The Meaning of Luke 6:3 Explained

Luke 6:3

KJV: And Jesus answering them said, Have ye not read so much as this, what David did, when himself was an hungred, and they which were with him;

YLT: And Jesus answering said unto them, 'Did ye not read even this that David did, when he hungered, himself and those who are with him,

Darby: And Jesus answering said to them, Have ye not read so much as this, what David did when he hungered, he and those who were with him,

ASV: And Jesus answering them said, Have ye not read even this, what David did, when he was hungry, he, and they that were with him;

What does Luke 6:3 Mean?

Context Summary

Luke 6:1-11 - The Right Use Of The Sabbath
It was a brave and bold step for Jesus to set Himself against the ritualistic proscriptions of the ruling religious party of His age. How many who had hoped that He would redeem Israel, must have been hurt by what seemed to be ruthless iconoclasm. But there was no hope of the holy thoughts of God ever emerging from the mass of hide-bound rules and regulations with which the Pharisees had covered them, unless the frost of literalism was broken up with a strong hand. Christ was not destroying religion, but freeing it from the formalist. Reality, reality! Be true and real!
The grave question today is, whether, in our revolt from Puritan strictness in observing Sunday, we have not gone to the other extreme. The Church of God will have to stand for God's day, not only for God's sake, but for the sake of the masses, who are menaced by a seven-days' working week. The Sabbath was made for man; he needs it. If God made it for him, let God's children preserve it. [source]

Chapter Summary: Luke 6

1  Jesus reproves the Pharisees;
12  chooses apostles;
17  heals the diseased;
20  preaches to his disciples before the people: the beattitudes;
27  Love your Enemy
37  Do not Judge
43  A Tree and Its Fruit
46  The House on the Rock

Greek Commentary for Luke 6:3

Not even this [ουδε τουτο]
This small point only in Luke. [source]
What [ο]
Literally, which. Mark 2:25; Matthew 12:3 have τι — ti (what). [source]
which []
. Mark 2:25; Matthew 12:3 have τι — ti (what). [source]
Have ye not read [οὐδὲ ἀνέγνωτε]
The A. V. misses the force of οὐδὲ : “have ye not so much as read?” Rev., “have ye not read even this?” [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Luke 6:3

