The Meaning of Mark 2:2 Explained

Mark 2:2

KJV: And straightway many were gathered together, insomuch that there was no room to receive them, no, not so much as about the door: and he preached the word unto them.

YLT: and immediately many were gathered together, so that there was no more room, not even at the door, and he was speaking to them the word.

Darby: and straightway many were gathered together, so that there was no longer any room, not even at the door; and he spoke the word to them.

ASV: And many were gathered together, so that there was no longer room for them , no, not even about the door: and he spake the word unto them.

What does Mark 2:2 Mean?

Context Summary

Mark 2:1-22 - The Friend Of Sinners
The leper, Mark 1:40-45. The news of Christ spread fast and far until it reached the outcasts from Jewish society, the very dregs of humanity. As the story of the wonderful miracles wrought by our Lord was pondered deeply by this man, He concluded that the only question which remained was that of Christ's willingness to hear. As to His power there could be no doubt. But no one of all the religious world of that time had ever thought of extending a helping hand to such as he. Note the instantaneousness of our Lord's response to this appeal. His love and power are commensurate; when you gauge the one, you have measured the other.
The paralytic, Mark 2:1-12. The disease had resulted from sin. It was necessary to deal with the soul before the body could be emancipated. As soon as we sin, God's pardon awaits our asking for it, and of this fact our Lord gave the paralytic man definite assurance. Jesus' right to speak was evidenced by His power to heal. If the latter was effectual, so was the former.
The sinner's friend, Mark 2:13-22. They thought to coin a term of reproach, but they added a crown of glory. In eternity the Friend of sinners will surround His table with saved sinners who have become His guests. [source]

Chapter Summary: Mark 2

1  Jesus followed by multitudes,
3  heals a paralytic;
13  calls Matthew;
15  eats with tax collectors and sinners;
18  excuses his disciples for not fasting;
23  and for picking the heads of grain on the Sabbath day

Greek Commentary for Mark 2:2

So that there was no longer room for them, no, not even about the door [ωστε μηκετι χωρειν μηδε τα προς την τυραν]
Another graphic Markan detail seen through Peter‘s eyes. The double compound negative in the Greek intensifies the negative. This house door apparently opened into the street, not into a court as in the larger houses. The house was packed inside and there was a jam outside. [source]
And he spake the word unto them [και ελαλει αυτοις τον λογον]
And he was speaking the word unto them, Mark‘s favourite descriptive imperfect tense Note this word λαλεω — laleō about the preaching of Jesus (originally just sounds like the chatter of birds, the prattling of children, but here of the most serious kind of speech. As contrasted with λεγω — legō (to say) it is rather an onomatopoetic word with some emphasis on the sound and manner of speaking. The word is com- mon in the vernacular papyri examples of social inter-course. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Mark 2:2

