without augment, with αν — an in apodosis of second-class condition.With us In fellowship, for which see μετα — meta in 1 John 1:3. They had lost the inner fellowship and then apparently voluntarily broke the outward.But they went (αλλ — all'). Ellipsis of the verb εχηλταν — exēlthan above, a common habit (ellipse) in John s Gospel (John 1:8; John 9:3; John 13:18; John 15:25).That they might be made manifest Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the first aorist passive subjunctive of πανεροω — phaneroō for which verb see John 21:1; Colossians 3:4. See 2 Corinthians 3:3 for the personal construction with οτι — hoti as here.They all are not (ουκ εισιν παντες — ouk eisin pantes). Not just some, but all, as in 1 John 2:21; 1 John 3:5. These antichrists are thus revealed in their true light. [source]
1 John 2:19 With us [μετ ημων]
In fellowship, for which see μετα — meta in 1 John 1:3. They had lost the inner fellowship and then apparently voluntarily broke the outward.But they went (αλλ — all'). Ellipsis of the verb εχηλταν — exēlthan above, a common habit (ellipse) in John s Gospel (John 1:8; John 9:3; John 13:18; John 15:25).That they might be made manifest Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the first aorist passive subjunctive of πανεροω — phaneroō for which verb see John 21:1; Colossians 3:4. See 2 Corinthians 3:3 for the personal construction with οτι — hoti as here.They all are not (ουκ εισιν παντες — ouk eisin pantes). Not just some, but all, as in 1 John 2:21; 1 John 3:5. These antichrists are thus revealed in their true light. [source]
Revelation 1:1 The Revelation [ἀποκάλυψις]
The Greek word is transcribed in Apocalypse. The word occurs only once in the Gospels, Luke 2:32, where to lighten should be rendered for revelation. It is used there of our Lord, as a light to dispel the darkness under which the heathen were veiled. It occurs thirteen times in Paul's writings, and three times in first Peter. It is used in the following senses: (a.) The unveiling of something hidden, which gives light and knowledge to those who behold it. See Luke 2:32(above). Christianity itself is the revelation of a mystery (Romans 16:25). The participation of the Gentiles in the privileges of the new covenant was made known by revelation (Ephesians 3:3). Paul received the Gospel which he preached by revelation (Galatians 1:12), and went up to Jerusalem by revelation (Galatians 2:2). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(b.) Christian insight into spiritual truth. Paul asks for Christians the spirit of revelation (Ephesians 1:17). Peculiar manifestations of the general gift of revelation are given in Christian assemblies (1 Corinthians 14:6, 1 Corinthians 14:26). Special revelations are granted to Paul (2 Corinthians 12:1, 2 Corinthians 12:7). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(c.) The second coming of the Lord (1 Peter 1:7, 1 Peter 1:13; 2 Thessalonians 1:7; 1 Corinthians 1:7) in which His glory shall be revealed (1 Peter 4:13), His righteous judgment made known (Romans 2:5), and His children revealed in full majesty (Romans 8:19). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The kindred verb ἀποκαλύπτω is used in similar connections. Following the categories given above,-DIVIDER-
(a.) Galatians 1:16; Galatians 3:23; Ephesians 3:5; 1 Peter 1:12. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(b.) Matthew 11:25, Matthew 11:27; Matthew 16:17; Luke 10:21, Luke 10:22; 1 Corinthians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 14:30; Philemon 3:15. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(c.) Matthew 10:26; Luke 2:35; Luke 12:2; Luke 17:30; Romans 1:17, Romans 1:18; Romans 8:18; 1 Corinthians 3:13; 2 Thessalonians 2:3, 2 Thessalonians 2:6, 2 Thessalonians 2:8; 1 Peter 1:5; 1 Peter 5:1. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The word is compounded with ἀπό fromand καλύπτω tocover. Hence, to remove the cover from anything; to unveil. So of Balaam, the Lord opened or unveiled his eyes ( ἀπεκάλυψεν τοὺς ὀφθαλμοὺς : Numbers 22:31, Sept.). So Boaz to Naomi's kinsman: “I thought to advertise thee:” Rev., “disclose it unto thee” ( ἀποκαλύψω τὸ οὖς σου : Rth 4:4 , Sept.). Lit., I will uncover thine ear. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The noun ἀποκάλυψις revelationoccurs only once in the Septuagint (1 Samuel 20:30), in the physical sense of uncovering. The verb is found in the Septuagint in Daniel 2:19, Daniel 2:22, Daniel 2:28. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In classical Greek, the verb is used by Herodotus (i., 119) of uncovering the head; and by Plato: thus, “reveal ( ἀποκαλύψας ) to me the power of Rhetoric” (“Gorgias,” 460): “Uncover your chest and back” (“Protagoras,” 352). Both the verb and the noun occur in Plutarch; the latter of uncovering the body, of waters, and of an error. The religious sense, however, is unknown to heathenism. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The following words should be compared with this: Ὀπτασία avision (Luke 1:22; Acts 26:19; 2 Corinthians 12:1). Ὅραμα avision (Matthew 17:9; Acts 9:10; Acts 16:9). Ὅρασις avision (Acts 2:17; Revelation 9:17. Of visible form, Revelation 4:3). These three cannot be accurately distinguished. They all denote the thing seen or shown, without anything to show whether it is understood or not. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