Matthew 13:3 Parables [παραβολαῖς]
From παρά , beside, and βάλλω , to throw. A parable is a form of teaching in which one thing is thrown beside another. Hence its radical idea is comparison. Sir John Cheke renders biword, and the same idea is conveyed by the German Beispiela pattern or example; beibeside, and the old high German speldiscourse or narration. The word is used with a wide range in scripture, but always involves the idea of comparison:1.Of brief sayings, having an oracular or proverbial character. Thus Peter (Matthew 15:15), referring to the words “If the blind lead the blind,” etc., says, “declare unto us thisparable. ” Compare Luke 6:39. So of the patched garment (Luke 5:36), and the guest who assumes the highest place at the feast (Luke 14:7, Luke 14:11). Compare, also, Matthew 24:39; Mark 13:28.2.Of a proverb. The word for proverb ( παροιμία ) has the same idea at the root as parable. It is παρά , beside, οἶμος , a way or road. Either a trite, wayside saying (Trench), or a path by the side of the high road (Godet). See Luke 4:23; 1 Samuel 24:13. 3.Of a song or poem, in which an example is set up by way of comparison. See Micah 2:4; Habakkuk 2:6. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
4.Of a word or discourse which is enigmatical or obscure until the meaning is developed by application or comparison. It occurs along with the words αἴνιγμα , enigma, and πρόβλημα , a problem, something put forth or proposed ( πρό , in front βάλλω , to throw ). See Psalm 49:4 (Sept. 48:4); Psalm 78:2 (Sept. 77:2); Proverbs 1:6, where we have παραβολὴν , parable; σκοτεινὸν λόγον , dark saying; and αἰνίγματα , enigmas. Used also of the sayings of Balaam (Numbers 23:7, Numbers 23:18; Numbers 24:3, Numbers 24:15).In this sense Christ uses parables symbolically to expound the mysteries of the kingdom of God; as utterances which conceal from one class what they reveal to another (Matthew 13:11-17), and in which familiar facts of the earthly life are used figuratively to expound truths of the higher life. The un-spiritual do not link these facts of the natural life with those of the supernatural, which are not discerned by them (1 Corinthians 2:14), and therefore they need an interpreter of the relation between the two. Such symbols assume the existence of a law common to the natural and spiritual worlds under which the symbol and the thing symbolized alike work; so that the one does not merely resemble the other superficially, but stands in actual coherence and harmony with it. Christ formulates such a law in connection with the parables of the Talents and the Sower. “To him that hath shall be given. From him that hath not shall be taken away.” That is a law of morals and religion, as of business and agriculture. One must have in order to make. Interest requires capital. Fruit requires not only seed but soil. Spiritual fruitfulness requires an honest and good heart. Similarly, the law of growth as set forth in the parable of the Mustard Seed, is a law common to nature and to the kingdom of God. The great forces in both kingdoms are germinal, enwrapped in small seeds which unfold from within by an inherent power of growth.5. A parable is also an example or type; furnishing a model or a warning; as the Good Samaritan, the Rich Fool, the Pharisee and the Publican. The element of comparison enters here as between the particular incident imagined or recounted, and all cases of a similar kind.The term parable, however, as employed in ordinary Christian phraseology, is limited to those utterances of Christ which are marked by a complete figurative history or narrative. It is thus defined by Goebel (“Parables of Jesus”). “A narrative moving within the sphere of physical or human life, not professing to describe an event which actually took place, but expressly imagined for the purpose of representing, in pictorial figure, a truth belonging to the sphere of religion, and therefore referring to the relation of man or mankind to God.” In form the New Testament parables resemble the fable. The distinction between them does not turn on the respective use of rational and irrational beings speaking and acting. There are fables where the actors are human. Nor does the fable always deal with the impossible, since there are fables in which an animal, for instance, does nothing contrary to its nature. The distinction lies in the religious character of the New Testament parable as contrasted with the secular character of the fable. While the parable exhibits the relations of man to God, the fable teaches lessons of worldly policy or natural morality and utility. “The parable is predominantly symbolic; the fable, for the most part, typical, and therefore presents its teaching only in the form of example, for which reason it chooses animals by preference, not as symbolic, but as typical figures; never symbolic in the sense in which the parable mostly is, because the higher invisible world, of which the parable sees and exhibits the symbol in the visible world of nature and man, lies far from it. Hence the parable can never work with fantastic figures like speaking animals, trees,” etc. (Goebel, condensed). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The parable differs from the allegory in that there is in the latter “an interpenetration of the thing signified and the thing signifying; the qualities and properties of the first being attributed to the last,” and the two being thus blended instead of being kept distinct and parallel. See, for example, the allegory of the Vine and the Branches (John 15) where Christ at once identifies himself with the figure' “I am the true vine.” Thus the allegory, unlike the parable, carries its own interpretation with it. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Parable and proverb are often used interchangeably in the;New Testament; the fundamental conception being, as we have seen, the same in both, the same Hebrew word representing both, and both being enigmatical. They differ rather in extent than in essence; the parable being a proverb expanded and carried into detail, and being necessarily figurative, which the proverb is not; though the range of the proverb is wider, since the parable expands only one particular case of a proverb. (See Trench, “Notes on the Parables,” Introd.) [source]

