What does Lord mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
κυρίου he to whom a person or thing belongs 230
אֲדֹנָ֣י my lord 188
κύριος he to whom a person or thing belongs 133
κύριε he to whom a person or thing belongs 95
κυρίῳ he to whom a person or thing belongs 93
אֲדֹנָ֥י my lord 85
κύριον he to whom a person or thing belongs 64
אֲדֹנִ֣י firm 24
אֲדֹנִ֥י firm 19
אֲדֹנִ֖י firm 17
אֲדֹנָ֑י my lord 16
אֲדֹנִ֔י firm 14
אֲדֹנָ֤י my lord 14
אֲדֹנָ֗י firm 10
אֲדֹנָ֔י firm 9
אֲ֭דֹנָי my lord 8
אֲדֹנִֽי firm 8
κύριός he to whom a person or thing belongs 8
אֲדֹנִי֙ firm 8
אֲדֹנָי֙ my lord 7
אֲדֹנִ֑י firm 6
אֲדֹנָ֧י my lord 6
אֲדֹנָ֨י my lord 6
אֲדֹנִֽי־ firm 6
אֲדֹנָ֛י my lord 5
אֲ֝דֹנָ֗י my lord 5
אֲדֹנָֽי my lord 5
אֲדֹנָ֖י my lord 4
אֲדֹנִ֨י firm 4
אֲדֹנִ֗י firm 4
לַֽאדֹנִ֔י firm 4
אֲדֹנָי֮ my lord 3
אֲדֹנָי֒ my lord 3
אֲדֹנָֽיו firm 3
לַֽאדֹנִ֖י firm 3
אֲדֹנָ֤י ׀ my lord 3
אֲדֹנִ֤י firm 3
אֲדֹנָי֩ my lord 2
וַאדֹנִ֣י firm 2
לַֽאדֹנָי֙ my lord 2
δέσποτα a master 2
אֲדֹנָ֜י my lord 2
לַֽאדֹנִ֑י firm 2
לַֽאדֹנָ֑י my lord 2
؟ אֲדֹנִֽי firm 2
אֲד֥וֹן firm 2
אָד֣וֹן firm 2
κυριοσ he to whom a person or thing belongs 2
דִּבֶּ֣ר to speak 2
הָאָד֜וֹן firm 2
אֲדֹנִ֛י firm 2
לַֽאדֹנָ֧י my lord 2
לַֽאדֹנָ֣י my lord 2
וַאדֹנָ֨י my lord 1
הָֽאָדֹ֥ן ׀ my lord 1
הָאָד֣וֹן ׀ firm 1
הָאָדֹ֥ן ׀ my lord 1
וַאֲדֹנֵ֖י my lord 1
אֲד֣וֹן firm 1
אֲדֹנָ֕י my lord 1
؟ אֲדֹנָ֖י my lord 1
לַֽאדֹנָ֔י my lord 1
אֲ֝דֹנָי my lord 1
הַשֵּׁם֙ name. 1
רַ֣ב great. / captain 1
אִקָּ֥רֶה to encounter 1
מָרֵֽא־ lord. 1
(מָרִ֥י) lord. 1
(מָרִ֕י) lord. 1
וּמָרֵ֥א lord. 1
לַֽיהוָֽה the proper name of the one true God. 1
וְדִבֶּ֖ר to speak 1
וַֽאדֹנָ֤י my lord 1
אֲדֹנָ֪י my lord 1
בַּאדֹנָ֣י my lord 1
؟ אֲדֹנָ֑י my lord 1
וַאדֹנָ֖י my lord 1
אֲ‍ֽדֹנָי my lord 1
וַֽאדֹנָ֣י my lord 1
וַ֝אֲדֹנֵ֗ינוּ my lord 1
אֲדֹנָ֞י my lord 1
אֲדֹנֵ֔ינוּ my lord 1
אֲדֹנֵ֗ינוּ firm 1
אֲדוֹנָ֔י my lord 1
אֲד֤וֹן my lord 1
אֲד֖וֹן my lord 1
לַאדֹנָ֨י my lord 1
לַאדֹנָ֧י my lord 1
אֲדֹנַ֣יִךְ my lord 1
וַאדֹנָ֤י my lord 1
אֲדֹנֵ֑ינוּ firm 1
מֵֽאֲדֹנִ֔י firm 1
אֲ֝דֹנַ֗יִךְ firm 1
אֲדֹנֵ֜ינוּ firm 1
אֲדֹֽנֵיהֶ֗ם firm 1
؟ אֲדֹנִ֣י firm 1
؟ אֲדֹנִ֑י firm 1
אֲדֹנֶֽיךָ firm 1
אֲדֹנֶ֖יךָ firm 1
לַאדֹנִ֗י firm 1
אֲדֹנִ֜י firm 1
לַֽאדֹנִ֜י firm 1
אֲדֹנִ֣י ׀ firm 1
בַּֽאדֹנִ֔י firm 1
לַֽאדֹנִ֤י firm 1
לַֽאדֹנִי֙ firm 1
אֲדֹ֣נֵיהֶ֔ם firm 1
אֲדֹנֵ֥ינוּ firm 1
וַאדֹנִ֨י firm 1
אֲדֹנֵיכֶ֔ם firm 1
וַאֲדֹנֵ֥ינוּ firm 1
לַאדֹנִ֥י firm 1
לַאדֹנִ֤י firm 1
לַאדֹנִ֖י firm 1
κύριέ he to whom a person or thing belongs 1
κυρίου» he to whom a person or thing belongs 1
κύριόν he to whom a person or thing belongs 1
κυριος he to whom a person or thing belongs 1
‹κύριε› he to whom a person or thing belongs 1
κυριεύομεν to be lord of 1
κυριακῇ belonging to the Lord. 1
κυριακὸν belonging to the Lord. 1
אֲדֹנָ֑יו firm 1
אֲדֹנָ֔יו firm 1
אֲדוֹנֵ֣ינוּ firm 1
אֲדֹנִי֒ firm 1
לַאֲדֹנֵ֣י firm 1
אָ֭דוֹן firm 1
לַֽאדֹנִ֗י firm 1
וַֽאדֹנִי֙ firm 1
אֲדֹנֵיהֶֽם firm 1
לַאֲד֥וֹן firm 1
! אָד֖וֹן firm 1
הָאָד֖וֹן firm 1
הָאָדוֹן֙ firm 1
הָֽאָדוֹן֙ firm 1
δεσπότης a master 1
לְאָד֖וֹן firm 1
וּלְאָדוֹן֙ firm 1
؟ לַֽאדֹנִ֔י firm 1
בַּֽאדֹנִ֥י firm 1
אֲדֹנֶ֔יךָ firm 1
אֲדֹנֵ֣י firm 1
אֲדֹנֵ֥י firm 1
אֲדֹנָ֖יו firm 1
לַאֲדֹנֵיהֶ֖ם firm 1
אֲדֹנִ֕י firm 1
؟ אֲדֹ֣נִי firm 1
לַֽאדֹנִ֨י firm 1
אֲדֹנֶ֙יךָ֙ firm 1
אֲדֹֽנֵיכֶם֙ firm 1
לַאדֹנִ֣י firm 1
וַאדֹנִ֤י firm 1
אֲדֹנִי֮ firm 1
שֵׁ֖ם name. 1

Definitions Related to Lord

G2962


   1 he to whom a person or thing belongs, about which he has power of deciding; master, Lord.
      1a the possessor and disposer of a thing.
         1a1 the owner; one who has control of the person, the master.
         1a2 in the state: the sovereign, prince, chief, the Roman emperor.
      1b is a title of honour expressive of respect and reverence, with which servants salute their master.
      1c this title is given to: God, the Messiah.
      Additional Information: For synonyms see entry 1203, despotes.
      See entry 5830 for comparison of synonyms.
      

H136


   1 my Lord, Lord.
      1a of men.
      1b of God.
   2 Lord—title, spoken in place of Yahweh in Jewish display of reverence.
   

H113


   1 firm, strong, Lord, master.
      1a Lord, master.
         1a1 reference to men.
            1a1a superintendent of household,of affairs.
            1a1b master.
            1a1c king.
         1a2 reference to God.
            1a2a the Lord God.
            1a2b Lord of the whole earth.
      1b lords, kings.
         1b1 reference to men.
            1b1a proprietor of hill of Samaria.
            1b1b master.
            1b1c husband.
            1b1d prophet.
            1b1e governor.
            1b1f prince.
            1b1g king.
         1b2 reference to God.
            1b2a Lord of lords (probably = “thy husband, Yahweh”).
      1c my Lord, my master.
         1c1 reference to men.
            1c1a master.
            1c1b husband.
            1c1c prophet.
            1c1d prince.
            1c1e king.
            1c1f father.
            1c1g Moses.
            1c1h priest.
            1c1i theophanic angel.
            1c1j captain.
            1c1k general recognition of superiority.
         1c2 reference to God.
            1c2a my Lord,my Lord and my God.
            1c2b Adonai (parallel with Yahweh).
            

H1696


   1 to speak, declare, converse, command, promise, warn, threaten, sing.
      1a (Qal) to speak.
      1b (Niphal) to speak with one another, talk.
      1c (Piel).
         1c1 to speak.
         1c2 to promise.
      1d (Pual) to be spoken.
      1e (Hithpael) to speak.
      1f (Hiphil) to lead away, put to flight.
      

H3068


   1 the proper name of the one true God.
      1a unpronounced except with the vowel pointings of 0136.
      Additional Information: Jehovah = “the existing One”.
      

H8034


   1 name.
      1a name.
      1b reputation, fame, glory.
      1c the Name (as designation of God).
      1d memorial, monument.
      

G1203


   1 a master, Lord.
   Additional Information: For synonyms see entry 2962, kurios.
   See entry 5830 for comparison of synonyms.
   

G2960


   1 belonging to the Lord.
   2 related to the Lord.
   

H7136


   1 to encounter, meet, befall, happen, come to meet.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to encounter, meet.
         1a2 to befall.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to encounter, meet (without pre-arrangement).
         1b2 to chance to be present.
         1b3 to come to meet.
      1c (Hiphil) to cause to meet, appoint.
   2 to build with beams.
      2a (Piel) to lay the beams of, furnish with beams.
      

G2961


   1 to be Lord of, to rule, have dominion over.
   2 of things and forces.
      2a to exercise influence upon, to have power over.
      

H7229


   1 great.
      1a great.
      1b great (fig of power) n.
   2 captain, chief.
   

H4756


   1 Lord.
      1a of king.
      1b of God.
      

Frequency of Lord (original languages)

Frequency of Lord (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Lord
Heb. Jehovah, has been rendered in the English Bible LORD, printed in small capitals. This is the proper name of the God of the Hebrews. The form "Jehovah" is retained only in Exodus 6:3 ; Psalm 83:18 ; Isaiah 12:2 ; 26:4 , both in the Authorized and the Revised Version.
Heb. 'adon, means one possessed of absolute control. It denotes a master, as of slaves (Genesis 24:14,27 ), or a ruler of his subjects (45:8), or a husband, as lord of his wife (18:12). The old plural form of this Hebrew word is 'Adonai . From a superstitious reverence for the name "Jehovah," the Jews, in reading their Scriptures, whenever that name occurred, always pronounced it 'Adonai .
Greek kurios, a supreme master, etc. In the LXX. this is invariably used for "Jehovah" and "'Adonai."
Heb. ba'al, a master, as having domination. This word is applied to human relations, as that of husband, to persons skilled in some art or profession, and to heathen deities. "The men of Shechem," literally "the baals of Shechem" ( Judges 9:2,3 ). These were the Israelite inhabitants who had reduced the Canaanites to a condition of vassalage (Joshua 16:10 ; 17:13 ).
Heb. seren, applied exclusively to the "lords of the Philistines" (Judges 3:3 ). The LXX. render it by satrapies. At this period the Philistines were not, as at a later period (1 Samuel 21:10 ), under a kingly government. (See Joshua 13:3 ; 1 Samuel 6:18 .) There were five such lordships, viz., Gath, Ashdod, Gaza, Ashkelon, and Ekron.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Nativity of Our Lord in Art
Among the many masters who have represented the subject are: Alberti, Caedi, Civerchio, Correggio, David, A. Della Robbia, L. Della Robbia, Dettmann, Dürer, El Greco, Fra Angelico, Francia, Ghirlandajo, Lippi, Lochner, Luini, Master of the Glorification of Mary, Murillo, Pacchiarotto, Palma, Perugino, Pinturicchio, Rembrandt, Santa Croce, Sarto, and Uhde.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jesus! my Lord, my God, my All!
Hymn written in the 19th century by Reverend F. W. Faber.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lord of Hosts
in Isaias 9:9, as in many other passages of the Bible, designates God as supreme over untold armies of spiritual and other agencies, which He can employ to give effect to His purposes. The angels, the stars, as well as armies of men are represented in the Bible as subject to Him. The Septuagint Version sometimes simply translates the expression Lord of Hosts by a word which means the Omnipotent. In the text referred to, Isaias says that God, Who is Almighty, will bring about the fulfillment of His prophecy concerning Emmanuel.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Master And Lord
Name of Christ addressed to Him by the Apostles, and accepted by Him after washing the feet of the Apostles (John 13).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Misrule, Lord of
One of the chief characters in the celebration of the Feast of Fools, a custom of the later medieval period, which came to be marked with much license and buffoonery, and was eventually suppressed. The Lord of Misrule was a mock precentor of the cathedral choir. Before the first Vespers he was allowed to intone the prose "Laetemur gaudiis"; during the second Vespers he was deprived of his precentor's staff. The Feast of Fools originated in the Feast of the Subdeacons occurring January 1,; later it developed into a feast of the lower clergy; and still later it was taken up by certain brotherhoods of "fools." There is little doubt that the license and buffoonery which came to be associated with this, as with other medieval feasts, had their origin in pagan times. The ecclesiastical authorities repeatedly condemned it or eandeavored to restrain it within bounds. Eventually it passed out of practise.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Hosts, Lord of
See Lord of Hosts.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Servant of the Lord
SERVANT OF THE LORD . In this phrase, as repeatedly in the EV [1] of the OT, ‘Lord’ is substituted for ‘Jahweh,’ the proper name of the God of Israel, which stands in the Hebrew text.
1 . Originally the term ‘ servant ’ in this phrase is simply correlative to such terms as ‘lord,’ ‘master,’ which the ancient Hebrews, in common with their Semitic kinsmen, applied to their god. In the first instance, the phrase ‘the servant of Jahweh’ merely defines a man as one who acknowledges Jahweh as his god; it corresponds closely to what we might rather call a worshipper of Jahweh. Naturally, therefore, it may stand in antithesis to a similar phrase in which the name of another deity takes the place of that of Jahweh. Thus the ‘servants of Jahweh’ and ‘the servants of the (Tyrian) Baal’ are contrasted in 2 Kings 10:23 , though the fact that the same word is used in both phrases is obscured by the RV [2] , which exaggerates a distinction capriciously introduced by the punctuators into the Hebrew text.
2 . Thus it will be readily understood that any Israelite might be called ‘the servant of Jahweh,’ and as a matter of fact a large number of individuals received this phrase as their name; it is familiar to English readers in the form Obadiah , which was originally pronounced, as the LXX [3] indicates, Abdiyah (cf. the parallel name Abdiel ‘servant of God’). Adherents of other gods received similar proper names, such as Ebed-melech (wh. see) = ‘servant of the god Melech,’ or Abd-Melkarth , Abd-Eshmun , and Abd-Manât , typical Phœnician and Nabatæan names meaning respectively servant of the gods Melkarth, Eshmun, and Manât.
3 . But just as modern terms denoting religions attachment, like ‘Christian’ or ‘believer,’ may, according to the connexion in which they occur, differ greatly in the fulness of their meaning, so ‘the servant of Jahweh’ might imply a higher degree, or more special form, of service than is necessarily involved in the proper name Obadiah, or in the distinction between ‘servants of Jahweh’ and ‘servants of Baal.’ Such fuller significance attaches to the phrase when prophets ( Amos 3:7 , 2 Kings 9:7 , Jeremiah 7:25 , and often) or priests and Levites ( Psalms 134:1 ) are specified as ‘the servant of Jahweh’; so also when particular individuals are thus described. Among the individuals specifically termed ‘the servant of Jahweh’ (which in speeches of Jahweh of course becomes ‘my servant’) are Abraham ( Genesis 26:24 ), Moses ( Exodus 14:31 , Numbers 12:7 f., and often), Joshua ( Joshua 24:29 ), Caleb ( Isaiah 40:1-31 ), Job ( Job 1:8 ), David ( 2 Samuel 3:18 and often), Eliakim ( Isaiah 22:20 ), Zerubbabel ( Haggai 2:23 ), and the person who is termed ‘the Shoot’ (EV [1] text ‘the Branch,’ Zechariah 3:8 ).
4 . The use of the term in Deutero-Isaiah ( Numbers 14:24 ; Isaiah 41:1-29 ; Isaiah 42:1-25 ; Isaiah 43:1-28 ; Isaiah 44:1-28 ; Isaiah 45:1-25 ; Isaiah 46:1-13 ; Isaiah 47:1-15 ; Isaiah 48:1-22 ; Isaiah 49:1-26 ; Isaiah 50:1-11 ; Isaiah 51:1-23 ; Isaiah 52:1-15 ; Isaiah 53:1-12 ; Isaiah 54:1-17 ; Isaiah 55:1-13 ) is peculiar. In certain passages this writer clearly uses the term to describe the nation: the entire people is personified, spoken of as an individual, and called by Jahweh ‘my servant,’ or, by the prophet speaking in his own name, ‘the servant of Jahweh.’ These passages are Isaiah 41:8 f., Isaiah 44:21 , Isaiah 49:3 , Isaiah 44:1 f., Isaiah 45:4 . The same use of the term is found in Psalms 136:22 , which was written much later; but it does not occur in any extant literature that is unquestionably earlier than the Deutero-Isaiah, for Jeremiah 30:10 (not found in the Greek text) = Jeremiah 46:27 f. is probably not a saying of the prophet Jeremiah’s, and in Ezekiel 37:25 ; Ezekiel 28:25 , sometimes cited as parallel, the phrase is used of an individual of the past, the patriarch Jacob, not of the nation of the present.
5 . But though the particular character of ‘the servant of Jahweh’ in which the nation is personified may be peculiar to the Deutero-Isaiah, and one or two writers influenced by him, similar personifications are common enough with Hebrew writers, and are sometimes so remote from our habits of thought and expression that the RV [2] has sacrificed the figure to gain intelligibility, as, e.g. , in Joshua 9:7 , which, literally rendered, runs, ‘and the man of Israel said unto the Hivite, perhaps thou art dwelling in my midst’ (for further examples see G. B. Gray, Divine Discipline of Israel , 79 f., or ‘Numbers,’ in ICC [6] p. 265 f.). Other notable instances of personification retained even in RV [2] are Hosea 11:1 ‘When Israel was a child, then I loved him, and called my son out of Egypt’ (where son = the Hebrew nation), and Psalms 129:1 ff., where Israel is to say, ‘Many a time have they afflicted me from my youth up, yet have they not prevailed against me. The plowers plowed upon my back; they made long their furrows.’
6 . But while the personification of the nation as the ‘servant of Jahweh’ is certain in the passages cited in § 4 , there are other passages in which most scholars in the past, and many of the present, have concluded that the title has another application that it refers prophetically to Jesus Christ, or to some individual known historically to the writer, such as Jeremiah, Jehoiachin, Zerubbabel, or the Eleazar of 2Ma 6:18-31 , or to the pious section of Israel. In so far as this conclusion rests on the individualizing traits in the description of the servant in such passages as Isaiah 50:4-9 ; Isaiah 52:13 to Isaiah 53:12 , it is unconvincing; for the facts can be equally well, and, so far as the death, burial, and resurrection (cf. Ezekiel 37:1-28 ) of the servant are concerned, far better, explained by the analogy of the personifications referred to in the last paragraph, as figuralive descriptions of the history of the nation in the past, and of the prophet’s hopes for it in the future.
7 . In one passage ( Isaiah 50:10 f.), indeed, ‘the servant of Jahweh’ is probably not the nation Israel; for the audience addressed appears to consist of Jews; if so, the servant here is either an individual or a comparatively small class not the whole of the pious Israelites, for he is distinguished from ‘those that fear Jahweh.’ This passage is commonly considered to be the work of a later writer than the Deutero-Isaiah.
8 . The most important differences of interpretation are concerned with four passages, Isaiah 42:1-4 ; Isaiah 49:1-8 ; Isaiah 50:4-9 ; Isaiah 52:13 to Isaiah 53:12 . These are commonly, though not unanimously, held to be the work of one writer, but several scholars hold that this writer was not the Deutero-Isaiah. The critical question is largely an exegetical one; if there really is the wide difference, which some claim to discover, between the use of the term ‘servant of Jahweh’ in, and the religious standpoints of, these passages and the Deutero-Isaiah, differences of authorship may not unnaturally be inferred; otherwise the grounds for disintegration are slight. Unfortunately the interpretation of the passages is rendered difficult and ambiguous by the state of the text; that the text is to some extent corrupt, especially in Isaiah 52:13 to Isaiah 53:12 , is now generally admitted; but as to the exact extent, and the nature of the corruption, differences of judgment prevail. No consistent interpretation of ‘the servant of Jahweh’ given in these four passages is possible on the basis of the present text; for in Isaiah 49:3 the servant is identified with the nation, but in Isaiah 53:8 he is distinguished from the nation, for ‘my people’ (if the text be sound) cannot be made to mean anything but Israel except by very forced exegesis. Consequently, in the interests of consistency some scholars have struck out the word ‘Israel’ in Isaiah 49:3 , others have corrected ‘the transgression of my people’ in Isaiah 53:8 to ‘our transgressions,’ or ‘their transgression,’ or ‘the transgression of peoples’ (all comparatively slight changes in the Hebrew text). It may be observed that Isaiah 53:8 is in other respects admittedly obscure, if not also corrupt.
It must suffice to refer briefly here to one or two of the chief points for or against the two main alternatives that in these passages, as elsewhere in Deutero-Isaiah, the servant is Israel, or something less than Israel (whether a section of the nation or an individual). We shall consider the latter alternative first.
(1) Two passages have been considered to demand a distinction between the servant and Israel. One of these, Isaiah 53:8 , as already stated, certainly does demand it, if the text be sound; but this is doubtful. The other passage is Isaiah 49:5-6 , which follows the statement in the present text that the servant is Israel ( Isaiah 49:3 ). These verses as translated in RV [2] imply that the servant and Israel are distinct. But though the translation of RV [2] in Isaiah 43:1-28 is grammatically correct, it is not necessary; other grammatically correct translations are: ‘and now Jahweh that formed me to be his servant hath determined to bring back Jacob again to himself, and that Israel should be gathered to him,’ or ‘and now saith Jahweh that formed me from the womb to be his servant in that he brought Jacob again to him, and drew Israel unto him.’ Either of these translations allows of the identity of Israel and the servant. In Isaiah 49:5 RV [2] is incorrect. The Hebrew is extremely awkward and questionable, but literally translated Isaiah 49:6 runs: ‘(a) lighter (thing) than thy being my servant is the raising up of the tribes of Jacob and the restoring of the preserved of Israel, and I will give thee for a light of the nations,’ etc. The ‘also’ in ‘I will also give’ of RV [2] , which suggests that the illumination of the nations is a second function of the servant, in addition to one already described, is absolutely unrepresented in and unsuggested by the Hebrew text. Thus Isaiah 49:8 is ambiguous as to the point at issue; it may mean (if it means anything) either , You do not exhaust your service by restoring Israel, you have also to illumine the nations; or , The fact that you are my servant means more than that I shall rescue you, it means that I shall make use of you for carrying out my purpose of illumining the nations.
(2) Apart from the passages just discussed, which are either textually open to suspicion or ambiguous in meaning, there is nothing that directly forbids identifying the servant with Israel in Isaiah 42:1-4 , Isaiah 49:1-6 , Isaiah 50:4-9 , Isaiah 52:13 to Isaiah 53:12 , as he is unmistakably identified with Israel by the Deutero-Isaiah in many passages (see § 4 ). In the present text of Isaiah 49:3 the identification is actually made. But the strongest argument for the correctness of this identification is to be found in the fact that it does fuller justice to the general tenor of the passages: this is perfectly clear in Isaiah 42:1-4 ; here the Divine speech and the writer’s mind are alike filled with two subjects the Servant and the Nations of the world; the servant is to instruct the nations in the religion of Jahweh: granted that the servant is Israel, we have here a constantly recurring contrast, Israel and the nations; otherwise Israel is totally disregarded. In Isaiah 49:1-6 the servant addresses the nations of the world, and the function of the servant, which on some interpretations (see above) alone is mentioned, and on any interpretation alone receives prominence , is that of spiritually illumining the nations; in Isaiah 52:13-15 Jahweh states that, as the past humiliation of the servant by its very extent attracted far-spread attention, so his coming exaltation will impress nations and kings. Here again, nothing is said of Israel, unless the servant is Israel. In Isaiah 53:1 ff. certain speakers make a confession that they had misjudged the servant of Jahweh, terming him not the righteous one but a sinner, and regarding the unparalleled sufferings which they now perceive had been horne for them, as due to the fact that he was abandoned by Jahweh. Again, the least difficult view as to the speakers who make this confession is that they are the nations referred to in Isaiah 52:15 , and that the servant is the Hebrew nation. That Israel suffered for the nations is certainly a remarkable idea, but that all the sufferings of Israel were not due to its own sins appears to be the thought of Deutero-Isaiah in Isaiah 40:2 . Again, the relative righteousness of Israel, which is all that need be implied if we see in ch. 53 a confession of the nations, is implied elsewhere, e.g. in Isaiah 40:27 .
It is impossible even to indicate here all the difficulties that beset, or the points that favour, the several theories of interpretation. The case for identifying the servant with Israel throughout Is 40 55 has been ably presented in English by K. Budde in AJTh [12] , iii. pp. 499 ff., and by A. S. Peake in the Problem of Suffering in the OT , pp. 34 72 and 180 193, who gives on pp. 44 59 a valuable critical translation of the chief passages. With equal ability the identification of the servant with the ideal Israel is maintained by J. Skinner in the Cambridge Bible for Schools , ‘ Isaiah 40:1-31 ; Isaiah 41:1-29 ; Isaiah 42:1-25 ; Isaiah 49:5 ; Isaiah 44:1-28 ; Isaiah 45:1-25 ; Isaiah 46:1-13 ; Isaiah 47:1-15 ; Isaiah 48:1-22 ; Isaiah 49:1-26 ; Isaiah 50:1-11 ; Isaiah 51:1-23 ; Isaiah 52:1-15 ; Isaiah 53:1-12 ; Isaiah 54:1-17 ; Isaiah 55:1-13 ; Isaiah 56:1-12 ; Isaiah 57:1-21 ; Isaiah 58:1-14 ; Isaiah 59:1-21 ; Isaiah 60:1-22 ; Isaiah 61:1-11 ; Isaiah 62:1-12 ; Isaiah 63:1-19 ; Isaiah 64:1-12 ; Isaiah 65:1-25 ; Isaiah 66:1-24 ,’ pp. 30 37 and 233 238, together with the notes on the relevant passages. The case for interpreting the servant in some passages as an individual has not been fully re-stated in English over against the recent thorough arguments for other interpretations; the student may best turn to Delitzsch’s Com . (Eng. tr. [13] 1890), or G. A. Smith’s ‘Isaiah,’ vol. ii. ( Expositor’s Bible ). T. K. Cheyne, in EBi [14] 4398 4410, offers a very valuable and penetrating criticism of all these theories, as a prelude to his own Jerahmeelite theory, for which he has hitherto found no supporters.
9 . In NT some of the passages in the Deutero-Isaiah are frequently cited or referred to: and in most cases, though not in all (see Acts 13:47 , cf. 2 Timothy 2:24 ), the servant is identified with Jesus ( e.g. Matthew 8:17 ; Matthew 12:18-21 , Luke 22:37 , Acts 8:32 f.). This, of course, proves nothing with regard to the original meaning; for Christian, like Jewish, exegesis was capable of individualizing terms that originally had a wider application; for an instance of this, see Hebrews 2:6-8 , where what is stated in Psalms 8:1-9 of man in general is referred specifically to our Lord.
G. B. Gray.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Day of the Lord
The time when God reveals His sovereignty over human powers and human existence. The day of the Lord rests on the Hebrew term, yom , “day,” the fifth most frequent noun used in the Old Testament and one used with a variety of meanings: time of daylight from sunrise to sunset (Genesis 1:14 ; Genesis 3:8 ; Genesis 8:22 ; Amos 5:8 ); 24 -hour period (Genesis 1:5 ; Numbers 7:12 ,Numbers 7:12,7:18 ; Haggai 1:15 ); a general expression for “time” without specific limits (Genesis 2:4 ; Psalm 102:3 ; Isaiah 7:17 ); the period of a specific event (Isaiah 9:3 ; Jeremiah 32:31 ; Ezekiel 1:28 ). The “day of the Lord” then does not give a precise time period. It may mean either the daylight hours, the 24-hour day, or a general time period, perhaps characterized by a special event. Zechariah 14:7 even points to a time when all time is daylight, night with its darkness having vanished.
“Day of the Lord” does not in itself designate the time perspective of the event, whether it is past, present, or future. Lamentations 2:2 can speak of the “day of the Lord's anger” in past tense, describing the fall of Jerusalem. Joel 1:15 could describe a present disaster as the “day of the Lord.”
The Old Testament prophets used a term familiar to their audience, a term by which the audience expected light and salvation (Amos 5:18 ), but the prophets painted it as a day of darkness and judgment (Isaiah 2:10-22 ; Isaiah 13:6 ,Isaiah 13:6,13:9 ; Joel 1:15 ; Joel 2:1-11 ,Joel 2:1-11,2:31 ; Joel 3:14-15 ; Amos 5:20 ; Zephaniah 1:7-8 ,Zephaniah 1:7-8,1:14-18 ; Malachi 4:5 ). The Old Testament language of the day of the Lord is thus aimed at warning sinners among God's people of the danger of trust in traditional religion without commitment to God and to His way of life. It is language that could be aimed at judging Israel or that could be used to promise deliverance from evil enemies (Isaiah 13:6 ,Isaiah 13:6,13:9 ; Ezekiel 30:3 ; Obadiah 1:15 ). The day of the Lord is thus a point in time in which God displays His sovereign initiative to reveal His control of history, of time, of His people, and of all people.
New Testament writers took up the Old Testament expression to point to Christ's final victory and the final judgment of sinners. In so doing, they used several different expressions: “day of Jesus Christ” (Philippians 1:6 ,Philippians 1:6,1:10 ), “day of our Lord Jesus” (1 Corinthians 1:8 ; 1 Corinthians 5:5 ); “day of the Lord” (1 Thessalonians 5:2 ); “day of Christ” (Philippians 2:16 ); “day of judgment” (1 John 4:17 ); “the day” (1 Thessalonians 5:4 ); “that day” (2 Timothy 1:12 ); “day of wrath” (Romans 2:5 ).
People who take a dispensational perspective on Scripture often seek to interpret each of the terms differently, so that the “day of Christ” is a day of blessing equated with the rapture, whereas the day of God is an inclusive term for all the events of end time (2 Peter 3:12 ). See Dispensations. In this view the day of the Lord includes the great tribulation, the following judgment on the nations, and the time of worldwide blessing under the rule of the Messiah.
Many Bible students who do not take a dispensational viewpoint interpret the several expressions in the New Testament to refer to one major event: the end time when Christ returns for the final judgment and establishes His eternal kingdom.
Whichever interpretation one makes of specific details, the day of the Lord points to the promise that God's eternal sovereignty over all creation and all nations will one day become crystal clear to all creatures.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Detained Before the Lord
To remain in the presence of the Lord at the Tabernacle or Temple (1 Samuel 21:7 ). The reason for Doeg's remaining at the Tabernacle is not given. Perhaps he was there to fulfill a vow, receive an oracle, perform an act of penance, or to celebrate a holiday. 1 Samuel 21:6 suggests that it was the Sabbath. (See Mark 2:25-26 ).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Names of Our Lord
Various names have been given to Our Lord in Holy Scripture and the liturgy of the Church. These are given below as found in the Old Testament, used by Himself, by the Apostles and Evangelists, and by others, particularly in the liturgy.
IN THE OLD TESTAMENT
Almighty Word, Wisdom of Solomon 18:15
Brightness of Eternal Light, Wisdom of Solomon 7:26
Child, Isaiah 9:6
Counsellor, Isaiah 9:6
Desire of Eternal Hills, Genesis 49:26
Desired of all nations, Aggeus 2:8
Emmanuel, Isaiah 7:14
Expectation of nations, Genesis
Father of World to Come, Isaiah
God the Mighty, Isaiah 9:6
Holy One of Israel, Isaiah 43:3
Holy One, Psalms 15:10
Just Branch, Jeremiah 23:5
Just, Isaiah 45:8
King of Glory, Psalms 23:7
Lord of Hosts, Isaiah 9:7
Lord Our Just One, Jeremiah 23:6
Man of Sorrows, Isaiah 53:3
Man, Michah 5:5
My Just One, Isaiah 41:10
Orient, Zachariah 6:12
Prince of Peace, Isaiah 9:6
Root of Jesse, Isaiah 11:10
Ruler of the Earth, Isaiah 16:1
Sun of Justice, Malachi 4:2
Wonderful, Isaiah 9:6
USED BY HIMSELF
Bread of Life, John 6:35
Door, John 10:9
Good Shepherd, John 10:11
Life, John 11:25
Light of the World, John 9:5
Lord, John 13:13
Master, John 13:13
Resurrection and Life, John 11:25
Son of Man, Matthew 8:2O
Son, John 5:22
Vine, John 15:1
Way, Truth, and Life, John 14:6
USED BY THE APOSTLES and EVANGELISTS
Advocate, 1 John 2:1
Almighty, Apocalypse 1:8
Alpha and Omega, Apocalypse 1:8
Amen, Apocalypse 3:14
Author and Finisher of Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Author of Life, Acts 3:15
Beginning and End, Apocalypse 1:8
Blessed God, Mark 14:61
Child Jesus, Luke 2:43
Christ Jesus, 1 Timothy 1:1
Christ, Matthrew 1:18
Corner-Stone, Epheisans 2:21
Day Star, 2 Peter 1:19
Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Faithful Witness, Apocalypse 1:5
First and Last, Apocalypse 1:17
First Born from the Dead, Apocalypse 1:5
Galitean, Matthew 26:69
God of the Jews, Romans 3:29
Great Pastor, Hebrews 13:20
He that is to come, Hebrews 10:37
Head, Ephesians 4:15
High Priest, Hebrews 2:17
Jesus Christ the Just, 1 John 2:1
Jesus, Matthew 27:17
Key of David, Apocalypse 3:7
King of Kings, Apocalypse 19:16
Lamb of God, John 1:29
Life Eternal, 1 John 1:2
Lion of the Tribe of Juda, Apocalypse 5:5
Living Stone, 1 Peter 2:4
Lord Jesus Christ, Acts 10:48
Lord of All, Galatians 4:1
Lord of Lords, Apocalypse 19:16
Lord Our God, Apocalypse 4:11
Mediator, Hebrews 9:15
Messias, John 1:41 (passim)
Only Begotten of the Father, John 1:14
Our Lord Jesus Ghrist, Romans 1:4
Pascha Nostrum, 1 Corinthians 5:7
Power of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Priest, Hebrews 8:4
Prince of the kings of the earth, Apocalypse 1:5
Rabbi, John 1:18
Rock of Scandal, Romans 9:33
Root of David, Apocalypse 5:6
Saviour of the world, John 4:42
Saviour, Luke 2:11
Son of David, Mark 12:86
Son of God, Matthew 8:29
Son of Joseph, Luke 3:23
Son of the Living God, Matthew 16:16
Star of the morning, Apocalypse 2:23
Stone of stumbling, 1 Peter 2:8
Stone, Matthew 21:42
Teacher, John 3:2
That which was from the beginning, 1 John 1:1
Victim, Ephesians 5:2
Wisdom of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Word, John 1:1
Word of God, Apocalypse 19:13
Word of Life, 1 John 1:1
USED BY OTHERS
Adonai, O Antiphons
Angel in the liturgy of the Mass
Captain of our salvation, Ephiphany, Matins
Captain of the Martyrs, Octain of Saint Stephen, Matins
Carpenter's Son, Matthew 13:55
Christ our King, First Wednesday in Advent, Matins
Christ the Lord, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Eagle, Saint Maximus, Homily 42
Eternal, Christmas Day, Lauds
Eternal Word of God made Flesh, Ember Saturday in Advent, Martins
Glory of Thy people Israel, Luke 2:32
God of God, title in Gloria
God our Saviour, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
God the Son, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Great Prophet, First Sunday in Advent, Lauds
Heavenly Bridegroom, Epiphany, Lauds
Holy, Luke 1:35
Holy One of God, Luke 4
King of all the earth, Second Monday in Advent, Vespers
King of Angel Hosts above, Circumcision, Matins
King of Heaven, Christmas Day, Matins
King of Israel, Mark 15:32
King of Righteousness, Third Thursday in Advent, Matins
King of the Gentiles, O Antiphons
King of the Jews, Matthew 2:2
King Peaceful, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
Light to the revelation of the Gentiles, Luke 2:32
Light of Light, title in Gloria
Lord of Angels, Eve of Epiphany, Matins
Lord Our King, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Lawgiver, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Saviour, Circumcision, Matins
Lord that shall rule, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord the King, Ephiphany, Matins
Lord the Ruler, Second Sunday in Advent, Matins
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Wars of the Lord, Book of the
WARS OF THE LORD, BOOK OF THE . A work quoted in Numbers 21:14 f. to settle a point with regard to the boundary of Moab and Ammon. The quotations in Numbers 21:17-18 ; Numbers 21:27-30 are probably from the same original. This is the only mention of the book in the OT. It is not likely that the work is identical with the Book of Jashar . It probably consisted of a collection of songs celebrating the victories of Israel over their neighbours. The song in Exodus 15:1-19 describing the Lord as ‘a man of war’ has been thought to be derived from it. The date of the work is unknown. As it deals with the heroic age, it likely originated in the period immediately following, and it has been dated in the reign of Omri (Stade), and by others as early as the time of David or Solomon. If Numbers 21:27-30 refer to the wars of Omri, we must regard the work as a product of the N. kingdom.
W. F. Boyd.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the
Expression, often in the context of future events, which refers to the time when God will intervene decisively for judgment and/or salvation. Variously formulated as the "day of the Lord" (Amos 5:18 ), the "day of our Lord Jesus Christ" (1Col 1:8; cf. 2Col 1:14), the "day of God" (2 Peter 3:12 ; Revelation 16:14 ), or "the last day(s), " the expression highlights the unmistakable appearance of God. God will make visible his rule of righteousness by calling for an accounting by the nations as well as individuals, dispensing punishment for some and ushering in salvation for others.
In the Old Testament the expression "day of the Lord" occurs eighteen times in prophetic literature, most often in the books of Joel and Zephaniah. It is not found in Daniel. A similar expression that stands close to it is "on that day, " which occurs 208 times in the Old Testament; half the occurrences are in the prophets. In the New Testament, equivalent expressions, such as "day of Jesus Christ, " are found in 1 Corinthians 1:8 ; 2 Corinthians 1:14 ; Philippians 1:6,10 ; and 2 Peter 3:10,12 . "Day of the Lord" appears in 2 Thessalonians 2:2 .
Origin of the Expression . The origin of the expression is in dispute. Some suggest that it is anchored in creation vocabulary (e.g., the seventh day as especially God's day). Others point to Israel's history, theologically interpreted. Scholars have suggested a cultic ritual, such as the day of a king's enthronement, as providing the setting for the expression. More likely, however, is the proposal that the wars of the Lord in Israel's history serve as the background, since battle images abound (Joel 3:9-10 ; Revelation 16:14 ) and issues of jurisdiction and authority are central to the day of the Lord.
The Quality of the Day . A cluster of various meanings belong to the expression, "day of the Lord." Its first occurrence (Amos 5:18 ), for example, does not refer to the end of the world; in the New Testament, however, such a meaning emerges.
In biblical thought the character or quality of a day (time period) was of greater importance than its date (the numerical quantity in a sequence). From the first mention of the expression by Amos (although some date Obadiah 15 and Joel earlier), the notion of divine intervention, of a "God who comes" is evident. Israel anticipated that for them God's coming would hold favorable prospects, that it would be a day of light. Amos announces that, given Israel's great evil, God's coming will signal for them disappointment and calamity, a day of darkness. Predominant in the divine intervention is the awesome presence of the Almighty. It is as though God not only comes on the scene, but fills the screen of all that is. His presence totally dominates. Human existence pales before this giant reality. On that day, "all hands will go limp, every man's heart will melt" (Isaiah 13:7 ). At a later time the descriptions move beyond human experience. The cosmos will go into convulsions. In stereotyped language it is said that the sun will refuse to give its light, the moon and the stars will cease to shine (Isaiah 13:10 ). Joel, preoccupied with the subject, cites wonders in heaven and on earth, including the moon turning to blood (Joel 2:30-31 ).
In the New Testament the appearance of God is more distinctly the coming of Christ, specifically the return of Christ, his second coming. Paul's mention of the "day of our Lord Jesus Christ" (1 Corinthians 1:8 ) is likely the day of "the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and our being gathered together to him" (2 Thessalonians 2:1 ). Whether the day is the parousia, or the climax of history and all things as in the "day of God" when the dissolution of the heavens occurs (2 Peter 3:12 ), the "day" will be characterized by the unquestioned and unmistakable presence of Almighty God.
As depicted by Joel, the day of the Lord means decision: "Multitudes, multitudes in the valley of decision! For the day of the Lord is near in the valley of decision" (3:14). A verdict will be rendered. God will adjudicate peoples. His decision for some nations, such as Tyre, Sidon, Moab, Philistia, and Assyria, will be punishment (Joel 3:4-13 ; cf. Zephaniah 2:6-15 ). Divine judgment will be executed. On that day a decision will be rendered against everything proud (Isaiah 2:12-18 ). God Acts with dispatch as he judges nations in the Valley of Jehoshaphat (Joel 3:2,12-13 ). The decision for others will have a saving dimension, for God's promise of blessing will be activated and realized (Joel 3:18-21 ).
The Calendaring of the Day . The "day of the Lord" is not a one-time occurrence. Days of the Lord, while often represented in the Bible as in the future, are not limited to the future. There have been days of the Lord in the past. The catastrophe of the fall of Jerusalem in 587 b.c. was described as a "day of the Lord" (Lamentations 2:21 ). Isaiah says that the day of the Lord will involve the fall of Babylon. God's agency will be recognized, for he will "make the heavens tremble; and the earth will shake from its place" (Isaiah 13:13 ). God's immediate agent will be the Medes whom he will stir up against Babylon; their action will be decisive. "Babylon, the jewel of kingdoms, the glory of the Babylonians' pride, will be overthrown by God like Sodom and Gomorrah" (13:19). Historically, that event is to be dated to 539 b.c. Joel, in turn, describes a grasshopper plague that for him represents the day of the Lord as imminent, even immediate. The day of Pentecost, now history, is described as the day of the Lord (Acts 2:16-21 ).
Still, for the prophets and for many of the New Testament writers, the day of the Lord points to the future. That future may be centuries distant, as in Isaiah's prophecy about Babylon (chap. 13) or Joel's prophecy about the Spirit (2:28-32), or it may be in the far distant future. Isaiah's language about the universal humiliation of the lofty and arrogant indicates a grand finale, possibly at the end of history (2:12-18). The New Testament, while speaking of the Christ event as a day of the Lord (Acts 2:16-21 ), also speaks of the anticipated day of Christ as his return (2 Thessalonians 2:1-2 ), which is yet, after almost two thousand years, still future. The surprise factor (it will come "like a thief in the night") is a marked feature of the day in the New Testament (1 Thessalonians 5:2,4 ; 2 Peter 3:10 ). Eventually the day of the Lord (God) came to mean the termination of the world.