Matthew 26:29 New [καινὸν]
Another adjective, νεόν , is employed to denote new wine in the sense of freshly-made (Matthew 9:17; Mark 2:22; Luke 5:37, Luke 5:38, Luke 5:39). The difference is between newness regarded in point of time or of quality. The young, for instance, who have lately sprung up, are νείοι , or νεώτεροι (Luke 15:12, Luke 15:13). The new garment (Luke 5:36) is contrasted as to quality with a worn and threadbare one. Hence καινοῦ . So a new heaven (2 Peter 3:13) is καινὸς , contrasted with that which shows signs of dissolution. The tomb in which the body of Jesus was laid was καινὸν (Matthew 27:60); in which no other body had lain, making it ceremonially unclean; not recently hewn. Trench (“Synonyms”) cites a passage from Polybius, relating a stratagem by which a town was nearly taken, and saying “we are still new ( καινοί ) and young ( νέοι ) in regard of such deceits.” Here καινοί expresses the inexperience of the men; νέοι , their youth. Still, the distinction cannot be pressed in all cases. Thus, 1 Corinthians 5:7, “Purge out the old leaven that ye may be a new ( νέον ) lump;” and Colossians 3:10, “Put on the new ( νέον ) man,” plainly carry the sense of quality. In our Lord's expression, “drink it new,” the idea of quality is dominant. All the elements of festivity in the heavenly kingdom will be of a new and higher quality. In the New Testament, besides the two cases just cited, νέος is applied to wine, to the young, and once to a covenant. [source]
Mark 3:20 So that they could not so much as eat bread [ωστε μη δυνασται αυτους μηδε αρτον παγειν]
Note infinitive with ωστε — hōste Apparently Jesus and the disciples indoors with the great crowd in the house and at the door as in Mark 1:32; Mark 2:2 to which Mark refers by “again.” The jam was so great that they could not rest, could not eat, and apparently Jesus could not even teach. The crowd reassembled at once on Christ‘s return from the mountain. [source]
Luke 9:25 Lose [ἀπολέσας]
“When he might have been saved” (Bengel). This word, in classical Greek, is used: 1. Of death in battle or elsewhere. 2. Of laying waste, as a city or heritage. 3. Of losing of life, property, or other objects. As an active verb, to kill or demolish. 4. Of being demoralized, morally abandoned or ruined, as children under bad influences. In New Testament of killing (Matthew 2:13; Matthew 12:14). 5. Of destroying and perishing, not only of human life, but of material and intellectual things (1 Corinthians 1:19; John 6:27; Mark 2:22; 1 Peter 1:7; James 1:11; Hebrews 1:11). 6. Of losing (Matthew 10:6, Matthew 10:42; Luke 15:4, Luke 15:6, Luke 15:8). Of moral abandonment (Luke 15:24, Luke 15:32). 7. Of the doom of the impenitent (Matthew 10:28; Luke 13:3; John 3:15; John 10:28; 2 Peter 3:9; Romans 2:12. [source]
Luke 6:4 The shew-bread []
See on Mark 2:26. [source]
Luke 6:1 Went through [διαπορεύεσθαι]
Rev., was going. Compare παραπορεύεσθαι , went along beside- Mark 2:23. [source]
Luke 6:1 Plucked [ἔτιλλον]
Imperfect; were plucking, as they walked. In classical Greek the word is used mostly of pulling out hair or feathers. See on Mark 2:23. [source]
Luke 5:35 Then in those days [τοτε εν εκειναις ταις ημεραις]
Here Mark 2:20 has “then in that day,” and Matthew 9:15 only “then.” [source]
Luke 5:36 Putteth it [επιβαλλει]
So Matthew 9:16 when Mark 2:21 has επιραπτει — epiraptei (sews on). The word for “piece” or “patch” (επιβλημα — epiblēma) in all the three Gospels is from the verb επιβαλλω — epiballō to clap on, and is in Plutarch, Arrian, lxx, though the verb is as old as Homer. See Matthew 9:16 and Mark 2:21 for distinction between καινος — kainos (fresh), νεος — neos (new), and παλαιος — palaios (old). [source]
Luke 5:36 He will rend the new [και το καινον σχισει]
Future active indicative. So the best MSS.Will not agree (ου συμπωνησει — ou sumphōnēsei). Future active indicative. So the best manuscripts again.With the old Associative instrumental case. Instead of this phrase in Luke, Mark 2:21; Matthew 9:16 have “a worse rent” (χειρον σχισμα — cheiron schisma). [source]
Luke 5:36 With the old [τωι παλαιωι]
Associative instrumental case. Instead of this phrase in Luke, Mark 2:21; Matthew 9:16 have “a worse rent” (χειρον σχισμα — cheiron schisma). [source]
Luke 6:1 Plucked [ετιλλον]