Matthew 7:12 That men should do unto you [ινα ποιωσιν μν οι αντρωποι]
Luke (Luke 6:31) puts the Golden Rule parallel with Matthew 5:42. The negative form is in Tobit 4:15. It was used by Hillel, Philo, Isocrates, Confucius. “The Golden Rule is the distilled essence of that ‹fulfilment‘ (Matthew 5:17) which is taught in the sermon” (McNeile). Jesus puts it in positive form. [source]
Mark 4:24 With what measure [εν ωι μετρωι]
See already in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 7:2; see note on Luke 6:38). [source]
Luke 1:30 Grace [χάριν]
From the same root as χαίρω ,to rejoice. I. Primarily that which gives joy or pleasure; and hence outward beauty, loveliness, something which delights the beholder. Thus Homer, of Ulysses going to the assembly: “Athene shed down manly grace or beauty upon him” (“Odyssey,” ii., 12); and Septuagint, Proverbs 1:9; Proverbs 3:22. Substantially the same idea, agreeableness, is conveyed in Luke 4:22, respecting the gracious words, lit., words of grace, uttered by Christ. So Ephesians 4:29. II. As a beautiful or agreeable sentiment felt and expressed toward another; kindness, favor, good-will. 2 Corinthians 8:6, 2 Corinthians 8:7, 2 Corinthians 8:9; 2 Corinthians 9:8; Luke 1:30; Luke 2:40; Acts 2:47. So of the responsive sentiment of thankfulness. See Luke 6:32, Luke 6:33, Luke 6:34:; Luke 17:9; but mostly in the formula thanks to God; Romans 6:17; 1 Corinthians 15:57; 2 Corinthians 2:14; 2 Timothy 1:3. III. The substantial expression of good-will; a boon, a favor, a gift; but not in New Testament. See Romans 5:15, where the distinction is made between χάρις , grace, and δωρεὰ ἐν χάριτι , a gift in grace. So a gratification or delight, in classical Greek only; as the delight in battle, in sleep, etc. IV. The higher Christian signification, based on the emphasis offreeness in the gift or favor, and, as commonly in New Testament, denoting the free, spontaneous, absolute loving-kindness of God toward men, and so contrasted with debt, law, works, sin. The word does not occur either in Matthew or Mark. [source]
Luke 21:26 Shall be shaken [σαλευθήσονται]
Compare Matthew 11:7; Luke 6:38; Acts 4:31; Hebrews 12:26, Hebrews 12:27. The root of the verb is the same as that of billows, Luke 21:25. [source]
Luke 16:25 Receivedst [ἀπέλαβες]
Received back ( ἀπό ) as a reward or quittance. Compare Luke 6:34; Luke 18:30; Luke 23:41. [source]
Luke 1:30 Favour [χαριν]
Grace. Same root as χαιρω — chairō (rejoice) and χαριτοω — charitoō in Luke 1:28. To find favour is a common O.T. phrase. Χαρις — Charis is a very ancient and common word with a variety of applied meanings. They all come from the notion of sweetness, charm, loveliness, joy, delight, like words of grace, Luke 4:22, growing grace, Ephesians 4:29, with grace, Colossians 4:6. The notion of kindness is in it also, especially of God towards men as here. It is a favourite word for Christianity, the Gospel of the grace of God (Acts 20:24) in contrast with law or works (John 1:16). Gratitude is expressed also (Luke 6:32), especially to God (Romans 6:17). [source]
Luke 1:32 The Son of the Most High [υιος υπσιστου]
There is no article in the Greek, but the use of Most High in Luke 1:35 clearly of God as here. In Luke 6:35 we find “sons of the Most High” (υιοι υπσιστου — huioi Hupsistou) so that we cannot insist on deity here, though that is possible. The language of 2 Samuel 7:14; Isaiah 9:7 is combined here. [source]
Luke 12:20 Is thy soul required of thee [την πσυχην σου αιτουσιν απο σου]
Plural active present, not passive: “They are demanding thy soul from thee.” The impersonal plural (aitousin) is common enough (Luke 6:38; Luke 12:11; Luke 16:9; Luke 23:31). The rabbis used “they” to avoid saying “God.” [source]
Luke 16:25 Receivedst [απελαβες]
Second aorist indicative of απολαμβανω — apolambanō old verb to get back what is promised and in full. See also Luke 6:34; Luke 18:30; Luke 23:41. [source]
Luke 8:28 The Most High God [του τεου του υπσιστου]
Uncertain whether του τεου — tou theou genuine or not. But “the Most High” clearly means God as already seen (Luke 1:32, Luke 1:35, Luke 1:36; Luke 6:35). The phrase is common among heathen (Numbers 24:16; Micah 6:6; Isaiah 14:14). The demoniac may have been a Gentile, but it is the demon here speaking. See note on Mark 5:7; note on Matthew 8:29 for the Greek idiom “What have I to do with thee?” See there also for “Torment me not.” [source]