The Day of the Lord as a Day of Calamity . The day of the Lord means destruction of the godless. With metaphor the prophets excel in describing the calamitous aspect of day of the Lord. Amos speaks of it as a day of darkness (5:18). Joel depicts it as a day of clouds and thick darkness (2:2). Zephaniah's description (1:15-16a) is vivid as he mixes direct description and metaphor:
That day will be a day of wrath, A day of distress and anguish A day of trouble and ruin, A day of darkness and gloom, A day of clouds and blackness A day of trumpet and battle cry. Isaiah describes a massive leveling; whatever is lofty will be brought low (2:12-17). A frequent metaphor is war. Isaiah invokes the war model to characterize the day of the Lord—"The Lord Almighty is mustering an army for war" (13:4). With war comes fear and cruelty. The opponents are afraid; "pain and anguish will grip them They will look aghast at each other" (13:8). Joel describes the Lord's army: "They charge like warriors; they scale walls like soldiers. They all march in line" (2:7). Their effectiveness is telling: "Before them fire devours, behind them a flame blazes. Before them the land is like the garden of Eden, behind them, a desert waste" (2:3). The effect is awesome: "Before them the earth shakes, the sky trembles" (2:10). Zephaniah, emphasizing the destructive nature of that day, compares it to a sacrifice (1:8). In keeping with the motif of fire, the Septuagint renders Malachi 3:19 : "For the day of the Lord is coming burning like an oven." The New Testament only confirms the destructive character of the "day" (1 Thessalonians 1:9-10 ). The author of 2Peter reiterates the theme of fire and explains that by fire the earth and the elements themselves will be destroyed. The heavens will disappear, also by fire (2 Peter 3:10-11 ).
The elaborate description of the day of the Lord in Joel is about calamity for Israel. Drought has paralyzed the economy (1:4-12), brought the giving of gifts in worship to a halt (1:13), and jeopardized even the survival of animals (1:18). To forestall total disaster the prophet calls for a fast (1:14; 2:12). Amos depicts a day of darkness for Israel. The reason for such calamity lies in Israel's failure to do justice (5:7,10-12) and her devotion to gods other than Yahweh (5:25-27). Zephaniah announces that great distress will come on the people, to the point that "their blood shall be poured out like dust." He explains that nothingneither silver nor goldwill be able to save them (1:17-18). It is because the people have been violent and deceitful that such calamity will come (1:9,17). The "day of the Lord" is focused, then, on Israel. Even though they expected their righteousness to be vindicated against their enemies, they were to discover that God's righteousness entailed his move against them.
Early descriptions of the day are found in the oracles against the nations. Joel graphically depicts a roll call of Tyre, Sidon, and Philistia. They will be judged on the basis of their treatment of Israel, the people of God. These nations are indicted for appropriating parts of the land of Israel (3:2), for inhumane treatment of young boys and young girls (3:3,6), for traffic in slavery (3:6), and for expropriating temple articles (3:5). Obadiah announces that the deeds of the nations will return on their own heads (v. 15). Zephaniah's roll call is more extensive (Gaza, Moab, Ethiopia, Assyria) and the accusations include reproaching God's people (2:8,10) and arrogance (2:15). Zechariah's announcement about the day of the Lord includes a battle with nations (14:3; cf. Revelation 16:14 ). More universally Isaiah lumps together all those who are proud, lofty, and arrogant: "The loftiness of man shall be bowed down and the haughtiness of men shall be brought low" (2:17). In the same vein, Paul associates the second coming of Christ with destructive power (1 Thessalonians 5:2-3 ).
The outcome, according to Isaiah, is the massive abolition of idols (2:18,20). Threatened by God's fury, men and women will seek refuge in rocks (Isaiah 2:21 ). One striking consequence of the day of the Lord for nations will be a recognition of Yahweh (Joel 3:17 ), but not without desolation (Zephaniah 2:13-14 ) and death (Zephaniah 2:12 ).
The day of the Lord also affects the natural order. The plague of locusts in Joelwhether a pointer to the day of the Lord or itself a "day of the Lord"brings unproductive conditions for trees and vines and jeopardizes the survival of animals (1:12,18). An upheaval of cosmic proportions means changes in the sun, moon, and stars (2:30). Some hold that these luminaries are symbolic, as often in the ancient Near East, of potentates and governmental powers. While there is no direct evidence that civil powers are intended, it must be understood that the authors were describing the indescribable, and that rigorous literalism need not always be required. Still, an overriding impression is that the day of the Lord will powerfully affect nature.
The Day as Salvation . While the judgment dimension is dominant in descriptions of the day of the Lord, the salvation dimension, although less emphasized, is nevertheless present. Some metaphors for the day are negative. Other metaphors are positive. It is a time of return to paradise (Isaiah 35:1-10 ). The mountains will drip with new wine and the hills will flow with milk (Joel 3:18 ). The setting is as a day of abundant harvest (Joel 2:24 ).
The day of the Lord brings salvation for Israel. Drought and disaster drive Israel to their knees. They cry for God's mercy (Joel 2:17 ), and he answers. Salvation follows judgment. God forcibly and effectively removes the enemy (2:20). Salvation consists in abundance of grain, new wine, and oil, "enough to satisfy you fully" (2:19; cf. 2:24,26). In the words of Zephaniah, God will "restore their [1] fortunes" (2:7), an expression that implies the restoration of a desirable situation, a recovery of what has been lost. To God's saving activity will belong his pouring forth of his Spirit on all people (Joel 2:29 ). In the words of Zephaniah, "The Lord your God is with you, he is mighty to save. He will take great delight in you, he will quiet you with his love" (3:17). It will mean that "everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved" (Joel 2:32 ).
In the New Testament the day of the Lord is more precisely the day of Jesus Christ and especially the manifestation of his glory. While this revelation of the person of Jesus spells calamity for unbelievers, for believers it means to be caught up to be with Christ their redeemer forever (1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:3 ). Such a prospect leads to joyous expectation and fervor. With this prospect and other promises in mind, Paul urges Christians to persevere (1 Corinthians 1:8 ).
The day of the Lord portends salvation for the nations. Announcements about favorable prospects for Gentiles, while considerable, are not often found in conjunction with language about the day of the Lord. Still, pictures of Gentile response given elsewhere (such as Psalm 96 ) are reinforced by Zephaniah's classic description of the day of the Lord: "From beyond the rivers of Cush my worshipers, my scattered people, will bring me offerings" (3:10; cf. 3:9). The same prophet also portrays nations, each in their own place, bowing down to the Lord (2:11). Such a day is on the far side of the day of judgment, a situation true for peoples generally but also for the individual. Paul urges the church at Corinth to discipline the immoral person so that at the day of the Lord his spirit may be saved (1 Corinthians 5:5 ).
The day of the Lord will transform nature. For God's people, Israel, the day of the Lord will mean physical abundance and spiritual blessing. Nature will be affected. Joel addresses an oracle to the earth, calling on it not to fear, and promises that it will be fertile and productive (2:22) so that threshing floors will be filled with grain and vats will overflow with new wine (2:24). Although the new heaven and earth are not in the Old Testament specifically connected to the day of the Lord (Isaiah 65:17-25 ), that connection is made in 2 Peter 3:13 . The old world has passed away to be replaced by a new heaven and a new earth. The table below sketches the nature of the day of the Lord as described by the preexilic prophets.
Theological Significance . The theological significance of the day of the Lord may be summarized along three lines of thought. First, without question, the day of the Lord is a day of God's vindication. In the battle between evil and God, it is God who is victorious and vindicated. He is the ultimate power to whom is given the final word and against whom no force can stand (Isaiah 2:17 ). God's summons of the nations for an accounting in Joel 3 and Zephaniah and the description of the cosmos being annihilated through fire ( 2 Peter 3:10-13 ) are two impressive ways of insisting on the truth that God is fully in charge. The preview of the day of the Lord, as in the destruction of Babylon or at the time of the Christ-event, including the day of Pentecost, already shows evidence of God's extraordinary work and power, so that the day of the Lord at the end of history is quite beyond human description.
Second, the day of Yahweh addresses the question of theodicynot only the existence of evil, but especially undoing the havoc that it brings and making all things right. Ambiguities will be resolved. The message of the day of the Lord is that evil be trounced and evildoers will in the end receive their due. There is justice after all. God will settle his accounts with all that is godless and anti-God, arrogant and pridefully hostile against the Almighty. On the other hand, the scenes about God's blessing and the recovery of an Edenic paradise have and will continue to offer hope for those whose trust is in God (2 Peter 3:13 ).
Third, the certain coming of that day with its dark side of judgment and its bright side of a giant transformation encompassing human beings, human society, the world's physical environment, and the cosmos as such, calls on believers especially to live in its light. The purpose of discussions about the day of the Lord, past or future, is to illumine the present. Peter's question is rhetorical but pointed. In view of the coming day of the Lord, "What kind of people ought you to be?" (2 Peter 3:11 ).
Elmer A. Martens
See also Day ; Judgment, Day of
Bibliography . G. Brauman and C. Brown, NIDNTT, 2:887-88,890-91; E. Delling, TDNT, 2:943-53; A. J. Everson, JBL 93 (1979): 329-37; E. Jenni, IDB, 1:784-85; W. C. Kaiser, Jr., Toward an Old Testament Theology ; E. A. Martens, God's Design ; R. L. Mayhue, Grace Theological Journal 6 (1985): 231-46; W. Van Gemeren, Interpreting the Prophetic Word ; G. von Rad, Old Testament Theology, 2:119-25; B. Witherington, Jesus, Paul and the End of the World: A Comparative Study in New Testament Eschatology .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Fear of the Lord the
Is in the Old Testament used as a designation of true piety (Proverbs 1:7 ; Job 28:28 ; Psalm 19:9 ). It is a fear conjoined with love and hope, and is therefore not a slavish dread, but rather filial reverence. (Compare Deuteronomy 32:6 ; Hosea 11:1 ; Isaiah 1:2 ; 63:16 ; 64:8 .) God is called "the Fear of Isaac" (Genesis 31:42,53 ), i.e., the God whom Isaac feared. A holy fear is enjoined also in the New Testament as a preventive of carelessness in religion, and as an incentive to penitence (Matthew 10:28 ; 2 Corinthians 5:11 ; 7:1 ; Philippians 2:12 ; Ephesians 5:21 ; Hebrews 12:28,29 ).
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Sab'Aoth, the Lord of,
occurs in (Romans 9:29 ; James 5:4 ) but is more familiar through its occurrence in the Sanctus of Te Deum --"Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of Sabaoth." Sabaoth is the Greek form of the Hebrew word tsebaoth "armies," and is translated in the Authorized Version of the Old Testament by "Lord of hosts," "Lord God of hosts." In the mouth and the mind of an ancient Hebrew, Jehovah-tsebaoth was the leader and commander of the armies of the nation, who "went forth with them" (Psalm 44:9 ) and led them to certain victory over the worshippers of Baal Chemosh. Molech, Ashtaroth and other false gods.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Cloud, Cloud of the Lord
The Old Testament. The Literal Cloud . Natural phenomena involving clouds are depicted occasionally in the Old Testament, but far from being only "natural," these are invariably linked with the direct activity of God. Especially in the books of Job and Psalms, cloud-related phenomena are described as evidence of God's mighty, wondrous works and inscrutable ways (Job 22:14 ; 26:8-9 ; 35:5 ; 36:28-29 ; 37:11,15-16,18 ; 38:9,34 , 36-37 ; Psalm 77:17 ; 147:8 ). The rainbow in the clouds is a sign of the covenant (Genesis 9:13-14,16 ), and clouds themselves are presented as witnesses to the surety of the covenant with David (Psalm 89:37 ). Withholding of rain from the clouds is seen as divine activity in fulfillment of the covenant curses (Isaiah 5:6 ; Leviticus 26:19 ; cf. Deuteronomy 28:23-24 ), and the restoring of rain after drought is the sign of God's removing the covenant curse from Israel (1 Kings 18:44-45 ; cf. Zechariah 10:1 ).
The Metaphorical Cloud . The biblical writers frequently employ phenomena of cloud formation and activity in order to metaphorically illustrate aspects of their theological message. In a positive sense, clouds represent unlimited extent (of God's faithfulness and truth, Psalm 36:5 ; 57:10 ; 108:4 ; of Babylon's judgment, Jeremiah 51:9 ); life-giving refreshment (of the king's favor, Proverbs 16:15 ); a normal occurrence (cycle of nature, Ecclesiastes 11:3 ); shade or shelter (from the "heat" of the ruthless, Isaiah 25:5 ); calm (of the Lord in his heavenly sanctuary, Isaiah 18:4 ); covering or concealment (of Israel's sins in forgiveness, Isaiah 44:22 ); speed and mobility (of the Gentiles "flying" to Mount Zion, Isaiah 60:8 ); and an abundant outpouring (of the "rain" of righteousness, 1 Corinthians 10:1-29 , and of manna in the wilderness, Psalm 78:23 ).
In a negative sense, clouds are used to symbolize prideful self-exaltation (of the wicked, Job 20:6 ; of Satan, Isaiah 14:14 ); misery or gloom (at the day of Job's birth, Job 3:5 ; at the day of the Lord, Isaiah 60:2 ; Jeremiah 13:16 ; Ezekiel 30:3 ; 34:12 ; Joel 2:2 ; Zephaniah 1:15 ); pervasiveness (of enemy invasion, Ezekiel 38:9,16 ); transitoriness (of Job's prosperity and life, Job 7:9 ; 30:15 ; of Israel's love and life, Hosea 6:4 ; 13:3 ); futile, idle activity (Ecclesiastes 11:4 ); dimness (of eyesight in old age, Ecclesiastes 12:2 ; of a nation's splendor following divine judgment, Lamentations 2:1 ; Ezekiel 30:18 ); swiftness (of divine judgment, Jeremiah 4:13 ); and covering or concealing (of divine mercy in judgment, Lamentations 3:44 ).
The Theophanic Cloud . The most common usage of the Hebrew terms for cloud comes in the context of divine theophany. By far the largest group (about fifty occurrences) of these refer to the visible manifestation of the divine presence during Israel's exodus from Egypt and wilderness wandering. This sign of God's presence is termed variously: pillar of cloud (Exodus 13:21-22 , ; plus eleven times), pillar of fire and cloud (Exodus 14:24 ); a thick cloud (Exodus 19:9,16 ), the cloud (Exodus 14:20 , plus thirty-three times); and the cloud of the Lord (Exodus 40:38 ; Numbers 10:34 ).
The pillar of cloud motif-set forth in the exodus account and expanded in the prophetic announcements of a new exodus after the Babylonian exile-encompasses a rich complex of theological meanings and functions: guidance/leading (of Israel out of Egypt and through the wilderness to Canaan, Exodus 13:21 ; Numbers 14:14 ; Nehemiah 9:12 ; Psalm 78:14 ); a signal for movement (breaking and setting up camp, Exodus 40:36-37 ; Numbers 9:17-23 ); protection from danger (as a barrier of darkness between Israel and the Egyptians, Exodus 14:19-20 ); the sustained, immediate, personal presence of Yahweh/the angel of the Lord (Exodus 13:22 ; 14:19,24 ; 40:38 ; Numbers 9:15-16 ); an agency of summons (to battle, Numbers 10:34-35 ; and to worship, Exodus 33:10 ); both a concealment and manifestation of divine glory (Exodus 16:10 ; 19:9,16 ; 20:21 ; 24:15-18 ; 34:5 ; Deuteronomy 4:11 ; 5:22 ); the place of propositional revelation (as an oracular cloud, Exodus 33:9 ; Psalm 99:7 ); the dwelling place/throne of divinity (over the tabernacle, Numbers 9:18,22 ; 10:11 ; and in particular, over the mercy seat, Leviticus 16:2 ); the locus of cultic theophany (for the investiture of the seventy elders and Joshua, Numbers 11:25 ; Deuteronomy 31:15 ; for the inauguration of the tabernacle, Exodus 40:34-35 ); shade/protection from the sun or storm (Numbers 10:34 ; Psalm 105:39 ; Isaiah 4:5 ); illumination (as a pillar of fire by night, Exodus 14:20 ; Numbers 9:15 ); and an agency of legal investigation and/or executive judgment (against Israel's enemies, Exodus 14:24 ; and against rebels within Israel, Numbers 12:5,10 ; 16:42 ).
Clouds are depicted in other Old Testament theophanies. At creation Yahweh makes the clouds his chariots (Psalm 104:3 ). The Song of Deborah describes the appearance of Yahweh in a thunderstorm (Judges 5:4 ). Answering David's plea for help, Yahweh rides upon a cherub from his heavenly temple with thick clouds as his canopy (Psalm 18:11 ). Clouds are Yahweh's swift chariot as he executes judgment upon Egypt (Isaiah 19:1 ). Nahum's theophanic vision portrays clouds as the dust of Yahweh's feet (1:3). In Ezekiel's inaugural vision, Yahweh emerges from a great cloud riding upon his celestial palanquin (1:4,28), and the temple is filled with a cloud some fourteen months later when the covenant lawsuit is completed and executive judgment is about to be poured out (10:3-4).
The Eschatological/Apocalyptic Cloud . The eschatological day of the Lord is several times described as a day of cloud-mass and dark storm cloud for the nation(s) being judged (Ezekiel 34:12 ; Joel 2:2 ; Zephaniah 1:15 ; cf. Ezekiel 30:2 ). On that day the anger of Yahweh will burn with "a thick rising (smoke-) cloud" (Isaiah 30:27 ). Clouds of theophany are also associated with eschatological judgment/salvation (Isaiah 4:5 ; Nahum 1:3 ).
The New Testament. The Literal/Metaphorical Cloud . The only New Testament reference to literal cloud phenomena is Jesus' graphic contrast between his hearers' ability to interpret the meaning of a cloud rising in the west-that a shower is coming-and their inability to interpret the present time (Luke 12:54 ). Metaphorical cloud references in the New Testament include Jude's depiction of the unstable, deceptive, false teachers as waterless clouds, carried along by winds (v. 12), and Hebrews' portrayal of the many worthy of faith as a great "cloud of witnesses" (12:1).
The Theophanic/Eschatological Cloud . The remaining twenty-two New Testament occurrences of the word "cloud" appear in the context of theophany, and encompass six theologically crucial, eschatologically related events or visionary scenes in salvation history: (1) the pillar of cloud at the exodus, viewed as a type of Christian baptism in the time of eschatological fulfillment (1618067627_73 ); (2) Jesus' transfiguration, as a foretaste of the kingdom of God, during which the Father appears and speaks in a cloud (Matthew 17:5 ; Mark 9:7 ; Luke 9:34 ); (3) Jesus' ascension, explained by the angels as a paradigm for his return (Acts 1:9 ); (4) the "mighty angel" descending from heaven wrapped in a cloud, announcing (against the eschatological backdrop of Daniel 12:7 ) that time should be no longer (Revelation 10:1 ); (5) the two resurrected witnesses ascending to heaven in a cloud, described in the context of the eschatological measuring of the temple of God (Revelation 11:12 ); and (6) Jesus' parousia, against the backdrop of Daniel 7:13 , as the Son of Man coming with/on/in a cloud/the clouds/the clouds of heaven (Matthew 24:30 ; 26:64 ; Mark 13:26 ; 14:62 ; Luke 12:54 ; 21:27 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:17 ; Revelation 1:7 ; 14:14-16 ).
Richard M. Davidson
Bibliography . T. W. Mann, JBL 90 (1971): 15-30; A. Oepke, TDNT, 4:902-10; L. Sabourin, BTB 4 (1974): 290-311; R. B. Y. Scott, NTS 5 (1958-59): 127-32; idem, ZAW 64 (1952): 11-25; E. F. Sutcliffe, VT 3 (1953): 99-103.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Wars of the Lord, the Book of the
(Genesis 14:14-166 ), some unknown book so called (Compare 1618067627_36 ; Exodus 17:8-16 ; Numbers 14:40-45 ; 21:1-3,21-25,33-35 ; 31 . The wars here recorded might be thus designated).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Lord
(See JEHOVAH.) In small letters and with initial capital "Lord" represents Αdonai in KJV of Old Testament. In capitals "LORD" represents Jehovah , except Exodus 23:17. The "LORD God", Αdonai Jehovah , where it ought to be "the Lord Jehovah," and Exodus 34:23. "GOD" in capitals also represents Jehovah (Genesis 15:2, 'Αdonay Υahweh ). "God" in small letters, with initial capital, represents 'Εlohiym . (See GOD.)
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Lord
A term properly denoting one who has dominion. Applied to God, the supreme governor and disposer of all things.
See GOD.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Servant of the Lord
In a sense all God’s people are servants of the Lord (Numbers 12:7; Psalms 105:6; 1 Corinthians 4:1; Revelation 22:3), but the Bible speaks of one particular figure who in a special sense is the servant of the Lord (Isaiah 50:4-9; Isaiah 53:4-6). This particular ‘servant of the Lord’ is the subject of the present article. Concerning the more general usage of the expression see SERVANT.
Details about the servant of the Lord are found mainly in what are known as the four Servant Songs of Isaiah (Isaiah 42:1-4; Isaiah 49:1-6; Isaiah 42:1; Isaiah 52:13-15; Isaiah 53). There is a threefold meaning to these songs.
Firstly, the nation Israel was chosen to be God’s servant (Isaiah 41:8), but the nation as a whole was a failure (Isaiah 42:19). This leads to the second meaning, which is to the faithful minority within Israel. While the rest of the people rebelled against God, the believing remnant kept serving him loyally (Isaiah 49:4-6; see REMNANT). Even they, however, did not experience the full blessings that God intended for his people. The third and highest meaning of the servant applies to the Messiah, Jesus (Isaiah 53:12; Luke 22:37; Acts 3:13; Acts 4:30; Philippians 2:7).
Israel as a nation was Abraham’s natural offspring (John 8:37; Romans 4:1; Romans 11:1), the faithful remnant were his spiritual offspring (Romans 9:6-7; Galatians 3:28-29), but the Messiah Jesus was the perfect offspring. In him the purposes of God for Israel reached their fulfilment (Galatians 3:16).
Four Servant Songs
The first Servant Song outlines the ideal character of God’s servant. Those ideals never became a reality for the nation Israel, and only to a limited extent did they characterize the faithful remnant. But they found their perfect expression in Jesus Christ (Isaiah 42:1-4; Matthew 12:15-21).
God had a particular task for his servant, and the second Servant Song describes that task. God’s servant was to take the light of his salvation to the Gentile nations. Again Israel as a whole failed, though some of the people were faithful (Isaiah 49:1-7; Acts 13:46-47). Jesus, by contrast, fulfilled the task perfectly, bringing salvation to Israel and to the Gentiles (Matthew 1:21; Luke 2:32; Acts 26:23; Romans 15:8-12).
In the third Servant Song the emphasis is on the servant’s patient endurance. This had some meaning in relation to Israel’s experiences among hostile nations, and considerably more meaning in relation to the godly believers’ experiences among their ungodly fellow Israelites. The full meaning is found only in the experiences of Jesus (Isaiah 50:4-9; Matthew 26:67; 1 Peter 2:22-24).
The fourth Servant Song speaks of the servant’s suffering and glory. God punished Israel for its sins by sending the nation into captivity in Babylon, but after the removal of sin he restored the nation to its land. Israel’s sufferings at the hands of Babylon and its glory in the rebuilt Jerusalem were a picture of the sufferings of the Messiah and the glory that followed (Isaiah 52:13-15; Acts 2:23-24; Acts 2:36; Philippians 2:8-11; 1 Peter 1:18-21).
Israel, God’s unfaithful servant, suffered the judgment that its sin deserved; Jesus, the faithful servant, bore a judgment that he did not deserve. The godly remnant within Israel suffered because of the sins of others, and so did Jesus; but, more than that, Jesus suffered to take away the sins of others (Isaiah 52:13; Matthew 8:17; Matthew 20:28; 1 Peter 2:22-25). He bore shame and injustice at the hands of wicked men (Isaiah 53:3; Isaiah 53:7-8; Matthew 27:26-31; Acts 8:32-35), though he did at least receive a decent burial (Isaiah 53:9; Matthew 27:57-60).
Yet through all Jesus’ experiences, God was bringing his purposes to fulfilment. Jesus’ glorious resurrection showed God’s complete satisfaction with his Son’s atoning work. It also marked the beginning of a new age in which God’s salvation goes to people throughout the world (Isaiah 53:10-12; Mark 10:45; Luke 24:46-47; Acts 2:23-24; Acts 28:28; Romans 8:32-34; Revelation 5:9-10).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Lord
In the Authorized Version the word ‘lord’ generally represents the Greek κύριος, with the exception of Acts 4:24, 2 Peter 2:1, Judges 1:4, and Revelation 6:10, where it stands for δεσπότης. In the last three passages the Revised Version renders ‘master.’ On the other hand, there are cases where κύριος is rendered ‘master’ both in the Authorized Version and the Revised Version -e.g. Acts 16:16; Acts 16:19, Ephesians 6:5; Ephesians 6:9. As a common noun the word ‘lord’ is not of very frequent occurrence. It is used of the Roman Emperor (Acts 25:26); of a husband (1 Peter 3:6); of the heir of a property (Galatians 4:1); and of the angelic powers (1 Corinthians 8:5). But usually it is applied either to God or to Christ, and comes to be used almost as a proper name.
1. The name applied to God.-In the Septuagint κύριος is employed consistently to represent אַדֹנָי, which the Jews substituted in reading for the name יהוה, and hence it became the general designation of God. We meet with it frequently in the NT in this application, sometimes expanded into the title κύριος ὁ θεός, or even κύριος ὁ θεὸς ὁ παντοκράτωρ (Revelation 4:8; Revelation 11:17, etc.). God is addressed as κύριος in prayer (Acts 1:24). The title is used predicatively of Him in Acts 17:24 (‘Lord of heaven and earth’). In such phrases as ‘even as the Lord gave’ (1 Corinthians 3:5), ‘if the Lord will’ (1 Corinthians 4:19; cf. Romans 1:10; Romans 15:32), ‘chastened of the Lord’ (1 Corinthians 11:32), the reference is probably to God rather than to Christ. Naturally it is God who is referred to where the term occurs in quotations from the OT, as Acts 3:22, Romans 4:8; Romans 9:28 f., 2 Corinthians 6:17 f.; though, as we shall see, there are occasions where such quotations are interpreted as referring directly to Christ. The reference is likewise to God in various phrases which recall OT associations, such as ‘the Spirit of the Lord’ (Acts 5:9), ‘the fear of the Lord’ (Acts 9:31), ‘the hand of the Lord’ (Acts 11:21). In Rev., with one or two exceptions, the title refers to God-e.g. Acts 4:8; Acts 4:11, Acts 11:15; Acts 11:17, Acts 19:1 -though on occasions Christ, in contrast to the kings of the earth, is called ‘King of kings and Lord of lords’ (Acts 17:14, Acts 19:16). St. Peter, St. James, and Hebrews seem to use the term indifferently for God or Christ. In the Pauline Epistles the term usually designates Christ, but there are occasional exceptions, and we must determine from the context whether God or Christ is to be understood. Thus, e.g., in the phrase ‘the word of the Lord,’ i.e. the gospel (1 Thessalonians 1:6), we should certainly expect ‘the Lord’ to refer to Christ, yet the phrase recurs in the following chapter in the form ‘the word of God’ (1 Thessalonians 2:13). So ‘the Lord of peace’ (2 Thessalonians 3:16) corresponds to ‘the very God of peace’ (1 Thessalonians 5:23); and 1 Corinthians 3:5, where some take κύριος to apply to Christ, is proved by 1 Corinthians 3:9 to refer to God. But indeed it is difficult to say with certainty in many cases who is intended, and sometimes St. Paul ascribes the same function now to God and now to Christ (e.g. 1 Corinthians 7:17 compared with 2 Corinthians 10:13). Some (e.g. Cremer and Godet) would lay down the rule that in the NT κύριος is to be understood as referring to God only in the OT quotations and references (so also Lietzmann, so far as St. Paul is concerned); but it is evident from some of the cases already quoted that such a canon cannot be consistently observed.
2. The name applied to Christ.-For the most part, however, the term is employed in the NT to designate Christ.
(1) The subjection of the believer to Christ.-The simplest instance of the use of the word ‘Lord’ for Christ is in the Gospels, where it describes the relationship of Jesus to the disciples. In this sense it occurs in Acts 1:6 as a form of address of the Master, and in the phrase frequently recurring throughout the book-‘the Lord Jesus,’ e.g. Acts 1:21, Acts 4:33, Acts 8:16. But such employment of the term is innocent of the doctrinal implication that attaches to it as generally employed in the NT. We meet with it in various forms-sometimes simply κύριος or ὁ κύριος, sometimes ὁ κύριος ἡμῶν, usually with the addition of Ἰησοῦς or Ἰησοῦς Χριστός. What is suggested by this title as assigned to Christ? The simplest answer is that it calls up the relation of king and subject, conceived in the Oriental spirit as that of lord and slave (cf. 2 Kings 17:32; 2 Kings 24:3 [1]), as typical of that which obtains between Christ and the believer. St. Paul frequently calls himself δοῦλος Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ (Romans 1:1, Galatians 1:10, etc.); on one occasion he uses that term as a worthy designation of a faithful disciple (Colossians 4:12), and reminds believers that such slavery is the condition into which they have surrendered themselves (1 Corinthians 7:22).
(2) The majesty of Christ.-The title κύριος as applied to Christ suggests something more than the relation of subjection in which the believer stands to Him. It is deliberately selected to assign a certain lofty dignity to Christ. It was the custom in the East to call gods by the title ‘Lord’ (Deissmann, Licht vom Osten, 253ff.), and, as we have seen, the practice of the Septuagint had made this term the familiar one to the Jew for his God Jahweh. The title was deliberately transferred to Christ by the early Christians to signify that they worshipped Him as a Divine Being. In 1 Corinthians 8:5 f. St. Paul defines the Christian attitude to Christ by contrasting it with that of the worshippers of false gods. They worship many so-called gods and lords, but the Christian has but the ‘one God, the Father, of whom are all things and we unto him, and one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom are all things, and we through him.’ Here St. Paul places Christ alongside of God as entitled to Divine honour. How such a position is compatible with the strict monotheism of the ‘one God, the Father,’ he does not discuss. It may be, as Johannes Weiss (Christus, p. 26) suggests, that he selected the title ‘Lord’ for Christ here as predicating a dignity one rank lower than that of Supreme God, and so leaving room for that relation of subordination which the Apostle elsewhere assigns to Him (2 Corinthians 1:3, Ephesians 1:17). It was in virtue of the Resurrection that the Church came to invest Jesus with such unique dignity. This is the standpoint of Peter in Acts 2:32-36. Jesus of Nazareth, ‘a man approved of God’ (v. 22), has by the Resurrection and Exaltation been made by God ‘both Lord and Christ.’ So in Romans 1:4 St. Paul says that Jesus has been constituted (ὁρισθέντος) God’s Son in power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection of the dead (cf. also Ephesians 1:20 ff.). And the well-known passage Philippians 2:9-11 accounts for Jesus’ investment with the title ‘Lord’ along the same lines. After the humiliation of the Cross ‘God highly exalted him, and gave unto him the name which is above every name; that in the name of Jesus [2] every knee should bow, of things in heaven and things on earth and things under the earth, and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.’ There is difference of opinion as to whether ‘the name which is above every name’ is the title ‘Lord.’ In view of the confession of Lordship to which the passage leads up, it seems natural to adopt this interpretation. By exalting Jesus, God has raised Him to supreme honour. He has bestowed on Him that name which He had hitherto borne Himself. The passage becomes pregnant with meaning when taken (as Weiss suggests [3]) in connexion with the Septuagint of Isaiah 42:8 : ἐγὼ κύριος ὁ θεός, τοῦτό μού ἐστι τὸ ὄνομα, τὴν δόξαν μου ἑτέρῳ οὐ δώσω. But this name and this glory God has given to another. He has invested Jesus with the Divine name; He has given Him supreme sovereignty. All beings in heaven and earth must bow the knee before Him. He virtually takes the place of God, the monotheistic position being safeguarded in that concluding phrase, ‘to the glory of God the Father.’
The whole of the NT goes to corroborate the lofty estimate of the dignity of Christ suggested by this title. As Lord He comes in the mind of the Church to take His position alongside of God, to éxercise such functions as had been attributed to God, and to receive such reverence as had been accorded to God alone-according to an interpretation of Romans 9:5 which is linguistically unexceptionable, He is even called θεός (cf. also 2 Peter 1:1). Prayer is addressed to Him (Acts 7:60, Romans 10:12, 1 Corinthians 1:2, 2 Corinthians 12:8). He is expected to judge the world (2 Corinthians 5:10 f., 2 Timothy 4:1; 2 Timothy 4:8), and is endowed with Divine omniscience (1 Corinthians 4:5). It is He who assigns their various lots to men (1 Corinthians 7:17), who grants power of service and endows with grace (1 Timothy 1:12; 1 Timothy 1:14), who stands by and strengthens in time of trouble (2 Timothy 4:17), and delivers out of persecutions (2 Timothy 3:11). All authority in the Church proceeds from Him (1 Corinthians 5:4, 2 Corinthians 10:8; 2 Corinthians 13:10). The most frequent form of benediction invokes His grace. Baptism is performed in His name (Acts 8:16; Acts 10:48). That name is invoked when the sick are anointed with oil (James 5:14); and not only on such formal occasions, but in every word and deed (Colossians 3:17), for that appears to be the significance of the phrase, one is to ‘do all in the name of the Lord’ (Heitmüller, op. cit. p. 69). He is the Creator of all things (1 Corinthians 8:5, Colossians 1:16) and Lord over all beings (Acts 10:36, Romans 10:12), our only Master and Lord (Judges 1:4).
But perhaps the most striking instance of all of how Christ comes to have the value of God in the Christian consciousness is afforded by the fact that, repeatedly in the NT, quotations from the OT which manifestly refer to God are immediately applied to Christ. Thus, e.g., the exhortation of the Psalmist to taste and see that the Lord is good (Psalms 34:8) is interpreted (1 Peter 2:3) with reference to the experience of the believer of the salvation of Christ; and St. Paul finds an answer to the question of Isaiah 40:13 (Septuagint ), ‘Who hath known the mind of the Lord?’ in the triumphant declaration, ‘But we have the mind of Christ’ (1 Corinthians 2:16). Other instances of this practice will be found in Romans 10:13, 1 Corinthians 1:31; 1 Corinthians 10:22, 2 Corinthians 3:16; 2 Corinthians 3:18; 2 Corinthians 10:17, 1 Peter 3:15. Such being the significance with which the title is invested, it is small wonder that St. Paul should have regarded acknowledgment of Christ’s Lordship as the mark of the true believer (Colossians 2:6). To confess Him as Lord with one’s mouth, and to believe in one’s heart that God has raised Him from the dead (observe the connexion between the Resurrection and Lordship), is to be assured of salvation (Romans 10:9). In cases of ecstasy such confession was the infallible sign of the presence of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 12:3). The proclamation of Christ’s Lordship was the central theme of the Apostle’s preaching (2 Corinthians 4:5), the universal recognition of that Lordship the consummation of the Divine purpose (Philippians 2:11).
(3) The protest against Emperor-worship.-There remains to be noted one other aspect of the assertion of Christ’s Lordship-the protest implied against the worship of the Emperor under the same title. Deissmann has shown (op. cit. p. 255ff.) that already in the time of St. Paul the title was current as a form of address of the Emperor (cf. Acts 25:26), if not in Rome, at any rate in the East. Caligula had ordered his statue to be erected in the Temple at Jerusalem, and required that he should be worshipped as God. Domitian is called in official reports ‘our Lord and God.’ When such was the tendency that was abroad, it is possible that even in the mouth of a man who, like St. Paul, urged subjection to the higher powers, the proclamation of the Lordship of Christ may have had a polemical nuance. In the middle of the 2nd cent. we find Polycarp laying down his life rather than say κύριος καῖσαρ (Mart. Polyc. 8:2), and probably long before that time, on the lips of those who repeated it, if not by the men who first employed it, the formula ‘our Lord Jesus Christ’ was uttered with an emphasis on the word our which suggested repudiation of the claims made on behalf of the Emperor (Weinel, Die Stellung des Urchristentums zum Staat, p. 19). St. Paul could say of the Christian, ‘our state is in heaven’ (Philippians 3:20), and endeavour to keep his religion apart altogether from politics. But when politics invaded the sphere of religion and Caesar laid claim to the things that are Christ’s, it became the duty of the Christian to maintain the sovereignty of his Lord. Such passages as Philippians 2:9-11, 1 Corinthians 8:5 f. cannot fail to have been interpreted as a protest against the growing tendency to ascribe to the Emperor the reverence which belonged to Christ alone. We hear the same protest in the claim of Judges 1:4, ‘our only Master and Lord, Jesus Christ,’ and in a milder form in the subtle distinction made in 1 Peter 2:17, ‘Fear God, honour the king,’ i.e. the Emperor. In Rev. the references to the Emperor-worship become more explicit (Revelation 13:8; Revelation 13:15; Revelation 14:9; Revelation 20:4), and the protest against it finds freer utterance. Christ is proclaimed King of kings and Lord of lords (Revelation 17:14; Revelation 19:16), while the sovereignty of this world becomes the sovereignty of the Lord and of His anointed one, and He shall reign for ever and ever (Revelation 11:15).
Literature.-A. B. Bruce, Apologetics, 1892, bk. iii. ch. v.; H. Lietzmann, Die Briefe des Apostels Paulus (=Handbuch zum NT, iii. 1 [4]), p. 53ff.; A. Deissmann, Die Urgeschichte des Christentums im Lichte der Sprachforschung, 1910, Licht uom Osten, 1908; Joh. Weiss, Christus, 1909, Das Urchristentum, 1914, ch. ii. § 5, iv. § 3, vii. § 4; H. Weinel, Die Stellung deg Urchristentums zum Staat, 1908; H. R. Mackintosh, The Person of Jesus Christ, 1912, bk. iii. ch. v.; W. Bousset, Kyrios Christos, 1913.
G. Wauchope Stewart.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lord
A title commonly used of God in the Old Testament, but commonly appropriated to Christ in the New Testament. In the Old Testament Greek version and those dependent on it, as the Vulgate in this matter, it is used in place of Jahweh (Jehovah), the proper name of God among the Israelites. The way Saint Paul and other New Testament writers use the title is one of the proofs that they regarded Christ as God. ln Acts 10:48, He is referred to as the Lord Jesus Christ.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lord of Lords
A title of Christ in Saint Paul's first letter to Timothy 6:15; also in the Apocalypse 11:14; the Lamb will overcome the coalitions of the future as He does these of the present because He is "Lord of Lords" and "King of Kings." The two titles suitable only to God, are again given to Our Lord in Apocalypse 19:11.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lords, Lord of
A title of Christ in Saint Paul's first letter to Timothy 6:15; also in the Apocalypse 11:14; the Lamb will overcome the coalitions of the future as He does these of the present because He is "Lord of Lords" and "King of Kings." The two titles suitable only to God, are again given to Our Lord in Apocalypse 19:11.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lord, Brethren of the
Certain relatives of Christ mentioned in several passages of the New Testament. They are recognized as four in number.
 
