Exhaustive information for Strongs Number: 1161

Word info for δέ

Root: δέ
Strongs Number: 1161
Transliteration: [de]
Phonetics: deh
Etymology: A primary particle (adversative or continuative)
Parts of Speech: conj.
Twot:
Sense: but, moreover, and, etc (more info)

Outline of Biblical Usage:


   1 but, moreover, and, etc.
   Additional Information: Frequency count based on Scrivener’s 1894 Greek New Testament.
   J.
   B.
   Smith listed no count.
   

Frequency in the Books

Words from the Root of G1161

δὲ, δ’, δέ, ‹δὲ›, 〈δὲ〉, Δὲ, [δὲ], (δὲ), ‹δέ›, δὲ›

All words for strongs number G1161 :

Word Occurance
δὲ 2316
δέ 133
δ’ 22
‹δὲ› 8
[δὲ] 4
Δὲ 3
(δὲ) 2
〈δὲ〉 1
‹δέ› 1
δὲ› 1

How strongs number G1161 is translated (KJV)

English Occurance
now 784
however 656
then 538
and 318
but 143
also 29
therefore 4
yet 4
even 2
indeed 2
and the 1
- 1
moreover 1
while 1
and [they said] 1
however [are] 1
and [for] 1
for 1
nevertheless 1
but [he] 1
though 1