Imperfect active. They were plucking as they went on through Whether wheat or barley, we do not know, not our “corn” (maize).Did eat (ηστιον — ēsthion). Imperfect again. See Matthew 12:1. and notes on Mark 2:23. for the separate acts in supposed violence of the sabbath laws.Rubbing them in their hands Only in Luke and only here in the N.T. This was one of the chief offences. “According to Rabbinical notions, it was reaping, threshing, winnowing, and preparing food all at once” (Plummer). These Pharisees were straining out gnats and swallowing camels! This verb psōchō is a late one for πσωχοντες ταις χερσιν — psaō to rub. [source]
Luke 5:36 Rendeth [σχισας]
This in Luke alone. Common verb. Used of splitting rocks (Matthew 27:51). Our word schism comes from it.Putteth it (επιβαλλει — epiballei). So Matthew 9:16 when Mark 2:21 has επιραπτει — epiraptei (sews on). The word for “piece” or “patch” (επιβλημα — epiblēma) in all the three Gospels is from the verb επιβαλλω — epiballō to clap on, and is in Plutarch, Arrian, lxx, though the verb is as old as Homer. See Matthew 9:16 and Mark 2:21 for distinction between καινος — kainos (fresh), νεος — neos (new), and παλαιος — palaios (old).He will rend the new Future active indicative. So the best MSS.Will not agree (ου συμπωνησει — ou sumphōnēsei). Future active indicative. So the best manuscripts again.With the old Associative instrumental case. Instead of this phrase in Luke, Mark 2:21; Matthew 9:16 have “a worse rent” (χειρον σχισμα — cheiron schisma). [source]
Luke 6:1 Did eat [ηστιον]
Imperfect again. See Matthew 12:1. and notes on Mark 2:23. for the separate acts in supposed violence of the sabbath laws. [source]
Luke 6:3 What [ο]
Literally, which. Mark 2:25; Matthew 12:3 have τι — ti (what). [source]
Luke 6:3 which []
. Mark 2:25; Matthew 12:3 have τι — ti (what). [source]
Luke 6:4 Did take [λαβων]
Second aorist active participle of λαμβανω — lambanō Not in Mark and Matthew. See notes on Matthew 12:1-8 and notes on Mark 2:23-28 for discussion of details about the shewbread and the five arguments in defence of his conduct on the sabbath (example of David, work of the priests on the sabbath, prophecy of Hosea 6:6, purpose of the sabbath for man, the Son of Man lord of the sabbath). It was an overwhelming and crushing reply to these pettifogging ceremonialists to which they could not reply, but which increased their anger. Codex D transfers Luke 6:5 to after Luke 6:10 and puts here the following: “On the same day beholding one working on the sabbath he said to him: Man, if you know what you are doing, happy are you; but if you do not know, cursed are you and a transgressor of the law.” [source]
John 5:8 Arise, take up thy bed, and walk [Εγειρε αρον τον κραβαττον σου και περιπατει]
Present active imperative of αρον — egeirō a sort of exclamation, like our “Get up.” The first active imperative (αιρω — āron of περιπατεω — airō) means to pick up the pallet, and then “go on walking” (present active imperative of κραβαττον — peripateō). For krabatton (pallet) see Mark 2:2-12; Mark 6:55; Acts 5:15; Acts 9:33. [source]
John 5:9 Took up his bed and walked [ηρε τον κραβαττον αυτου και περιεπατει]
The same distinction in tenses in the same verbs preserved, punctiliar action in ηρε — ēre (first aorist active of αιρω — airō took it up at once) and linear act (imperfect active of περιπατεω — peripateō went on walking). The sabbath on that day The first of the violations of the Sabbath rules of the Jews by Jesus in Jerusalem that led to so much bitterness (cf. John 9:14, John 9:16). This controversy will spread to Galilee on Christ‘s return there (Mark 2:23-3:6; Matthew 12:1-14; Luke 6:1-11). [source]
John 5:16 Persecute [εδιωκον]
Inchoative imperfect, “began to persecute” and kept it up. They took this occasion as one excuse They disliked Jesus when here first (John 2:18) and were suspicious of his popularity (John 4:1). Now they have cause for an open breach. Because he did Imperfect active, not just this one act, but he was becoming a regular Sabbath-breaker. The Pharisees will watch his conduct on the Sabbath henceforth (Mark 2:23; Mark 3:2). [source]
John 14:2 Mansions [μοναι]