The most prominent member of the group is James the Less (Mark 15), called "the brother of the Lord" (Galatians 1). He is to be distinguished from James, the brother of John, the son of Zebedee and Salome. His father was a certain Alphaeus, equivalent to the Cleophas or Clopas of John 19, according to the synoptic Gospels (Matthew 10; Mark 3; Luke 6), and his mother, Mary, was a close attendant on Jesus (Mark 15), being a sister of the mother of Jesus (John 19) or a sister-in-law (on Hegesippus's assertion that Cleophas was Saint Joseph's brother). He became an ardent apostle of Our Lord (Galatians 2), prominent in the Church at Jerusalem (Acts 21:12), and aide to Saint Peter (Acts 15 and Galatians 2) in administering the affairs of the Church. The canonical Epistle of Saint James is his. He was assassinated by the Jews about A.D. 62. Feast, May 1,.
 
Joseph or Joses, probably next in age to James (Matthew 13), is only noteworthy because his mother, at the scene of the Crucifixion, is identified by the use of his name (Mark 15).
 
Simon or Simeon is merely mentioned as the third of the four brothers (Matthew 13; Mark 6). He is reputed the successor of James as bishop of Jerusalem, "being proposed as the cousin of Our Lord."
 
Jude or Judas Thaddeus was, like his elder brother James (Matthew 13; Jude 1:1), slow to understand Jesus's true mission (as, indeed, all the brothers were, according to John 7), like him, drawn to the apostleship (Luke 6), and, like him, the author of a catholic epistle. Hence we may recognize the "Brethren of the Lord" as cousins of Christ, children of Mary, wife of Cleophas, and nephews of the Blessed Virgin. There is no need to believe (like the Syrians and Greeks, moved by the "protoevangelium Jacobi" and other apocryphals) that they are Saint Joseph's children by a wife deceased, or (as Helvidius and other heretics thought) by Mary after Jesus's birth.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Noble Champion of the Lord
Hymn for Matins on May 18, feast of Saint Venantius; written in the 17th century; author unknown. There are three translations. The English title given is by Edward Caswall.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - o God of Truth, o Lord of Might
Hymn for Sext throughout the year. It is possible that Saint Ambrose wrote it. About twenty translations are in existence; the English title given above is by J. Neale.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - o Sovereign Lord of Nature's Might
Hymn for Thursday at Vespers. It was probably written by Pope Saint Gregory the Great (540-604). Fourteen translations are in existence; the English title given above is by W. Courthope.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - o Jesus, Jesus! Dearest Lord
Hymn written in the 19th century by Reverend F W Faber.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lord of Glory
In the Epistle of Saint James 2:1, we read, "My brethren, have not the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ of glory, with respect of persons." In this passage, glory is regarded as an essential attribute of Christ (John 11,5); some commentators think that the genitive of quality "of glory" is connected only with "our Lord," but more likely it goes with "our Lord Jesus Christ."
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Lord of Hosts
LORD OF HOSTS ( Jahweh lsbĕâ’ôth ) appears in the OT as a title of God 282 times, of which all but 36 are found in the Prophetical writings. There is considerable uncertainty as to what the term ‘hosts’ signifies, and it seems best to suppose that its meaning underwent modifications in the course of time. We can, perhaps, distinguish three stages.
1 . It is possible that at one time the title suggested the idea of Jahweh as the leader of the Israelite forces . In favour of this view is the fact that the word tsěb â’ôth outside this phrase always refers to bodies of men, and usually to Israelite forces. There is no doubt that in the early stages of the history of the nation the popular view of the functions of Jahweh was concentrated to a large extent on this point that He was the guider and commander of the armies in warfare; and the same idea lingered late, and lies at the bottom of the objection to the institution of the monarchy which is put in Samuel’s mouth (cf. 1 Samuel 8:20 with 1 Samuel 12:12 ). In the same way, David, as he taunts Goliath, says to him, ‘I come in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel’ ( 1 Samuel 17:45 ). And once more there is evidently a special connexion between the title ‘Lord of hosts’ and the Ark which is regarded as the habitation of Jahweh in His capacity as War-God (cf. 1Sa 4:3 ; 1 Samuel 4:6-8 ; 1 Samuel 4:5-6 ). But this explanation of the origin of the title, as Delitzsch pointed out, is greatly invalidated by the fact that we do not find it in the period in which we should expect it to be most common, that is, in the wars of the Wandering in the Wilderness.
2 . So we are brought to another view, which may merely mark a later stage: the ‘hosts’ are the spiritual forces which stand at God’s disposal . So in Joshua 5:13-14 , when Joshua asks the unknown warrior whether he is on their side or on that of their enemies, the implied answer of the Divine stranger is that he belongs to neither side, but is come as captain of the Lord’s host to succour His people. For the idea of the angelic host engaged in the service of God, cf. 2 Samuel 24:16 , 1 Kings 22:19 , 2 Kings 6:17 ; and in the NT Matthew 26:52 , Luke 2:13 , Hebrews 1:14 .
3 . The third stage is reached in the prophets, esp. Isaiah, Jeremiah, Zechariah, and Malachi, where the title assumes a far wider meaning and embraces all the forces of the universe . The term ‘ host of heaven ’ is commonly used of the heavenly bodies to which the later kings paid idolatrous worship (cf. also Genesis 2:1 , Psalms 33:6 ). As the Idea of the omnipotence of God grew loftier and wider, the elemental forces of nature were regarded as performing service to their Creator. So the sun is God’s minister ( Psalms 19:4-5 ), and even so early as the Song of Deborah the stars are represented as joining by God’s behest in the battle against the invader ( Judges 5:20 ). Hence the term ‘Lord of hosts’ becomes with the prophets the highest and most transcendental title of God, and is even rendered by the LXX [1] in a certain number of passages ‘Lord of the forces (of nature).’ It serves as a constant reminder of the illimitable width of God’s sway, and as such it acquires a close connexion with the other great attribute of God, His holiness. Hence we get the summit of the OT creed in the angelic song of praise, Isaiah 6:3 , ‘Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts: the fulness of the whole earth is his glory.’
In the NT, with the exception of a quotation from Isaiah 1:9 in Romans 9:29 , the term occurs only in James 5:4 (in both passages EV [2] has the form ‘ Lord of Sabaoth ’), where it is singularly appropriate in the passionate denunciation of the oppression practised by the unscrupulous landowners, recalling as it does the spirit of the Hebrew prophets.
H. C. O. Lanchester.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lord, Master And
Name of Christ addressed to Him by the Apostles, and accepted by Him after washing the feet of the Apostles (John 13).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lord of Misrule
One of the chief characters in the celebration of the Feast of Fools, a custom of the later medieval period, which came to be marked with much license and buffoonery, and was eventually suppressed. The Lord of Misrule was a mock precentor of the cathedral choir. Before the first Vespers he was allowed to intone the prose "Laetemur gaudiis"; during the second Vespers he was deprived of his precentor's staff. The Feast of Fools originated in the Feast of the Subdeacons occurring January 1,; later it developed into a feast of the lower clergy; and still later it was taken up by certain brotherhoods of "fools." There is little doubt that the license and buffoonery which came to be associated with this, as with other medieval feasts, had their origin in pagan times. The ecclesiastical authorities repeatedly condemned it or eandeavored to restrain it within bounds. Eventually it passed out of practise.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lord, i am Not Worthy
Words of the centurion to Our Lord when He offered to go to his house to cure his daughter; repeated by the priest at Mass thrice before he communicates and thrice also before giving Communion to the people.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Angel of the Lord
(Heb. mal'ak yehwah) . Supernatural being who bears a message on behalf of God. In many passages in the Old Testament, the angel of the Lord is identified with God, while in other instances a distinction is made between the Lord and the angel. In general, however, the terms "the angel of the Lord, " "the Lord, " and "God" are interchangeable.
The angel of the Lord is the messenger of both good and evil. He comes to Hagar after she has fled from the abusive Sarai (Genesis 16:7-14 ) to assure her that God has heard about her misery and that her descendants will be too numerous to count. She names him "You are the God who sees me" (v. 13). The angel of the Lord pronounces a curse on the people of Meroz, because they refused to come to the help of the Lord (Judges 5:23 ).
The angel of the Lord executes judgment on behalf of the Lord. He puts to death 185,000 Assyrian soldiers in their camp, thereby saving Jerusalem from decimation (2 Kings 19:35 ).
The angel of the Lord both commissions and commends God's servants. The commander of the Lord's army commissions Joshua to undertake the Lord's battles for Canaan, just as Moses had been commissioned to confront Pharaoh (Joshua 5:13-15 ; cf. Exodus 3:5 ). The angel of the Lord appears to Abraham. He stops Abraham from sacrificing Isaac and commends him because he has not withheld his only son from God (Genesis 22:11-18 ). Abraham identifies the angel as God, calling the place "The Lord Will Provide."
The angel of the Lord carries out a ministry of reconciliation. He asks how long God will withhold mercy from Jerusalem and Judah (Zechariah 1:12 ).
The connection between the angel of the Lord and the preincarnate appearance of the Messiah cannot be denied. Manoah meets the angel of the Lord, and declares that he has seen God. The angel accepts worship from Manoah and his wife as no mere angel, and refers to himself as "Wonderful, " the same term applied to the coming deliverer in Isaiah 9:6 ( Judges 13:9-22 ). The functions of the angel of the Lord in the Old Testament prefigure the reconciling ministry of Jesus. In the New Testament, there is no mention of the angel of the Lord; the Messiah himself is this person.
Louis Goldberg
See also Theophany
Bibliography . A. Bowling, TWOT, 1:464-65; G. B. Funderburk, ZPEB, 1:160-66; J. B. Payne, Theology of the Older Testament .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Lord
(Luhrd) One who has power and exercises it responsibly. Lordship must include power to exercise control as well as possession of power within the boundaries of a well-defined system such as law. A despot is only a caricature of the legal term “Lord” or “ruler.”
Humans as Lord The Hebrew word adon , “lord,” is used more than 300 times in the Old Testament for a human's rule over another person. This is to be distinguished from baal (also “lord”) in that adon represents a personal relationship of the subjection of one person to another, while baal designates the owner of things, including slaves and women. See Baal . At times persons would address someone of equal social status as “lord” out of respect
In the New Testament the Greek word kurios can designate both one who exercises rule over persons as well as the owner of goods. It is also used in respectful address to a father ( Matthew 21:29-30 ) or to a ruler (Acts 25:26 ). In the era of the Roman caesars, the title kurios symbolized the caesar's position as absolute monarch. It did not mean that the caesar was a god. Kurios was not used in the cults devoted to the worship of the caesars. When the early Christians confessed Jesus as Lord, they protested against the religious claims of the state but not against the rulership of the caesar as such. On the other hand, the Jewish rebels denied the political authority of the caesar. Being exempt from the cult of the caesar, Jews could easily call the caesar: “lord.” Christians had to dispute the caesar's claim to be lord when that claim was understood to mean the caesar was divine. See Emporer Worship.
God the Lord Nations around Israel often called their gods: “lord.” We need to distinguish between the Near Eastern and Greek religions. At first the Greeks did not see themselves in a slave/lord relationship with their gods because they did not believe their gods were responsible for their creation. They could, indeed, call the gods “lord,” but that was not characteristic. Instead, both they and their gods were subject to the same higher power—that is, fate. Thus the Greeks felt no personal responsibility before the gods. The divine manifested itself much more in the political governing structures. In the democracy the divine manifested itself in the law which the citizens served. In the monarchy the divine was embodied in the ruler; and, in the worship of the ruler the law (which lived in all citizens of Greece) was honored.
In the Near East the gods were lords of fate. Humans were thus responsible to the gods. Many gods were called “lord.” Marduk, the national god of Babylon, was called Bel, another form of Baal (Isaiah 46:1 ; Jeremiah 50:2 ; Jeremiah 51:44 ). From among humans, the king towered above and beyond all others. The god had transferred the administration of divine law to the king.
In the Old Testament, Lord usually describes the essence of Yahweh: His power over His people (Exodus 34:23 ; Isaiah 1:24 ), over the entire earth (Joshua 3:13 ; Micah 4:13 ), and over all gods (Deuteronomy 10:17 ; Psalm 135:5 ). Thus adon could stand parallel to the personal name of God, Yahweh ( Exodus 15:17 ): Yahweh is Lord; the Lord is Yahweh. Additional terms such as Sabbaoth (that is, Supreme Head and Commander of all the heavenly forces) underscored the absolute lordship of Yahweh (Isaiah 3:1 ; Isaiah 10:16 ,Isaiah 45:23-24:33 ). Many times adon or the special form adonai was used in direct address to God (439 times), attesting to the honor of God or His representative (2Samuel 7:18-22, 2 Samuel 7:28-29 ; Joshua 5:14 ; Zechariah 4:4 ). In time a formal designation, adonai jahweh (“the Lord Yahweh”), developed. This corresponded to the uniqueness of Yahweh; and, finally, Yahweh was referred to as adonai alone, especially in Isaiah, Psalms, and Lamentations. Israelites formed personal names with adonai (Adonijah, Adoniram) just as did their neighbors (Adoni-zedek, Joshua 10:1-3 ), since these peoples also addressed their gods as “lord.”
The designation of Yahweh as adonai led to varied forms of conflict with Baal and his worshipers during the history of Israel: for example, prior to the conquest ( Numbers 25:1 ); during the time of the Judges (Judges 6:25-32 ); during the monarchy (1 Kings 18:1 ; 1 Kings 22:54 ; 2 Kings 3:2 ; 2 Kings 10:18-28 ). Even in Judah, worship of Baal proved a danger (2 Kings 11:18 ; 2 Kings 21:1-5 ). King Josiah's reform finally ended the conflict with Baal by destroying the worship places outside Jerusalem (2 Kings 23:1 ). The prophets Hosea, Jeremiah, Zephaniah, and Ezekiel spoke out against the hidden “Baalizing” of the religion of Yahweh. They claimed Israel went to worship Yahweh but did it in such a way they were actually worshiping Baal without naming his name. Yahweh was the supreme Lord over the world; but Baal's worshipers saw Baal as lord of at least a part of the world. He appeared and disappeared with the vegetation, being humiliated and defeated by other gods, even becoming weak, sick, and dying. See God's Pagan. These competing understandings could only mean alternatives and opposition. The revelation of God in the Old Testament, however, speaks against any such alternative or opposition, for Yahweh alone is Lord. He is Lord in His historical acts. Humans have no power over Him. He is Lord in His directions for life. Humans are to obey Him totally. He is the Lord who reveals Himself in His covenant, His law, and His faithfulness.
About 300 B.C. adonai became more frequently used than Yahweh. Thus the Books of Esther, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon do not use the name: Yahweh. The title “Lord” ( adonai ) was no longer an adjective modifying the divine name but was a substitute for the divine name: Yahweh. Origen reported that when Jews read the divine name Yahweh, they would pronounce it adonai , while non-Jews would pronounce it kurios .
In the Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint), written before the time of Christ, “Yahweh” was written in Hebrew characters. In the Dead Sea Scrolls, the scribes out of awe for the divine name wrote it in ancient Hebrew script rather in their normal script. Later, Christian scribes replaced the Hebrew characters in the Greek Bible with kurios . Scribes transmitting the Hebrew Bible showed that Yahweh should not be pronounced but read as adonai by substituting the Hebrew vowels of adonai for those of Yahweh when writing the divine name. See Kere-Kethib . Later readers who did not know this history did not pronounce Yahweh; but neither did they pronounce adonai , as the scribes intended. Rather in the Middle Ages readers of the Hebrew Bible began pronouncing precisely what was written, the mixture of consonants from Yahweh and vowels from adonai , producing the pronunciation of Jehovah, a word that never existed for speakers of classic Hebrew.
In the majority of the books of the New Testament, also, Yahweh, or God was called Lord. That occurs above all in quotations from the Old Testament and in translating terms such as “angel,” “way,” “word,” “day,” “name,” or “hand” of the Lord. In important passages kurios (Lord) appears in the sense of the Old Testament adonai as Creator of the world and Director of history ( Matthew 9:38 ; Matthew 11:25 ; Acts 17:24 ; 1 Timothy 6:15 ; Book of Revelation). In this way Christians preserved and continued the Jewish understanding of God. Since the New Testament and early Christians also called Jesus “Lord,” we have difficulty many times determining whether Jesus or God is meant by “Lord” (Matthew 24:42 ; Mark 5:19-20 ; Luke 1:76 ; Acts 10:14 ).
Jesus is Lord The two words, “Kurios Jesus ,” composed the first Christian confession of faith (1 Corinthians 12:3 ; Romans 10:9 ). The decisive reason for transferring the divine title Lord to Jesus was His resurrection from the dead.
Before His resurrection, Jesus was addressed with the Jewish title of honor Rabbi (“teacher”, Mark 9:5 ; Mark 11:21 , for example). Luke always, and Matthew usually, translated this title into Greek as kurios (“Lord). According to Mark only once did a non-Jew address Jesus as Lord ( Mark 7:28 ), but even that was simply a polite and courteous way of speaking (equivalent to our “sir”). Jesus was also addressed with the Aramaic mari (“lord”, John 13:13 ). The resurrection changed the respectful student/teacher relationship of the disciples with Jesus into the believers' servant/Lord relationship. The designation of Jesus as Lord in the Gospels (esp. in Luke) is an indication of this shift in relationship. Paul said that God honored Jesus with the title of Lord as His response to Jesus' obedient suffering (Philippians 2:6-11 ). Jesus in the form of a Servant is the humbled One with the marks of the cross, before whom the entire world will bow down. Thus the Crucified One will experience an act of homage like that due God Himself (Isaiah 10:16,10 ). His church already gives Him such homage. He has been seated at the right hand of God, which demonstrates the elevation of Jesus to the position of Ruler next to God Himself (Psalm 110:1 ; see Mark 12:35-37 ). Still, the New Testament does not go so far as to identify Jesus with God by calling Him, “abba ” (that is, father; see Abba ).
Jesus as the Messiah of Israel (Acts 2:36 ) was installed as Head of His church and Ruler of the cosmos by His resurrection (Colossians 1:17 ; Colossians 2:6 ,Colossians 2:6,2:10 ; Ephesians 1:20-23 ). As such, the church prays for His return: “Come, our Lord” (or in Aramaic, maranatha , 1 Corinthians 16:22 ; 1 Corinthians 11:26 ; Revelation 22:20 ). The cosmic lordship of Jesus still remains the lordship of God. Jesus will give the judged and redeemed world back to the Father (1 Corinthians 15:28 ). The center of this lordship is the power of administration over all things human (Romans 14:9 ).
The lordship of Jesus has ethical consequences. He makes the significance of all other powers of only relative importance (1 Corinthians 8:5-6 ; Colossians 2:15 ). The Christian believer is foundationally freed from being servant to any thing or person in the human world (1 Corinthians 7:22-23 ). The believer devotes self to serve others, even the ones in power, as his or her lord in voluntary service (Mark 10:42-45 ). Speaking the word Lord or calling out to Jesus with the title “Lord” is not enough for salvation. Such calling must be accompanied by actions which correspond to the teachings of the resurrected, Crucified One and to His example ( Matthew 7:21-22 ; John 13:14-15 ).
Already in Acts, “Lord” had become something like a summary of the Christian message. This expresses itself in a growing, more extensive formulation of the name of Jesus: “Lord Jesus,” “the Lord Jesus,” “the Lord Jesus Christ.” In the introductions and conclusions of Paul's Epistles—as well as at significant places of the logical argument of the Epistles—the name is expressed in especially extensive formulations (Romans 5:1 ; Romans 8:39 ; Romans 15:30 ; 1 Corinthians 15:57 ). The objective fact of the Lordship of Christ is supplemented by the subjective element of personal bonds to Christ through the possessive pronoun: “My/our Lord Jesus Christ.” The “our” in “our Lord” includes all Christians; “your Lord” does not occur in the New Testament. Jesus Christ either joins people together, or He separates them, when they deny His right to be Lord (Romans 16:18 ; 1Corinthians 1:2,1 Corinthians 1:10-13 ). The personal bond or union with Jesus and with one another is especially emphasized in the formula “in the Lord” or “in Christ.” Here it is evident that Lord and Christ are, in the final analysis, interchangeable (1 Corinthians 7:22 ; 2 Corinthians 4:5 ). The Lord is Jesus, through whom God intervened in the activities of the world in order to bring salvation.
How can humans be convinced that the crucified Jesus from Nazareth is the Lord—that is, that in Him God acted in the way that the Bible says and in the way that the world needs? How can people be convinced that He is the Messiah of Israel and the Lord of all people, who comes near to all people as Friend and Brother? How does the Lord of the cosmos become our personal Lord in His church? This happens through the Holy Spirit. God has fully empowered the resurrected Jesus to send out this Spirit (Acts 2:33 ). Indeed, Paul could say that the Lord is the Spirit (1 Corinthians 15:45 ; 2 Corinthians 3:17 ). This does not signify a total identifying of Jesus with the Spirit of God (compare 2 Corinthians 13:13 ), but it testifies to the inseparable unity of the Lordship of God with the sending of Jesus and with the work of the Spirit. See Christ; God ; Holy Spirit ; Messiah ; Jesus; Rabbi ; Resurrection .
Christian Wolf
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Brethren of the Lord
BRETHREN OF THE LORD . Jesus was Mary’s first-born ( Luke 2:7 ), and she subsequently (according to the view accepted in the present article) bore to Joseph four sons, James, Joseph, Judas, and Simon, and several daughters ( Matthew 13:55-56 = Mark 6:3 ). During His ministry the Lord’s brethren did not believe in Him. They sneered at Him ( John 7:3-5 ), and once they concluded that He was mad, and wished to arrest Him and convey Him away from Capernaum ( Mark 3:21 ; Mark 3:31 ). After the Resurrection, however, convinced by so tremendous a demonstration, they joined the company of the believers ( Acts 1:14 ).
In early days, partly at least in the interests of the notion of Mary’s perpetual virginity, two theories were promulgated in regard to the ‘Brethren of the Lord.’ ( a ) They were supposed to be sons of Joseph by a former marriage , having thus no blood-relationship with Jesus. So Origen, Clement of Alexandria, Epiphanius. ( b ) They were held to be His cousins, sons of Mary, the wife of Alphœus ( Matthew 27:56 = Mark 15:40 ); ‘brother’ here implying merely kinship, as Abraham calls himself and his nephew Lot ‘brethren’ ( Genesis 13:8 ), and Laban calls Jacob, his sister’s son, his ‘brother’ ( Genesis 29:16 ). So Jerome and Augustine. That Mary, the wife of Alphæus and mother of James the Little, was a sister of Mary the mother of Jesus, is an inference from John 19:25 , where it is supposed that only three women are mentioned: (1) His mother, (2) His mother’s sister, viz., Mary, the wife of Clopas (= Alphæus), and (3) Mary Magdalene. But there are probably four: (1) His mother, (2) her sister Salome, the mother of the sons of Zebedee (cf. Mt. = Mk.), (3) Mary, the wife of Clopas, and (4) Mary Magdalene. It is very unlikely that two sisters should have been named Mary; and moreover, James, the son of Alphæus, was an Apostle ( Matthew 10:3 = Mark 3:18 = Luke 6:15 ), and none of the Lord’s brethren was an Apostle in His life-time (cf. Acts 1:13-14 ).
David Smith.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Hosts, Lord of
in Isaias 9:9, as in many other passages of the Bible, designates God as supreme over untold armies of spiritual and other agencies, which He can employ to give effect to His purposes. The angels, the stars, as well as armies of men are represented in the Bible as subject to Him. The Septuagint Version sometimes simply translates the expression Lord of Hosts by a word which means the Omnipotent. In the text referred to, Isaias says that God, Who is Almighty, will bring about the fulfillment of His prophecy concerning Emmanuel.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Lord, God of Israel
See God ; Lord of Hosts; Lord Sabbaoth.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Lord Will Provide, the
See Jehovah-jireh .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Lord is my Banner, the
See Jehovah-Nissi .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Lord is Peace, the
See Jehovah-shalom .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Lord is Shalom, the
See Jehovah-shalom .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Lord is There, the
See Jehovah-shamma .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Servant of the Lord, the
Title Jesus took up from the Old Testament, especially Isaiah 40-55 . The term the servant of the Lord (or “My servant” or “His servant” where the pronouns refer to God) is applied to many leaders of God's people: to Moses over 30 times, to David over 70 times, and to Israel as a nation a number of times. It assumes a special significance in Isaiah 40-55 .
The idea is introduced almost incidentally. Isaiah 41:1 pictures a great crisis, as a powerful army moves westward from Persia, conquering many nations and filling all with terror. In contrast, God told Israel not to fear. “But thou, Israel, art my servant, Jacob, whom I have chosen, the seed of Abraham my friend. Thou art my servant; I have chosen thee, and not cast thee away” ( Isaiah 41:8 ,Isaiah 41:8,41:9 ). Israel had to be preserved, because it was God's instrument to perform a task of worldwide importance.
Isaiah 42:1 gives a remarkable picture of the ideal Servant of the Lord and the great work that God intends Him to accomplish. He is to “bring forth judgment to the Gentiles” ( Isaiah 42:1 ). He must “set judgment in the earth,” and the distant “isles shall wait for his law” (Isaiah 42:4 ). The tasks He is destined to accomplish are almost beyond belief. He is to bring God's justice to all the nations (Isaiah 42:1 ,Isaiah 42:1,42:4 ).
Almost more remarkable than the immensity of the task that the Servant must perform is the description of the way He is to do it. He will move forward with absolute confidence, but nothing indicates strenuous effort will be needed. He will have such an understanding of His overwhelming power that He can be absolutely gentle as He does His work (Isaiah 42:2-4 ) even toward those whose efforts have failed. This first part of Isaiah 42:1 pictures the ideal Servant—the goal for which Israel was to be preserved.
As an Israelite read this prediction, he would think: “How can Israel even think of performing this great task that God's Servant must do?” Soon the Lord Himself called attention to the inability of the natural Israelite to fulfill the picture of the ideal Servant. In Isaiah 42:19 He says, “Who is blind, but my servant? or deaf, as my messenger that I sent?” Israel had a responsibility to fulfill this ideal, but to do so was far beyond its power. Still, the Lord says: “Ye are my witnesses, and my servant whom I have chosen” ( Isaiah 43:10 ; compare Isaiah 44:1-2 ,Isaiah 44:1-2,44:21 ).
Israel had responsibility to do the work of the Servant. Yet not all Israel could be meant, for some were blasphemers and idolaters. Could part of Israel be the real Servant? Or might it really point to One who must come out of Israel—One who could represent Israel in accomplishing the task? Matthew 12:17-21 quotes Isaiah 42:1-4 as fulfilled in Jesus Christ.
Isaiah 49:1 presents the work of the Servant in more detail. The Servant tells the “isles” and the “people, from far;” that God called Him before His birth, even mentioning His name: Israel ( Luke 4:18-19 ). Isaiah 49:4 describes the godly in Israel who know what God wants but feel their own inadequacy and provides assurance that the work belongs to God, and He will bring it to pass. Isaiah 49:5 and Isaiah 49:6 distinguish between the One who will fulfill the work of the Servant and the nation of Israel, to which this One belongs and which He represents. Not only is He to bring judgment to all the world—He is “to bring Jacob again to him” ( Isaiah 49:5 ) and “to restore the preserved of Israel” (Isaiah 49:6 ). He is to be “a light to the Gentiles” and “my salvation unto the end of the earth” (Isaiah 49:6 ). In Isaiah 50:4-10 , we hear of the sufferings to which He will voluntarily submit.
All this leads up to the triumphal picture in Isaiah 52:13-53:12 , showing the sufferings of the Servant (Isaiah 52:14 ; Isaiah 53:2-5 ,Isaiah 53:2-5,53:7-8 ,Isaiah 53:7-8,53:10 ), their vicarious and redemptive nature (Isaiah 52:15 ; Isaiah 53:4-6 ,Isaiah 53:4-6,53:8 ,Isaiah 53:8,53:10-12 ; compare 1 Peter 1:1-2 ). Isaiah 54:1 shows the outreach of the Servant's work, and Isaiah 55:1 gives the glorious call to receive the salvation won by the Servant's redemptive work, “without money and without price” ( Isaiah 55:1 ).
After Isaiah 53:1 , Isaiah never again used “servant” in the singular; rather he spoke of the blessings that the followers of the Servant will receive, calling them “the servants of the Lord” (Isaiah 54:17 ); “his servants” (Isaiah 56:6 ; Isaiah 65:15 ; Isaiah 66:1 ;Isaiah 66:1;14:1 ); and “my servants” (Isaiah 65:8-9 ,Isaiah 65:8-9,65:13-14 ).
The New Testament pictures Jesus as the Suffering Servant fulfilling the glorious descriptions of Isaiah. In refusing to let disciples reveal His true identity, Jesus was the pleasing Servant who did not strive or cry out (Matthew 12:14-21 ). In the resurrection and ascension, God glorified Jesus the Servant (Acts 3:1 ;Acts 3:1;13:1 ; compare Acts 13:26 where the same Greek word for servant appears though KJV translates “Son.”). Gentile and Jewish leaders conspired to make Jesus, “your holy servant” suffer as God “had decided beforehand” ( Acts 4:27-28 NIV). This led the early church to pray that as God's servants they would speak with boldness and perform miracles through the name of “your holy servant Jesus” ( Acts 4:29-30 NIV). Jesus saw His mission as that of the Servant ( Isaiah 49:3 ; compare Luke 22:37 ) and symbolized it for His disciples, calling on them to serve one another and the world (John 13:4-17 ). See Christology; Isaiah ; Jesus Christ ; Slavery; Son of God
Allan A. MacRae
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Servant of the Lord
God's servants were those who worshiped him and carried out his will, often in important leadership roles. Individuals such as Abraham (Genesis 26:24 ), Moses (Exodus 14:31 ; Deuteronomy 34:5 ), David (2 Samuel 7:5,8 ), and Isaiah (20:3) were called God's "servants" as they obediently walked with the Lord. There are several references to "my servants the prophets" (2 Kings 17:13 ; Jeremiah 7:25 ; 26:5 ), sent by God to call Israel to repentance and renewal of the covenant. Sadly, the prophets were often rejected and sometimes killed (Luke 11:47-51 ), in spite of the divine word they delivered. In the last half of Isaiah, scholars have identified four servant songs that describe the accomplishments and suffering of one called the servant of the Lord (42:1-7; 49:1-6; 50:4-11; 52:13-53:12). Possibly Isaiah 61:1-3 contains yet another servant song. Although Isaiah sometimes refers to the servant as "Israel, " New Testament quotations and allusions clearly relate the ministry of the servant to the first coming of Christ and his atoning death.
The Identity of the Servant . At times it seems quite clear that the servant refers collectively to the nation of Israel. In 41:8-9 the servant is called "Israel" or "Jacob, " the "descendants of Abraham my friend." Since the nation often proved to be unresponsive to the word of the Lord, the servant is called "blind" and "deaf" in 42:19. The suffering and affliction caused by Israel's sin (1:5-6) is similar to the experience of the servant in 53:4-5. Sometimes the concept of the "servant" seems to refer to those in Israel who were spiritual, the righteous remnant who remained faithful to the Lord. In 42:5,49:8 the servant functions as "a covenant for the people" and is involved in the restoration of the land after the Babylonian exile. Even though the servant is called "Israel" in 49:3, he is distinguished from Israel in verse 5, where the servant brings Israel back to the Lord. Starting with 54:17 and ending with 66:14 there are several references to "the servants" of the Lord, and the plural may be another term for the righteous remnant.
A careful reading of the four servant songs has nonetheless led many scholars to argue that the servant refers to an individual who fulfills in himself all that Israel was meant to be. This individual was the ideal Israel, a righteous and faithful servant who suffered unjustly and died to atone for the sins of humankind. H. H. Rowley has said that by chapter 53 the personification has become a person. The one who "was led like a lamb to the slaughter" died to bear "the sins of many" (vv. 6,12) and "was assigned a grave with the wicked" (v. 9). This description does not apply very well to a nation or even a part of the nation, but it certainly can apply to an individual. In some respects the servant can be compared with the Davidic messianic king. Both were chosen by God and characterized by righteousness and justice (cf. 9:7; 42:1,6). The Spirit of God would empower both the king and the servant (11:1-4; 42:1), and ultimately the suffering servant would be highly exalted (cf. 52:13; 53:12) and given the status of a king. The "shoot" or "branch" from the family of Jesse (11:1) is linked with the description of the servant as "a tender shoot" (53:2).
The Work of the Servant . Unlike the nation Israel, the servant of the Lord listened to God's word and spoke words of comfort and healing (42:2-3; 50:4-5). Yet his words were powerful and authoritative, and like a judge he was concerned about establishing justice and righteousness (42:1,4; 49:2). Twice the servant is called "a light to the Gentiles" (42:6; 49:6), and "light" is clearly paralleled to "salvation." Similarly, the servant is involved in the restoration of the nation Israel (49:5). He is "a covenant for the people" (42:6; 49:8) as the ruler who was promised in the Davidic covenant (2 Samuel 7:16 ) and the One who would initiate the new covenant. The servant opens the eyes of the blind and frees captives from prison (42:7; cf. 61:1).
The Suffering of the Servant . In order to bring salvation to Israel and the nations, the servant had to die to pay for sin, and this theme of suffering and death becomes increasingly clear as the servant songs unfold. At first we are told only that "he was not falter or be discouraged" (42:4), but then the servant faces strong opposition and appears to have failed (49:4). He was despised and mocked to the point of being spit on, beaten, and otherwise humiliated (49:7; 50:6-7). In the final servant song (52:13-53:12) we learn that the servant was disfigured "beyond human likeness" (52:14) and "poured out his life unto death" as a guilt offering to make atonement for sin (53:10,12). His vicarious death brought peace and healing to humankind and justification for many (53:5,11). As the perfect sacrifice for sin, the death of the servant was in accord with God's will and resulted ultimately in victory and exaltation. The one who died now lives to intercede on behalf of believers (53:10,12).
New Testament Quotations . Although the number of quotations from the servant songs are surprisingly limited in the New Testament, there are several important references to Christ as God's servant (pais theous ). The longest quotation is found in Matthew 12:18-21 , which cites almost all of Isaiah 42:1-4 in connection with Christ's healing of the sick. Matthew 8:17 also refers to Christ's ability to heal the sick and drive out evil spirits as a fulfillment of Isaiah 53:4 : "He took up our infirmities and carried our diseases." Paul quotes Isaiah 52:15 in connection with his mission to preach the gospel to the Gentiles ( Romans 15:21 ), and both Paul and John cite 53:1 with reference to Jewish unbelief (Romans 10:16 ; John 12:38 ). Paul also utilized Isaiah 49:6 as his preaching became "a light for the Gentiles" ( Acts 13:47 ). Of the Gospel writers only Luke uses Isaiah 53 in speaking of Christ's suffering and death: "And he was numbered with the transgressors" (53:12; Luke 22:37 ). It was also Luke who related Philip's encounter with the Ethiopian eunuch, who was reading Isaiah 53:6-7 ( Acts 8:32-33 ). Answering the eunuch's question, Philip preached "the good news about Jesus" from this passage about the lamb who was sacrificed (Acts 8:34-35 ).
While encouraging believers who were suffering, Peter cites several verses from Isaiah 53 . Christ's submission in the midst of unjust threats is linked to verse 9 (1 Peter 2:22 ), and the substitutionary nature of Christ's death is derived from verses 4,11 (1 Peter 2:24 ). We have been healed by the wounds Christ suffered on our behalf as the good Shepherd gave his life to rescue the straying sheep (Isaiah 53:5-6 ; 1 Peter 2:25 ).
New Testament Allusions . The portrayal of Christ as the suffering servant stands behind many other passages. Four times in Acts the word "servant" (pais ) is applied to Christ in connection with his death (3:13,26; 4:27,30). Twice Christ is called the "Righteous One, " perhaps an allusion to the "righteous servant" of Isaiah 53:11 ( Acts 3:14 ; 7:52 ). John the Baptist called Jesus "the Lamb of God" (John 1:29,36 ), while on the day of Pentecost Peter spoke of "God's set purpose and foreknowledge" that lay behind Calvary (Acts 2:23 ). Paul's reference to Christ's being raised for our justification reflects the Greek translation of Isaiah 53:11 ( Romans 4:25 ), and the same verse may have affected the wording of "the many will be made righteous" (Romans 5:19 ). Mark's key reference to the Son of Man as a servant who gave his life "as a ransom for many" (10:45) may also stem from Isaiah 53 .
Herbert M. Wolf
See also Isaiah, Theology of ; Jesus Christ ; Messiah
See also Jesus Christ, Name and Titles of
Bibliography. R. T. France, Tyn Bul 19 (1968); M. D. Hooker, Jesus and the Servant ; F. D. Lindsey, The Servant Songs ; C. R. North, The Suffering Servant in Deutero-Isaiah ; H. M. Wolf, Interpreting Isaiah ; W. Zimmerli and J. Jeremias, The Servant of God .
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Hosts, Lord of
See God, Names of
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Lord
See Jesus Christ, Name and Titles of
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hosts, Lord of
We do not meet with this name until 1 Samuel 1:3 . It came in with prophetic testimony, faith laying hold of Jehovah's glory when Israel had corrupted themselves, and were in a weak and low estate. Scripture reveals that there is a mighty heavenly host, and principalities and powers in the unseen world. God is the God of them all, as well as God of all the elements of nature, which have often been used by Him to punish His enemies. "The stars in their courses fought against Sisera." Judges 5:20 . We read of 'the God of hosts' only a few times comparatively; it is mostly 'Jehovah of hosts,' and at times 'Jehovah God of hosts,' showing that it is in connection with Israel that God revealed Himself under this name. Jehovah of hosts dwelt between the cherubim. From the beginning of 1Samuel these titles constantly occur to the end of the O.T. In Psalm 24:10 the Lord Jesus is shown to be "Jehovah of hosts: he is the king of glory:" cf. Ephesians 1:20,21 ; Colossians 1:16 . The same title occurs in the N.T. as the LORD OF SABAOTH. Romans 9:29 (in a quotation from Isaiah 1:9 ), and James 5:4 .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Angel of the Lord
(See ANGELS.)
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Lord (2)
LORD.—This title is used as the translation of three different words in the Gr. Gospels: (1) ὁ δεσπότης. This word occurs only once in the Gospels, in the prayer of Simeon, ‘Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word’ (Luke 2:29). It is the proper correlative of δοῦλος. In thus addressing God, Simeon thinks of himself as His slave. (2) οἱ μεγιστᾶνες. This word also occurs but once in the Gospels, in Mark 6:21 ‘Herod … made a supper to his lords.’ It describes the chief men or nobles of a city or kingdom. (3) κύριος, ὁ κύριος. Except in the above instances, this is the word which stands for ‘Lord’ and ‘lord’ in the Gospels. It occurs with great frequency. With or without the article, it is found at least 244 times. The frequency of its use is concealed from readers of the English versions. It is sometimes translated ‘master’ (‘Yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which fall from their master’s table,’ Matthew 15:27), or ‘sir’ (‘I go, sir, and went not,’ Matthew 21:30), or ‘owner’ (‘the owners therefore said, Why loose ye the colt?’ Luke 19:33). Fundamentally the title describes one who has power or authority (ὁ ἔχων κῦρος) over persons or things. Strictly speaking, it implies ownership, but it is also used as a title of reverence or courtesy. In the Gospels it is applied in a wide variety of relationship.
1. It is frequently used as a name for God.—(1) In most cases as a name for God, it is used without the article. It occurs in all 59 times (17 in Matthew , 8 in Mk., 30 in Luke , 4 in Jn.). It is found in quotations from the OT, as ‘Thou shalt not tempt (the) Lord thy God’ (Matthew 4:7); and in phrases of OT origin, as ‘the angel of (the) Lord’ (Matthew 1:20 || Luke 1:11); ‘the law of (the) Lord’ (Luke 2:23); ‘the power of (the) Lord’ (Luke 5:17). It is noteworthy that the only instances in the Gospels where the title is used in direct address to God, are found in the prayers of Jesus: ‘I thank thee, Father, Lord of heaven and earth’ (Matthew 11:25 || Luke 10:21). In both cases the title is found in exactly the same phrase. (2) The use of the name with the article is infrequent, occurring in all 11 times (twice in Mt., once in Mark , 8 times in Lk.): e.g. ‘Perform unto the Lord thine oaths’ (Matthew 5:33); ‘Tell how great things the Lord hath done for thee’ (Mark 5:19); ‘Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest’ (Luke 10:2). In the application of this name to God, with and without the article, the Gospels follow the usage of the LXX Septuagint .
2. It is also used with great frequency as a general title of courtesy, or as a name for a master or owner. (1) Without the article, it is employed in direct address, as the salutation of a son to a father, ‘I go, sir’ (Matthew 21:30); of servants to their master, ‘Sir, didst not thou sow good seed in thy field?’ (Matthew 13:27); ‘Lord, let it alone this year also’ (Luke 13:8); of the Greeks to Philip, ‘Sir, we would see Jesus’ (John 12:21); of the Pharisees and priests to Pilate, ‘Sir, we remember that this deceiver said’ (Matthew 27:63). This use of the title, as a general term of courtesy in direct address, is not found in Mk., but it occurs 9 times in Matthew , 8 times in Lk., and twice in John. As the name for a master, without the article it is found only in Matthew 6:24 ‘No man can serve two masters,’ and in Luke 16:13, the parallel passage. (2) With the article, it is a frequent name for a master or owner, as ‘the lord of the vineyard’ (Matthew 20:8), ‘the lord of that servant’ (Luke 12:46), ‘the servant knoweth not what his lord doeth’ (John 15:15). In Luke 16:8 it is the ‘lord’ of the unjust steward who commended his dishonest method of providing for himself.
3. It is most frequently of all employed as a title of courtesy in direct address to, or as a name for Jesus.
(1) Without the article, it is used (a) by His disciples, as ‘Lord, if it be thou, bid me come unto thee on the water’ (Matthew 14:28). This title in direct address to Jesus by disciples is never found in Mark. It is most frequent in Jn., as is to be expected, since he records most of the private intercourse between Jesus and His disciples. (b) By others than disciples, as ‘Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean’ (Matthew 8:2). In Mk. it is employed only once in this relation, by the Syrophœnician woman, ‘Yes, Lord’ (Mark 7:28). In most cases, the title as used by others than disciples is found in narratives of miracle. (c) By Jesus Himself, as ‘Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 7:21). (d) It is also found in the words of the angel to the shepherds, ‘Unto you is born this day … a Saviour, who is Christ (the) Lord’ (Luke 2:11). This phrase (χριστὸς κύριος) is found in Ps-Sol 17:36. Briggs (Messiah of the Gospels, pp. 34, 35, notes) says it is probably to be interpreted on the basis of אדני Psalms 110:1 (‘The Lord said unto my Lord’), but adds that Schürer, Ewald, Wellhausen, and W. R. Smith regard the phrase in Ps-Sol as a mistranslation of סשיח יהוה (‘Anointed of (the) Lord,’—a phrase which is found in Luke 2:26’ (the) Lord’s Christ’). Dalman, on the other hand (Words of Jesus, T. & T. Clark, p. 303 f.), thinks it incredible that a translator should have made such a mistake. We agree with him in regarding κύριος (Lord) as a word added by the Evangelist to interpret the Jewish title Messiah (χριστός) to his Gentile readers. (The same necessity of interpretation accounts for the phrase ‘Christ, a king’ (Luke 23:2), in the accusation made before Pilate. The claim that Jesus was ‘the Christ’ had no political significance to the Gentile governor. It had to be interpreted to him as ‘king’ before he could receive the charge as an accusation). In Acts 2:36 the phrase ‘God hath made that same Jesus … both Lord and Christ’ (κύριον καὶ χριστόν), is to be explained in the same way. ‘Lord’ is an addition by the Evangelist, to interpret ‘Christ’ to Gentile Christians. We may add that the same necessity of interpreting ‘Christ’ to Gentiles accounts for the curious phrase in the address of Peter to Cornelius, which has been found so difficult—‘Jesus Christ (he is Lord of all, πάντων κύριος),’ Acts 10:36. The clause in brackets is added to interpret the confessional title ‘Christ.’ It may be due to Lk., but it is more likely that it was added at the time by Peter. He was speaking to a Gentile, who, though he was ‘a devout man and one that feared God,’ may not have understood the confessional significance of the term ‘Christ.’ Without the addition of the interpretation, Cornelius might have regarded it as part of the name of Jesus. The title ‘Christ’ did become a proper name, but that use of the term did not arise till a later date. If the interpretation was given by Peter when speaking to Cornelius, it provides an interesting illustration of the way in which the first preachers of Christianity adapted themselves to the new conditions in which they found themselves, when they began to preach to Gentiles. The Saviour of the world must not have a local or national confessional title, (cf. the words of Paul and Silas to the Philippian jailer as they are given in אAB, and accepted by Westcott and Hort, Tischendorf, and other critical editors, ‘Believe on the Lord Jesus (i.e. believe on Jesus as Lord), and thou shalt be saved,’ Acts 16:31. Also, ‘No man can say that Jesus is Lord but by the Holy Ghost’ (1 Corinthians 12:3), and ‘every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father,’ Philippians 2:11). To the Jewish Christian, Jesus was the ‘Messiah,’ to the Hellenistic Christian Jew He was ‘the Christ,’ and to the Gentile Christian He was ‘the Lord.’ The Hellenistic and Gentile terms are combined in our familiar name ‘the Lord Jesus Christ.’ The interpretation of ‘Christ’ as ‘Lord’ enables us to understand that the essential idea of the first term is that of Sovereignty or Lordship. The Saviour is the Lord, the Possessor and Ruler of the Kingdom of God.
This title readily acquired its highest significance as one of Divine honour among the Gentile Christians, especially in the East. ‘Oriental religions are fond of expressing the relationship between the divinity and the devotee, as that of the “Lord” or “Lady” to a slave’ (Deissmann). The higher significance of the title was most likely assisted also by the fact that among Hellenistic Jewish Christians κύριος was in use as a Divine title applied to God.
(2) With the article, the title is applied to Jesus (a) by Himself, directly, as ‘Ye call me Master and Lord’ (more literally, ‘the Teacher and the Lord’) (John 13:13), and indirectly, as ‘(The) Lord said unto my Lord (τῷ κυρίῳ μου), Sit thou on my right hand till I make thine enemies thy footstool’ (Matthew 22:44). (b) The historical application of the title, with the article, to Jesus is specially significant. Tischendorf and Westcott-Hort omit the title in this form, in the only place where it is found in Mt. (Matthew 28:6). It occurs twice in Mk. (Mark 16:19-20), i.e. in that part of the Gospel which is regarded by critical editors as not belonging to the original Manuscripts . Therefore it is only in the Gospels of Lk. and Jn. that the title in this form is applied historically to Jesus. This is a strong argument for the earlier composition of Mt. and Mk., for the title became so common in the Apostolic Church that its absence from these Gospels can be explained only by their early date. The title occurs 18 times in Luke , 12 times in John. Twelve of the instances in Lk. are found in passages which are peculiar to that Gospel, as ‘the Lord appointed other seventy’ (Luke 10:1). The other instances may be regarded as editorial additions (Luke 7:13; Luke 11:39; Luke 12:42; Luke 17:5-6; Luke 24:3). Three of the instances in Jn., which are found in the early part of the Gospel, are plainly editorial additions (John 4:1; John 6:23; John 11:2). The remaining instances are found in the last two chapters of the Gospel, and in passages which are peculiar to it. They deal with the risen life of Jesus, and were written at a time when the higher conceptions of His personality gave a deeper significance to the title, and when its confessional meaning was universally known. The adoring cry of Thomas, ‘My Lord and my God’ (ὁ κύριός μου καὶ ὁ θεός μου) John 20:28, is an illustration of how among Jewish Christians the title of respect addressed to a teacher became one of Divine honour. Yet, as Dalman says, ‘it must … be remembered that the Aramaic-speaking Jews did not, save exceptionally, designate God as “Lord,” so that in the Hebraic section of the Jewish Christians the expression “our Lord” was used in reference to Jesus only, and would be quite freh from ambiguity’ (p. 329).
4. In comparing parallel passages in which the title occurs, it is to be noticed that other titles are sometimes employed as equivalent terms in addressing Jesus.—
i.Matthew 8:25 (κύριε) ‘Lord, save us: we perish.’
Mark 4:38 (διδάσκαλς) ‘Teacher, earest thou not that we perish?’
Luke 8:24 (ἐπιστάτα) ‘Master (teacher), we perish.’
ii.Matthew 17:4 (κύριε) ‘Lord, it is good for us to be here.’
Mark 9:5 (Ραββεί) ‘Rabbi, it is good for us to be here.’
Luke 9:33 (ἐπιστάτα) ‘Master (teacher), it is good for us to be here.’
iii.Matthew 26:22 (κύριε) ‘Is it I, Lord?’
Matthew 26:25 (Ραββει) ‘Is it I, Rabbi?’
John 13:25 (κύριε) ‘Lord, who is it?’
The variety in the title used in addressing Jesus is not confined to the parallel passages. It is to be seen throughout each of the Gospels. Arranging the titles in the order of preference, Mt. uses κύριος, διδάσκαλος, and Ῥαββεί; Mk. διδάσκαλος Ῥαββεί, Ῥαββουνεί, and κὐριος Lk. κὐριος, διδάσκαλος, and ἐπιστάτης; Jn. κύριος, Ῥαββεί, Ῥαββουνεί, and διδάσκαλος. Sometimes the variety of the title is seen even in the same passage. It cannot be without intention or meaning that in (iii.) Mt. represents the eleven disciples as asking, ‘Is it I, Lord?’ while Judas, the traitor, says, ‘Is it I, Rabbi?’ (Matthew 26:22; Matthew 26:25). Possibly Judas indicated his position of detachment or opposition by using ‘Rabbi’ instead of the title employed by the rest of the disciples. It is only by Judas that Jesus is addressed as ‘Rabbi’ in Mt. (Matthew 26:25; Matthew 26:49). There must also be some difference of feeling in the use of different titles in Luke 5:5 ‘Master (teacher, ἐπιστάτα), we have toiled all night’; and Luke 5:8, where Peter, after the miraculous draught of fishes, falls at the fect of Jesus with the cry, ‘Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord’ (κύριε). But it is possible that the variation of title in the parallel passages may have taken place in the process of oral transmission, or in translation from the Aramaic.
5. The variation of title in addressing Jesus suggests that in the original language of the Gospels at least two titles were employed. Of these Ῥαββεί was one, cf. ‘ye call me Master (teacher) and Lord,’ John 13:13, and the frequent use of ‘Rabbi’ in the Gospels. Evidently ‘teacher’ (διδάσκαλος) is a translation of ‘Rabbi’ in some of its forms (רב, רבי, רבן). In 7 places Lk. uses ἐπιστάτης as a synonym for διδάσκαλος (Luke 5:5; Luke 8:24 bis. Luke 8:45; Luke 9:33; Luke 9:49; Luke 17:13), and, without doubt, some form of רב lies behind this also. As to the title κύριος (Lord), which is used so frequently in addressing Jesus, it is most probably a translation of מָרִי or מָרַנָא. It was a common name for a master, and was used as a title of courtesy. It was used by a servant to a master, by a debtor to a creditor, and by a layman to a learned man. It is possible, however, since many of the people of Palestine were bilingual, that κύριος was used by itself when one who knew Greek spoke to Jesus.
6. We thus suggest a twofold origin of the title as applied to Jesus. First, as the translation of the Aramaic titles in use among the disciples; and second, as the substitute for χριστός with confessional meaning among Gentiles. These distinctions of origin and meaning were soon lost in the gradual but rapid adoption of the title as one expressive of Divine honour. It is possible that this use of the title first became common among Eastern Christians.
7. In regard to the application of κύριος to God, it may be said that this was entirely due to the influence of Hellenistic Judaism. It is very unlikely that it was in use among Aramaic-speaking Jews at the time of our Lord. In reading the Scriptures in the synagogue in Hebrew, the name ארני (Lord) was read wherever the sacred name יהוה was found in the text. When it became necessary to translate the Scriptures into Aramaic in public reading, ארני still took the place of the sacred name. In quoting from the Scriptures ארני was not employed for the name of God, but הַשֵׁם (‘the Name’) in Hebrew, and שְׁמָא in Aramaic. In phrases of OT origin like ‘the angel of (the) Lord,’ the name of God was entirely omitted or merely hinted at.
Literature.—Dalman, The Words of Jesus, 324; Bruce, Apologetics, 398; Naville, The Christ, 144; Somerville, St. Paul’s Conception of Christ, 295; Spurgeon, The Messiah, 649: Expository Times, vol. xii. [1] p. 425 ff., vol. xiii. p. 236 ff., vol. xv. p. 296 ff.: Deissmann, ibid. vol. xviii. p. 195 ff.; Lexicons of Cremer and Grimin-Thayer, s.v. κύριος.
John Reid.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - King of Kings And Lord of Lords
The title ‘King of kings,’ assumed of old by the Babylonian monarchs and adopted by the Achaemenidae, is proved by coins and inscriptions to have been laid claim to, about the beginning of the Christian era, by various other Oriental potentates, e.g. the Kings of Armenia, the Bosporus, and Palmyra (A. Deissmann, Licht vom Osten, 1908, p. 265). It had been applied by the Jews to their God (2 Maccabees 13:4, 3 Maccabees 5:35), and is combined with the appellation ‘Lord of lords’ (bestowed on Jahweh in Deuteronomy 10:17, Psalms 136:3) to form the supreme title ‘King of kings and Lord of lords,’ with which God is invested in 1 Timothy 6:15. This heaping up of attributes has a parallel in 1 Timothy 1:17. It is not evident what is its precise purpose in the context. Some would explain it as a counterblast to Gnostic misrepresentations. H. Weinel (Die Stellung des Urchristentums zum Staat, 1908, pp. 22, 51), who recalls the Babylonian origin of the title, finds some trace of the old Babylonian astrology in the further course of the passage, ‘who only hath immortality, dwelling in the light which no man can approach’ (cf. James 1:17, ‘the Father of lights,’ i.e. stars). The same lofty title is applied in Revelation 17:14; Revelation 19:16 to Christ, in earnest of the certainty of His triumph over the kings of the earth. In view of the hostility to the Roman Empire which breathes throughout the Book of Revelation, and the express references in it to the worship of the Emperor (Revelation 13:8; Revelation 13:15, Revelation 14:9, Revelation 20:4), it is probable that this title is deliberately assigned to Christ in assertion of His right to that dignity and reverence which were falsely claimed by the Roman Emperor (see articles King and Lord).
G. Wauchope Stewart.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Day of the Lord
DAY OF THE LORD . The day in which Jehovah was expected to punish sinful Hebrews and the enemies of Israel, and to establish at least the righteous remnant of His people in political supremacy. The Hebrews believed implicitly that their God Jehovah was certain to defeat all rivals. Before Amos this view had not reached a definite eschatology, and probably involved only a general expectation of the triumph of Israel and Israel’s God. With Amos, however, the conception of punishment became less ethnic and more moral. The sins of Israel itself deserved punishment, and Amos declared that the luxury of the nation, with all its economic oppression, had grown hateful to Jehovah, and unless abandoned would bring fearful punishment ( Amos 2:6-8 ; Amos 3:9-15 ; Amos 5:10-13 ; Amos 6:4-8 ). The righteousness of Jehovah demanded that the sins of His people as well as those of the heathen should be punished. After Amos the thought of an awful day of Divine punishment was extended from Israel to a world of sinners. According to Zephaniah ( Amos 1:2-15 , Amos 2:4-15 ), punishment was now to come upon all wicked persons, both Jews and Gentiles, because of wrong. So, too, the unknown prophet who wrote under the name of Malachi. Ezekiel ( Ezekiel 30:2 f., Ezekiel 34:12 , Ezekiel 39:8 f.), however, reverted to the same national thought of a ‘day of battle,’ in which Jehovah would conquer all Israel’s foes; and to some extent this same national idea is represented by Joel ( Joel 2:18-27 ). With the later prophets there is to be seen an element of reconstruction as well as punishment in Jehovah’s action. Sinners, whether Jews or Gentiles, are to be punished, but a pious remnant is to be saved, the beginnings of a new Israel.
It is clear that this conception of a great Day of Jehovah underlies much of the Messianic expectation of apocryphal literature. The establishment of a remnant of a pious Israel was the germ of the hope of the Messianic kingdom; and the Day of Jehovah itself became the Day of Judgment , which figures so largely in both Jewish and Christian Messianism. It fact, it is not too much to say that the eschatology of Judaism is really a development of the implications of the prophetic teaching as to the Day of Jehovah.
Shailer Mathews.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Giver of Life, Eternal Lord!
Hymn for Lauds on November 1, the feast of All Salnts. It is attributed to Rabanus Maurus and has eight translations; the English title given is by E. Caswall.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Glory, Lord of
In the Epistle of Saint James 2:1, we read, "My brethren, have not the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ of glory, with respect of persons." In this passage, glory is regarded as an essential attribute of Christ (John 11,5); some commentators think that the genitive of quality "of glory" is connected only with "our Lord," but more likely it goes with "our Lord Jesus Christ."
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jesus, the Lord
Jesus is the pre-announced name of the Son of God as man. It signifies 'Jehovah the Saviour.' Matthew 1:21 . What is revealed of Him historically may be thus divided:-
1. His birth and early years until He was about thirty years old.
2. His baptism by John; His being anointed with the Holy Ghost, and consequently John's testimony that He was the Lamb of God, the Baptiser with the Holy Ghost, and the Son of God. This testimony attracted, as to a new centre, some of John's disciples. Subsequently, and before entering upon His public ministry, He was led of the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil.
3. His public ministry, extending over the period of three-and-a-half years.
4. His sufferings and death upon the cross.
5. His resurrection and subsequent exaltation to glory.
1. Begotten by the power of the Holy Ghost, He was born of the Virgin Mary, as predicted in Isaiah 7:14 . The details of this wonderful event are given in the gospels of Matthew and Luke. The former gospel records the accomplishment of the prophetic word that God would be present with His people, signified by the name Immanuel, 'God with us.' The latter, that the babe born of Mary was 'that Holy thing,' called "the Son of God." For thirty years He led a life of lowly retirement, but the references of scripture to this period show that He grew up under the eye of God in the perfection of manhood, and yet in conscious Sonship to the Father, the vessel of the grace and wisdom of God.
2. At thirty years of age He took His place in Jordan with the repentant remnant of Israel, entering in by the door according to divine appointment, and He fulfilled righteousness in being baptised of John. He was at once owned of God by being sealed with the Holy Ghost, as distinct from all the others baptised, a voice from heaven declaring "Thou art my beloved Son; in thee I am well pleased." The gospel of John, at this moment, shows the momentous issues which hung upon the truth of His person. The taking away of the sin of the world by the Lamb of God, the baptising with the Holy Ghost, and Himself as the powerful attraction and commanding object for repentant sinners. The gospels of Matthew and Luke here record His being led of the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil. It was necessary that the tempter of man should be overcome by man, and Jesus overcame all the wiles of Satan by the spiritual power of the word of God. Thus vanquished, the devil left Him for a season.
3. In the power of the Spirit (John the Baptist's preparatory ministry having closed through his imprisonment by Herod) He now commenced the marvellous ministry of divine words and works of grace and power which is presented to us in the four gospels.
In Matthew we see Him as the Seed of promise, the Son of Abraham, and as the Son of David, the Heir of the throne of the Lord in Israel; He is also Emmanuel, the Jehovah of Israel.
In Mark He is viewed as the Son and Servant of God, acting and speaking for God in the midst of the circumstances of sin and sorrow into which He had entered.
In Luke He is Son of man, yet altogether of a new order of manhood, the vessel of grace for man in the like circumstances of sin and sorrow.
In John He is the Word, the Light and Revelation of God, but He became flesh and tabernacled here, full of grace and truth; and, as the only begotten Son who is in the bosom of the Father, He fully declared God, whom no man had seen at any time. It is said of Him, that He "went about doing good and healing all that were oppressed of the devil." He relieved man of every pressure which sin had brought upon him. He preached glad tidings to the poor, and brought to man the light of another sphere — the kingdom of God. It is also said of Him, that "God was in Christ reconciling the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses." He refused to judge, for He came to save. He perfectly set forth God to men, and in Him as Man God found His delight. His words were the words of God ( John 3:34 ), and the Father who dwelt in Him did the works. John 14:10 . His presence among men exposed men and revealed the thoughts of many hearts, and divine wisdom in Him detected the hollow religiousness, the infidelity, and the worldliness of the heart of man. As sent to do the will of God, He received all that came to Him, drawn by the grace of the Father. He led them and went before them as the Good Shepherd, held them in His hand, securing them thus for eternal life, and finally laid down His life for the sheep. In death He wrought redemption and by that work gave effect to His ministry.
4. From the first He was refused by the leaders of Israel, and 'the world knew him not.' From the mount of transfiguration, where God gave Him honour and glory, He descended to suffer at the hands of men, though His death was according to "the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God." Because of this enmity of man, He retired beyond Jordan till the time came for the counsels of God to be accomplished in His death. During that period He visited Bethany to raise Lazarus, but again retired into the wilderness till six days before the Passover. He then presented Himself to Zion as her king, cleansed the temple of God, and judged with divine wisdom all the questions by which they sought to entrap Him. Then approached the 'hour' of man and of 'the power of darkness.' Jesus, knowing that this hour was at hand, ate the last Passover with His disciples, and instituted the Lord's supper. He then crossed the Kidron valley into the garden of Gethsemane. There His soul was 'exceeding sorrowful even unto death' in the anticipation of the cup which He had to drink, but, in the submission which flowed from His perfect accord with the Father's will, He received the cup from the Father's hands, and went forth to drink it. On the cross the judgement of God as to sin was fully executed; God was glorified as to it, and redemption was accomplished, hence a dying malefactor who turned to Jesus could that day be with Him in Paradise. He gave up His life, and the blood and water which flowed from His dead side witnessed that expiation and cleansing for man are alone found in His death. His death also laid the righteous ground for God to effectuate His counsels with regard to man, and to fulfil His promises.