Greek Commentary Search

Matthew 1:22 “All this has happened” [τουτο δε ολον γεγονεν]
The Hebrew word for young woman is translated by virgin See note on Matthew 2:15, Matthew 2:23; Matthew 4:14-17; Matthew 8:17; Matthew 12:17-21; Matthew 13:35; Matthew 21:4.; John 12:38.; John 13:18; John 19:24, John 19:28, John 19:36. [source]
Matthew 11:2 John heard in the prison [ο δε Ιωανης ακουσας εν τωι δεσμωτηριωι]
Probably (Luke 7:18) the raising of the son of the widow of Nain. The word for prison here is the place where one was kept bound (Acts 5:21, Acts 5:23; Acts 16:26). See note on Matthew 4:12. It was in Machaerus east of the Dead Sea which at this time belonged to the rule of Herod Antipas (Jos. Ant. XVIII. v.2). John‘s disciples had access to him. So he sent word by (δια — dia not δυο — duo as in Luke 7:19) them to Jesus. [source]
Matthew 12:24 The Pharisees [οι δε Παρισαιοι]
Already (Matthew 9:32-34) we have had in Matthew the charge that Jesus is in league with the prince of demons, though the incident may be later than this one. See note on Matthew 10:25 about “Beelzebub.” The Pharisees feel that the excited condition of the crowds and the manifest disposition to believe that Jesus is the Messiah (the Son of David) demand strenuous action on their part. They cannot deny the fact of the miracles for the blind and dumb men both saw and spoke (Matthew 12:22). So in desperation they suggest that Jesus works by the power of Beelzebub the prince of the demons. [source]
Matthew 12:25 Knowing their thoughts [ειδως δε τας εντυμησεις αυτων]
What they were revolving in their minds. They now find out what a powerful opponent Jesus is. By parables, by a series of conditions (first class), by sarcasm, by rhetorical question, by merciless logic, he lays bare their hollow insincerity and the futility of their arguments. Satan does not cast out Satan. Note timeless aorist passive εμεριστη — emeristhē in Matthew 12:26, επτασεν — ephthasen in Matthew 12:28 (simple sense of arriving as in Philemon 3:16 from πτανω — phthanō). Christ is engaged in deathless conflict with Satan the strong man (Matthew 12:29). “Goods” (σκευη — skeuē) means house-gear, house furniture, or equipment as in Luke 17:36 and Acts 27:17, the tackling of the ship. [source]
Matthew 12:31 But the blasphemy against the Spiritδε του πνευματος βλασπημια]
Objective genitive. This is the unpardonable sin. In Matthew 12:32 we have κατα του πνευματος του αγιου — kata tou pneumatos tou hagiou to make it plainer. What is the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit? These Pharisees had already committed it. They had attributed the works of the Holy Spirit by whose power Jesus wrought his miracles (Matthew 12:28) to the devil. That sin was without excuse and would not be forgiven in their age or in the coming one (Matthew 12:32). People often ask if they can commit the unpardonable sin. Probably some do who ridicule the manifest work of God‘s Spirit in men‘s lives and attribute the Spirit‘s work to the devil. [source]
Matthew 13:16 Blessed are your eyes [υμων δε μακαριοι οι οπταλμοι]
A beatitude for the disciples in contrast with the Pharisees. Note position of “Happy” here also as in the Beatitudes in Matthew 5. [source]
Matthew 13:21 Yet hath he not root in himself [ουκ εχει δε ριζαν εν εαυτωι]
Cf. Colossians 2:7 and Ephesians 3:18 ερριζωμεμοι — errizōmemoi Stability like a tree. Here the man has a mushroom growth and “endureth for a while” What a picture of some converts in our modern revivals. They drop away overnight because they did not have the root of the matter in them. This man does not last or hold out. [source]
Matthew 13:38 The field is the world [ο δε αγρος εστιν ο κοσμος]
The article with both “field” and “world” in Greek means that subject and predicate are coextensive and so interchangeable. It is extremely important to understand that both the good seed and the darnel (tares) are sown in the world, not in the Kingdom, not in the church. The separation comes at the consummation of the age (συντελεια αιωνος — sunteleia aiōnos Matthew 13:39), the harvest time. They all grow together in the field (the world). [source]
Matthew 14:17 And they say unto him [οι δε λεγουσιν αυτωι]
The disciples, like us today, are quick with reasons for their inability to perform the task imposed by Jesus. [source]
Matthew 14:18 And he said [ο δε ειπεν]
Here is the contrast between the helpless doubt of the disciples and the confident courage of Jesus. He used “the five loaves and two fishes” which they had mentioned as a reason for doing nothing. “Bring them hither unto me.” They had overlooked the power of Jesus in this emergency. [source]
Matthew 15:5 But ye say [μεις δε λεγετε]
In sharp contrast to the command of God. Jesus had quoted the fifth commandment (Exodus 20:12, Exodus 20:16) with the penalty “die the death” All one had to do to evade one‘s duty to father or mother was to say “Corban” or “Gift” (Δωρον — Dōron) with the idea of using the money for God. By an angry oath of refusal to help one‘s parents, the oath or vow was binding. By this magic word one set himself free (ου μη τιμησει — ou mē timēsei he shall not honour) from obedience to the fifth commandment. Sometimes unfilial sons paid graft to the rabbinical legalists for such dodges. Were some of these very faultfinders guilty? [source]
Matthew 16:14 And they said [οι δε ειπαν]
They were ready to respond for they knew that popular opinion was divided on that point (Matthew 14:1.). They give four different opinions. It is always a risky thing for a pastor to ask for people‘s opinions of him. But Jesus was not much concerned by their answers to this question. He knew by now that the Pharisees and Sadducees were bitterly hostile to him. The masses were only superficially following him and they looked for a political Messiah and had vague ideas about him. How much did the disciples understand and how far have they come in their development of faith? Are they still loyal? [source]
Matthew 16:15 But who say ye that I am? [μεις δε τινα με λεγετε ειναι]
This is what matters and what Jesus wanted to hear. Note emphatic position of hūmeis “But you, who say ye that I am?” [source]
Matthew 16:18 And I also say unto thee [καγω δε σοι λεγω]
“The emphasis is not on ‹Thou art Peter‘ over against ‹Thou art the Christ,‘ but on Καγω — Kagō ‹The Father hath revealed to thee one truth, and I also tell you another” (McNeile). Jesus calls Peter here by the name that he had said he would have (John 1:42). Peter Then it was prophecy, now it is fact. In Matthew 16:17 Jesus addresses him as “Simon Bar-Jonah,” his full patronymic (Aramaic) name. But Jesus has a purpose now in using his nickname “Peter” which he had himself given him. Jesus makes a remarkable play on Peter‘s name, a pun in fact, that has caused volumes of controversy and endless theological strife. [source]
Matthew 16:23 But he turned [ο δε στραπεις]
Second aorist passive participle, quick ingressive action, away from Peter in revulsion, and toward the other disciples (Mark 8:33 has επιστραπεις — epistrapheis and ιδων τους ματητας αυτου — idōn tous mathētas autou). [source]
Matthew 17:4 And Peter answered [αποκριτεις δε ο Πετρος]
“Peter to the front again, but not greatly to his credit” (Bruce). It is not clear what Peter means by his saying: “It is good for us to be here” Luke (Luke 9:33) adds “not knowing what he said,” as they “were heavy with sleep.” So it is not well to take Peter too seriously on this occasion. At any rate he makes a definite proposal. [source]
Matthew 18:30 And he would not [ο δε ουκ ητελεν]
Imperfect tense of persistent refusal. [source]
Matthew 19:8 But from the beginning it hath not been so [απ αρχης δε ουκ γεγονεν ουτως]
The present perfect active of γινομαι — ginomai to emphasize the permanence of the divine ideal. “The original ordinance has never been abrogated nor superseded, but continues in force” (Vincent). “How small the Pharisaic disputants must have felt in presence of such holy teaching, which soars above the partisan view of controversialists into the serene region of ideal, universal, eternal truth” (Bruce). [source]
Matthew 2:1 Now when Jesus was born [του δε Ιησου γεννητεντος]
The fact of the birth of Jesus is stated by the genitive absolute construction (first aorist passive participle of the same verb γενναω — gennaō used twice already of the birth of Jesus, Matthew 1:16, Matthew 1:20, and used in the genealogy, Matthew 1:2-16). Matthew does not propose to give biographic details of the supernatural birth of Jesus, wonderful as it was and disbelieved as it is by some today who actually deny that Jesus was born at all or ever lived, men who talk of the Jesus Myth, the Christ Myth, etc. “The main purpose is to show the reception given by the world to the new-born Messianic King. Homage from afar, hostility at home; foreshadowing the fortunes of the new faith: reception by the Gentiles, rejection by the Jews” (Bruce). [source]
Matthew 2:5 And they said unto him [οι δε ειπαν αυτωι]
Whether the ecclesiastics had to search their scriptures or not, they give the answer that is in accord with the common Jewish opinion that the Messiah was to come from Bethlehem and of the seed of David (John 7:42). So they quote Micah 5:2, “a free paraphrase” Alford calls it, for it is not precisely like the Hebrew text or like the Septuagint. It may have come from a collection of testimonia with which J. Rendel Harris has made the world familiar. He had consulted the experts and now he has their answer. Bethlehem of Judah is the place. The use of the perfect passive indicative (γεγραπται — gegraptai) is the common form in quoting scripture. It stands written. [source]
Matthew 22:5 another to his merchandise [ος δε επι την εμποριαν αυτου]
(ος δε επι την εμποριαν αυτου — hos de epi tēn emporian autou) only example in the N.T., from εμπορος — emporos merchant, one who travels for traffic (εμπορευομαι — emporeuomai), a drummer. [source]
Matthew 22:14 For many are called, but few chosen [πολλοι γαρ εισιν κλητοι ολιγοι δε εκλεκτοι]
This crisp saying of Christ occurs in various connections. He evidently repeated many of his sayings many times as every teacher does. There is a distinction between the called (κλητοι — klētoi) and the chosen (εκλεκτοι — eklektoi) called out from the called. [source]
Matthew 23:8 But be not ye called Rabbi [υμεις δε μη κλητητε αββει]
An apparent aside to the disciples. Note the emphatic position of υμεις — hūmeis Some even regard Matthew 23:8-10 as a later addition and not part of this address to the Pharisees, but the apostles were present. Euthymius Zigabenus says: “Do not seek to be called (ingressive aorist subjunctive), if others call you this it will not be your fault.” This is not far from the Master‘s meaning. Rabbi means “my great one,” “my Master,” apparently a comparatively new title in Christ‘s time. [source]
Matthew 23:24 Swallow the camel [την δε καμηλον καταπινοντες]
Gulping or drinking down the camel. An oriental hyperbole like that in Matthew 19:24. See also Matthew 5:29, Matthew 5:30; Matthew 17:20; Matthew 21:21. Both insects and camels were ceremonially unclean (Leviticus 11:4, Leviticus 11:20, Leviticus 11:23, Leviticus 11:42). “He that kills a flea on the Sabbath is as guilty as if he killed a camel” (Jer. Shabb. 107). [source]
Matthew 25:10 And while they went away [απερχομενων δε αυτων]
Present middle participle, genitive absolute, while they were going away, descriptive linear action. Picture of their inevitable folly. [source]
Matthew 25:15 To one [ωι μεν ωι δε ωι δε]
Demonstrative δεναριυς — hos not the relative. Neat Greek idiom. [source]
Matthew 26:15 They weighed unto him [οι δε εστησαν αυτο]
They placed the money in the balances or scales. “Coined money was in use, but the shekels may have been weighed out in antique fashion by men careful to do an iniquitous thing in the most orthodox way” (Bruce). It is not known whether the Sanhedrin had offered a reward for the arrest of Jesus or not. [source]
Matthew 27:1 Now when morning was come [πρωιας δε γενομενης]
Genitive absolute. After dawn came the Sanhedrin held a formal meeting to condemn Jesus and so ratify the illegal trial during the night (Mark 15:1; Luke 22:66-71). Luke gives the details of this second ratification consultation. The phrase used, took counsel (συμβουλιον ελαβον — sumboulion elabon) is a Latin idiom (consilium ceperunt) for συνεβουλευσαντο — sunebouleusanto f0). [source]
Matthew 27:11 Now Jesus stood before the governor [ο δε Ιησους εστατη εμπροστεν του ηγεμονος]
Here is one of the dramatic episodes of history. Jesus stood face to face with the Roman governor. The verb εστατη — estathē not εστη — estē (second aorist active), is first aorist passive and can mean “was placed” there, but he stood, not sat. The term ηγεμων — hēgemōn (from ηγεομαι — hēgeomai to lead) was technically a legatus Caesaris, an officer of the Emperor, more exactly procurator, ruler under the Emperor of a less important province than propraetor (as over Syria). The senatorial provinces like Achaia were governed by proconsuls. Pilate represented Roman law. [source]
Matthew 27:57 And when even was come [οπσιας δε γενομενης]
It was the Preparation Παρασκευη — Paraskeuē is the name in modern Greek today for Friday. The Jews were anxious that these bodies should be taken down before the sabbath began at 6 p.m. The request of Joseph of Arimathea for the body of Jesus was a relief to Pilate and to the Jews also. We know little about this member of the Sanhedrin save his name Joseph, his town Arimathea, that he was rich, a secret disciple, and had not agreed to the death of Jesus. Probably he now wished that he had made an open profession. But he has courage now when others are cowardly and asked for the personal privilege They were sitting opposite and looking in silence. [source]
Matthew 28:1 Now late on the sabbath as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week [οπσε δε σαββατων τηι επιπωσκουσηι εις μιαν σαββατων]
This careful chronological statement according to Jewish days clearly means that before the sabbath was over, that is before six p.m., this visit by the women was made “to see the sepulchre” They had seen the place of burial on Friday afternoon (Mark 15:47; Matthew 27:61; Luke 23:55). They had rested on the sabbath after preparing spices and ointments for the body of Jesus (Luke 23:56), a sabbath of unutterable sorrow and woe. They will buy other spices after sundown when the new day has dawned and the sabbath is over (Mark 16:1). Both Matthew here and Luke (Luke 23:54) use dawn (επιπωσκω — epiphōskō) for the dawning of the twenty-four hour-day at sunset, not of the dawning of the twelve-hour day at sunrise. The Aramaic used the verb for dawn in both senses. The so-called Gospel of Peter has epiphōskō in the same sense as Matthew and Luke as does a late papyrus. Apparently the Jewish sense of “dawn” is here expressed by this Greek verb. Allen thinks that Matthew misunderstands Mark at this point, but clearly Mark is speaking of sunrise and Matthew of sunset. Why allow only one visit for the anxious women? [source]
Matthew 28:17 But some doubted [οι δε εδιστασαν]
From δις — dis (in two, divided in mind). Cf. Matthew 14:31. The reference is not to the eleven who were all now convinced after some doubt, but to the others present. Paul states that over five hundred were present, most of whom were still alive when he wrote (1 Corinthians 15:6). It is natural that some should hesitate to believe so great a thing at the first appearance of Jesus to them. Their very doubt makes it easier for us to believe. This was the mountain where Jesus had promised to meet them. This fact explains the large number present. Time and place were arranged beforehand. It was the climax of the various appearances and in Galilee where were so many believers. They worshipped He is now their Risen Lord and Saviour. [source]
Matthew 3:1 And in those days cometh John the Baptist [εν δε ταις ημεραις παραγινεται Ιωανης ο απτιστης]
Here the synoptic narrative begins with the baptism of John (Matthew 3:1; Mark 1:2; Luke 3:1) as given by Peter in Acts 1:22, “from the baptism of John, unto the day that he was received up from us” (cf. also Acts 10:37-43, Peter‘s summary to Cornelius very much like the outline of Mark‘s Gospel). Matthew does not indicate the date when John appeared as Luke does in ch. 3 (the fifteenth year of Tiberius‘s reign). It was some thirty years after the birth of John, precisely how long after the return of Joseph and Mary to Nazareth we do not know. Moffatt translates the verb But this rite was meant for the Gentiles who accepted Judaism. John is treating the Jews as Gentiles in demanding baptism at their hands on the basis of repentance. [source]
Matthew 3:4 Now John himself [αυτος δε ο Ιωανης]
Matthew thus introduces the man himself and draws a vivid sketch of his dress (note ειχεν — eichen imperfect tense), his habit, and his food. Would such an uncouth figure be welcome today in any pulpit in our cities? In the wilderness it did not matter. It was probably a matter of necessity with him, not an affectation, though it was the garb of the original Elijah (2 Kings 1:8), rough sackcloth woven from the hair of camels. Plummer holds that “John consciously took Elijah as a model.” [source]
Matthew 4:12 Now when he heard [ακουσας δε]
The reason for Christ‘s return to Galilee is given here to be that John had been delivered up into prison. The Synoptic Gospels skip from the temptation of Jesus to the Galilean ministry, a whole year. But for John 1:19-3:36 we should know nothing of the “year of obscurity” (Stalker). John supplies items to help fill in the picture. Christ‘s work in Galilee began after the close of the active ministry of the Baptist who lingered on in prison for a year or more. [source]
Matthew 5:22 But I say unto you [εγω δε λεγω υμιν]
Jesus thus assumes a tone of superiority over the Mosaic regulations and proves it in each of the six examples. He goes further than the Law into the very heart. [source]
Matthew 8:24 But he was asleep [αυτος δε εκατευδεν]
Imperfect, was sleeping. Picturesque scene. The Sea of Galilee is 680 feet below the Mediterranean Sea. These sudden squalls come down from the summit of Hermon with terrific force (σεισμος μεγας — seismos megas) like an earthquake. Mark (Mark 4:37) and Luke (Luke 8:23) term it a whirlwind (λαιλαπς — lailaps) in furious gusts. [source]
Matthew 9:13 But go ye and learn [πορευτεντες δε ματετε]
With biting sarcasm Jesus bids these preachers to learn the meaning of Hosea 6:6. It is repeated in Matthew 12:7. Ingressive aorist imperative (ματετε — mathete). [source]
Mark 10:22 But his countenance fell [ο δε στυγνασας]
In the lxx and Polybius once and in Matthew 16:3 (passage bracketed by Westcott and Hort). The verb is from στυγνος — stugnos sombre, gloomy, like a lowering cloud. See note on Matthew 19:22 for discussion of “sorrowful” (lupoumenos). [source]
Mark 12:5 Beating some and killing some [ους μεν δεροντεσ ους δε αποκτεννυντες]
This distributive use of the demonstrative appears also in Matthew 21:35 in the singular Originally αποκτεννυμι — derō in Homer meant to skin, flay, then to smite, to beat. Apoktennuntes is a mi form of the verb (apoktennumi) and means to kill off. [source]
Mark 13:9 But take heed to yourselves [λεπετε δε υμεις εαυτους]
Only in Mark, but dominant note of warning all through the discourse. Note υμεις — humeis here, very emphatic. [source]
Mark 13:13 But he that endureth to the end [ο δε υπομεινας εις τελος]
Note this aorist participle with the future verb. The idea here is true to the etymology of the word, remaining under (υπομενω — hupomenō) until the end. The divisions in families Jesus had predicted before (Luke 12:52.; Luke 14:25.). [source]
Mark 13:23 But take ye heed [υμεις δε βλεπετε]
Gullibility is no mark of a saint or of piety. Note emphatic position of you Credulity ranks no higher than scepticism. God gave us our wits for self-protection. Christ has warned us beforehand. [source]
Mark 14:11 And they, when they heard it, were glad [οι δε ακουσαντες εχαρησαν]
No doubt the rabbis looked on the treachery of Judas as a veritable dispensation of Providence amply justifying their plots against Jesus. [source]
Mark 14:64 They all [οι δε παντες]
This would mean that Joseph of Arimathea was not present since he did not consent to the death of Jesus (Luke 23:51). Nicodemus was apparently absent also, probably not invited because of previous sympathy with Jesus (John 7:50). But all who were present voted for the death of Jesus. [source]
Mark 15:23 But he received it not [ος δε ουκ ελαβεν]
Note the demonstrative ος — hos with δε — de Matthew has it that Jesus was not willing to take. Mark‘s statement is that he refused it. [source]
Mark 3:4 But they held their peace [οι δε εσιωπων]
Imperfect tense. In sullen silence and helplessness before the merciless questions of Jesus as the poor man stood there before them all. Jesus by his pitiless alternatives between doing good (αγατοποιεω — agathopoieō late Greek word in lxx and N.T.) and doing evil (κακοποιεω — kakopoieō ancient Greek word), to this man, for instance, to save a life or to kill (πσυχην σωσαι η αποκτειναι — psuchēn sōsai ē apokteinai), as in this case. It was a terrible exposure. [source]
Mark 4:34 But privately to his disciples he expounded all things [κατ ιδιαν δε τοις ιδιοις ματηταις επελυεν παντα]
To his own First future passive indicative from επιλυω — epiluō The word means to give additional Here the use of γινεται — ginetai (comes) with the ablative case (επιλυσεως — epiluseōs) and the explanation given in verse 2 Peter 1:21 shows plainly that disclosure or revelation to the prophet is what is meant, not interpretation of what the prophet said. The prophetic impulse and message came from God through the Holy Spirit. In private the further disclosures of Jesus amounted to fresh revelations concerning the mysteries of the kingdom of God. [source]
Mark 6:19 And Herodias set herself against himδε ηρωιδιας ενειχεν αυτωι]
Dative of disadvantage. Literally, had it in for him. This is modern slang, but is in exact accord with this piece of vernacular Koiné. No object of ειχεν — eichen is expressed, though οργην — orgēn or χολον — cholon may be implied. The tense is imperfect and aptly described the feelings of Herodias towards this upstart prophet of the wilderness who had dared to denounce her private relations with Herod Antipas. Gould suggests that she “kept her eye on him” or kept up her hostility towards him. She never let up, but bided her time which, she felt sure, would come. See the same idiom in Genesis 49:23. She desired to kill him Imperfect again. [source]
Mark 8:28 And they told him [οι δε ειπαν]
They knew only too well. See note on Matthew 16:14, Matthew 16:28 for discussion. [source]
Luke 1:76 Yea and thou [και συ δε]
Direct address to the child with forecast of his life (cf. Luke 1:13-17). [source]
Luke 10:27 And he answering [ο δε αποκριτεις]
First aorist participle, no longer passive in idea. The lawyer‘s answer is first from the Shema (Deuteronomy 6:3; Deuteronomy 11:13) which was written on the phylacteries. The second part is from Leviticus 19:18 and shows that the lawyer knew the law. At a later time Jesus himself in the temple gives a like summary of the law to a lawyer (Mark 12:28-34; Matthew 22:34-40) who wanted to catch Jesus by his question. There is no difficulty in the two incidents. God is to be loved with all of man‘s four powers (heart, soul, strength, mind) here as in Mark 12:30. [source]
Luke 10:33 A certain Samaritan [Σαμαρειτης δε τις]
Of all men in the world to do a neighbourly act! [source]
Luke 10:38 Now as they went on their way [ην δε τωι πορευεσται αυτους]
Luke‘s favourite temporal clause again as in Luke 10:35. [source]
Luke 10:41 But one thing is needful [ενος δε εστιν χρεια]
This is the reading of A C and may be correct. A few manuscripts have: “There is need of few things.” Aleph B L (and Westcott and Hort) have: “There is need of few things or one,” which seems like a conflate reading though the readings are all old. See Robertson, Introduction to Textual Criticism of the N.T., p. 190. Jesus seems to say to Martha that only one dish was really necessary for the meal instead of the “many” about which she was so anxious. [source]
Luke 11:11 Of which of you that is a father [τινα δε εχ υμων τον πατερα]
There is a decided anacoluthon here. The MSS. differ a great deal. The text of Westcott and Hort makes τον πατερα — ton patera (the father) in apposition with τινα — tina (of whom) and in the accusative the object of αιτησει — aitēsei (shall ask) which has also another accusative (both person and thing) “a loaf.” So far so good. But the rest of the sentence is, will ye give him a stone? Μη — Mē shows that the answer No is expected, but the trouble is that the interrogative τινα — tina in the first clause is in the accusative the object of αιτησει — aitēsei while here the same man (he) is the subject of επιδωσει — epidōsei It is a very awkward piece of Greek and yet it is intelligible. Some of the old MSS. do not have the part about “loaf” and “stone,” but only the two remaining parts about “fish” and “serpent,” “egg” and “scorpion.” The same difficult construction is carried over into these questions also. [source]
Luke 11:17 But he [αυτος δε]
In contrast with them. [source]
Luke 11:19 And if I by Beelzebub [ει δε εγω εν εεζεβουλ]
Also a condition of the first class, determined as fulfilled. A Greek condition deals only with the statement, not with the actual facts. For sake of argument, Jesus here assumes that he casts out demons by Beelzebub. The conclusion is a reductio ad absurdum. The Jewish exorcists practiced incantations against demons (Acts 19:13). [source]
Luke 11:22 But when [επαν δε]
Note οταν — hotan in Luke 11:21. [source]
Luke 11:28 But he said [αυτος δε ειπεν]
Jesus in contrast turns attention to others and gives them a beatitude “The originality of Christ‘s reply guarantees its historical character. Such a comment is beyond the reach of an inventor” (Plummer). [source]
Luke 11:37 Now as he spake [εν δε τωι λαλησαι]
Luke‘s common idiom, εν — en with the articular infinitive (aorist active infinitive) but it does not mean “after he had spoken” as Plummer argues, but simply “in the speaking,” no time in the aorist infinitive. See note on Luke 3:21 for similar use of aorist infinitive with εν — en Present active indicative, dramatic present. Request, not question. [source]
Luke 11:39 But your inward part [το δε εσωτεν υμων]
The part within you (Pharisees). They keep the external regulations, but their hearts are full of plunder See note on Matthew 23:25 for a like indictment of the Pharisees for care for the outside of the cup but neglect of what is on the inside. Both inside and outside should be clean, but the inside first. [source]
Luke 12:10 But unto him that blasphemeth against the Holy Spirit [τωι δε εις το αγιον πνευμα βλασπημησαντι]
This unpardonable sin is given by Mark 3:28.; Matthew 12:31. immediately after the charge that Jesus was in league with Beelzebub. Luke here separates it from the same charge made in Judea (Luke 11:15-20). As frequently said, there is no sound reason for saying that Jesus only spoke his memorable sayings once. Luke apparently finds a different environment here. Note the use of εις — eis here in the sense of “against.” [source]
Luke 12:41 Peter said [Ειπεν δε ο Πετρος]
This whole paragraph from verse 22-40 had been addressed directly to the disciples. Hence it is not surprising to find Peter putting in a question. This incident confirms also the impression that Luke is giving actual historical data in the environment of these discourses. He is certain that the Twelve are meant, but he desires to know if others are included, for he had spoken to the multitude in Luke 12:13-21. Recall Mark 13:37. This interruption is somewhat like that on the Mount of Transfiguration (Luke 9:33) and is characteristic of Peter. Was it the magnificent promise in Luke 12:37 that stirred Peter‘s impulsiveness? It is certainly more than a literary device of Luke. Peter‘s question draws out a parabolic reply by Jesus (Luke 12:42). [source]
Luke 12:48 To whomsoever much is given [παντι δε ωι εδοτη πολυ]
Here is inverse attraction from οι — hoi to παντι — panti (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 767f.). Note παρ αυτου — par' autou (from him) without any regard to παντι — panti commit Second aorist middle indicative, timeless or gnomic aorist. Note the impersonal plural after the passive voice just before. [source]
Luke 12:50 I have a baptism [βαπτισμα δε εχω]
Once again Jesus will call his baptism the baptism of blood and will challenge James and John to it (Mark 10:32.; Matthew 20:22.). So here. “Having used the metaphor of fire, Christ now uses the metaphor of water. The one sets forth the result of his coming as it affects the world, the other as it affects himself. The world is lit up with flames and Christ is bathed in blood” (Plummer). [source]
Luke 13:15 The Lord answered him [απεκριτη δε αυτωι ο Κυριος]
Note use of “the Lord” of Jesus again in Luke‘s narrative. Jesus answered the ruler of the synagogue who had spoken to the crowd, but about Jesus. It was a crushing and overwhelming reply. [source]
Luke 13:28 And yourselves cast forth without [υμας δε εκβαλλομενους εχω]
Present passive participle, continuous action, “you being cast out” with the door shut. See notes on Matthew 8:11. for this same picture. [source]
Luke 14:32 Or else [ει δε μηγε]
Same idiom in Luke 5:36. Luke is fond of this formula. [source]
Luke 15:12 And he divided [ο δε διειλεν]
The second aorist active indicative of διαιρεω — diaireō an old and common verb to part in two, cut asunder, divide, but in the N.T. only here and 1 Corinthians 12:11. The elder son got his share also of the “substance” or property or estate (της ουσιας — tēs ousias), “the living” (τον βιον — ton bion) as in Mark 12:44, not “life” as in Luke 8:14. [source]
Luke 15:17 But when he came to himself [εις εαυτον δε ελτων]
As if he had been far from himself as he was from home. As a matter of fact he had been away, out of his head, and now began to see things as they really were. Plato is quoted by Ackerman (Christian Element in Plato) as thinking of redemption as coming to oneself. [source]
Luke 15:17 I perish [εγω δε λιμωι ωδε απολλυμαι]
Every word here counts: While I on the other hand am here perishing with hunger. It is the linear present middle of απολλυμι — apollumi Note εγω — egō expressed and δε — de of contrast. [source]
Luke 17:25 But first [πρωτον δε]
The second coming will be only after the Cross. [source]
Luke 19:42 But now [νυν δε]
Aposiopesis. The conclusion is not expressed and the sudden breaking off and change of structure is most impressive. [source]
Luke 21:1 And he looked up [Αναβλεπσας δε]
He had taken his seat, after the debate was over and the Sanhedrin had slunk away in sheer defeat, “over against the treasury” (Mark 12:41). The word for “treasury” (γαζοπυλακιον — gazophulakion) is a compound of γαζα — gaza (Persian word for royal treasury) and πυλακη — phulakē guard or protection. It is common in the lxx, but in the N.T. only here and Mark 12:41, Mark 12:43; John 8:20. Jesus was watching (Mark 12:41) the rich put in their gifts as a slight diversion from the intense strain of the hours before. [source]
Luke 21:12 But before all these things [προ δε τουτων παντων]
In Mark 13:8; Matthew 24:8 these things are termed “the beginning of travail.” That may be the idea here. Plummer insists that priority of time is the point, not magnitude. [source]
Luke 21:36 But watch ye [αγρυπνειτε δε]
Αγρυπνεω — Agrupneō is a late verb to be sleepless Keep awake and be ready is the pith of Christ‘s warning. [source]
Luke 22:27 But I [Εγω δε]
Jesus dares to cite his own conduct, though their leader, to prove his point and to put a stop to their jealous contention for the chief place at this very feast, a wrangling that kept up till Jesus had to arise and give them the object lesson of humility by washing their feet (John 13:1-20). [source]
Luke 23:5 But they were the more urgent [οι δε επισχυον]
Imperfect active of επισχυω — epischuō to give added And they kept insisting. Evidently Pilate had taken the thing too lightly. [source]
Luke 23:21 But they shouted [οι δε επεπωνουν]
Imperfect active of επιπωνεω — epiphōneō to call to. Old verb and a verb pertinent here. They kept on yelling. [source]
Luke 23:23 But they were instant [οι δε επεκειντο]
Imperfect middle of επικειμαι — epikeimai an old verb for the rush and swirl of a tempest. [source]
Luke 24:21 But we hoped [ημεις δε ηλπιζομεν]
Imperfect active, we were hoping. Note emphasis in ημεις — hēmeis (we). [source]
Luke 3:1 Now in the fifteenth year [εν ετει δε πεντεκαιδεκατωι]
Tiberius Caesar was ruler in the provinces two years before Augustus Caesar died. Luke makes a six-fold attempt here to indicate the time when John the Baptist began his ministry. John revived the function of the prophet (Ecce Homo, p. 2) and it was a momentous event after centuries of prophetic silence. Luke begins with the Roman Emperor, then mentions Pontius Pilate Procurator of Judea, Herod Antipas Tetrarch of Galilee (and Perea), Philip, Tetrarch of Iturea and Trachonitis, Lysanias, Tetrarch of Abilene (all with the genitive absolute construction) and concludes with the high-priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas (son-in-law and successor of Annas). The ancients did not have our modern system of chronology, the names of rulers as here being the common way. Objection has been made to the mention of Lysanias here because Josephus (Ant. XXVII. I) tells of a Lysanias who was King of Abila up to b.c. 36 as the one referred to by Luke with the wrong date. But an inscription has been found on the site of Abilene with mention of “Lysanias the tetrarch” and at the time to which Luke refers (see my Luke the Historian in the Light of Research, pp. 167f.). So Luke is vindicated again by the rocks. [source]
Luke 4:21 And he began to say [ηρχατο δε λεγειν]
Aorist ingressive active indicative and present infinitive. He began speaking. The moment of hushed expectancy was passed. These may or may not be the first words uttered here by Jesus. Often the first sentence is the crucial one in winning an audience. Certainly this is an arresting opening sentence. [source]
Luke 4:24 And he said [ειπεν δε]
Also in Luke 1:13. The interjection of these words here by Luke may indicate a break in his address, though there is no other indication of an interval here. Perhaps they only serve to introduce solemnly the new proverb like the words Verily I say unto you This proverb about the prophet having no honour in his own country Jesus had already applied to himself according to John 4:44. Both Mark 6:4 and Matthew 13:57 give it in a slightly altered form on the last visit of Jesus to Nazareth. The devil had tempted Jesus to make a display of his power to the people by letting them see him floating down from the pinnacle of the temple (Luke 4:9-11). [source]
Luke 5:16 But he withdrew himself in the deserts and prayed [αυτος δε ην υποχωρων εν ταις ερημοις και προσευχομενος]
Periphrastic imperfects. Literally, “But he himself was with drawing in the desert places and praying.” The more the crowds came as a result of the leper‘s story, the more Jesus turned away from them to the desert regions and prayed with the Father. It is a picture of Jesus drawn with vivid power. The wild enthusiasm of the crowds was running ahead of their comprehension of Christ and his mission and message. υποχωρεω — Hupochōreō (perhaps with the notion of slipping away secretly, υπο — hupo -) is a very common Greek verb, but in the N.T. occurs in Luke alone. Elsewhere in the N.T. αναχωρεω — anachōreō (to go back) appears. [source]
Luke 5:33 But thine [οι δε σοι]
Sharp contrast between the conduct of the disciples of Jesus and those of John and the Pharisees who here appear together as critics of Christ and his disciples (Mark 2:18; Matthew 9:14), though Luke does not bring that out sharply. It is probable that Levi had his reception for Jesus on one of the Jewish fast days and, if so, this would give special edge to their criticism. [source]
Luke 6:8 But he knew their thoughts [αυτος δε ηιδει τους διαλογισμους αυτων]
In Luke alone. Imperfect in sense, second past perfect in form ηιδει — ēidei from οιδα — oida Jesus, in contrast to these spies (Plummer), read their intellectual processes like an open book. [source]
Luke 6:49 He that heareth and doeth not [ο δε ακουσας και μη ποιησας]
Aorist active participle with article. Particular case singled out (punctiliar, aorist). [source]
Luke 7:16 Fear seized all [ελαβεν δε ποβος παντας]
Aorist active indicative. At once. [source]
Luke 7:47 But to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little [ωι δε ολιγον απιεται ολιγον αγαπαι]
This explanation proves that the meaning of οτι — hoti preceding is proof, not cause. [source]
Luke 8:11 Is this [εστιν δε αυτη]
Means this. Jesus now proceeds to interpret his own parable. [source]
Luke 9:20 But who say ye? [υμεις δε τινα λεγετε]
Note the emphatic proleptical position of υμεις — humeis “But ye who do ye say? This is really what mattered now with Jesus. [source]
Luke 9:23 He said unto all [ελεγεν δε προς παντας]
This is like Luke (cf. Luke 9:43). Jesus wanted all (the multitude with his disciples, as Mark 8:34 has it) to understand the lesson of self-sacrifice. They could not yet understand the full meaning of Christ‘s words as applied to his approaching death of which he had been speaking. But certainly the shadow of the cross is already across the path of Jesus as he is here speaking. For details (soul, life, forfeit, gain, profit, lose, world) see notes on Matthew 16:24-26 and note on Mark 8:34-37. The word for lose (απολεσει — apolesei from απολλυμι — apollumi a very common verb) is used in the sense of destroy, kill, lose, as here. Note the mercantile terms in this passage (gain, lose, fine or forfeit, exchange). [source]
Luke 9:32 But when they were fully awake [διαγρηγορησαντες δε]
First aorist active participle of this late (Herodian) and rare compound verb (here alone in the N.T.), διαγρηγορεω — diagrēgoreō (Luke is fond of compounds with δια — dia). The simple verb γρηγορεω — grēgoreō (from the second perfect active εγρηγορα — egrēgora) is also late, but common in the lxx and the N.T. The effect of δια — dia can be either to remain awake in spite of desire to sleep (margin of Revised Version) or to become thoroughly awake (ingressive aorist tense also) as Revised Version has it. This is most likely correct. The Syriac Sinaitic has it “When they awoke.” Certainly they had been through a strain.His glory (την δοχαν αυτου — tēn doxan autou). See also Luke 9:26 in the words of Jesus. [source]
Luke 9:49 And John answered [αποκριτεις δε Ιωανης]
As if John wanted to change the subject after the embarrassment of the rebuke for their dispute concerning greatness (Luke 9:46-48). [source]
Luke 9:55 But he turned [στραπεις δε]
Second aorist passive participle of στρεπω — strephō common verb, to turn round. Dramatic act. Some ancient MSS. have here: Ye know not what manner of spirit ye are of This sounds like Christ and may be a genuine saying though not a part of Luke‘s Gospel. A smaller number of MSS. add also: For the Son of Man came not to destroy men‘s lives, but to save them (ο γαρ υιος του αντρωπου ουκ ηλτεν πσυχας αντρωπων απολεσαι αλλα σωσαι — Ho gar huios tou anthrōpou ouk ēlthen psuchas anthrōpōn apolesai alla sōsai), a saying reminding us of Matthew 5:17; Luke 19:10. Certain it is that here Jesus rebuked the bitterness of James and John toward Samaritans as he had already chided John for his narrowness towards a fellow-worker in the kingdom. [source]
Luke 9:59 And he said unto another [ειπεν δε προς ετερον]
Matthew 8:21 omits Christ‘s “Follow me” (ακολουτει μοι — akolouthei moi) and makes this man a volunteer instead of responding to the appeal of Jesus. There is no real opposition, of course. In Matthew‘s account the man is apologetic as in Luke. Plummer calls him “one of the casual disciples” of whom there are always too many. The scribes knew how to give plausible reasons for not being active disciples. [source]
Luke 9:60 But go thou and publish abroad the kingdom of God [συ δε απελτων διαγγελλε την βασιλειαν του τεου]
The scribe‘s duty is put sharply Christ called him to preach, and he was using pious phrases about his father as a pretext. Many a preacher has had to face a similar delicate problem of duty to father, mother, brothers, sisters and the call to preach. This was a clear case. Jesus will help any man called to preach to see his duty. Certainly Jesus does not advocate renunciation of family duties on the part of preachers. [source]
Luke 9:61 And another also said [ειπεν δε και ετερος]
A volunteer like the first. This third case is given by Luke alone, though the incident may also come from the same Logia as the other two. ετερος — Heteros does not here mean one of a “different” sort as is sometimes true of this pronoun, but merely another like αλλος — allos (Robertson, Grammar, p. 749). [source]