Old word from μενω — menō to abide, abiding places, in N.T. only here and John 14:23. There are many resting-places in the Father‘s house Christ‘s picture of heaven here is the most precious one that we possess. It is our heavenly home with the Father and with Jesus. If it were not so Ellipsis of the verb (Mark 2:21; Revelation 2:5, Revelation 2:16; John 14:11). Here a suppressed condition of the second class (determined as unfulfilled) as the conclusion shows. I would have told you Regular construction for this apodosis For I go Reason for the consolation given, futuristic present middle indicative, and explanation of his words in John 13:33 that puzzled Peter so (John 13:36.). To prepare a place for you First aorist active infinitive of purpose of ετοιμαζω — hetoimazō to make ready, old verb from ετοιμος — hetoimos Here only in John, but in Mark 10:40 (Matthew 20:23). It was customary to send one forward for such a purpose (Numbers 10:33). So Jesus had sent Peter and John to make ready (this very verb) for the passover meal (Mark 14:12; Matthew 26:17). Jesus is thus our Forerunner (προδρομος — prodromos) in heaven (Hebrews 6:20). [source]
Acts 11:23 Purpose [προθέσει]
Originally, placing in public; setting before. Hence of the shew-bread, the loaves set forth before the Lord (see on Mark 2:26). Something set before one as an object of attainment: a purpose. [source]
Romans 3:25 Set forth [προέθετο]
Publicly, openly ( πρό ); correlated with to declare. He brought Him forth and put Him before the public. Bengel, “placed before the eyes of all;” unlike the ark of the covenant which was veiled and approached only by the high-priest. The word is used by Herodotus of exposing corpses (v. 8); by Thucydides of exposing the bones of the dead (ii. 34). Compare the shew-bread, the loaves of the setting-forth ( τῆς προθεσέως ). See on Mark 2:26. Paul refers not to preaching, but to the work of atonement itself, in which God's righteousness is displayed. Some render purposed or determined, as Romans 1:13; Ephesians 1:9, and according to the usual meaning of πρόθεσις purposein the New Testament. But the meaning adopted here is fixed by to declare. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:10 Divisions [σχίσματα]
See on John 10:19. In classical Greek used only of actual rents in material. So in Matthew 9:16; Mark 2:21. In the sense of discord, see John 7:43; John 9:16; John 10:19. Here, faction, for which the classical word is στάσις :division within the christian community. The divisions of the Corinthian church arose on questions of marriage and food (1 Corinthians 7:3, 1 Corinthians 7:5, 1 Corinthians 7:12); on eating, meat offered to idols (1 Corinthians 8:7; 1 Corinthians 10:20); on the comparative value of spiritual endowments, such as speaking with “tongues” (14); on the privileges and demeanor of women in the assemblies for worship (1 Corinthians 11:5-15); on the relations of the rich and the poor in the agape or love-feasts (1 Corinthians 11:17-22); and on the prerogatives of the different christian teachers (1 Corinthians 1:12, 1 Corinthians 1:13; 3:3-22). [source]
1 Corinthians 1:10 Through the name [δια του ονοματος]
Genitive, not accusative (cause or reason), as the medium or instrument of the appeal (2 Corinthians 10:1; Romans 12:1; Romans 15:30). That (ινα — hina). Purport (sub-final) rather than direct purpose, common idiom in Koiné{[28928]}š (Robertson, Grammar, pp.991-4) like Matthew 14:36. Used here with λεγητε ηι ητε κατηρτισμενοι — legēteλεγητε παντες — ēiμη ηι εν υμιν σχισματα — ēte katērtismenoi though expressed only once. All speak Present active subjunctive, that ye all keep on speaking. With the divisions in mind. An idiom from Greek political life (Lightfoot). This touch of the classical writers argues for Paul‘s acquaintance with Greek culture. There be no divisions among you (σχιζω — mē ēi en humin schismata). Present subjunctive, that divisions may not continue to be (they already had them). Negative statement of preceding idea. αιρεσεις — Schisma is from στασις — schizō old word to split or rend, and so means a rent (Matthew 9:16; Mark 2:21). Papyri use it for a splinter of wood and for ploughing. Here we have the earliest instance of its use in a moral sense of division, dissension, see also 1 Corinthians 11:18 where a less complete change than ητε δε κατηρτισμενοι — haireseis 1 Corinthians 12:25; John 7:43 (discord); John 