5. Though rejected here by men, He was "raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father," and "God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name: that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord to the glory of God the Father." As Lord, He administers everything for God according to the redemption He has accomplished, and the place He has taken in resurrection life and glory. He is there as the last Adam and the Second man, the Head and pattern of a new race of men. He is also the Advocate, Intercessor, and High Priest on behalf of those who believe on Him, who are still in weakness on earth and need His support and aid.
He is sitting at the right hand of God until His enemies are made His footstool. It is revealed that He will descend from heaven into the clouds to receive His own to Himself: the living changed and the dead raised in glory will be caught up to meet Him in the air. He will come with all His saints to reign where once He was rejected. He will purge out of His kingdom all evil and reign in righteousness, King of Righteousness and King of Peace. He will finally, having put down all enemies, deliver up the kingdom to God, even the Father; and, as the Son who has assumed manhood, take the place of subjection to Him who put all things under Him, that God may be all in all — supreme in a vast universe of bliss, the Son being the Head and Pattern of the whole redeemed and blessed race of man.
He is Judge of living and dead, and all that have done evil He will exclude from the presence of God, in the hopeless and helpless misery prepared for the devil and his angels. He will thus have brought to an issue the whole question of good and evil. Good will be for ever secured, and evil be in its own place of powerless misery.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Lord
This glorious name is peculiarly and properly the distinguishing name of JEHOVAH, and ought to have been so hallowed and sacred, as never upon any occasion whatever to have been applied to any other, For we read that JEHOVAH is very jealous of His name, and will not allow the very mention of it, unless in a way of reverence to himself, without attaching guilt to the person that doth it. Thus we read, "Thou shalt riot take the name of the Lord thy God in vain: for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain." (Exodus 20:7) So again (Isaiah 42:8) "I am the Lord; that is my name, and my glory will I not give to another, neither my praise to graven images." With what reverence and sanctity, therefore, ought the glorious name of JEHOVAH, Lord, to be held? Indeed, though among men, master and lord are sometimes used from servants to their superiors, yet the incommunicable name of JEHOVAH, is never used in this way by any. It is impossible to preserve it too sacred.
JEHOVAH, or Lord, is equally adapted and made use of in common to teach us all the persons of the GODHEAD, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. We find, it, every part of the word of God, JEHOVAH the Father, so called, (see Zechariah 2:10) where JEHOVAH the Father is represented as sending JEHOVAH the Son. So again we find JEHOVAH the Father speaking to JEHOVAH the Son, (Psalms 110:1; Isaiah 42:5-8) and numberless other instances occur throughout the Bible. In like manner, God the Son is called by this glorious name, (Jeremiah 23:6) with express designation of character, and this also by JEHOVAH the Father, And throughout both Testaments of Scripture, God the Son possesseth in common with the Father and the Holy Ghost, the distinguishing name of Lord. And no less God the Holy Ghost, (Numbers 6:24-26) where each glorious person is severally and distinctly called JEHOVAH. (2 Corinthians 3:17; 1 John 5:7) See God Jehovah. Ruhumah.
See Ammi.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Brethren of the Lord (2)
BRETHREN OF THE LORD.—The only three theories about ‘the brethren of the Lord’ which are worthy of serious consideration are those which are called by Lightfoot (1) the Hieronymian (from its advocacy by Jerome [1]), (2) the Epiphanian (from its advocacy by Epiphanius), and (3) the Helvidian (from its advocacy by Jerome’s opponent, Helvidius).
According to the Hieronymian view, the ‘brethren’ of Jesus were His first cousins, being sons of the Virgin’s sister, Mary the wife of Clopas. According to the Epiphanian view, they were sons of Joseph by a former wife. According to the Helvidian view, they were sons of Joseph and Mary born after Jesus. All these views claim to be Scriptural, and the Epiphanian claims in addition to be in accordance with the most ancient tradition.
i. Points that are certain.—In discussing a question of such intricacy as the present, it is well to begin by distinguishing what is reasonably certain from what is uncertain. A careful comparison of the relevant Scripture passages renders it certain—
(1) That the brethren of the Lord, whatever their true relationship to Him was, lived under the same roof with Jesus and His mother, and were regarded as members of the Virgin’s family. The common household is implied in John 7:3, and more distinctly still in John 2:12, where we read that ‘he went down to Capernaum, he, and his mother, and his brethren, and his disciples: and there they abode not many days.’ That the brethren were members of the same family as Jesus, and stood in some definite filial relation to Joseph and Mary, is distinctly stated in Matthew 13:55 ||, ‘Is not this the carpenter’s son? is not his mother called Mary? and his brethren, James, and Joseph,* [2] and Simon, and Judas? And his sisters, are they not all† [3] with us?’ (cf. also Matthew 12:47 ‘Behold thy mother and thy brethren stand without, seeking to speak to thee’). In harmony with this the Gospels represent the brethren of Jesus as habitually going about in company with the Virgin (Matthew 12:46 ||).
(2) That the brethren of Jesus were jealous of Him, and up to the time of the Resurrection disbelieved His claims. Thus the Gospels represent Jesus as lamenting the unbelief and want of sympathy of His near relatives: ‘A prophet is not without honour, save in his own country, and among his own kin, and in his own house’ (Mark 6:4); and again, ‘My time is not yet come, but your time is alway ready. The world cannot hate you, but me it hateth’ (John 7:6 f.). There are, moreover, the still more definite statements, ‘For even his brethren did not believe on him’ (John 7:5); and, ‘his friends (οἱ παρʼ αὐτοῦ) went out to lay hold on him, for they said, He is beside himself (Mark 3:21).
Some attempts have been made to attenuate the force of these passages. Cornelius a Lapide, for instance, commenting on John 7:5, says: ‘Licet enim viderent eum tot signa et miracula facere, illaque vera esse non dubitarent, tamen dubitabant an ipse esset Messias et Dei Filius: licet enim hoc verum esse optarent, et ex parte ob tot ejus miracula crederent—tamen alia ex parte videntes ejus paupertatem et neglectum, dubitabant. Ut ergo certi hac de re fiant, hortantur Christum ire secum in Jerusalem, etc.’ But St. John asserts disbelief (οὐδὲ ἑτίστειον), not doubt, and implies jealousy and hostility. Other critics have maintained that some only of the brethren disbelieved. But St. John’s language at the very least asserts that the majority (that is, three out of the four brethren) disbelieved, and almost certainly implies the disbelief of all.
From this there follows the necessary inference—
(3) That none of the brethren were numbered among the Twelve Apostles. This conclusion is confirmed by the manner in which they are distinguished from the Twelve in Acts 1:14,[4] all with one accord continued steadfastly in prayer with the women, and Mary the mother of Jesus, and with his brethren.’ With this may be compared 1 Corinthians 9:5 (‘Have we no right to lead about a wife that is a believer, even as the rest of the apostles, and the brethren of the Lord, and Cephas?’), which, though less decisive than Acts 1:14, because Cephas is first classed among the Twelve and then separately, points in the same direction. It is no sufficient reply to this to say that in Galatians 1:19 James is called an Apostle (‘But other of the apostles saw I none, save [5] James the Lord’s brother’). Granting that this is the case, though it has been denied (e.g. by Grotius, Winer, Bleek; cf. (Revised Version margin)), it may be fairly maintained that St. James is called an Apostle in that wider sense in which the term is applied to St. Paul himself, to St. Barnabas (Acts 14:4; Acts 14:14, 1 Corinthians 9:6), to Andronicus and Junias (Romans 16:7), and perhaps also to Silvanus (1 Thessalonians 2:6; cf. 1 Thessalonians 1:1). That James the Lord’s brother was one of the Twelve is implied already in the Gospel according to the Hebrews (circa (about) a.d. 100),* [6] but the evidence of this dubious source cannot outweigh the strong negative presumption afforded by the canonical writings.† [7]
ii. The Hieronymian View.—With these three points established, we proceed to consider the Hieronymian view that the brethren of Jesus were really His first cousins. Jerome’s theory, as stated by himself in his acrimonious but able treatise adversus Helvidium, involves the following positions:—
(a) That James the Lord’s brother was an Apostle, being identical with James the Less, the son of Alphaeus.
(b) That the mother of James and of the other ‘brethren’ was ‘Mary of Clopas’ (John 19:25).
(c) That this Mary was the Virgin’s sister.
As developed by subsequent writers, the Hieronymian theory affirms in addition—
(d) That Simon the Zealot and Judas ‘not Iscariot’ were also brethren of the Lord.
(e) That Clopas is identical with Alphaeus, and that consequently ‘Mary of Clopas’ is not to be regarded as the daughter of Clopas, but as his wife.‡ [8]
As these two additional points are maintained by all modern followers of Jerome, we shall regard them as integral parts of the Hieronymian theory. Jerome’s theory has already been virtually disproved by the proof (i. 2, 3) that the Lord’s brethren were not Apostles, but its great ingenuity and wide acceptance§ [9] render full discussion of it necessary.
A. Arguments for the Hieronymian view.—
(1) James the Lord’s brother must have been of the Twelve, because he is called an Apostle, Galatians 1:19. (For a reply to this see i. 2, 3).
(2) James the Lord’s brother must have been of the Twelve, because he exercised great authority among, and even over Apostles. Thus at the Council of Jerusalem he presided and pronounced the decision, although St. Peter himself was present (Acts 15:13). St. Paul names him before St. Peter as one of the chief pillars of the Church (Galatians 2:9). The Galatian heretics appealed to his authority as superior to that of St. Paul (Galatians 2:12), and his importance is further shewn by such passages as Acts 12:17; Acts 21:18.
Reply.—St. James’ prominent position is admitted, but it can be accounted for without supposing him to have been of the Twelve. For—
(a) His close relationship to Jesus (whatever the relationship was) would have sufficed of itself to gain him great consideration among the first Christians. He probably owed in part at least to this his election to the see of Jerusalem. Relationship to Jesus was clearly the main motive in the appointment of his successor, Symeon the son of Clopas,|| [10] who was a cousin of Jesus (Eusebius, Historia Ecclesiastica iii. 11). Hegesippus speaks of the relations of Jesus as ‘ruling the churches’ as such. Even as late as the reign of Domitian they were sufficiently important to incur the jealousy of the tyrant (l.c. iii. 20).
(b) James the Lord’s brother possessed personal qualities which fully account for his elevation. Even the Jews, according to Hegesippus, reverenced him for his piety, his unceasing prayers, his life-long Nazirite vow, and above all for his justice (l.c. ii. 23). Josephus mentions the indignation which his execution excited among the Jews (Ant. xx. ix. 1), and in a passage not now extant ascribes the sufferings endured by the Jews during the siege of Jerusalem to Divine vengeance for his murder (Origen, circa (about) Celsum, i. 47).
(3) James the Lord’s brother must have been of the Twelve, because there were only two prominent Jameses in the Church, as the expression ‘James the Less’ (Mark 15:40) indicates. He was therefore either James the Great, son of Zebedee, or James the Less, son of Alphaeus. But he was not the former, who was martyred as early as a.d. 44 (Acts 12:2). Therefore he was the latter, the son of Alphaeus.
Reply.—Jerome and his followers have been misled by the Latin translation Jacobus minor, ‘James the Less.’ The Greek is, Ἰάκωβος ὁ μικρός, ‘James the Little,’ the allusion being to his short stature.
(4) The names of James, Simon, and Jude occur together, and in the same division, in all the Apostolic lists. This suggests—(a) that they were brothers, and (b) that they are identical with our Lord’s brethren of the same name (see Matthew 10:2 ff., Mark 3:16 ff., Luke 6:14 ff., Acts 1:13).
Reply.—It has already been conclusively proved that our Lord’s brethren were not Apostles (see i. 2, 3); but, waiving this point, we answer: (1) The occurrence of the three names together in the list of Apostles is no proof of fraternal relationship. (2) There is definite proof that the three were not brothers. For had they been so, it would naturally have been mentioned in some at least of the Gospels, as it is in the cases of the brothers Peter and Andrew, James and John. Moreover, the father of James is Alphaeus, but the father of Jude is a certain James, of whom nothing definite is known. It is true that some propose to translate Ἰούδας Ἱακώβου (Luke 6:16, Acts 1:13) ‘Jude the brother of James,’ but so unusual, and probably unexampled, a meaning would require at least to be indicated by the context. We conclude, therefore, that James was certainly not the brother of Jude, and there is no evidence that he was the brother of Simon. If he was the brother of any Apostle, it was of Matthew (Levi), whose father was also called Alphaeus (Mark 2:14). But even this, in the absence of any evidence of the identity of the two Alphaeuses, must be pronounced doubtful.
Equally evident is it that these three Apostles were not brethren of Jesus. The coincidence of three such common names as James, Simon, and Jude in the list of brethren and in the list of Apostles proves nothing. So common are the names that they are duplicated in the Apostolic list itself. If it could be shown that James, Simon, and Jude, Apostles, were also brothers, the coincidence would be worth considering; but since they were not, the coincidence is without significance. The very way in which these three Apostles are designated shows that they were not brethren of Jesus. It was necessary to distinguish them from three other Apostles of the same name, and yet they are not once called, for distinction, ‘the Lord’s brethren.’ James is called ‘of Alphaeus,’ perhaps also ‘the Little’; Simon is called the Cananaean,’ and ‘the Zealot’; Jude receives no less than four distinguishing titles, ‘not Iscariot,’ ‘of James,’ ‘Thaddaeus,’ and ‘Lebbaeus’ (Matthew 10:3, Western Text). How strange, if he really was the Lord’s brother, that he is not once so described!
(5) The last argument consists of three distinct steps. (a) James, the son of Alphaeus, the Apostle, is identical with ‘James the Little’ of Mark 15:40 = Matthew 27:56. But this James the Little had a brother Joses, clearly a well-known character, and therefore (since no other Joses is mentioned in the Gospels) the same as Joses the brother of Jesus (Mark 6:3; and Matthew 13:53, where the authorities are divided between the forms Joses and Joseph). (b) The mother of this James is called by the Synoptists Mary, and she is further described in John 19:25 as ‘Mary of Clopas’ (Μαρία ἡ τοῦ Κλωπᾶ). This might mean ‘Mary daughter of Clopas,’ but since Clopas and Alphaeus are the same word, both being transliterations of the Aramaic (חַלְפי) חַלְפַי, the correct translation is ‘Mary wife of Clopas.’ () This Mary, wife of Clopas, is said by St. John to have been the Virgin’s sister. Accordingly James and Joses (and consequently also Simon and Jude), the Lord’s ‘brethren,’ were really His cousins on His mother’s side.
Reply.—This argument is ingenious rather than strong. For (a) the identification of James the Little (Mark 15:40) with the son of Alphaeus, though generally accepted and not improbable, is only a guess. Indeed it may be argued that since St. Mark in his Gospel gives no hint that the son of Alphaeus was called ‘the Little,’ he must mean by ‘James the Little’ another person. But conceding the identity (which, however, whether true or not, is too precarious to bear the weight of an important argument), we still cannot concede the identity of Joses, the brother of this James, with Joses the brother of Jesus. The identity of James of Alphaeus with James the Little may be conceded, because, though it is weakly attested, nothing of weight can be urged against it. But if this Joses, the brother of James, was also the brother of Jesus, then three of our Lord’s brethren were Apostles, a conclusion which is negatived by an overwhelming weight of evidence (see i. 2, 3). In such a case the mere coincidence of a name (and Joses or Joseph is, as Lightfoot shews, a particularly common name) is of no weight at all. (b) Jerome’s assumption that ‘Mary the mother of James and Joses’ (Mt., Mk.) is identical with ‘Mary of Clopas’ is probably, though not certainly, correct. But there is no ground for supposing, as Jerome’s supporters do, that this Mary was the wife of Clopas. There being no indication in the context to the contrary, the natural translation of Μαρία ἡ τοῦ Κλωπᾶ is ‘Mary the daughter of Clopas.’* [11] It is maintained, indeed, that since she was the mother of James the Little (who was an Apostle), her husband must have been Alphaeus, i.e. Clopas. But it is doubtful if James the Little really was an Apostle, and it is still more doubtful if Alphaeus is the same person as Clopas. Κλωπᾶς, or, as it should probably be accented, Κλώπας, is a purely Greek name, being contracted from Κλεόπατρος (cf. Ἁντίπας, from Ἁντίπατρος). Ἁλφαῖος (Ἁλφαῖος, WH [12] ), on the other hand, is the Aramaic חַלְפי (Halpai), the initial guttural being, as is frequently the case, omitted. The names are therefore linguistically distinct. It is true that if there were strong independent reasons for identifying Alphaeus and Clopas, the linguistic difficulties might possibly be surmounted, but there are no such reasons, or at least none are alleged.
Against the identification of Κλὡτας and Alphaeus it may be urged: (1) That inasmuch as initial sh‘va is almost invariably represented by a full vowel in Greek (שִׁלמה = Σαλομών; צְבָאוֹח = σαβαώθ; etc.), there is a presumption against a word like Clopas, which begins with two consonants, representing a Semitic name. (2) Although ח is occasionally transliterated κ in the middle or at the end of a word, this never, or hardly ever, happens at the beginning. (3) (חַלְפִי) חַלְפַי is transliterated quite regularly Χαλφἱ; in 1 Maccabees 11:70. (4) The ω of Κλὡτας cannot be derived from חַלְפַי. The nearest Semitic equivalent of Κλώτας would be some such form as קלוֹפָא. (5) The Semitic versions uniformly regard Ἀλφαὶος as a Semitic word, but Κλὡτας as Greek, transliterating the κ by ק.
(c) There is more plausibility about Jerome’s contention that Mary of Clopas is described in John 19:25 as the Virgin’s sister. The words are ἱστήκεισαν δὲ παρὰ τῷ σταυρῷ τοῦ Ἰησοῦ ἡ μητἠρ αὑτοῦ καὶ ἡ ἀδελφὴ τῆς μητρὸς αὐτοῦ, Μαρία ἡ τοῦ Κλωπᾶ, καὶ Μαρία ἡ Μαγδαληνή. It must be candidly admitted that the prima facie impression which this passage makes upon the mind is that only three women are mentioned, and that the Virgin’s sister is Mary of Clopas. There are, however, important considerations on the other side. (1) When persons or things are enumerated in pairs (cf. the list of Apostles, Matthew 10:2-4), the copula is not inserted between the pairs. If, therefore, St. John in this passage designs to speak of two pairs of women, καὶ is correctly omitted before Μαρία ἡ τοῦ Κλωπᾶ. (2) The Synoptic parallels show that Salome, the mother of James and John, was present at the Crucifixion, and since it is unlikely that St. John would omit to mention the presence of his own mother, ἡ ἀδελφὴ τῆς μητρὸς αὐτοῦ is probably not Mary of Clopas, but Salome. The suppression of her name is quite in the style of the Evangelist, who is very reticent in personal matters, and never even names himself. (3) If Mary of Clopas was sister to the Virgin, then two sisters had the same name, a circumstance most improbable, unless they were only step-sisters. The point is undoubtedly a difficult one, and different opinions will continue to be held about it, but fortunately its decision does not affect the main point of our inquiry, because, whether Mary of Clopas was the Virgin’s sister or not, there is no reason for supposing that she was the mother of the brethren of Jesus.
B. Objections to the Hieronymian view.—
The Hieronymian view is to be rejected, partly because the arguments in its favour, though ingenious, are inconclusive and often far-fetched; partly because no trace of it is to be found before the time of Jerome, who apparently invented it;* [13] partly because it ‘is obviously an attempt of an ardent champion of celibacy to maintain the perpetual virginity not only of Mary, but of Joseph;† [14] partly because it involves an unnatural use of the term ‘brethren’;‡ [Note: It is true, as Jerome warmly urges (adv. Helvidium, xiv., xv.), that the OT usage of ‘brother’ is somewhat wide. In " translation="">1 Chronicles 23:21-22 first cousins are called brethren (אַחיהָם = ἁδελφοὶ αὑτῶν, LXX): in " translation="">Leviticus 10:4, first cousins once removed (אֲחַיכַם : = τοὐς ἁδελφοὺς ὑμῶν, LXX). So also in " translation="">Genesis 14:14; " translation="">Genesis 14:16 Abraham’s nephew is called his brother (אָהיו ); and in " translation="">Genesis 29:15 Jacob is called Laban’s brother. It cannot therefore he pronounced that our Lord’s cousins might occasionally be alluded to as His brethren, especially if it be true, as is generally alleged, that there is no word in Aramaic for cousin. At the same time it should be remembered that all Jerome’s examples of an extended use of ‘brother’ are taken from the OT; that the usage of ἁδελφός is much less elastic than that of אָה ; that no instances of ἁδελφός = ἀνεψιός are cited from profane writers; and that even the OT does not sanction the use of אָה to describe any other relationship than that of brother. The term ἀνεψιός is not avoided in the NT (see " translation="">Colossians 4:10), and Hegesippus (a.d. 160), in discussing the subject of our Lord’s human relationships, keeps the two terms distinct, calling Symeon, the second bishop of Jerusalem, and our Lord’s , ἀνεψιός; but James, the first bishop of Jerusalem, always ἁδελφός. Clearly, therefore, Hegesippus did not regard Lord of
Hebrew tsebaot (not Sabbath, an altogether different word), i.e. "of hosts", namely, of the heavenly powers (1 Kings 22:19; Psalms 103:21; Psalms 148:2; Romans 9:29; James 5:4, reminding the rich who think the poor have no advocate that the Lord of the whole hosts in heaven is their patron). Implying the boundless resources at His command for His people's good (Psalms 59:5). The sabaoth included both the angelic and starry hosts. The latter were objects of the idolatry, hence called sabaism (2 Kings 17:16). God is above even them (1 Chronicles 16:26). The "groves" symbolized these starry hosts. In contrast, Jehovah is the Lord of them, therefore alone to be worshipped. The title does not occur in the Pentateuch, nor earlier than 1 Samuel 1:3, but in the singular Joshua 5:14-15.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Day of the Lord
See Eschatology.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Brethren of the Lord
See James, Ep. of.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Lord
This title is very widely used for many purposes and reasons. We shall enumerate some of these so that the reader may acquaint himself with the many different ways in which GOD is Lord, and in which various kinds of people, nations and rulers are lords.
The Lord:
He is GOD He is Lord of lords Deuteronomy 4:35 Deuteronomy 10:17.
He is Lord of all the earth Joshua 3:11.
The Lord is King The Lord is a refuge Psalm 10:16 Psalm 14:6.
The Lord is my shepherd Psalm 23:1.
The Lord is my light Psalm 27:1.
The Lord is my salvation Psalm 27:1.
The Lord is my strength Psalm 28:7.
The Lord is my shield Psalm 28:7.
The Lord is good Psalm 34:8.
The Lord is terrible Psalm 47:2.
The Lord is our defense Psalm 89:18.
The Lord is upright Psalm 92:15.
The Lord is merciful Psalm 103:8.
The Lord is gracious Psalm 103:8.
The Lord is thy keeper Psalm 121:5.
The Lord is thy shade Psalm 121:5.
The Lord is around us Psalm 125:2.
The Lord is righteous Psalm 129:4.
The Lord is nigh us Psalm 145:18.
The Lord is far off Proverbs 15:29.
The Lord is our Maker Proverbs 22:2.
The Lord is that Spirit2Co3:17.
The Lord is at hand Philippians 4:5.
He is the Lord our righteousness Jeremiah 23:6.
He is the Lord of kings Daniel 2:47.
He is the Lord of the sabbath Mark 2:28.
He is Lord and CHRIST Acts 2:36.
He is Lord of all Acts 10:36.
He is Lord of the dead and the living Romans 14:9.
He is the Lord of glory1Co2:8.
He is the Lord from Heaven1Co15:47.
The Lord is the avenger1Th4:6.
The Lord is faithful2Th3:3.
The Lord is pitiful James 5:11.
This title is given to us in His Word in order that we may learn to know Him more intimately and trust Him more intelligently in the many vicissitudes of life.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Angel of the Lord (Jahweh)
ANGEL OF THE LORD (JAHWEH) , called also the ‘Angel of God.’ He occupies a special and unique position; he is not merely one among the angels, albeit a great one, but one sui generis , in a special way Jahweh’s representative among men. He may be regarded as in some sense the guardian-angel of the nation of Israel, in that he appears to be the nation’s representative at important crises ( e.g. Genesis 22:11 ; Genesis 22:15 ff., Exodus 3:2 ; Exodus 14:19 ; Exodus 23:23 , Numbers 22:22 , Jdg 6:11 , 2 Kings 1:3 , Zechariah 1:9 ).
He appears in human form, and most of the characteristics of angels generally are his. The main difficulty with regard to him is that while in some passages he is identified with Jahweh Himself ( e.g. Genesis 48:15-16 , Judges 6:11-24 ), in others there is a distinct differentiation, ( e.g. Genesis 16:11 ; Genesis 21:17 ; Genesis 24:7 ; in this last he is spoken of as having been sent from Jahweh); this differentiation becomes more and more marked in the later books ( e.g. Zechariah 1:12 ). The contradiction here presented can be adequately explained only on the supposition that the evolution of thought on the subject must have run somewhat on the following lines. From the earliest angelology of the Hebrews, itself the offspring of still earlier Animistic conceptions (see Angel), there emerged the figure of Jahweh; originally, i.e. long before the time of Moses, Jahweh must, in the popular mind, have been regarded as belonging to the angelic host, and by degrees He assumed a more and more exalted position; as subjective revelation increased, the more fully did the personality of Jahweh become realized, and His superiority to the angels recognized, though in the process it was inevitable that the differentiation should not always be complete. When ultimately, under the Mosaic dispensation, the holy character and the real nature of Jahweh began to be apprehended, the belief that He personally appeared among men necessarily became more and more untenable; hence, while Jahweh Himself receded further from men, His messenger, or angel, appeared in His stead, and became His representative in all His dealings with men. What must have been such a revolution in the time-honoured faith would meet with many retrograde movements before it finally triumphed, as is shown by such passages as Judges 6:19 ff. Some such process must be predicated in order to understand the otherwise unaccountable contradiction referred to above.
The angel of the Lord spoken of in the NT ( e.g. Matthew 1:20 , Luke 2:9 ) must not be confounded with the OT ‘Angel of Jahweh’; an OT parallel is to be found rather in such a passage as Zechariah 3:6-7 , where the angel is one of a kind, not the only one of his kind.
W. O. E. Oesterley.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
This is given in Matthew 1 and Luke 3 . According to the distinctive character of Matthew in which Christ is emphatically the Messiah and Son of David, the genealogy commences with Abraham; whereas in Luke, in which Christ is displayed as the Son of man, the list is traced up to "Adam who was the son of God." Both lists are the same from Abraham to David; then they differ until they reach Salathiel and Zorobabel, which names are in both lists; and then they again differ. The list in Luke is much fuller, having from David to Joseph forty-one names, where Matthew has only twenty-six. Names are omitted from Matthew, and this enables the whole to be brought into the three divisions of 'fourteen generations.' Ozias is placed as the son of Joram, but on consulting 1 Chronicles 3:11,12 (where for Ozias is read Azariah, as also in 2 Kings 14:21 ), it will be seen that three kings are omitted, Ahaziah, Joash, and Amaziah. Such omissions are found in the genealogies in the O.T. In 2 Chronicles 22:9 Ahaziah is called the son of Jehoshaphat; whereas he was his grandson; and by comparing the generations in 1 Chronicles 6:3-15 with Ezra 7:1-5 seven names will be found to be omitted in the latter.
It will be noted that in Matthew the word 'begat' is used, whereas in Luke it is more indefinite. Jesus was 'supposed' or 'accounted' to be the son of Joseph, and 'Joseph was of Heli' without the word 'begat.' Again, it should be noted that by a Jewish law if a man died childless, his brother was to raise up seed to the deceased by his widow, so that a son born thus might be called the legal son of the deceased, whereas he would be the actual or lineal son of his father, the brother of the deceased. The list in Matthew is clearly the royal line; between David and Salathiel twelve kings are given, all of whom are omitted from Luke. Being the royal line it must also be the legal line.
There is more difficulty as to the genealogy in Luke: is it the lineal line of Joseph or Mary? Women are never quoted as forming a line of succession, yet Christ is spoken of as the 'seed' of the woman, Genesis 3:15 ; 'come of woman,' Galatians 4:4 ; 'the seed of Abraham,' Hebrews 2:16 ; 'the seed of David according to flesh,' Romans 1:3 ; 2 Timothy 2:8 ; 'the offspring of David.' Revelation 22:16 . And as the Lord was not really the son of Joseph, these scriptures can only be fulfilled through His mother, who must have been a lineal descendant of David and Abraham. It is better therefore to consider that Luke gives the lineal descent of the Lord through Mary. In accordance with the above it will be seen that Matthew in speaking of the birth of the Lord frequently mentions Joseph, seldom Mary; whereas Luke frequently mentions Mary, but seldom Joseph.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Arm of the Lord
In the language of Scripture, this is one of the names of Christ. Thus the prophet calls upon the Lord to arise for his people. (Isaiah 50:9) And thus the Lord promiseth, under this character, to make bare his holy arm; that is, to reveal Christ. (Isaiah 52:10; Luke 1:51)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Lord
1. adon, κύριος.These words are commonly translated 'lord.' They are used as a term of respect as between man and man, as seen in the children of Heth to Abraham. Genesis 23:6 ; between servants and masters, and once by a wife to her husband. Genesis 18:12 ; Luke 16:3,5 ; 1 Peter 3:6 . The title 'Lord' is applied to God ( Psalm 90:1 , Adonai ), and in the N.T. to the Lord Jesus, not only as a term of respect, but as owning His constituted lordship. Acts 2:36 ; Philippians 2:11 He is emphatically the Lord as eclipsing every other for the Christian, who delights to appropriate Him as 'My Lord.' Luke 1:43 ; John 20:13 ; Philippians 3:8 . To believers collectively He is 'Our Lord Jesus Christ.'
There is also in this title the idea of administration which it is of great consequence to observe. As Man the Lord Jesus is mediator between God and men, and receives blessings for men which are administered through Him as Lord. "To us there is . . . . one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom are all things, and we through him." 1 Corinthians 8:6 . See Romans 5:1,2,11,17,21 and other scriptures.
The same Greek word is often used in the LXX for the Hebrew name Jehovah, and is transferred to the N.T. without the article. It stands as a proper name in the sense of Jehovah, as in Matthew 1:20,22,24 , etc., though the English requires it to be translated 'the Lord.' See GOD.
2. δεσπότης, signifying 'owner, master,' as a man who owns slaves. It is applied to God and to the Lord Jesus, Luke 2:29 ; Acts 4:24 ; 2 Peter 2:1 ; Jude 4 ; Revelation 6:10 ; and in 2 Timothy 2:21 is translated 'master.'
3. ῥαββονί, a word similar to Rabbi, a term of respect among the Jews, signifying 'teacher.' It is applied to the Lord by the blind man in Mark 10:51 ; and by Mary in John 20:16 , where it is untranslated.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Lord
Âdôn (אָדֹן, Strong's #113), or 'Âdônay (אָדֹן, Strong's #113), “lord; master; Lord.” Cognates of this word appear in Ugaritic and Phoenician. The form 'âdôn appears 334 times, while the form 'âdônay (used exclusively as a divine name) appears 439 times.
Basically, 'âdôn means “lord” or “master.” It is distinguished from the Hebrew word ba’al, which signifies “possessor” or “owner.” 'Âdôn basically describes the one who occupies the position of a “master” or “lord” over a slave or servant: “And the servant put his hand under the thigh of Abraham his master …” (Gen. 24:9). It is used of kings and their most powerful aides. Joseph told his brothers: “So now it was not you that sent me hither, but God: and he hath made me a father [1] to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house, and a ruler throughout all the land of Egypt” (Gen. 45:8; cf. 42:30). Only once is this word used in the sense of “owner” or “possessor” (1 Kings 16:24).
'Âdôn is often used as a term of polite address. In some cases, the one so named really occupies a position of authority. In Gen. 18:12 (the first occurrence) Sarah called Abraham her “lord.” On the other hand, this may be a purely honorary title by which the speaker intends to indicate his submission to the one so addressed. Jacob instructed his slaves to speak to “my lord Esau” (Gen. 32:18); i.e., Jacob called his brother Esau “lord.” In places where the speaker is addressing someone calling him “lord,” the word virtually means “you.”
When applied to God, âdôn is used in several senses. It signifies His position as the one who has authority (like a master) over His people to reward the obedient and punish the disobedient: “Ephraim provoked him to anger most bitterly: therefore shall he leave his blood upon him, and his reproach shall his Lord return unto him” (Hos. 12:14). In such contexts God is conceived as a Being who is sovereign ruler and almighty master. The word is often a title of respect, a term of direct address usually assuming a specific concrete lord-vassal or master-servant relationship (Ps. 8:1). In some cases the word appears to be a title suggesting God’s relationship to and position over Israel: “Three times in the year all thy males shall appear before the Lord God” (Exod. 23:17). In such contexts âdôn is a formal divine name and should probably be transliterated if the proper emphasis is to be retained. In the form âdônay the word means “Lord” par excellence or “Lord over all,” even as it sometimes does in the form âdôn (cf. Deut. 10:17, where God is called the “God of gods, and Lord of lords”; Josh. 3:11, where He is called the “Lord of all the earth”).
The word âdônay appears in Gen. 15:2: “And Abram said, Lord God, what wilt thou give me, seeing I go childless,.…” This word frequently appears in Psalms (Ps. 68:17; 86:3) and Isaiah (Isa. 29:13; 40:10).
Yehôvâh (יהוה, Strong's #3068), “Lord.” The Tetragrammaton YHWH appears without its own vowels, and its exact pronunciation is debated (Jehovah, Yehovah, Jahweh, Yahweh). The Hebrew text does insert the vowels for âdônay, and Jewish students and scholars read âdônay whenever they see the Tetragrammaton. This use of the word occurs 6,828 times. The word appears in every period of biblical Hebrew.
The divine name YHWH appears only in the Bible. Its precise meaning is much debated. God chose it as His personal name by which He related specifically to His chosen or covenant people. Its first appearance in the biblical record is Gen. 2:4: “These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens.” Apparently Adam knew Him by this personal or covenantal name from the beginning, since Seth both called his son Enosh (i.e., man as a weak and dependent creature) and began (along with all other pious persons) to call upon (formally worship) the name of YHWH, “the Lord” (Gen. 4:26). The covenant found a fuller expression and application when God revealed Himself to Abraham (Gen. 12:8), promising redemption in the form of national existence. This promise became reality through Moses, to whom God explained that He was not only the “God who exists” but the “God who effects His will”: “Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, The Lord [2] God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath sent me unto you: this is my name for ever, and this is my memorial unto all generations. Go, and gather the elders of Israel together, and say unto them, The Lord [2] God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob, appeared unto me, saying, I have surely visited you, and seen that which is done to you in Egypt: And I have said, I will bring you up out of the affliction of Egypt unto the land of the Canaanites …” (Exod. 3:15-17). So God explained the meaning of “I am who I am” (Exod. 3:14). He spoke to the fathers as YHWH, but the promised deliverance and, therefore, the fuller significance or experienced meaning of His name were unknown to them (Exod. 6:2-8).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Acceptable Year of the Lord
The Lord Jesus at the beginning of His ministry entered into the synagogue at Nazareth, and on the prophecy by Isaiah being handed to Him read from Isaiah 61 , the passage, "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the broken-hearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised, to preach the acceptable year of the Lord " — leaving off in the middle of a sentence, for the next words are, "and the day of vengeance of our God" Luke 4:18,19 ; Isaiah 61:1,2 . The Lord added, "This day is this scripture fulfilled in your ears." The vengeance will be executed for the deliverance of Israel in a coming day; but when our Lord spoke there was the fullest grace for his hearers: it was the acceptable year of Jehovah. There may be an allusion to the year of Jubilee (type of the millennium) when servants were liberated, debts cancelled, and when family possessions were restored to their original owners. But the grace vouchsafed by the Lord brought lasting blessings for their souls.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Lord (2)
Lord's Day. Revelation 1:10. From the times of the apostles, the first day of the week has been kept sacred by Christians in commemoration of the resurrection of Christ, and it is invariably designated as the Lord's day by the fathers of the primitive church up to the time of the edict of Constantine, when the name Sunday became common. "On the first day of the week when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them." Acts 20:7. His charge "concerning the collection for the saints" to the church in Corinth is, "Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him." 1 Corinthians 16:1-2. John commences the Revelation saying: "I was in the Spirit on the Lord's day." Revelation 1:10. The Lord's day, as the Sabbath, reminds us of the finished work of creation and redemption. See Sabbath.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Lord (2)
Lord's Day. Revelation 1:10. From the times of the apostles, the first day of the week has been kept sacred by Christians in commemoration of the resurrection of Christ, and it is invariably designated as the Lord's day by the fathers of the primitive church up to the time of the edict of Constantine, when the name Sunday became common. "On the first day of the week when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them." Acts 20:7. His charge "concerning the collection for the saints" to the church in Corinth is, "Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him." 1 Corinthians 16:1-2. John commences the Revelation saying: "I was in the Spirit on the Lord's day." Revelation 1:10. The Lord's day, as the Sabbath, reminds us of the finished work of creation and redemption. See Sabbath.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - the Angel of the Lord
or the Angel Jehovah, a title given to Christ in his different appearances to the patriarchs and others in the Old Testament.
When the Angel of the Lord found Hagar in the wilderness, "she called the name of JEHOVAH that spake to her, Thou God seest me."—JEHOVAH appeared unto Abraham in the plains of Mamre. Abraham lifted up his eyes, and three men, three persons in human form, "stood by him." One of the three is called Jehovah. And J
EHOVAH said, "Shall I hide from Abraham the thing that I do?" Appearances of the same personage occur to Isaac and to Jacob under the name of "the God of Abraham, and of Isaac." After one of these manifestations, Jacob says, "I have seen God face to face;"
and at another, "Surely the Lord (JEHOVAH) is in this place." The same Jehovah was made visible to Moses, and gave him his commission; and God said, "I AM THAT I AM; thou shalt say to the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you." The same JEHOVAH went before the Israelites by day in a pillar of cloud, and by night in a pillar of fire; and by Him the law was given amidst terrible displays of power and majesty from mount Sinai. "I am the Lord (JEHOVAH) thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage: Thou shalt have no other gods before me," &c. The collation of a few passages, or of the different parts of the same passages, of Scripture, will show that Jehovah, and "the Angel of the Lord," when used in this eminent sense, are the same person. Jacob says of Bethel, where he had exclaimed, "Surely Jehovah is in this place;" "The Angel of God appeared to me in a dream, saying, I am the God of Bethel." Upon his death bed he gives the names of God and Angel to this same person: "The God which fed me all my life long unto this day, the Angel which redeemed me from all evil, bless the lads." So in Hosea 12:2 ; Hosea 12:5 , it is said, "By his strength he had power with God; yea, he had power over the Angel, and prevailed." "We found him in Bethel, and there he spake with us, even the Lord God of Hosts; the Lord is his memorial." Here the same person has the names, God, Angel, and Lord God of Hosts. "The Angel of the Lord called to Abraham a second time from heaven, and said, By myself have I sworn, saith the Lord, (JEHOVAH,) that since thou hast done this thing, in blessing will I bless thee." The Angel of the Lord appeared to Moses in a flame of fire; but this same Angel "called to him out of the bush, and said, I am the God of thy fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob; and Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look upon God." To omit many other passages, St. Stephen, in alluding to this part of the history of Moses, in his speech before the council, says, "There appeared to Moses in the wilderness of Mount Sinai, an Angel of the Lord in a flame of fire," showing that that phraseology was in use among the Jews in his day, and that this Angel and Jehovah were regarded as the same being; for he adds, "Moses was in the church in the wilderness with the Angel which spoke unto him in Mount Sinai." There is one part of the history of the Jews in the wilderness, which so fully shows that they distinguished this Angel of Jehovah from all created angels, as to deserve particular attention. In Exodus 23:20 , God makes this promise to Moses and the Israelites: "Behold, I send an Angel before thee to keep thee in the way, and to bring thee into the place which I have prepared. Beware of him, and obey his voice; provoke him not; for he will not pardon your transgressions, for my name is in him." Of this Angel let it be observed, that he is here represented as the guide and protector of the Israelites; to him they were to owe their conquests and their settlement in the promised land, which are in other places often attributed to the immediate agency of God; that they are cautioned to "beware of him," to reverence and stand in dread of him; that the pardoning of transgressions belongs to him; finally, "that the name of God was in him." This name must be understood of God's own peculiar name, JEHOVAH, I AM, which he assumed as his distinctive appellation at his first appearing to Moses; and as the names of God are indicative of his nature, he who had a right to bear the peculiar name of God, must also have his essence. This view is put beyond all doubt by the fact, that Moses and the Jews so understood the matter; for afterward when their sins had provoked God to threaten not to go up with them himself, but to commit them to "an angel who should drive out the Canaanite," &c, the people mourned over this as a great calamity, and Moses betook himself to special intercession, and rested not until he obtained the repeal of the threat, and the renewed promise, "My presence shall go with thee, and I will give thee rest." Nothing, therefore, can be more clear than that Moses and the Israelites considered the promise of the Angel, in whom was "the name of God," as a promise that God himself would go with them. With this uncreated Angel, this presence of the Lord, they were satisfied, but not with "an angel" indefinitely, who was by nature of that order of beings usually so called, and therefore a created being; for at the news of God's determination not to go up with them, Moses hastens to the tabernacle to make his intercessions, and refuses an inferior conductor:—"If thy presence go not with me, carry us not up hence."
The Jews held this Word, or Angel of the Lord, to be the future Messiah, as appears from the writings of their older rabbins. So that he appears as the Jehovah of all the three dispensations, and yet is invariably described as a separate person from the unseen Jehovah who sends him. He was then the Word to be made flesh, and to dwell for a time among us, to open the way to God by his sacrifice, and to rescue the race, whose nature he should assume, from sin and death. This he has now actually effected; and the Patriarchal, Mosaic, and Christian religions are thus founded upon the same great principles,—the fall and misery of mankind, and their deliverance by a Divine Redeemer.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Mount of the Lord
See Mount
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Day of the Lord
This cannot be separated from Messiah's day. It is often characterised by judgement: "A day of darkness and of gloominess, a day of clouds and of thick darkness . . . . the day of the Lord is great and very terrible." Joel 2:2,11,31 ; Malachi 4:1 . "The day of the Lord so cometh as a thief in the night; for when they shall say, Peace and safety; then sudden destruction cometh upon them." 1 Thessalonians 5:2,3 . "The day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night; in the which the heavens shall pass away with a great noise, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat, the earth also and the works that are therein shall be burned up." 2 Peter 3:10 . This scene is followed by 'THE DAY OF GOD' in 2 Peter 3:12 , which ushers in the new heavens and the new earth.
It is important to keep the 'day' quite distinct from the coming of the Lord to fetch His saints; for many have misapplied the term, and it has been constantly asserted that the Second Epistle to the Thessalonians was written to show the saints that it was wrong to be expecting the return of the Lord; whereas the fact is they thought the day of the Lord had come (though the First Epistle keeps the two things quite distinct: compare 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 with 1 Thessalonians 5:1-4 ), and this could not come until Antichrist was revealed. There will be judgements before the millennium, and there will be judgements after the millennium, so that we may regard the Day of the Lord as extending through the millennium: it will be 'the Lord's' day in contrast to 'man's' day.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Lord, Lordship
A — 1: κύριος (Strong's #2962 — Noun Masculine — kurios — koo'-ree-os ) properly an adjective, signifying "having power" (kuros) or "authority," is used as a noun, variously translated in the NT, "'Lord,' 'master,' 'Master,' 'owner,' 'Sir,' a title of wide significance, occurring in each book of the NT save Titus and the Epistles of John. It is used (a) of an owner, as in Luke 19:33 , cp. Matthew 20:8 ; Acts 16:16 ; Galatians 4:1 ; or of one who has the disposal of anything, as the Sabbath, Matthew 12:8 ; (b) of a master, i.e., one to whom service is due on any ground, Matthew 6:24 ; 24:50 ; Ephesians 6:5 ; (c) of an Emperor or King, Acts 25:26 ; Revelation 17:14 ; (d) of idols, ironically, 1 Corinthians 8:5 , cp. Isaiah 26:13 ; (e) as a title of respect addressed to a father, Matthew 21:30 , a husband, 1 Peter 3:6 , a master, Matthew 13:27 ; Luke 13:8 , a ruler, Matthew 27:63 , an angel, Acts 10:4 ; Revelation 7:14 ; (f) as a title of courtesy addressed to a stranger, John 12:21 ; 20:15 ; Acts 16:30 ; from the outset of His ministry this was a common form of address to the Lord Jesus, alike by the people, Matthew 8:2 ; John 4:11 , and by His disciples, Matthew 8:25 ; Luke 5:8 ; John 6:68 ; (g) kurios is the Sept. and NT representative of Heb. Jehovah ('Lord' in Eng. versions), see Matthew 4:7 ; James 5:11 , e.g., of adon, Lord, Matthew 22:44 , and of Adonay, Lord, Matthew 1:22 ; it also occurs for Elohim, God, 1 Peter 1:25 .
"Thus the usage of the word in the NT follows two main lines: one-- a-f, customary and general, the other, g, peculiar to the Jews, and drawn from the Greek translation of the OT.
"Christ Himself assumed the title, Matthew 7:21,22 ; 9:38 ; 22:41-45 ; Mark 5:19 (cp. Psalm 66:16 ; the parallel passage, Luke 8:39 , has 'God'); Luke 19:31 ; John 13:13 , apparently intending it in the higher senses of its current use, and at the same time suggesting its OT associations.
"His purpose did not become clear to the disciples until after His resurrection, and the revelation of His Deity consequent thereon. Thomas, when he realized the significance of the presence of a mortal wound in the body of a living man, immediately joined with it the absolute title of Deity, saying, 'My Lord and my God,' John 20:28 . Thereafter, except in Acts 10:4 ; Revelation 7:14 , there is no record that kurios was ever again used by believers in addressing any save God and the Lord Jesus; cp. Acts 2:47 with Acts 4:29,30 .
"How soon and how completely the lower meaning had been superseded is seen in Peter's declaration in his first sermon after the resurrection, 'God hath made Him, Lord,' Acts 2:36 , and that in the house of Cornelius, 'He is Lord of all,' Acts 10:36 ; cp. Deuteronomy 10:14 ; Matthew 11:25 ; Acts 17:24 . In his writings the implications of his early teaching are confirmed and developed. Thus Psalm 34:8 , 'O taste and see that Jehovah is good,' is applied to the Lord Jesus, 1 Peter 2:3 , and 'Jehovah of Hosts, Him shall ye sanctify,' Isaiah 8:13 , becomes 'sanctify in your hearts Christ as Lord,' 1 Peter 3:15 .
"So also James who uses kurios alike of God, James 1:7 (cp. James 1:5 ); 3:9 ; 4:15 ; 5:4,10,11 , and of the Lord Jesus, James 1:1 (where the possibility that kai is intended epexegetically, i.e. = even, cp. 1 Thessalonians 3:11 , should not be overlooked); James 2:1 (lit., 'our Lord Jesus Christ of glory,' cp. Psalm 24:7 ; 29:3 ; Acts 7:2 ; 1 Corinthians 2:8 ); 5:7,8 , while the language of James 4:10 ; 5:15 , is equally applicable to either.
"Jude, Jude 1:4 , speaks of 'our only--Lord, Jesus Christ,' and immediately, Jude 1:5 , uses 'Lord' of God (see the remarkable marg. here), as he does later, Jude 1:9,14 .
"Paul ordinarily uses kurios of the Lord Jesus, 1 Corinthians 1:3 , e.g., but also on occasion, of God, in quotations from the OT, 1 Corinthians 3:20 , e.g., and in his own words, 1 Corinthians 3:5 , cp. 1 Corinthians 3:10 . It is equally appropriate to either in 1 Corinthians 7:25 ; 2 Corinthians 3:16 ; 8:21 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:6 , and if 1 Corinthians 11:32 is to be interpreted by 1 Corinthians 10:21,22 , the Lord Jesus is intended, but if by Hebrews 12:5-9 , then kurios here also = God. 1 Timothy 6:15,16 is probably to be understood of the Lord Jesus, cp. Revelation 17:14 .
"Though John does not use 'Lord' in his Epistles, and though, like the other Evangelists, he ordinarily uses the personal Name in his narrative, yet he occasionally speaks of Him as 'the Lord,' John 4:1 ; 6:23 ; 11:2 ; 20:20 ; 21:12 .
"The full significance of this association of Jesus with God under the one appellation, 'Lord,' is seen when it is remembered that these men belonged to the only monotheistic race in the world. To associate with the Creator one known to be a creature, however exalted, though possible to Pagan philosophers, was quite impossible to a Jew.
"It is not recorded that in the days of His flesh any of His disciples either addressed the Lord, or spoke of Him, by His personal Name. Where Paul has occasion to refer to the facts of the Gospel history he speaks of what the Lord Jesus said, Acts 20:35 , and did, 1 Corinthians 11:23 , and suffered, 1 Thessalonians 2:15 ; 5:9,10 . It is our Lord Jesus who is coming, 1 Thessalonians 2:19 , etc. In prayer also the title is given, 1 Thessalonians 3:11 ; Ephesians 1:3 ; the sinner is invited to believe on the Lord Jesus, Acts 16:31 ; 20:21 , and the saint to look to the Lord Jesus for deliverance, Romans 7:24,25 , and in the few exceptional cases in which the personal Name stands alone a reason is always discernible in the immediate context.
"The title 'Lord,' as given to the Savior, in its full significance rests upon the resurrection, Acts 2:36 ; Romans 10:9 ; 14:9 , and is realized only in the Holy Spirit, 1 Corinthians 12:3 ." * [1]
A — 2: δεσπότης (Strong's #1203 — Noun Masculine — despotes — des-pot'-ace ) "a master, lord, one who possesses supreme authority," is used in personal address to God in Luke 2:29 ; Acts 4:24 ; Revelation 6:10 ; with reference to Christ, 2 Peter 2:1 ; Jude 1:4 ; elsewhere it is translated "master," "masters," 1 Timothy 6:1,2 ; 2 Timothy 2:21 (of Christ); Titus 2:9 ; 1 Peter 2:18 . See MASTER.
Note: For rabboni, rendered "Lord" in the AV of Mark 10:51 , see RABBONI.
A — 3: μεγιστάν (Strong's #3175 — Noun Masculine — megistan — meg-is-tan'-es ) akin to megistos, "greatest," the superlative degree of megas, "great," denotes "chief men, nobles;" it is rendered "lords" in Mark 6:21 , of nobles in Herod's entourage; "princes" in Revelation 6:15 ; 18:23 , RV (AV, "great men").
B — 1: κυριεύω (Strong's #2961 — Verb — kurieuo — koo-ree-yoo'-o ) denotes "to be lord of, to exercise lordship over," Luke 22:25 ; Romans 6:9,14 ; 7:1 ; 14:9 ; 2 Corinthians 1:24 ; 1 tim. 6:15; see DOMINION , B, No. 1.
B — 2: κατακυριεύω (Strong's #2634 — Verb — katakurieuo — kat-ak-oo-ree-yoo'-o ) a strengthened form of No. 1, is rendered "lording it" in 1 Peter 5:3 , RV: see DOMINION , B, No. 2.
C — 1: κυριακός (Strong's #2960 — Adjective — kuriakos — koo-ree-ak-os' ) from kurios (A, No. 1), signifies "pertaining to a lord or master;" "lordly" is not a legitimate rendering for its use in the NT, where it is used only of Christ; in 1 Corinthians 11:20 , of the Lord's Supper, or the Supper of the Lord (see FEAST); in Revelation 1:10 , of the Day of the Lord (see DAY , No. 1).
Webster's Dictionary - Lord
(1):
(v. i.) To play the lord; to domineer; to rule with arbitrary or despotic sway; - sometimes with over; and sometimes with it in the manner of a transitive verb.
(2):
(n.) The Supreme Being; Jehovah.
(3):
(v. t.) To rule or preside over as a lord.
(4):
(v. t.) To invest with the dignity, power, and privileges of a lord.
(5):
(n.) The Savior; Jesus Christ.
(6):
(n.) One of whom a fee or estate is held; the male owner of feudal land; as, the lord of the soil; the lord of the manor.
(7):
(n.) A hump-backed person; - so called sportively.
(8):
(n.) One who has power and authority; a master; a ruler; a governor; a prince; a proprietor, as of a manor.
(9):
(n.) A titled nobleman., whether a peer of the realm or not; a bishop, as a member of the House of Lords; by courtesy; the son of a duke or marquis, or the eldest son of an earl; in a restricted sense, a boron, as opposed to noblemen of higher rank.
(10):
(n.) A title bestowed on the persons above named; and also, for honor, on certain official persons; as, lord advocate, lord chamberlain, lord chancellor, lord chief justice, etc.
(11):
(n.) A husband.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Lord
Lord. The rendering of the two Hebrew words "Jehovah" and "Adonai." When it represents the former it is printed with capitals. Genesis 15:4. When it represents the latter it is printed with a capital initial. Psalms 97:5.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Lord (2)
Lord's Day. Revelation 1:10. From the times of the apostles, the first day of the week has been kept sacred by Christians in commemoration of the resurrection of Christ, and it is invariably designated as the Lord's day by the fathers of the primitive church up to the time of the edict of Constantine, when the name Sunday became common. "On the first day of the week when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them." Acts 20:7. His charge "concerning the collection for the saints" to the church in Corinth is, "Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him." 1 Corinthians 16:1-2. John commences the Revelation saying: "I was in the Spirit on the Lord's day." Revelation 1:10. The Lord's day, as the Sabbath, reminds us of the finished work of creation and redemption. See Sabbath.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Right of the Lord
A vulgar fable for which there is not the slightest foundation in legend, or in, the historical records of any Christian country.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - This the Confessor of the Lord, Whose Triumph
Hymn for Vespers and Matins for the Common of confessors (bishops and not bishops). This hymn was written in the 8th century by an unknown author. It has 12 translations; the English title given is the first lIne of a cento from "The Hymner."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Remember, o Creator Lord
Hymn from the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin. Its first verse is taken from the hymn "Jesu Redemptor omnium"; its second verse is a continuation of the hymns "Quem terra, pontus, sidera," and "O gloriosa virginum," which have been attributed to Fortunatus (530-609). The English title given is by E. Caswall.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - ye Sons And Daughters of the Lord
Hymn used at the Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament on Easter Sunday. It was written by Jean Tisserand (died 1494) and has several translations. The title given above is by E. Caswall.
King James Dictionary - Lord
LORD, n.
1. A master a person possessing supreme power and authority a ruler a governor. Man over man he made not lord.
But now I was the lord of this fair mansion.
2. A tyrant an oppressive ruler. 3. A husband. I oft in bitterness of soul deplores my absent daughter, and my dearer lord.
My lord also being old. Genesis 18 .
4. A baron the proprietor of a manor as the lord of the manor. 5. A nobleman a title of honor in Great Britain given to those who are noble by birth or creation a peer of the realm, including dukes, marquises, earls, viscounts and barons. Archbishops and bishops also, as members of the house of lords, are lords of parliament. Thus we say, lords temporal and spiritual. By courtesy also the title is given to the sons of dukes and marquises, and to the eldest sons of earls. 6. An honorary title bestowed on certain official characters as lord advocate, lord chamberlain, lord chancellor, lord chief justice, &c. 7. In scripture, the Supreme Being Jehovah. When Lord, in the Old Testament, is prints in capitals, it is the translation of JEHOVAH, and so might, with more propriety, be rendered. The word is applied to Christ, Psalms 110 . Colossians 3 . and to the Holy Spirit, 2 Thessalonians 3 . As a title of respect, it is applied to kings, Genesis 40 . 2 Samuel 19 . to princes and nobles, Genesis 42 . Daniel 4 . to a husband, Genesis 18 . to a prophet, 1 Kings 18 . 2 Kings 2 . and to a respectable person, Genesis 24 . Christ is called the Lord of glory, 1 Corinthians 2 . and Lord of lords, Revelation 19 . LORD, To invest with the dignity and privileges of a lord.
LORD, To domineer to rule with arbitrary or despotic sway sometimes followed by over, and sometimes by it, in the manner of a transitive verb.
The whiles she lordeth in licentious bliss.
I see them lording it in London streets.
They lorded over them whom now they serve.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Lord
This name belongs to God by preeminence; and in this sense ought never to be given to any creature. Jesus Christ, as the Messiah, the Son of God, and equal with the Father, is often called Lord in Scripture, especially in the writing of Paul. The word LORD , in the English Bible, when printed in small capitals, stands always for JEHOVAH in the Hebrew. See JEHOVAH .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Lord
[1]
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Lord
For the use of ‘Lord’ among the Israelites of Old Testament times see YAHWEH. For the use of ‘Lord’ among the followers of Jesus in New Testament times see JESUS CHRIST, sub-heading ‘Jesus as Lord’.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Day of the Lord
Israelites of Old Testament times looked for the day when God would intervene in the affairs of the world, righting the wrongs and establishing his just rule on the earth. They called this divine intervention the day of the Lord (Isaiah 2:12-19; Isaiah 13:6; Isaiah 13:9; Zephaniah 1:14-16; Zechariah 14:9).
Earlier ‘days of the Lord’
Although the day of the Lord was usually considered to be something terrifying, Israelites often looked forward to it. The reason for this was that they believed that God would punish Israel’s enemies and bring in Israel’s golden age (Jeremiah 46:10; Zephaniah 3:16-20). They failed to realize, however, that in that day God would punish all sinners, Israelites included, and save all the faithful, regardless of national or social status (Joel 2:30-32; Amos 5:18; Malachi 3:1-4; Malachi 4:1-3).
Any catastrophic judgment, such as a flood, earthquake, locust plague, famine or war, could be called a day of the Lord (Joel 1:15-16; Joel 2:1-2; Joel 2:11). But such a catastrophe was only a forerunner (and at the same time a guarantee) of the great and final day of the Lord (Joel 2:30-32; Joel 3:14-18).
Jesus Christ’s first coming was, in a sense, a day of the Lord, for through Christ God intervened in the affairs of the world to conquer Satan, deal with sin and proclaim his kingdom (Matthew 3:11-12; Matthew 4:14-17; Acts 2:16-21; see KINGDOM OF GOD). The ‘last days’ had begun (Acts 2:17; 1 Corinthians 10:11; 2 Timothy 3:1; Hebrews 1:2; 1 Peter 1:20; 1 John 2:18). They will reach their climax when Christ returns at the end of the age to purge the world of sin and bring his kingdom to its victorious completion (Isaiah 2:2-4; Matthew 24:29-31; Matthew 25:31-32; 2 Peter 3:3-4; 2 Peter 3:10).
The final great ‘day of the Lord’
Christ’s people have always suffered persecution, but before the final great day of the Lord that persecution will become more severe (Matthew 24:5-14; John 16:33; 2 Thessalonians 1:5-12; see PERSECUTION). The spirit of antichrist, which has always been in the world, will express itself in a final great rebellion against God. There will be all sorts of pressures, both subtle and open, to force Christians to abandon their faith in Christ (Matthew 24:15-24; 2 Thessalonians 2:1-7; 1 John 2:18; see ANTICHRIST).
In a series of devastating judgments, God will pour out his wrath upon a rebellious world (2 Thessalonians 1:8; Revelation 6:17; Revelation 14:9-11; Revelation 16:2). God will not pour out his wrath upon his own people; on the contrary he will protect them from it (Revelation 7:1-3; Revelation 9:20-21; cf. Romans 5:9; 1 Thessalonians 1:10; 1 Thessalonians 5:9). But the rebels, instead of turning to God in repentance, will hate him and persecute his people even more (Revelation 9:18; Revelation 9:4; Revelation 11:7-10; Revelation 12:17; Revelation 16:9; Revelation 16:21). The persecution will be so bitter that, for the sake of his people, God will shorten the day of his wrath. Although some believers will be killed for their faith in Christ, as far as God is concerned not one will be lost (Revelation 6:9-11; Revelation 12:11-12; Revelation 20:4; cf. Matthew 24:22; Luke 21:16-18).
Christ’s return will be a day of judgment that will result in a separation between the wicked and the righteous. For one it will be a day of wrath, for the other a day of salvation (Matthew 24:36-41; Matthew 25:32; Matthew 25:46; Luke 21:27-28; Acts 24:15; Romans 2:5; Philippians 1:6; Philippians 1:10; 1 Thessalonians 4:16-18; 2 Thessalonians 1:5-8; Revelation 22:12-15; see JUDGMENT; RESURRECTION).
In every era the circumstances of Christians vary from nation to nation. Christians in any place at any time could belong to the last generation of humanity as we know it. Therefore, the Bible urges Christians of all nations and eras to be alert and ready at all times for the onset of the final day of the Lord and the return of Christ (Matthew 24:42-44; Mark 13:32-37; 1 Thessalonians 5:2-6; 2 Peter 3:10-12).
However, no one knows when the end of the age will come, and Christians should not behave foolishly by thinking the world is about to come to an end (Matthew 24:36; 2 Thessalonians 2:1-2; 2 Thessalonians 3:11-12). They must carry on with life normally, making long-term plans where necessary, yet remembering that God may intervene at any time (Luke 19:11-27; Acts 1:6-8; 1 Corinthians 15:5-7; Philippians 1:9-10; 1 Thessalonians 5:6; 1 Thessalonians 5:11; 1 Thessalonians 5:14).
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Nativity of Our Lord
The Prayer Book title of the Festival ofChristmas is, "The Nativity of our Lord, or the Birthday of Christ,commonly called CHRISTMAS DAY" (which see).