Luke 9:61 But first [πρωτον δε]
He also had something that was to come “first.”To bid farewell to them that are at my house (αποταχασται τοις εις τον οικον μου — apotaxasthai tois eis ton oikon mou). In itself that was a good thing to do. This first aorist middle infinitive is from αποτασσω — apotassō an old verb, to detach, to separate, to assign as a detachment of soldiers. In the N.T. it only appears in the middle voice with the meaning common in late writers to bid adieu, to separate oneself from others. It is used in Acts 18:18 of Paul taking leave of the believers in Corinth. See also Mark 6:46; 2 Corinthians 2:13. It is thus a formal function and this man meant to go home and set things in order there and then in due time to come and follow Jesus. [source]
John 11:5 Now Jesus loved [ηγαπα δε]
Imperfect active of αγαπαω — agapaō picturing the continued love of Jesus for this noble family where he had his home so often (Luke 10:38-42; John 12:1-8). The sisters expected him to come at once and to heal Lazarus. [source]
John 11:10 But if a man walk in the night [εαν δε τις περιπατηι εν τηι νυκτι]
Third condition again. It is spiritual darkness that Jesus here pictures, but the result is the same. See the same figure in John 12:35 (1 John 2:11). The ancients had poor illumination at night as indeed we did before Edison gave us electric lights. Pedestrians actually used to have little lamps fastened on the feet to light the path. In him Spiritual darkness, the worst of all (cf. Matthew 6:23; John 8:12). Man has the capacity for light, but is not the source of light. “By the application of this principle Christianity is distinguished from Neo-Platonism” (Westcott). [source]
John 10:38 But if I do [ει δε ποιω]
Condition again of the first class, assumed as true, but with the opposite results. Though ye believe not me Condition now of third class, undetermined (but with prospect), “Even if you keep on (present active subjunctive of πιστευο — pisteuo) not believing me.” Believe the works These stand irrefutable. The claims, character, words, and works of Jesus challenge the world today as then. That ye may know and understand Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the same verb γινωσκω — ginōskō repeated in different tenses (first γνωτε — gnōte the second ingressive aorist active subjunctive, that ye may come to know; then the present active subjunctive, “that ye may keep on knowing”). This is Christ‘s deepest wish about his enemies who stand with stones in their uplifted hands to fling at him. That the Father is in me, and I in the Father Thus he repeats (John 10:30) sharply his real claim to oneness with the Father as his Son, to actual deity. It was a hopeless wish. [source]
John 11:2 And it was that Mary which anointed the Lord with ointment, and wiped his feet with her hair [ην δε Μαριαμ η αλειπσασα τον κυριον μυρωι και εκμαχασα τους ποδας αυτου ταις τριχιν αυτης]
This description is added to make plainer who Mary is “whose brother Lazarus was sick” There is an evident proleptic allusion to the incident described by John in John 12:1-8 just after chapter 11. As John looks back from the end of the century it was all behind him, though the anointing Note the Aramaic form Μαριαμ — Mariam as usual in John, but Μαριας — Marias in John 11:1. When John wrote, it was as Jesus had foretold (Matthew 26:13), for the fame of Mary of Bethany rested on the incident of the anointing of Jesus. The effort to link Mary of Bethany with Mary Magdalene and then both names with the sinful woman of Luke 7:36-50 is gratuitous and to my mind grotesque and cruel to the memory of both Mary of Bethany and Mary Magdalene. Bernard may be taken as a specimen: “The conclusion is inevitable that John (or his editor) regarded Mary of Bethany as the same person who is described by Luke as αμαρτωλος — hamartōlos This critical and artistic heresy has already been discussed in Vol. 2 on Luke‘s Gospel. Suffice it here to say that Luke introduces Mary Magdalene as an entirely new character in John 8:2 and that the details in Luke 7:36-50; John 12:1-8 have only superficial resemblances and serious disagreements. John is not here alluding to Luke‘s record, but preparing for his own in chapter 12. What earthly difficulty is there in two different women under wholly different circumstances doing a similar act for utterly different purposes? [source]
John 11:30 Now Jesus was not yet come into the town [ουπω δε εληλυτει ο Ιησους εις την κωμην]
Explanatory parenthesis with past perfect as in John 11:19. Martha had her interview while he was still coming (John 11:20) and left him (went off, απηλτεν — apēlthen John 11:28) to hurry to Mary with the news. Why Jesus tarried still where he had met Martha we do not know. Westcott says, “as though He would meet the sisters away from the crowd of mourners.” [source]
John 11:42 And I knew [εγω δε ηιδειν]
Past perfect of οιδα — oida used as imperfect. This confident knowledge is no new experience with Jesus. It has “always” Second perfect active (intransitive) articular participle of περιιστημι — periistēmi It was a picturesque and perilous scene. That they may believe Purpose clause with ινα — hina and first ingressive aorist active subjunctive of πιστευω — pisteuō “that they may come to believe.” That thou didst send me First aorist active indicative of αποστελλω — apostellō and note position of συ με — su me side by side. This claim Jesus had long ago made (John 5:36) and had repeatedly urged (John 10:25, John 10:38). Here was a supreme opportunity and Jesus opens his heart about it. [source]
John 13:1 Now before the feast of the passover [προ δε της εορτης του πασχα]
Just before, John means, not twenty-four hours before, that is our Thursday evening (beginning of 15th of Nisan, sunset to sunset Jewish day), since Jesus was crucified on Friday 15th of Nisan. Hence Jesus ate the regular passover meal at the usual time. The whole feast, including the feast of unleavened bread, lasted eight days. For a discussion of the objections to this interpretation of John in connexion with the Synoptic Gospels one may consult my Harmony of the Gospels, pp. 279-84, and David Smith‘s In the Days of His Flesh, Appendix VIII. The passover feast began on the 15th Nisan at sunset, the passover lamb being slain the afternoon of 14th Nisan. There seems no real doubt that this meal in John 13:1-30 is the real passover meal described by the Synoptics also (Mark 14:18-21; Matthew 26:21-25; Luke 22:21-23), followed by the institution of the Lord‘s Supper. Thus understood John 13:1 here serves as an introduction to the great esoteric teaching of Christ to the apostles (John 13:2-17:26), called by Barnas Sears The Heart of Christ. This phrase goes with the principal verb ηγαπησεν — ēgapēsen (loved). Knowing Second perfect active participle, emphasizing the full consciousness of Christ. He was not stumbling into the dark as he faced “his hour” See John 18:4; John 19:28 for other examples of the insight and foresight (Bernard) of Jesus concerning his death. See on John 12:23 for use before by Jesus. That he should depart Sub-final use of ινα — hina with second aorist active subjunctive of μεταβαινω — metabainō old word, to go from one place to another, here (John 5:24; 1 John 3:14) to go from this world (John 8:23) back to the Father from whom he had come (John 14:12, John 14:28; John 16:10, John 16:28; John 17:5). His own which were in the world His own disciples (John 17:6, John 17:9, John 17:11), those left in the world when he goes to the Father, not the Jews as in John 1:11. See Acts 4:23; 1 Timothy 5:8 for the idiom. John pictures here the outgoing of Christ‘s very heart‘s love (chs. John 13-17) towards these men whom he had chosen and whom he loved “unto the end” (εις τελος — eis telos) as in Matthew 10:22; Luke 18:15, but here as in 1 Thessalonians 2:16 rather “to the uttermost.” The culmination of the crisis (“his hour”) naturally drew out the fulness of Christ‘s love for them as is shown in these great chapters (John 13-17). [source]
John 14:19 But ye behold me [υμεις δε τεωρειτε με]
Emphatic position of υμεις — humeis (ye) in contrast to the blind, unseeing world. Cf. John 13:33; John 16:10, John 16:16. Because I live, ye shall live also This is our blessed guarantee of immortal, eternal life, the continued living of Jesus. He is the surety of a better covenant (Hebrews 7:22), the Risen Christ Jesus. He had said it before (John 6:57). [source]
John 15:27 And ye also bear witness [και υμεις δε μαρτυρειτε]
Present active indicative or imperative (do ye bear witness), same form of μαρτυρεω — martureō “Ye also” as well as the Holy Spirit, ye also when filled with and taught by the Holy Spirit the things concerning Jesus. It is here that Christians fail most. Have been Progressive present of ειμι — eimi “are with me from the beginning of my ministry” as in John 14:9. They were chosen to be with Christ (Mark 3:14). [source]
John 16:13 Howbeit [δε]
One of the most delicate and difficult particles to translate, varying from “and” to “but.” When he, the Spirit of truth, is come Indefinite relative clause (ερχομαι — hotan and the second aorist active subjunctive of εκεινος — erchomai no futurum exactum), “whenever he comes.” Note πνευμα — ekeinos (masculine demonstrative pronoun, though followed by neuter οδηγησει υμας — pneuma in apposition. See John 15:26 for this phrase about the Holy Spirit. He shall guide you (οδηγεω — hodēgēsei humas). Future active of old verb οδηγος — hodēgeō (from οδος — hodēgos from ηγεομαι — hodos way, οδηγησον με εις την αλητειαν σου — hēgeomai to lead). See Psalm 24:5 for “lead me into thy truth” (απ εαυτου — hodēgēson me eis tēn alētheian sou). Christ is both the Way and the Truth (John 14:6) and the Holy Spirit is the Guide who shows the way to the Truth (John 16:14). This he does gradually. We are still learning the truth in Christ. From himself (αναγγελει — aph' heautou). In this he is like Christ (John 1:26; John 12:49; John 14:10). He shall declare (αναγγελλω — anaggelei). Future active of τα ερχομενα — anaggellō as in John 4:25. See it also repeated in John 16:14. The things that are yet to come (ερχομαι — ta erchomena). Neuter plural articular participle of ο ερχομενος — erchomai “the coming things.” This phrase only here in the N.T. The things already begun concerning the work of the Kingdom (Luke 7:19.; Luke 18:30) not a chart of future history. See Luke 7:20; John 6:14; John 11:27 for ho erchomenos (the coming one) used of the Messiah. [source]
John 19:38 But secretly for fear of the Jews [κεκρυμμενος δε δια τον ποβον των Ιουδαιων]
Perfect passive participle of κρυπτω — kruptō An example of the rulers described in John 12:41-43 who through cowardice feared to own their faith in Jesus as the Messiah. But it must be put down to the credit of Joseph that he showed courage in this darkest hour when the majority had lost heart. That he might take away Final clause with ινα — hina and the first aorist active subjunctive of αιρω — airō Else the body of Jesus might have gone to the potter‘s field. Pilate gladly consented. [source]
John 2:21 But he spake of the temple of his body [εκεινος δε ελεγεν περι του ναου του σωματος αυτου]
Emphatic he This is John‘s view as he looks back at it, not what he understood when Jesus spoke the words. [source]
John 2:24 But Jesus did not trust himself to them [αυτος δε Ιησους ουκ επιστευεν αυτον αυτοις]
“But Jesus himself kept on refusing (negative imperfect) to trust himself to them.” The double use of πιστευω — pisteuō here is shown by Acts 8:13 where Simon Magus “believed” Causal use of δια — dia and the accusative case of the articular infinitive το γινωσκειν — to ginōskein (because of the knowing) with the object of the infinitive (παντας — pantas all men) and the accusative of general reference (αυτον — auton as to himself). [source]
John 20:1 Now on the first day of the week [τηι δε μιαι των σαββατων]
Locative case of time when. Both Mark (Mark 16:2) and Luke (Luke 24:1) have this very idiom of the cardinal τηι μιαι — tēi miāi instead of the usual ordinal τηι πρωτηι — tēi prōtēi (first), an idiom common in the papyri and in the modern Greek (Robertson, Grammar, p. 671). In all three instances also we have the genitive plural των σαββατων — tōn sabbatōn for “the week” as in Acts 20:7. The singular σαββατον — sabbaton also occurs for “the week” as in Luke 18:12; Mark 16:9. Cometh Mary Magdalene Vivid historical present. Mary Magdalene is not to be confounded with Mary of Bethany. While it was yet dark Genitive absolute. For σκοτια — skotia see John 6:17; Matthew 10:27. Mark (Mark 16:2) says the sun was risen on their actual arrival. She started from the house while still dark. Taken away Perfect passive participle of αιρω — airō predicate accusative in apposition with τον λιτον — ton lithon f0). [source]
John 21:21 And what shall this man do? [ουτος δε τι]
Literally, “But this one … what?” The abrupt ellipsis is intelligible. [source]
John 3:1 Now [δε]
So often in John δε — de is explanatory and transitional, not adversative. Nicodemus is an instance of Christ‘s knowledge of men (John 2:25) and of one to whom he did trust himself unlike those in John 2:24. As a Pharisee “he belonged to that party which with all its bigotry contained a salt of true patriotism and could rear such cultured and high-toned men as Gamaliel and Paul” (Marcus Dods). Named Nicodemus Same construction as in John 1:6, “Nicodemus name to him.” So Revelation 6:8. It is a Greek name and occurs in Josephus (Ant. XIV. iii. 2) as the name of an ambassador from Aristobulus to Pompey. Only in John in N.T. (here, John 7:50; John 19:39). He was a Pharisee, a member of the Sanhedrin, and wealthy. There is no evidence that he was the young ruler of Luke 18:18 because of αρχων — archōn (ruler) here. [source]
John 3:19 And this is the judgment [αυτη δε εστιν η κρισις]
A thoroughly Johannine phrase for sequence of thought (John 15:12; John 17:3; 1 John 1:5; 1 John 5:11, 1 John 5:14; 3 John 1:6). It is more precisely the process of judging The light is come Second perfect active indicative of το σκοτος — erchomai a permanent result as already explained in the Prologue concerning the Incarnation (John 1:4, John 1:5, John 1:9, John 1:11). Jesus is the Light of the world. Loved darkness Job (Job 24:13) spoke of men rebelling against the light. Here πονηρα — to skotos common word for moral and spiritual darkness (1 Thessalonians 5:5), though Πονηρος — hē skotia in John 1:5. “Darkness” is common in John as a metaphor for the state of sinners (John 8:12; John 12:35, John 12:46; 1 John 1:6; 1 John 2:8, 1 John 2:9, 1 John 2:11). Jesus himself is the only moral and spiritual light of the world (John 8:12) as he dared claim to his enemies. The pathos of it all is that men fall in love with the darkness of sin and rebel against the light like denizens of the underworld, “for their works were evil In the end the god of this world blinds men‘s eyes so that they do not see the light (2 Corinthians 4:4). The fish in the Mammoth Cave have no longer eyes, but only sockets where eyes used to be. The evil one has a powerful grip on the world (1 John 5:19). [source]
John 3:23 John was also baptizing [ην δε και ο Ιωανης βαπτιζων]
Periphrastic imperfect picturing the continued activity of the Baptist simultaneous with the growing work of Jesus. There was no real rivalry except in people‘s minds. In Aenon near to Salim It is not clearly known where this place was. Eusebius locates it in the Jordan valley south of Beisan west of the river where are many springs (fountains, eyes). There is a place called Salim east of Shechem in Samaria with a village called Aimen, but with no water there. There may have been water there then, of course. Because there was much water there “Because many waters were there.” Not for drinking, but for baptizing. “Therefore even in summer baptism by immersion could be continued” (Marcus Dods). And they came, and were baptized Imperfects both, one middle and the other passive, graphically picturing the long procession of pilgrims who came to John confessing their sins and receiving baptism at his hands. [source]
John 4:4 He must needs pass through Samaria [Εδει δε αυτον διερχεσται δια της Σαμαριας]
Imperfect indicative of the impersonal verb δει — dei with subject infinitive Note repetition of δια — dia It was only necessary to pass through Samaria in going directly north from Judea to Galilee. In coming south from Galilee travellers usually crossed over the Jordan and came down through Perea to avoid the hostility of the Samaritans towards people who passed through their land to go to Jerusalem. Jesus once met this bitterness on going to the feast of tabernacles (Luke 9:51-56). [source]
John 5:11 But he answered [ος δε απεκριτη]
Demonstrative ος — hos (But this one) and deponent use of απεκριτη — apekrithē (first aorist passive indicative of αποκρινομαι — apokrinomai with no passive force). The same “That one,” emphatic demonstrative as often in John (John 1:18, John 1:33; John 9:37; John 10:1, etc.). The man did not know who Jesus was nor even his name. He quotes the very words of Jesus. Whole Predicate accusative agreeing with με — me (me). [source]
John 5:34 But the witness which I receive [Εγω δε ου την μαρτυριαν λαμβανω]
“But I do not receive the witness” simply from a man (like John). The εγω — egō (I) in sharp contrast with υμεις — humeis (ye) of John 5:33. Jesus complained of Nicodemus for not accepting his witness (John 3:11). Cf. also John 3:32. In 1 John 5:9 the witness of God is greater than that of men and this Jesus has. That ye may be saved Final clause with ινα — hina and first aorist passive subjunctive of σωζω — sōzō This was the purpose of Christ‘s coming, that the world might be saved (John 3:17). [source]
John 5:36 But the witness which I have is greater than that of John [Εγω δε εχω την μαρτυριαν μειζω του Ιωανου]
Literally, “But I have the witness greater than John‘s.” Μειζω — Meizō Final clause with ινα — hina and first aorist active subjunctive of τελειοω — teleioō the same idiom in John 4:34. Jesus felt keenly the task laid on him by the Father (cf. John 3:35) and claimed at the end that he had performed it (John 17:4; John 19:30). Jesus held that the highest form of faith did not require these “works” The very works “The works themselves,” repeating τα εργα — ta erga just before for vernacular emphasis. Hath sent me Perfect active indicative of αποστελλω — apostellō the permanence of the mission. Cf. John 3:17. The continuance of the witness is emphasized in John 5:32; John 8:18. [source]
John 6:12 And when they were filled [ως δε ενεπληστησαν]
First aorist (effective) passive indicative of εμπιμπλημι — empimplēmi old verb to fill in, to fill up, to fill completely. They were all satisfied. The Synoptics have εχορταστησαν — echortasthēsan like John 6:26 Gather up Second aorist active imperative of συναγω — sunagō to gather together. Broken pieces From κλαω — klaō to break. Not crumbs or scraps on the ground, but pieces broken by Jesus (Mark 6:41) and not consumed. Be lost Second aorist middle subjunctive of απολλυμι — apollumi with ινα — hina in purpose clause. Only in John. There was to be no wastefulness in Christ‘s munificence. The Jews had a custom of leaving something for those that served. [source]
John 7:14 But when it was now in the midst of the feast [ηδη δε της εορτης μεσουσης]
Literally, “But feast being already midway.” Genitive absolute, present active participle, of μεσοω — mesoō old verb from μεσος — mesos in lxx, here only in N.T. The feast of tabernacles was originally seven days, but a last day (John 7:37; Leviticus 23:36) was added, making eight in all. And taught Imperfect active of διδασκω — didaskō probably inchoative, “began to teach.” He went up The leaders had asked (John 7:11) where Jesus was. There he was now before their very eyes. [source]
John 7:37 Now on the last day [εν δε τηι εσχατηι ημεραι]
The eighth day which was “an holy convocation,” kept as a Sabbath (Leviticus 23:36), apparently observed as a memorial of the entrance into Canaan, hence “the great day of the feast” Stood and cried Past perfect active of ιστημι — histēmi used as imperfect and intransitive and first aorist active of κραζω — krazō Picture Jesus standing (linear) and suddenly crying out (punctiliar). If any man thirst Third class condition with εαν — ean and present active subjunctive of διπσαω — dipsaō “if any one is thirsty.” On each of the seven preceding days water was drawn in a golden pitcher from the pool of Siloam and carried in procession to the temple and offered by the priests as the singers chanted Isaiah 12:3: “With joy shall ye draw water out of the wells of salvation.” “It is uncertain whether the libations were made upon the eighth day. If they were not made, the significant cessation of the striking rite on this one day of the feast would give a still more fitting occasion for the words” (Westcott). [source]
John 8:1 But Jesus went [Ιησους δε επορευτη]
Same deponent use of πορευομαι — poreuomai as in John 7:53 and in contrast to the Sanhedrin‘s conduct, though it seems “pointless” (Dods). Apparently Jesus was lodging in the home of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus. [source]
John 8:16 Yea and if I judge [και εαν κρινω δε εγω]
“And even if I pass judgment.” Condition of third class again. True (ale4thine4). See John 1:9 for αλητινος — alēthinos genuine, soundly based (cf. δικαια — dikaia in John 5:30), “satisfying our perfect conception” (Westcott), not merely true For I am not alone Jesus now takes up the technical criticism in John 8:13 after justifying his right to speak concerning himself. But I and the Father that sent me See John 16:32 for a like statement about the Father being with Christ. It is not certain that πατηρ — patēr is genuine here (omitted by Aleph D, but in B L W), but the Father is clearly meant as in John 7:18, John 7:33. Jesus gives the Father as the second witness. [source]
John 8:40 But now [νυν δε]
Clear statement that they are not doing “the works of Abraham” in seeking to kill him. See this use of νυν δε — nun de after a condition of second class without αν — an in John 16:22, John 16:24. This did not Abraham Blunt and pointed of their unlikeness to Abraham. A man that hath told you the truth Αντρωπον — Anthrōpon (here = person, one) is accusative case in apposition with me Here we have “I” in the English. “God” here is equal to “My Father” in John 8:38. The only crime of Jesus is telling the truth directly from God. [source]
John 8:17 Yea and in your law [και εν τωι νομωι δε τωι υμετερωι]
Same use of καιδε — kai -de as in John 8:16. They claimed possession of the law (John 7:49) and so Jesus takes this turn in answer to the charge of single witness in John 8:13. He will use similar language (your law) in John 10:34 in an argumentum ad hominem as here in controversy with the Jews. In John 15:24 to the apostles Jesus even says “in their law” in speaking of the hostile Jews plotting his death. He does not mean in either case to separate himself wholly from the Jews and the law, though in Matthew 5 he does show the superiority of his teaching to that of the law. For the Mosaic regulation about two witnesses see Deuteronomy 17:6; Deuteronomy 19:15. This combined witness of two is not true just because they agree, unless true in fact separately. But if they disagree, the testimony falls to the ground. In this case the Father confirms the witness of the Son as Jesus had already shown (John 5:37). [source]
John 8:45 Because I speak the truth [εγω δε οτι την αλητειαν λεγω]
Proleptic emphatic position of εγω — egō “Truth is uncongenial to them” (Bernard). See John 3:19 for their picture. [source]
John 8:50 But I seek not mine own glory [εγω δε ου ζητω την δοχαν μου]
As they did not seek the glory of God (John 5:44; John 8:4). And judgeth The Father judges between you and me, though the Son is the Judge of mankind (John 5:22). “It is only the δοχα — doxa (glory) that comes from God that is worth having” (Bernard). [source]
John 9:14 Now it was the sabbath [ην δε σαββατον]
Literally, “Now it was a sabbath” (no article). To the Pharisees this fact was a far more important matter than whether or how the thing was done. See notes in Volume 1 and notes in Volume 2 for discussions of the minute Sabbath regulations of the rabbis. [source]
John 9:21 But how he now seeth we know not [πως δε νυν βλεπει ουκ οιδαμεν]
Concerning the third question they profess ignorance both as to the “how” Opened First aorist active indicative with single augment of ανοιγω — anoigō same form as ηνεωιχεν — ēneōixen (triple augment) in John 9:17. They were not witnesses of the cure and had the story only from the son as the Pharisees had. He is of age “He has maturity of age.” He is an adult. A regular classical phrase in Plato, etc. The parents were wholly right and within their rights. [source]
Acts 12:5 But prayer was made earnestly [προσευχη δε ην εκτενως γινομενη]
Probably δε — de here is not adversative (but), merely parallel (and) as Page argues. It was a crisis for the Jerusalem church. James had been slain and Peter was to be the next victim. Hence “earnestly” (late adverb from εκτενης — ektenēs strained, from εκτεινω — ekteinō to stretch. In the N.T. only here, Luke 22:44; 1 Peter 1:22) prayer was going up It looked like a desperate case for Peter. Hence the disciples prayed the more earnestly. [source]
Acts 13:5 They had also [ειχον δε και]
Imperfect active, descriptive. As their attendant (υπηρετην — hupēretēn). Literally, “under-rower” (υπο ηρετης — hupoχαζζαν — ēretēs) in the trireme. Probably here minister (chazzan) or assistant in the synagogue as in Luke 4:20. Cf. Matthew 5:25. It is not clear what John Mark did, though he was evidently selected by Barnabas as his cousin. He may have helped in the baptizing. There were probably others also in the company (Acts 13:13). The “also” may mean that Mark did some preaching. Barnabas was probably the leader in the work in these Jewish synagogues. [source]
Acts 13:9 But Saul, who is also called Paul [Σαυλος δε ο και Παυλος]
By this remarkably brief phrase Luke presents this epoch in the life of Saul Paul. The “also” Jerome held that the name of Sergius Paulus was adopted by Saul because of his conversion at this time, but this is a wholly unlikely explanation, “an element of vulgarity impossible to St. Paul “ (Farrar). Augustine thought that the meaning of the Latin paulus (little) would incline Saul to adopt, “but as a proper name the word rather suggested the glories of the Aemilian family, and even to us recalls the name of another Paulus, who was ‹lavish of his noble life‘” (Page). Among the Jews the name Saul was naturally used up to this point, but from now on Luke employs Paul save when there is a reference to his previous life (Acts 22:7; Acts 26:14). His real career is work among the Gentiles and Paul is the name used by them. There is a striking similarity in sound between the Hebrew Saul and the Roman Paul. Paul was proud of his tribe of Benjamin and so of King Saul (Philemon 3:5). [source]
Acts 13:30 But God raised him from the dead [ο δε τεος ηγειρεν εκ νεκρων]
This crucial fact Paul puts sharply as he always did. [source]
Acts 13:42 And as they went out [Εχιοντων δε αυτων]
Genitive absolute with present active participle of εχειμι — exeimi to go out, old verb, in the N.T. only in Acts 13:42; Acts 17:15; Acts 20:7; Acts 27:43. As they (Paul and Barnabas) were going out with all the excitement and hubbub created by the sermon. [source]
Acts 13:51 But they shook off the dust of their feet against them [οι δε εκτιναχαμενοι τον κονιορτον των ποδων επ αυτους]
First aorist middle (indirect) participle of εκτινασσω — ektinassō to shake out or off. Homer uses it for knocking out teeth. In the papyri. The middle aorist participle occurs again in Acts 18:6 and the active imperative with the dust of the feet in Mark 6:11 (Luke 10:11 has απομασσομετα — apomassometha). and Matthew 10:14 (command of Jesus). It is a dramatic gesture that forbids further intercourse. “As a protest against the injustice which cast them out. The sandal was taken off and the dust shaken out as a symbolic token that the very soil of the country was defiling” (Furneaux). [source]
Acts 14:4 But the multitude of the city was divided [εσχιστη δε το πλητος της πολεως]
First aorist passive indicative of σχιζω — schizō old verb to split, to make a schism or factions as Sadducees and Pharisees (Acts 23:7). This division was within the Gentile populace. Part held Common demonstrative of contrast The Jewish leaders made some impression on the Gentiles as at Antioch in Pisidia and later at Thessalonica (Acts 17:4.). This is the first time in the Acts that Paul and Barnabas are termed “apostles” (see also Acts 13:14). Elsewhere in the Acts the word is restricted to the twelve. Certainly Luke does not here employ it in that technical sense. To have followed Jesus in his ministry and to have seen the Risen Christ was essential to the technical use (Acts 1:22.). Whether Barnabas had seen the Risen Christ we do not know, but certainly Paul had (1 Corinthians 9:1.; 1 Corinthians 15:8). Paul claimed to be an apostle on a par with the twelve (Galatians 1:1, Galatians 1:16-18). The word originally means simply one sent (John 13:16) like messengers of the churches with the collection (2 Corinthians 8:23). The Jews used it of those sent from Jerusalem to collect the temple tribute. Paul applies the word to James the Lord‘s brother (Galatians 1:19), to Epaphroditus (Philemon 2:25) as the messenger of the church in Philippi, to Silvanus and Timothy (1 Thessalonians 2:6; Acts 18:5), apparently to Apollos (1 Corinthians 4:9), and to Andronicus and Junias (Romans 16:6.). He even calls the Judaizers “false apostles” (2 Corinthians 11:13). [source]
Acts 14:12 And Paul, Mercury [τον δε Παυλον ερμην]
Mercury (ερμης — Hermēs) was the messenger of the gods, and the spokesman of Zeus. ερμης — Hermēs was of beautiful appearance and eloquent in speech, the inventor of speech in legend. Our word hermeneutics or science of interpretation comes from this word (Hebrews 7:2; John 1:38). [source]
Acts 14:19 But there came thither Jews from Antioch and Iconium [Επηλταν δε απο Αντιοχειας και Ικονιου Ιουδαιοι]
Came to or upon them, επηλταν — epēlthan second aorist (ingressive) indicative of επερχομαι — eperchomai Whether news of the miracle had reached those cities we do not know. These may have been travelling grain merchants. At any rate there was an interval in which Paul and Barnabas won some disciples (Acts 14:22). There would be a natural reaction, even revulsion, in the minds of many who had come so near to worshipping Paul and Barnabas. The pendulum swings easily from one extreme to the other. The hostile Jews from Antioch and Iconium may even have followed Paul and Barnabas along the fine Roman road on purpose to keep them on the run. They had driven them out of Antioch and out of Iconium and now appear at Lystra at an opportune moment for their work. [source]
Acts 14:23 And when they had appointed for them elders in every church [χειροτονησαντες δε αυτοις κατ εκκλησιαν πρεσβυτερους]
They needed also some form of organization, though already churches. Note distributive use of κατα — kata with εκκλησιαν — ekklēsian (Acts 2:46; Acts 5:42; Titus 1:5). Χειροτονεω — Cheirotoneō (from χειροτονος — cheirotonos extending the hand, χειρ — cheir hand, and τεινω — teinō to stretch) is an old verb that originally meant to vote by show of the hands, finally to appoint with the approval of an assembly that chooses as in 2 Corinthians 8:19, and then to appoint without regard to choice as in Josephus (Ant. XIII. 2, 2) of the appointment of Jonathan as high priest by Alexander. So in Acts 10:41 the compound προχειρατονεω — procheiratoneō is used of witnesses appointed by God. But the seven (deacons) were first selected by the Jerusalem church and then appointed Elder Hovey rightly holds against Hackett that teaching was a normal function of these elders, pastors or bishops as they were variously called (1 Timothy 3:2; Titus 1:9; 1 Corinthians 12:28, 1 Corinthians 12:30; Ephesians 4:11). [source]
Acts 14:28 And they tarried no little time [διετριβον δε χρονον ουκ ολιγον]
Imperfect active of διατριβω — diatribō old verb to rub hard, to consume, with accusative of extent of time. It was a happy time of fellowship. The experiment entered upon by the church of Antioch was now a pronounced success. It was at the direct command of the Holy Spirit, but they had prayed for the absent missionaries and rejoiced at their signal success. There is no sign of jealousy on the part of Barnabas when Paul returns as the chief hero of the expedition. A new corner has been turned in the history of Christianity. There is a new centre of Christian activity. What will Jerusalem think of the new developments at Antioch? Paul and Barnabas made no report to Jerusalem. [source]
Acts 15:5 But there rose up [εχανεστησαν δε]
Second aorist active indicative (intransitive). Note both εχ — exō and αν — an These men rose up out of the crowd at a critical moment. They were believers in Christ Evidently they still held to the Pharisaic narrowness shown in the attack on Peter (Acts 11:2.). Note the dogmatism of their “must” They are unconvinced and expected to carry the elders with them. Codex Bezae says that they had appealed to the elders (Acts 15:2, Acts 15:5). At any rate they have made the issue in open meeting at the height of the jubilation. It is plain from Acts 15:6 that this meeting was adjourned, for another gathering came together then. It is here that the private conference of which Paul speaks in Galatians 2:1-10 took place. It was Paul‘s chance to see the leaders in Jerusalem (Peter, James, and John) and he won them over to his view of Gentile liberty from the Mosaic law so that the next public conference (Acts 15:6-29) ratified heartily the views of Paul, Barnabas, Peter, James, and John. It was a diplomatic triumph of the first order and saved Christianity from the bondage of Jewish ceremonial sacramentalism. So far as we know this is the only time that Paul and John met face to face, the great spirits in Christian history after Jesus our Lord. It is a bit curious to see men saying today that Paul surrendered about Titus and had him circumcised for the sake of peace, the very opposite of what he says in Galatians, “to whom I yielded, no not for an hour.” Titus as a Greek was a red flag to the Judaizers and to the compromisers, but Paul stood his ground. [source]
Acts 15:34 But it seemed good unto Silas to abide there [εδοχε δε Σιλαι επιμειναι αυτου]
This verse is not in the Revised Version or in the text of Westcott and Hort, being absent from Aleph A B Vulgate, etc. It is clearly an addition to help explain the fact that Silas is back in Antioch in Acts 15:40. But the “some days” of Acts 15:36 afforded abundant time for him to return from Jerusalem. He and Judas went first to Jerusalem to make a report of their mission. [source]
Acts 15:36 Let us return now and visit the brethren [επιστρεπσαντες δε επισκεπσωμετα τους αδελπους]
Paul takes the initiative as the leader, all the more so if the rebuke to Peter and Barnabas in Galatians 2:11-21 had already taken place. Paul is anxious, like a true missionary, to go back to the fields where he has planted the gospel. He uses the hortatory subjunctive Note the repeated επι — epi There is special point in the use of δη — dē (shortened form of ηδη — ēdē), now at this juncture of affairs (cf. Acts 13:2). [source]
Acts 15:38 But Paul thought not good to take with them [Παυλος δε ηχιουμη συνπαραλαμβανειν τουτον]
The Greek is far more effective than this English rendering. It is the imperfect active of αχιοω — axioō old verb to think meet or right and the present active infinitive of the same verb Each was insistent in his position (two imperfects). Paul had a definite reason for his view describing John Mark as “him who withdrew from them from Pamphylia” Second aorist active articular participle of απιστημι — aphistēmi intransitive use, “the one who stood off from, apostatized from” (our very word “apostasy”). And also as the one who “went not with them to the work” At Perga Mark had faced the same task that Paul and Barnabas did, but he flinched and flickered and quit. Paul declined to repeat the experiment with Mark. [source]
Acts 16:1 And he came also to Derbe and Lystra [κατηντησεν δε και εις Δερβην και εις Λυστραν]
First aorist active of κατανταω — katantaō late verb to come down to, to arrive at. He struck Derbe first of the places in the first tour which was the last city reached then. [source]
Acts 16:15 And when she was baptized [ως δε εβαπτιστη]
First aorist passive indicative of βαπτιζω — baptizō The river Gangites was handy for the ordinance and she had now been converted and was ready to make this public declaration of her faith in Jesus Christ. [source]
Acts 16:25 About midnight [κατα δε μεσονυκτιον]
Middle of the night, old adjective seen already in Mark 13:35; Luke 11:5 which see. [source]
Acts 17:14 And then immediately [ευτεως δε τοτε]
They acted swiftly as in Thessalonica. [source]
Acts 17:15 But they that conducted Paul [οι δε κατιστανοντες τον Παυλον]
Articular present active participle of κατιστανω — kathistanō (late form in A B of κατιστημι — kathistēmi or κατισταω — kathistaō), an old verb with varied uses to put down, to constitute, to conduct, etc. This use here is in the lxx (Joshua 6:23) and old Greek also. [source]
Acts 17:16 Now while Paul waited for them in Athens [Εν δε ταις Ατηναις εκδεχομενου αυτους του Παυλου]
Genitive absolute with present middle participle of εκδεχομαι — ekdechomai old verb to receive, but only with the sense of looking out for, expecting found here and elsewhere in N.T We know that Timothy did come to Paul in Athens (1 Thessalonians 3:1, 1 Thessalonians 3:6) from Thessalonica and was sent back to them from Athens. If Silas also came to Athens, he was also sent away, possibly to Philippi, for that church was deeply interested in Paul. At any rate both Timothy and Silas came from Macedonia to Corinth with messages and relief for Paul (Acts 18:5; 2 Corinthians 11:8.). Before they came and after they left, Paul felt lonely in Athens (1 Thessalonians 3:1), the first time on this tour or the first that he has been completely without fellow workers. Athens had been captured by Sulla b.c. 86. After various changes Achaia, of which Corinth is the capital, is a separate province from Macedonia and a.d. 44 was restored by Claudius to the Senate with the Proconsul at Corinth. Paul is probably here about a.d. 50. Politically Athens is no longer of importance when Paul comes though it is still the university seat of the world with all its rich environment and traditions. Rackham grows eloquent over Paul the Jew of Tarsus being in the city of Pericles and Demosthenes, Socrates and Plato and Aristotle, Sophocles and Euripides. In its Agora Socrates had taught, here was the Academy of Plato, the Lyceum of Aristotle, the Porch of Zeno, the Garden of Epicurus. Here men still talked about philosophy, poetry, politics, religion, anything and everything. It was the art centre of the world. The Parthenon, the most beautiful of temples, crowned the Acropolis. Was Paul insensible to all this cultural environment? It is hard to think so for he was a university man of Tarsus and he makes a number of allusions to Greek writers. Probably it had not been in Paul‘s original plan to evangelize Athens, difficult as all university seats are, but he cannot be idle though here apparently by chance because driven out of Macedonia. [source]
Acts 17:18 And certain also of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers encountered him [τινες δε και των Επικουριων και Στωικων πιλοσοπων συνεβαλλον αυτωι]