Luke 4:23 This parable [την παραβολην ταυτην]
See discussion on Matthew 13. Here the word has a special application to a crisp proverb which involves a comparison. The word physician is the point of comparison. Luke the physician alone gives this saying of Jesus. The proverb means that the physician was expected to take his own medicine and to heal himself. The word παραβολη — parabolē in the N.T. is confined to the Synoptic Gospels except Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 11:19. This use for a proverb occurs also in Luke 5:36; Luke 6:39. This proverb in various forms appears not only among the Jews, but in Euripides and Aeschylus among the Greeks, and in Cicero‘s Letters. Hobart quotes the same idea from Galen, and the Chinese used to demand it of their physicians. The point of the parable seems to be that the people were expecting him to make good his claim to the Messiahship by doing here in Nazareth what they had heard of his doing in Capernaum and elsewhere. “Establish your claims by direct evidence” (Easton). This same appeal (Vincent) was addressed to Christ on the Cross (Matthew 27:40, Matthew 27:42). There is a tone of sarcasm towards Jesus in both cases.Heard done (ηκουσαμεν γενομενα — ēkousamen genomena). The use of this second aorist middle participle γενομενα — genomena after ηκουσαμεν — ēkousamen is a neat Greek idiom. It is punctiliar action in indirect discourse after this verb of sensation or emotion (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 1040-42, 1122-24).Do also here Ingressive aorist active imperative. Do it here in thy own country and town and do it now. Jesus applies the proverb to himself as an interpretation of their real attitude towards himself. [source]
Luke 6:35 But [πλην]
Plain adversative like πλην — plēn in Luke 6:24. Never despairing Μηδεν — Mēden is read by A B L Bohairic and is the reading of Westcott and Hort. The reading μηδενα — mēdena is translated “despairing of no man.” The Authorized Version has it “hoping for nothing again,” a meaning for απελπιζω — apelpizō with no parallel elsewhere. Field (Otium Nor.iii. 40) insists that all the same the context demands this meaning because of απελπιζειν — apelpizein in Luke 6:34, but the correct reading there is ελπιζειν — elpizein not απελπιζειν — apelpizein Here Field‘s argument falls to the ground. The word occurs in Polybius, Diodorus, lxx with the sense of despairing and that is the meaning here. D and Old Latin documents have nihil desperantes, but the Vulgate has nihil inde sperantes (hoping for nothing thence) and this false rendering has wrought great havoc in Europe. “On the strength of it Popes and councils have repeatedly condemned the taking of any interest whatever for loans. As loans could not be had without interest, and Christians were forbidden to take it, money lending passed into the hands of the Jews, and added greatly to the unnatural detestation in which Jews were held” (Plummer). By “never despairing” or “giving up nothing in despair” Jesus means that we are not to despair about getting the money back. We are to help the apparently hopeless cases. Medical writers use the word for desperate or hopeless cases. [source]
John 13:23 Bosom []
See on Luke 6:38. The Synoptists do not give this incident.sa40 [source]
John 7:30 They sought therefore [εζητουν ουν]
Imperfect active of ζητεω — zēteō inchoative or conative, they began to seek. Either makes sense. The subject is naturally some of the Jerusalemites (Westcott) rather than some of the leaders (Bernard). To take him First aorist active infinitive, Doric form from πιαζω — piazō from the usual πιεζω — piezō occasionally so in the papyri, but πιαζω — piazō always in N.T. except Luke 6:38. And Here = “but.” Laid his hand Second aorist active indicative of επιβαλλω — epiballō to cast upon. Old and common idiom for arresting one to make him a prisoner (Matthew 26:50). See repetition in John 7:44. His hour In John 13:1 we read that “the hour” had come, but that was “not yet” “John is at pains to point out at every point that the persecution and death of Jesus followed a predestined course” (Bernard), as in John 2:4; John 7:6, John 7:8; John 8:10; John 10:39; John 13:1, etc. Was not yet come Past perfect active of ερχομαι — erchomai as John looks back on the story. [source]