Sentence search

Lord - We shall enumerate some of these so that the reader may acquaint himself with the many different ways in which GOD is Lord, and in which various kinds of people, nations and rulers are Lords. ...
The Lord:...
He is GOD He is Lord of Lords Deuteronomy 4:35 Deuteronomy 10:17. ...
He is Lord of all the earth Joshua 3:11. ...
The Lord is King The Lord is a refuge Psalm 10:16 Psalm 14:6. ...
The Lord is my shepherd Psalm 23:1. ...
The Lord is my light Psalm 27:1. ...
The Lord is my salvation Psalm 27:1. ...
The Lord is my strength Psalm 28:7. ...
The Lord is my shield Psalm 28:7. ...
The Lord is good Psalm 34:8. ...
The Lord is terrible Psalm 47:2. ...
The Lord is our defense Psalm 89:18. ...
The Lord is upright Psalm 92:15. ...
The Lord is merciful Psalm 103:8. ...
The Lord is gracious Psalm 103:8. ...
The Lord is thy keeper Psalm 121:5. ...
The Lord is thy shade Psalm 121:5. ...
The Lord is around us Psalm 125:2. ...
The Lord is righteous Psalm 129:4. ...
The Lord is nigh us Psalm 145:18. ...
The Lord is far off Proverbs 15:29. ...
The Lord is our Maker Proverbs 22:2. ...
The Lord is that Spirit2Co3:17. ...
The Lord is at hand Philippians 4:5. ...
He is the Lord our righteousness Jeremiah 23:6. ...
He is the Lord of kings Daniel 2:47. ...
He is the Lord of the sabbath Mark 2:28. ...
He is Lord and CHRIST Acts 2:36. ...
He is Lord of all Acts 10:36. ...
He is Lord of the dead and the living Romans 14:9. ...
He is the Lord of glory1Co2:8. ...
He is the Lord from Heaven1Co15:47. ...
The Lord is the avenger1Th4:6. ...
The Lord is faithful2Th3:3. ...
The Lord is pitiful James 5:11
Lording - ) The son of a Lord; a person of noble lineage. ) of Lord...
(3):...
(n. ) A little Lord; a Lordling; a Lord, in contempt or ridicule
Liege - Bound by a feudal tenure obliged to be faithful and loyal to a superior, as a vassal to his Lord subject faithful as a liege man. By liege homage, a vassal was bound to serve his Lord against all, without excepting his sovereign or against all, excepting a former Lord to whom he owed like service. Sovereign as a liege Lord. A vassal holding a fee by which he is bound to perform certain services and duties to his Lord. A Lord or superior a sovereign. This is a false application of the word, arising probably from transferring the word from the vassal to the Lord the Lord of liege men, being called liege Lord
Adoni-Zedek - Justice of the Lord; Lord of justice
Lord, God of Israel - See God ; Lord of Hosts; Lord Sabbaoth
Pethahiah - The Lord opening; gate of the Lord
Jedeiah - One Lord; the joy of the Lord
Zerahiah - The Lord rising; brightness of the Lord
Jezrahiah - The Lord arises; brightness of the Lord
Josiah - The Lord burns; the fire of the Lord
Pelatiah - Let the Lord deliver; deliverance of the Lord
Amariah - The Lord says; the integrity of the Lord
Jedaiah - The hand of the Lord; confessing the Lord
Sheariah - Gate of the Lord; tempest of the Lord
Izrahiah - The Lord ariseth; the clearness of the Lord
Lord - Lord, n. Man over man he made not Lord. ...
But now I was the Lord of this fair mansion. I oft in bitterness of soul deplores my absent daughter, and my dearer Lord. ...
My Lord also being old. A baron the proprietor of a manor as the Lord of the manor. Archbishops and bishops also, as members of the house of Lords, are Lords of parliament. Thus we say, Lords temporal and spiritual. An honorary title bestowed on certain official characters as Lord advocate, Lord chamberlain, Lord chancellor, Lord chief justice, &c. When Lord, in the Old Testament, is prints in capitals, it is the translation of JEHOVAH, and so might, with more propriety, be rendered. Christ is called the Lord of glory, 1 Corinthians 2 . and Lord of Lords, Revelation 19 . Lord, To invest with the dignity and privileges of a Lord. ...
Lord, To domineer to rule with arbitrary or despotic sway sometimes followed by over, and sometimes by it, in the manner of a transitive verb. ...
The whiles she Lordeth in licentious bliss. ...
I see them Lording it in London streets. ...
They Lorded over them whom now they serve
Adonai - This is one of the names peculiarly applied to the person of the Lord Jesus Christ. By way of distinguishing it from JEHOVAH, it is rendered Lord in our English Bibles, in smaller letters, while JEHOVAH, which is also translated Lord, is in capitals. (Psalms 110:1) The Lord said unto my Lord. It is a sweet and interesting name of the Lord Jesus
Adoni-Bezek - The lightning of the Lord; the Lord of lightning
Zebadiah - Portion of the Lord; the Lord is my portion
Lordly - ) Suitable for a Lord; of or pertaining to a Lord; resembling a Lord; hence, grand; noble; dignified; honorable. ) In a Lordly manner
d.n. - = Dominus Noster (Our Lord) ...
- or - ...
= Domino Nostro (to Our Lord)
d.n. - = Dominus Noster (Our Lord) ...
- or - ...
= Domino Nostro (to Our Lord)
Adoniram - My Lord is most high; Lord of might and elevation
Zedekiah - The Lord is my justice; the justice of the Lord
Jah - one of the names of God, which we meet with in the composition of many Hebrew words; as, Adonijah, Allelujah, Malachia; that is, "My Lord," "Praise the Lord," "The Lord is my King
Jaresiah - The bed of the Lord; the Lord hath taken away; poverty
Lord - For the use of ‘Lord’ among the Israelites of Old Testament times see YAHWEH. For the use of ‘Lord’ among the followers of Jesus in New Testament times see JESUS CHRIST, sub-heading ‘Jesus as Lord
Overlord - ) One who is Lord over another or others; a superior Lord; a master
Lord - ) In small letters and with initial capital "Lord" represents Αdonai in KJV of Old Testament. In capitals "LORD" represents Jehovah , except Exodus 23:17. The "LORD God", Αdonai Jehovah , where it ought to be "the Lord Jehovah," and Exodus 34:23
Baconian - ) Of or pertaining to Lord Bacon, or to his system of philosophy. ) One who adheres to the philosophy of Lord Bacon. ) One who maintains that Lord Bacon is the author of the works commonly attributed to Shakespeare
Jedidiah - The name the Lord gave to Solomon; meaning beloved of the Lord
Angel of the Lord - In many passages in the Old Testament, the angel of the Lord is identified with God, while in other instances a distinction is made between the Lord and the angel. In general, however, the terms "the angel of the Lord, " "the Lord, " and "God" are interchangeable. ...
The angel of the Lord is the messenger of both good and evil. The angel of the Lord pronounces a curse on the people of Meroz, because they refused to come to the help of the Lord (Judges 5:23 ). ...
The angel of the Lord executes judgment on behalf of the Lord. ...
The angel of the Lord both commissions and commends God's servants. The commander of the Lord's army commissions Joshua to undertake the Lord's battles for Canaan, just as Moses had been commissioned to confront Pharaoh (Joshua 5:13-15 ; cf. The angel of the Lord appears to Abraham. Abraham identifies the angel as God, calling the place "The Lord Will Provide. "...
The angel of the Lord carries out a ministry of reconciliation. ...
The connection between the angel of the Lord and the preincarnate appearance of the Messiah cannot be denied. Manoah meets the angel of the Lord, and declares that he has seen God. The functions of the angel of the Lord in the Old Testament prefigure the reconciling ministry of Jesus. In the New Testament, there is no mention of the angel of the Lord; the Messiah himself is this person
Lord - ) To play the Lord; to domineer; to rule with arbitrary or despotic sway; - sometimes with over; and sometimes with it in the manner of a transitive verb. ) To rule or preside over as a Lord. ) To invest with the dignity, power, and privileges of a Lord. ) One of whom a fee or estate is held; the male owner of feudal land; as, the Lord of the soil; the Lord of the manor. , whether a peer of the realm or not; a bishop, as a member of the House of Lords; by courtesy; the son of a duke or marquis, or the eldest son of an earl; in a restricted sense, a boron, as opposed to noblemen of higher rank. ) A title bestowed on the persons above named; and also, for honor, on certain official persons; as, Lord advocate, Lord chamberlain, Lord chancellor, Lord chief justice, etc
Belord - ) To act the Lord over. ) To address by the title of "lord"
Pekahiah - (2 Kings 15:22) The Lord opens, from Pacah, to open—and Jah, the Lord
Thunder - Thunder is poetically called "the voice of the Lord" in the sublime description of a thunder-storm in Psalm 29:11 ; ...
...
"The voice of the Lord is upon the waters;...
The God of glory thundereth;...
The Lord is upon many waters. ...
The voice of the Lord is powerful;...
The voice of the Lord is full of majesty. ...
The voice of the Lord breaketh the cedars;...
Yea, the Lord breaketh the cedars of Lebanon," etc
Unlorded - ) Not raised to the rank of a Lord. ) Deprived of the rank of a Lord
Armies - (Song of Song of Solomon 6:10) And in allusion to the same, the Lord himself is called the Lord of hosts. And hence, that expression in the hymn, Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of Sabaoth, or rather Zebaoth, which signifies, hosts or armies. Beautifully the Lord takes this title to himself; not only to indicate the greatness of his power, but the greatness of his security to his church and people, in his care and government over them. And it is a blessed thing to have this Lord God of Zebaoth for our stay
Shemariah - (See 1 Chronicles 12:5; Ezra 10:32) From Shimar, a guard—and Jah, the Lord. The Lord is my guard
Jesaiah - Son of Palatiah, meaning, salvation of the Lord, compounded of Jashah, to save; and Jab, the Lord
Seigniory - ) The power or authority of a Lord; dominion. ) The territory over which a Lord holds jurisdiction; a manor
Sabaoth - or rather Zabaoth, a Hebrew word, signifying hosts or armies, יהוה צבאות , Jehovah Sabaoth, The Lord of Hosts. By this phrase we may understand the host of heaven, or the angels and ministers of the Lord; or the stars and planets, which, as an army ranged in battle array, perform the will of God; or, lastly, the people of the Lord, both of the old and new covenant, which is truly a great army, of which God is the Lord and commander
Liege - , a Lord paramount; a sovereign. ) The subject of a sovereign or Lord; a liegeman. ) Sovereign; independent; having authority or right to allegiance; as, a liege Lord. ) Serving an independent sovereign or master; bound by a feudal tenure; obliged to be faithful and loyal to a superior, as a vassal to his Lord; faithful; loyal; as, a liege man; a liege subject
Irijah - (Jeremiah 37:13) His name means, the fear of the Lord; from Jarah, to fear; and Jah, the Lord
Lord - These words are commonly translated 'lord. The title 'Lord' is applied to God ( Psalm 90:1 , Adonai ), and in the N. to the Lord Jesus, not only as a term of respect, but as owning His constituted Lordship. Acts 2:36 ; Philippians 2:11 He is emphatically the Lord as eclipsing every other for the Christian, who delights to appropriate Him as 'My Lord. To believers collectively He is 'Our Lord Jesus Christ. As Man the Lord Jesus is mediator between God and men, and receives blessings for men which are administered through Him as Lord. one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom are all things, and we through him. , though the English requires it to be translated 'the Lord. It is applied to God and to the Lord Jesus, Luke 2:29 ; Acts 4:24 ; 2 Peter 2:1 ; Jude 4 ; Revelation 6:10 ; and in 2 Timothy 2:21 is translated 'master. ' It is applied to the Lord by the blind man in Mark 10:51 ; and by Mary in John 20:16 , where it is untranslated
Lordly - Lord'LY, a. Lord and like. Becoming a Lord pertaining to a Lord. Lordly sins require Lordly estates to support them. Every rich and Lordly swain, with pride would drag about her chain. ...
Lord'LY, adv. ...
A famished lion, issuing from the wood, roars Lordly fierce
Thomas - He comes prominently before us on two significant occasions: once when he said to the Lord, "We know not whither thou goest, and how can we know the way?" The Lord replied, "I am the way, the truth, and the life. Also when he said that he would not believe that the Lord had risen until he had ocular demonstration as to His wounds; but when he saw the Lord, he at once confessed Him as "My Lord and my God. He was not with the other disciples when the Lord breathed into them, and said, "Receive ye the Holy Ghost;" and thus he may be taken as a type of the future remnant of the Jews, who will not believe till they see their Messiah. In contrast to which the Lord added a beautiful sentence respecting those of the present time: "Blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed
Pethahiah - (1 Chronicles 24:16) His name means gate of the Lord, from Pathac, gate—and Jah, Lord
Adonai - Lord, ruler, Lord of Lords, a name bestowed upon God in the Old Testament
Jehoram - (2 Kings 3:2-3) The meaning of the name is, exaltation of the Lord; from Ram, exaltation; and Jah, the Lord
Saints, Litany of the - ...
Litany of the Saints Lord, have mercy on us. Lord, have mercy on us. ...
Lord, have mercy on us. Lord, have mercy on us. ...
Lord, be merciful, Lord, save us. ...
From all harm, Lord, save us. ...
From every sin, Lord, save us. ...
From all temptations, Lord, save us. ...
From everlasting death, Lord, save us. ...
By Your coming among us, Lord, save us. ...
By Your death and rising to new life, Lord, save us. ...
By Your gift of the Holy Spirit, Lord, save us. ...
Be merciful to us sinners, Lord, hear our prayer. ...
Guide and protect Your Holy Church, Lord, hear our prayer. Lord, hear our prayer. Lord, hear our prayer. Lord, hear our prayer
Shemaiah - A prophet of the Lord. His name means, that hears the Lord, from Thamah that hears—and Jah, the Lord
Lordship - ) The state or condition of being a Lord; hence (with his or your), a title applied to a Lord (except an archbishop or duke, who is called Grace) or a judge (in Great Britain), etc. ) Seigniory; domain; the territory over which a Lord holds jurisdiction; a manor
Abigail - A memorable name in Scripture, whom the Lord, in his providence made instrumental to save David from blood-shedding. ) Her name is as remarkable, for the event the Lord enabled her to accomplish; for it means, the joy of the Father; from Gul, to rejoice, and Ab, father. I have often admired the sweet and gracious conclusion, which David made, on occasion of the sin-preventing providence, the Lord accomplished on the patriarch's mind, through the instrumentality of this woman. He saw the hand of the Lord in the appointment; and, first, he blessed God; and next, he blessed her advice; and next, he blessed her: for all come in for a blessing, since the Lord had wrought deliverance by such means from sin. "Blessed (said he) be the Lord; and blessed be thy advice; and blessed be thou that hast kept me this day from shedding blood
Hornet - We read of this insect a particularly commissioned by the Lord, to punish and drive out the enemies of Israel. In hot countries, it may easily be conceived, how formidable a swarm of such creatures armed with stings must become to any people, and especially when sent, like the flies of Egypt, in judgment by the Lord. (See Deuteronomy 7:20; Joshua 24:12) But some, beside the history of the fact itself, in the hornets the Lord literally and truly sent to drive out before Israel their enemies, take the expression also in a figurative sense, and consider hornets from the Lord as the buzzing and stinging effects of a guilty conscience. "I will send my fear before thee, saith the Lord. " (Exodus 23:27-28) And where the Lord sends his fear, a man's own feelings will make him flee
Mary, Sister of Lazarus And Martha - They resided at Bethany, where they were privileged to welcome the Lord Jesus as a guest. On one of these visits Mary took her place at the feet of the Lord, feasting upon the words that fell from His lips. Martha wanted her help, but the Lord declared that one thing was needful, and Mary had chosen that good part, which should not be taken away from her. Word had been sent to the Lord that he was sick, and yet He had not come. When Jesus arrived Mary exclaimed, as Martha had done previously, "Lord, if thou hadst been here, my brother had not died:" but Mary said it at the feet of the Lord. ...
Afterwards, when they made the Lord a supper, a few days before He suffered, Mary, in full appreciation of her Lord, anointed His head and His feet with costly ointment. Judas and others were indignant at what they called 'waste,' but the Lord defended Mary's action, and said He was being anointed for His burial: this act should be told of her in the whole world. Nothing was too costly to be spent upon such a Lord
Exorcists - The incident recorded in Acts 19:13-16 , raises the question as to what was an 'exorcist'? The disciples of the Lord who were able to cast out demons were never so called. Were these vagabond or wandering Jews able to cast out demons irrespective of the name of the Lord Jesus? or did they only pretend to do so? Matthew 12:27 is often quoted to show that the Lord admitted that such persons were able to cast out demons. Is it not more probable that the Lord was in that passage alluding to His disciples? The Lord was a mysterious person whom they could not comprehend; and He was charged with casting out demons by the prince of demons; but the Lord said, By whom do your children (the origin of whom you do know) cast them out? On the other hand, the Lord describes some of the lost as pleading that they had cast out demons in His name, Matthew 7:22 ; but these also speak of having prophesied in His name; so that they would be persons who had made a profession, as Judas who was sent out with the other apostles. ...
On one occasion the disciples met with a man who was casting out demons in the name of the Lord, whom they forbade because he followed not with them; but the Lord said that no one who did a miracle in His name could lightly speak evil of Him. As explained by the Lord, Satan would not destroy his own kingdom. What power the exorcists really had we know not, but in the case under consideration God did not allow them to use the name of the Lord Jesus, and the demon overpowered and wounded them
Elijah - 1 Kings 17:1 (c) He is a type of CHRIST as Lord, as King, as the Lion, and as the Eagle. The word means "GOD is the Lord
Seignior - ) A Lord; the Lord of a manor
Jah - " It is part of the compound words "Adonijah" ("God is my Lord") and "hallelujah" ("Praise the Lord")
Hephzibah - (2 Kings 21:1) But it is infinitely more interesting to consider, that the Lord calls his church by this name, and the cause for which he did, namely, because the Lord delighted in her. The name itself conveys as much, from Chaphatz, to will: as if the Lord had said by Hephzibah,
Lord of Glory - In the Epistle of Saint James 2:1, we read, "My brethren, have not the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ of glory, with respect of persons. " In this passage, glory is regarded as an essential attribute of Christ (John 11,5); some commentators think that the genitive of quality "of glory" is connected only with "our Lord," but more likely it goes with "our Lord Jesus Christ
Baal - The word signifies also Lord, or commander and the character of the idol was varied by different nations, at different times. Thus Baal Berith is supposed to signify the Lord of the Covenant Baal Peor, or rather Baal Phegor, the Lord of the dead
Glory, Lord of - In the Epistle of Saint James 2:1, we read, "My brethren, have not the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ of glory, with respect of persons. " In this passage, glory is regarded as an essential attribute of Christ (John 11,5); some commentators think that the genitive of quality "of glory" is connected only with "our Lord," but more likely it goes with "our Lord Jesus Christ
Ideon - " He is a type of a humble, industrious Christian who yields himself to the Lord of the harvest, affiliates with others of GOD's children, claims GOD's promises, and expects the Lord to manifest Himself in power. Also a type of one who displays implicit and explicit obedience and depends on the Lord for results
er - "He was wicked in the sight of the Lord, and the Lord slew him. Son of Jose, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Sabaoth - " The words "Lord God ofSabaoth," to be found in the Te Deum, mean the same as "Lord God ofHosts" in the Ter Sanctus in the Communion Service
Outcasts - Thus by the prophet Isaiah, (Isaiah 56:8) "The Lord God, which gathereth the outcasts of Israel, saith, Yet will I gather others to him besides those which are gathered to him. " So that it should seem, that there is a peculiar meaning in the term outcasts, as if the outcasts of other nations had a reference to that part of the Gentile church which is to be brought into one fold, under one shepherd, Jesus Christ the Lord. And concerning the outcasts of Israel, in several parts of Scripture we find the Lord is expressing more than ordinary attention to them. They called thee an outcast, saith the Lord, by Jeremiah, (Jeremiah 30:17) saying, This is Zion whom no man seeketh after. The Lord will gather them; (for he saith, Psalms 147:2) "The Lord doth build up Jerusalem, he gathered together the outcasts of Israel. " And during their state of being outcasts, the Lord watcheth over them for good, yea, he makes provision for them even in the midst of their enemies. Even Moab, the sworn foe of Israel, shall take them in when they are turned out, If the Lord hath corrected them, they are still his children; if the Lord for a time hath cast them out, he hath not cast them off. Outcasts they are, but still they are the Lord's outcasts; the Lord still owns them as such. In due season the Lord will take them home; for the Lord will set up an ensign for the nations, and assemble the outcasts of Israel, and gather together the dispersed of Judah from the four corners of the earth. And in that day there shall be an altar to the Lord in the midst of the land of Egypt; and the Lord shall be known to Egypt, and the Egyptians shall know the Lord in that day. " And after many blessings of grace that the Lord promiseth shall be shown to Egypt in smiting and healing, it is added, "whom the Lord of hosts will bless, saying, Blessed be Egypt my people, and Assyria the work of mine hands, and Israel mine inheritance
Martha - She received the Lord into 'her house. Having the Lord for a visitor she was burdened with much service, and begged Him to instruct her sister Mary to help her. A contrast is here drawn between the two sisters: the one occupied with what she could do for the Lord; the other with what He was: self being plainly uppermost in Martha, while the Lord Himself was paramount with Mary. But in John 12 , when the Lord was again at Bethany, and they made a supper for Him, Martha's service is in no way qualified, the raising up by the Lord of her brother Lazarus, and His dealings with herself, having doubtless taught her the needed lesson
Maaseiah - (1 Chronicles 15:18; 2 Chronicles 28:7) The signification, it should seem, is the hope of the Lord; from Chasah, hope, and Jab, Lord
Uriah - (2 Samuel 11:5-6) His name is a compound of Ur, light; and jah, the Lord. Hence Uriah means, the Lord is my light
Wedding - Matthew 22:3 (a) Our Lord is referring in this passage to the meeting between a sinner and his Saviour individually, and perhaps also between the church and her Lord collectively. When the individual comes to the Lord JESUS, falls in love with Him and trusts Him, it is described as a marriage, as in Romans 7:4. When the church is caught up to meet the Lord in the air to be actually, personally and physically in His presence forever, that also is described as a marriage, as in Revelation 19:7. Everything has been prepared by the Lord JESUS, both for the reception of the individual, and for the reception of the entire church
Zechariah - We meet with many of this name in Scripture, and it is not to be wondered at, when we consider the sense of it, and the general desire which the Hebrews all had, to carry somewhat in name, which referred to the Lord. Zachar means memory, and Jah the Lord. Zechariah therefore, seemed to intimate the hope, that the person so called should be remembered of the Lord
Neriah - Light of the Lord, or the Lord is my light
Boanerges - This name, signifying 'sons of thunder,' was given by the Lord to James and John the sons of Zebedee, Mark 3:17 , perhaps because of their urgent zeal, as was manifest when, indignant at the treatment of their Lord, they asked if they should call down fire from heaven. It was John who told the Lord that they had forbidden one who was casting out demons in His name, because he followed not with them. This act of the apostles was condemned by the Lord, but it is to be feared that similar prohibition has often been repeated by others since those days
Maranatha - Two Aramaic words signifying, 'the Lord cometh,' added (perhaps as a kind of watchword) after the word Anathema, 'let him be accursed,' applied to those who love not the Lord Jesus
Owner - Probably the answer which the disciples were instructed to give (‘The Lord hath need of him,’ Luke 19:31; Luke 19:34) was a prearranged sign between the owners and Jesus. Elsewhere in the Gospels the frequency of the occurrence of the word ‘owner’ is concealed from readers of the English versions by its translation as ‘lord’ (see art. Lord). ‘Lord’ (κύριος) has the sense of ‘owner’ in the phrases ‘the Lord of the vineyard’ (Matthew 20:8; Matthew 21:40 || Mark 12:9 || Luke 20:15). In the phrases, ‘the servant is not above his Lord’ (Matthew 10:24), ‘the servant showed his Lord these things’ (Luke 14:21), ‘the Lord of that servant’ (Luke 12:46 f. The terrible punishment mentioned in Luke 12:46 (‘the Lord of that servant … will cut him in sunder [1], and appoint him his portion with the unbelievers’) is probably taken from the punishments which were practised in the Gentile world
Merciful - ...
The Lord passed before him and proclaimed, the Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious, long-suffering and abundant in goodness and truth
Zephaniah - His name is a compound, from Tzaphan, secret—and Jah, the Lord. And very suited was this name to the prophet; for much of the Lord Jesus is in his prophecy, when opened and explained by God the Holy Ghost. Hence, that Scripture, "the secret of the Lord is with them that fear him, and he will shew them his covenant
Ismachiah - (2 Chronicles 31:13) The name signifies, one joined to the Lord; for Samach, to unite; and Jah, the Lord
Lord - Lordship must include power to exercise control as well as possession of power within the boundaries of a well-defined system such as law. A despot is only a caricature of the legal term “Lord” or “ruler. ”...
Humans as Lord The Hebrew word adon , “lord,” is used more than 300 times in the Old Testament for a human's rule over another person. This is to be distinguished from baal (also “lord”) in that adon represents a personal relationship of the subjection of one person to another, while baal designates the owner of things, including slaves and women. At times persons would address someone of equal social status as “lord” out of respect...
In the New Testament the Greek word kurios can designate both one who exercises rule over persons as well as the owner of goods. When the early Christians confessed Jesus as Lord, they protested against the religious claims of the state but not against the rulership of the caesar as such. Being exempt from the cult of the caesar, Jews could easily call the caesar: “lord. ” Christians had to dispute the caesar's claim to be Lord when that claim was understood to mean the caesar was divine. ...
God the Lord Nations around Israel often called their gods: “lord. At first the Greeks did not see themselves in a slave/lord relationship with their gods because they did not believe their gods were responsible for their creation. They could, indeed, call the gods “lord,” but that was not characteristic. ...
In the Near East the gods were Lords of fate. Many gods were called “lord. ...
In the Old Testament, Lord usually describes the essence of Yahweh: His power over His people (Exodus 34:23 ; Isaiah 1:24 ), over the entire earth (Joshua 3:13 ; Micah 4:13 ), and over all gods (Mark 10:42-45 ; 2 Kings 10:18-28 ). Thus adon could stand parallel to the personal name of God, Yahweh ( Exodus 15:17 ): Yahweh is Lord; the Lord is Yahweh. Additional terms such as Sabbaoth (that is, Supreme Head and Commander of all the heavenly forces) underscored the absolute Lordship of Yahweh (Isaiah 3:1 ; Isaiah 10:16 ,Isaiah 10:16,10:33 ). In time a formal designation, adonai jahweh (“the Lord Yahweh”), developed. Israelites formed personal names with adonai (Adonijah, Adoniram) just as did their neighbors (Adoni-zedek, Joshua 10:1-3 ), since these peoples also addressed their gods as “lord. Yahweh was the supreme Lord over the world; but Baal's worshipers saw Baal as Lord of at least a part of the world. The revelation of God in the Old Testament, however, speaks against any such alternative or opposition, for Yahweh alone is Lord. He is Lord in His historical acts. He is Lord in His directions for life. He is the Lord who reveals Himself in His covenant, His law, and His faithfulness. The title “Lord” ( adonai ) was no longer an adjective modifying the divine name but was a substitute for the divine name: Yahweh. ...
In the majority of the books of the New Testament, also, Yahweh, or God was called Lord. That occurs above all in quotations from the Old Testament and in translating terms such as “angel,” “way,” “word,” “day,” “name,” or “hand” of the Lord. In important passages kurios (Lord) appears in the sense of the Old Testament adonai as Creator of the world and Director of history ( Matthew 9:38 ; Matthew 11:25 ; Acts 17:24 ; 1 Timothy 6:15 ; Book of Revelation). Since the New Testament and early Christians also called Jesus “Lord,” we have difficulty many times determining whether Jesus or God is meant by “Lord” (Matthew 24:42 ; Mark 5:19-20 ; Luke 1:76 ; Acts 10:14 ). ...
Jesus is Lord The two words, “Kurios Jesus ,” composed the first Christian confession of faith (1 Corinthians 12:3 ; Romans 10:9 ). The decisive reason for transferring the divine title Lord to Jesus was His resurrection from the dead. Luke always, and Matthew usually, translated this title into Greek as kurios (“Lord). According to Mark only once did a non-Jew address Jesus as Lord ( Mark 7:28 ), but even that was simply a polite and courteous way of speaking (equivalent to our “sir”). Jesus was also addressed with the Aramaic mari (“lord”, John 13:13 ). The resurrection changed the respectful student/teacher relationship of the disciples with Jesus into the believers' servant/Lord relationship. The designation of Jesus as Lord in the Gospels (esp. Paul said that God honored Jesus with the title of Lord as His response to Jesus' obedient suffering (Philippians 2:6-11 ). As such, the church prays for His return: “Come, our Lord” (or in Aramaic, maranatha , 1 Corinthians 16:22 ; 1 Corinthians 11:26 ; Revelation 22:20 ). The cosmic Lordship of Jesus still remains the Lordship of God. The center of this Lordship is the power of administration over all things human (Romans 14:9 ). ...
The Lordship of Jesus has ethical consequences. The believer devotes self to serve others, even the ones in power, as his or her Lord in voluntary service (Deuteronomy 10:17 ). Speaking the word Lord or calling out to Jesus with the title “Lord” is not enough for salvation. ...
Already in Acts, “Lord” had become something like a summary of the Christian message. This expresses itself in a growing, more extensive formulation of the name of Jesus: “Lord Jesus,” “the Lord Jesus,” “the Lord Jesus Christ. The objective fact of the Lordship of Christ is supplemented by the subjective element of personal bonds to Christ through the possessive pronoun: “My/our Lord Jesus Christ. ” The “our” in “our Lord” includes all Christians; “your Lord” does not occur in the New Testament. Jesus Christ either joins people together, or He separates them, when they deny His right to be Lord (Romans 16:18 ; 1Corinthians 1:2,1 Corinthians 1:10-13 ). The personal bond or union with Jesus and with one another is especially emphasized in the formula “in the Lord” or “in Christ. ” Here it is evident that Lord and Christ are, in the final analysis, interchangeable (1 Corinthians 7:22 ; 2 Corinthians 4:5 ). The Lord is Jesus, through whom God intervened in the activities of the world in order to bring salvation. ...
How can humans be convinced that the crucified Jesus from Nazareth is the Lord—that is, that in Him God acted in the way that the Bible says and in the way that the world needs? How can people be convinced that He is the Messiah of Israel and the Lord of all people, who comes near to all people as Friend and Brother? How does the Lord of the cosmos become our personal Lord in His church? This happens through the Holy Spirit. Indeed, Paul could say that the Lord is the Spirit (1 Corinthians 15:45 ; 2 Corinthians 3:17 ). This does not signify a total identifying of Jesus with the Spirit of God (compare 2 Corinthians 13:13 ), but it testifies to the inseparable unity of the Lordship of God with the sending of Jesus and with the work of the Spirit
Crib - Proverbs 14:4 (b) Where no work is undertaken for the Lord, there is no trouble and no blessing. If work is undertaken for the Lord, though it entails much labor, pain and trouble, great blessings will follow. ...
Isaiah 1:3 (b) The Lord is teaching us that the ox, which represents the Christian, knows and esteems the one who owns him, as the Christian knows and loves his Lord
Dns. - = Dominus (Lord)
Baal - Master; Lord
ad'Don - (lord )
Author - ' It is 'prince' in Acts 3:15 ('author' in the margin), the Lord Jesus is the originator of life. In Hebrews 12:2 , the Lord Jesus is the 'leader ' and completer of faith: He began and finished the whole course. ' The Lord Jesus became the author of eternal salvation
Sabaoth - The phrase "Lord of Sabaoth" occurs twice in the New Testament, in Romans 9:29 and James 5:4 It should not be mistaken as referring to the Sabbath. But it is the Greek transliteration of the Hebrew Tsebaoth, "hosts" or "armies," so often recurring in the Old Testament, "the Lord of hosts," Isaiah 1:9, "the Lord God of hosts," i
Pine Tree - This tree is spoken of in Scripture by the Lord himself, as one of the trees which the Lord would take to beautify his sanctuary, (Isaiah 60:13) No doubt, it is figuratively spoken in allusion to believers
Pelaliah - Entreating the Lord
Hazaiah - Seeing the Lord
Hallelujah - Praise the Lord
Alleluia - Praise the Lord
Jehiah - The Lord liveth
Sabaoth - Lord of hosts
Azaliah - Near the Lord
Semaiah - Obeying the Lord
Eliah - God the Lord
Elijah - God the Lord
Eliasaph - The Lord increaseth
Barachias - His name signifies, to bless the Lord; from Barach, to bless; and Jah, Lord
Jehoshaphat - God established the kingdom in his hand, and the fear of the Lord fell upon the kingdoms around. He not only feared the Lord himself, but he sent Levites and priests throughout all Judah, to teach the people. He was rebuked by Jehu the seer, who said, "Shouldest thou help the ungodly, and love them that hate the Lord? Therefore is wrath upon thee from before the Lord. " Then he sought the Lord, and set his heart to bring all his people to fear the Lord. He turned to the Lord, proclaimed a fast, and prayed for help in the house of the Lord, where the Lord had set His name, pleading that He was their God, who had given the land to the seed of Abraham His friend, pleading also His response to the prayer of Solomon. He was at once assured by a prophet that the battle was not theirs, but God's, whose name they had invoked: they should see the salvation of the Lord. Jehoshaphat and all the people fell down and worshipped the Lord, and the next morning they marched toward the enemy singing. Subsequently the king, forgetting what was due to the name of the Lord, associated himself with the wicked Ahaziah king of Israel in sending ships to Tarshish. The faithfulness of the Lord in chastening Jehoshaphat is very marked, and in not allowing him to be in a false position which practically denied the name of the Lord
Roll - Hence we are told that the prophet Jeremiah was commanded to take the roll of a book, and write all the words which the Lord had said unto him concerning Israel and Judah; and that Baruch wrote upon a roll, from the mouth of Jeremiah, all the words of the Lord. ) So Ezekiel's visions were written in a roll, and the Lord caused him to eat it; intimating, no doubt figuratively, the durable impression the words of the Lord made upon his mind
Melatiah - Deliverance of the Lord
Hosts, Lord of - See Lord of Hosts
Gaius - Lord; an earthly man
Addon - Basis; foundation; the Lord
Ahiah - Brother of the Lord
Besodeiah - Counsel of the Lord
Bithiah - Daughter of the Lord
Pedaiah - Redemption of the Lord
Obadiah - Servant of the Lord
Benaiah - Son of the Lord
Binea - Son of the Lord
Adonikam - The Lord is raised
Jedidiah - Beloved of the Lord
Jehoram - Exaltation of the Lord
Jeremiah - Exaltation of the Lord
Jehoash - Fire of the Lord
Jehozadak - Justice of the Lord
Zidkijah - Justice of the Lord
Jehoiada - Knowledge of the Lord
Zachariah - Memory of the Lord
Jehoahaz - Possession of the Lord
Jehoshaphat - The Lord is judge
Jehovah-Shammah - The Lord is there
Jehovah-Nissi - The Lord my banner
Jehovah-Tsidkenu - The Lord our righteousness
Jehovah-Shalom - The Lord send peace
Jehovah-Jireh - The Lord will provide
Sabaoth - See HOSTS, Lord OF
Moriah - Bitterness of the Lord
Neariah - Child of the Lord
Ramiah - Exaltation of the Lord
Shecaniah - Habitation of the Lord
Semachiah - Joined to the Lord
Minneiah - Possession of the Lord
Seraiah - Prince of the Lord
Shachia - Protection of the Lord
Jesiah - Sprinkling of the Lord
Azaziah - Strength of the Lord
Coniah - Strength of the Lord
Asaiah - The Lord hath wrought
Maranatha - The Lord is coming
Shebaniah - The Lord that converts
Reaiah - Vision of the Lord
Kolariah - Voice of the Lord
Ishmachiah - Cleaving to the Lord
Ishiah - It is the Lord
Iphedeiah - Redemption of the Lord
Lordkin - ) A little Lord
Shephatiah - The Lord that judges
Sherebiah - Singing with the Lord
Aaron - ...
...
As he entered into the Holy of Holies once a year with the blood of an animal, so our Lord JESUS entered into Heaven by His own blood, not just once a year, but forever. ...
Aaron bore the names of the twelve tribes on his shoulders, so the Lord JESUS carries His people and their burdens on His shoulders. ...
Aaron wore a gold band on his forehead bearing the inscription "Holiness to the Lord. " So our Lord JESUS was holy, pure and perfect in all His ways, words and character. So our Lord JESUS "ever liveth to make intercession for us," and appears in GOD's presence for us. So the garment of our Lord JESUS is called "the robe of righteousness, the garments of salvation," Isaiah 61:10
Sheaf - The sheaf of the first fruits to be offered unto the Lord had much of Christ in it. (1 Corinthians 15:20) The sheaf was to be waved before the Lord, not only to acknowledge him as the Lord, proprietor of all the earth, but also to have an eye to the Lord in Christ, as sanctifying and blessing all our enjoyments. Hence, the Priest was to receive the first fruits of the sheaf, and to wave it before the Lord: and then and not before, the people had liberty to use it. Sweetly teaching us that Christ is first to be eyed in the blessing and then he will be enjoyed in the blessing; so that both law and gospel hold forth the same blessed teaching; "Honour the Lord with thy substance, and with the first fruits of all thine increase; so shall thy barns be filled with plenty, and thy presses shall burst out with new wine
Acceptable Year of the Lord - The Lord Jesus at the beginning of His ministry entered into the synagogue at Nazareth, and on the prophecy by Isaiah being handed to Him read from Isaiah 61 , the passage, "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the broken-hearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised, to preach the acceptable year of the Lord " — leaving off in the middle of a sentence, for the next words are, "and the day of vengeance of our God" Luke 4:18,19 ; Isaiah 61:1,2 . The Lord added, "This day is this scripture fulfilled in your ears. " The vengeance will be executed for the deliverance of Israel in a coming day; but when our Lord spoke there was the fullest grace for his hearers: it was the acceptable year of Jehovah. But the grace vouchsafed by the Lord brought lasting blessings for their souls
Honey - It is made, indeed, by the Lord himself, a type of the promised land. And the manna from heaven, that the Lord fed the church with in the wilderness forty years, is said in taste, to have been "like wafers made with honey. " (Exodus 16:31) Notwithstanding this, it is somewhat remarkable, that the Lord forbade the offering of it upon the altar. (Leviticus 2:11) The Lord Jesus, in commending the loveliness and sweetness of his church, compares her lips to the "droppings of the honeycomb. (Malachi 3:16-17) "Then they that feared the Lord, spake often one to another, and the Lord hearkened and heard it; and a book of remembrance was written before him, for them that feared the Lord, and that thought upon his name. And they shall be mine, saith the Lord of hosts, in that day when I make up my jewels; and I will spare them, as a man spareth his own son that serveth him
Ourd - The Lord gives and the Lord takes away and we should rejoice in both instances
Remaliah - Father of Pekah, king of Israel, (2 Kings 15:25) If the word be a compound, and derived from Ram-am, it means exalted of the Lord. If otherwise, from Ramah, with the preposition Lamed, it may mean the reverse, namely, rejected of the Lord
Annas - His son-in-law, Caiaphas, was high priest during the ministry of Our Lord, but Annas was still influential. He interrogated Our Lord and delivered Him bound to Caiaphas and the Sanhedrin for trial (John 28)
Adonijah - His name forms a wonderful compound of two glorious names of the Lord. So very earnest were the children of Israel to preserve the constant remembrance of the Lord God of their fathers in their families, (1 Kings 1:5)...
Haggai - His name signifies a feast of the Lord, from Chagag, a feast; and Jah, the Lord
Juda - One of the brethren of the Lord, Mark 6:3 : called JUDAS in Matthew 13:55 . Son of Joanna, and son of Joseph, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Enos - In his time "men began to call upon the name of the Lord" (Genesis 4:26 ), meaning either (1) then began men to call themselves by the name of the Lord (marg. , to distinguish themselves thereby from idolaters; or (2) then men in some public and earnest way began to call upon the Lord, indicating a time of spiritual revival
Habaiah - The hiding of the Lord
c.j.d. - = Canons of Jesus the Lord ...
Hashabiah - The estimation of the Lord
Hasadiah - The mercy of the Lord
Baalis - A rejoicing; a proud Lord
Baalath - A rejoicing; our proud Lord
Baali - My idol; Lord over me
Ahaziah - Seizure; vision of the Lord
Berachiah - Speaking well of the Lord
Beraiah - The choosing of the Lord
Hodaiah - The praise of the Lord
Hoshaiah - The salvation of the Lord
Hizkijah - The strength of the Lord
Amaziah - The strength of the Lord
Adiel - The witness of the Lord
Hachaliah - Who waits for the Lord
Zibiah - The Lord dwells; deer; goat
Zephaniah - The Lord is my secret
Jehudijah - The praise of the Lord
Nehemiah - Consolation; repentance of the Lord
Joah - Fraternity; brother of the Lord
Azariah - He that hears the Lord
Neriah - Light; lamp of the Lord
Bukkiah - The dissipation of the Lord
Remaliah - The exaltation of the Lord
Mattathias - The gift of the Lord
Nethaniah - The gift of the Lord
Abiah - The Lord is my father
Abijah - The Lord is my father
Adonijah - The Lord is my master
Jotham - The perfection of the Lord
Dalaiah - The poor of the Lord
Delaiah - The poor of the Lord
Athaliah - The time of the Lord
Adaiah - The witness of the Lord
Maaseiah - The work of the Lord
Ishmaiah - Hearing or obeying the Lord
Irijah - The fear of the Lord
Igdaliah - The greatness of the Lord
Isaiah - The salvation of the Lord
Jahaziah - The vision of the Lord
Jaazaniah - Whom the Lord will hear
Lorded - ) of Lord...
Hallelujah - (praise ye the Lord )
Elijah - Though the history of this highly favoured servant of the Lord would afford much improvement to enlarge upon, according to the Scripture testimony concerning him, yet it would swell this work to a size much beyond the limits intended, for the writer to indulge himself in it. Eli, my God; and Jah, the Lord. It would be thought presumptuous to call our children in the present hour by such names, in the plain English of the words, but with the Hebrews it was done in honour of the Lord God of their fathers. And so particular do the pious fathers of the Old Testament seem to have been, in naming their children, that they studied to give them such as might have some allusion to the Lord, or to retain one of the letters of JEHOVAH in them. If I venture to add another observation concerning this great man, it would be but just to remark, that in that memorable prophecy of Malachi, concerning the coming of Elijah before the day of Christ, (Malachi 4:5) though our Lord explained this to his disciples, in making reference to the spirit of Elias in the person of John the baptist, (Matthew 17:11-12) yet our Lord did not limit the coming of Elijah to that season only. The Evangelists, in describing the transfiguration of the Lord Jesus, relate that Elijah and Moses were present at the solemn scene. (Matthew 17:3-4) And there doth not seem an objection, wherefore Elijah may not again appear before the Lord Jesus comes in glory, as is supposed, he will in his reign upon earth. The expression of Malachi seems to warrant this conclusion, for it is said, that this mission of Elijah will be "before the great and dreadful day of the Lord. Whereas, the second coming is uniformly spoken of as the terrible day of the Lord. For while it will be "to be glorified in his saints, and to be admired in all them that believe," it is no less said to be "in flaming fire, taking vengeance on them that know not God, and that obey not the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ
Maranatha - The Lord comes or has come a word used by the apostle Paul in expressing a curse. This word was used in anathematizing persons for great crimes as much as to say, "may the Lord come quickly to take vengeance on thee for thy crimes
Zedekiah - There are several of this name in Scripture; and it is no wonder, being a compound of Zedek, justice—and Jah, Lord. The Lord is my judge
Hilkiah - The father of Eliakim, (2 Kings 18:18) His name signifies, the Lord is my portion, from Cheleath, a portion; and Jah, the Lord
Er - Er "was wicked in the sight of the Lord; and the Lord slew him
Joanna - Son of Rhesa in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus. Wife of Chuza, Herod's steward: she ministered to the Lord of her substance, and was one who carried news of His resurrection to the apostles
Lord - Âdôn (אָדֹן, Strong's #113), or 'Âdônay (אָדֹן, Strong's #113), “lord; master; Lord. ...
Basically, 'âdôn means “lord” or “master. ” 'Âdôn basically describes the one who occupies the position of a “master” or “lord” over a slave or servant: “And the servant put his hand under the thigh of Abraham his master …” ( Lord of all his house, and a ruler throughout all the land of Egypt” ( Lord Esau” ( Lord return unto him” ( Lord-vassal or master-servant relationship ( Lord God” ( Lord of Lords”; Lord God, what wilt thou give me, seeing I go childless,. ...
Yehôvâh (יהוה, Strong's #3068), “Lord. 2:4
: “These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens. , man as a weak and dependent creature) and began (along with all other pious persons) to call upon (formally worship) the name of YHWH, “the Lord” ( Lord [2] God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath sent me unto you: this is my name for ever, and this is my memorial unto all generations. Go, and gather the elders of Israel together, and say unto them, The Lord [2] God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob, appeared unto me, saying, I have surely visited you, and seen that which is done to you in Egypt: And I have said, I will bring you up out of the affliction of Egypt unto the land of the Canaanites …” ( Sir - In the English versions ‘lord’ (κύριε) is frequently used in the same sense (‘Lord, thou deliveredst unto me live talents,’ Matthew 25:20; Matthew 25:22; Matthew 25:24; ‘Lord, let it alone this year also,’ Luke 13:8; Luke 14:22; Luke 19:16; Luke 19:18; Luke 19:20). It is also a term frequently employed in addressing Jesus, both by disciples and others (‘Lord, if thou wilt thou canst make me clean,’ Matthew 8:2, John 11:12); so the woman of Samaria says to Jesus, ‘Sir, thou hast nothing to draw with’ (John 4:11). Lord
Beelzebub, - The meaning of this word is much disputed, some associate it with BAAL-ZEBUB 'lord of the fly,' in the O. , but others believe it to be a term of contempt, signifying 'lord of dung. ' The Jews, who blasphemously charged the Lord with casting out demons by Beelzebul (as it should be spelled), call him 'the prince of the demons,' which sufficiently explains their meaning to be that the one who was the head of those demons enabled the Lord to cast them out. The Lord shows the folly of supposing that the same evil one who was seeking to build up a kingdom should be at the same time the means of pulling it down
Lord, Lordship - A — 1: κύριος (Strong's #2962 — Noun Masculine — kurios — koo'-ree-os ) properly an adjective, signifying "having power" (kuros) or "authority," is used as a noun, variously translated in the NT, "'Lord,' 'master,' 'Master,' 'owner,' 'Sir,' a title of wide significance, occurring in each book of the NT save Titus and the Epistles of John. Isaiah 26:13 ; (e) as a title of respect addressed to a father, Matthew 21:30 , a husband, 1 Peter 3:6 , a master, Matthew 13:27 ; Luke 13:8 , a ruler, Matthew 27:63 , an angel, Acts 10:4 ; Revelation 7:14 ; (f) as a title of courtesy addressed to a stranger, John 12:21 ; 20:15 ; Acts 16:30 ; from the outset of His ministry this was a common form of address to the Lord Jesus, alike by the people, Matthew 8:2 ; John 4:11 , and by His disciples, Matthew 8:25 ; Luke 5:8 ; John 6:68 ; (g) kurios is the Sept. Jehovah ('Lord' in Eng. , of adon, Lord, Matthew 22:44 , and of Adonay, Lord, Matthew 1:22 ; it also occurs for Elohim, God, 1 Peter 1:25 . Thomas, when he realized the significance of the presence of a mortal wound in the body of a living man, immediately joined with it the absolute title of Deity, saying, 'My Lord and my God,' John 20:28 . Thereafter, except in Acts 10:4 ; Revelation 7:14 , there is no record that kurios was ever again used by believers in addressing any save God and the Lord Jesus; cp. ...
"How soon and how completely the lower meaning had been superseded is seen in Peter's declaration in his first sermon after the resurrection, 'God hath made Him, Lord,' Acts 2:36 , and that in the house of Cornelius, 'He is Lord of all,' Acts 10:36 ; cp. Thus Psalm 34:8 , 'O taste and see that Jehovah is good,' is applied to the Lord Jesus, 1 Peter 2:3 , and 'Jehovah of Hosts, Him shall ye sanctify,' Isaiah 8:13 , becomes 'sanctify in your hearts Christ as Lord,' 1 Peter 3:15 . James 1:5 ); 3:9 ; 4:15 ; 5:4,10,11 , and of the Lord Jesus, James 1:1 (where the possibility that kai is intended epexegetically, i. , 'our Lord Jesus Christ of glory,' cp. ...
"Jude, Jude 1:4 , speaks of 'our only--Lord, Jesus Christ,' and immediately, Jude 1:5 , uses 'Lord' of God (see the remarkable marg. ...
"Paul ordinarily uses kurios of the Lord Jesus, 1 Corinthians 1:3 , e. It is equally appropriate to either in 1 Corinthians 7:25 ; 2 Corinthians 3:16 ; 8:21 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:6 , and if 1 Corinthians 11:32 is to be interpreted by 1 Corinthians 10:21,22 , the Lord Jesus is intended, but if by Hebrews 12:5-9 , then kurios here also = God. 1 Timothy 6:15,16 is probably to be understood of the Lord Jesus, cp. ...
"Though John does not use 'Lord' in his Epistles, and though, like the other Evangelists, he ordinarily uses the personal Name in his narrative, yet he occasionally speaks of Him as 'the Lord,' John 4:1 ; 6:23 ; 11:2 ; 20:20 ; 21:12 . ...
"The full significance of this association of Jesus with God under the one appellation, 'Lord,' is seen when it is remembered that these men belonged to the only monotheistic race in the world. ...
"It is not recorded that in the days of His flesh any of His disciples either addressed the Lord, or spoke of Him, by His personal Name. Where Paul has occasion to refer to the facts of the Gospel history he speaks of what the Lord Jesus said, Acts 20:35 , and did, 1 Corinthians 11:23 , and suffered, 1 Thessalonians 2:15 ; 5:9,10 . It is our Lord Jesus who is coming, 1 Thessalonians 2:19 , etc. In prayer also the title is given, 1 Thessalonians 3:11 ; Ephesians 1:3 ; the sinner is invited to believe on the Lord Jesus, Acts 16:31 ; 20:21 , and the saint to look to the Lord Jesus for deliverance, Romans 7:24,25 , and in the few exceptional cases in which the personal Name stands alone a reason is always discernible in the immediate context. ...
"The title 'Lord,' as given to the Savior, in its full significance rests upon the resurrection, Acts 2:36 ; Romans 10:9 ; 14:9 , and is realized only in the Holy Spirit, 1 Corinthians 12:3 . ]'>[1] ...
A — 2: δεσπότης (Strong's #1203 — Noun Masculine — despotes — des-pot'-ace ) "a master, Lord, one who possesses supreme authority," is used in personal address to God in Luke 2:29 ; Acts 4:24 ; Revelation 6:10 ; with reference to Christ, 2 Peter 2:1 ; Jude 1:4 ; elsewhere it is translated "master," "masters," 1 Timothy 6:1,2 ; 2 Timothy 2:21 (of Christ); Titus 2:9 ; 1 Peter 2:18 . ...