Imperfect active of συνβαλλω — sunballō old verb, in the N.T. only by Luke, to bring or put together in one‘s mind (Luke 2:19), to meet together (Acts 20:14), to bring together aid (Acts 18:27), to confer or converse or dispute as here and already Acts 4:15 which see. These professional philosophers were always ready for an argument and so they frequented the agora for that purpose. Luke uses one article and so groups the two sects together in their attitude toward Paul, but they were very different in fact. Both sects were eager for argument and both had disdain for Paul, but they were the two rival practical philosophies of the day, succeeding the more abstruse theories of Plato and Aristotle. Socrates had turned men‘s thought inward Aristotle with his cyclopaedic grasp sought to unify and relate both physics and metaphysics. Both Zeno and Epicurus (340-272 b.c.) took a more practical turn in all this intellectual turmoil and raised the issues of everyday life. Zeno (360-260 b.c.) taught in the Στοα — Stoa (Porch) and so his teaching was called Stoicism. He advanced many noble ideas that found their chief illustration in the Roman philosophers (Seneca, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius). He taught self-mastery and hardness with an austerity that ministered to pride or suicide in case of failure, a distinctly selfish and unloving view of life and with a pantheistic philosophy. Epicurus considered practical atheism the true view of the universe and denied a future life and claimed pleasure as the chief thing to be gotten out of life. He did not deny the existence of gods, but regarded them as unconcerned with the life of men. The Stoics called Epicurus an atheist. Lucretius and Horace give the Epicurean view of life in their great poems. This low view of life led to sensualism and does today, for both Stoicism and Epicureanism are widely influential with people now. “Eat and drink for tomorrow we die,” they preached. Paul had doubtless become acquainted with both of these philosophies for they were widely prevalent over the world. Here he confronts them in their very home. He is challenged by past-masters in the art of appealing to the senses, men as skilled in their dialectic as the Pharisaic rabbis with whom Paul had been trained and whose subtleties he had learned how to expose. But, so far as we know, this is a new experience for Paul to have a public dispute with these philosophical experts who had a natural contempt for all Jews and for rabbis in particular, though they found Paul a new type at any rate and so with some interest in him. “In Epicureanism, it was man‘s sensual nature which arrayed itself against the claims of the gospel; in Stoicism it was his self-righteousness and pride of intellect” (Hackett). Knowling calls the Stoic the Pharisee of philosophy and the Epicurean the Sadducee of philosophy. Socrates in this very agora used to try to interest the passers-by in some desire for better things. That was 450 years before Paul is challenged by these superficial sophistical Epicureans and Stoics. It is doubtful if Paul had ever met a more difficult situation. [source]
Acts 17:18 Other some [οι δε]
But others, in contrast with the “some” just before. Perhaps the Stoics take this more serious view of Paul. [source]
Acts 17:32 But others [οι δε]
A more polite group like those who had invited him to speak (Acts 17:19). They were unconvinced, but had better manners and so were in favour of an adjournment. This was done, though it is not clear whether it was a serious postponement or a courteous refusal to hear Paul further (probably this). It was a virtual dismissal of the matter. “ It is a sad story--the noblest of ancient cities and the noblest man of history--and he never cared to look on it again” (Furneaux). [source]
Acts 18:12 When Gallio was proconsul of Achaia [Γαλλιωνος δε αντυπατου οντος της Αχαιας]
Genitive absolute of present participle οντος — ontos Brother of Seneca the Stoic (Nero‘s tutor) and uncle of Lucan the author of the Παρσαλια — Pharsalia His original name was M. Annaeus Novatus till he was adopted by Gallio the rhetorician. The family was Spanish. Gallio was a man of culture and refinement and may have been chosen proconsul of Achaia for this reason. Statius calls him “dulcis Gallio.” Seneca says of him: Nemo enim mortalium uni tam dulcis quam hic omnibus (No one of mortals is so pleasant to one person as he is to all). Luke alone among writers says that he was proconsul, but Seneca speaks of his being in Achaia where he caught fever, a corroboration of Luke. But now a whitish grey limestone inscription from the Hagios Elias quarries near Delphi (a letter of Claudius to Delphi) has been found which definitely names Gallio as proconsul of Achaia The province of Achaia after various shifts (first senatorial, then imperial) back and forth with Macedonia, in a.d. 44 Claudius gave back to the Senate with proconsul as the title of the governor. It is amazing how Luke is confirmed whenever a new discovery is made. The discovery of this inscription has thrown light also on the date of Paul‘s work in Corinth as it says that Gallio came in the 26th acclamation of Claudius as Emperor in a.d. 51, that would definitely fix the time of Paul in Corinth as a.d. 50 and 51 (or 51 and 52). Deissmann has a full and able discussion of the whole matter in Appendix I to his St. Paul. [source]
Acts 18:19 But he himself [αυτος δε]
Paul again the leading person in the narrative. On this occasion he may have gone alone into the synagogue. He reasoned (διελεχατο — dielexato). Luke‘s favourite word for Paul‘s synagogue discourses (Acts 17:2, Acts 17:17; Acts 18:4 which see) as also Acts 19:8, Acts 19:9. [source]
Acts 19:9 But when some were hardened [ως δε τινες εσκληρυνοντο]
Imperfect passive of σκληρυνω — sklērunō causative like hiphil in Hebrew, to make hard In lxx and Hippocrates and Galen (in medical writings). In N.T. only here and Romans 9:18 and Romans 9:4 times in Hebrews 3:8, Hebrews 3:13, Hebrews 3:15; Hebrews 4:7, Hebrews 4:8 quoting and referring to Psalm 95:8 about hardening the heart like a gristle. The inevitable reaction against Paul went on even in Ephesus though slowly. [source]
Acts 19:15 But who are ye? [υμεις δε τινες εστε]
But you, who are you? Emphatic prolepsis. [source]
Acts 19:30 And when Paul was minded to enter in unto the people [Παυλου δε βουλομενου εισελτειν εις τον δημον]
Genitive absolute. Plainly Paul wanted to face the howling mob, whether it was the occasion pictured in 2 Corinthians 1:9 or not. “St. Paul was not the man to leave his comrades in the lurch” (Knowling). [source]
Acts 19:31 Certain also of the chief officers of Asia [τινες δε και των Ασιαρχων]
These “Asiarchs” were ten officers elected by cities in the province who celebrated at their own cost public games and festivals (Page). Each province had such a group of men chosen, as we now know from inscriptions, to supervise the funds connected with the worship of the emperor, to preside at games and festivals even when the temple services were to gods like Artemis. Only rich men could act, but the position was eagerly sought. [source]
Acts 19:33 And they brought Alexander out of the crowd [εκ δε του οχλου συνεβιβασαν Αλεχανδρον]
The correct text (Aleph A B) has this verb συνεβιβασαν — sunebibasan (from συνβιβαζω — sunbibazō to put together) instead of προεβιβασαν — proebibasan (from προβιβαζω — probibazō to put forward). It is a graphic word, causal of βαινω — bainō to go, and occurs in Acts 16:10; Colossians 2:19; Ephesians 4:16. Evidently some of the Jews grew afraid that the mob would turn on the Jews as well as on the Christians. Paul was a Jew and so was Aristarchus, one of the prisoners. The Jews were as strongly opposed to idolatry as were the Christians. [source]
Acts 20:7 Upon the first day of the week [εν δε μιαι των σαββατων]
The cardinal μιαι — miāi used here for the ordinal πρωτηι — prōtēi (Mark 16:9) like the Hebrew ehadh as in Mark 16:2; Matthew 28:1; Luke 24:1; John 20:1 and in harmony with the Koiné{[28928]}š idiom (Robertson, Grammar, p. 671). Either the singular (Mark 16:9) σαββατου — sabbatou or the plural σαββατον — sabbaton as here was used for the week (sabbath to sabbath). For the first time here we have services mentioned on the first day of the week though in 1 Corinthians 16:2 it is implied by the collections stored on that day. In Revelation 1:10 the Lord‘s day seems to be the day of the week on which Jesus rose from the grave. Worship on the first day of the week instead of the seventh naturally arose in Gentile churches, though John 20:26 seems to mean that from the very start the disciples began to meet on the first (or eighth) day. But liberty was allowed as Paul makes plain in Romans 14:5. [source]
Acts 21:32 Left off beating Paul [οι δε]
The participle with οι — pauomai describes what they were already doing, the supplementary participle (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1121). They stopped before the job was over because of the sudden onset of the Roman soldiers. Some ten years before in a riot at the passover the Roman guard marched down and in the panic several hundred were trampled to death. [source]
Acts 22:6 And it came to pass [εγενετο δε]
Rather than the common και εγενετο — kai egeneto and with the infinitive (περιαστραπσαι — periastrapsai), one of the three constructions with και ̔δἐ εγενετο — kai ‛de' egeneto by Luke (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 1042f.), followed by και — kai by finite verb, by subject infinitive as here. [source]
Acts 22:9 But they heard not the voice [την δε πωνην ουκ ηκουσαν]
The accusative here may be used rather than the genitive as in Acts 22:7 to indicate that those with Paul did not understand what they heard (Acts 9:7) just as they beheld the light (Acts 22:9), but did not see Jesus (Acts 9:7). The difference in cases allows this distinction, though it is not always observed as just noticed about Acts 22:14; Acts 26:14. The verb ακουω — akouō is used in the sense of understand (Mark 4:33; 1 Corinthians 14:2). It is one of the evidences of the genuineness of this report of Paul‘s speech that Luke did not try to smooth out apparent discrepancies in details between the words of Paul and his own record already in ch. 9. The Textus Receptus adds in this verse: “And they became afraid” Clearly not genuine. [source]
Acts 22:28 But I am a Roman born [Εγω δε και γεγεννημαι]
Perfect passive indicative of γενναω — gennaō The word “Roman” not in the Greek. Literally, “But I have been even born one,” (i.e. born a Roman citizen). There is calm and simple dignity in this reply and pardonable pride. Being a citizen of Tarsus (Acts 21:39) did not make Paul a Roman citizen. Tarsus was an urbs libera, not a colonia like Philippi. Some one of his ancestors (father, grandfather) obtained it perhaps as a reward for distinguished service. Paul‘s family was of good social position. “He was educated by the greatest of the Rabbis; he was at an early age entrusted by the Jewish authorities with an important commission; his nephew could gain ready access to the Roman tribune; he was treated as a person of consequence by Felix, Festus, Agrippa, and Julius” (Furneaux). [source]
Acts 23:6 But when Paul perceived [γνους δε ο Παυλος]
Perceiving (second aorist ingressive of γινωσκω — ginōskō). Paul quickly saw that his cause was ruined before the Sanhedrin by his unwitting attack on the high priest. It was impossible to get a fair hearing. Hence, Vincent says, “Paul, with great tact, seeks to bring the two parties of the council into collision with each other.” So Alford argues with the motto “divide and conquer.” Farrar condemns Paul and takes Acts 24:21 as a confession of error here, but that is reading into Paul‘s word about the resurrection more than he says. Page considers Luke‘s report meagre and unsatisfactory. Rackham thinks that the trial was already started and that Paul repeated part of his speech of the day before when “the Sadducees received his words with ostentatious scepticism and ridicule: this provoked counter-expressions of sympathy and credulity among the Pharisees.” But all this is inference. We do not have to adopt the Jesuitical principle that the end justifies the means in order to see shrewdness and hard sense in what Paul said and did. Paul knew, of course, that the Sanhedrin was nearly evenly divided between Pharisees and Sadducees, for he himself had been a Pharisee. [source]
Acts 23:9 And what if a spirit hath spoken to him or an angel? [ει δε πνευμα ελαλησεν αυτωι η αγγελοσ]
This is aposiopesis, not uncommon in the N.T., as in Luke 13:9; John 6:62 (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1203). See one also in Exodus 32:32. [source]
Acts 23:29 But to have nothing laid to his charge worthy of death or of bonds [μηδεν δε αχιον τανατου η δεσμων εχοντα ενκλημα]
Literally, “having no accusation (or crime) worthy of death or of bonds.” This phrase here only in the N.T. Εγκλημα — Egklēma is old word for accusation or crime from εγκαλεω — egkaleō used in Acts 23:28 and in the N.T. only here and Acts 25:16. Lysias thus expresses the opinion that Paul ought to be set free and the lenient treatment that Paul received in Caesarea and Rome (first imprisonment) is probably due to this report of Lysias. Every Roman magistrate before whom Paul appears declares him innocent (Gallio, Lysias, Felix, Festus). [source]
Acts 24:27 But when two years were fulfilled [διετιας δε πληρωτεισης]
Genitive absolute first aorist passive of πληροω — plēroō common verb to fill full. Διετια — Dietia late word in lxx and Philo, common in the papyri, in N.T. only here and Acts 28:30. Compound of δια — dia two (δυο δις — duoετος — dis) and ελαβεν διαδοχον — etos year. So Paul lingered on in prison in Caesarea, waiting for the second hearing under Felix which never came. Caesarea now became the compulsory headquarters of Paul for two years. With all his travels Paul spent several years each at Tarsus, Antioch, Corinth, Ephesus, though not as a prisoner unless that was true part of the time at Ephesus for which there is some evidence though not of a convincing kind. We do not know that Luke remained in Caesarea all this time. In all probability he came and went with frequent visits with Philip the Evangelist. It was probably during this period that Luke secured the material for his Gospel and wrote part or all of it before going to Rome. He had ample opportunity to examine the eyewitnesses who heard Jesus and the first attempts at writing including the Gospel of Mark (Luke 1:1-4). [source]
Acts 25:19 But had [δε ειχον]
Descriptive imperfect active of εχω — echō and δε — de of contrast (but). [source]
Acts 25:25 But I found [εγω δε κατελαβομην]
Second aorist middle of καταλαμβανω — katalambanō to lay hold of, to grasp, to comprehend as in Acts 4:13; Acts 10:34. [source]
Acts 27:36 Then were they all of good cheer [ευτυμοι δε γενομενοι]
More exactly, “Then all becoming cheerful,” because of Paul‘s words and conduct. [source]
Acts 27:41 But lighting upon [περιπεσοντες δε]
Second aorist active participle of περιπιπτω — peripiptō old verb to fall into and so be encompassed by as in Luke 10:30; James 1:2. There is a current on one side of St. Paul‘s Bay between a little island (Salmonetta) and Malta which makes a sand bank between the two currents. Unexpectedly the ship stuck in this sandbar. [source]
Acts 28:6 But they expected [οι δε προσεδοκων]
Imperfect active, were expecting, continued to expect. [source]
Acts 28:22 But we desire [αχιουμεν δε]
Old verb αχιοω — axioō to deem worthy, to think right or proper as in Acts 15:38 which see. They think it only fair to hear Paul‘s side of his case. [source]
Acts 3:14 But ye [υμεις δε]
In contrast with Pilate (εκεινου — ekeinou). [source]
Acts 3:15 But the Prince of life ye killed [τον δε αρχηγον της ζωης απεκτεινατε]
“The magnificent antithesis” (Bengel) Peter here draws between their asking for a murderer and killing the Prince (or Author) of life. Peter pictures Jesus as the source of all life as is done in John 1:1-18; Colossians 1:14-20; Hebrews 1:2. Αρχηγος — Archēgos See also Hebrews 2:10; Acts 5:31 where it is applied to Jesus as “Prince and Saviour.” But God raised him from the dead in contrast to what they had done. [source]
Acts 5:7 And it was about the space of three hours after [εγενετο δε ως ωρων τριων διαστημα]
Literally “Now there came an interval (διαστημα — diastēma distance, space between) of about (ως — hōs) three hours.” [source]
Acts 5:39 But if it is of God [ει δε εκ τεου εστιν]
The second alternative is a condition of the first class, determined as fulfilled, ει — ei with the present indicative. By the use of this idiom Gamaliel does put the case more strongly in favor of the apostles than against them. This condition assumes that the thing is so without affirming it to be true. On the basis of this alternative Gamaliel warns the Sanhedrin that they cannot “overthrow” (καταλυσαι — katalusai) these men for they in that case must “overthrow” God, lest haply ye be found (μη ποτευρετητε — mē potė̇hurethēte negative purpose with first aorist passive subjunctive) even to be fighting against God (και τεομαχοι — kai theomachoi late adjective from τεος — theos and μαχομαι — machomai in lxx and here only in the N.T.). [source]
Acts 6:4 But we [εμεις δε]
In contrast to the work given the seven. [source]
Acts 8:13 And Simon also himself believed [ο δε Σιμων και αυτος επιστευσεν]
Note the same verb in the aorist tense επιστευσεν — episteusen What did he believe? Evidently that Jesus was this “power of God” not himself (Simon). He saw that the miracles wrought by Philip in the name of Christ were genuine while he knew that his own were frauds. He wanted this power that Philip had to add to his own pretensions. “He was probably half victim of self-delusion, half conscious impostor” (Furneaux). He was determined to get this new “power,” but had no sense of personal need of Jesus as Saviour for his sins. So he submitted to baptism (βαπτιστεις — baptistheis first aorist passive participle of βαπτιζω — baptizō), clear proof that baptism does not convey salvation. [source]
Acts 8:16 Only they had been baptized [μονον δε βαβαπτισμενοι υπηρχον]
Periphrastic past perfect passive of βαπτιζω — baptizō with υπαρχω — huparchō (see Acts 8:9 προυπηρχον — proupērchon), instead of ησαν — ēsan Into the name (εις το ονομα — eis to onoma). Better, in the name (See note on Acts 2:38). [source]
Acts 8:18 When Simon saw [Ιδων δε ο Σιμων]
This participle (second aorist active of οραω — horaō) shows plainly that those who received the gift of the Holy Spirit spoke with tongues. Simon now saw power transferred to others. Hence he was determined to get this new power. [source]
Acts 9:7 Hearing the voice, but beholding no man [ακουοντες μεν της πωνησ μηδενα δε τεωρουντες]
Two present active participles in contrast In Acts 22:9 Paul says that the men “beheld the light” Instead of this being a flat contradiction of what Luke says in Acts 9:7 it is natural to take it as being likewise (as with the “light” and “no one”) a distinction between the “sound” (original sense of πωνη — phōnē as in John 3:8) and the separate words spoken. It so happens that ακουω — akouō is used either with the accusative (the extent of the hearing) or the genitive (the specifying). It is possible that such a distinction here coincides with the two senses of πωνην — phōnē They heard the sound (Acts 9:7), but did not understand the words (Acts 22:9). However, this distinction in case with ηκουσεν πωνην — akouō though possible and even probable here, is by no means a necessary one for in John 3:8 where ηκουσα πωνης — phōnēn undoubtedly means “sound” the accusative occurs as Luke uses ηκουσα πωνην — ēkousen phōnēn about Saul in Acts 9:4. Besides in Acts 22:7 Paul uses ēkousa phōnēs about himself, but ēkousa phōnēn about himself in Acts 26:14, interchangeably. [source]
Romans 1:12 That is [τουτο δε εστιν]
“An explanatory correction” (Denney). The δε — de should not be ignored. Instead of saying that he had a spiritual gift for them, he wishes to add that they also have one for him. [source]
Romans 12:5 And severally [το δε κατ εις]
A difficult late idiom where the preposition κατ — kath' So εις κατ εις — heis kath' heis (Mark 14:19) and in Modern Greek κατεις — katheis as a distributive pronoun. But we have κατ ενα — kath' hena in 1 Corinthians 14:31. The use of the neuter article here το — to with κατ εις — kath' heis is probably the accusative of general reference, “as to each one.” [source]
Romans 13:4 But if thou do [εαν δε ποιηις]
Condition of third class, εαν — ean and present active subjunctive of ποιεω — poieō “if thou continue to do.” [source]
Romans 14:2 But he that is weak [ο δε αστενων]
One would expect ος δε — hos de (but that one) in contrast with ος μεν — hos men ο — Ho is demonstrative with δε — de sometimes, but here is probably just the article with αστενων — asthenōn [source]
Romans 14:10 But thou, why dost thou judge? [συ δε τι συ κρινεισ]
Referring to the conduct of the “weak” brother in Romans 14:3. [source]
Romans 15:9 And that the Gentiles might praise [τα δε ετνη δοχασαι]
Coordinate with βεβαιωσαι — bebaiōsai and εις το — eis to to be repeated with τα ετνη — ta ethnē the accusative of general reference and τον τεον — ton theon the object of δοχασαι — doxasai Thus the Gentiles were called through the promise to the Jews in the covenant with Abraham (Romans 4:11., Romans 4:16.). Salvation is of the Jews. Paul proves his position by a chain of quotations from the O.T., the one in Romans 15:9 from Psalm 18:50. For εχομολογεω — exomologeō see note on Romans 14:11. [source]
Romans 15:20 Yea [ουτως δε]
“And so,” introducing a limitation to the preceding statement. [source]
Romans 15:25 But now [νυνι δε]
Repeats the very words used in Romans 15:23. [source]
Romans 16:26 But now is manifested [πανερωτεντος δε νυν]
First aorist passive participle of πανεροω — phaneroō to make plain, genitive case in agreement with μυστηριου — mustēriou [source]
Romans 2:8 But unto them that are factious and obey not the truth but obey unrighteousness [τοις δε εχ εριτειας και απειτουσιν τηι αλητειαι πειτομενοις δε αδικιαι]
The other side with δε — de and the articular present participles in the dative again, only with εχ εριτειας — ex eritheias there is no participle ουσιν — ousin But the construction changes and the substantives that follow are not the object of αποδωσει — apodōsei like ζωην αινωνιον — zōēn ainōnion above, but are in the nominative as if with εσονται — esontai (shall be) understood (anger and wrath, both οργη — orgē and τυμος — thumos tribulation and anguish, again a pair τλιπσις και στενοχωρια — thlipsis kai stenochōria on which see note on 2 Corinthians 6:4, 2 Corinthians 12:10). [source]
Romans 3:4 But every man a liar [πας δε αντρωπος πσευστης]
The contrast in δε — de really means, “though every man be found a liar.” Cf. Psalm 116:12. As it is written (κατως γεγραπται — kathōs gegraptai). Psalm 51:6. That thou mightest be justified οπως — Hopōs rather than the common ινα — hina for purpose and αν — an with the first aorist passive subjunctive of δικαιοω — dikaioō Used of God this verb here has to mean “declared righteous,” not “made righteous.” Mightest prevail (νικησεις — nikēseis). Future active indicative with οπως — hopōs of νικαω — nikaō to win a victory, though B L have νικησηις — nikēsēis (first aorist active subjunctive, the usual construction). When thou comest into judgement “In the being judged as to thee” (present passive infinitive or, if taken as middle, “in the entering upon trial as to thee”). Common construction in the lxx from the Hebrew infinitive construct. [source]
Romans 3:21 But now apart from the law [νυνι δε χωρις νομου]
He now (νυνι — nuni emphatic logical transition) proceeds carefully in Romans 3:21-31 the nature of the God-kind of righteousness which stands manifested (δικαιοσυνη τεου πεπανερωται — dikaiosunē theou pephanerōtai perfect passive indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō to make manifest), the necessity of which he has shown in 1:18-3:20. This God kind of righteousness is “apart from law” of any kind and all of grace (χαριτι — chariti) as he will show in Romans 3:24. But it is not a new discovery on the part of Paul, but “witnessed by the law and the prophets” (μαρτυρουμενη — marturoumenē present passive participle, υπο του νομου και των προπητων — hupo tou nomou kai tōn prophētōn), made plain continuously by God himself. [source]
Romans 3:22 Even [δε]
Not adversative here. It defines here. [source]
Romans 5:13 Sin is not imputed [αμαρτια δε ουκ ελλογειται]
Present passive indicative of late verb ελλογαω — ellogaō Genitive absolute, no law of any kind, he means. There was law before the Mosaic law. But what about infants and idiots in case of death? Do they have responsibility? Surely not. The sinful nature which they inherit is met by Christ‘s atoning death and grace. No longer do men speak of “elect infants.” [source]
Romans 6:22 And the end eternal life [το δε τελος ζωην αιωνιον]
Note accusative case ζωην αιωνιον — zōēn aiōnion object of εχετε — echete (ye have), though τανατος — thanatos in contrast above is nominative. [source]
Romans 7:2 But if the husband die [εαν δε αποτανηι ο ανηρ]
Third class condition, a supposable case (εαν — ean and the second aorist active subjunctive). [source]
Romans 7:6 But now [νυνι δε]
In the new condition. [source]
Romans 7:9 But I died [εγω δε απετανον]
My seeming life was over for I was conscious of sin, of violation of law. I was dead before, but I did not know. Now I found out that I was spiritually dead. [source]
Romans 7:14 But I am carnal [εγω δε σαρκινος ειμι]
“Fleshen” as in 1 Corinthians 3:1 which see, more emphatic even than σαρκικος — sarkikos a creature of flesh.” Sold under sin (πεπραμενος υπο την αμαρτιαν — pepramenos hupo tēn hamartian). Perfect passive participle of πιπρασκω — pipraskō old verb, to sell. See note on Matthew 13:46 and note on Acts 2:45, state of completion. Sin has closed the mortgage and owns its slave. [source]
Romans 7:17 So now [νυνι δε]
A logical contrast, “as the case really stands.” [source]
Romans 8:10 The spirit is life [το δε πνευμα ζωη]
The redeemed human spirit. He uses ζωη — zōē (life) instead of ζωσα — zōsa (living), “God-begotten, God-sustained life” (Denney), if Christ is in you. [source]
Romans 9:6 But it is not as though [ουχ οιον δε οτι]
Supply εστιν — estin after ουχ — ouch “But it is not such as that,” an old idiom, here alone in N.T. [source]
Romans 9:13 But Esau I hated [τον δε Εσαυ εμισησα]
This language sounds a bit harsh to us. It is possible that the word μισεω — miseō did not always carry the full force of what we mean by “hate.” See Matthew 6:24 where these very verbs (μισεω — miseō and αγαπαω — agapaō) are contrasted. So also in Luke 14:26 about “hating” (μισεω — miseō) one‘s father and mother if coming between one and Christ. So in John 12:25 about “hating” one‘s life. There is no doubt about God‘s preference for Jacob and rejection of Esau, but in spite of Sanday and Headlam one hesitates to read into these words here the intense hatred that has always existed between the descendants of Jacob and of Esau. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:10 Now I beseech you [παρακαλω δε υμας]
Old and common verb, over 100 times in N.T., to call to one‘s side. Corresponds here to ευχαριστω — eucharistō I thank, in 1 Corinthians 1:4. Direct appeal after the thanksgiving. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:12 And I of Christ [εγω δε Χριστου]
Still a fourth faction in recoil from the partisan use of Paul, Apollos, Cephas, with “a spiritually proud utterance” (Ellicott) that assumes a relation to Christ not true of the others. “Those who used this cry arrogated the common watchword as their peculium ” (Findlay). This partisan use of the name of Christ may have been made in the name of unity against the other three factions, but it merely added another party to those existing. In scouting the names of the other leaders they lowered the name and rank of Christ to their level. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:12 Now this I mean [λεγω δε τουτο]
Explanatory use of λεγω — legō Each has his party leader. Απολλω — Apollō is genitive of Απολλως — Apollōs (Acts 18:24), probably abbreviation of Απολλωνιυς — Apollōnius as seen in Codex Bezae for Acts 18:24. See note on Acts 18:24 for discussion of this “eloquent Alexandrian” (Ellicott), whose philosophical and oratorical preaching was in contrast “with the studied plainness” of Paul (1 Corinthians 2:1; 2 Corinthians 10:10). People naturally have different tastes about styles of preaching and that is well, but Apollos refused to be a party to this strife and soon returned to Ephesus and refused to go back to Corinth (1 Corinthians 16:12). Χηπα — Cēphā is the genitive of Χηπας — Cēphās the Aramaic name given Simon by Jesus (John 1:42), Πετρος — Petros in Greek. Except in Galatians 2:7, Galatians 2:8 Paul calls him Cephas. He had already taken his stand with Paul in the Jerusalem Conference (Acts 15:7-11; Galatians 2:7-10). Paul had to rebuke him at Antioch for his timidity because of the Judaizers (Galatians 2:11-14), but, in spite of Baur‘s theory, there is no evidence of a schism in doctrine between Paul and Peter. If 2 Peter 3:15. be accepted as genuine, as I do, there is proof of cordial relations between them and 1 Corinthians 9:5 points in the same direction. But there is no evidence that Peter himself visited Corinth. Judaizers came and pitted Peter against Paul to the Corinthian Church on the basis of Paul‘s rebuke of Peter in Antioch. These Judaizers made bitter personal attacks on Paul in return for their defeat at the Jerusalem Conference. So a third faction was formed by the use of Peter‘s name as the really orthodox wing of the church, the gospel of the circumcision. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:23 But we preach Christ crucified [ημεις δε κηρυσσομεν Χριστον εσταυρωμενον]
Grammatically stated as a partial result Christ (Messiah) as crucified, as in 1 Corinthians 2:2; Galatians 3:1, “not a sign-shower nor a philosopher” (Vincent). Perfect passive participle of σταυροω — stauroō [source]
1 Corinthians 1:24 But to them that are called [αυτοις δε τοις κλητοις]
Dative case, to the called themselves. [source]
1 Corinthians 10:4 And the rock was Christ [η πετρα δε ην ο Χριστος]
He definitely states here in symbolic form the preexistence of Christ. But surely “we must not disgrace Paul by making him say that the pre-incarnate Christ followed the march of Israel in the shape of a lump of rock” (Hofmann). He does mean that Christ was the source of the water which saved the Israelites from perishing (Robertson and Plummer) as he is the source of supply for us today. [source]
1 Corinthians 10:11 Now these things happened unto them [ταυτα δε συνεβαινον εκεινοις]
Imperfect tense because they happened from time to time. [source]
1 Corinthians 10:28 But if any man say unto you [εαν δε τις υμιν ειπηι]
Condition of third class. Suppose at such a banquet a “weak” brother makes the point to you: “This hath been offered in sacrifice” ιεροτυτον — Hierothuton late word in Plutarch, rare in inscriptions and papyri, only here in N.T. [source]
1 Corinthians 11:3 But I would have you know [τελω δε υμας ειδεναι]
But I wish you to know, censure in contrast to the praise in 1 Corinthians 11:2. [source]
1 Corinthians 11:6 If it is a shame [ει δε αισχρον]
Condition of first class assumed to be true. Αισχρον — Aischron is old adjective from αισχος — aischos bareness, disgrace. Clearly Paul uses such strong language because of the effect on a woman‘s reputation in Corinth by such conduct that proclaimed her a lewd woman. Social custom varied in the world then as now, but there was no alternative in Corinth. To be shorn or shaven (το κειρασται και χυρασται — to keirasthai kai xurasthai). Articular infinitives subject of copula εστιν — estin understood, κειρασται — keirasthai first aorist middle, χυρασται — xurasthai present middle. Note change in tense. Let her be veiled Present middle imperative of old compound κατακαλυπτω — katȧkaluptō here alone in N.T. Let her cover up herself with the veil (down, κατα — kata the Greek says, the veil hanging down from the head). [source]
1 Corinthians 11:21 This one is hungry [ος δε πειναι]
Demonstrative ος — hos Nothing is left for him at the love-feast. Another is drunken (ος δε μετυει — hos de methuei). Such disgusting conduct was considered shameful in heathen club suppers. “Hungry poor meeting intoxicated rich, at what was supposed to be a supper of the Lord” (Robertson and Plummer). On μετυω — methuō to be drunk, see Matthew 24:49; Acts 2:15. [source]
1 Corinthians 11:21 Another is drunken [ος δε μετυει]
Such disgusting conduct was considered shameful in heathen club suppers. “Hungry poor meeting intoxicated rich, at what was supposed to be a supper of the Lord” (Robertson and Plummer). On μετυω — methuō to be drunk, see Matthew 24:49; Acts 2:15. [source]
1 Corinthians 11:31 But if we discerned ourselves [ει δε εαυτους διεκρινομεν]
This condition of the second class, determined as unfulfilled, assumes that they had not been judging themselves discriminatingly, else they would not be judged Note distinction in the two verbs. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:1 Now concerning spiritual gifts [περι δε των πνευματικων]
Clearly one of the items asked about in the letter to Paul (1 Corinthians 7:1) and introduced precisely as the problem of meats offered to idols (1 Corinthians 8:1). This question runs to the end of chapter 14. Plainly much trouble had arisen in Corinth in the exercise of these gifts. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:18 But now [νυν δε]
But as things are, in contrast to that absurdity. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:20 Many members, but one body [πολλα μελη εν δε σωμα]
The argument in a nutshell, in one epigram. [source]
1 Corinthians 13:1 But have not love [αγαπην δε μη εχω]
This is the crux of the chapter. Love is the way par excellence of 1 Corinthians 12:31. It is not yet clearly certain that αγαπη — agapē (a back-formation from αγαπαω — agapaō) occurs before the lxx and the N.T. Plutarch used αγαπησις — agapēsis Deissmann (Bible Studies, p. 198) once suspected it on an inscription in Pisidia. It is still possible that it occurs in the papyri (Prayer to Isis). See Light from the Ancient East, p. 75 for details. The rarity of αγαπη — agapē made it easier for Christians to use this word for Christian love as opposed to ερως — erōs (sexual love). See also Moffatt‘s Love in the N.T. (1930) for further data. The word is rare in the Gospels, but common in Paul, John, Peter, Jude. Paul does not limit αγαπη — agapē at all (both toward God and man). Charity (Latin caritas) is wholly inadequate. “Intellect was worshipped in Greece, and power in Rome; but where did St. Paul learn the surpassing beauty of love?” (Robertson and Plummer). Whether Paul had ever seen Jesus in the flesh, he knows him in the spirit. One can substitute Jesus for love all through this panegyric. I am become (γεγονα — gegona). Second perfect indicative in the conclusion rather than the usual future indicative. It is put vividly, “I am already become.” Sounding brass (χαλχος ηχων — chalchos ēchōn). Old words. Brass was the earliest metal that men learned to use. Our word echoing is ηχων — ēchōn present active participle. Used in Luke 21:25 of the roaring of the sea. Only two examples in N.T. Clanging cymbal Cymbal old word, a hollow basin of brass. Αλαλαζω — Alalazō old onomatopoetic word to ring loudly, in lament (Mark 5:38), for any cause as here. Only two N.T. examples. [source]
1 Corinthians 13:6 But rejoiceth with the truth [συνχαιρει δε τηι αλητειαι]
Associative instrumental case after συν — suṅ in composition. Truth personified as opposed to unrighteousness (2 Thessalonians 2:12; Romans 2:8). Love is on the side of the angels. Paul returns here to the positive side of the picture (1 Corinthians 13:4) after the remarkable negatives. [source]
1 Corinthians 14:1 But rather that ye may prophesy [μαλλον δε ινα προπητευητε]
Distinct aim in view as in 1 Corinthians 14:5. Old verb from προπητης — prophētēs common in N.T. Present subjunctive, “that ye may keep on prophesying.” [source]
1 Corinthians 14:14 But my understanding is unfruitful [ο δε νους μου ακαρπος]
My intellect (νους — nous) gets no benefit (ακαρπος — akarpos without fruit) from rhapsodical praying that may even move my spirit (πνευμα — pneuma). [source]
1 Corinthians 14:28 But if there be no interpreter [εαν δε μη ηι διερμηνευτης]
Third class condition. Earliest known instance and possibly made by Paul from verb in 1 Corinthians 14:27. Reappears in Byzantine grammarians. [source]
1 Corinthians 15:20 But now [νυνι δε]
Emphatic form of νυν — nun with ι — ̇i added (cf. 1 Corinthians 12:18). It is the logical triumph of Paul after the reductio ad impossibile (Findlay) of the preceding argument. [source]
1 Corinthians 15:27 But when he saith [οταν δε ειπηι]
Here Christ must be supplied as the subject if the reference is to his future and final triumph. The syntax more naturally calls for God as the subject as before. Either way makes sense. But there is no need to take ειπηι — eipēi (second aorist active subjunctive) as a futurum exactum, merely “whenever he shall say.” Are put in subjection (υποτετακται — hupotetaktai). Perfect passive indicative, state of completion, final triumph. It is evident that Supply εστιν — estin (is) before οτι — hoti He is excepted who did subject (εκτος του υποταχαντος — ektos tou hupotaxantos). “Except the one (God) who did subject (articular aorist active participle) the all things to him (Christ).” [source]
1 Corinthians 15:28 And when all things have been subjected [οταν δε υποταγηι τα παντα]
Second aorist passive subjunctive of υποτασσω — hupotassō not perfect. Merely, “when the all things are subjected unto him.” The aorist subjunctive has given translators a deal of needless trouble in this passage. It is prophecy, of course. [source]
1 Corinthians 15:40 Is one [ετερα δε]
Antithesis that admits glory for bodies on earth and bodies in the heavens. Experience does not argue against a glory for the spiritual body (Philemon 3:21). [source]
1 Corinthians 15:51 But we shall all be changed [παντες δε αλλαγησομετα]
Second future passive indicative of αλλασσω — allassō Both living and dead shall be changed and so receive the resurrection body. See this same idea at more length in 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18. [source]
1 Corinthians 15:57 But thanks be to God [τωι δε τεωι χαρις]
Exultant triumph through Christ over sin and death as in Romans 7:25. [source]
1 Corinthians 16:1 Now concerning the collection for the saints [περι δε της λογιας της εις τους αγιους]
Paul has discussed all the problems raised by the Corinthians. Now he has on his own heart the collection for the saints in Jerusalem (see chapters 2 Corinthians 8; 2 Corinthians 9:1-15). This word λογια — logia (or εια — ̇eia) is now known to be derived from a late verb λογευω — logeuō to collect, recently found in papyri and inscriptions (Deissmann, Bible Studies, p. 143). The word λογια — logia is chiefly found in papyri, ostraca, and inscriptions that tell of religious collections for a god or a temple (Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East, p. 105). The introduction of this topic may seem sudden, but the Corinthians were behind with their part of it. They may even have asked further about it. Paul feels no conflict between discussion of the resurrection and the collection. [source]
1 Corinthians 16:4 And if it be meet for me to go also [εαν δε αχιον ηι του καμε πορευεσται]
“If the collection be worthy of the going as to me also.” Condition of third class (εανηι — eaṅ̇ēi) and the articular infinitive in the genitive (του — tou) after αχιον — axion The accusative of general reference (καμε — kame me also) with the infinitive. So the awkward phrase clears up. [source]
1 Corinthians 2:12 But we [ημεις δε]
We Christians like us (ημιν — hēmin) in 1 Corinthians 2:10 of the revelation, but particularly Paul and the other apostles. [source]
1 Corinthians 2:14 Now the natural man [πσυχικος δε αντρωπος]
Note absence of article here, “A natural man” (an unregenerate man). Paul does not employ modern psychological terms and he exercises variety in his use of all the terms here present as πνευμα — pneuma and πνευματικοσ πσυχη — pneumatikosπσυχικοσ σαρχ — psuchē and σαρκινος — psuchikosσαρκικος — sarx and σαρχ πνευμα — sarkinos and πσυχη — sarkikos A helpful discussion of the various uses of these words in the New Testament is given by Burton in his New Testament Word Studies, pp. 62-68, and in his Spirit, Soul, and Flesh. The papyri furnish so many examples of Πσυχικος — sarxπσυχη — pneuma and ανιμα — psuchē that Moulton and Milligan make no attempt at an exhaustive treatment, but give a few miscellaneous examples to illustrate the varied uses that parallel the New Testament. πσυχικος — Psuchikos is a qualitative adjective from πνευματικος — psuchē (breath of life like πσυχικος — anima life, soul). Here the Vulgate renders it by animalis and the German by sinnlich, the original sense of animal life as in Judges 1:19; James 3:15. In 1 Corinthians 15:44, 1 Corinthians 15:46 there is the same contrast between πνευματικος — psuchikos and ου δεχεται — pneumatikos as here. The ουδε γαρ δυναται — psuchikos man is the unregenerate man while the μωρια — pneumatikos man is the renewed man, born again of the Spirit of God. [source]
1 Corinthians 2:15 He himself is judged of no man [αυτος δε υπ ουδενος ανακρινεται]
Men will pass judgment on him, but the spiritual man refuses to accept the decision of his ignorant judges. He stands superior to them all as Polycarp did when he preferred to be burnt to saying, “Lord Caesar” in place of “Lord Jesus.” He was unwilling to save his earthly life by the worship of Caesar in place of the Lord Jesus. Polycarp was a πνευματικος — pneumatikos man. [source]
1 Corinthians 2:16 But we have the mind of Christ [ημεις δε νουν Χριστου εχομεν]
As he has already shown (1 Corinthians 2:6-13). Thus with the mind Hence Paul and all πνευματικοι — pneumatikoi men are superior to those who try to shake their faith in Christ, the mystery of God. Paul can say, “I know him whom I have believed.” “I believe; therefore I have spoken.” [source]