Acts 10:47 Can any man forbid the water? [Μητι το υδωρ δυναται κωλσαι τισ]
The negative μητι — mēti expects the answer No. The evidence was indisputable that these Gentiles were converted and so were entitled to be baptized. See the similar idiom in Luke 6:39. Note the article with “water.” Here the baptism of the Holy Spirit had preceded the baptism of water (Acts 1:5; Acts 11:16). “The greater had been bestowed; could the lesser be withheld?” (Knowling). [source]
Acts 7:49 What manner of house [Ποιον οικον]
What sort of a house? This interrogative is sometimes scornful as in Acts 4:7; Luke 6:32. (Page). So Stephen shows by Isaiah that Solomon was right that the temple was not meant to “confine” God‘s presence and that Jesus had rightly shown that God is a spirit and can be worshipped anywhere by any individual of any race or land. It is a tremendous argument for the universality and spirituality of Christianity free from the shackles of Jewish racial and national limitations, but its very strength only angered the Sanhedrin to desperation. [source]
Acts 27:39 Bay [κόλπον]
See on bosom, Luke 6:38. [source]
Acts 1:16 Guide []
See on lead, Luke 6:39. [source]
Romans 1:27 Lust [ορεχει]
Only here in N.T. Unseemliness (ασχημοσυνην — aschēmosunēn). Old word from ασχημον — aschēmon (deformed). In N.T. only here and Revelation 16:15. Recompense See note on 2 Corinthians 6:13 for only other N.T. instance of this late Pauline word, there in good sense, here in bad. Which was due (hēn edei). Imperfect active for obligation still on them coming down from the past. This debt will be paid in full (apolambanontes pay back as in Luke 6:34, and due as in Luke 23:41). Nature will attend to that in their own bodies and souls. [source]
Romans 1:27 Recompense [αντιμιστιαν]
See note on 2 Corinthians 6:13 for only other N.T. instance of this late Pauline word, there in good sense, here in bad. Which was due (hēn edei). Imperfect active for obligation still on them coming down from the past. This debt will be paid in full (apolambanontes pay back as in Luke 6:34, and due as in Luke 23:41). Nature will attend to that in their own bodies and souls. [source]
2 Corinthians 11:32 Guarded [επρουρει]
Imperfect active of προυρεω — phroureō old verb (from προυρος — phrouros a guard) to guard by posting sentries. In Acts 9:24 we read that the Jews kept watch to seize Paul, but there is no conflict as they cooperated with the guard set by Aretas at their request. To seize (πιασαι — piasai). Doric first aorist active infinitive of πιεζω — piezō (Luke 6:38) for which see note on Acts 3:7. [source]
2 Corinthians 11:32 To seize [πιασαι]
Doric first aorist active infinitive of πιεζω — piezō (Luke 6:38) for which see note on Acts 3:7. [source]
1 Timothy 6:18 Do good [ἀγαθοεργεῖν]
In this uncontracted form, N.T.oolxx, oClass. Comp. Acts 14:17. The usual word is ἀγαθοποιεῖν , see Mark 3:4; Luke 6:9, Luke 6:33, Luke 6:35; 1 Peter 2:15. oP. who has ἐργάζεσθαι τὸ ἀγαθὸν towork that which is good, Romans 2:10; Galatians 6:10; Ephesians 4:28. [source]
2 Timothy 3:2 Lovers of money [αλαζονες]
Old compound adjective, in N.T. only here and Luke 16:14. See note on 1 Timothy 6:10. Boastful (υπερηπανοι — alazones). Old word for empty pretender, in N.T. only here and Romans 1:30. Haughty See also Romans 1:30 for this old word. Railers (γονευσιν απειτεις — blasphēmoi). See note on 1 Timothy 1:13. Disobedient to parents See note on Romans 1:30. Unthankful (ανοσιοι — acharistoi). Old word, in N.T. only here and Luke 6:35. Unholy See note on 1 Timothy 1:9. Without natural affection (astorgoi). See note on Romans 1:31. [source]
2 Timothy 3:2 Haughty [βλασπημοι]
See also Romans 1:30 for this old word. Railers (γονευσιν απειτεις — blasphēmoi). See note on 1 Timothy 1:13. Disobedient to parents See note on Romans 1:30. Unthankful (ανοσιοι — acharistoi). Old word, in N.T. only here and Luke 6:35. Unholy See note on 1 Timothy 1:9. Without natural affection (astorgoi). See note on Romans 1:31. [source]
2 Timothy 3:2 Disobedient to parents [αχαριστοι]
See note on Romans 1:30. Unthankful (ανοσιοι — acharistoi). Old word, in N.T. only here and Luke 6:35. Unholy See note on 1 Timothy 1:9. Without natural affection (astorgoi). See note on Romans 1:31. [source]