As distinguished from these, ἀποκάλυψις includes, along with the thing shown or seen, its interpretation or unveiling. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Ἐπιφάνεια appearing(hence our epiphany ), is used in profane Greek of the appearance of a higher power in order to aid men. In the New Testament by Paul only, and always of the second appearing of Christ in glory, except in 2 Timothy 1:10, where it signifies His first appearing in the flesh. See 2 Thessalonians 2:8; 1 Timothy 6:14; Titus 2:13. As distinguished from this, ἀπολάλυψις is the more comprehensive word. An apocalypse may include several ἐπιφάνειαι appearingsThe appearings are the media of the revealings. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Φανέρωσις manifestationonly twice in the New Testament; 1 Corinthians 12:7; 2 Corinthians 4:2. The kindred verb φανερόω tomake manifest, is of frequent occurrence. See on John 21:1. It is not easy, if possible, to show that this word has a less dignified sense than ἀποκάλυψις . The verb φανερόω is used of both the first and the second appearing of our Lord (1 Timothy 3:16; 1 John 1:2; 1 Peter 1:20; Colossians 3:4; 1 Peter 5:4). See also John 2:11; John 21:1. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Some distinguish between φανέρωσις as an external manifestation, to the senses, but single and isolated; while ἀποκάλυψις is an inward and abiding disclosure. According to these, the Apocalypse or unveiling, precedes and produces the φανέρωσις or manifestation. The Apocalypse contemplates the thing revealed; the manifestation, the persons to whom it is revealed. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The Revelation here is the unveiling of the divine mysteries.Of Jesus ChristNot the manifestation or disclosure of Jesus Christ, but the revelation given by Him.To shew ( δεῖξαι )Frequent in Revelation (Revelation 4:1; Revelation 17:1; Revelation 21:9; Revelation 22:1). Construe with ἔδωκεν gavegave him to shew. Compare “I will give him to sit” (Revelation 3:21): “It was given to hurt” (Revelation 7:2): “It was given him to do;” (A.V. “had power to do;” Revelation 13:14).Servants ( δούλοις )Properly, bond-servants. See on Matthew 20:26; see on Mark 9:35.Must ( δεῖ )As the decree of the absolute and infallible God.Shortly come to pass ( γενέσθαι ἐν τάχει )For the phrase ἐν τάχει shortlysee Luke 18:8, where yet long delay is implied. Expressions like this must be understood, not according to human measurement of time, but rather as in 2 Peter 3:8. The idea is, before long, as time is computed by God. The aorist infinitive γενέσθαι is not begin to come to pass, but denotes a complete fulfilment: must shortly come to pass in their entirety. He sent ( ἀποστείλας )See on Matthew 10:2, Matthew 10:16.Signified ( ἐσήμανεν )From σῆμα asign. Hence, literally, give a sign or token. The verb occurs outside of John's writings only in Acts 11:28; Acts 25:27. See John 12:33; John 18:32; John 21:19. This is its only occurrence in Revelation. The word is appropriate to the symbolic character of the revelation, and so in John 12:33, where Christ predicts the mode of His death in a figure. Compare sign, Revelation 12:1.Angel ( ἀγγέλου )Strictly, a messenger. See Matthew 11:10; Luke 8:24; Luke 9:52. Compare the mediating angel in the visions of Daniel and Zechariah (Daniel 8:15, Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21; Daniel 10:10; Zechariah 1:19). See on John 1:51.ServantDesignating the prophetic office. See Isaiah 59:5; Amos 3:7; compare Revelation 19:10; Revelation 22:9.JohnJohn does not name himself in the Gospel or in the Epistles. Here “we are dealing with prophecy, and prophecy requires the guarantee of the individual who is inspired to utter it” (Milligan). Compare Daniel 8:1; Daniel 9:2. [source]

What do the individual words in Colossians 3:4 mean?

When - Christ may be revealed the life of you then also you with Him will appear in glory
ὅταν Χριστὸς φανερωθῇ ζωὴ ὑμῶν τότε καὶ ὑμεῖς σὺν αὐτῷ φανερωθήσεσθε ἐν δόξῃ

  - 
Parse: Article, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Χριστὸς  Christ 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: Χριστός  
Sense: Christ was the Messiah, the Son of God.
φανερωθῇ  may  be  revealed 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Subjunctive Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: φανερόω  
Sense: to make manifest or visible or known what has been hidden or unknown, to manifest, whether by words, or deeds, or in any other way.
ζωὴ  life 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Feminine Singular
Root: ζωή  
Sense: life.
ὑμῶν  of  you 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive 2nd Person Plural
Root: σύ  
Sense: you.
καὶ  also 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: καί  
Sense: and, also, even, indeed, but.
φανερωθήσεσθε  will  appear 
Parse: Verb, Future Indicative Passive, 2nd Person Plural
Root: φανερόω  
Sense: to make manifest or visible or known what has been hidden or unknown, to manifest, whether by words, or deeds, or in any other way.
δόξῃ  glory 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: δόξα  
Sense: opinion, judgment, view.