1 Corinthians 3:15 But he himself shall be saved [αυτος δε σωτησεται]
Eternal salvation, but not by purgatory. His work is burned up completely and hopelessly, but he himself escapes destruction because he is really a saved man a real believer in Christ. [source]
1 Corinthians 3:15 Yet so as through fire [ουτως δε ως δια πυρος]
Clearly Paul means with his work burned down (1 Corinthians 3:15). It is the tragedy of a fruitless life, of a minister who built so poorly on the true foundation that his work went up in smoke. His sermons were empty froth or windy words without edifying or building power. They left no mark in the lives of the hearers. It is the picture of a wasted life. The one who enters heaven by grace, as we all do who are saved, yet who brings no sheaves with him. There is no garnered grain the result of his labours in the harvest field. There are no souls in heaven as the result of his toil for Christ, no enrichment of character, no growth in grace. [source]
1 Corinthians 4:3 But with me [εμοι δε]
The ethical dative of personal relation and interest, “as I look at my own case.” Cf. Philemon 1:21. [source]
1 Corinthians 5:11 But now I write unto you [νυν δε εγραπσα υμιν]
This is the epistolary aorist referring to this same epistle and not to a previous one as in 1 Corinthians 5:9. As it is (when you read it) I did write unto you. [source]
1 Corinthians 6:13 But God shall bring to nought both it and them [ο δε τεος και ταυτην και ταυτα καταργησει]
Another proverb about the adaptation of the belly These Gentiles mixed up matters not alike at all (questions of food and sensuality). “We have traces of this gross moral confusion in the circumstances which dictated the Apostolic Letter (Acts 15:23-29), where things wholly diverse are combined, as directions about meats to be avoided and a prohibition of fornication” (Lightfoot). Both the belly (ταυτην — tautēn) and the foods (ταυτα — tauta) God will bring to an end by death and change. [source]
1 Corinthians 6:13 But the body is not for fornication, but for the Lord, and the Lord for the body [το δε σωμα ου τηι πορνειαι αλλα τωι κυριωι και ο κυριος τωι σωματι]
Paul here boldly shows the fallacy in the parallel about appetite of the belly for food. The human body has a higher mission than the mere gratification of sensual appetite. Sex is of God for the propagation of the race, not for prostitution. Paul had already stated that God dwells in us as the sanctuary of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 3:16.). This higher function of the body he here puts forward against the debased Greek philosophy of the time which ignored completely Paul‘s idea, “the body for the Lord and the Lord for the body” (dative of personal interest in both cases). “The Lord Jesus and πορνεια — porneia contested for the bodies of Christian men; loyal to him they must renounce that, yielding to that they renounce him” (Findlay). [source]
1 Corinthians 7:1 Now concerning the things whereof ye wrote [περι δε ων εγραπσατε]
An ellipsis of περι τουτων — peri toutōn the antecedent of περι ων — peri hōn is easily supplied as in papyri. The church had written Paul a letter in which a number of specific problems about marriage were raised. He answers them seriatim. The questions must be clearly before one in order intelligently to interpret Paul‘s replies. The first is whether a single life is wrong. Paul pointedly says that it is not wrong, but good One will get a one-sided view of Paul‘s teaching on marriage unless he keeps a proper perspective. One of the marks of certain heretics will be forbidding to marry (1 Timothy 4:3). Paul uses marriage as a metaphor of our relation to Christ (2 Corinthians 11:2; Romans 7:4; Ephesians 5:28-33). Paul is not here opposing marriage. He is only arguing that celibacy may be good in certain limitations. The genitive case with απτεσται — haptesthai (touch) is the usual construction. [source]
1 Corinthians 7:7 Yet I would [τελω δε]
“But I wish.” Followed by accusative and infinitive This is Paul‘s personal preference under present conditions (1 Corinthians 7:26). [source]
1 Corinthians 7:9 But if they have not continency [ει δε ουκ εγκρατευονται]
Condition of the first class, assumed as true. Direct middle voice εγκρατευονται — egkrateuontai hold themselves in, control themselves. [source]
1 Corinthians 7:11 But and if she depart [εαν δε και χωριστηι]
Third class condition, undetermined. If, in spite of Christ‘s clear prohibition, she get separated (ingressive passive subjunctive), let her remain unmarried Paul here makes no allowance for remarriage of the innocent party as Jesus does by implication. [source]
1 Corinthians 7:12 But to the rest say I, not the Lord [τοις δε λοιποις λεγω εγω ουχ ο Κυριος]
Paul has no word about marriage from Jesus beyond the problem of divorce. This is no disclaimer of inspiration. He simply means that here he is not quoting a command of Jesus. [source]
1 Corinthians 7:15 But God hath called us in peace [εν δε ειρηνηι κεκληκεν ημας]
Perfect active indicative of καλεω — kaleō permanent call in the sphere or atmosphere of peace. He does not desire enslavement in the marriage relation between the believer and the unbeliever. [source]
1 Corinthians 7:25 But I give my judgment [γνωμην δε διδωμι]
About mixed marriages (1 Corinthians 7:12) Paul had the command of Jesus concerning divorce to guide him. Here he has nothing from Jesus at all. So he gives no “command,” but only “a judgment,” a deliberately formed decision from knowledge (2 Corinthians 8:10), not a mere passing fancy. As one that hath obtained mercy of the Lord to be faithful (ως ηλεημενος υπο κυριου πιστος ειναι — hōs ēleēmenos hupo kuriou pistos einai). Perfect passive participle of ελεεω — eleeō old verb to receive mercy (ελεος — eleos). Πιστος — Pistos is predicate nominative with infinitive ειναι — einai This language, so far from being a disclaimer of inspiration, is an express claim to help from the Lord in the forming of this duly considered judgment, which is in no sense a command, but an inspired opinion. [source]
1 Corinthians 7:28 But and if thou marry [εαν δε και γαμησηις]
Condition of the third class, undetermined with prospect of being determined, with the ingressive first aorist (late form) active subjunctive with εαν — ean “But if thou also commit matrimony or get married,” in spite of Paul‘s advice to the contrary. [source]
1 Corinthians 7:28 And I would spare you [εγω δε υμων πειδομαι]
Possibly conative present middle indicative, I am trying to spare you like αγει — agei in Romans 2:4 and δικαιουστε — dikaiousthe in Galatians 5:4. [source]
1 Corinthians 7:29 But this I say [τουτο δε πημι]
A new turn is here given to the argument about the present necessity. [source]
1 Corinthians 8:1 Now concerning things sacrificed to idols [περι δε των ειδωλοτυτων]
Plainly the Corinthians had asked also about this problem in their letter to Paul (1 Corinthians 7:1). This compound adjective The connection between idolatry and impurity was very close, especially in Corinth. See both topics connected in Revelation 2:14, Revelation 2:20. By ειδωλοτυτα — eidōlothuta was meant the portion of the flesh left over after the heathen sacrifices. The heathen called it ιεροτυτον — hierothuton (1 Corinthians 10:28). This leftover part “was either eaten sacrificially, or taken home for private meals, or sold in the markets” (Robertson and Plummer). What were Christians to do about eating such portions either buying in the market or eating in the home of another or at the feast to the idol? Three questions are thus involved and Paul discusses them all. There was evidently difference of opinion on the subject among the Corinthian Christians. Aspects of the matter come forward not touched on in the Jerusalem Conference to which Paul does not here allude, though he does treat it in Galatians 2:1-10. There was the more enlightened group who acted on the basis of their superior knowledge about the non-existence of the gods represented by the idols. [source]
2 Corinthians 1:23 But I call God for a witness upon my soul [Εγω δε μαρτυρα τον τεον επικαλουμαι επι την εμην πσυχην]
Solemn attestation, “calling heaven to witness is frequent in literature from Homer onwards” (Plummer). Thus God is described above (cf. 1 Thessalonians 2:5, 1 Thessalonians 2:10; Romans 1:9; Galatians 1:20; Philemon 1:8). [source]
2 Corinthians 10:1 Now I Paul myself [Αυτος δε εγω Παυλος]
Cf. Galatians 5:2. Paul now turns to the third part of the epistle in chapters 10-13 in which he vigorously defends himself against the accusations of the stubborn minority of Judaizers in Corinth. Great ministers of Christ through the ages have had to pass through fiery trials like these. Paul has shown the way for us all. He speaks of himself now plainly, but under compulsion, as is clear. It may be that at this point he took the pen from the amanuensis and wrote himself as in Galatians 6:11. [source]
2 Corinthians 11:16 But if ye do [ει δε μη γε]
Literally, “But if not at least (or otherwise),” that is, If you do think me foolish. Yet as foolish (καν ως απρονα — kan hōs aphrona). “Even if as foolish.” Paul feels compelled to boast of his career and work as an apostle of Christ after the terrible picture just drawn of the Judaizers. He feels greatly embarrassed in doing it. Some men can do it with complete composure (sang froid). [source]
2 Corinthians 12:5 But on mine own behalf [υπερ δε εμαυτου]
As if there were two Pauls. In a sense there were. He will only glory in the things mentioned above, the things of his weaknesses (2 Corinthians 11:30). [source]
2 Corinthians 13:7 Though we be as reprobate [ημεις δε ως αδοκιμοι ωμεν]
Literally, “And that” Paul wishes them to do no wrong He has no desire to exercise his apostolic authority and “appear approved” He had far rather see them do “the noble thing” (το καλον — to kalon) even if it should make him appear disapproved after all that he has said. [source]
2 Corinthians 2:14 But thanks be unto God [τωι δε τεωι χαρις]
Sudden outburst of gratitude in contrast to the previous dejection in Troas. Surely a new paragraph should begin here. In point of fact Paul makes a long digression from here to 2 Corinthians 6:10 on the subject of the Glory of the Christian Ministry as Bachmann points out in his Kommentar (p. 124), only he runs it from 2:12-7:1 (Aus der Tiefe in die Hohe, Out of the Depths to the Heights). We can be grateful for this emotional outburst, Paul‘s rebound of joy on meeting Titus in Macedonia, for it has given the world the finest exposition of all sides of the Christian ministry in existence, one that reveals the wealth of Paul‘s nature and his mature grasp of the great things in service for Christ. See my The Glory of the Ministry (An Exposition of II Cor. 2:12-6:10). [source]
2 Corinthians 3:17 Now the Lord is the Spirit [ο δε Κυριος το πνευμα εστιν]
Some, like E. F. Scott (The Spirit in the N.T.), take Κυριος — Kurios here to be Christ and interpret Paul as denying the personality of the Holy Spirit, identifying Christ and the Holy Spirit. But is not Bernard right here in taking Κυριος — Kurios (Lord) in the same sense here as in Exodus 34:34 Christ dwells in us by the Holy Spirit, but the language here in 2 Corinthians 3:17 should not be pressed unduly (Plummer. See also P. Gardner, The Religious Experience of St. Paul, p. 176f.). Note “the Spirit of the Lord” here. [source]
2 Corinthians 6:10 Yet making many rich [πολλους δε πλουτιζοντες]
Old word from πλουτος — ploutos (wealth), to enrich. Spiritual riches Paul has in mind as in 1 Corinthians 1:5 (cf. Matthew 5:37). As having nothing and yet possessing all things (ως μηδεν εχοντες και παντα κατεχοντες — hōs mēden echontes kai panta katechontes). Contrast between μηδεν — mēden (nothing) and παντα — panta (all things, cf. 1 Corinthians 3:22) and εχω — echō (to have) and κατεχω — katechō (to hold down, to hold fast). Play on words (simple and compound) as in 2 Corinthians 3:2; 2 Corinthians 4:8. Climax of Paul‘s panegyric on the Christian ministry. He now resumes the thread of the story broken off in 2 Corinthians 2:14. [source]
2 Corinthians 6:13 Now for a recompense in like kind [την δε αυτην αντιμιστιαν]
No example of this expressive word outside of this passage and Romans 1:27 and later Christian writers. Paul may have found it in use in the Koiné{[28928]}š vernacular or he may have coined it from αντιμιστος — antimisthos remunerating (paying back). There is no verb here to explain the accusative which may be the accusative of general reference or the object of a verb not expressed. [source]
2 Corinthians 7:10 But the sorrow of the worldδε του κοσμου λυπη]
In contrast, the kind of sorrow that the world has, grief “for failure, not for sin” (Bernard), for the results as seen in Cain, Esau (his tears!), and Judas (remorse, μετεμελητη — metemelēthē). Works out (perfective use of κατ — kaṫ) death in the end. [source]
Galatians 1:22 And I was still unknown [ημην δε αγνουμενος]
Periphrastic imperfect passive of αγνοεω — agnoeō not to know. [source]
Galatians 2:4 But because of the false brethren privately brought in [δια δε τους παρεισακτους πσευδαδελπους]
Late verbal adjective παρεισακτος — pareisaktos from the double compound verb παρεισαγω — pareisagō found in papyri in the sense of brought in by the side or on the sly as here. Evidently some of the Judaizers or sympathizers whom Paul had not invited had come in as often happens. Paul terms them “false brethren” like “the false apostles” in 2 Corinthians 11:13 of the Judaizers in Corinth. [source]
Galatians 3:17 Now this I say [τουτο δε λεγω]
Now I mean this. He comes back to his main point and is not carried afield by the special application of σπερμα — sperma to Christ. [source]
Galatians 3:20 But God is one [ο δε τεος εις εστιν]
There was no middleman between God and Abraham. He made the promise directly to Abraham. Over 400 interpretations of this verse have been made! [source]
Galatians 3:29 If ye are Christ‘s [ει δε υμεις Χριστου]
This is the test, not the accident of blood, pride of race or nation, habiliments or environment of dress or family, whether man or woman. Thus one comes to belong to the seed of Abraham and to be an heir according to promise. [source]
Galatians 4:9 Now that ye have come to know God [νυν δε γνοντες]
Fine example of the ingressive second aorist active participle of γινωσκω — ginōskō come to know by experience through faith in Christ. [source]
Galatians 4:9 Rather to be known of God [μαλλον δε γνωστεντες υπο τεου]
First aorist passive participle of the same verb. He quickly turns it round to the standpoint of God‘s elective grace reaching them (Galatians 4:6). How (πως — pōs). “A question full of wonder” (Bengel). See note on Galatians 1:6. Turn ye back again? Present active indicative, “Are ye turning again?” See μετατιτεστε — metatithesthe in Galatians 1:6. The weak and beggarly rudiments (τα αστενη και πτωχα στοιχεια — ta asthenē kai ptōcha stoicheia). The same στοιχεια — stoicheia in Galatians 4:3 from which they had been delivered, “weak and beggarly,” still in their utter impotence from the Pharisaic legalism and the philosophical and religious legalism and the philosophical and religious quests of the heathen as shown by Angus‘s The Religious Quests of the Graeco-Roman World. These were eagerly pursued by many, but they were shadows when caught. It is pitiful today to see some men and women leave Christ for will o‘the wisps of false philosophy. Over again Old word, from above (ανω — anō) as in Matthew 27:51, from the first (Luke 1:3), then “over again” as here, back to where they were before (in slavery to rites and rules). [source]
Galatians 4:28 Now we [ημεις δε]
Some MSS. have υμεις δε — humeis de (now ye). In either case Paul means that Christians (Jews and Gentiles) are children of the promise as Isaac was (κατα Ισαακ — kata Isaak after the manner of Isaac). [source]
Ephesians 2:4 But God [ο δε τεος]
Change in the structure of the sentence here, resuming Ephesians 2:1 after the break. [source]
Ephesians 2:13 But now [νυνι δε]
Strong contrast, as opposed to “at that time.” [source]
Ephesians 4:9 Now this [το δε]
Paul picks out the verb αναβας — anabas (second aorist active participle of αναβαινω — anabainō to go up), changes its form to ανεβη — anebē (second aorist indicative), and points the article (το — to) at it. Then he concludes that it implied a previous καταβας — katabas (coming down). [source]
Ephesians 4:20 But ye did not so learn Christ [υμεις δε ουχ ουτως εματετε τον Χριστον]
In sharp contrast to pagan life Second aorist active indicative of μαντανω — manthanō f0). [source]
Ephesians 5:8 But now light [νυν δε πως]
Jesus called his disciples the light of the world (Matthew 5:14). [source]
Ephesians 5:32 But I speak [εγω δε λεγω]
“Now I mean.” Cf. 1 Corinthians 7:29; 1 Corinthians 15:50. In regard of Christ and of the church (εις Χριστον και εισ την εκκλησιαν — eis Christon kai ̣eiš tēn ekklēsian). “With reference to Christ and the church.” That is all that εις — eis here means. [source]
Philippians 2:8 Yea, the death of the cross [τανατου δε σταυρου]
The bottom rung in the ladder from the Throne of God. Jesus came all the way down to the most despised death of all, a condemned criminal on the accursed cross. [source]
Philippians 3:12 But I press on [διωκω δε]
He is not discouraged, but encouraged. He keeps up the chase (real idea in διωκω — diōkō as in 1 Corinthians 14:1; Romans 9:30; 1 Timothy 6:11). If so be that (ει και — ei kai). “I follow after.” The condition (third class, εικαταλαβω — ei̇̇katalabō second aorist active subjunctive of καταλαμβανω — katalambanō) is really a sort of purpose clause or aim. There are plenty of examples in the Koiné{[28928]}š of the use of ει — ei and the subjunctive as here (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1017), “if I also may lay hold of that for which (επ ωι — Ephesians' hōi purpose expressed by επι — epi) I was laid hold of (κατελημπτην — katelēmphthēn first aorist passive of the same verb καταλαμβανω — katalambanō) by Christ Jesus.” His conversion was the beginning, not the end of the chase. [source]
Philippians 3:13 But one thing [εν δε]
No verb in the Greek. We can supply ποιω — poiō (I do) or διωκω — diōkō (I keep on in the chase), but no verb is really needed. “When all is said, the greatest art is to limit and isolate oneself” (Goethe), concentration. [source]
Colossians 1:22 Yet now [νυνι δε]
Sharpened contrast with emphatic form of νυν — nun “now” being not at the present moment, but in the present order of things in the new dispensation of grace in Christ. [source]
Colossians 1:26 But now it hath been manifested [νυν δε επανερωτη]
First aorist passive indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō to make manifest The construction is suddenly changed (anacoluthon) from the participle to the finite verb. [source]
Colossians 3:8 But now [νυνι δε]
Emphatic form of νυν — nun in decided contrast (to ποτε — pote in Colossians 3:7) in the resurrection life of Colossians 2:12; Colossians 3:1. [source]
Colossians 3:14 And above all these things [επι πασιν δε τουτοις]
“And upon all these things.” [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:1 But concerning the times and the seasons [περι δε των χρονων και των καιρων]
See both words used also in Titus 1:2. Χρονος — Chronos is rather an extended period and καιρος — kairos a definite space of time. [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:21 Prove all things [παντα δε δοκιμαζετε]
Probably δε — de (but) is genuine. Even the gift of prophecy has to be tested (1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 14:29) to avoid error. Paul shows fine balance here. [source]
2 Thessalonians 3:3 But the Lord is faithful [πιστος δε εστιν ο κυριος]
(πιστος δε εστιν ο κυριος — pistos de estin ho kurios). [source]
2 Thessalonians 3:6 Now we command you [παραγγελλομεν δε υμιν]
Paul puts into practice the confidence expressed on their obedience to his commands in 2 Thessalonians 3:4. [source]
2 Thessalonians 3:13 But ye, brethren, be not weary in well-doing [υμεις δε αδελποι μη ενκακησητε καλοποιουντες]
Emphatic position of εν κακος — humeis in contrast to these piddlers. καλοποιεω — Mē and the aorist subjunctive is a prohibition against beginning an act (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 851-4). It is a late verb and means to behave badly in, to be cowardly, to lose courage, to flag, to faint, It occurs in Polybius. The late verb αγατοποιεω — kalopoieō to do the fair (kalos) or honourable thing occurs nowhere else in the N.T., but is in the lxx and a late papyrus. Paul uses to kalon poiein in 2 Corinthians 13:7; Galatians 6:9; Romans 7:21 with the same idea. He has agathopoieō to do good, in 1 Timothy 6:18. [source]
2 Thessalonians 3:14 And if any one obeyeth not our word by this epistle [ει δε τις ουχ υπακουει τωι λογωι ημων δια της επιστολης]
Paul sums up the issue bluntly with this ultimatum. Condition of the first class, with negative ου — ou assuming it to be true. [source]
1 Timothy 3:15 But if I tarry long [εαν δε βραδυνω]
Condition of third class with εαν — ean and the present active subjunctive of βραδυνω — bradunō old verb, to be slow (usually intransitive), from βραδυς — bradus (slow, dull, Luke 24:25), in N.T. only here and 2 Peter 3:9. [source]
1 Timothy 5:11 But younger widows refuse [νεωτερας δε χηρας παραιτου]
Present middle imperative as in 1 Timothy 4:7. “Beg off from.” They lack experience as above and they have other ambitions. [source]
1 Timothy 5:13 And withal [αμα δε και]
See note on Philemon 1:22 for this very phrase, “and at the same time also.” Such young enrolled widows have other perils also. [source]
1 Timothy 5:24 And some men also they follow after [τισιν δε και επακολουτουσιν]
Associative instrumental case τισιν — tisin with επακολουτουσιν — epakolouthousin for which verb see 1 Timothy 5:10, “dog their steps” (Parry) like 1 Peter 2:21, not clearly manifest at first, but come out plainly at last. How true that is of secret sins. [source]
2 Timothy 1:10 But hath now been manifested [πανερωτεισαν δε νυν]
First aorist passive participle of πανεροω — phaneroō agreeing with χαριν — charin See Titus 1:3; Colossians 1:26; Colossians 3:4 for πανεροω — phaneroō and the contrast made. [source]
2 Timothy 1:10 Brought to light [πωτισαντος δε]
First aorist active participle of πωτιζω — phōtizō literary Koiné{[28928]}š word for which see note on 1 Corinthians 4:5; Ephesians 1:18, to turn the light on. Life and incorruption (ζωην και απταρσιαν — zōēn kai aphtharsian). The opposite of τανατος — thanatos “life and immortality” (unchangeable life). [source]
2 Timothy 2:5 If also a man contend in the games [εαν δε και ατληι τις]
Condition of third class with present (linear) active subjunctive of ατλεω — athleō old and common verb (from ατλος — athlos a contest), only this verse in N.T., but συνατλεω — sunathleō in Philemon 1:27. Note sharp distinction between ατληι — athlēi (present subjunctive, engage in a contest in general) and ατλησηι — athlēsēi (first aorist active subjunctive, engage in a particular contest). Not “except he have contended,” but simply “unless he contend” (in any given case) “lawfully” Old adverb, agreeably to the law, in N.T. only here and 1 Timothy 1:8. [source]
2 Timothy 3:14 But abide thou [συ δε μενε]
Emphatic contrast (συ δε — su de), “But thou.” Present active imperative of μενω — menō common verb, to remain. [source]
2 Timothy 4:5 But be thou sober [συ δε νηπε]
Present active imperative of νηπω — nēphō for which see note on 1 Thessalonians 5:6, 1 Thessalonians 5:8. “Be sober in thy head.” [source]
2 Timothy 4:17 But the Lord stood by me [ο δε κυριος μοι παρεστη]
Second aorist active of παριστημι — paristēmi (intransitive use), “took his stand by my side.” See note on Romans 16:2. Clearly Jesus appeared to Paul now at this crisis and climax as he had done so many times before. [source]
Titus 2:1 But speak thou [συ δε λαλει]
In contrast to these Pharisaic Gnostics in Crete. [source]
Philemon 1:11 But now is profitable to thee and to me [νυνι δε σοι και εμοι ευχρηστον]
“But now to thee and to me useful.” Still further play on the name Onesimus by ευχρηστον — euchrēston (verbal adjective from ευ — eu and χραομαι — chraomai to use). Ethical dative here (σοι εμοι — soiemoi). [source]
Philemon 1:16 How much rather to thee [ποσωι δε μαλλον σοι]
“By how much more to thee,” because of Philemon‘s legal ownership of this now Christian slave. “In the flesh Philemon had the brother for a slave; in the Lord he had the slave for a brother” (Meyer). [source]
Philemon 1:18 But if he hath wronged thee at all [ει δε τι ηδικησε σε]
Condition of the first class, assumed to be true. Onesimus did wrong He had probably robbed Philemon before he ran away. [source]
Philemon 1:22 But withal [αμα δε]
Along with your kindly reception of Onesimus. On αμα — hama see note on Acts 24:26 and note on Acts 27:40. [source]
Hebrews 1:6 And when he again bringeth in [οταν δε παλιν εισαγαγηι]
Indefinite temporal clause with οταν — hotan and second aorist active subjunctive of εισαγω — eisagō If παλιν — palin is taken with εισαγαγηι — eisagagēi the reference is to the Second Coming as in Hebrews 9:28. If παλιν — palin merely introduces another quotation (Psalm 97:7) parallel to και παλιν — kai palin in Hebrews 1:5, the reference is to the incarnation when the angels did worship the Child Jesus (Luke 2:13.). There is no way to decide certainly about it. The first-born See Psalm 89:28. For this compound adjective applied to Christ in relation to the universe see Colossians 1:15, to other men, Romans 8:29; Colossians 1:18, to the other children of Mary, Luke 2:7; here it is used absolutely. The world “The inhabited earth.” See Acts 17:6. Let worship Imperative first aorist active third plural of προσκυνεω — proskuneō here in the full sense of worship, not mere reverence or courtesy. This quotation is from the lxx of Deut 32:43, but is not in the Hebrew, though most of the lxx MSS. (except F) have υιοι τεου — huioi theou but the substance does occur also in Psalm 97:7 with οι αγγελοι αυτου — hoi aggeloi autou f0). [source]
Hebrews 10:15 And the Holy Ghost also beareth witness to us [μαρτυρει δε ημιν και το πνευμα το αγιον]
Μαρτυρεω — Martureō is common in Philo for Scripture quotation. The author confirms his interpretation of Psalm 40:7-9 by repeating from Jeremiah (Jeremiah 31:31.) what he had already quoted (Hebrews 8:8-12). After he hath said Accusative case after μετα — meta of the articular infinitive perfect active, “after the having said.” [source]
Hebrews 10:39 But we [ημεις δε]
In contrast to renegades who do flicker and turn back from Christ. Of them that shrink back unto perdition Predicate genitive of υποστολη — hupostolē as in Hebrews 12:11, from υποστελλω — hupostellō with same sense here, stealthy retreat in Plutarch, dissimulation in Josephus. Here alone in the N.T. Unto the saving of the soul Old word from περιποιεω — peripoieō to reserve, to preserve (Luke 17:33) to purchase (Acts 20:28). So here preserving or saving one‘s life as in Plato, but possession in Ephesians 1:14, obtaining in 1 Thessalonians 4:9. Papyri have it in sense of preservation. [source]
Hebrews 11:1 Now faith is [εστιν δε πιστις]
He has just said that “we are of faith” (Hebrews 10:39), not of apostasy. Now he proceeds in a chapter of great eloquence and passion to illustrate his point by a recital of the heroes of faith whose example should spur them to like loyalty now. The assurance of things hoped for υπιστημι — Hupostasis is a very common word from Aristotle on and comes from υπο — huphistēmi See the philosophical use of it in Hebrews 1:3, the sense of assurance (une assurance certaine, Menegoz) in Hebrews 3:14, that steadiness of mind which holds one firm (2 Corinthians 9:4). It is common in the papyri in business documents as the basis or guarantee of transactions. “And as this is the essential meaning in Hebrews 11:1 we venture to suggest the translation ‹Faith is the title-deed of things hoped for‘” (Moulton and Milligan, Vocabulary, etc.). The proving of things not seen The only N.T. example of ελεγμον — elegchos (except Textus Receptus in 2 Timothy 3:16 for ελεγχω — elegmon). Old and common word from elegchō (Matthew 18:15) for “proof” and then for “conviction.” Both uses occur in the papyri and either makes sense here, perhaps “conviction” suiting better though not in the older Greek. [source]
Hebrews 12:27 And this word [το δε]
He uses the article to point out “ετι απαχ — eti hapax ” which he explains The removing For this word see Hebrews 7:12; Hebrews 11:5. For the transitory nature of the world see 1 Corinthians 7:31; 1 John 2:17. “There is a divine purpose in the cosmic catastrophe” (Moffatt). Made Perfect passive participle of ποιεω — poieō Made by God, but made to pass away. That those things which are not shaken may remain Final clause with μη — mē and the first aorist active subjunctive of μενω — menō The Kingdom of God is not shaken, fearful as some saints are about it. [source]
Hebrews 2:6 But one somewhere [δε που τις]
See Hebrews 4:4 for a like indefinite quotation. Philo uses this “literary mannerism” (Moffatt). He quotes Psalm 8:5-7 and extends here to Hebrews 2:8. Hath testified First aorist middle indicative of διαμαρτυρομαι — diamarturomai old verb to testify vigorously (Acts 2:40). What Neuter, not masculine τις — tis (who). The insignificance of man is implied. The son of man Not ο υιος του αντρωπου — ho huios tou anthrōpou which Jesus used so often about himself, but literally here “son of man” like the same words so often in Ezekiel, without Messianic meaning here. Visited Second person singular present indicative middle of επισκεπτομαι — episkeptomai old verb to look upon, to look after, to go to see (Matthew 25:36), from which verb επισχοπος — episcopos overseer, bishop, comes. [source]
Hebrews 6:9 But we are persuaded [πεπεισμετα δε]
Perfect passive indicative of πειτω — peithō literary plural. Note Paul‘s use of πεπεισμαι — pepeismai in 2 Timothy 1:12. Better things “The better things” than those pictures in Hebrews 6:4-8. That accompany salvation “Things holding on to salvation” (Mark 1:38), a common Greek phrase εχομενα — echomena present middle participle of εχω — echō Though we thus speak Concessive condition of the first class. Explanatory, not apologetic, of his plain talk. Not unrighteous to forget Second aorist middle infinitive of επιλαντανω — epilanthanō with genitive case But even God cannot remember what they did not do. In that ye ministered and still do minister First aorist active and present active participle of the one verb διακονεω — diakoneō the sole difference being the tense (single act aorist, repeated acts present). [source]
Hebrews 6:11 And we desire [επιτυμουμεν δε]
Literary plural again like πεπεισμετα — pepeismetha (Hebrews 6:9). He is not wholly satisfied with them as he had already shown (Hebrews 5:11-14). They have not given up Christ (Hebrews 6:4-8), but many of them are still babes For πληροπορια — plērophoria see 1 Thessalonians 1:5; Colossians 2:2. To the end As in Hebrews 3:6, Hebrews 3:14. [source]
Hebrews 8:6 But now [νυν δε]
Logical use of νυν — nun as the case now stands, with Jesus as high priest in heaven. Hath he obtained Perfect active indicative of τυγχανω — tugchanō with the genitive, a rare and late form for τετευχεν — teteuchen (also τετευχηκεν — teteuchēken), old verb to hit the mark, to attain. A ministry the more excellent “A more excellent ministry.” For the comparative of διαπορος — diaphoros see Hebrews 1:4. This remark applies to all the five points of superiority over the Levitical priesthood. By how much Instrumental case of the relative οσος — hosos between two comparative adjectives as in Hebrews 1:4. The mediator Late word from μεσος — mesos (amid) and so a middle man (arbitrator). Already in Galatians 3:19. and see 1 Timothy 2:5. See Hebrews 9:15; Hebrews 12:24 for further use with διατηκη — diathēkē Of a better covenant Called “new” For νενομοτετηται — diathēkē see Matthew 26:28; Luke 1:72; Galatians 3:17, etc. This idea he will discuss in Hebrews 8:7-13. Hath been enacted (νομοτετεω — nenomothetētai). Perfect passive indicative of επι κρειττοσιν επαγγελιαις — nomotheteō as in Hebrews 7:11 which see. Upon better promises (επι — epi kreittosin epaggeliais). Upon the basis of (κρεισσων — epi). But how “better” if the earlier were also from God? This idea, alluded to in Hebrews 6:12-17, Will be developed in 10:19-12:3 with great passion and power. Thus it is seen that “better” (kreissōn) is the keynote of the Epistle. At every point Christianity is better than Judaism. [source]
James 1:9 But [δε]
Return to the point of view in James 1:2. [source]
James 1:13 And he himself tempteth no man [πειραζει δε αυτος ουδενα]
Because “untemptable.” [source]
James 1:22 But be ye [γινεστε δε]
Rather, “But keep on becoming” (present middle imperative of γινομαι — ginomai). [source]
James 2:3 And ye have regard to [επιβλεπσητε δε επι]
First aorist active subjunctive (still with εαν — ean of James 2:2) of επιβλεπω — epiblepō followed by repeated preposition επι — epi to gaze upon, old compound, in N.T. only here and Luke 1:48; Luke 9:38. [source]
James 2:6 But ye have dishonoured the poor man [υμεις δε ητιμασατε τον πτωχον]
First aorist active indicative of ατιμαζω — atimazō old verb from ατιμος — atimos dishonoured (Matthew 13:57). In the act of partiality pictured in James 2:3. [source]
James 2:9 But if ye have respect of persons [ει δε προσωπολημπτειτε]
Condition of first class by contrast with that in James 2:8. For this verb (present active indicative), formed from προσωπον λαμβανω — prosōpon lambanō here alone in the N.T., see in James 2:1. A direct reference to the partiality there pictured. [source]
James 2:16 And one of you say unto them [ειπηι δε τις αυτοις εχ υμων]
Third-class condition again continued from James 2:15 with second aorist active subjunctive ειπηι — eipēi in peace Present active imperative of υπαγω — hupagō Common Jewish farewell (Judges 18:6; 1 Samuel 1:17; 1 Samuel 20:42; 2 Samuel 15:9). Used by Jesus (Mark 5:34; Luke 7:50). [source]
James 2:16 And yet ye give not [μη δωτε δε]
Third-class condition with δε — de (and yet) and μη — mē and the second aorist active subjunctive of διδωμι — didōmi to give, cold deeds with warm words. [source]
James 2:20 But wilt thou know? [τελεις δε γνωναι]
“But dost thou wish to know?” Ingressive aorist active infinitive of γινοσκω — ginoskō (come to know). James here introduces a new argument like Romans 13:3. [source]
1 Peter 1:7 Though it is proved by fire [δια πυρος δε δοκιμαζομενου]
Present passive articular participle (in the ablative like χρυσιου — chrusiou) of δοκιμαζω — dokimazō (common verb for testing metals) with δε — de which gives a concessive sense to the participle. Faith stands the test of fire better than gold, but even gold is refined by fire. [source]
1 Peter 1:20 But was manifested [πανερωτεντος δε]
First aorist (ingressive) passive participle of πανεροω — phaneroō referring to the Incarnation in contrast with the preexistence of Christ (cf. John 1:31; 1 John 3:5, 1 John 3:8). [source]
1 Peter 2:7 But for such as disbelieve [απιστουσιν δε]
Dative present active participle again of απιστεω — apisteō opposite of πιστευω — pisteuō (Luke 24:11).Was made the head of the corner (εγενητη εις κεπαλην γωνιας — egenēthē eis kephalēn gōnias). This verse is from Psalm 118:22 with evident allusion to Isaiah 28:16 (κεπαλην γωνιασακρογωνιαιον — kephalēn gōnias =οι οικοδομουντες — akrogōniaion). See Matthew 21:42; Mark 12:10; Luke 20:17, where Jesus himself quotes Psalm 118:22 and applies the rejection of the stone by the builders (hoi oikodomountes the experts) to the Sanhedrin‘s conduct toward him. Peter quoted it also (and applied it as Jesus had done) in his speech at the Beautiful Gate (Acts 4:11). Here he quotes it again to the same purpose. [source]
1 Peter 2:9 But ye [υμεις δε]
In contrast with the disobedient ones. [source]
1 Peter 2:10 But now have obtained mercy [νυν δε ελεητεντες]
Change to first aorist passive participle from “the long antecedent state” to “the single event of conversion which ended it” (Hort). [source]
1 Peter 2:23 But committed himself [παρεδιδου δε]
Imperfect active again (kept on committing himself) of παραδιδωμι — paradidōmi to hand over, usually of one to a judge, but here not of another (as the Sanhedrin), but himself (supply εαυτον — heauton), for Jesus uses this very idea in Luke 23:46 as he dies. Jesus thus handed himself and his cause over to the Father who judges righteously (τωι κρινοντι δικαιως — tōi krinonti dikaiōs dative of present active articular participle of κρινω — krinō). [source]
1 Peter 3:9 But contrariwise blessing [τουναντιον δε ευλογουντες]
Adverbial accusative and crasis (το εναντιον — to enantion) of the neuter article and the adjective εναντιος — enantios (εν αντιος — enευλογουντες — antios opposite, Matthew 14:24), “on the contrary.” For ευλογεω — eulogountes (present active participle of ευλογειτε — eulogeō) see Luke 6:28; Romans 12:14 (imperative οτι εις τουτο εκλητητε — eulogeite). [source]
1 Peter 4:7 But the end of all things is at hand [παντων δε το τελος ηγγικεν]
Perfect active indicative of εγγιζω — eggizō to draw near, common late verb (from εγγυς — eggus), same form used by the Baptist of the Messiah‘s arrival (Matthew 3:2) and by James in James 5:8 (of the second coming). How near Peter does not say, but he urges readiness (1 Peter 1:5.; 1 Peter 4:6) as Jesus did (Mark 14:38) and Paul (1 Thessalonians 5:6), though it is drawing nearer all the time (Romans 12:11), but not at once (2 Thessalonians 2:2). [source]
1 Peter 4:16 But if as a Christian [ει δε ως Χριστιανος]
Supply the verb πασχει — paschei (condition of first class, “if one suffer as a Christian”). This word occurs only three times in the N.T. (Acts 11:26; Acts 26:28; 1 Peter 4:16). It is word of Latin formation coined to distinguish followers of Christ from Jews and Gentiles (Acts 11:26). Each instance bears that idea. It is not the usual term at first like ματηται — mathētai (disciples), saints By a.d. 64 the name Christian was in common use in Rome (Tacitus, Ann. XV. 44). Owing to itacism it was sometimes spelled Χρηστιανοι — Chrēstianoi (ι ει — iη — ei and μη αισχυνεστω — ē pronounced alike). [source]
1 Peter 4:17 And if it begin first at us [ει δε πρωτον απημων]
Condition of first class again, with the verb αρχεται — archetai understood. “From us” Final fate.Of them that obey not the gospel of God “Of those disobeying the gospel of God.” See the same idea in Romans 2:8. See Mark 1:14 for believing in the gospel. [source]
2 Peter 1:5 Yea, and for this very cause [και αυτο τουτο δε]
Adverbial accusative “The soul of religion is the practical part” (Bunyan). Because of the new birth and the promises we have a part to play. [source]
2 Peter 2:1 But there arose [εγενοντο δε]
Second aorist middle indicative of γινομαι — ginomai (cf. γινεται — ginetai in 2 Peter 1:20). [source]
2 Peter 2:12 But these [ουτοι δε]
The false teachers of 2 Peter 2:1. [source]
2 Peter 2:16 But he was rebuked [ελεγχιν δε εσχεν]
“But he had rebuke.” Second aorist active indicative of εχω — echō and accusative of ελεγχις — elegxis (late word from ελεγχω — elegchō a periphrasis for ελεγχω — elegchō here only in N.T. [source]
2 Peter 3:18 But grow [αυχανετε δε]
Present active imperative of αυχανω — auxanō in contrast with such a fate pictured in 2 Peter 3:17, “but keep on growing.” [source]
1 John 1:3 Yea, and our fellowship [και η κοινωνια δε η ημετερα]
Careful explanation of his meaning in the word “fellowship” (partnership), involving fellowship with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ and only possible in Christ. [source]
3 John 1:12 Yea we also [και ημεις δε]
A third witness to Demetrius, that is John himself (literary plural). [source]
Jude 1:14 And to these also [δε και τουτοις]
Dative case, for these false teachers as well as for his contemporaries. [source]
Jude 1:23 And some save [ους δε σωζετε]
B omits ους δε — hous de them out of the fire Present active participle of αρπαζω — harpazō old verb, to seize. Quotation from Amos 4:11 and Zechariah 3:3. Cf. Psalm 106:18. Firemen today literally do this rescue work. Do Christians? [source]
Jude 1:23 And on some have mercy with fear [ους δε ελεατε εν ποβωι]
In fear “of the contagion of sin while we are rescuing them” (Vincent). For this idea see 1 Peter 1:17; 1 Peter 3:15; 2 Corinthians 7:1; Philemon 2:12.Spotted (εσπιλωμενον — espilōmenon). Perfect passive participle of σπιλοω — spiloō late and common verb (from σπιλος — spilos spot, 2 Peter 2:13), in N.T. only here and James 3:6. [source]
Revelation 2:5 Or else [ει δε μη]
Elliptical condition, the verb not expressed Futuristic present middle (John 14:2.).To thee Dative, as in Revelation 2:16 also.Will move (κινησω — kinēsō). Future active of κινεω — kineō In Ignatius‘ Epistle to Ephesus it appears that the church heeded this warning.Except thou repent Condition of third class with εαν μη — ean mē instead of ει μη — ei mē above, with the first aorist active subjunctive of μετανοεω — metanoeō f0). [source]