Note: For rabboni, rendered "Lord" in the AV of Mark 10:51 , see RABBONI. ...
A — 3: μεγιστάν (Strong's #3175 — Noun Masculine — megistan — meg-is-tan'-es ) akin to megistos, "greatest," the superlative degree of megas, "great," denotes "chief men, nobles;" it is rendered "lords" in Mark 6:21 , of nobles in Herod's entourage; "princes" in Revelation 6:15 ; 18:23 , RV (AV, "great men"). ...
B — 1: κυριεύω (Strong's #2961 — Verb — kurieuo — koo-ree-yoo'-o ) denotes "to be Lord of, to exercise Lordship over," Luke 22:25 ; Romans 6:9,14 ; 7:1 ; 14:9 ; 2 Corinthians 1:24 ; 1 Peter 5:3 , RV: see DOMINION , B, No. 1), signifies "pertaining to a Lord or master;" "lordly" is not a legitimate rendering for its use in the NT, where it is used only of Christ; in 1 Corinthians 11:20 , of the Lord's Supper, or the Supper of the Lord (see FEAST); in Revelation 1:10 , of the Day of the Lord (see DAY , No
Just, the - Our Lord, according to Acts 3
Jehoadah - Passing over; testimony of the Lord
Christophany - See Angel of the Lord ; Theophany ...
...
Gemariah - Accomplishment or perfection of the Lord
Hananiah - Grace; mercy; gift of the Lord
Pekahiah - It is the Lord that opens
Holy One, the - Our Lord, according to Acts 3
Seigniorize - ) To Lord it over
Zeruiah - Pain or tribulation of the Lord
Arimathea - A lion dead to the Lord
Joanna - Grace or gift of the Lord
Azaniah - Hearing the Lord; the Lord's weapons
Rephaiah - Medicine or refreshment of the Lord
Shehariah - Mourning or blackness of the Lord
Sharai - My Lord; my prince; my song
Maadiah - Pleasantness; the testimony of the Lord
Nedabiah - Prince or vow of the Lord
Joakim - Rising or establishing of the Lord
Reelaiah - Shepherd or companion to the Lord
Shemaiah - That hears or obeys the Lord
Judah - The praise of the Lord; confession
Shamariah - Throne or keeping of the Lord
Kelaiah - Voice of the Lord; gathering together
a.d. - = Anno Domini (year of the Lord) ...
Lordling - ) A little or insignificant Lord
Elisabeth - The first to bless Mary as "the mother of her Lord" (Luke 1:40-45). Thus, our Lord, though not of the priestly tribe, was related to it; He fulfilled it, in His distinct priesthood of the Melchizedek order. Like her husband, Elisabeth was "righteous before God, walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless
Baali - (bay' uhl i) Form of address meaning, “my Lord,” or “my Baal. He said Israel, the bride, would refer to Yahweh, her God and husband, as “my man” (Hebrew, ishi ) but not as “my Lord” (Hebrew, baali ). Even though baal was a common word for Lord or husband, Israel could not use it because it reminded them too easily of Baal, the Canaanite god
Agrapha - Sayings (not discourses) attributed to Our Lord that have come down to us through channels outside the canonical Gospels, one, for instance, in Acts 20:35: "Remember the word of the Lord Jesus, how He said: It is a more blessed thing to give, rather than to receive
Closet - Matthew 6:6 (b) This is any quiet place where one may retire from the busy world to be alone with the Lord. ...
Luke 12:3 (b) Here is a figure to describe that the secret things of life shall become public property in the sight of the Lord
Jehoshaphat - (1 Kings 22:42) His name meaneth, the Lord judgeth; from Shephat, to judge; and Jab, the Lord
Baal - )...
I cannot take a more effectual method to shew the Lord's watchful care over his Israel, to preserve them from this contagion, than what the Lord himself hath manifested in that beautiful chapter, the second of the prophecy of Hosea. If the reader will turn to it, and peruse it from beginning to end, he will observe, that at that time the tribes of the Lord were much disposed to idolatry. The Lord sets himself therefore to bring them back, and in opening to them the prospects of salvation, shews how he will bring them under afflictions, in wilderness dispensations, and then having hedged their way up with thorns, compels them, by his grace, to return to him their first lover. "And it shall be in that day, saith the Lord, that thou shalt call me Ishi, and shalt call me no more Baali. The reader will have a full apprehension of the grace and loving kindness of the Lord in this ordination, when he is told, that as the word Baal, Lord; or Baali, my Lord, was a general name to imply Lordship, or sovereignty: the Lord JEHOVAH had been considered as Israel's Baal, to distinguish him from the nations' Baal around. But as there was not distinction enough in those general names, to preserve Israel in a proper sense of reverence between JEHOVAH, and those dunghill gods, being all alike called Baal, or Lord; the Lord graciously saith, in this sweet Scripture, that he will be no more called Baal, but will lose as it were, the name of Lord, in that of husband. And when he hath duly contemplated the unequalled subject, let him add to it the farther consideration, how the Lord Jesus Christ hath really, and indeed, fulfilled all he here promised, in becoming the Husband of his church and people. Hence the prophet sings, "For thy Maker is thine husband, the Lord of hosts is his name: and thy Redeemer the Holy One of Israel, the God of the whole earth shall he be called
Gaddiel - Goat of God; the Lord my happiness
Antothijah - Answers or songs of the Lord; afflictions
Josiphiah - Increase of the Lord; the Lord's finishing
John - The grace or mercy of the Lord
Jeshohaia - The Lord pressing; the meditation of God
Author of Life, the - Title of Our Lord (Acts 3:15) ...
Heriot - ) Formerly, a payment or tribute of arms or military accouterments, or the best beast, or chattel, due to the Lord on the death of a tenant; in modern use, a customary tribute of goods or chattels to the Lord of the fee, paid on the decease of a tenant
Love - This word seems to require explanation only in the case of its use by our Lord in his interview with "Simon, the son of Jonas," after his resurrection (John 21:16,17 ). When our Lord says, "Lovest thou me?" he uses the Greek word Agapas ; And when Simon answers, he uses the Greek word Philo , I. " This is the usage in the first and second questions put by our Lord; but in the third our Lord uses Simon's word. agapas) on the lips of the Lord seems to Peter at this moment too cold a word, as though his Lord were keeping him at a distance, or at least not inviting him to draw near, as in the passionate yearning of his heart he desired now to do. And now he has conquered; for when the Lord demands a third time whether he loves him, he does it in the word which alone will satisfy Peter ('Lovest thou,' Gr
d.n.j.c. - = Dominus Noster Jesus Christus (Our Lord Jesus Christ)
Habazinaiah - A hiding of the shield of the Lord
Father of the World to Come - Title of Our Lord in Isaias 9:6
Day of Christ - See Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the ...
...
Jehonathan - Gift of the Lord; gift of a dove
Great Pastor of the Sheep - Title given Our Lord Jesus Christ (Hebrews 13)
Adoni-Bezek - The Lord of Bezek (Judges 1:4-5)...
Canon of Scripture - The Psalms, divided into five books to correspond with it, begin, "Blessed is the man" whose "delight is in the law of the Lord; and in His law will he meditate day and night. " In Joshua (Joshua 1:8) similarly the Lord saith, "this book of the law shall not depart out of thy mouth, but thou shalt meditate therein day and night. " Moses directed the Levites, "Take this book of the law, and put it in the side of the ark of the covenant of the Lord your God" (Deuteronomy 31:25-26). ...
Hilkiah "found the book of the law in the house of the Lord," where it had lain neglected during the reigns that preceded godly Josiah's reign (2 Kings 22:8; 2 Chronicles 34:14), "the law of the Lord by (the hand of) Moses. " The earlier sacred writings by his time seem to have been gathered into one whole, called "the book of the Lord": "seek ye out of the book of the Lord" (Isaiah 33:16; Isaiah 29:18). Just as our Lord saith" Search the Scriptures" (John 5:39)
Scorpion - When we consider the wilderness-state through which the Lord brought the church after coming out of Egypt, and hear what the Lord saith to his people concerning his care over them there, it is very blessed to trace a subject so abundantly interesting. "Who led thee (saith the Lord) through that great and terrible wilderness, wherein were fiery serpents, and scorpions, and drought, where there was no water. Though the scorpion is not a large animal, yet its bite, unless restrained by the Lord, was sure death. And as the scorpion had two eyes at each extremity, and one species of scorpions possessed wings like the locusts, what could be more formidable to the traveller through the hot, sultry, unwatered wilderness!...
What a sweet thought is it to the church of Christ, that as this as a figure of the present life, it is Jesus that now speaks to his people in the same gracious language, while they are going home through their eventful pilgrimage! What scorpions, what fiery flying serpents, do they meet with in every part of their warfare! "Behold, (saith the Lord Jesus) I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy, and nothing shall by any means hurt you. "No weapon formed against them can prosper; and every tongue that shall rise against them in judgment the Lord will condemn. This is the heritage of the servants of the Lord; and their righteousness is of me, saith the Lord
Beelzebub - ), the god of Ekron, meaning "the Lord of flies," or, as others think, "the Lord of dung," or "the dung-god
Bridegroom - Isaiah 61:10 (a) In this and in other passages, the Bridegroom is the Lord JESUS Himself. In the Old Testament, the Bride is Israel and the Bridegroom is the Father, but in the New Testament, the Bride is the church, and the Bridegroom is the Lord JESUS
Arm of the Lord - Thus the prophet calls upon the Lord to arise for his people. (Isaiah 50:9) And thus the Lord promiseth, under this character, to make bare his holy arm; that is, to reveal Christ
Nadab - He offered incense to the Lord with strange fire, that is, with common fire, and not with that which had been miraculously lighted upon the altar, of burnt-offerings. Therefore, he was slam by the Lord, together with his brother Abihu, Leviticus 10:1 , &c
Stakes - Isaiah 33:20 (c) By this lovely type we learn how secure is that one who belongs to the Lord JESUS CHRIST and is kept by the power of GOD through faith unto salvation. ...
Isaiah 54:2 (b) Probably we learn from this interesting type that the Lord wants us to constantly strengthen our faith through reading His Word, learning all that CHRIST has done for us, and all that He means to us. Faith is strengthened as we learn from the Scriptures the many things the Lord JESUS does for the soul who trusts Him
Breath - This word is sometimes made use of in Scripture in allusion to the Lord Jesus Christ. Hence, the prophet Jeremiah, in reference to Christ, saith, "the breath of our nostrils, the Anointed of the Lord was taken in their pits. " (Lamentations 4:20) And hence, when the Lord Jesus, after his resurrection, imparted to his disciples the gracious influences of his Spirit, it is said, that "he breathed on them, and said, Receive ye the Holy Ghost
First-Begotten of the Dead - Our Lord (Apocalypse 1:5), because of His Resurrection
Sabaoth - See God, 2 ( h ), and Lord of Hosts
End, End Time - See Day ; Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the ...
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Chiefrie - ) A small rent paid to the Lord paramount
Amminadab - —An ancestor of our Lord, Matthew 1:4
Feast of the Circumcision - January 1, commemorates the occasion when this rite of the Jewish religion was received by Our Lord, eight days after His birth. The Mass and Office give prominence to the part the Mother of Our Lord has in the work of Redemption
New Year's Day - January 1, commemorates the occasion when this rite of the Jewish religion was received by Our Lord, eight days after His birth. The Mass and Office give prominence to the part the Mother of Our Lord has in the work of Redemption
Wisdom - Proverbs 8:12 (b) It is quite clear that this word is used to describe the Lord JESUS CHRIST Himself. It is a lovely picture of our wonderful Lord in His pre-natal glory
Maranatha - ) "Our Lord cometh;" - an expression used by St. This word has been used in anathematizing persons for great crimes; as much as to say, "May the Lord come quickly to take vengeance of thy crimes
Semei - Mentioned in the genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:26 )
Byronic - ) Pertaining to, or in the style of, Lord Byron
Shelah - —A Judahite ancestor of our Lord (Luke 3:35)
Seniorize - ) To exercise authority; to rule; to Lord it
Seignioralty - ) The territory or authority of a seignior, or Lord
Lordolatry - ) Worship of, or reverence for, a Lord as such
Backsliding - The common received opinion concerning backsliding is, that it is turning back, or going away, from the Lord. The Lord himself, by his servant the prophet Hosea, makes use of a simile, which seems to explain the meaning, "Israel (saith the Lord) slideth back as a backsliding heifer. "Now the Lord will feed them as a lamb in a large place. " So that the Lord undertakes to preserve Israel from sliding back, by putting his people in a roomy place, where the ground shall not be slippery. The Lord pardon me if I err. One thing, however, is certain, the recovery of all backsliding is of the Lord; and his promise to his people, on this subject, is most blessed
Day of the Lord - the day of the Lord is great and very terrible. "The day of the Lord so cometh as a thief in the night; for when they shall say, Peace and safety; then sudden destruction cometh upon them. "The day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night; in the which the heavens shall pass away with a great noise, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat, the earth also and the works that are therein shall be burned up. ...
It is important to keep the 'day' quite distinct from the coming of the Lord to fetch His saints; for many have misapplied the term, and it has been constantly asserted that the Second Epistle to the Thessalonians was written to show the saints that it was wrong to be expecting the return of the Lord; whereas the fact is they thought the day of the Lord had come (though the First Epistle keeps the two things quite distinct: compare 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 with 1 Thessalonians 5:1-4 ), and this could not come until Antichrist was revealed. There will be judgements before the millennium, and there will be judgements after the millennium, so that we may regard the Day of the Lord as extending through the millennium: it will be 'the Lord's' day in contrast to 'man's' day
Lord (2) - LORD. This word occurs only once in the Gospels, in the prayer of Simeon, ‘Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word’ (Luke 2:29). This word also occurs but once in the Gospels, in Mark 6:21 ‘Herod … made a supper to his Lords. Except in the above instances, this is the word which stands for ‘Lord’ and ‘lord’ in the Gospels. It is found in quotations from the OT, as ‘Thou shalt not tempt (the) Lord thy God’ (Matthew 4:7); and in phrases of OT origin, as ‘the angel of (the) Lord’ (Matthew 1:20 || Luke 1:11); ‘the law of (the) Lord’ (Mark 16:19-206); ‘the power of (the) Lord’ (Luke 5:17). It is noteworthy that the only instances in the Gospels where the title is used in direct address to God, are found in the prayers of Jesus: ‘I thank thee, Father, Lord of heaven and earth’ (Matthew 11:25 || Luke 10:21). ‘Perform unto the Lord thine oaths’ (Matthew 5:33); ‘Tell how great things the Lord hath done for thee’ (Mark 5:19); ‘Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest’ (Luke 10:2). (1) Without the article, it is employed in direct address, as the salutation of a son to a father, ‘I go, sir’ (Matthew 21:30); of servants to their master, ‘Sir, didst not thou sow good seed in thy field?’ (Matthew 13:27); ‘Lord, let it alone this year also’ (Luke 2:237); of the Greeks to Philip, ‘Sir, we would see Jesus’ (John 12:21); of the Pharisees and priests to Pilate, ‘Sir, we remember that this deceiver said’ (Matthew 27:63). (2) With the article, it is a frequent name for a master or owner, as ‘the Lord of the vineyard’ (Matthew 20:8), ‘the Lord of that servant’ (Luke 12:46), ‘the servant knoweth not what his Lord doeth’ (John 15:15). In Luke 16:8 it is the ‘lord’ of the unjust steward who commended his dishonest method of providing for himself. ...
(1) Without the article, it is used (a) by His disciples, as ‘Lord, if it be thou, bid me come unto thee on the water’ (Matthew 14:28). (b) By others than disciples, as ‘Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean’ (Matthew 8:2). it is employed only once in this relation, by the Syrophœnician woman, ‘Yes, Lord’ (Mark 7:28). (c) By Jesus Himself, as ‘Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 7:21). (d) It is also found in the words of the angel to the shepherds, ‘Unto you is born this day … a Saviour, who is Christ (the) Lord’ (Luke 2:11). 34, 35, notes) says it is probably to be interpreted on the basis of אדני Psalms 110:1 (‘The Lord said unto my Lord’), but adds that Schürer, Ewald, Wellhausen, and W. Smith regard the phrase in Ps-Sol as a mistranslation of סשיח יהוה (‘Anointed of (the) Lord,’—a phrase which is found in Luke 2:26’ (the) Lord’s Christ’). We agree with him in regarding κύριος (Lord) as a word added by the Evangelist to interpret the Jewish title Messiah (χριστός) to his Gentile readers. In Acts 2:36 the phrase ‘God hath made that same Jesus … both Lord and Christ’ (κύριον καὶ χριστόν), is to be explained in the same way. ‘Lord’ is an addition by the Evangelist, to interpret ‘Christ’ to Gentile Christians. We may add that the same necessity of interpreting ‘Christ’ to Gentiles accounts for the curious phrase in the address of Peter to Cornelius, which has been found so difficult—‘Jesus Christ (he is Lord of all, πάντων κύριος),’ Acts 10:36. the words of Paul and Silas to the Philippian jailer as they are given in אAB, and accepted by Westcott and Hort, Tischendorf, and other critical editors, ‘Believe on the Lord Jesus (i. believe on Jesus as Lord), and thou shalt be saved,’ Acts 16:31. Also, ‘No man can say that Jesus is Lord but by the Holy Ghost’ (1 Corinthians 12:3), and ‘every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father,’ Philippians 2:11). To the Jewish Christian, Jesus was the ‘Messiah,’ to the Hellenistic Christian Jew He was ‘the Christ,’ and to the Gentile Christian He was ‘the Lord. ’ The Hellenistic and Gentile terms are combined in our familiar name ‘the Lord Jesus Christ. ’ The interpretation of ‘Christ’ as ‘Lord’ enables us to understand that the essential idea of the first term is that of Sovereignty or Lordship. The Saviour is the Lord, the Possessor and Ruler of the Kingdom of God. ‘Oriental religions are fond of expressing the relationship between the divinity and the devotee, as that of the “Lord” or “Lady” to a slave’ (Deissmann). ...
(2) With the article, the title is applied to Jesus (a) by Himself, directly, as ‘Ye call me Master and Lord’ (more literally, ‘the Teacher and the Lord’) (John 13:13), and indirectly, as ‘(The) Lord said unto my Lord (τῷ κυρίῳ μου), Sit thou on my right hand till I make thine enemies thy footstool’ (Matthew 22:44). are found in passages which are peculiar to that Gospel, as ‘the Lord appointed other seventy’ (Luke 10:1). The adoring cry of Thomas, ‘My Lord and my God’ (ὁ κύριός μου καὶ ὁ θεός μου) John 20:28, is an illustration of how among Jewish Christians the title of respect addressed to a teacher became one of Divine honour. Yet, as Dalman says, ‘it must … be remembered that the Aramaic-speaking Jews did not, save exceptionally, designate God as “Lord,” so that in the Hebraic section of the Jewish Christians the expression “our Lord” was used in reference to Jesus only, and would be quite freh from ambiguity’ (p. Matthew 8:25 (κύριε) ‘Lord, save us: we perish. Matthew 17:4 (κύριε) ‘Lord, it is good for us to be here. Matthew 26:22 (κύριε) ‘Is it I, Lord?’...
Matthew 26:25 (Ραββει) ‘Is it I, Rabbi?’...
John 13:25 (κύριε) ‘Lord, who is it?’...
The variety in the title used in addressing Jesus is not confined to the parallel passages. represents the eleven disciples as asking, ‘Is it I, Lord?’ while Judas, the traitor, says, ‘Is it I, Rabbi?’ (Matthew 26:22; Matthew 26:25). There must also be some difference of feeling in the use of different titles in Luke 5:5 ‘Master (teacher, ἐπιστάτα), we have toiled all night’; and Luke 5:8, where Peter, after the miraculous draught of fishes, falls at the fect of Jesus with the cry, ‘Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord’ (κύριε). ‘ye call me Master (teacher) and Lord,’ John 13:13, and the frequent use of ‘Rabbi’ in the Gospels. As to the title κύριος (Lord), which is used so frequently in addressing Jesus, it is most probably a translation of מָרִי or מָרַנָא. It is very unlikely that it was in use among Aramaic-speaking Jews at the time of our Lord. In reading the Scriptures in the synagogue in Hebrew, the name ארני (Lord) was read wherever the sacred name יהוה was found in the text. In phrases of OT origin like ‘the angel of (the) Lord,’ the name of God was entirely omitted or merely hinted at
Jairus, Daughter of - Child of a ruler of the synagogue, whom Our Lord raised to; life (Mark 5). " This is one of the few cases in whieh the Bible gives the words of Our Lord as He spoke them in His mother tongue
Nurture - ” To rear children “in the nurture and admonition of the Lord” is to discipline and correct them as the Lord would
Prune - Isaiah 5:6 (b) This describes the blessed action of the Lord in taking away from His people anything that would hinder them from being most fruitful. He sovereignly steps into the life of His child to cut off various things which have developed and which keep him from being all that the Lord wants him to be
Isaac - Genesis 22:9 (c) He is a type of the Lord JESUS being offered up by His own Father for the sins of man. He is also a type of the sinner who should be punished for his sins but who finds a substitute in the Lord JESUS, represented by the ram caught in the thicket
Sir - In Genesis 43:20 the word is adon, often translated 'Lord. the word is κύριος, commonly translated 'Lord': in these cases the context determines how it should be rendered
Jehovah - Hebrew text, however, represents scribe's efforts to prevent people from pronouncing the divine name by combining consonants of Yahweh and vowels of Hebrew word adonai (“Lord”) so readers would pronounce adonai rather than risk blasphemy by improperly pronouncing divine name. See God ; Lord ; Yahweh
Sadoc - Just, mentioned in the genealogy of our Lord (Matthew 1:14 )
Zithri - The Lord protects, a Levite, son of Uzziel (Exodus 6:22 )
Tob-Adonijah - My good God; the goodness of the foundation of the Lord
Teinland - ) Land granted by the crown to a thane or Lord
Maranatha - Composed of two Syriac words, signifying "the Lord cometh
Hallelujah - A Hebrew word, meaning "Praise the Lord"; same asALLELUIA (which see)
Face - Hence, when the church prayeth, "O Lord God, turn not away the face of thine Anointed;" that is, the person of thine Anointed. (2 Chronicles 6:42) So again, when it is said, "The face of the Lord is against them that do evil," it means, that the Lord himself is so. " (Genesis 48:11)...
Concerning the face of the Lord, it is said by the Lord to Moses, "Thou canst not see my face; for there shall no man see me and live. " And yet in the same chapter we are told, that "the Lord spake to Moses face to face, as a man speaketh to his friend. " (1 Corinthians 2:13)...
But every difficulty is at once removed concerning seeing the face of JEHOVAH, by considering the person of the Lord Jesus in his mediatorial character and office, as the visible JEHOVAH. (1 Samuel 3:21) "And the Lord appeared again in Shiloh; for the Lord revealed himself to Samuel in Shiloh, by the word of the Lord. " What word could this be but the uncreated Word, which was, in the after ages of the church, "made flesh, and dwelt among us?" (John 1:1-4) Surely, in these and numberless other instances, spoken of in the Old Testament Scripture, of JEHOVAH'S appearance, sometimes in the form of a man, and sometimes of an angel, the Lord Jesus is all along intended to be represented
Lamb of God - A title applied to Our Lord by Saint John the Baptist (John 1,29,36). The title suggests the idea of a victim offered for sins; it probably goes back to Isaias, 53,7, where the Servant of the Lord, i. " In 1Corinthians 5:7,1 Peter 1:19, however, Our Lord is called a "lamb", with reference to the paschal lamb; Saint John also regards the paschal lamb as symbolic of Christ, a victim for sin
Sab'Aoth, the Lord of, - occurs in (Romans 9:29 ; James 5:4 ) but is more familiar through its occurrence in the Sanctus of Te Deum --"Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of Sabaoth. " Sabaoth is the Greek form of the Hebrew word tsebaoth "armies," and is translated in the Authorized Version of the Old Testament by "Lord of hosts," "Lord God of hosts
Hope - Blessed is the man whose hope the Lord is; though troubles arise he will not cease to bear fruit. There is nothing vague in the Christian's hope: it is an anchor of the soul, sure and steadfast, because the Lord Himself is his hope, and Christ in him is the hope of glory. The coming of the Lord, and not death, is a blessed part of the Christian's hope
God, Lamb of - A title applied to Our Lord by Saint John the Baptist (John 1,29,36). The title suggests the idea of a victim offered for sins; it probably goes back to Isaias, 53,7, where the Servant of the Lord, i. " In 1Corinthians 5:7,1 Peter 1:19, however, Our Lord is called a "lamb", with reference to the paschal lamb; Saint John also regards the paschal lamb as symbolic of Christ, a victim for sin
Canticle - ...
Hear the word of the Lord, O ye nations. ...
O all ye works of the Lord, bless ye the Lord. ...
Blessed art thou, O Lord, the God of Israel, Our Father. ...
Blessed art thou, O Lord, the God of our fathers. ...
Let us sing unto the Lord: for He hath triumphed gloriously. ...
I will give thanks to Thee, O Lord, for Thou wast angry with me. ...
O Lord, I have heard Thy speech. ...
My heart rejoiceth in the Lord. ...
Let us sing a hymn to the Lord ...
Canticle of Judith, Judith 16:15-21. Wednesday at Lauds Lord. (I) ...
Magnus es, Domine, in aeternum;...
Thou art great, O Lord, forever ...
Canticle of Tobias, Tobias 13:1-10. ...
The Breviary also contains three canticles from the New Testament, the Benedictus, Magnificat, and Nunc Dimittis, respectively recited each day at Lauds, Vespers, and Compline: ...
Benedictus Dominus, Deus Israel...
Blessed be the Lord God of Israel. ...
My soul doth magnify the Lord. ...
Now Thou dost dismiss Thy servant, O Lord
Anathema - ...
Another kind of anathema, very peculiarly expressed, occurs 1 Corinthians 16:22 : "If any man love not the Lord Jesus Christ let him be Anathema, Maranatha. " This last word is made up of two Syriac words, signifying, "The Lord cometh," that is, the Lord will surely come, and will execute this curse, by condemning those who love him not. At the same time, the opposite is also implied, that is, the Lord cometh also to reward those who love him
Man, Son of - This term occurs 82 times in the Gospel and, except on one occasion, is always used by Our Lord. There can be no doubt that the term is genuine, and that by it Our Lord meant to designate Himself. Rather, Our Lord adopted the title both to reveal and to hide His messiasship. It was regarded by the Jews as messianic, and hence by applying it to Himself Our Lord to all appearances claimed to be the Messias; on the other hand, it did not bear that sinister anti-Roman meaning which the Jews had then given to other messianic titles
Israel - -Or more properly, as it is rendered, Ishrael, the name given to Jacob by the Lord himself, on his wrestling with God in prayer and prevailing. So again, Exodus 6:6-7) But what endears this name yet infinitely more is, that the Lord Jesus himself, as the glorious Head of his church and people, including both Jew and Gentile, calls himself by this name; and JEHOVAH doth the same by Christ. (See Isaiah 49:1-6 and Isaiah 44:1-5) And hence the whole church of the Lord Jesus are called Israelites. (Romans 9:4) and the Lord Jesus, when speaking of his sheep under one view, saith, that they shall be brought into "one fold under one shepherd
Son of Man - This term occurs 82 times in the Gospel and, except on one occasion, is always used by Our Lord. There can be no doubt that the term is genuine, and that by it Our Lord meant to designate Himself. Rather, Our Lord adopted the title both to reveal and to hide His messiasship. It was regarded by the Jews as messianic, and hence by applying it to Himself Our Lord to all appearances claimed to be the Messias; on the other hand, it did not bear that sinister anti-Roman meaning which the Jews had then given to other messianic titles
Beelzebul - The name meant ‘lord of flies’, probably because the local people believed this god gave the citizens of Ekron protection against disease-carrying flies that plagued the area. ...
By contrast other people interpreted the name in a bad sense – Lord of flies, and therefore Lord of filth. Satan was Beelzebul, for he was Lord of all things unclean, in particular unclean spirits, or demons (Mark 3:21-22; Luke 11:14-15)
Joseph, Son of - Our Lord, "as it was supposed", according to Saint Luke 3:23
Parousia - ) The nativity of our Lord
Unlord - ) To deprive of the rank or position of a Lord
Mat'Than - Son of Eleazar, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Son of Joseph - Our Lord, "as it was supposed", according to Saint Luke 3:23
Feasts or Festivals - Days set apart for the celebration of somegreat event connected with our Blessed Lord or His Saints, alsocalled Holy Days.   The Circumcision of our Lord. The Nativity of our Lord.   The Ascension of our Lord.   The Transfiguration of our Lord
Butter - The Lord is telling us in this passage that the blessings of the living GOD for and upon the one who daily trusts Him and loves His will will be copious and constant. The living Lord gives His richest blessings to His people who know Him as the living Lord. Those who have daily fellowship with the Lord JESUS in Heaven are said to be living an milk and honey. These are had because the living Lord of Heaven commands His daily blessing of His obedient child
Master, the - In John 13, Jesus claims to be the teacher of whom the disciples are the servants: He is the Master and the Lord. Mary uses the words "the Master" in speaking of Our Lord, John 11:28
Pekahiah - The Lord opened his eyes, the son and successor of Menahem on the throne of Israel. He "did that which was evil in the sight of the Lord
Lord of Lords - A title of Christ in Saint Paul's first letter to Timothy 6:15; also in the Apocalypse 11:14; the Lamb will overcome the coalitions of the future as He does these of the present because He is "Lord of Lords" and "King of Kings. " The two titles suitable only to God, are again given to Our Lord in Apocalypse 19:11
Lords, Lord of - A title of Christ in Saint Paul's first letter to Timothy 6:15; also in the Apocalypse 11:14; the Lamb will overcome the coalitions of the future as He does these of the present because He is "Lord of Lords" and "King of Kings. " The two titles suitable only to God, are again given to Our Lord in Apocalypse 19:11
Barrel - Those who walk with the Lord will always find that the Lord has blessings left for the believing and trusting soul
Joppa - The name signifies beauty—from Japhah, Here it was that Jonah went to flee from the presence of the Lord. (Jonah 1:3) Here Peter dwelt when sent for by Cornelius And Tabitha also lived here, whom Peter by the Lord raised from the dead
Manor - ) The land belonging to a Lord or nobleman, or so much land as a Lord or great personage kept in his own hands, for the use and subsistence of his family
Ebenezer - the name of that field wherein the Israelites were defeated by the Philistines, when the ark of the Lord was taken, 1 Samuel 4:1 ; also a memorial stone set up by Samuel to commemorate a victory over the Philistines. The word signifies the stone of help; and it was erected by the prophet, saying, "Hitherto the Lord hath helped us
Owner - 1: κύριος (Strong's #2962 — Noun Masculine — kurios — koo'-ree-os ) "one having power" (kuros) or "authority, a Lord, master," signifies "an owner" in Luke 19:33 . See Lord , MASTER , SIR
Samuel - A well-known and eminent prophet of the Lord. But the call of Samuel when a child to the knowledge of the Lord is so truly interesting, and forms a point of decline so intimately connected with the gospel of Christ, that I cannot wholly pass it by without begging the reader's permission to offer a short observation upon it. "And the child Samuel ministered unto the Lord before Eli. And the word of the Lord was precious in those days; there was no open vision. And ere the lamp of God went out in the temple of the Lord where the ark of God was, and Samuel was laid down to sleep, that the Lord called Samuel, and he answered, Here am I"...
There are a great number of very interesting things in this relation that I must not stay to dwell upon. The preciousness of the Lord's words, in this period of the church, when open visions were for a time suspended; the special grace shewn to Samuel in a season of general depravity, and when even the sons of Eli, who were priests of the Lord, were given up to a state of daring impiety end uncleanness; the childhood of Samuel, so particularly noted in the history, as if to encourage the youthful part of the Lord's people to be found waiting on the Lord in ordinances; all these, and more to the same purport, which this relation of the call of Samuel brings forward, would furnish much observation for improvement. Indeed, ye are told, in the seventh verse that, "Samuel did not yet know the Lord, neither was the word of the Lord revealed unto him. If we love him, it is because he first loved us, It was the Lord first called Samuel, yea, repeated that call, or Samuel never world have called upon the Lord. It was directed to Samuel, and to him in secret, and what the Lord said related to him personally. Who can mark the properties of distinguishing grace in their own case and circumstances without having the heart melted into the fullest sense of affection?"Lord "Lord how is it (said the astonished disciple) that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us and not unto the world. Both the time and place, the manner and effect, no doubt became like Bethel to Jacob, so that he could say with the patriarch, "Surely the Lord is in this place, and I knew it not. " (Genesis 28:11; Gen 28:17) I cannot prevail upon myself to dismiss our view of Samuel before that I have first requested the reader to remark with me some features in the portrait of this great prophet, which bear resemblance, however faint, to the person and offices of the Lord God of the prophets, Jesus Christ. And how earnestly was the Lord Jesus asked by the Old Testament saints before his coming! How blessedly did JEHOVAH, in the opening of Samuel's life, point to the Lord Jesus as the faithful Priest he would raise up, who should do according to all that was in his heart! (1 Samuel 2:35) And what a delightful view doth the prophet Samuel exhibit, as typical of the Lord Christ, under the several offices he sustained, not only as prophet, as Priest and as Judge in Israel!...
Rachab - Rahab, a name found in the genealogy of our Lord (Matthew 1:5 )
Azor - Son of Eliakim in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Cosam - Son of Elmodam in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Janna - Son of Joseph in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Heli - Son of Matthat in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Esli - Son of Nagge in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Sadoc - Son of Azor, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Semei - Son of Joseph, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Nagge - Son of Maath, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Maath - Son of Mattathias in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Eliud - Son of Achim in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Elmodam - Son of Er, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Naum - Son of Esli in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Menan - Son of Mattatha, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Neri - Son of Melchi, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Melea - Son of Menan, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Mattatha - Son of Nathan, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus, Luke 3:31
Manrent - ) Homage or service rendered to a superior, as to a Lord; vassalage
Harhai'ah - (the Lord is angry ), father of Uzziel
Jonan - Son of Eliakim in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Jose - Son of Eliezer in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Rhesa - Son of Zorobabel, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Rhesa - Affection, son of Zorobabel, mentioned in the genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:27 )
Zidkijah - The Lord is righteous, one who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah (Nehemiah 10:1 )
Bartimaeus - The blind beggar of Jericho, to whom the Lord gave sight
Susanna - ) One of the women who ministered to the Lord Jesus (Luke 8:3)
Cosam - —A name occurring in the Lukan genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:28)
Phalec - Son of Heber, mentioned in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Raglan - ) A loose overcoat with large sleeves; - named from Lord Raglan, an English general
Laird - ) A Lord; a landholder, esp
Marcher - ) The Lord or officer who defended the marches or borders of a territory
a'Zor - (a helper ), son of Eliakim, in the line of our Lord
Lordlike - ) Befitting or like a Lord; Lordly
Leaves (2) - The barren fig-tree was cursed by our Lord because it had leaves only (Matthew 21:19, Mark 11:13) and no fruit. We have here a type of religious profession unaccompanied by practice, a spiritual condition which always drew from our Lord the strongest condemnation. ...
The putting forth of leaves by the fig-tree is referred to by our Lord as one of the indications that summer is nigh (Matthew 24:32, Mark 13:28)
Irdle - No doubt it is primarily a prophecy concerning the Lord JESUS CHRIST. ...
Jeremiah 13:1,10 (a) The Lord tells us in this story that the girdle represents Israel in her decadence, her wickedness and weakness. ...
Revelation 1:13 (c) This golden garment over the heart or the breast of the Lord indicates the purity, beauty and value of the love of CHRIST for His people
Malchiah - Malchiah is a compound of Melek, a king; and Jah, the Lord; therefore Malchiah means, "the Lord rules, or the Lord is king
Huldah - Josiah consulted her on account of the book found in the house of the Lord. Tell the man that sent you, thus saith the Lord, "Behold, I will bring evil upon this place; but because thine heart was tender, and thou hast humbled thyself before the Lord, thine eyes shall not see all the evil which I will bring upon this place
Hannah - On occasion of one of these "yearly" visits, being grieved by reason of Peninnah's conduct toward her, she went forth alone, and kneeling before the Lord at the sanctuary she prayed inaudibly. Thereafter Elkanah and his family retired to their quiet home, and there, before another Passover, Hannah gave birth to a son, whom, in grateful memory of the Lord's goodness, she called Samuel, i. " After the child was weaned (probably in his third year) she brought him to Shiloh into the house of the Lord, and said to Eli the aged priest, "Oh my Lord, I am the woman that stood by thee here, praying unto the Lord. For this child I prayed; and the Lord hath given me my petition which I asked of him: therefore I also have granted him to the Lord; as long as he liveth he is granted to the Lord" (1 Samuel 1:27,28 , RSV). He was left at Shiloh to minister "before the Lord. "And the child Samuel grew before the Lord
Bride - Isaiah 62:5 (a) This is a term applied to Israel in the rejuvenation, when Israel returns to the Lord and CHRIST reigns in Jerusalem. ...
John 3:29 (a) This is a picture of the Lord's disciples and Himself. ...
Revelation 21:2 (a) This is a picture of the whole church of GOD gathered together in glory for the wonderful meeting with her Lord, the Bridegroom
Malchus - But our Lord cured it with a touch (Matthew 26:51 ; Mark 14:47 ; Luke 22:51 ). This was the last miracle of bodily cure wrought by our Lord
Bochim - This signifies 'weepers:' it was the place near Gilgal where an angel of the Lord charged the Israelites with having disobeyed God in making leagues with the inhabitants of the land, and in not throwing down their altars; and told them the results. The people wept and sacrificed to the Lord
Lattice - Song of Solomon 2:9 (c) It may be that this indicates an obscured vision of the Lord. We shall then see our lovely Lord clearly
Ephphatha - Whenever we read this miracle of the Lord Jesus, shall we not beg the Lord to say to us, as to this poor man, that all our spiritual faculties may be opened at his sovereign voice, and all unite in his praises?...
Lord - Jesus Christ, as the Messiah, the Son of God, and equal with the Father, is often called Lord in Scripture, especially in the writing of Paul. The word Lord , in the English Bible, when printed in small capitals, stands always for JEHOVAH in the Hebrew
Angel, Thy Holy - Name applied to Our Lord in the Mass, in the third prayer after the Consecration
Ophel - The name of a wall in the house of the Lord
Maranatha - An Aramaic expression signifying "Our Lord will come
Last Things - See Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the ; Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times ...
...
Jannai - —One of the links in the Lukan genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:24)
Servant (2) - Service, Slave; and for ‘Servant of the Lord’ see Prophet, p
Achim - ACHIM (perhaps a shortened form of Jehoiachim ), an ancestor of our Lord ( Matthew 1:14 )
Ezekias - The Greek form of Hezekiah, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Milord - , my Lord; hence (as used on the Continent), an English nobleman or gentleman
ss.d.n. - = Sanctissimus Dominus Noster (Our Most Holy Lord [1]; also a title of the pope) ...
Thy Holy Angel - Name applied to Our Lord in the Mass, in the third prayer after the Consecration
Hiss - And the Lord declared, that if the people departed from following him, he would cause the house which Solomon had built for the Lord to become a proverb and a bye-word, and men should hiss at it as they passed by. (1 Kings 9:7-8) But, beside this acceptation of the word, certain it is, that it is also used in a favourable point of view, and sometimes means the call of the Lord to his ministers and messengers, for the performing his sovereign will and pleasure. Thus the Lord saith, that he will "lift up an ensign to the nations from far, and will hiss unto them, that is, will call them from the end of the earth. " (Isaiah 5:26) So again the bee of Egypt, and the bee of Assyria, meaning the armies of those nations, the Lord saith, he will hiss for: that is, will call them. (Isaiah 7:18) But the ultimate object of this hissing of the Lord, in his sovereign command, is, to bring on the perpetual reproach of the ungodly
Admiration - We may apply the words of the Lord upon another occasion, and say,"Because it is marvellous in the eyes of the remnant of the people, should it be also marvellous in mine eyes, saith the Lord of hosts?" (Zechariah 8:6) The Hebrew word, in this instance, is the same as that given of Christ by the prophet, (Isaiah 9:6) when he calls him Wonderful. Hence in like manner, the Lord is said to shew his marvellous loving kindness. (Psalms 17:7) So that it is marvellous, and it is to the admiration of his people and of all that look on, when the Lord by his grace distinguisheth them from others. They are men wondered at, (Zechariah 3:8) In this sense, the Lord Jesus admired and praised, it may be said, by the notice he took of it, the faith of the centurion, and the faith of the woman of Canaan
James, Son of Zebedee - He at once forsook all and followed the Lord. James and his brother were named by the Lord BOANERGES, 'sons of thunder. ...
Peter, James, and John were privileged by the Lord to attend Him on several occasions, as on the mount of transfiguration. The mother of James and John requestedthat her two sons might sit, the one on the right hand and the other on the left of the Lord in His kingdom. This raised the indignation of the other disciples; but the Lord taught them all a lesson of humility: He Himself had come to minister and to give His life a ransom for many
Harvest And Few Laborers, Parable of the - Parable of Our Lord occurring in the Gospels of Saint Matthew 9, and Saint Luke 10, in slightly different settings. In the former it is a reflection of Our Lord saddened at the sight of the multitude but poorly cared for by their spiritual guides; in the latter it is a part of the instruction given to the 72 disciples as a preparation for their mission as forerunners of Jesus. It is very probable that Our Lord uttered this entreaty more than once and in different circumstances. In any case the meaning is the same: God, the Father, or even Christ Himself, is the Lord of the Harvest, the field is the world, the crops to be harvested are first the Jewish people, then the Gentiles, the laborers the Apostles, their workers, and successors
Parable - It was a method of teaching common in the eastern part of the world, and hence all the sacred writers and servants of the Lord adopted it. Yea; the Lord Jesus himself condescended to the same; and indeed so much so that at one time we are told, "without a parable spake he not unto them. " (Matthew 13:34)...
There is another sense of the word parable, in which it is sometimes used in Scripture when spoken in a way of reproach; hence Moses, when charging Israel to faithfulness, declares that if the people of God apostatize from him, and set up idols in the land, the Lord would scatter them among all nations, "and thou shalt become (saith Moses) an astonishment, a proverb, (or parable) and a by-word, among all nations whither the Lord shall lead thee
Blessed Virgin Mary - The title which the Church has always givento the Mother of our Lord, and by which all devout churchmen speakof her of whom the angel declared, "Blessed art thou among women. ""Not even the glorified Saints who have attained to the purity andbliss of Heaven are raised to higher blessedness and purity thanthat saintly maiden was whom Elizabeth was inspired to call 'theMother of my Lord. "...
The perpetual Virginity of the lowly Mother of our Lord has alwaysbeen a very strong tradition among all devout Christians; a beliefwhich is prompted by reverence for the great mystery of theIncarnation, and confirmed by the universal consent of the Church. The term "brethren" of our Lord, which occurs in the New Testamentmeans simply kindred, according to the Jewish use of the word
Devotions - Pious practises in honor of the Blessed Trinity, Our Lord, the Blessed Virgin, angels, and saints
Palti - Deliverance from the Lord, one of the spies representing the tribe of Benjamin (Numbers 13:9 )
Carpenter's Son - Designation of Our Lord by Jews when scandalized by His wisdom and miracles (Matthew 13:55)
Passion - Only once found, in Acts 1:3 , meaning suffering, referring to the sufferings of our Lord
Elgin Marbles - They were obtained at Athens, about 1811, by Lord Elgin
Adonai - ) A Hebrew name for God, usually translated in the Old Testament by the word "Lord"
Esrom - Son of Phares in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Son, Carpenter's - Designation of Our Lord by Jews when scandalized by His wisdom and miracles (Matthew 13:55)
Sabaoth - Armies a word used, Romans 9:29 , James 5:4 , the Lord of Sabaoth
Name - " (Psalms 9:10) —The sense is, that the right knowledge of the Lord can only induce a right dependance upon him: and in this sense, what a blessedness is there in the name of JEHOVAH! Hence Moses, towards the close of his ministry, admonisheth Israel to this proper apprehension concerning JEHOVAH. "That thou mayest fear (said Moses) this glorious and fearful name, THE Lord THY GOD. " (Deuteronomy 28:58) And what an infinite fulness is contained in this glorious and fearful name! Observe, not only The Lord, that is JEHOVAH in his threefold character of person, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, but Thy God, that is, God in covenant; so that in this view of the name of JEHOVAH, is included both his essence, nature, attributes, perfections, counsel, will, and purpose. All his gracious revelations in the person of his dear Son, his grace, love, wisdom, mercy, and the whole constellation of glories manifested in Christ and by Christ; and so running through the whole kingdoms of nature, and providence, and grace, and glory; so much, and infinitely more, is included in this one view of the glorious and fearful name of The Lord Thy God. ...
And we find the Lord himself helping his people, as it were, in this sacred regard which they desired to have to his honour, by commanding them to avoid all temptations to it, in prohibiting their use of the names of the dunghill gods around them; knowing that the familiar use of the one, might insensibly lead to the use of the other. "And in all things that I have said unto you, (saith the Lord) be circumspect: and make no mention of the name of other gods, neither let it be heard out of thy mouth. " (Exodus 23:13) And hence we find, in after-ages of the church, the Lord again interposing with his grace on this occasion, and saying: "And it shall be at that day, saith the Lord, that thou shalt call me Ishi, and shalt call me no more Baali; for I will take away the names of Baalim out of her mouth. " (Hosea 2:16-17) The Israelites were not only in danger from using the same name of Baali, which signifies Lord, as their idolatrous neighbours did, when speaking of their gods, but they had been upon numberless occasions infected also with their idolatry. Hence the Lord graciously promised, in this sweet and condescending Scripture, to remove the temptation to this sin, by taking the names of Baal and Baalim out of their mouths. As if the Lord had said, by being called Ishi, my man, the Lord would came home nearer to their affections. ...
I must not dismiss this view of the glorious and fearful name of JEHOVAH, of which we are so repeatedly told, in the word of God, the Lord is jealous, without first begging the reader to remark with me the very tender intimations the Lord gives of this name, in the person, work, and righteousness of the Lord Jesus Christ
Heal - Deuteronomy 32:39 (b) This type teaches the spiritual lesson that the Lord is able to mend the troubles that come in among GOD's people. ...
Psalm 147:3 (b) By this is revealed that the Lord, by His words of comfort, His messages of mercy, and His promises of peace, will remove the sting and the hurt from human hearts. ...
Jeremiah 3:22 (a) This is a promise from GOD that He will repair the damage that has been done by and in Israel when they return to the Lord their GOD, and in humility walk again with Him. ...
Jeremiah 17:14 (a) In this way Jeremiah expressed his great desire for the Lord to minister comfort to his heart; his spirit was sore broken by the way he had been treated by the people whom he came to help. ...
Lamentations 2:13 (a) The Lord indicates quite clearly that nobody on earth could restore Israel to her former state of health, holiness and power, except the Lord of glory Himself. ...
Zechariah 11:16 (a) The Lord indicates here that He will raise up a ruler over Israel who will pretend to be a shepherd, but will really be an idolator who will deceive Israel, and will work for their eventual ruin. ...
Matthew 13:15 (a) GOD expresses His desire to restore Israel, but they reject His offer and prefer to stay as slaves to the invader and live in rebellion to their Lord
Judas Iscariot - He was a false disciple: when the Lord said to His apostles 'ye are clean,' He excepted Judas in the words 'but not all. ' He was sent out with the others to preach, and no exception is made in his case as to the working of miracles in the name of the Lord Jesus. Under the plea of the necessities of the poor he complained of money being wasted when Mary anointed the Lord. Satan knew the covetousness of Judas and put it into his heart to betray the Lord for money, which he did for thirty pieces of silver. ...
Judas probably thought that the Lord would escape from those who arrested Him, as He had escaped from previous dangers, while he would gain the money. When the Lord was condemned, Judas was filled with remorse, confessed he had betrayed innocent blood, and cast the money into the temple. The Lord called him the 'son of perdition. ' It was a trial of man under new circumstances: to be a 'familiar friend' (Psalm 41:9 ) of the Lord Jesus, to hear His gracious words, see His miracles, and probably be allowed to work miracles himself in His name; and yet, as in every other trial of man, he fell
Canticle of the Three Children - It begins Benedicite, omnia opera Domini, Domino (O all ye works of the Lord, bless ye the Lord), and is included in the Roman Breviary for Lauds on Sundays throughout the year