2 Timothy 3:2 Unthankful [ανοσιοι]
Old word, in N.T. only here and Luke 6:35. [source]
2 Timothy 3:2 Unthankful [ἀχάριστοι]
Only here and Luke 6:35. [source]
James 5:11 Very pitiful and of tender mercy [πολυσπλαγχνός καὶ οἰκτίρμων]
The former adjective only here in New Testament; the latter here and Luke 6:36. Rev., full of pity and merciful. Πολυσπλαγχνός is from πολύς , much, and σπλάγχνα , the nobler entrails, used like our heart, as the seat of the emotions Hence the term bowels in the A. V. (Philemon 1:8; Colossians 3:12, etc.). Compare εὔσπλαγχνοι , tender-hearted, Ephesians 4:32. The distinction between this and οἰκτίρμων , merciful, seems to be that the former denotes the general quality of compassion, while the latter emphasizes the sympathy called out by special cases, being the feeling which is moved to pain at another's suffering. [source]
James 4:11 Judgeth [κρινων]
In the sense of harsh judgment as in Matthew 7:1; Luke 6:37 (explained by καταδικαζω — katadikazō).Not a doer of the law, but a judge (ουκ ποιητης νομου αλλα κριτης — ouk poiētēs nomoualla kritēs). This tone of superiority to law is here sharply condemned. James has in mind God‘s law, of course, but the point is the same for all laws under which we live. We cannot select the laws which we will obey unless some contravene God‘s law, and so our own conscience (Acts 4:20). Then we are willing to give our lives for our rebellion if need be. [source]
James 5:11 Ye have heard [ηκουσατε]
First aorist (constative) active indicative of ακουω — akouō As in Matthew 5:21, Matthew 5:27, Matthew 5:33, Matthew 5:38, Matthew 5:43. Ropes suggests in the synagogues.Of Job (Ιωβ — Iōb). Job did complain, but he refused to renounce God (Job 1:21; Job 2:10; Job 13:15; Job 16:19; Job 19:25.). He had become a stock illustration of loyal endurance.Ye have seen Second aorist (constative) active indicative of οραω — horaō In Job‘s case.The end of the Lord (το τελος κυριου — to telos kuriou). The conclusion wrought by the Lord in Job‘s case (Job 42:12).Full of pity Late and rare compound “Very kind.”Merciful (οικτειρω — oiktirmōn). Late and rare adjective (from oikteirō to pity), in N.T. only here and Luke 6:36. [source]
James 5:11 Ye have seen [ειδετε]
Second aorist (constative) active indicative of οραω — horaō In Job‘s case.The end of the Lord (το τελος κυριου — to telos kuriou). The conclusion wrought by the Lord in Job‘s case (Job 42:12).Full of pity Late and rare compound “Very kind.”Merciful (οικτειρω — oiktirmōn). Late and rare adjective (from oikteirō to pity), in N.T. only here and Luke 6:36. [source]
James 5:11 Full of pity [πολυσπλαγχνος]
Late and rare compound “Very kind.”Merciful (οικτειρω — oiktirmōn). Late and rare adjective (from oikteirō to pity), in N.T. only here and Luke 6:36. [source]
James 5:11 Merciful [οικτειρω]
Late and rare adjective (from oikteirō to pity), in N.T. only here and Luke 6:36. [source]
1 Peter 2:19 If a man endureth griefs [ει υοπερει τις λυπας]
Condition of first class with ει — ei and present active indicative of υποπερω — hupopherō old verb, to bear up under, in N.T. only here, 1 Corinthians 10:13; 2 Timothy 3:11. Note plural of λυπη — lupē (grief).For conscience toward God (δια συνειδησιν τεου — dia suneidēsin theou). Suffering is not a blessing in and of itself, but, if one‘s duty to God is involved (Acts 4:20), then one can meet it with gladness of heart. Τεου — Theou (God) is objective genitive. For συνειδησις — suneidēsis (conscience) see note on Acts 23:1; and see note on 1 Corinthians 8:7. It occurs again in 1 Peter 3:16.Suffering wrongfully Present active participle of πασχω — paschō and the common adverb αδικως — adikōs unjustly, here alone in N.T. This is the whole point, made clear already by Jesus in Matthew 5:10-12, where Jesus has also “falsely” See also Luke 6:32-34. [source]
1 Peter 2:19 Suffering wrongfully [πασχων αδικως]
Present active participle of πασχω — paschō and the common adverb αδικως — adikōs unjustly, here alone in N.T. This is the whole point, made clear already by Jesus in Matthew 5:10-12, where Jesus has also “falsely” See also Luke 6:32-34. [source]
Revelation 7:17 Shall lead [ὁδηγήσει]
See on Luke 6:39. [source]