Greek Commentary Content Search

Matthew 22:5 another to his merchandise [ος δε επι την εμποριαν αυτου]
(ος δε επι την εμποριαν αυτου — hos de epi tēn emporian autou) only example in the N.T., from εμπορος — emporos merchant, one who travels for traffic (εμπορευομαι — emporeuomai), a drummer. [source]
Matthew 25:15 To one [ωι μεν ωι δε ωι δε]
Demonstrative δεναριυς — hos not the relative. Neat Greek idiom. [source]
Mark 15:23 But he received it not [ος δε ουκ ελαβεν]
Note the demonstrative ος — hos with δε — de Matthew has it that Jesus was not willing to take. Mark‘s statement is that he refused it. [source]
Luke 15:17 I perish [εγω δε λιμωι ωδε απολλυμαι]
Every word here counts: While I on the other hand am here perishing with hunger. It is the linear present middle of απολλυμι — apollumi Note εγω — egō expressed and δε — de of contrast. [source]
Luke 6:8 But he knew their thoughts [αυτος δε ηιδει τους διαλογισμους αυτων]
In Luke alone. Imperfect in sense, second past perfect in form ηιδει — ēidei from οιδα — oida Jesus, in contrast to these spies (Plummer), read their intellectual processes like an open book. [source]
John 10:22 And it was the feast of the dedication at Jerusalem [εγενετο δε τα ενκαινια εν τοις Ιεροσολυμοις]
But Westcott and Hort read τοτε — tote (then) instead of δε — de (and) on the authority of B L W 33 and some versions. This is probably correct: “At that time came the feast of dedication in Jerusalem.” Τοτε — Tote does not mean that the preceding events followed immediately after the incidents in 10:1-21. Bernard brings chapter 9 up to this date (possibly also chapter 8) and rearranges chapter 10 in a purely arbitrary way. There is no real reason for this arrangement. Clearly there is a considerable lapse between the events in 10:22-39 and 10:1-21, possibly nearly three months (from just after tabernacles John 7:37 to dedication John 10:22). The Pharisees greet his return with the same desire to catch him. This feast of dedication, celebrated for eight days about the middle of our December, was instituted by Judas Maccabeus b.c. 164 in commemoration of the cleansing of the temple from the defilements of pagan worship by Antiochus Epiphanes (1Macc 4:59). The word ενκαινια — enkainia Winter Old word from χειμα — cheima See Matthew 24:20. [source]
John 3:1 Now [δε]
So often in John δε — de is explanatory and transitional, not adversative. Nicodemus is an instance of Christ‘s knowledge of men (John 2:25) and of one to whom he did trust himself unlike those in John 2:24. As a Pharisee “he belonged to that party which with all its bigotry contained a salt of true patriotism and could rear such cultured and high-toned men as Gamaliel and Paul” (Marcus Dods). Named Nicodemus Same construction as in John 1:6, “Nicodemus name to him.” So Revelation 6:8. It is a Greek name and occurs in Josephus (Ant. XIV. iii. 2) as the name of an ambassador from Aristobulus to Pompey. Only in John in N.T. (here, John 7:50; John 19:39). He was a Pharisee, a member of the Sanhedrin, and wealthy. There is no evidence that he was the young ruler of Luke 18:18 because of αρχων — archōn (ruler) here. [source]
John 4:4 He must needs pass through Samaria [Εδει δε αυτον διερχεσται δια της Σαμαριας]
Imperfect indicative of the impersonal verb δει — dei with subject infinitive Note repetition of δια — dia It was only necessary to pass through Samaria in going directly north from Judea to Galilee. In coming south from Galilee travellers usually crossed over the Jordan and came down through Perea to avoid the hostility of the Samaritans towards people who passed through their land to go to Jerusalem. Jesus once met this bitterness on going to the feast of tabernacles (Luke 9:51-56). [source]
John 8:40 But now [νυν δε]
Clear statement that they are not doing “the works of Abraham” in seeking to kill him. See this use of νυν δε — nun de after a condition of second class without αν — an in John 16:22, John 16:24. This did not Abraham Blunt and pointed of their unlikeness to Abraham. A man that hath told you the truth Αντρωπον — Anthrōpon (here = person, one) is accusative case in apposition with me Here we have “I” in the English. “God” here is equal to “My Father” in John 8:38. The only crime of Jesus is telling the truth directly from God. [source]
John 8:17 Yea and in your law [και εν τωι νομωι δε τωι υμετερωι]
Same use of καιδε — kai -de as in John 8:16. They claimed possession of the law (John 7:49) and so Jesus takes this turn in answer to the charge of single witness in John 8:13. He will use similar language (your law) in John 10:34 in an argumentum ad hominem as here in controversy with the Jews. In John 15:24 to the apostles Jesus even says “in their law” in speaking of the hostile Jews plotting his death. He does not mean in either case to separate himself wholly from the Jews and the law, though in Matthew 5 he does show the superiority of his teaching to that of the law. For the Mosaic regulation about two witnesses see Deuteronomy 17:6; Deuteronomy 19:15. This combined witness of two is not true just because they agree, unless true in fact separately. But if they disagree, the testimony falls to the ground. In this case the Father confirms the witness of the Son as Jesus had already shown (John 5:37). [source]
Acts 12:5 But prayer was made earnestly [προσευχη δε ην εκτενως γινομενη]
Probably δε — de here is not adversative (but), merely parallel (and) as Page argues. It was a crisis for the Jerusalem church. James had been slain and Peter was to be the next victim. Hence “earnestly” (late adverb from εκτενης — ektenēs strained, from εκτεινω — ekteinō to stretch. In the N.T. only here, Luke 22:44; 1 Peter 1:22) prayer was going up It looked like a desperate case for Peter. Hence the disciples prayed the more earnestly. [source]
Acts 17:16 Now while Paul waited for them in Athens [Εν δε ταις Ατηναις εκδεχομενου αυτους του Παυλου]
Genitive absolute with present middle participle of εκδεχομαι — ekdechomai old verb to receive, but only with the sense of looking out for, expecting found here and elsewhere in N.T We know that Timothy did come to Paul in Athens (1 Thessalonians 3:1, 1 Thessalonians 3:6) from Thessalonica and was sent back to them from Athens. If Silas also came to Athens, he was also sent away, possibly to Philippi, for that church was deeply interested in Paul. At any rate both Timothy and Silas came from Macedonia to Corinth with messages and relief for Paul (Acts 18:5; 2 Corinthians 11:8.). Before they came and after they left, Paul felt lonely in Athens (1 Thessalonians 3:1), the first time on this tour or the first that he has been completely without fellow workers. Athens had been captured by Sulla b.c. 86. After various changes Achaia, of which Corinth is the capital, is a separate province from Macedonia and a.d. 44 was restored by Claudius to the Senate with the Proconsul at Corinth. Paul is probably here about a.d. 50. Politically Athens is no longer of importance when Paul comes though it is still the university seat of the world with all its rich environment and traditions. Rackham grows eloquent over Paul the Jew of Tarsus being in the city of Pericles and Demosthenes, Socrates and Plato and Aristotle, Sophocles and Euripides. In its Agora Socrates had taught, here was the Academy of Plato, the Lyceum of Aristotle, the Porch of Zeno, the Garden of Epicurus. Here men still talked about philosophy, poetry, politics, religion, anything and everything. It was the art centre of the world. The Parthenon, the most beautiful of temples, crowned the Acropolis. Was Paul insensible to all this cultural environment? It is hard to think so for he was a university man of Tarsus and he makes a number of allusions to Greek writers. Probably it had not been in Paul‘s original plan to evangelize Athens, difficult as all university seats are, but he cannot be idle though here apparently by chance because driven out of Macedonia. [source]
Acts 22:6 And it came to pass [εγενετο δε]
Rather than the common και εγενετο — kai egeneto and with the infinitive (περιαστραπσαι — periastrapsai), one of the three constructions with και ̔δἐ εγενετο — kai ‛de' egeneto by Luke (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 1042f.), followed by και — kai by finite verb, by subject infinitive as here. [source]
Acts 25:19 But had [δε ειχον]
Descriptive imperfect active of εχω — echō and δε — de of contrast (but). [source]
Romans 1:12 That is [τουτο δε εστιν]
“An explanatory correction” (Denney). The δε — de should not be ignored. Instead of saying that he had a spiritual gift for them, he wishes to add that they also have one for him. [source]
Romans 14:2 But he that is weak [ο δε αστενων]
One would expect ος δε — hos de (but that one) in contrast with ος μεν — hos men ο — Ho is demonstrative with δε — de sometimes, but here is probably just the article with αστενων — asthenōn [source]
Romans 2:8 But unto them that are factious and obey not the truth but obey unrighteousness [τοις δε εχ εριτειας και απειτουσιν τηι αλητειαι πειτομενοις δε αδικιαι]
The other side with δε — de and the articular present participles in the dative again, only with εχ εριτειας — ex eritheias there is no participle ουσιν — ousin But the construction changes and the substantives that follow are not the object of αποδωσει — apodōsei like ζωην αινωνιον — zōēn ainōnion above, but are in the nominative as if with εσονται — esontai (shall be) understood (anger and wrath, both οργη — orgē and τυμος — thumos tribulation and anguish, again a pair τλιπσις και στενοχωρια — thlipsis kai stenochōria on which see note on 2 Corinthians 6:4, 2 Corinthians 12:10). [source]
Romans 3:4 But every man a liar [πας δε αντρωπος πσευστης]
The contrast in δε — de really means, “though every man be found a liar.” Cf. Psalm 116:12. As it is written (κατως γεγραπται — kathōs gegraptai). Psalm 51:6. That thou mightest be justified οπως — Hopōs rather than the common ινα — hina for purpose and αν — an with the first aorist passive subjunctive of δικαιοω — dikaioō Used of God this verb here has to mean “declared righteous,” not “made righteous.” Mightest prevail (νικησεις — nikēseis). Future active indicative with οπως — hopōs of νικαω — nikaō to win a victory, though B L have νικησηις — nikēsēis (first aorist active subjunctive, the usual construction). When thou comest into judgement “In the being judged as to thee” (present passive infinitive or, if taken as middle, “in the entering upon trial as to thee”). Common construction in the lxx from the Hebrew infinitive construct. [source]
1 Corinthians 11:21 This one is hungry [ος δε πειναι]
Demonstrative ος — hos Nothing is left for him at the love-feast. Another is drunken (ος δε μετυει — hos de methuei). Such disgusting conduct was considered shameful in heathen club suppers. “Hungry poor meeting intoxicated rich, at what was supposed to be a supper of the Lord” (Robertson and Plummer). On μετυω — methuō to be drunk, see Matthew 24:49; Acts 2:15. [source]
1 Corinthians 2:14 Now the natural man [πσυχικος δε αντρωπος]
Note absence of article here, “A natural man” (an unregenerate man). Paul does not employ modern psychological terms and he exercises variety in his use of all the terms here present as πνευμα — pneuma and πνευματικοσ πσυχη — pneumatikosπσυχικοσ σαρχ — psuchē and σαρκινος — psuchikosσαρκικος — sarx and σαρχ πνευμα — sarkinos and πσυχη — sarkikos A helpful discussion of the various uses of these words in the New Testament is given by Burton in his New Testament Word Studies, pp. 62-68, and in his Spirit, Soul, and Flesh. The papyri furnish so many examples of Πσυχικος — sarxπσυχη — pneuma and ανιμα — psuchē that Moulton and Milligan make no attempt at an exhaustive treatment, but give a few miscellaneous examples to illustrate the varied uses that parallel the New Testament. πσυχικος — Psuchikos is a qualitative adjective from πνευματικος — psuchē (breath of life like πσυχικος — anima life, soul). Here the Vulgate renders it by animalis and the German by sinnlich, the original sense of animal life as in Judges 1:19; James 3:15. In 1 Corinthians 15:44, 1 Corinthians 15:46 there is the same contrast between πνευματικος — psuchikos and ου δεχεται — pneumatikos as here. The ουδε γαρ δυναται — psuchikos man is the unregenerate man while the μωρια — pneumatikos man is the renewed man, born again of the Spirit of God. [source]
2 Corinthians 6:10 Yet making many rich [πολλους δε πλουτιζοντες]
Old word from πλουτος — ploutos (wealth), to enrich. Spiritual riches Paul has in mind as in 1 Corinthians 1:5 (cf. Matthew 5:37). As having nothing and yet possessing all things (ως μηδεν εχοντες και παντα κατεχοντες — hōs mēden echontes kai panta katechontes). Contrast between μηδεν — mēden (nothing) and παντα — panta (all things, cf. 1 Corinthians 3:22) and εχω — echō (to have) and κατεχω — katechō (to hold down, to hold fast). Play on words (simple and compound) as in 2 Corinthians 3:2; 2 Corinthians 4:8. Climax of Paul‘s panegyric on the Christian ministry. He now resumes the thread of the story broken off in 2 Corinthians 2:14. [source]
Galatians 4:28 Now we [ημεις δε]
Some MSS. have υμεις δε — humeis de (now ye). In either case Paul means that Christians (Jews and Gentiles) are children of the promise as Isaac was (κατα Ισαακ — kata Isaak after the manner of Isaac). [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:21 Prove all things [παντα δε δοκιμαζετε]
Probably δε — de (but) is genuine. Even the gift of prophecy has to be tested (1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 14:29) to avoid error. Paul shows fine balance here. [source]
2 Thessalonians 3:3 But the Lord is faithful [πιστος δε εστιν ο κυριος]
(πιστος δε εστιν ο κυριος — pistos de estin ho kurios). [source]
2 Timothy 3:14 But abide thou [συ δε μενε]
Emphatic contrast (συ δε — su de), “But thou.” Present active imperative of μενω — menō common verb, to remain. [source]
James 2:16 And yet ye give not [μη δωτε δε]
Third-class condition with δε — de (and yet) and μη — mē and the second aorist active subjunctive of διδωμι — didōmi to give, cold deeds with warm words. [source]
1 Peter 1:7 Though it is proved by fire [δια πυρος δε δοκιμαζομενου]
Present passive articular participle (in the ablative like χρυσιου — chrusiou) of δοκιμαζω — dokimazō (common verb for testing metals) with δε — de which gives a concessive sense to the participle. Faith stands the test of fire better than gold, but even gold is refined by fire. [source]
Jude 1:23 And some save [ους δε σωζετε]
B omits ους δε — hous de them out of the fire Present active participle of αρπαζω — harpazō old verb, to seize. Quotation from Amos 4:11 and Zechariah 3:3. Cf. Psalm 106:18. Firemen today literally do this rescue work. Do Christians? [source]