Huldah - Her message from the Lord was that God would surely bring the evils upon the people according to what the book said, because they had turned to idolatry; but Josiah having humbled himself, the Lord did not bring the evils in his day
Benedicite, the - It begins Benedicite, omnia opera Domini, Domino (O all ye works of the Lord, bless ye the Lord), and is included in the Roman Breviary for Lauds on Sundays throughout the year
Confidence - "In the fear of the Lord is strong confidence;" "The Lord shall be thy confidence
Benefactor - The Lord said it was not to be so with His disciples; they had been disputing who should be the greatest (and that too when their Lord was approaching the cross!) whereas they ought to have taken a low place, following in His steps
Anglesey, Henry Paget, 1st Marquess of - Appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, he did all he could for the Irish people, and was recalled by the government for trying to relieve penal legislation against Catholics. Again appointed Lord lieutenant, 1830, he strongly opposed the repeal of the union
Zachariah - He did evil in the sight of the Lord, and Shallum son of Jabesh conspired against him, killed him in public, and reigned in his stead. Thus was fulfilled what the Lord had foretold to Jehu, that his children should sit on the throne of Israel to the fourth generation, 2 Kings 14:29 ; 15:8-11
Sabaoth - While the word "hosts" probably had special reference to angels, the title "the Lord of hosts" became used to designate Him as the One who is supreme over all the innumerable hosts of spiritual agencies, or of what are described as "the armies of heaven. " Eventually it was used as equivalent to "the Lord all-sovereign. sometimes has Kurios Sabaoth as the equivalent of "the Lord of hosts," sometimes Kurios Pantokrator, in Job, it uses Pantokrator to render the Hebrew Divine title Shadday (see ALMIGHTY)
Crown of Thorns - The crown placed in derision on the head of the Lord Jesus, when arrayed in a scarlet robe. Though applied to His sacred head by the rough soldiers, it was connived at by Pilate, who presented the Lord in this garb to the Jews, but which only drew forth their cry, 'Crucify Him. It is supposed to have been made of the Arabian nabk, which has flexible branches with very sharp thorns, and ivy-like leaves: mocking the Lord, as some think, both as a king and as a victor
Sieve - Isaiah 30:28 (a) The Lord promised in this passage that He would strain out the nations in such a way that all their boastings, pride and vain glory would prove to be of no value whatever, and would not stand His testings and siftings. The Lord thus describes the helplessness of the proud enemies of Israel. ...
Amos 9:9 (a) In this promise the Lord assures Israel that He will put them through severe testings and will remove all that is not profitable nor righteous nor good from among them, but He will keep the people eventually for Himself
Hananiah - A false prophet, in the days of Jeremiah, whose history, though short, is so very striking and awful, that the Holy Ghost hath been pleased to appoint a whole chapter in the writings of Jeremiah to record it; as if the Lord the Spirit intended it to be frequently read in the church. The word signifies the grace or gift of the Lord, from Chen or Chanan, grace; and Jah, the Lord
King - There is somewhat very blessed in eyeing the Lord Jesus in this character, His church must always find in this view of their Lord a very high satisfaction. And what a rapturous thought is it to recollect, that his kingdom is for ever, and his dominion that which shall have no end! While we behold the Lord Jesus in this exalted point of view, it becomes an interesting enquiry of the soul, whether we are subjects of his kingdom
Ale Silver - A duty payable to the Lord mayor of London by the sellers of ale within the city
Corvee - ) An obligation to perform certain services, as the repair of roads, for the Lord or sovereign
Bealiah - ]'>[1] is Lord’)
Rabboni - ' Mark 10:51 (translated 'Lord' in A
Pelaliah - (Nehemiah 11:12) Compounded of Pillel, to meditate or pray—and Jah, the Lord
Obed - —Father of Jesse, mentioned in both genealogies of our Lord (Matthew 1:5, Luke 3:32)
Lamb - Genesis 22:7 (b) It is quite evident that this lamb is a type of the Lord JESUS CHRIST who was described by John as "the Lamb of God. " The Lord JESUS was and is one of the persons of the Godhead, and He gave His own self to be a sacrifice. ...
Exodus 13:13 (b) In this place again the Lord JESUS is evidently the anti-type, while we are represented by the ass. " Each one of us must be redeemed by the Blood of the Lord JESUS, the Lamb of GOD, or else we shall be punished ourselves. ...
Leviticus 23:12 (c) The Lord JESUS was inspected before He was offered as the Passover Lamb. ...
Proverbs 27:26 (c) It may be that this also is a picture of the Lord JESUS in that we must be clothed with Him as the Scripture say; "Put ye on the Lord Jesus Christ. ...
John 1:29 (a) The Lord JESUS is often compared to a lamb, and for many reasons. " The lamb's a gentle creature, and our Lord said he was "meek and lowly in heart. "...
Revelation 5:6 (a) Throughout the book of Revelation, the Lord JESUS is presented under the type of "a lamb as it had been slain. GOD will never let us forget that the Lord JESUS became a sacrifice for our sins, and for ourselves
Names of Our Lord - Various names have been given to Our Lord in Holy Scripture and the liturgy of the Church. ...
IN THE OLD TESTAMENT ...
Almighty Word, Wisdom of Solomon 18:15
Brightness of Eternal Light, Wisdom of Solomon 7:26
Child, Isaiah 9:6
Counsellor, Isaiah 9:6
Desire of Eternal Hills, Genesis 49:26
Desired of all nations, Aggeus 2:8
Emmanuel, Isaiah 7:14
Expectation of nations, Genesis
Father of World to Come, Isaiah
God the Mighty, Isaiah 9:6
Holy One of Israel, Isaiah 43:3
Holy One, Psalms 15:10
Just Branch, Jeremiah 23:5
Just, Isaiah 45:8
King of Glory, Psalms 23:7
Lord of Hosts, Isaiah 9:7
Lord Our Just One, Jeremiah 23:6
Man of Sorrows, Isaiah 53:3
Man, Michah 5:5
My Just One, Isaiah 41:10
Orient, Zachariah 6:12
Prince of Peace, Isaiah 9:6
Root of Jesse, Isaiah 11:10
Ruler of the Earth, Isaiah 16:1
Sun of Justice, Malachi 4:2
Wonderful, Isaiah 9:6
USED BY HIMSELF ...
Bread of Life, John 6:35
Door, John 10:9
Good Shepherd, John 10:11
Life, John 11:25
Light of the World, John 9:5
Lord, John 13:13
Master, John 13:13
Resurrection and Life, John 11:25
Son of Man, Matthew 8:2O
Son, John 5:22
Vine, John 15:1
Way, Truth, and Life, John 14:6
USED BY THE APOSTLES and EVANGELISTS ...
Advocate, 1 John 2:1
Almighty, Apocalypse 1:8
Alpha and Omega, Apocalypse 1:8
Amen, Apocalypse 3:14
Author and Finisher of Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Author of Life, Acts 3:15
Beginning and End, Apocalypse 1:8
Blessed God, Mark 14:61
Child Jesus, Luke 2:43
Christ Jesus, 1 Timothy 1:1
Christ, Matthrew 1:18
Corner-Stone, Epheisans 2:21
Day Star, 2 Peter 1:19
Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Faithful Witness, Apocalypse 1:5
First and Last, Apocalypse 1:17
First Born from the Dead, Apocalypse 1:5
Galitean, Matthew 26:69
God of the Jews, Romans 3:29
Great Pastor, Hebrews 13:20
He that is to come, Hebrews 10:37
Head, Ephesians 4:15
High Priest, Hebrews 2:17
Jesus Christ the Just, 1 John 2:1
Jesus, Matthew 27:17
Key of David, Apocalypse 3:7
King of Kings, Apocalypse 19:16
Lamb of God, John 1:29
Life Eternal, 1 John 1:2
Lion of the Tribe of Juda, Apocalypse 5:5
Living Stone, 1 Peter 2:4
Lord Jesus Christ, Acts 10:48
Lord of All, Galatians 4:1
Lord of Lords, Apocalypse 19:16
Lord Our God, Apocalypse 4:11
Mediator, Hebrews 9:15
Messias, John 1:41 (passim)
Only Begotten of the Father, John 1:14
Our Lord Jesus Ghrist, Romans 1:4
Pascha Nostrum, 1 Corinthians 5:7
Power of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Priest, Hebrews 8:4
Prince of the kings of the earth, Apocalypse 1:5
Rabbi, John 1:18
Rock of Scandal, Romans 9:33
Root of David, Apocalypse 5:6
Saviour of the world, John 4:42
Saviour, Luke 2:11
Son of David, Mark 12:86
Son of God, Matthew 8:29
Son of Joseph, Luke 3:23
Son of the Living God, Matthew 16:16
Star of the morning, Apocalypse 2:23
Stone of stumbling, 1 Peter 2:8
Stone, Matthew 21:42
Teacher, John 3:2
That which was from the beginning, 1 John 1:1
Victim, Ephesians 5:2
Wisdom of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Word, John 1:1
Word of God, Apocalypse 19:13
Word of Life, 1 John 1:1
USED BY OTHERS ...
Adonai, O Antiphons
Angel in the liturgy of the Mass
Captain of our salvation, Ephiphany, Matins
Captain of the Martyrs, Octain of Saint Stephen, Matins
Carpenter's Son, Matthew 13:55
Christ our King, First Wednesday in Advent, Matins
Christ the Lord, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Eagle, Saint Maximus, Homily 42
Eternal, Christmas Day, Lauds
Eternal Word of God made Flesh, Ember Saturday in Advent, Martins
Glory of Thy people Israel, Luke 2:32
God of God, title in Gloria
God our Saviour, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
God the Son, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Great Prophet, First Sunday in Advent, Lauds
Heavenly Bridegroom, Epiphany, Lauds
Holy, Luke 1:35
Holy One of God, Luke 4
King of all the earth, Second Monday in Advent, Vespers
King of Angel Hosts above, Circumcision, Matins
King of Heaven, Christmas Day, Matins
King of Israel, Mark 15:32
King of Righteousness, Third Thursday in Advent, Matins
King of the Gentiles, O Antiphons
King of the Jews, Matthew 2:2
King Peaceful, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
Light to the revelation of the Gentiles, Luke 2:32
Light of Light, title in Gloria
Lord of Angels, Eve of Epiphany, Matins
Lord Our King, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Lawgiver, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Saviour, Circumcision, Matins
Lord that shall rule, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord the King, Ephiphany, Matins
Lord the Ruler, Second Sunday in Advent, Matins
Maker - Hence, in reference to this perfection, the Psalmist invites the whole creation of God to "worship and bow down and kneel, before the Lord our Maker. " (Psalms 95:6) So again the prophet Isaiah, (Isaiah 52:12-13) "Who art thou that thou shouldest be afraid of a man that shall die and of the son of man which shall be made as grass; and forgettest the Lord thy Maker, that hath stretched forth the heavens, and laid the foundations of the earth!" It is not a little interesting, but highly important to be kept in view, that the act itself is connected with the glorious and fearful name of JEHOVAH-ALEHIM, (see Deuteronomy 28:58) to intimate the plurality of persons in the GODHEAD. " And elsewhere, the church is called upon to remember the Lord under this threefold character of persons in the plural of the word. (Ecclesiastes 12:1) So again in Job, (Job 35:10) the word is plural, where is God my Makers? And yet that the church night never lose sight of the unity of the divine Essence, while thus believing in the existence of a threefold character of person in the GODHEAD, the Lord, by Moses, delivered this glorious fundamental truth in the plainest and strongest terms; "Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God is one Lord!" (Deuteronomy 6:4) Oh! that these sacred, hallowed truths, were both duly and reverently considered and pondered over, agreeably to their immense sublimity, in these days of Arian and Socinian blasphemy!...
...
Melea - Fulness, the son of Menan and father of Eliakim, in the genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:31 )
Peulthai - Wages of the Lord, one of the sons of Obed-edom, a Levite porter (1 Chronicles 26:5 )
Rehabiah - Enlargement of the Lord, the son of Eliezer, and grandson of Moses (1 Chronicles 23:17 ; 24:21 )
Human Figure, Winged - Emblem in art associated with Saint Matthew as typifying the human descent of Our Lord in His Incarnation
Primitive Christians - Those who lived in the first ages of Christianity, especially the apostles and immediate followers of our Lord
Dispositor - ) The planet which is Lord of the sign where another planet is
Mamre - The hallowed spot where the Lord appeared unto Abraham
Boaz - —The husband of Ruth, named in the genealogies of our Lord (Matthew 1:5, Luke 3:32)
Johanan - (2 Kings 25:23) His name is compounded of Chanan, grace; and Jah, the Lord
Jehudi - The servant of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, (Jeremiah 36:14) His name signifies, the Lord is my praise
Baal-Meon - This was the idol of Beth-jesimoth, and is rendered, "the Lord of the house
Mattathias - Son of Amos, and son of Semei, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Melchi - Son of Janna, and son of Addi, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Nedabiah - (1 Chronicles 3:18) This man's name is compounded of Nadab, gift—and Jah, Lord
Winged Human Figure - Emblem in art associated with Saint Matthew as typifying the human descent of Our Lord in His Incarnation
Beali'ah - (Jehovah is Lord ), a Benjamite who went over to David at Ziklag
Maranatha - ]'>[1] expression which occurs in 1 Corinthians 16:22 in juxtaposition with ‘anathema’ (‘If any man loveth not the Lord, let him be anathema. Most moderns follow Bickell in holding that the two parts of which the expression is composed mean ‘Our Lord, come I’ (= Aram. This seems preferable to the older view, according to which the meaning would be ‘Our Lord has come I’ (= Aram. Come, Lord Jesus!’), from which it may perhaps be inferred that some such formula as ‘O our Lord, or O Lord, come!’ was in use in early Christian circles. Amen (= ‘O our Lord, come! Amen’) is strikingly parallel with the remarkable phrase in Revelation 22:20 (‘Amen. Come, Lord’). It was rather a watchword of the earliest Christian community, embodying the thought in the form of a prayer that the ‘Parousia,’ or Second Advent of the Lord, might soon be consummated, in accordance with the ardent expectations current in the first generation
Temple - First used of the tabernacle, which is called "the temple of the Lord" (1 Samuel 1:9 ). The Church is designated "an holy temple in the Lord" (Ephesians 2:21 ). It is called "the temple" (1 Kings 6:17 ); "the temple [1] of the Lord" (2 Kings 11:10 ); "thy holy temple" (Psalm 79:1 ); "the house of the Lord" (2 Chronicles 23:5,12 ); "the house of the God of Jacob" (Isaiah 2:3 ); "the house of my glory" (60:7); an "house of prayer" (56:7; Matthew 21:13 ); "an house of sacrifice" (2 Chronicles 7:12 ); "the house of their sanctuary" (2 Chronicles 36:17 ); "the mountain of the Lord's house" (Isaiah 2:2 ); "our holy and our beautiful house" (64:11); "the holy mount" (27:13); "the palace for the Lord God" (1 Chronicles 29:1 ); "the tabernacle of witness" (2 Chronicles 24:6 ); "Zion" (Psalm 74:2 ; 84:7 )
Storm - The Lord is to be our place of refuge, and the shelter in the time of storm. Our Lord is telling us that He is able to speak peace on all such occasions and bring rest to the heart with peace in the mind. ...
Isaiah 4:6 (b) Here again our Lord is telling us that we may expect times of trouble in our lives, but He has provided a hiding place in His own presence, resting under the shadow of His wings, and leaving the solution with Him. ...
Isaiah 25:4 (b) Evidently our Lord is referring to the times of great stress and strain that GOD's people often had to pass through. In the midst of these difficulties the Lord became a hiding place, and a shelter from the conflict
Kid - The Lord does not want us to use for destructive purposes that which He has given us for constructive use. The Lord warns people not to resort to these heathen expedients but rather to look to Him and depend upon Him for blessing on their fields and crops. ...
1 Samuel 10:3 (c) This is probably a type of the Lord JESUS, the young man, offered as a sacrifice. As each of these three men had an entire kid for himself, so each believer may have all of the Lord JESUS for himself. ...
Luke 15:29 (c) This is a type of the Lord JESUS unrecognized, unused, and unappreciated by those who should have known Him best
Calvary - A fit place; in death's stronghold the Lord of life gave death his deathblow through death (Hebrews 2:14). Chronicles, 434, quoted in Ellicott's Life of our Lord
Baal-Berith - The name means “lord of covenant,” and the god's temple was located at Shechem. The designation, “lord of covenant,” may mean that a covenant between the Israelites and the Shechemites was agreed to and annually renewed in his shrine
Crimson - Thus the Lord is telling us that no matter how deep the sinner may be dyed in his sins, the Lord is able to blot them out, and to make him white and clean
Baldness - The Israelites were forbidden to cut themselves or to make themselves bald for the dead, as the heathen did; for they were a holy people unto the Lord. Baldness is one of the judgements of the Lord: perhaps they would make themselves bald in their distress
Fuller - ' The coming of the Lord is compared to a 'refiner's fire, and like fullers' soap,' when the dross and dirt will be cleared away. At the transfiguration the clothing of the Lord became so white that it exceeded the whiteness produced by any fuller on earth
Meonothai - (mih ahn' oh thawee) Personal name meaning, “habitations of the Lord
Hezekiah - ) genealogy of our Lord
Susanna - One of the women who had the honour of ministering to the Lord of their substance
Rabbi - ) Master; Lord; teacher; - a Jewish title of respect or honor for a teacher or doctor of the law
Seigneurial - ) Of or pertaining to the Lord of a manor; manorial
Jairus - Ruler of a synagogue in Galilee, whose daughter the Lord restored to life
Signiorize - ) To exercise dominion over; to Lord it over
Matthat - Son of Levi, and son of another Levi, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Just One - A well-known name and character of the Lord Jesus Christ: (Acts 3:24; Act 7:52)...
See Christ...
Amasiah - Son of Zichri, who willingly offered himself to the Lord in the time of Jehoshaphat
Abiud - Son of Zorobabel, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus, Matthew 1:13 : not mentioned in the Old Testament
Malchus - The high priest's servant whose ear Peter cut off, but who was healed by the Lord
Noadiah - (See Nehemiah 6:14) The name is a compound of Nuach, rest—and Jah, the Lord
Bithi'ah - (daughter of the Lord ), daughter of a Pharaoh, and wife of Mered
ma-Asi'ai - (work of the Lord ), a priest who after the return from Babylon dwelt in Jerusalem
Lord - Thus we read, "Thou shalt riot take the name of the Lord thy God in vain: for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain. " (Exodus 20:7) So again (Isaiah 42:8) "I am the Lord; that is my name, and my glory will I not give to another, neither my praise to graven images. " With what reverence and sanctity, therefore, ought the glorious name of JEHOVAH, Lord, to be held? Indeed, though among men, master and Lord are sometimes used from servants to their superiors, yet the incommunicable name of JEHOVAH, is never used in this way by any. ...
JEHOVAH, or Lord, is equally adapted and made use of in common to teach us all the persons of the GODHEAD, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. In like manner, God the Son is called by this glorious name, (Jeremiah 23:6) with express designation of character, and this also by JEHOVAH the Father, And throughout both Testaments of Scripture, God the Son possesseth in common with the Father and the Holy Ghost, the distinguishing name of Lord
Ishi - ...
Let the reader first observe, that the prophet was commissioned to tell the church, that in the gospel-day, when the glorious Messiah, whom the church had been all along expecting, should come, the church should know the Lord by this name Ishi, my husband, or my man; and should drop the common name of Baali, my Lord: as if this was not sufficiently expressive of the nearness and dearness between them. The church was then to know here Lord in his human nature, as well as his GODHEAD, and in the union of both as her Lord her Righteousness. Now then, saith the Lord Jesus, (for observe it is Jesus himself that is the speaker in this chapter) now then, thou shalt call me by that tender and endearing name, in the nature that I shall then openly appear in among you, my man. I have been from everlasting the Husband and Head of my church, in the secret transactions of covenant redemption; but in that day when I shall openly manifest myself in that character I will be called Ishi: "for my people shall know my name, therefore they shall in that day know that I am he that doth speak, behold, it is I!" (Isaiah 52:6) Reader think if of the love and tenderness of thy Jesus! Was there ever such grace manifested as by him? Who but must love him? Who but must delight in him? Yes, Lord, I will do as thou hast said, and call thee Ishi, my Husband, my man, and also the Lord my Righteousness!...
See Ammi...
Eli - Samuel was lent to the Lord by his pious mother, and he ministered unto the Lord before Eli. Eli spoke to his sons of their evil doings, but he did not with energy prevent the dishonour to the Lord. It should be remembered that the responsibility of maintaining Israel, the people of the Lord, before Him, rested on the priestly house, hence the enormity of the young men's sin, and the solemnity of Eli's negligent conduct. A man of God came and told Eli plainly that he honoured his sons before the Lord, and detailed some judgements that should befall his house, and that his two sons should be slain in one day. " Alas, poor Eli merely said, "It is the Lord: let him do what seemeth him good. Abiathar his descendant was thrust from the priesthood by Solomon that the word of the Lord might be fulfilled which He spake concerning the house of Eli in Shiloh
Eli - Samuel was lent to the Lord by his pious mother, and he ministered unto the Lord before Eli. Eli spoke to his sons of their evil doings, but he did not with energy prevent the dishonour to the Lord. It should be remembered that the responsibility of maintaining Israel, the people of the Lord, before Him, rested on the priestly house, hence the enormity of the young men's sin, and the solemnity of Eli's negligent conduct. A man of God came and told Eli plainly that he honoured his sons before the Lord, and detailed some judgements that should befall his house, and that his two sons should be slain in one day. " Alas, poor Eli merely said, "It is the Lord: let him do what seemeth him good. Abiathar his descendant was thrust from the priesthood by Solomon that the word of the Lord might be fulfilled which He spake concerning the house of Eli in Shiloh
Communion of Saints - This spiritual food is our Lord'sown divine substance and life, by participation in which the faithfulChristian enters into a communion with his Lord which death cannotend or even interrupt. All who enter, whether in the present or inthe past, into this communion with their risen Lord are therebybound together in holy fellowship one with another also. It is thisholy fellowship of those whom the Spirit has sanctified, one withanother and with their Lord, that we call the Communion of Saints
Chaff - Hence the Lord, speaking of the preciousness of his word to that of the invention of men, thus expresseth "What is the chaff to the wheat, saith the Lord?" (Jeremiah 23:28) And the sacred writers, under the same Almighty authority, describe the wicked as chaff, which the wind scattereth, and the storm carrieth away; and which the Lord will burn up in the end, with unquenchable fire
Anathema - ' The solemn passage in 1 Corinthians 16 is "If any man love not the Lord Jesus Christ, let him be accursed, Maranatha (the Lord cometh). Two solemn denunciations relating to the person of the Lord Jesus and the gospel of God
Abijah - We meet with many of this name in Scripture: and it is not to be wondered at; for it is a very blessed one, compounded of Ab, Father, JAH, Lord, and I, my. Sweet appellation, when a child of God can say, JEHOVAH is my Father! For this is what the Lord himself provided for his people. "But I said, (said the Lord) how shall I put thee among the children, and give thee a pleasant land, a goodly heritage of the hosts of nations? And I said, Thou shalt call me my Father! and shalt not turn away from me
Earring - Genesis 24:22 (c) The jewelry given to Rebecca is a picture and a type of the blessings which GOD gives in this present world through the Holy Spirit, a sample of the greater riches that a wait us when we actually meet the Lord face to face. The Holy Spirit gives us samples of joy, peace, rest, zeal, vision and divine understanding, so that we too may be drawn to that unseen Lord with whom we shall spend eternity. ...
Ezekiel 16:12 (a) We learn from this that the Lord gave His people ears that love to hear His voice, and desire to know His Word and to obey His will. ...
Hosea 2:13 (a) The figure is used here to describe those who make themselves attractive to the world and to GOD's enemies, and turn their affections to those things and those people who do not love the Lord, nor want His presence
Thief - ' Used by the Lord in reference to those who bought and sold in the temple. When the Lord was arrested He asked if they had come out as against a robber. The two malefactors crucified with the Lord were also men of this character. This is the word employed in the expression "as a thief in the night," to which the unexpected coming of the Lord to the world is compared
Coshering - ) A feudal prerogative of the Lord of the soil entitling him to lodging and food at his tenant's house
Bealiah - Whose Lord is Jehovah, a Benjamite, one of David's thirty heroes of the sling and bow (1 Chronicles 12:5 )
my God, my God, Why Hast Thou Forsaken me - One of the last words of Our Lord dying on the Cross, as narrated by Matthew 27, and Mark 15
Yah - See God ; I Am ; Jehovah; Lord; YHWH
Hodaviah - (1 Chronicles 5:24) His name is compounded of Hod, praise, and Jah, the Lord
Jochebed - (Exodus 6:20) The name is of Cabad, glory; and Jah, the Lord
Eli Lama Sabacthani - One of the last words of Our Lord dying on the Cross, as narrated by Matthew 27, and Mark 15
Jedidiah - Beloved of the Lord, a name given to Solomon at his birth, by Nathan the prophet, 2 Samuel 12:25
Bochim - Weepings, a place near Gilgal, where the angel of the Lord reproved Israel for their remissness, Judges 2:1-5
Besode'Iah - (n the secret of the Lord ) father of one of the repairers of the wall of Jerusalem
Alleluia - A Hebrew word meaning "Praise ye the Lord
Theophany - In the latter category are found the appearances of the angel of the Lord, which some have taken to be Christophanies, reasoning that since the angel of the Lord speaks for God in the first person (Genesis 16:10 ) and the human addressed often attributes the experience to God directly (Genesis 16:13 ), the angel must therefore be the Lord or the preincarnate Christ. Yet, though the angel is clearly identified with the Lord, he is distinguished from him (he is called "angel, " meaning "messenger" similar patterns of identification and distinction can be seen in Genesis 19:1,21 ; 31:11,13 ; Exodus 3:2,4 ; Judges 2:1-5 ; 6:11-12,14 ; 13:3,6 , 8-11,13 , 15-17,20-23 ; Zechariah 3:1-6 ; 12:8 ). There seems, therefore, no necessity to posit a theophany for the angel of the Lord. In Joshua 5:13-6:5 , the conquest narrative is interrupted by the abrupt appearance of a being who calls himself the "commander of the army of the Lord" (5:14). The Lord appears to Abraham on his arrival in the land, wherein God promised the land to Abraham and his descendants (Genesis 12:7-9 ); God reaffirmed his promises of land and progeny when Abraham was ninety-nine years old (Genesis 17:1 ), and on the Plains of Mamre on his way to destroy Sodom (Genesis 18:1 ). At the conclusion of the book the Lord appears in a thunderstorm to deliver two discourses, designed to grant Job's request for a hearing and arguably to supply at least one of the meanings for Job's affliction: God is sovereign. Frequently the term, "glory of the Lord, " reflects a theophany, as in Exodus 24:16-18 ; the "pillar of cloud" has a similar function in Exodus 33:9 . The Spirit of God or the Spirit of the Lord must be considered theophanous, particularly when it comes upon men, transforming them (1 Samuel 10:6 ) and equipping them for divine service (1 Samuel 16:13 ). The Lord appears to people in visions (Genesis 15:1 ; 46:2 ; Job 33:15 ; Psalm 89:19 ; Daniel 2:19 ; Acts 9:10 ; 18:9 ) and in dreams (Genesis 20:3 ; 31:24 ; 1 Kings 3:5 ; Matthew 2:13 ) to reveal his plans for them or to unveil mysteries for the future. ...
The Lord appears in theophanies both to bless and to judge. A frequent introduction for theophanies may be seen in the words, "The Lord came down. Although the most common verb for the manifestation of the glory of the Lord is "appeared" (Leviticus 9:23 ; Numbers 14:10 ; 16:19,42 ; 20:6 ), God's glory also "settled" on Mount Sinai (Exodus 24:16 ). Williams...
See also Angel of the Lord ...
Bibliography
Famine - Is one of God's four sore judgments which the Lord threatened to send upon Jerusalem; the sword, and the famine, the noisome beast, and the pestilence, to cut off from it man and beast. Who can doubt but that the plenty in Egypt, which was succeeded by seven years famine, was to bring about the gracious purposes of the Lord concerning Joseph and his family, that Israel might be led out of Egypt? Who can question that the famine in the days of Elisha was the same, when we are told, that the Lord called for it seven years. (2 Kings 8:1) And who will put down to natural causes what the Lord accomplished lay instruments, in themselves so feeble, when in the days of Joel the Lord's great army ate up the whole produce of the land? (Joel 1:1-20; Joe 2:1-32, etc. )...
But reader! how dreadful soever a famine in a land may be, when for the wickedness of the people the Lord sends it, yet the word of God speaks of a famine yet more alarming. How very solemn are the words of the Lord, by the prophet, on this subject, Amos 8:11-12 "Behold, the days come, saith the Lord God, that I will send a famine in the land, not a famine of bread, nor a thirst for water, but of hearing the words of the Lord. And they shall wander from sea to sea, and from the north even unto the east; they shall run to and fro to seek the word of the Lord, and shall not find it. But to what period of the church are we to look for its accomplishment? Was it not eminently fulfilled in the instance of the house of Israel, when, after their rejecting the Lord of life and glory, the Lord scattered them over the face of the earth, and left the nation to a wandering state, "without a king, without a prince, without a sacrifice, without an image, without an ephod, and without teraphim?" Yea, are they not still in this awful state? Oh! that that sweet promise may be hastening for its accomplishment, which the prophet who related the famined state of Israel declared also, by the same authority, should be at length fulfilled. "Afterward" (said he,) "shall the children of Israel return, and seek the Lord their God, and David their king; and shall fear the Lord and his goodness many days. " (Hosea 3:4-5) But let not the reader close up his view of this spiritual famine as it relates to the Jews, without going farther, and enquiring whether the threatening may not belong equally to the Gentile church? yea, and whether it is not now in the present hour accomplishing in the earth? Is there not a famine of hearing the word of the Lord in numberless places which are called Christian countries, as well as idolatrous lands? Are there not multitudes who call themselves after Christ, but yet know no more of him than the name? Yea, to come nearer home, are there not villages and country places in this kingdom where the spiritual famine prevails, notwithstanding our land is called, a land of Bibles, and societies for disseminating the word of God are every where opening? Alas! while the grand and distinguishing principles of the faith of Christ are so openly and impudently denied; while God the Father's gracious purposes in the gift of salvation by his dear Son, is thought nothing of; while the GODHEAD of Christ, and redemption wholly by his blood, is daringly opposed; and while the person, work, and influence of God the Holy Ghost is not made the very foundation of a sinner's hope, in reading the sacred word to make wise unto salvation; while these things are kept in the back ground, and the object with many in teaching is but to introduce a flimsy system of morality to supply the place of vital godliness, is there not still a famine, yea, with many, with the Bible in their hand? Pious regenerated Christians see this, and find cause to mourn in secret over it; while they can only pray the Lord to take away the reproach of our land, and remove this spiritual famine from our people
Er - Tamar was his wife but bore him no son; for "Er was wicked in the sight of the Lord, and the Lord slew him," his sin being probably some abomination connected with the impure Canaanite idolatry (Genesis 38:3-7)
Fold - The divinely appointed system of Jewish ordinances which formed the enclosure into which the Lord entered by the door, in order to find His own sheep and lead them out. Gentile believers were added to them, and they became one flock (not 'one fold') with one Shepherd, the Lord Himself
Ephra - The Lord, he saith, will give them Pheer for Epher; that is, beauty for ashes; meaning the blessed change wrought by grace in the soul, when from sin they are brought to salvation in the Lord Jesus Christ
Rapture of the Saints - A term often applied to the 'catching up' in the clouds of the saints, including both those raised from among the dead, and those who will be alive on the earth at that time, to meet the Lord in the air at His coming, according to 1 Thessalonians 4:16,17 . This preliminary detail in the coming of the Lord is of great interest to the church, which is set to wait for Him
Jah - The same Hebrew word occurs many times, and is translated Lord
Pelaiah - Distinguished of the Lord
Paarai - Opening of the Lord, "the Arbite," one of David's heroes (2 Samuel 23:35 ); called also Naarai, 1 Chronicles 11:37
Beulah - ) Israel's future name when restored to her divine Husband, Protector, and Lord (Isaiah 62:4; compare Isaiah 54:4-6)
Igeal - Fourth in descent from Zerubbabel; but, according to Lord A
Clopas - See Alphæus and Brethren of the Lord
Gloriously - ...
Sing ye to the Lord, for he hath triumphed gloriously
Tryphena - A devout follower, of the Lord, spoken of by Paul
Chenani'ah - (established by the Lord ), chief of the Levites when David carried the ark to Jerusalem
ba'al - (lord )
ba'al - (lord )
ba'al - (lord )
Azani'ah - (whom the Lord hears ), the father or immediate ancestor of Jeshua the Levite, in the time of Nehemiah
Joatham - Son of Ozias in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
God - ; and of the Lord Jesus in Isaiah 9:6 . It is generally represented by Lord (sometimes GOD) printed in small capitals. by Lord, except in Psalm 68:4 , where Israel is exhorted to sing unto God, and "extol him by his name JAH. Elyon, 'the Most High,' is another name of God, which stands alone, as in Deuteronomy 32:8 ; 2 Samuel 24:14 ; and in Daniel 4:17-34 (from a kindred word); or it has one of the above words added and is then 'the most high God,' Genesis 14:20 ; or 'the Lordmost high. Adon and Adonai, and the plural Adonim, are all translated 'Lord'; they occur frequently, and are found in some of the following compounds:-...
Adon Jehovah, Exodus 23:17 , the Lord GOD. ...
Adon Jehovah Elohim, Isaiah 51:22 , thy Lord, the Lord,and thy God. ...
Adon Jehovah Sabaoth, Isaiah 19:4 , the Lord, the LordOF HOSTS. ...
Adonai Elohim, Psalm 86:12 , O Lord my God: cf. ...
Adona Jehovah, Deuteronomy 9:26 , O Lord GOD (occurs frequently). ...
Adonai Jehovah Sabaoth, Jeremiah 2:19 , the Lord GOD of hosts. ...
El Elohim Jehovah, Joshua 22:22 , the LordGod of gods. ...
Jah Jehovah, Isaiah 26:4 , the LordJEHOVAH. ...
Jehovah Adon, Nehemiah 10:29 , the Lordour Lord. ...
Jehovah Adonai, Psalm 68:20 , GOD the Lord. ...
Jehovah El, Psalm 31:5 , O LordGod. , the LordGod. ...
Jehovah Elohim Sabaoth Adonai, Amos 5:16 , the Lord,the God of hosts, the Lord. ...
Jehovah Jehovah El, Exodus 34:6 , the Lord,the LordGod. ...
Jehovah Sabaoth, Jeremiah 46:18 , the Lordof hosts. , the Lordof hosts, the God [3]. the word Θεός is constantly translated God; and Κύριος is the word commonly rendered Lord. The Lord is also called 'the Almighty,' Revelation 1:8 , etc. ...
Lord Almighty, 2 Corinthians 6:18 . ...
Lord God Almighty, Revelation 4:8 ; Revelation 11:17 ; Revelation 15:3 ; Revelation 16:7 ; Revelation 21:22 . ...
Lord of Sabaoth, Romans 9:29 ; Psalm 139:7-10 . in relationship with His saints is that of FATHER:it was used anticipatively in the Lord's intercourse with His disciples, but made a reality after His resurrection, when He sent the message: "I ascend unto my Father and your Father, and to my God and your God. The Lord Jesus is God. Ananias lied to 'the Holy Ghost,' 'unto God;' and Sapphira unto the 'Spirit of the Lord,' Acts 5:3,4,9 ; 'Spirit of God. The Father sent the Holy Spirit, and the Lord Jesus sent the Holy Spirit, and He came from heaven
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - Variously formulated as the "day of the Lord" (Amos 5:18 ), the "day of our Lord Jesus Christ" (Isaiah 2:12-18; cf. ...
In the Old Testament the expression "day of the Lord" occurs eighteen times in prophetic literature, most often in the books of Joel and Zephaniah. "Day of the Lord" appears in 2 Thessalonians 2:2 . More likely, however, is the proposal that the wars of the Lord in Israel's history serve as the background, since battle images abound (Joel 3:9-10 ; Revelation 16:14 ) and issues of jurisdiction and authority are central to the day of the Lord. A cluster of various meanings belong to the expression, "day of the Lord. Paul's mention of the "day of our Lord Jesus Christ" (1 Corinthians 1:8 ) is likely the day of "the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and our being gathered together to him" (2 Thessalonians 2:1 ). ...
As depicted by Joel, the day of the Lord means decision: "Multitudes, multitudes in the valley of decision! For the day of the Lord is near in the valley of decision" (3:14). The "day of the Lord" is not a one-time occurrence. Days of the Lord, while often represented in the Bible as in the future, are not limited to the future. There have been days of the Lord in the past. was described as a "day of the Lord" (Lamentations 2:21 ). Isaiah says that the day of the Lord will involve the fall of Babylon. Joel, in turn, describes a grasshopper plague that for him represents the day of the Lord as imminent, even immediate. The day of Pentecost, now history, is described as the day of the Lord (Acts 2:16-21 ). ...
Still, for the prophets and for many of the New Testament writers, the day of the Lord points to the future. The New Testament, while speaking of the Christ event as a day of the Lord (Acts 2:16-21 ), also speaks of the anticipated day of Christ as his return (2 Thessalonians 2:1-2 ), which is yet, after almost two thousand years, still future. Eventually the day of the Lord (God) came to mean the termination of the world. ...
The Day of the Lord as a Day of Calamity . The day of the Lord means destruction of the godless. With metaphor the prophets excel in describing the calamitous aspect of day of the Lord. Isaiah invokes the war model to characterize the day of the Lord—"The Lord Almighty is mustering an army for war" (13:4). Joel describes the Lord's army: "They charge like warriors; they scale walls like soldiers. In keeping with the motif of fire, the Septuagint renders Malachi 3:19 : "For the day of the Lord is coming burning like an oven. ...
The elaborate description of the day of the Lord in Joel is about calamity for Israel. The "day of the Lord" is focused, then, on Israel. Zechariah's announcement about the day of the Lord includes a battle with nations (14:3; cf. One striking consequence of the day of the Lord for nations will be a recognition of Yahweh (Joel 3:17 ), but not without desolation (Zephaniah 2:13-14 ) and death (Zephaniah 2:12 ). ...
The day of the Lord also affects the natural order. The plague of locusts in Joelwhether a pointer to the day of the Lord or itself a "day of the Lord"brings unproductive conditions for trees and vines and jeopardizes the survival of animals (1:12,18). Still, an overriding impression is that the day of the Lord will powerfully affect nature. While the judgment dimension is dominant in descriptions of the day of the Lord, the salvation dimension, although less emphasized, is nevertheless present. ...
The day of the Lord brings salvation for Israel. In the words of Zephaniah, "The Lord your God is with you, he is mighty to save. It will mean that "everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved" (Joel 2:32 ). ...
In the New Testament the day of the Lord is more precisely the day of Jesus Christ and especially the manifestation of his glory. ...
The day of the Lord portends salvation for the nations. Announcements about favorable prospects for Gentiles, while considerable, are not often found in conjunction with language about the day of the Lord. Still, pictures of Gentile response given elsewhere (such as Psalm 96 ) are reinforced by Zephaniah's classic description of the day of the Lord: "From beyond the rivers of Cush my worshipers, my scattered people, will bring me offerings" (3:10; Lord (2:11). Paul urges the church at Corinth to discipline the immoral person so that at the day of the Lord his spirit may be saved (1 Corinthians 5:5 ). ...
The day of the Lord will transform nature. For God's people, Israel, the day of the Lord will mean physical abundance and spiritual blessing. Although the new heaven and earth are not in the Old Testament specifically connected to the day of the Lord (Isaiah 65:17-25 ), that connection is made in 2 Peter 3:13 . The table below sketches the nature of the day of the Lord as described by the preexilic prophets. The theological significance of the day of the Lord may be summarized along three lines of thought. First, without question, the day of the Lord is a day of God's vindication. The preview of the day of the Lord, as in the destruction of Babylon or at the time of the Christ-event, including the day of Pentecost, already shows evidence of God's extraordinary work and power, so that the day of the Lord at the end of history is quite beyond human description. The message of the day of the Lord is that evil be trounced and evildoers will in the end receive their due. The purpose of discussions about the day of the Lord, past or future, is to illumine the present. In view of the coming day of the Lord, "What kind of people ought you to be?" (2 Peter 3:11 )
Hireling - "Is there not an appointed time to man upon earth? are not his days also like the days of an hireling?" (Job 7:1) By the law, the Lord made a gracious provision for the hireling, commanding that his wages should not abide all night, until the morning. Thus faithful servants of the Lord, in the ministry of his word and ordinances, are described as labourers sent into the vineyard by the Almighty Householder, and who, after the labour of the day, are called home to receive their hire; beginning from the last to the first. So that solemnly engaged in Christ's service, and hired to the work, they are supposed to labour in the word and doctrine with a single eye to the Lord's glory. They are, as instruments in the Lord's hand to break up the fallow ground of the hearts of their people, and to water the garden of Jesus. (Matthew 20:1-16) Whereas the mere hirelings, who enter the service of the Lord Jesus, not for love to the Lord, nor affection to his people, are represented as engaged only for filthy lucre's sake. (Isaiah 56:11) Our Lord, in his unequalled manner, hath strikingly defined their character
Jehovah-Jireh - The margin of our Bible renders it very properly, "the Lord will see or provide. " (Genesis 22:14) And the general acceptation of the words in the esteem of believers is, that the Lord will do by all of that character as he did by Abraham, and in every critical moment manifest his grace towards them, in proof that he doth both see and provide for them. Abraham saith, "to this day in the mount of the Lord shall it be seen;" by which it appears, that the mount of the Lord was to be the place where this provision and sight of JEHOVAH was to be seen. And was not this with an eye to the Lamb of God, in after-ages to be provided for the whole church, as well as the ram the Lord had then provided for Abraham's burnt offering? Recollect that this mount Moriah was near the spot, if not the very spot itself, afterwards called mount Calvary
Remaliah - Adorned by the Lord, the father of Pekah, who conspired successfully against Pekahiah (2 Kings 15:25,27,30,32,37 ; Isaiah 7:1,4,5,9 ; 8:6 )
Sabachthani - Thou hast forsaken me, one of the Aramaic words uttered by our Lord on the cross (Matthew 27:46 ; Mark 15:34 )
Raamiah - Thunder of the Lord, one of the princes who returned from the Exile (Nehemiah 7:7 ); called also Reelaiah (Ezra 2:2 )
Brennage - ) A tribute which tenants paid to their Lord, in lieu of bran, which they were obliged to furnish for his hounds
Bordland - ) Either land held by a bordar, or the land which a Lord kept for the maintenance of his board, or table
Bilshan - (bihl' sshan) Akkadian personal name meaning, “their Lord
Ishi (1) - ]'>[1] instead of Baali (‘my Lord’)
Euodias - A Christian woman at Philippi who is exhorted with Syntyche to be "of the same mind in the Lord
Venom - Deuteronomy 32:33 (b) This describes the evil and wicked effect of Israel's activities as they worshiped idols and forsook the Lord
Chancellor - One who has judicial authority, literally, a "lord of judgement;" a title given to the Persian governor of Samaria (Ezra 4:8,9,17 )
Baalberith - The god signifying 'covenant Lord' set up at Shechem
Rep-Silver - ) Money anciently paid by servile tenants to their Lord, in lieu of the customary service of reaping his corn or grain
Baladan - (2 Kings 20:12) The name seems to be a compound of Baal and Adorn, both meaning Lord
Manbote - ) A sum paid to a Lord as a pecuniary compensation for killing his man (that is, his vassal, servant, or tenant)
Spy Wednesday - The Wednesday in Holy Week, intimating that Judas Iscariot was watching the movements of Our Lord in order to secure His betrayal
Wednesday, Spy - The Wednesday in Holy Week, intimating that Judas Iscariot was watching the movements of Our Lord in order to secure His betrayal
Addi - Descendant of Cosam in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Portion - The Levites did not receive tribal territory with the other tribes but had the Lord for their special portion (Numbers 18:20 ). To have a portion in the Lord is to share the right of joining the community in worship of God (Joshua 22:25 ,Joshua 22:25,22:27 ; compare Nehemiah 2:20 ). The Psalms often speak of the Lord as the portion of the faithful (Psalm 16:5 ; Psalm 73:26 ; Psalm 119:57 )
Branch, the - A title of the Lord Jesus, which He will bear in connection with Israel in the future. In two of the passages the words 'unto David' are added, which coincides with the Lord Jesus being the 'offspring' (which is a similar word to 'branch') as well as the 'root' of David. It is a description of the Lord Jesus in the millennium
Clay - Isaiah 45:9 (b) This is typical of human beings who are shaped and molded in the hands of the Lord. ...
Jeremiah 18:6 (a) It represents Israel as a nation in the hands of the Lord for Him to alter, mold and make as He pleases. ...
John 9:6 (c) This probably indicates the fact that the Lord shuts our eyes effectually to the things of this earth that He may open them to see His face and rejoice in His presence, and enjoy spiritual realities
Footsteps - David calls upon the Lord to keep him in the way he should go, so that he may walk constantly in the presence of the Lord, and not wander away. ...
Psalm 77:19 (b) The Lord uses this figure to reveal the fact that GOD's ways are not known to men, for He does not reveal them to men
Sabbath - Immediately this friend rests in the Lord and begins to keep the true sabbath. where the rest which the Lord gives to the trusting soul is compared to the sabbath of the Old Testament. In our day the Lord JESUS says, "Come unto Me, and I will give you rest
Nathanael - One of whom the Lord said, "Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile. " He answered, "Whence knowest thou me?" The Lord told him that he had seen him under the fig tree, where probably he had been in some exercise of soul Godward: we may gather this from Psalm 32:2,5 , as one in whom is no guile is one who confesses his transgressions to the Lord
Anathema - Another kind of anathema, very peculiarly expressed, occurs in 1 Corinthians 16:22 : "If any man love not the Lord Jesus Christ, let him be anathema. " This last word is made up of two Syro-Chaldaic words, signifying "The Lord cometh;" that is, the Lord will surely come, and will execute this curse by condemning those who love him not
Sabaoth - JEHOVAH SABAOTH is the Lord of Hosts; and we are to understand the word hosts in the most comprehensive sense, as including the host of heaven, the angels and minister of the Lord; the stars and planets, which, as an army ranged in battle array, perform the will of God; the armies of earth, whose conflicts his providence overrules to the accomplishment of his own wise designs; the hordes of inferior creatures, as the locusts that plagued Egypt, the quails that fed Israel, and "the canker-worm and the palmer-worm, his great army," Joel 2:15 ; and lastly, the people of the Lord, both of the old and new covenants, a truly great army, of which God is the general and commander, 2 Samuel 6:2 Psalm 24:10 Romans 9:29 James 5:4
Keeper - In Great Britain, the keeper of the great seal, is a Lord by his office,and one of the privy council. He is constituted Lord-keeper by the delivery of the great seal. The keeper of the privy seal is also a Lord by his office,and a member of the privy council
Hosts - God was, to the Israelites, the Lord of hosts. Yet as Lord of hosts, God is more than just God of the armies of Israel. ...
As a title indicating a God whose power is unlimited, ‘Lord of hosts’ is a frequently used title of God in the Bible
Offering - The offerings and that which they represent are given as follows:...
Wave Offering Exodus 29:24 (c) This is typical of presenting before GOD all the beauties and the virtues of the Lord JESUS CHRIST as the One in whom we trust and in whom we delight in lieu of anything in ourselves. There was no leaven in any of the other offerings which represent the Lord JESUS. ...
Burnt Offering Leviticus 1:3 (c) This represents the offering of the entire person of the Lord JESUS to be accepted instead of our entire person. ...
Drink Offering Genesis 35:14 (c) This type represents the utter consecration of the believer who pours out all his life for the service of his Lord. ...
Meat Offering Leviticus 2:1 (c) This is a picture of the beautiful, smooth life of the Lord JESUS CHRIST offered to GOD instead of the horrible, rough life that we have lived. ...
Peace Offering Leviticus 3:1 (c) By this is illustrated the way in which our Lord JESUS by the sacrifice of Himself made peace for us by the Blood of His Cross. ...
Trespass Offering Leviticus 5:6 (c) This offering is for the actual sins which are committed day by day and must be met by the sacrifice of our blessed Lord. ...
Sin Offering Leviticus 5:17 (c) This type represents the suffering of the Lord JESUS for sinners. ...
Heave Offering Numbers 18:24 (c) This is a type of that which is offered to the Lord of our gifts, talents, activities, etc. ...
All the above types are summed up as pictures and types of our Lord JESUS in Ephesians 5:2, where we read that He "hath given Himself for us an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweet smelling savour
Solomon - But the greatest improvement we can make of the view of Solomon, is to consider him in those features of his character which were typical of the Lord Jesus Christ. " (Matthew 22:42) And it is remarkable that the Lord should have sent by the hand of Nathan, at the birth of Solomon, and called him Jedidiah, that is, beloved of the Lord. (2 Samuel 12:24-25) And we need not be told how the Lord, by a voice from heaven, proclaimed Christ to be his"beloved Son in whom he was well pleased. "Add to these, Solomon king of Israel typified Christ as a king and as a preacher in Jerusalem; and also in his wisdom, in the riches, magnitude; peaceableness, and glory of his kingdom, and in the building of the temple, which was a beautiful type of the Lord Jesus; who is not only the builder of the temple, which is his church, but the foundation of it, the substance, and the glory of it; for he and he alone, as the Lord said by the prophet, was the only one fit to build the temple of the Lord, and he alone "could only bear the glory. " (Zechariah 6:13)...
But when we have looked at Solomon, king of Israel, as in those and the like instances, as becoming a lively type of the ever-blessed Jesus, and see in our Lord Jesus Christ a greater than Solomon in every one, I would request the reader to detach from the person and character of David's son all that belongs not to him in those Scriptures, and particularly in the book of the Psalms, which are as if directed to him and spoken of him, but certainly with him have nothing to do. I know that some commentators have supposed that what is there said is said first of Solomon, king of Israel, and secondly in an higher sense of the Lord Jesus Christ. But oh, what a degradation of the subject is it thus to suppose! Oh, what indignity is thereby offered to the Lord Jesus Christ! I have said so much on this point in my Poor Man's Commentary on the Book of the Psalms, that I think it unnecessary in this place to enlarge; but I could not suffer the subject even in this little work, while speaking of Solomon, to pass by without remarking the great perversion of the Scripture to suppose that there is in those things the least reference to Solomon, king of Israel