What do the individual words in Luke 6:3 mean?

And answering to them said - Jesus Not even this have you read that which did David when was hungry he himself those who with him were
Καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς πρὸς αὐτοὺς εἶπεν Ἰησοῦς Οὐδὲ τοῦτο ἀνέγνωτε ἐποίησεν Δαυὶδ ὁπότε ἐπείνασεν αὐτὸς οἱ μετ’ αὐτοῦ ὄντες

ἀποκριθεὶς  answering 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Passive, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἀποκρίνομαι  
Sense: to give an answer to a question proposed, to answer.
εἶπεν  said 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: λέγω  
Sense: to speak, say.
  - 
Parse: Article, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Ἰησοῦς  Jesus 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: Ἰησοῦς  
Sense: Joshua was the famous captain of the Israelites, Moses’ successor.
Οὐδὲ  Not  even 
Parse: Adverb
Root: οὐδέ  
Sense: but not, neither, nor, not even.
τοῦτο  this 
Parse: Demonstrative Pronoun, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: οὗτος  
Sense: this.
ἀνέγνωτε  have  you  read 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: ἀναγινώσκω  
Sense: to distinguish between, to recognise, to know accurately, to acknowledge.
  that  which 
Parse: Personal / Relative Pronoun, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: ὅς 
Sense: who, which, what, that.
Δαυὶδ  David 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: Δαβίδ 
Sense: second king of Israel, and ancestor of Jesus Christ.
ἐπείνασεν  was  hungry 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: πεινάω  
Sense: to hunger, be hungry.
αὐτὸς  he  himself 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Nominative Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
οἱ  those  who 
Parse: Article, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.