2491 Verses with G1161

Matthew 1:2
Literal: Abraham begat - Isaac Isaac then Jacob Jacob Judah and the brothers of him
KJV: Abraham  begat  Isaac;  and  Isaac  begat  Jacob;  and  Jacob  begat  Judas  and  his  brethren; 

Matthew 1:3
Literal: Judah then begat - Perez and Zerah out of - Tamar Perez Hezron Hezron Ram
KJV: And  Judas  begat  Phares  and  Zara  of  Thamar;  and  Phares  begat  Esrom;  and  Esrom  begat  Aram; 

Matthew 1:4
Literal: Ram then begat - Amminadab Amminadab Nahshon Nahshon Salmon
KJV: And  Aram  begat  Aminadab;  and  Aminadab  begat  Naasson;  and  Naasson  begat  Salmon; 

Matthew 1:5
Literal: Salmon then begat - Boaz out of - Rahab Boaz Obed Ruth Obed Jesse
KJV: And  Salmon  begat  Booz  of  Rachab;  and  Booz  begat  Obed  of  Ruth;  and  Obed  begat  Jesse; 

Matthew 1:6
Literal: Jesse then begat - David the king David Solomon out of the [wife] - of Uriah
KJV: And  Jesse  begat  David  the king;  and  David  the king  begat  Solomon  of  her  that had been the wife of Urias; 

Matthew 1:7
Literal: Solomon then begat - Rehoboam Rehoboam Abijah Abijah Asa
KJV: And  Solomon  begat  Roboam;  and  Roboam  begat  Abia;  and  Abia  begat  Asa; 

Matthew 1:8
Literal: Asa then begat - Jehoshaphat Jehoshaphat Joram Joram Uzziah
KJV: And  Asa  begat  Josaphat;  and  Josaphat  begat  Joram;  and  Joram  begat  Ozias; 

Matthew 1:9
Literal: Uzziah then begat - Jotham Jotham Ahaz Ahaz Hezekiah
KJV: And  Ozias  begat  Joatham;  and  Joatham  begat  Achaz;  and  Achaz  begat  Ezekias; 

Matthew 1:10
Literal: Hezekiah then begat - Manasseh Manasseh Amos Amos Josiah
KJV: And  Ezekias  begat  Manasses;  and  Manasses  begat  and  begat  Josias; 

Matthew 1:11
Literal: Josiah then begat - Jeconiah and the brothers of him at [the time] of the carrying away to Babylon
KJV: And  Josias  begat  Jechonias  and  his  brethren,  about the time  they were carried away  to Babylon: 

Matthew 1:12
Literal: After then the carrying away to Babylon Jeconiah begat - Shealtiel Shealtiel Zerubbabel
KJV: And  after  they were brought  to Babylon,  Jechonias  begat  Salathiel;  and  Salathiel  begat  Zorobabel; 

Matthew 1:13
Literal: Zerubbabel then begat - Abiud Abiud Eliakim Eliakim Azor
KJV: And  Zorobabel  begat  Abiud;  and  Abiud  begat  Eliakim;  and  Eliakim  begat  Azor; 

Matthew 1:14
Literal: Azor then begat - Zadok Zadok Achim Achim Eliud
KJV: And  Azor  begat  Sadoc;  and  Sadoc  begat  Achim;  and  Achim  begat  Eliud; 

Matthew 1:15
Literal: Eliud then begat - Eleazar Eleazar Matthan Matthan Jacob
KJV: And  Eliud  begat  Eleazar;  and  Eleazar  begat  Matthan;  and  Matthan  begat  Jacob; 

Matthew 1:16
Literal: Jacob then begat - Joseph the husband of Mary out of whom was born Jesus the [One] being called Christ
KJV: And  Jacob  begat  Joseph  the husband  of Mary,  of  whom  was born  Jesus,  who  is called  Christ. 

Matthew 1:18
Literal: - Now of Jesus Christ the birth thus came about Having been pledged the mother of Him Mary - to Joseph before rather coming together of them she was found in womb having [a child] out of [the] Spirit Holy
KJV: Now  of Jesus  Christ  on this wise:  his  mother  Mary  was espoused  to Joseph,  before  they  came together,  she was found  with child  of  the Holy  Ghost. 

Matthew 1:19
Literal: Joseph now the husband of her righteous being and not willing her to expose publicly purposed secretly to send away her
KJV: Then  Joseph  her  husband,  a just  man, and  not  willing  her  was minded  her  away  privily. 

Matthew 1:20
Literal: These things now of him having pondered behold an angel of [the] Lord in a dream appeared to him saying Joseph son of David not you should fear to receive Mary [as] the wife of you that for in her having been conceived from [the] Spirit is Holy
KJV: But  while he  thought on  behold,  the angel  of the Lord  appeared  unto him  in  a dream,  saying,  Joseph,  thou son  of David,  fear  not  to take  Mary  thy wife:  for  that which is conceived  in  her  of  the Holy  Ghost. 

Matthew 1:21
Literal: She will bear then a son and you will call the name of Him Jesus He for will save the people from the sins of them
KJV: And  she shall bring forth  a son,  and  thou shalt call  his  name  JESUS:  for  he  shall save  his  people  from  their  sins. 

Matthew 1:22
Literal: This then all has come to pass that may be fulfilled that having been spoken by the Lord through the prophet saying
KJV: Now  all  was done,  that  it might be fulfilled  which  of  the Lord  by  the prophet,  saying, 

Matthew 1:24
Literal: Having been awoken then - Joseph from the sleep he did as had commanded him the angel of [the] Lord and received the wife of him
KJV: Then  Joseph  from  sleep  did  as  the angel  of the Lord  had bidden  him,  and  took  unto him  his wife: 

Matthew 2:1
Literal: - Now Jesus having been born in Bethlehem - of Judea [the] days of Herod the king behold Magi from [the] east arrived in Jerusalem
KJV: Now  when Jesus  was born  in  Bethlehem  of Judaea  in  the days  of Herod  the king,  behold,  there came  wise men  from  the east  to  Jerusalem, 

Matthew 2:3
Literal: Having heard then - King Herod he was troubled and all Jerusalem with him
KJV: When  Herod  the king  had heard  these things, he was troubled,  and  all  Jerusalem  with  him. 

Matthew 2:5
Literal: - And they said to him In Bethlehem - of Judea thus for has it been written through the prophet
KJV: And  they said  unto him,  In  Bethlehem  of Judaea:  for  thus  it is written  by  the prophet, 

Matthew 2:8
Literal: And having sent them to Bethlehem he said Having gone search carefully for the Child when then You shall have found [Him] bring word back to me so that I also having come may worship Him
KJV: And  he sent  them  to  Bethlehem,  and said,  Go  and search  diligently  for  the young child;  and  when  ye have found  word again,  that  I may come  and worship  him  also. 

Matthew 2:9
Literal: - And having heard the king they went away and behold the star which they saw in the east went before them until having arrived it stood over where was the Child
KJV: When  they had heard  the king,  they departed;  and,  lo,  the star,  which  in  the east,  went before  them,  till  it came  and stood  over  where  the young child 

Matthew 2:10
Literal: Having seen now the star they rejoiced [with] joy great exceedingly
KJV: When  the star,  they rejoiced  with exceeding  great  joy. 

Matthew 2:13
Literal: Having withdrawn then of them behold an angel of [the] Lord appears in a dream - to Joseph saying Having arisen take the Child and the mother of Him flee into Egypt remain there until - I should tell you is about for Herod to seek - to destroy Him
KJV: And  when they  were departed,  behold,  the angel  of the Lord  appeareth  to Joseph  in  a dream,  saying,  Arise,  and take  the young child  and  his  mother,  and  flee  into  Egypt,  and  there  until  word:  for  Herod  will  seek  the young child  to destroy  him. 

Matthew 2:14
Literal: - And having arisen he took the Child and the mother of Him by night withdrew into Egypt
KJV: When  he arose,  he took  the young child  and  his  mother  by night,  and  departed  into  Egypt: 

Matthew 2:19
Literal: Having died now - of Herod behold an angel of [the] Lord appears in a dream to Joseph in Egypt
KJV: But  when Herod  was dead,  behold,  an angel  of the Lord  appeareth  in  a dream  to Joseph  in  Egypt, 

Matthew 2:21
Literal: - And having arisen he took the Child and the mother of Him came into [the] land of Israel
KJV: And  he arose,  and took  the young child  and  his  mother,  and  into  the land  of Israel. 

Matthew 2:22
Literal: Having heard now that Archelaus reigns over - Judea in place of the father of him Herod he was afraid there to go having been divinely warned in a dream he withdrew into the district of Galilee
KJV: But  when he heard  that  Archelaus  did reign  Judaea  in the room  of his  father  Herod,  he was afraid  to go  thither:  notwithstanding,  being warned of God  in  a dream,  he turned aside  into  the parts  of Galilee: 

Matthew 3:1
Literal: In then the days those comes John the Baptist preaching the wilderness - of Judea
KJV: In  those  days  came  John  the Baptist,  preaching  in  the wilderness  of Judaea, 

Matthew 3:4
Literal: Himself now - John had the garment of him of hair of a camel and a belt of leather around the waist - and the food was locusts honey wild
KJV: And  the same  John  had  his  raiment  of  camel's  hair,  and  a leathern  girdle  about  his  loins;  and  his  meat  locusts  and  wild  honey. 

Matthew 3:7
Literal: Having seen now many of the Pharisees and Sadducees coming to the baptism of him he said to them Brood of vipers who forewarned you to flee from the coming wrath
KJV: But  many  of the Pharisees  and  Sadducees  come  to  his  baptism,  he said  unto them,  O generation  of vipers,  who  hath warned  to flee  from  the wrath  to come? 

Matthew 3:10
Literal: Already now the ax to the root of the trees is applied every therefore tree not producing fruit good is cut down and into [the] fire is thrown
KJV: And  now  also  the axe  is laid  unto  the root  of the trees:  therefore  every  tree  not  forth  good  fruit  is hewn down,  and  cast  into  the fire. 

Matthew 3:11
Literal: I indeed you baptize with water to repentance - but after me is coming mightier than I He of whom not I am fit the sandals to carry He you will baptize [the] Spirit Holy and with fire
KJV: indeed  baptize  with  water  unto  repentance:  but  he that cometh  after  mightier than  whose  shoes  I am  not  worthy  to bear:  he  shall baptize  with  the Holy  Ghost,  and  with fire: 

Matthew 3:12
Literal: whose - winnowing fork [is] in the hand of Him and He will clear the threshing floor will gather the wheat into barn the but chaff He will burn up with fire unquenchable
KJV: Whose  fan  is in  his  hand,  and  he will throughly purge  his  floor,  and  gather  his  wheat  into  the garner;  but  he will burn up  the chaff  with unquenchable  fire. 

Matthew 3:14
Literal: - But John was hindering Him saying I need have by You to be baptized and You come to me
KJV: But  John  forbad  him, saying,  have  need  to be baptized  of  and  comest  thou  to 

Matthew 3:15
Literal: Answering however - Jesus said unto him Permit [it] presently thus for fitting it is to us to fulfill all righteousness Then he permits Him
KJV: And  Jesus  answering  said  unto  him,  Suffer  it to be so now:  for  thus  it becometh  to fulfil  all  righteousness.  Then  he suffered  him. 

Matthew 3:16
Literal: Having been baptized now - Jesus immediately went up from the water and behold were opened to him the heavens he saw the Spirit of God descending as a dove and alighting upon Him
KJV: And  Jesus,  when he was baptized,  went up  out of  the water:  and,  lo,  the heavens  were opened  unto him,  and  the Spirit  of God  descending  like  a dove,  and  lighting  upon  him: 

Matthew 4:4
Literal: - But answering He said It has been written Not by bread alone shall live the man but by every word coming out of [the] mouth of God
KJV: But  he answered  and said,  It is written,  Man  not  live  by  bread  alone,  but  by  every  word  that proceedeth  out of  the mouth  of God. 

Matthew 4:12
Literal: Having heard now that John had been delivered up He withdrew into - Galilee
KJV: Now  had heard  that  John  was cast into prison,  he departed  into  Galilee; 

Matthew 4:18
Literal: Walking now beside the Sea - of Galilee He saw two brothers Simon - called Peter and Andrew the brother of him casting a net into they were for fishermen
KJV: And  walking  by  the sea  of Galilee,  two  brethren,  Simon  called  Peter,  and  Andrew  his  brother,  casting  a net  into  the sea:  for  fishers. 

Matthew 4:20
Literal: - And immediately having left the nets they followed Him
KJV: And  they straightway  left  their nets,  and followed  him. 

Matthew 4:22
Literal: - And immediately having left the boat and the father of them they followed Him
KJV: And  they immediately  left  the ship  and  their  father,  and followed  him. 

Matthew 5:1
Literal: Having seen then the crowds He went up on the mountain and having sat down of Him came to Him the disciples
KJV: And  the multitudes,  he went up  into  a mountain:  and  when he  was set,  his  disciples  came  unto him: 

Matthew 5:13
Literal: You are the salt of the earth if however becomes tasteless with what will it be salted For nothing it is potent any longer if not having been cast out to be trampled upon by - men
KJV: the salt  of the earth:  but  if  the salt  have lost his savour,  wherewith  shall it be salted?  it is thenceforth  good  for  nothing,  to be cast  out,  to be trodden under foot  of  men. 

Matthew 5:19
Literal: Whoever if then shall break one of the commandments of these the least and shall teach so the others least he will be called in the kingdom of the heavens now - shall keep shall teach [them] this [one] great will be called
KJV: Whosoever  therefore  shall break  least  commandments,  and  shall teach  men  so,  he shall be called  the least  in  the kingdom  of heaven:  but  whosoever  shall do  and  teach  them, the same  shall be called  great  in  the kingdom  of heaven. 

Matthew 5:21
Literal: You have heard that it was said to the ancients Not you shall murder whoever now - shall murder liable will be to the judgment
KJV: Ye have heard  that  by them of old time,  not  kill;  and  whosoever  shall kill  in danger  of the judgment: 

Matthew 5:22
Literal: I however say to you that everyone - being angry with the brother of him liable will be to the judgment whoever now - shall say to Raca to the Sanhedrin Fool to the hell - of fire
KJV: But  say  That  whosoever  is angry  with his  brother  in danger  of the judgment:  and  whosoever  shall say  to his  brother,  Raca,  in danger  of the council:  but  whosoever  shall say,  Thou fool,  in danger  of  hell  fire. 

Matthew 5:28
Literal: I however say to you that everyone - looking upon a woman in order - to lust after her already has committed adultery with in the heart of him
KJV: But  say  That  whosoever  looketh  on a woman  to  lust after  her  hath committed adultery  with her  already  in  his  heart. 

Matthew 5:29
Literal: If now the eye of you - right causes to stumble you pluck out it and cast [it] from you it is better indeed for you that should perish one of the members not all the body should be cast into hell
KJV: And  if  right  eye  offend  it  out,  and  cast  it from  for  it is profitable  that  one  members  should perish,  and  not  whole  body  should be cast  into  hell. 

Matthew 5:31
Literal: It was said also Whoever - shall divorce the wife of him let him give to her a letter of divorce
KJV: Whosoever  shall put away  his  wife,  let him give  her  a writing of divorcement: 

Matthew 5:32
Literal: I however say to you that everyone - divorcing the wife of him except on account of sexual immorality causes her to commit adultery And whoever if her having been divorced shall marry commits adultery
KJV: But  say  That  whosoever  shall put away  his  wife,  saving  for the cause  of fornication,  causeth  her  to commit adultery:  and  whosoever  shall marry  her that is divorced  committeth adultery. 

Matthew 5:33
Literal: Again you have heard that it was said to the ancients Not shall you swear falsely you shall keep now to the Lord the oaths of you
KJV: Again,  ye have heard  that  by them of old time,  not  forswear thyself,  but  shalt perform  unto the Lord  oaths: 

Matthew 5:34
Literal: I however say to you not to swear at all neither by - heaven because [the] throne it is - of God
KJV: But  say  Swear  not  at all;  neither  by  heaven;  for  God's  throne: 

Matthew 5:37
Literal: Let it be however the statement of you Yes ‘Yes [and] ‘No No The more than these from - evil comes
KJV: But  communication  Yea,  Nay,  for  whatsoever is more  of  evil. 

Matthew 5:39
Literal: I however say to you not to resist the evil [person] Instead whoever you shall strike on the right cheek of you turn to him also other
KJV: But  say  That ye resist  not  evil:  but  whosoever  shall smite  right  cheek,  turn  to him  the other  also. 

Matthew 5:44
Literal: I however say to you love the enemies of you and pray for those persecuting you bless those cursing good do to those persecuting hating you
KJV: But  say  Love  enemies,  bless  them that curse  do  good  to them that hate  and  pray  for  them which  despitefully use  and  persecute 

Matthew 6:1
Literal: Beware now the righteousness of you not to do before - men in order - to be seen by them if otherwise reward not have you with the Father who [is] in the heavens
KJV: Take heed  that ye do  not  before  men,  to be seen  of them:  otherwise  ye have  no  reward  of  Father  which  is in  heaven. 

Matthew 6:3
Literal: You however doing charity not let know the left [hand] of you what is doing right hand
KJV: But  doest  alms,  not  left hand  know  what  right hand  doeth: 

Matthew 6:6
Literal: You however when you pray enter into the room of you and having shut the door pray to Father the [One] in - secret the Father the [One] seeing will reward you
KJV: But  thou,  when  thou prayest,  enter  into  closet,  and  when thou hast shut  door,  pray  Father  which  is in  secret;  and  Father  which  seeth  in  secret  shall reward  openly. 

Matthew 6:7
Literal: Praying now not do use vain repetitions like the pagans they think for that in the many words of them they will be heard
KJV: But  when ye pray,  not  vain repetitions,  as  the heathen  do: for  they think  that  they shall be heard  for  their  much speaking. 

Matthew 6:15
Literal: If however not you forgive - men the trespasses of them neither the Father of you will forgive the
KJV: But  ye forgive  men  their  trespasses,  neither  Father  forgive  trespasses. 

Matthew 6:16
Literal: Whenever now you fast not be like the hypocrites gloomy they disfigure for the appearance of them so that they might appear - to men [as] fasting Truly I say to you they have the reward
KJV: Moreover  when  ye fast,  be  not,  the hypocrites,  of a sad countenance:  for  they disfigure  their  faces,  that  they may appear  unto men  to fast.  Verily  I say  They have  their  reward. 

Matthew 6:17
Literal: You however fasting anoint your - head and the face of you wash
KJV: But  thou,  when thou fastest,  anoint  head,  and  wash  face; 

Matthew 6:20
Literal: store up however for yourselves treasures in heaven where neither moth nor rust destroy and thieves not do break in nor steal
KJV: But  lay up  treasures  in  heaven,  where  neither  moth  nor  rust  doth corrupt,  and  where  thieves  not  break through  nor  steal: 

Matthew 6:23
Literal: If however the eye of you evil is all the body full of darkness will be If then light that [is] within you darkness is that how great
KJV: But  if  eye  evil,  whole  body  full of darkness.  If  therefore  the light  in  be darkness,  how great  is that darkness! 

Matthew 6:27
Literal: Who now from you being anxious is able to add to the lifespan of him hour one
KJV: Which  by taking thought  can  add  one  cubit  unto  his  stature? 

Matthew 6:29
Literal: I say however to you that not even Solomon in all the glory of him was adorned like one of these
KJV: And yet  I say  That  Solomon  in  all  his  glory  not  arrayed  like  one 

Matthew 6:30
Literal: If however the grass of the field today being [here] and tomorrow into the furnace being thrown - God thus clothes [will He] not much more you O [you] of little faith
KJV: Wherefore,  if  God  so  clothe  the grass  of the field,  which to day  and  to morrow  is cast  into  the oven,  shall he not  much  more  O ye of little faith? 

Matthew 6:33
Literal: Seek however first the kingdom of God and righteousness of Him these things all will be added to you
KJV: But  seek ye  first  the kingdom  of God,  and  his  righteousness;  and  all  shall be added 

Matthew 7:3
Literal: Why now do you look at the splinter that [is] in the eye the brother of you - and the in - your [own] beam not notice
KJV: And  why  beholdest  thou the mote  that is in  brother's  eye,  but  considerest  not  the beam  that is in  thine own  eye? 

Matthew 7:15
Literal: But beware of the false prophets who come to you in clothing of sheep inwardly however they are wolves ravenous
KJV: Beware  of  false prophets,  which  come  to  in  sheep's  clothing,  but  inwardly  ravening  wolves. 

Matthew 7:17
Literal: So every tree good fruits good produces - but the bad bad
KJV: Even so  every  good  tree  bringeth forth  good  fruit;  but  a corrupt  tree  bringeth forth  evil  fruit. 

Matthew 8:1
Literal: Having come down now He from the mountain followed Him crowds great
KJV: When  he  was come down  from  the mountain,  great  multitudes  followed  him. 

Matthew 8:5
Literal: Having entered now He into Capernaum came to Him a centurion imploring Him
KJV: And  was entered  into  Capernaum,  there came  unto him  a centurion,  beseeching  him, 

Matthew 8:8
Literal: Answering however the centurion said Lord not I am worthy that of me under the roof You should come but only speak the word and will be healed servant
KJV: The centurion  answered  and  said,  Lord,  I am  not  worthy  that  thou shouldest come  under  roof:  but  speak  the word  only,  and  servant  shall be healed. 

Matthew 8:10
Literal: Having heard now - Jesus marveled and said to those following Truly I say to you except no one so great faith in - Israel have I found
KJV: When  Jesus  heard  it, he marvelled,  and  said  to them that followed,  Verily  I say  found  so great  faith,  in  Israel. 

Matthew 8:11
Literal: I say now to you that many from east and west will come will recline with Abraham Isaac Jacob in the kingdom of the heavens
KJV: And  I say  That  many  shall come  from  the east  and  west,  and  shall sit down  with  Abraham,  and  Isaac,  and  Jacob,  in  the kingdom  of heaven. 

Matthew 8:12
Literal: the however sons of the kingdom will be cast out into the darkness outer there will be the weeping and gnashing of the teeth
KJV: But  the children  of the kingdom  shall be cast out  into  outer  darkness:  there  weeping  and  gnashing  of teeth. 

Matthew 8:16
Literal: Evening now having come they brought to Him being possessed with demons many and He cast out the spirits by a word all those sick being He healed
KJV: When  the even  was come,  they brought  unto him  many  that were possessed with devils:  and  he cast out  the spirits  with his word,  and  healed  all  that were  sick: 

Matthew 8:18
Literal: Having seen now - Jesus a great crowd around Him He commanded to depart to the other side
KJV: Now  when Jesus  great  multitudes  about  him,  he gave commandment  to depart  unto  the other side. 

Matthew 8:20
Literal: And says to him - Jesus - Foxes holes have the birds of the air nests but the Son - of Man no has [place] where the head He might lay
KJV: And  Jesus  saith  unto him,  The foxes  have  holes,  and  the birds  of the air  have nests;  but  the Son  of man  hath  not  where  to lay  his head. 

Matthew 8:21
Literal: Another now of the disciples of Him said to Him Lord allow me first to go and to bury the father of me
KJV: And  another  of his  disciples  said  unto him,  Lord,  suffer  first  to go  and  bury  father. 

Matthew 8:22
Literal: - But Jesus said to him Follow Me and leave the dead to bury - their own dead
KJV: But  Jesus  unto him,  Follow  and  let  the dead  bury  their  dead. 

Matthew 8:24
Literal: And behold a storm great arose in the sea so that the boat was being swamped by the waves He Himself however was sleeping
KJV: And,  behold,  there arose  a great  tempest  in  the sea,  insomuch that  the ship  was covered  with  the waves:  but  he  was asleep. 

Matthew 8:27
Literal: - And the men marveled saying What kind [of man] is this that even the winds and the sea Him obey
KJV: But  the men  marvelled,  saying,  What manner of man  this,  that  even  the winds  and  the sea  obey  him! 

Matthew 8:30
Literal: There was now far off from them a herd of pigs many feeding
KJV: And  a good way off  from  them  an herd  of many  swine  feeding. 

Matthew 8:31
Literal: - And the demons were begging Him saying If You cast out us send away into the herd - of pigs
KJV: So  the devils  besought  him,  saying,  If  out,  into  the herd  of swine. 

Matthew 8:32
Literal: And He said to them Go - And having gone out they went away into the pigs behold rushed all the herd down the steep bank the sea perished in the waters
KJV: And  he said  unto them,  Go.  And  when they were come out,  they went  into  the herd  of swine:  and,  behold,  the whole  herd  of swine  ran violently  down  a steep place  into  the sea,  and  perished  in  the waters. 

Matthew 8:33
Literal: Those now feeding [them] fled and having gone away into the city they related everything including the [matter] of those being possessed by demons
KJV: And  they that kept  them fled,  and  went their ways  into  the city,  and told  every thing,  and  what was befallen to the possessed of the devils. 

Matthew 9:6
Literal: So that however you may know that authority has the Son - of Man on the earth to forgive sins Then He says to the paralytic Having arisen take up your - mat and go to the house of you
KJV: But  that  ye may know  that  the Son  of man  hath  power  on  earth  to forgive  sins,  (then  saith he  to the sick of the palsy,)  Arise,  take up  bed,  and  go  unto  house. 