Disciple - (Latin: discipulus, a student) ...
A term used in the New Testament to designate a Christian follower, either a personal adherent of Our Lord or the Apostles; the disciples, strictly so called, are to be distinguished from the Apostles. The Latin Church gives the number of disciples of Our Lord as either 72 or 70
Jehovah-Shalom - The margin of the Bible renders this title of a covenant God, "The Lord send peace. " It was ascribed to the Lord by Gideon, in the prospect of conquering Midian
Jehovah-Tsidkenu - (jeh hoh' vuh-tssihd kee' nyoo) Hebrew name meaning “The Lord [1] our righteousness” (Jeremiah 23:6 ; Jeremiah 33:16 , margin). The name is possibly a play on the name of Zedekiah (“Righteous [1] the Lord”) who reigned from 597 to 587 B
Bastard - Illegitimate children were not permitted to enter the assembly of the Lord (Deuteronomy 23:2 ). According to Hebrews, those who do not have the discipline of the Lord are illegitimate children (Deuteronomy 12:8 )
Incense - Exodus 30:1 (c) A figure of the sweet, fragrant life of the Lord JESUS offered up to GOD during His life of suffering and death of agony wherein and wherewith GOD was well pleased. ...
(Strange)...
Exodus 30:9 (c) In this case, the strange incense is a figure of human activities and religious performances which are offered to GOD for His acceptance in competition with and instead of the life of the Lord JESUS
Concerning - ...
The Lord hath spoken good concerning Israel. The Lord hath spoken good, which speaking good is concerning Israel
Caesar - Thus Tiberius was the Emperor in the days of our Lord. (See Luke 3:1) But our Lord only called him Caesar
Censer - When Aaron made an atonement for himself and his house, he was to take a censer full of burning coals of fire from off the altar of the Lord, Leviticus 16:12 . And Solomon, when he provided furniture for the temple of the Lord, made, among other things, censers of pure gold, 1 Kings 7:50
Enos - In his days "began men to call upon the name of the Lord" in organized and systematic public worship; then began men to call themselves by the name of the Lord; that is, for the purpose of marking the distinction between men of God and the ungodly
Jewels - In Malachi 3:17 it is used symbolically for the remnant that will be precious to the Lord of hosts in a future day, as the saints are now during the rejection of the Lord Jesus by the world
Sherezer - One of the messengers whom the children of the Captivity sent to Jerusalem "to pray for them before the Lord" (Zechariah 7:2 )
Second Coming - See also DAY OF THE Lord; ESCHATOLOGY; JUDGMENT; KINGDOM OF GOD; MILLENNIUM; RESURRECTION
Baal-Hamon - (bay' uhl-hay' mohn) Place name meaning, “lord of abundance
House of Prayer - A church, the house of God, as Our Lord designated the Temple of Jerusalem: "My house is the house of prayer
Dominus - ) Master; sir; - a title of respect formerly applied to a knight or a clergyman, and sometimes to the Lord of a manor
Mattaniah - Or more properly Mattan-Jah—Gift of the Lord
Ramiah - One who returned from Babylon, (Ezra 10:25) The compound makes the name, raised up of the Lord
Consuming - The Lord thy God is a consuming fire
Sergeanty - ) Tenure of lands of the crown by an honorary kind of service not due to any Lord, but to the king only
Hoshaiah - His name is a compound of Hosha and Jah, from Jasha, Saviour; and Jah, Lord, (See Nehemiah 12:32
Ahaz - Matthew’s genealogy of our Lord (Matthew 1:9)
Ith'a-i - (with the Lord ), a Benjamite, son of Ribai of Gibeah, one of the heroes of David's guard
Nimrod - (Genesis 10:8-9) The character given of this man is that of a mighty hunter before the Lord
Cononi'ah - (appointed by the Lord ), a Levite, ruler of the offerings and tithes in the time of Hezekiah
Dod'Avah - (love of the Lord ), a man of Maresha in Judah; father of Eliezer, who denounced Jehoshaphat's alliance with Ahaziah
ra'Gau, - one of the ancestors of our Lord, son of Peleg
Asa - "Asa did that which was right in the sight of the Lord, as did David his father. On the country being invaded by the Ethiopians with a million troops and 300 chariots, he cried to the Lord, who fought for him, and the enemy was smitten. He was counselled by Azariah not to forsake the Lord, which led to the spoil being offered to God, and to the king and his people entering into a covenant to seek the Lord. While Asa trusted in the Lord he had deliverance, but having relied on the king of Syria, he should have war all his days. He was disciplined in his person, for he was diseased in his feet, and the disease increased exceedingly; yet he sought not the Lord, but to the physicians (perhaps these were healers by magic arts in connection with idolatry, on which God's blessing could not be asked) and he died after a reign of 41 years
Dominion - ...
A — 2: κυριότης (Strong's #2963 — Noun Feminine — kuriotes — koo-ree-ot'-ace ) denotes "lordship" (kurios, "a Lord"), "power, dominion," whether angelic or human, Ephesians 1:21 ; Colossians 1:16 ; 2 Peter 2:10 (RV, for AV, "government"); Jude 1:8 . ...
B — 1: κυριεύω (Strong's #2961 — Verb — kurieuo — koo-ree-yoo'-o ) "to be Lord over, rule over, have dominion over" (akin to A, No. 2), is used of (a) Divine authority over men, Romans 14:9 , "might be Lord;" (b) human authority over men, Luke 22:25 , "lordship," 1 Timothy 6:15 , "lords" (RV, marg. , "them that rule as Lords"); (c) the permanent immunity of Christ from the "dominion" of death, Romans 6:9 ; (d) the deliverance of the believer from the "dominion" of sin, Romans 6:14 ; (e) the "dominion" of law over men, Romans 7:1 ; (f) the "dominion" of a person over the faith of other believers, 2 Corinthians 1:24 (RV, "lordship"). See Lord. 1, "to exercise, or gain, dominion over, to Lord it over," is used of (a) the "lordship" of gentile rulers, Matthew 20:25 , AV, "exercise dominion," RV, "lord it;" Mark 10:42 , AV, "exercise Lordship," RV, "lord it;" (b) the power of demons over men, Acts 19:16 , AV, "overcame," RV, "mastered;" (c) of the evil of elders in "lording" it over the saints under their spiritual care, 1 Peter 5:3 . See LordSHIP , OVERCOME
Pomegranate - And as every thing she had and was came from her Lord, surely her Lord should have the best of his own gifts and graces. In a spiritual sense, believers may be said to entertain Christ when, in their exercises of faith in any of the gracious, or providential dispensations of the Lord, our sorrows are so sweetly tinged with the presence and sanctifying blessings of the Lord, that they are like to spiced wine in which is infused the juice of the pomegranate
Side - Numbers 33:55 (b) The heart is located in the side of the breast, and the Lord was warning Israel that if they permitted the enemy to remain in the land, then these enemies would strike at their very lives, and wreck their existence. ...
Ezekiel 1:17 (b) In this peculiar expression, the Lord is informing us that the Lord JESUS CHRIST, who is represented by the four animals, and the Holy Spirit, who is represented by the eyes, would influence and affect every part of the earth. The Lord uses the expression "the four sides" and the expression "the four corners" to represent north, south, east and west
Flood - This word is particularly and perhaps especially applicable only to the deluge, when the Lord by a flood of waters destroyed every thing that lived upon the earth of his creatures. So that there is one of the sweetest promises in the Bible, in allusion to the graces of the Lord the Spirit, made use of in a way of illustration, by the figure of a flood. "When the enemy shall come in like a flood, the Spirit of the Lord shall lift up a standard against him. " (Isaiah 59:19) Yea the Lord Jesus himself adopts the figure in reference to his own personal sufferings
Mount Tabor - Hence, we find the Lord himself referring to mount Tabor as eminent among the mountains; "As I live, saith the King, whose name is the Lord of hosts; surely as Tabor is among the mountains, and as Carmel by the sea, so shall he come. ) And the Psalmist celebrates this mountain as rejoicing with Hermon in the Lord. ) Some have thought that it was in mount Tabor the Lord Jesus was transfigured
Machbanai - Clad with a mantle, or bond of the Lord, one of the Gadite heroes who joined David in the wilderness (1 Chronicles 12:13 )
Tob-Adonijah - Good is Jehovah, my Lord, a Levite sent out by Jehoshaphat to instruct the people of Judah in the law (2 Chronicles 17:8 )
Sheshbazzar - O sun-god, defend the Lord! (Ezra 1:8,11 ), probably another name for Zerubbabel (q
Matthias - Or more property Mattath, gift-and Jah, the Lord
Bel - It signifies "lord
Asunder - ...
The Lord hath cut asunder the cords of the wicked
Salome - Honorable mention is made of this woman in her attendance on the Lord Jesus, Mark 15:40; Mar 16:1
Thin - Genesis 41:27 (a) The Lord uses this symbol to describe the famine and dearth which was to prevail in Egypt for seven years
Keilah - (Joshua 15:44) The word is compounded of Kol, a voice; and Jah, the Lord. —The voice of the Lord
Hachaliah - His name is compounded of Chakah and Jab, signifying a waiter upon the Lord
Jehudijah - (See 1 Chronicles 4:18) The name is very striking in the Jah twice—to the praise of the Lord
Monsignore - ) My Lord; - an ecclesiastical dignity bestowed by the pope, entitling the bearer to social and domestic rank at the papal court
Intercessions of the Litany - Those petitions in the Litany whichhave for their response the words, "We beseech Thee to hear us,Good Lord," are so called
Joseph - The interesting history of Joseph is too well known to need being given in its detail, but attention should be given to the many respects in which Joseph was a striking type of the Lord Jesus. He was the beloved one of his father: this with the intimations given to him of his future position, destined for him by God in the midst of his family, stirred up the envy of his brethren and resulted in his being sold to the Gentiles: as the Lord was hated by His brethren the Jews, and sold by one of them. He was brought very low, being cast into prison, under a false accusation against him because he would not sin: his feet were 'made fast in the stocks,' and the iron entered his soul: in all these circumstances he was foreshadowing the Lord in His humiliation. ...
On the elevation of Joseph to power he was unknown to his brethren, as the Lord in exaltation is now to His brethren after the flesh. During thistime he had a Gentile wife and children and became 'fruitful': so while the Lord is rejected by the Jews, God is gathering from the nations a people for His name. Joseph ruled over the Gentiles, as the Lord will do. Then all Joseph's brethren bowed down to him, as eventually all the twelve tribes will bow down to the Lord. ...
The beautiful and touching way in which Joseph dealt with his brethren, will be repeated in a magnified way by the Lord's tender and loving dealing with the remnant of Judah when they come to speak to Him about the wounds in His hands, and to mourn over the way He was treated by them. He was sorely grieved, hated, and shot at, as was the Lord; but his bow abode in strength, and from him was the shepherd, the stone of Israel (two titles of the Lord). Then the blessings of heaven and of the deep, of the breasts and of the womb, are multiplied on the head and on the crown of Joseph, as the one separated from his brethren: all foreshadowing, though to be far exceeded by, the many crowns and the glory in heaven and on earth of the true Nazarite, now sanctified in heavenly glory, the Lord Jesus. The visit to Jerusalem, when the Lord was twelve years old, is the last incident recorded of him. He is once called 'the carpenter,' Matthew 13:55 , as is the Lord also in Mark 6:3 . He was a secret disciple of Jesus, and had not consented to the action of the Sanhedrim in condemning the Lord. Son of Mattathias; son of Juda; and son of Jonan — three in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Nobleman - He is supposed to have been the Chuza, Herod's steward, whose wife was one of those women who "ministered unto the Lord of their substance" (Luke 8:3 ). Our Lord sent him away with the joyful assurance that his son was alive
Polish - They become precious jewels to adorn both their family and the cause of their Lord. ...
Isaiah 49:2 (a) This is a picture of the loveliness, the beauty, the majesty and the glory of our wonderful Saviour, CHRIST JESUS the Lord
Consecration - The Hebrews devoted their fields and cattle, and sometimes the spoils of war, to the Lord (Leviticus 27:28,29 ). In the New Testament, Christians are regarded as consecrated to the Lord (1 Peter 2:9 )
Elisabeth - On being visited by Mary, she was filled with the Holy Spirit, and hailed Mary as 'the mother of my Lord. ' She said, "Blessed is she that believed: for there shall be a performance of those things which were told her from the Lord
Sapphire - Isaiah 54:11 (a) Our Lord JESUS is compared to this beautiful stone because of His holy and heavenly character, and as the foundation of GOD's Church. ...
Ezekiel 1:26 (a) This is a bright blue stone which is typical of the heavenly and holy character of our Lord
Baal-Hamon - So that Baal-hamon may be rendered, Lord or master of a troop, or people. We all apprehend, that "the vineyard of the Lord of hosts is the house, of Israel; and the men of Judah his pleasant plant
Doeg - An Edomite, the chief of Saul's herdsmen, "detained before the Lord," probably by a vow, or because it was the sabbath, when David fled to Nob. Doeg afterwards falsely accused Abimelech, the high priest, to Saul; and, when none of the king's guard would execute the ferocious sentence to slay the priests of the Lord, he fell upon them and killed 80 persons, sacking also their city
Mount Horeb - This mountain will always be memorable in Scripture; because here it was the Lord appeared to Moses. ) Here the Lord seemed to stand, as if to intimate that the law was given by Moses, "but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ
Lordship - Lord'SHIP, n. The state of quality of being a Lord hence, a title of honor given to noblemen, except to dukes, who have the title of grace. They who are accounted to rule over the Gentiles, exercise Lordship over them. Seigniory domain the territory of a Lord over which he holds jurisdiction a manor. What lands and Lordships for their owner know my quondam barber
Litany Desk - The significance of this position may be seen byreference to the words of the prophet Joel read on Ash Wednesdayas the Epistle, "Let the Priests, the Ministers of the Lord, weepbetween the porch and the Altar, and let them say, Spare Thypeople, O Lord
Lamb And Flag - A symbolical representation of our Blessed Lord,used in Church decorations. Therays are marks of divinity and belong only to our Lord
Charles Russell Lawyer - In 1894 he was made Lord of appeals, and raised to the peerage for life; he was also appointed Lord chief justice. His Catholic faith alone prevented him from being appointed Lord chancellor in the Liberal government of 1892, such an appointment being contrary to the provisions of the Act of Settlement
Ittai - In spite of being urged by David to return to his home, he determined to follow the king in his misfortune, affirming his faithfulness in the beautiful words: ‘As the Lord liveth, and as my Lord the king liveth, surely in what place my Lord the king shall be, whether for death or for life, even there also will thy servant be’ ( 2 Samuel 15:21 )
Ephod - It may represent that part of our Christian experience in which and through which we show forth the virtues of our Lord JESUS CHRIST. These colors and materials represent the various and glorious characteristics of our Lord JESUS, and are imparted and imputed to us when we are made children of GOD. All of this refers in some way to our Lord JESUS who carries us on His shoulders and on His breast
Hang(ed) - ...
Isaiah 22:24 (a) This figure is used to describe the work of GOD in placing on the Lord JESUS all the majesty, glory and honor which is due to Him. ...
Matthew 22:40 (a) By this type the Lord is telling us that all of GOD's plans for men and His purposes depend upon the two great commandments which He mentions. ...
Hebrews 12:12 (a) Here we see a picture of the discouraged and defeated Christian who is called upon to look up to His Lord, and to take fresh courage
Shewbread - They were twelve loaves in number, meaning one for every tribe, to be presented before the Lord. Those twelve loaves were carried in by the priests hot before the Lord, and the twelve which had been there from the Sabbath before were then taken away. The Hebrews called them Lechem Panahim, the bread of faces: probably from being thus presented before the face of the Lord
Maranatha - In addition to what was then observed under this head, it may not be improper to remark yet farther, that when the apostle Paul useth this form of expression, which signifies, Let the offender that loves not the Lord Jesus Christ be punished when the Lord comes, he useth it not as a matter that was new, or a form that was never heard of before, but rather one well known. It is as if the person so pronouncing the punishment meant thereby to say, it exceeds my power to express what ought to be the consequence of your crime, I therefore leave you to the Lord when he comes
Pashur - Son of Immer, 'chief governor in the house of the Lord. Jeremiah said to him that the Lord had called his name MAGOR-MISSABIB, 'fear round about' margin . The Lord would make him a terror to himself and all his friends; and they should fall by the sword
Poor - The Lord said, "Ye have the poor with you always, and whensoever ye will ye may do them good. "He that hath pity upon the poor lendeth unto the Lord. Of the Lord Jesus it is said, that though He was rich, yet for our sakes He became poor
Sweep - Isaiah 14:23 (b) This picture describes the thorough destruction of Babylon, which was foretold by our Lord, and was completely carried out to the extermination of that great city. Eventually, Israel will be "holiness to the Lord. The lost coin represents the Christian who has drifted out of the way of the Lord, and is hiding under home life, or business life, or laziness, and is not being used among GOD's people
Russell, Charles - In 1894 he was made Lord of appeals, and raised to the peerage for life; he was also appointed Lord chief justice. His Catholic faith alone prevented him from being appointed Lord chancellor in the Liberal government of 1892, such an appointment being contrary to the provisions of the Act of Settlement
Persis - She is spoken of as "beloved," and as having "laboured much in the Lord
Mattathias -
The son of Amos, in the genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:25 )
Beulah - , favoured and blessed of the Lord
Reyhound - Proverbs 30:31 (c) This is a type of the Lord JESUS in His swift actions both of judgment and of blessing
Judah (2) - —The eponymous ancestor of the tribe to which our Lord belonged (Matthew 1:2 f
Possessory - ) Of or pertaining to possession, either as a fact or a right; of the nature of possession; as, a possessory interest; a possessory Lord
Thyratira - Here was one of the seven churches to whom the Lord Jesus sent his epistles
King - Song of Solomon 1:4 (c) In this way we see the Lord JESUS CHRIST in His glory as the sovereign ruler of His church
Tanist - ) In Ireland, a Lord or proprietor of a tract of land or of a castle, elected by a family, under the system of tanistry
Metecorn - ) A quantity of corn formerly given by the Lord to his customary tenants, as an encouragement to, or reward for, labor and faithful service
Nativity of Our Lord - The Prayer Book title of the Festival ofChristmas is, "The Nativity of our Lord, or the Birthday of Christ,commonly called CHRISTMAS DAY" (which see)
Prince - This is one of the titles of the Lord Jesus. The prophet Ezekiel, in the close of his prophecy, dwells much upon the character of the Lord Jesus under the title of prince. I shall not think it necessary to enlarge in our views of our adorable Lord as our Prince and Saviour, for every act of his manifests his royal princely sovereignty and power as the glorious Head of his body the church. All his reigns in nature, providence, grace, and glory, set him forth as the Prince of Peace, the universal Lord and emperor in heaven and in earth. Hail, thou almighty Lord! do thou reign and rule in me and my poor heart now and for ever
Honey - The land of Canaan represents that place in the Christian's life wherein by utter consecration he begins to receive his richest blessings from the living Lord on the throne. ...
Deuteronomy 32:13 (a) The rock represents the Lord JESUS, and the honey represents the sweetness, the loveliness and all those precious graces which one receives from CHRIST by faith. In the sacrifices to the Lord, nothing is acceptable to GOD except the virtues of CHRIST. All the natural graces which we admire in one another are to be completely omitted from everything that pertains to sacrifice for sins or for merit before the Lord. ...
Judges 14:9 (c) The lion represents the Lord JESUS and the honey represents the lovely and delightful sweetness which the believer enjoys as he comes and takes out of CHRIST's heart and life the blessings which are so freely given
Peace - Hence the believer is justified by faith, and has peace (peace of conscience) with God through the Lord Jesus Christ. Christ made peace through the blood of the cross, Colossians 1:20 and to the Christian God is 'the God of peace,' and the Lord Jesus is 'the Lord of peace. ...
When the Lord Jesus left the earth He left to the disciples peace, and said, "My peace I give unto you. " Isaiah 57:21 The Lord Jesus will, in the future, among His other titles, be hailed as PRINCE OF PEACE
Harvest - Jesus reflects the Bible's theological viewpoint on harvest when he enjoins believers to ask the "Lord of the harvest" for laborers (Matthew 9:38 ). But the focus in harvest revolved around the product and the work of the Lord in bringing it to completion. Even during harvest, the Sabbath rest was to be kept so that the focus would remain on the Lord (Exodus 34:21-22 ). ...
The firstfruits came to the priest, who would offer them to the Lord. If a person brought them, then the Lord might accept them (Leviticus 23:10-11 ), an acceptance perhaps reflected in the successful completion of the harvest in the fall, a "blessing" (Deuteronomy 24:19 ; Psalm 107:37-38 ). ...
Acknowedgment of the Lord's part in the harvest was important, perhaps best seen when crops failed, usually attributed to the Lord for the failure of Israel to recognize God's part (Isaiah 17:11 ; Amos 4:7 ; Haggai 1:6 ). The prophets indicate that the Lord destroyed the harvest in judgment (Isaiah 18:4-6 ; Jeremiah 12:13 ). As God of the harvest, the Lord speaks and takes it away (Hosea 2:9 ). Israel turned away from the Lord and suffered a punishment like a harvest
Child - But these things are so obvious and plain, that I should not have thought it necessary, in a work of this kind, purposely contracted into the narrowest compass, to have noticed the word Child, but for the introducing a short observation on the term itself, as applied to the Lord Jesus Christ. The passages I refer to are in the prayer of the church, on that memorable occasion when the Lord answered, by an immediate shaking of the place where they were assembled. (Acts 4:27-30) "Of a truth, Lord, against thy holy child Jesus, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, with the Gentiles and the people of Israel were gathered together. And now, Lord, grant that signs and wonders may be done by the name of thy holy child Jesus. And for the complete justification of the church, the Lord Jesus took that nature in its perfect holiness. Hence Abraham, the great father the faithful, when the Lord promised, that he himself would be his shield, and his exceeding reward, said, Lord God, "what wilt thou give me seeing I go childless?" (Genesis 15:1-2) And the punishment the Lord appointed to unnatural alliances, was to bear their sins in dying childless. (Leviticus 20:20) And in the case of Coniah, the Lord said, "Write this man childless," (Jeremiah 22:30) It were well among Christians, if this was well understood
Borrow - From that memorable passage in Scripture, Exodus 3:22, where the Lord commanded Moses, that the people should borrow of their neighbours, on their departure from Egypt, jewels of gold and of silver, the idea hath arisen in many minds, that as the things then borrowed were never afterwards returned, there was intended, and committed, a real fraud. But it is to be observed, that the word borrow, from the same root, is differently rendered in the case of Hannah, when asking the Lord for a son. Had the root been regarded in her instance, from whence the word Hannah used it, and from whence it was taken, it would have been, she borrowed of the Lord a son. For when she brought Samuel to the temple, she tells Eli, for this child (said she) I prayed, and the Lord "hath given me my petition which I asked of him;" therefore also, I have lent him to the Lord; as long as he liveth he shall be lent to the Lord. In the margin it is, I have returned him, whom I have received by petition, to the Lord; or, he whom I have received by petition shall be returned. " (Acts 7:19) When, therefore, the Lord had turned their tables upon them, and by the plagues upon Pharaoh, and all his people, had made a way for the Exodus, of his chosen, no doubt, under the remorse of their minds, and their sorrow of heart, the Egyptians were glad to part with the Israelites at any rate, and therefore lent them, or gave them such things as they asked. ...
I only beg to add, under this view of the subject, that as the tabernacle in the wilderness was afterwards adorned with the gold and silver the Israelites brought with them from Egypt, it is plain that the Lord approved of the conduct of his servants in asking from their neighbours such things as they needed, and as the Lord himself had commanded. (Exodus 3:22)...
And might there not be somewhat typical in the thing itself, in reference to the future call (as was all along intended) of the Gentile church? I beg the reader to read that sweet passage of the prophet Isaiah 19:18-25; and see the rich promises of the call of Egypt with Assyria, when the Lord shall set up the New Testament altar, even the Lord Jesus Christ, in the midst of the land of Egypt; and five cities shall speak the language of Canaan, even the gospel language of salvation by the blood and righteousness of the Lord Jesus Christ. And I would ask, Is not that day, yea, that very day, at hand? Hath not the Lord, even now, been planting the gospel in Egypt? Hath not our God, when working by terrible things in righteousness, as he doth in the present awful war, caused even the Musselmen and inhabitants of Egypt to look on the congregations and prayer meetings of some of our pious soldiers who have been there? The writer of this hath himself received testimony to this striking providence of our God from a faithful soldier of the Lord Jesus Christ, as well as a faithful servant of his king and country, who was there, and an eye-witness to such characters looking in upon them, when he and a few of his devout comrades met together to read the Scriptures, and pray, and sing praises to the Lord. And who shall say what eventual blessed consequences may arise out of it? Who knows, but from this may spring up, as from a grain of mustard seed, a glorious harvest to our God? Oh! for that happy period when, according to this sweet prophecy, "the Lord of hosts himself shall bless, saying, Blessed be Egypt my people, and Assyria the work of my hand, and Israel mine inheritance
Phalti - Deliverance of the Lord, the son of Laish of Gallim (1 Samuel 25:44 )= Phaltiel (2 Samuel 3:15 )
Persis - He called her, "the beloved Persis, which laboured much in the Lord
Sabachthani - An Aramaic word, signifying, "hast thou forsaken me?" uttered by the Lord when on the cross as the sin-bearer
Fornication - Also spiritual unfaithfulness to the Lord, Israel's and the church's husband (Ezekiel 16; Jeremiah 2; Hosea 1; Revelation 17:4)
Divorce - Was tolerated by Moses for sufficient reasons, Deuteronomy 24:1-4 ; but our Lord has limited it to the single case of adultery, Matthew 5:31,32
Azali'ah - (whom the Lord reserved ), the father of Shaphan the scribe in the reign of Josiah
Dundrennan - (Celtic: fort of the thorn-bushes) ...
A Cistercian abbey in Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland, founded, 1142, by King David I and Fergtls, Lord of Galloway, for monks from Rievaulx, Yorkshire. The remains include the chapter-house, with a fine arched doorway and octagonal columns, tombs of many abbots and priors, and of Alan, Lord of Galloway (c
End - This word would not have needed particular attention, but for that the Lord Jesus on the throne called himself by it. (Revelation 21:6) And when we consider in how many ways the Lord is, both the beginning and the end, the Alpha and the Omega, surely it is very blessed to make him, what the Father hath made him, as the Mediator and head of his church and people, the first and the last in all our pursuits, affections, and designs: Jesus Christ, the same yesterday, today, and for ever
Conversation - Oh, wretch that I am! Is this to have my speech seasoned with grace? O Lord, forgive me! Some humbling thoughts for the above in prayer. Lord, make me more spiritual in time to come
Access - So the Lord has many treasuries and secrets all shut up from carnal minds with locks which they cannot open; but he who walks in fellowship with Jesus possesses the master-key which will admit him to all the blessings of the covenant; yea, to the very heart of God. Through the Well-beloved we have access to God, to heaven, to every secret of the Lord
Hannah - Because she had been barren for many years, she vowed to the Lord that if she should give birth to a son, she would dedicate the child to God (1 Samuel 1:11 ). She fulfilled her vow by bringing her son to the sanctuary at Shiloh, where he served the Lord under the direction of Eli
Physician - ...
Jeremiah 8:22 (c) This indicates that though the Lord is the Great Physician, these people overlook His ministry and His medicine. ...
Matthew 9:12 (b) Here we find a reminder that the Lord is a great Physician ready to help those who admit their need
Powder - ...
Luke 20:18 (a) By this figure the Lord is explaining to us the tragedy of being an enemy of JESUS CHRIST. CHRIST as the Lord of Lords will crush every enemy and render him helpless and hopeless
Convocation - "These are the feasts of the Lord, which ye shall proclaim to be holy convocations, to offer an offering made by fire unto the Lord
Unreproveable - Our Lord JESUS is so effective in His work in the soul that the person is completely prepared in this life for the entrance into GOD's presence. That point is settled the moment JESUS CHRIST becomes the Lord and the Saviour of the believer
Most High - MOST HIGH, MOST HIGHEST...
We find frequent mention made, in holy Scripture, of the Lord JEHOVAH under these appellations; and very blessed and proper they are, when speaking of him. The latter of them, except with an eye to him, would be a breach of grammar, but becomes beautiful, in compounding two superlatives, in reference to the Lord JEHOVAH, of whom it must be truly said, without exceeding the bounds of language, as one of the sacred writers expresseth it, "There is no end of his greatness
Bartim us - A blind man whose sight was restored by our Lord, when in the neighborhood of Jericho. According to some writers, our Lord healed one of these (as in Luke) on entering Jericho, and another (Bartimeus, as in Mark) on leaving it; and Matthew has, with characteristic brevity in recording miracles, combined both these in one
Nadab - The oldest son of Aaron, slain by the Lord for presumptuously offering strange fire on the altar of burnt offering, Leviticus 10:1-20 . Nadab did evil in the sight of the Lord; and with him perished his children and the race of Jeroboam, as God had foretold, 1 Kings 15:25-30
Serve - When Samuel was still a boy, he “… did minister unto the Lord before Eli the priest” ( Lord called to him while he “… ministered unto the Lord before Eli” ( Lord, for Israel was not to be “as the heathen, as the families of the countries; to serve wood and stone” ( Lord to serve as priests ( Lord separated the tribe of Levi … to minister unto him, and to bless in his name …” ( Lord thy God, and serve him …” ( Lord your God, and to serve him …” ( Lord with gladness …” ( Lord … that they may execute the service of the Lord. ” Israel was in the “service” of the Lord: “But that it may be a witness between us, and you, and our generations after us, that we might do the service of the Lord before him with our burnt offerings, and with our sacrifices, and with our peace offerings; that your children may not say to our children in time to come, Ye have no part in the Lord” ( Lord God or human kings with their requirements of forced “labor” and tribute: “Nevertheless they shall be his servants; that they may know my service, and the service of the kingdoms of the countries” ( Lord: “And they shall keep his charge, and the charge of the whole congregation before the tabernacle of the congregation, to do the service of the tabernacle” ( Lord. “So all the service of the Lord was prepared the same day, to keep the passover, and to offer burnt offerings upon the altar of the Lord, according to the commandment of King Josiah” ( Lord, I am not eloquent, neither heretofore, nor since thou hast spoken unto thy servant …” ( Lord, and his servant Moses. “And the Lord spake by his servants the prophets …” (2 Kings 21:10). So the Lord called “my righteous servant” ( Lord in Isaiah: “That signs and wonders may be done by the name of thy holy child Jesus (Acts 4:30; RSV, NASB, NIV, “servant Jesus”); and another important use is Paul’s personal use of “a servant of Jesus Christ” ( Lord it came to pass, that the Lord spake unto Joshua, the son of Nun, Moses’ minister [8]. …” The privilege of serving the Lord is not restricted to human beings: “Bless ye the Lord, all ye his hosts [9]; ye ministers of his, that do his pleasure” ( For Thine is the Kingdom, And the Power, And the g - An addition to the original text of the prayer of Our Lord, the Our Father, inserted in the East and adopted in the form used by Protestants
Dalmanutha - A place honoured with the presence of the Lord Jesus
Boanerges - Sons of thunder, a surname given by our Lord to James and John (Mark 3:17 ) on account of their fervid and impetuous temper (Luke 9:54 )
Rabboni - , "Lord," RSV, "Rabboni;" John 20:16 )
Baali - My Lord, a title the prophet (Hosea 2:16 ) reproaches the Jewish church for applying to Jehovah, instead of the more endearing title Ishi, meaning "my husband
Nostrils - Exodus 15:8 (c) This is a poetic expression to describe the great power of the Lord in cursing His enemies
Broth - Isaiah 65:4 (b) This term is used to describe the evil mixture of lust and pleasure which Israel was enjoying in her rebellion against the Lord
Goath - Place mentioned as one of the boundaries to which the city of Jerusalem will extend when it is rebuilt 'to the Lord
Despot - ) A master; a Lord; especially, an absolute or irresponsible ruler or sovereign
Villanage - ) The state of a villain, or serf; base servitude; tenure on condition of doing the meanest services for the Lord
Beeli'Ada - (the Lord knows ); one of David's 9 sons, born in Jerusalem
Day of Christ - An alternate name for the Day of the Lord (2 Thessalonians 2:2 ) when Christ will come and gather the church to Himself. Some interpreters distinguish the Day of Christ as concerning the judgment of the church from the Day of the Lord as following the rapture and concerning judgment on earth. See Day of the Lord , Judgment Day
Alleluia - or HALLELU-JAH ...
הללואּ?יה , praise the Lord; or, praise to the Lord: compounded of הללו , praise ye, and יה the Lord
Baal-Zebub - (bay' uhl-zee' buhb) Deity's name meaning, “lord of the flies. One suggestion is “lord of the dwelling. ” A second, and more likely possibility is “lord of dung
Prison - Hence the Lord Jesus is said to be come to open the prison doors, and to bring sinners from the captivity of sin and Satan. And when at any time the soul of a poor buffeted child of God is again delivered by some renewed manifestation of the Lord Jesus, when he is brought out of the prison house, he is constrained to cry out,"O Lord, truly I am thy servant; I am thy servant, and the son of thine handmaid; thou hast loosed my bonds
Escheat - ) To revert, or become forfeited, to the Lord, the crown, or the State, as lands by the failure of persons entitled to hold the same, or by forfeiture. ) The falling back or reversion of lands, by some casualty or accident, to the Lord of the fee, in consequence of the extinction of the blood of the tenant, which may happen by his dying without heirs, and formerly might happen by corruption of blood, that is, by reason of a felony or attainder. ) Lands which fall to the Lord or the State by escheat
Slide - Deuteronomy 32:35 (b) In this way the Lord is describing the perilous condition of those who are His enemies. ...
Psalm 26:1 (b) David knew that he was in the hands of his loving Lord, and therefore would stand firm and would not fall by the wayside. ...
Jeremiah 8:5 (b) The inhabitants of Jerusalem were constantly drifting from the Lord, disobeying His laws, neglecting the sacrifices, and incurring the wrath of GOD
Joseph - Genesis 37:9-10 (c) This character is a type of the Lord JESUS in many respects. ...
Genesis 43:3 (c) Here Joseph is a true type of GOD, the Judge, and Benjamin is a type of the Lord JESUS. No man can see the Father's face unless he comes with the Lord JESUS, the elder brother
Garment - And hence the church is represented as singing, "I will greatly rejoice in the Lord: my soul shall be joyful it my God, for he hath clothed me with the garments of salvation, he hath covered me with the robe of righteousness, as a bridegroom decketh himself with ornaments, and as a bride adorneth herself with her jewels. " (Isaiah 61:10) And this corresponds to what the Lord Jesus counselled the church of Laodicea to buy of him "white raiment, that she might be clothed. " (Revelation 3:18) Hence, therefore, what is the garment, but Christ's righteousness, in which all the faithful are clothed, when justified in the perfect salvation of the Lord?...
Jotham - Jotham did that which was right in the sight of the Lord. He erected the high gate of the house of the Lord, and built much on Ophel; also in the mountains of Judah he built cities, castles, and towers. He became mighty because he prepared his way before the Lord his God
Jahaziel - Under the Spirit, who came upon him, he encouraged Jehoshaphat and the congregation of Judah in the house of the Lord, before the new court: "thus saith the Lord unto you, Be not . stand ye still, and see the salvation of the Lord with you" (2 Chronicles 20:14; Psalms 83:3-7). So, according to their faith, "when they began to sing and praise, the Lord set ambushments against Ammon, Moab,
Ird - ...
Psalm 30:11 (b) By this figure David is describing the joyful life which he received from his Lord and which was so precious to him that he compares it to a garment that surrounded him and strengthened him. ...
Isaiah 45:5 (a) The Lord in this way illustrates the truth that He gave to Cyrus the strength and the power which was necessary for conquering the world. ...
Ezekiel 16:10 (a) Here the Lord gives us a picture of the way He protected, surrounded and preserved Israel in the early days of their national existence. ...
Luke 12:35 (a) By this is indicated that the Christian should be ready for the service of the Lord day or night
Burnt Offering - Genesis 8:20 (c) This offering represents the perfect life and the perfect person of the Lord JESUS offered up to GOD in the place of and instead of our imperfect character and unholy life. It represents our entire self being acceptable to GOD in the person of the perfect Lord JESUS CHRIST. ...
Ezra 3:2 (c) Here this offering represents the person and work of the Lord JESUS, offered to GOD for the nation of Israel. ...
Isaiah 40:16 (c) If all the thousands of animals on the broad slopes of Lebanon were gathered together to make a burnt offering to GOD, this tremendous sacrifice would not be sufficient to put away one sin, nor would it equal the offering of the Lord JESUS CHRIST for our sins
Moriah - Here Abraham was directed by the Lord for the offering up of his son. ) The name itself is a compound of Mor and Jah, bitterness, or myrrh of the Lord. )...
It will not be unpleasant to the reader if I add under this article, that Moriah, in the intended offering of Isaac, being typical of Christ and his Calvary, as well as Isaac himself, may serve at all times to furnish sweet subject of meditation, The myrrh or Moriah of the Lord becomes no unapt resemblance of Jesus, because Christ's suffering, like myrrh, had a bitter taste, though fragrant smell. "In the mount of the Lord it shall be seen
Imposition of Hands - (Genesis 43:13-20) But in the striking act of laying on of hands on the day of atonement, and which was done by the express appointment of the Lord, we discover yet more of its importance. (See Leviticus 16:21-22) So again, by the same express command of the Lord, Joshua was ordained by the laying on of the hand of Moses, his successor. How lovely Jesus appears in receiving little children, and putting his hands on them, and blessing them! (Mark 10:13-16) We find the apostles in Jesus's name, using the imposition of hands, and the Lord confirming this act, by his accompanying it with the blessing of the Holy Ghost. (Acts 8:17; Act 19:6) But how far the Lord hath honoured it in the after ages of the church, I presume not to speak
Fisher - Besides its literal sense (Luke 5:2 ), this word is also applied by our Lord to his disciples in a figurative sense (Matthew 4:19 ; Mark 1:17 )
Zalmunna - One of the two kings of Midian whom the "Lord delivered" into the hands of Gideon
Diligently - ...
Ye shall diligently keep the commandments of the Lord your God
Clad - Isaiah 59:17 (a) This is a description of the complete abandonment of the Lord JESUS to the work of His Father and to His service for men
Reelaiah - Probably the name is derived from Rahal; astonishment-and Jah, the Lord
Persis - A Christian woman, saluted and praised by Paul (Romans 16:12) as having "laboured much in the Lord"; compare Priscilla' s ministrations as to Apollos (Acts 18:26)
Merchet - ) In old English and in Scots law, a fine paid to the Lord of the soil by a tenant upon the marriage of one the tenant's daughters
Margrave - ) Originally, a Lord or keeper of the borders or marches in Germany
Longsuffering - ...
The Lord God, merciful and gracious, long-suffering and abundant in goodness
Geshem or Gashmu - An Arabian, who opposed the work of the Lord in the time of Nehemiah, by ridicule and plots, Nehemiah 2:19 ; 6:1-9 ; about 445 B
Mach-Bana-i - (bond of the Lord ), one of the lion-faced warriors of Gad, who joined the fortunes of David when living in retreat at Ziklag
Maranath'a, - (1 Corinthians 16:22 ) signifying "our Lord cometh
Council, Heavenly - Micaiah saw the Lord sitting on His throne with “all the host of heaven” standing by to serve Him (1 Kings 22:19 ). The psalmist gave this insight into God's exalted being: “For who in the skies is comparable to the Lord? Who among the sons of the mighty is like the Lord, a God greatly feared in the council of the holy ones?” (Psalm 89:6-7 NAS). For Jeremiah the sign of false prophets was that they had not “stood in the counsel of the Lord” (Jeremiah 23:18 ). The servants of the Lord in good standing are those who obey their Sovereign's will (Psalm 103:21 ; Psalm 148:1-6 )
Banner - " (Psalms 60:4) And when Moses built an altar, after the victory obtained over Amalek, he called the name of it JEHOVAH Nissi; that is, the Lord is my banner. And what Lord but Christ? Were not both the altar and the banner tokens of the Lord Jesus Christ? (Exodus 17:15) Hence, the church speaks, in allusion to Christ, "In the name of our God, we set up our banners. " (Psalms 20:5) And hence also, the church, when beheld in her warlike appearance, fighting in the strength of her Lord, is said to be, "fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terrible as an army with banners. Reader! believer! friend! are we under this almighty Banner? Hath the Lord Jesus brought us to his banqueting house, and is his banner over us of love? Oh, then, let us sit down under his shadow, for, surely, all his fruit is sweet to our taste! Sure banner of peace with God, and good will towards men! See Jehovah Nissi
Abednego - And they no less knew, how tenacious Hebrew parents were to give names to their children, which bore some relation to the Lord God of their fathers. In changing their names therefore, they not only designed to make them forget their beloved Jerusalem, but the yet more beloved Lord God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. And what a change they wrought here, in the instance of this man! Azariah, or more properly speaking, Azar-Jah, meant, as the words themselves indeed express, the Lord is my help; from Azar, assistance; and Jab, Lord. Lord! keep thy people from "mingling with the heathen, and learning their works
Ark - We read in Scripture of the ark which the Lord directed Noah to make. For the same apostle elsewhere saith, that he "saw no temple in heaven? (Revelation 11:19 with Revelation 21:22) The ark of Noah, as well as that of Moses, were types of the Lord Jesus Christ. " Faith in what? Surely, faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. Never is it said in the word of God of more than one ark; no more than one Lord Jesus Christ. " And it were to be wished, that such men would call to mind the Lord's jealousy in the case of the men of Bethshemesh, (1 Samuel 6:19) and also the circumstance of Uzzah, (1 Chronicles 13:10) What was the sin of all those but overlooking Christ? And wherein do those differ, who talk of arks instead of one ark, and that expressly, and on no other account valuable, than as it represented the Lord Jesus? (1 Samuel 4:3; 2 Samuel 15:24)...
Sign - This word is used in the sense of token and pledge; as, when the Lord gave to Noah the rainbow, as a sign of his covenant, Genesis 9:12-13 ; and when he appointed to Abraham the use of circumcision, as the seal of the covenant he had made with him and his posterity, Genesis 17:11 . "What shall be the sign," or evidence, "that the Lord will heal me?" 2 Kings 20:8 . This acceptation agrees with the first above mentioned; as also what is said in Genesis 4:15 , "And the Lord set a mark or sign upon Cain;" he gave him a pledge that his life should not be taken away. The signs of heaven, and the signs of the magicians, are the phenomena of the heavens, and the impostures of magicians, which they made use of for the purposes of deception: "The Lord frustrateth the tokens or signs of the liars, and maketh diviners mad," Isaiah 44:25 . Thus the Prophet Isaiah 8:18 , "Behold, I and the children whom the Lord hath given me, are for signs and for wonders in Israel
Maran-Atha - " ...
The first part, ending in 'n,' signifies "Lord;" as to the second part, the Fathers regarded it as a past tense, "has come. " Certain Aramaic scholars regard the last part as consisting of 'tha,' and regard the phrase as an ejaculation, "Our Lord, come," or "O Lord, come. " After His resurrection they used the title of or to Him as applied to God, "but it must here be remembered that the Aramaic-speaking Jews did not, save exceptionally, designate God as 'Lord'; so that in the 'Hebraist' section of the Jewish Christians the expression 'our Lord' (Marana) was used in reference to Christ only" (Dalman, The Words of Jesus)
Simon - Simon, one of the brethren of the Lord. Simon the Leper, at whose house 'a woman' anointed the head of the Lord. There is no authority for associating this anointing of the Lord with that recorded in Luke 7:36-50 , described as being by 'a sinner. Simon the Cyrenian, father of Alexander and Rufus: he was made to carry the Lord's cross. Simon the Pharisee, who invited the Lord to his house, where a woman 'who was a sinner' anointed the feet of the Lord. The Pharisee judged that the Lord could not be a prophet, or He would have known that the woman was a sinner; but he was rebuked, and the woman was forgiven
Spring - Psalm 87:7 (a) David is telling us that all the source of his joy, hope, happiness and enrichment comes from the Lord, and not from any earthly conditions, situations or riches. ...
Isaiah 41:18 (c) It is true that our Lord is at the present time changing the desert into a garden in the land of Philistine. It is also true that in a typical sense the Lord does take the weary, worn and dried up Christian and sends into his life the Holy Spirit of GOD who is the Living Water, so that the life becomes radiant, fruitful and beautiful. ...
Isaiah 58:11 (a) In this beautiful picture we see the story of a child of GOD who walks with GOD, loves his Lord, obeys His Lord and permits the Holy Spirit, who is the Living Water, to flow through him into the lives of many. He shows forth the loveliness of his Lord, and lives a constantly beautiful life
Mount (And Forms) - He does not grow in grace nor in the knowledge of the Lord JESUS. The Lord wants us to go on and grow unto full stature for our Lord. ...
Isaiah 40:4 (a) By this delightful figure the Lord is encouraging us to know that He will remove obstacles and hindrances in the Christian's life so as to make His yoke easy and His burden light in the service which we render. ...
Matthew 17:20 (a) Our Lord is telling us the same message that He told to Zerubbabel in Zechariah 4:6-7. Those who know the Lord intimately and believe Him fully may address themselves to these problems and see the Lord solve them and remove them
Providence - Hence when we speak of the Lord's government, either in the kingdoms of nature or grace, we say, the Lord by his providence hath ordered all things in heaven and in earth. (Job 38:41) So again, speaking of the Lord's care over his people, it is said, "thou preparest them corn when thou hast so provided for it. " (Psalms 65:9) From all which it appears, that providence or providing are acts of the Lord, and not the Lord himself. Therefore when it is said, (as it is too frequently said) I hope providence will do this or that, I trust to providence, providence hath been very good, and the like, this is ascribing to the deed what belongs only to the Lord, the doer of that deed; and however unintentional on the part of the speaker, it becomes a great error. Both providence and grace are creatures of God; and however the Lord is carrying on his merciful purposes of redemption by both to his church and people, yet to give glory to either, instead of glorifying the Author of either, is to overlook the loveliness of the Lord in the loveliness of his creatures, and to place secondary things in the stead of the first. Whereas we ought to say, to use somewhat like the form of the apostle James, "If the Lord will, we shall live by his providence and grace
Foot - Deuteronomy 32:35 (a) In this way the Lord is indicating that the enemies of GOD will be cut off and die. ...
Ezekiel 1:7 (b) These are types of the walk of our Lord JESUS CHRIST. ...
Matthew 5:13 (a) Here we find a type of the actions of the world against the professing Christian who claims that he belongs to the Lord, yet shows no proofs of it in his daily life. ...
Matthew 18:8 (b) In this way the Lord is telling us that if we want to walk in the ways of the world so that the feet take us astray to the picture show, the tavern, the dance, it is best to cut off that foot so that such desires cannot and will not keep us away from CHRIST. Since this self-righteousness comes from the hands (what we do), and from the feet (how we walk), the Lord is indicating how worthless these are by telling the servant to bind him "hand and foot," and to cast him out of His presence. The Lord is telling us here that no part of the body is independent from the rest of the body. No, believer, no matter how humble or obscure, is overlooked by the Lord, either as to his care or his usefulness. ...
Hebrews 10:29 (b) Here is a picture of the hatred that some had and some now have toward the person of our Lord JESUS. ...
Revelation 10:2 (b) This figure represents the absolute power and authority of our Lord over all nations and His ability to punish all people
Rebel - 3:8 (NASB): “For Jerusalem has stumbled, and Judah has fallen, Because their speech and their actions are against the Lord, To rebel against His glorious presence. Several prepositions are used to indicate the object of rebellion (‘im, et, generally translated as “against”): “… Ye have been rebellious against [3] the Lord” ( Lord, and hast not kept the commandment which the Lord thy God commanded thee” (1 Kings 13:21); cf. 1 Kings 13:26: “It is the man of God, who was disobedient unto the word of the Lord. …” The Old Testament sometimes specifically states that someone “rebelled” against the Lord; at other times it may refer to a rebelling against the word of the Lord ( Lord is righteous; for I have rebelled against his commandment …” ( Lord, she does not draw near to her God” ( Day of the Lord - The day of the Lord rests on the Hebrew term, yom , “day,” the fifth most frequent noun used in the Old Testament and one used with a variety of meanings: time of daylight from sunrise to sunset (