Matthew 9:8
Literal: Having seen now the crowds marveled and glorified - God the [One] having given authority such - to men
KJV: But  when the multitudes  and  glorified  God,  which  had given  such  power  unto men. 

Matthew 9:12
Literal: - And having heard He said Not need have those being strong of a physician but sick being
KJV: But  heard  that, he said  They that be  whole  need  not  a physician,  but  they that are  sick. 

Matthew 9:13
Literal: Having gone however learn what is Mercy I desire and not sacrifice for I came to call [the] righteous but sinners
KJV: But  go ye  and learn  what  I will  have mercy,  and  not  sacrifice:  for  not  come  to call  the righteous,  but  sinners 

Matthew 9:14
Literal: Then come to Him the disciples of John saying Because of why we and Pharisees do fast many times however disciples of You not fast
KJV: Then  came  to him  the disciples  of John,  saying,  and  the Pharisees  fast  oft,  but  disciples  fast  not? 

Matthew 9:15
Literal: And said to them - Jesus Not can the sons of the bridechamber mourn as long as with them is the bridegroom Will come however days when shall have been taken away from then they will fast
KJV: And  Jesus  said  unto them,  Can  the children  of the bridechamber  mourn,  as long as  the bridegroom  with  them?  but  the days  will come,  when  the bridegroom  shall be taken  from  them,  and  then  shall they fast. 

Matthew 9:16
Literal: No one however puts a patch of cloth unshrunk on clothing old tears away for the patch of it from the garment and a worse tear emerges
KJV: No man  putteth  a piece  of new  cloth  unto  an old  garment,  for  that which is put in to fill it up  taketh  from  the garment,  and  the rent  is made  worse. 

Matthew 9:17
Literal: Nor pour they wine new into wineskins old if now lest are burst the wineskins and the wine is poured out wineskins are destroyed But they pour new both are preserved
KJV: Neither  do men put  new  wine  into  old  bottles:  else  the bottles  break,  and  the wine  runneth out,  and  the bottles  perish:  but  they put  new  wine  into  new  bottles,  and  both  are preserved. 

Matthew 9:22
Literal: - And Jesus having turned and having seen her said Take courage daughter the faith of you has cured you was cured woman from the hour very
KJV: But  Jesus  and  her,  he said,  Daughter,  be of good comfort;  faith  whole.  And  the woman  was made whole  from  that  hour. 

Matthew 9:25
Literal: When now had been put outside the crowd having entered He took hold of the hand of her and arose the girl
KJV: But  when  the people  were put forth,  he went in,  and took  her  by the hand,  and  the maid  arose. 

Matthew 9:28
Literal: Having come now into the house came to Him the blind [men] and says to them - Jesus Believe you that I am able this to do They say Yes Lord
KJV: And  when he was come  into  the house,  the blind men  came  to him:  and  Jesus  saith  unto them,  Believe ye  that  I am able  to do  They said  unto him,  Yea,  Lord. 

Matthew 9:31
Literal: - But having gone out they make known Him in all the land that
KJV: But  they, when they were departed,  his  fame  in  all  that  country. 

Matthew 9:32
Literal: [As] they now were going out behold they brought to Him a man mute possessed by a demon
KJV: As  they  went out,  behold,  they brought  to him  a dumb  man  possessed with a devil. 

Matthew 9:34
Literal: The now Pharisees were saying By the prince of the demons He casts out - demons
KJV: But  the Pharisees  He casteth out  devils  through  the prince  of the devils. 

Matthew 9:36
Literal: Having seen now the crowds He was moved with compassion for them because they were wearied and cast away as sheep not having a shepherd
KJV: But  the multitudes,  he was moved with compassion  on  them,  because  and  were scattered abroad,  as  sheep  having  no  shepherd. 

Matthew 9:37
Literal: Then He says to the disciples of Him The indeed harvest [is] plentiful the however workmen [are] few
KJV: Then  saith  he unto his  disciples,  The harvest  truly  is plenteous,  but  the labourers  are few; 

Matthew 10:2
Literal: - And of the twelve apostles the names are these first Simon - called Peter and Andrew the brother of him James the [son] of Zebedee John
KJV: Now  the names  of the twelve  apostles  The first,  Simon,  who  is called  Peter,  and  Andrew  his  brother;  James  the son of  Zebedee,  and  John  his  brother; 

Matthew 10:6
Literal: go however rather to those sheep - being lost of [the] house of Israel
KJV: But  go  rather  to  the lost  sheep  of the house  of Israel. 

Matthew 10:7
Literal: Going on also proclaim saying - Has drawn near The kingdom of the heavens
KJV: And  as ye go,  preach,  saying,  The kingdom  of heaven  is at hand. 

Matthew 10:11
Literal: Into whatever now - city or village you enter inquire who in it worthy is and there remain until you go forth
KJV: And  into  whatsoever  city  or  town  ye shall enter,  enquire  who  in  it  worthy;  and there  abide  till  ye go thence. 

Matthew 10:12
Literal: Entering now into the house greet it
KJV: And  when ye come  into  an house,  salute  it. 

Matthew 10:13
Literal: And if indeed be the house worthy let come peace of you upon it however not it be to you let return
KJV: And  if  the house  worthy,  peace  come  upon  it:  but  worthy,  peace  return  to 

Matthew 10:17
Literal: Beware however of - men they will deliver for you into courts and in the synagogues of them they will flog
KJV: But  beware  of  men:  for  up  to  the councils,  and  they will scourge  in  their  synagogues; 

Matthew 10:18
Literal: and before governors also kings you will be brought on account of Me for a testimony to them to the Gentiles
KJV: And  ye shall be brought  before  governors  and  kings  for my  for  a testimony  against them  and  the Gentiles. 

Matthew 10:19
Literal: When then they deliver up you not be anxious how or what you should speak it will be given for you in that - hour you should say
KJV: But  when  up,  no  thought  how  or  what  ye shall speak:  for  it shall be given  in  that same  hour  what  ye shall speak. 

Matthew 10:21
Literal: Will deliver up now brother brother to death and father child will rise up children against parents will put to death them
KJV: And  the brother  shall deliver up  the brother  to  death,  and  the father  the child:  and  the children  shall rise up  against  their parents,  and  them  to be put to death. 

Matthew 10:22
Literal: And you will be hated by all on account of the name of Me the [one] however having endured to [the] end he will be saved
KJV: And  be hated  of  all  men for  name's sake:  but  he that  endureth  to  the end  shall be saved. 

Matthew 10:23
Literal: Whenever then they persecute you in the city one flee to the next Truly for I say to you no not shall you have completed the cities of Israel until - be come the Son Man
KJV: But  when  they persecute  in  city,  flee ye  into  for  verily  I say  have gone over  the cities  of Israel,  till  the Son  of man  be  come. 

Matthew 10:28
Literal: And not you should be afraid of those killing the body the however soul being able to kill you should fear rather the [One] being able both to destroy in hell
KJV: And  fear  not  them which  kill  the body,  but  not  able  to kill  the soul:  but  rather  fear  him which  is able  to destroy  both  soul  and  body  in  hell. 

Matthew 10:30
Literal: Of you now even the hairs of the head all numbered are
KJV: But  the very  hairs  head  all  numbered. 

Matthew 10:33
Literal: Whoever now - shall deny Me before - men will deny I also him the Father of Me who [is] in the heavens
KJV: But  whosoever  shall  deny  before  men,  him  will I also  deny  before  Father  which  is in  heaven. 

Matthew 11:2
Literal: - And John having heard in the prison the works of the Christ having sent two of the disciples of him
KJV: Now  when John  had heard  in  the prison  the works  of Christ,  he sent  of his  disciples, 

Matthew 11:7
Literal: As these now were going away began - Jesus to speak to the crowds concerning John What went you out into the wilderness to see A reed by [the] wind shaken
KJV: And  they departed,  Jesus  began  to say  unto the multitudes  concerning  John,  What  went ye  out into  the wilderness  to see?  A reed  shaken  with  the wind? 

Matthew 11:11
Literal: Truly I say to you not there has risen among [those] born of women one greater than John the Baptist - Yet the least in the kingdom of the heavens greater than he is
KJV: Verily  I say  Among  them that are born  of women  not  risen  John  the Baptist:  notwithstanding  he that is least  in  the kingdom  of heaven  he. 

Matthew 11:12
Literal: From then the days of John the Baptist until now the kingdom of the heavens is taken by violence and [the] violent claim it
KJV: And  from  the days  of John  the Baptist  until  now  the kingdom  of heaven  suffereth violence,  and  the violent  it  by force. 

Matthew 11:16
Literal: To what however will I compare the generation this Like it is little children sitting in the markets and calling out - to others
KJV: But  whereunto  shall I liken  generation?  like  sitting  in  the markets,  calling 

Matthew 12:1
Literal: At that - time went - Jesus on the Sabbaths through the grainfields - and the disciples of Him were hungry and they began to pluck [the] heads of grain to eat
KJV: At  that  time  Jesus  went  on the sabbath day  through  the corn;  and  his  disciples  were an hungred,  and  began  to pluck  the ears of corn,  and  to eat. 

Matthew 12:2
Literal: - And the Pharisees having seen said to Him Behold the disciples of You are doing what not it is lawful to do on Sabbath
KJV: But  when the Pharisees  it, they said  unto him,  Behold,  disciples  do  that which  not  lawful  to do  upon  the sabbath day. 

Matthew 12:3
Literal: - And He said to them Not you have read what did David when he was hungry and those with him
KJV: But  he said  unto them,  not  read  what  David  did,  when  he  was an hungred,  and  they  that were with him; 

Matthew 12:6
Literal: I say however to you that the temple a greater than is here
KJV: But  I say  That  in this place  the temple. 

Matthew 12:7
Literal: If however you had known what is Mercy I desire and not sacrifice not - you would have condemned the guiltless
KJV: But  if  ye had known  what  I will have  mercy,  and  not  sacrifice,  ye would  not  have condemned  the guiltless. 

Matthew 12:11
Literal: - And He said to them What will there be among you man who will have sheep one and if falls it on the Sabbaths into a pit not will he take hold of it will raise [it] up
KJV: And  he said  unto them,  What  man  among  that  shall have  one  sheep,  and  if  fall  into  a pit  on the sabbath day,  not  lay hold  on it,  and  lift it out? 

Matthew 12:14
Literal: Having gone out now the Pharisees a counsel held against Him how Him they might destroy
KJV: Then  the Pharisees  went out,  and held  a council  against  him,  how  they might destroy  him. 

Matthew 12:15
Literal: - And Jesus having known withdrew from there And followed Him multitudes great He healed them all
KJV: But  when Jesus  knew  it, he withdrew himself  from thence:  and  great  multitudes  followed  him,  and  he healed  them  all; 

Matthew 12:24
Literal: - And the Pharisees having heard said This [man] not casts out the demons if not by - Beelzebul prince of the demons
KJV: But  when the Pharisees  heard  it, they said,  This  not  cast out  devils,  by  Beelzebub  the prince  of the devils. 

Matthew 12:25
Literal: Having known now the thoughts of them He said to them Every kingdom having been divided against itself is brought to desolation and city or house not will stand
KJV: And  knew  their  thoughts,  and said  unto them,  Every  kingdom  divided  against  itself  is brought to desolation;  and  every  city  or  house  divided  against  itself  not  stand: 

Matthew 12:28
Literal: If however by [the] Spirit of God I cast out - demons then has come upon you the kingdom -
KJV: But  if  cast out  devils  by  the Spirit  of God,  then  the kingdom  of God  is come  unto 

Matthew 12:31
Literal: Because of this I say to you every sin and blasphemy will be forgiven - men - however against [the] Spirit not
KJV: Wherefore  I say  All manner of  sin  and  blasphemy  shall be forgiven  unto men:  but  the blasphemy  against the Holy Ghost  not  be forgiven  unto men. 

Matthew 12:32
Literal: And whoever if speaks a word against the Son - of Man it will be forgiven him now - - Spirit the Holy not neither in this - age nor the coming [one]
KJV: And  whosoever  speaketh  a word  against  the Son  of man,  it shall be forgiven  him:  but  whosoever  speaketh  against  the Holy  Ghost,  not  be forgiven  him,  neither  in  world,  neither  in  the world to come. 

Matthew 12:36
Literal: I say now to you that every word careless that will speak - men they will give of it an account in day of judgment
KJV: But  I say  That  every  idle  word  that  men  shall speak,  they shall give  account  thereof  in  the day  of judgment. 

Matthew 12:39
Literal: - And answering He said to them A generation evil and adulterous a sign seeks for a sign not will be given to it if not the sign of Jonah the prophet
KJV: But  he answered  and said  unto them,  An evil  and  adulterous  generation  seeketh after  a sign;  and  there shall no  sign  be given  to it,  the sign  of the prophet  Jonas: 

Matthew 12:43
Literal: When now the unclean spirit is gone out from the man it passes through waterless places seeking rest and none finds [it]
KJV: When  the unclean  spirit  is gone  out of  a man,  he walketh  through  dry  places,  seeking  rest,  and  findeth  none. 

Matthew 12:46
Literal: While now He was speaking to the crowds behold the mother and the brothers of Him were standing outside seeking to Him to speak
KJV: While  he  yet  talked  to the people,  behold,  his mother  and  his  brethren  stood  without,  desiring  to speak  with him. 

Matthew 12:47
Literal: Said now someone to Him Behold the mother of You and the brothers outside are standing seeking to You to speak
KJV: Then  one  said  unto him,  Behold,  mother  and  brethren  stand  without,  desiring  to speak 

Matthew 12:48
Literal: - And answering He said to the [one] telling Him Who is the mother of Me and who are the brothers
KJV: But  he answered  and said  him,  Who  mother?  and  who  brethren? 

Matthew 13:5
Literal: Other now fell upon the rocky places where not it had soil much and immediately it sprang up through - not having depth of soil
KJV: Some  fell  upon  stony places,  where  they had  not  much  earth:  and  forthwith  they sprung up,  because  they had  no  deepness  of earth: 

Matthew 13:6
Literal: [the] sun now having risen they were scorched and through the not having root were dried up
KJV: And  when the sun  was up,  they were scorched;  and  because  they had  no  root,  they withered away. 

Matthew 13:7
Literal: Other now fell upon the thorns and grew up the thorns choked them
KJV: And  some  fell  among  thorns;  and  the thorns  sprung up,  and  them: 

Matthew 13:8
Literal: Other now fell upon the soil - good and were yielding fruit some indeed a hundredfold sixty thirty
KJV: But  other  fell  into  good  ground,  and  brought forth  fruit,  some  an hundredfold,  some  sixtyfold,  some  thirtyfold. 

Matthew 13:11
Literal: - And answering He said to them Because to you it has been granted to know the mysteries of the kingdom of the heavens to them however not
KJV: He answered  and  said  unto them,  Because  it is given  to know  the mysteries  of the kingdom  of heaven,  but  to them  not  given. 

Matthew 13:12
Literal: Whoever for has will be given to him and he will be in abundance now not even what he has will be taken away from him
KJV: For  whosoever  hath,  to him  shall be given,  and  he shall have more abundance:  but  whosoever  hath  not,  from  him  shall be taken away  even  that  he hath. 

Matthew 13:16
Literal: Of you however blessed [are] the eyes because they see and the ears they hear
KJV: But  blessed  eyes,  for  they see:  and  ears,  for  they hear. 

Matthew 13:20
Literal: That which now upon the rocky places having been sown this is the [one] the word hearing and immediately with joy receiving it
KJV: But  he that received the seed  into  stony places,  the same  he that heareth  the word,  and  with  joy  receiveth  it; 

Matthew 13:21
Literal: no he has now root in himself but temporary is having come however tribulation or persecution on account of the word immediately he falls away
KJV: Yet  hath he  not  root  in  himself,  but  for a while:  for  when tribulation  or  persecution  ariseth  because  of the word,  he is offended. 

Matthew 13:22
Literal: That which now among the thorns having been sown this is the [one] the word hearing and the care - present age of this deceit of riches choke unfruitful it becomes
KJV: He also  that received seed  among  the thorns  he that  heareth  the word;  and  the care  world,  and  the deceitfulness  of riches,  choke  the word,  and  he becometh  unfruitful. 

Matthew 13:23
Literal: That however on the good soil having been sown this is the [one] the word hearing and understanding who indeed brings forth fruit produces some indeed a hundredfold now sixty thirty
KJV: But  he that received seed  into  the good  ground  he  that heareth  the word,  and  understandeth  it; which  also  beareth fruit,  and  bringeth forth,  some  an hundredfold,  some  sixty,  some  thirty. 

Matthew 13:25
Literal: In now the [time] are sleeping the men came his - enemy and sowed weeds in [the] midst of the wheat went away
KJV: But  while  men  slept,  his  enemy  came  and  sowed  tares  among  the wheat,  and  went his way. 

Matthew 13:26
Literal: When now sprouted the plants and fruit produced then appeared also the weeds
KJV: But  when  the blade  was sprung up,  and  brought forth  fruit,  then  appeared  the tares  also. 

Matthew 13:27
Literal: Having come to [him] now the servants the master of the house said to him Sir not good seed did you sow in - your field How then has it the weeds
KJV: So  the servants  of the householder  came  and said  unto him,  Sir,  not  thou sow  good  seed  in  thy  field?  from whence  then  hath it  tares? 

Matthew 13:28
Literal: - And he said to them An enemy a man this did - the servants to him said Do you desire then [that] having gone forth we should gather them
KJV: He said  unto them,  An enemy  hath done  The servants  unto him,  Wilt thou  then  that we go  them  up? 

Matthew 13:29
Literal: - And he said No not lest gathering the weeds you would uproot with them the wheat
KJV: But  he said,  Nay;  while ye gather up  the tares,  ye root up  also the wheat  with  them. 

Matthew 13:30
Literal: Allow to grow together both until the harvest and in the time of the I will say to the harvesters Gather first the weeds bind them into bundles in order - to burn them - and the wheat gather together the barn of me
KJV: Let  both  grow together  the harvest:  and  in  the time  of harvest  I will say  to the reapers,  Gather ye together  first  the tares,  and  bind  them  in  bundles  to  burn  them:  but  gather  the wheat  into  barn. 

Matthew 13:32
Literal: which smallest indeed is of all the seeds when however it is grown greater than the garden plants it is and becomes a tree so that come the birds of the air perch in the branches of it
KJV: Which  indeed  the least  of all  seeds:  but  when  it is grown,  among herbs,  and  becometh  a tree,  so that  the birds  of the air  come  and  lodge  in  the branches  thereof. 

Matthew 13:37
Literal: - And answering He said The [One] sowing the good seed is the Son - of Man
KJV: He answered  and  said  He that soweth  the good  seed  the Son  of man; 

Matthew 13:38
Literal: - and the field is the world - the good seed these are the sons of the kingdom - the weeds of the evil [one]
KJV: The field  the world;  the good  seed  are  the children  of the kingdom;  but  the tares  the children  of the wicked 

Matthew 13:39
Literal: - and the enemy having sown them is the devil the harvest [the] consummation of the age - the harvesters angels are
KJV: The enemy  that sowed  them  the devil;  the harvest  the end  of the world;  and  the reapers  the angels. 

Matthew 13:46
Literal: having found now one very precious pearl having gone away he has sold all things as many as he had and bought it
KJV: when he had found  one  pearl  of great price,  went  and sold  all  that  he had,  and  bought  it. 

Matthew 13:48
Literal: which when it was filled having drawn up on the shore and having sat down they collected the good into vessels and bad out they cast
KJV: Which,  when  it was full,  they drew  to  shore,  and  sat down,  and gathered  the good  into  vessels,  but  cast  the bad  away. 

Matthew 13:52
Literal: - And He said to them Because of this every scribe having been discipled into the kingdom of the heavens like is a man a master of a house who puts forth out of the treasure of him [things] new and old
KJV: Then  said  he unto them,  Therefore  every  scribe  which is instructed  the kingdom  of heaven  like  unto a man  that is an householder,  which  bringeth forth  out of  his  treasure  things new  and  old. 

Matthew 13:57
Literal: And they were offended at Him - But Jesus said to them Not is a prophet without Honor if not in the hometown household of him
KJV: And  they were offended  in  him.  But  Jesus  said  unto them,  A prophet  not  without honour,  in  his own  country,  and  in  his own  house. 

Matthew 14:6
Literal: [The] birthday now having been celebrated - of Herod danced the daughter - of Herodias in the midst and pleased - Herod
KJV: But  when Herod's  birthday  the daughter  of Herodias  danced  before them,  and  pleased  Herod. 

Matthew 14:8
Literal: - And having been urged on by the mother of her Give me she says here upon a platter the head of John the Baptist
KJV: And  she, being before instructed  of  her  mother,  said,  Give  here  John  Baptist's  head  in  a charger. 

Matthew 14:13
Literal: Having heard now - Jesus withdrew from there by boat to a secluded place apart Himself And having heard [of it] the crowds followed Him on foot from the towns
KJV: When  Jesus  heard  of it, he departed  thence  by  ship  into  a desert  place  apart:  and  when the people  had heard  thereof, they followed  him  on foot  out of  the cities. 

Matthew 14:15
Literal: Evening now having come came to Him the disciples saying Desolate is this place and the time already is gone by Dismiss therefore the crowds that having gone into the villages they might buy for themselves food
KJV: And  when it was  evening,  his  disciples  came  to him,  saying,  a desert  place,  and  the time  is now  past;  the multitude  away,  that  they may go  into  the villages,  and buy  themselves  victuals. 

Matthew 14:16
Literal: - And Jesus said to them No need they have to go away Give you to eat
KJV: But  Jesus  said  unto them,  They need  not  depart;  give  them  to eat 

Matthew 14:17
Literal: - And they say to Him Not we have here if not five loaves and two fish
KJV: And  they say  unto him,  We have  here  but  five  loaves,  and  two  fishes. 

Matthew 14:18
Literal: - And He said Bring to Me here them
KJV: He said,  Bring  them  hither 

Matthew 14:19
Literal: And having commanded the crowds to sit down on the grass having taken five loaves two fish having looked up to - heaven He spoke a blessing having broken He gave to the disciples - and the disciples crowds
KJV: And  he commanded  the multitude  to sit down  on  the grass,  and  took  the five  loaves,  and  the two  fishes,  and looking up  to  heaven,  he blessed,  and  brake,  and gave  the loaves  to his disciples,  and  the disciples  to the multitude. 

Matthew 14:21
Literal: Those then eating were men about five thousand besides women and children
KJV: And  they that had eaten  about  five thousand  men,  beside  women  and  children. 

Matthew 14:23
Literal: And having dismissed the crowds He went up on the mountain by Himself to pray Evening now having arrived alone He was there
KJV: And  the multitudes  away,  he went up  into  a mountain  apart  to pray:  and  when the evening  was come,  there  alone. 

Matthew 14:24
Literal: - And the boat now stadia many from the land being tossed by the waves was for contrary [was] the wind
KJV: But  the ship  now  tossed  with  waves:  for  the wind  contrary. 

Matthew 14:25
Literal: In [the] fourth now watch of the night He went to them walking on the sea
KJV: And  in the fourth  watch  of the night  unto  them,  walking  on  the sea. 

Matthew 14:26
Literal: - And the disciples having seen Him on the sea walking were troubled saying - A ghost it is And in - fear they cried out
KJV: And  when the disciples  him  walking  on  the sea,  they were troubled,  saying,  a spirit;  and  they cried out  for  fear. 

Matthew 14:27
Literal: Immediately now spoke - Jesus to them saying Take courage I it is not fear
KJV: But  straightway  Jesus  spake  unto them,  saying,  Be of good cheer;  it is  I;  not  afraid. 

Matthew 14:28
Literal: Answering now to Him - Peter said Lord if You [it] is command me to come to You upon the waters
KJV: And  Peter  answered  him  and said,  Lord,  if  thou,  bid  come  unto  on  the water. 

Matthew 14:29
Literal: - And He said Come And having descended from the boat - Peter walked upon the water came to - Jesus
KJV: And  he said,  Come.  And  when Peter  was come down  out of  the ship,  he walked  on  the water,  to go  to  Jesus. 

Matthew 14:30
Literal: Seeing now the wind charging he was afraid and having begun to sink he cried out saying Lord save me
KJV: But  when he saw  the wind  boisterous,  he was afraid;  and  beginning  to sink,  he cried,  saying,  Lord,  save 

Matthew 14:31
Literal: Immediately now - Jesus having stretched out the hand took hold of him and says to him [You] of little faith of why did you doubt
KJV: And  immediately  Jesus  stretched forth  his hand,  and caught  him,  and  said  unto him,  O thou of little faith,  wherefore  didst thou doubt? 

Matthew 14:33
Literal: Those then in the boat worshiped Him saying Truly of God Son You are
KJV: Then  they that were in  the ship  and worshipped  him,  saying,  Of a truth  the Son  of God. 

Matthew 15:3
Literal: - And answering He said to them Because of why also you break the commandment - of God on account of tradition of you
KJV: But  he answered  and said  unto them,  also  transgress  the commandment  of God  by  tradition? 

Matthew 15:5
Literal: You however say Whoever - shall say to the father or the mother [It is] a gift whatever if by me you might be profited
KJV: But  say,  Whosoever  shall say  to his father  or  his mother,  It is a gift,  by  whatsoever  thou mightest be profited 

Matthew 15:8
Literal: The people this with the lips Me it honors the however heart of them far away is kept from Me
KJV: This  people  with their  honoureth  with their lips;  but  their  heart  is  far  from 

Matthew 15:9
Literal: in vain then they worship Me teaching [as] doctrines [the] precepts of men
KJV: But  in vain  they do worship  teaching  for doctrines  the commandments  of men. 

Matthew 15:13
Literal: - And answering He said Every plant that not has planted the Father of Me Heavenly it will be rooted up
KJV: But  he answered  and said,  Every  plant,  which  heavenly  Father  not  planted,  shall be rooted up. 

Matthew 15:14
Literal: Leave them Blind they are guides of the blind Blind now blind if they lead both into a pit will fall
KJV: them  alone:  blind  leaders  of the blind.  And  if  the blind  lead  the blind,  both  shall fall  into  the ditch. 

Matthew 15:15
Literal: Answering then - Peter said to Him Explain to us the parable this
KJV: Then  answered  Peter  and said  unto him,  Declare  parable. 

Matthew 15:16
Literal: - And He said Still also you without understanding are
KJV: And  said,  also  yet  without understanding? 

Matthew 15:18
Literal: The things however going forth out of the mouth the heart come forth and these defile the man
KJV: But  those things which  proceed  out of  the mouth  come forth  from  the heart;  and they  defile  the man. 

Matthew 15:20
Literal: These are the things defiling the man - but with unwashed hands to eat not defiles
KJV: the things which  defile  a man:  but  to eat  with unwashen  hands  defileth  not  a man. 

Matthew 15:23
Literal: - And not He answered her a word And having come to [him] the disciples of Him were imploring Him saying Dismiss her for she cries out after us
KJV: But  he answered  her  not  a word.  And  his  disciples  came  and besought  him,  saying,  her  away;  for  she crieth  after 

Matthew 15:24
Literal: - And answering He said Not I was sent if not to the sheep - being lost of [the] house of Israel
KJV: But  he answered  and said,  not  sent  unto  the lost  sheep  of the house  of Israel. 

Matthew 15:25
Literal: - And having come she was worshiping Him saying Lord help me
KJV: Then  came she  and worshipped  him,  saying,  Lord,  help 

Matthew 15:26
Literal: - And answering He said Not it is right to take the bread of the children and to cast [it] to the dogs
KJV: But  he answered  and said,  not  meet  to take  the children's  bread,  and  to cast  it to dogs. 

Matthew 15:27
Literal: - And she said Yes Lord even however the dogs eat of the crumbs - falling from the table of the masters of them
KJV: And  she said,  Truth,  Lord:  yet  the dogs  eat  of  the crumbs  which  fall  from  their  masters'  table. 

Matthew 15:32
Literal: - And Jesus having called to [him] the disciples of Him said I am moved with compassion toward the crowd because already days three they continue with Me and nothing have that they might eat to send away them hungry not I am willing not lest they faint on the way
KJV: Then  Jesus  called  his  disciples  unto him, and said,  I have compassion  on  the multitude,  because  they continue  now  three  days,  and  have  nothing  to eat:  and  I will  not  them  away  fasting,  they faint  in  the way. 

Matthew 15:34
Literal: And says to them - Jesus How many loaves have you - And they said Seven a few small fish
KJV: And  Jesus  saith  unto them,  How many  loaves  have ye?  And  they said,  Seven,  and  a few  little fishes. 

Matthew 15:36
Literal: having taken the seven loaves and fish having given thanks He broke [them] was giving to disciples - and the disciples to the crowd