9:16; John 10:19. “Here, faction, for which the classical word is νοι — stasis division within the Christian community” (Vincent). These divisions were over the preachers (1:12-4:21), immorality (1 Corinthians 5:1-13), going to law before the heathen (1 Corinthians 6:1-11), marriage (7:1-40), meats offered to idols (1 Corinthians 8-10), conduct of women in church (11:1-16), the Lord‘s Supper (11:17-34), spiritual gifts (1 Corinthians 12-14), the resurrection (1 Corinthians 15). But that ye be perfected together Periphrastic perfect passive subjunctive. See this verb in Matthew 4:21 (Mark 1:19) for mending torn nets and in moral sense already in 1 Thessalonians 3:10. Galen uses it for a surgeon‘s mending a joint and Herodotus for composing factions. See 2 Corinthians 13:11; Galatians 6:1. Mind (νους — noi), judgment (γνωμη — gnōmēi). “Of these words νους — nous denotes the frame or state of mind, gnōmē the judgment, opinion or sentiment, which is the outcome of nous ” (Lightfoot). [source]
1 Corinthians 1:10 All speak [Σχισμα]
Present active subjunctive, that ye all keep on speaking. With the divisions in mind. An idiom from Greek political life (Lightfoot). This touch of the classical writers argues for Paul‘s acquaintance with Greek culture. There be no divisions among you (σχιζω — mē ēi en humin schismata). Present subjunctive, that divisions may not continue to be (they already had them). Negative statement of preceding idea. αιρεσεις — Schisma is from στασις — schizō old word to split or rend, and so means a rent (Matthew 9:16; Mark 2:21). Papyri use it for a splinter of wood and for ploughing. Here we have the earliest instance of its use in a moral sense of division, dissension, see also 1 Corinthians 11:18 where a less complete change than ητε δε κατηρτισμενοι — haireseis 1 Corinthians 12:25; John 7:43 (discord); John 9:16; John 10:19. “Here, faction, for which the classical word is νοι — stasis division within the Christian community” (Vincent). These divisions were over the preachers (1:12-4:21), immorality (1 Corinthians 5:1-13), going to law before the heathen (1 Corinthians 6:1-11), marriage (7:1-40), meats offered to idols (1 Corinthians 8-10), conduct of women in church (11:1-16), the Lord‘s Supper (11:17-34), spiritual gifts (1 Corinthians 12-14), the resurrection (1 Corinthians 15). But that ye be perfected together Periphrastic perfect passive subjunctive. See this verb in Matthew 4:21 (Mark 1:19) for mending torn nets and in moral sense already in 1 Thessalonians 3:10. Galen uses it for a surgeon‘s mending a joint and Herodotus for composing factions. See 2 Corinthians 13:11; Galatians 6:1. Mind (νους — noi), judgment (γνωμη — gnōmēi). “Of these words νους — nous denotes the frame or state of mind, gnōmē the judgment, opinion or sentiment, which is the outcome of nous ” (Lightfoot). [source]
1 Corinthians 1:10 There be no divisions among you [σχιζω]
Present subjunctive, that divisions may not continue to be (they already had them). Negative statement of preceding idea. αιρεσεις — Schisma is from στασις — schizō old word to split or rend, and so means a rent (Matthew 9:16; Mark 2:21). Papyri use it for a splinter of wood and for ploughing. Here we have the earliest instance of its use in a moral sense of division, dissension, see also 1 Corinthians 11:18 where a less complete change than ητε δε κατηρτισμενοι — haireseis 1 Corinthians 12:25; John 7:43 (discord); John 9:16; John 10:19. “Here, faction, for which the classical word is νοι — stasis division within the Christian community” (Vincent). These divisions were over the preachers (1:12-4:21), immorality (1 Corinthians 5:1-13), going to law before the heathen (1 Corinthians 6:1-11), marriage (7:1-40), meats offered to idols (1 Corinthians 8-10), conduct of women in church (11:1-16), the Lord‘s Supper (11:17-34), spiritual gifts (1 Corinthians 12-14), the resurrection (1 Corinthians 15). [source]
Hebrews 9:2 The table and the shewbread [ἡ τράπεξα καὶ ἡ πρόθεσις τῶν ἀρτῶν]
See Exodus 25:23-30; Exodus 35:13; 2 Chronicles 2:4; 2 Chronicles 13:11. The table and the loaves are treated as one item. Lit. the table and the setting forth of the loaves, that is, the table with its loaves set forth. See on Mark 2:26; see on Acts 11:23. [source]
Hebrews 4:10 As God did from his [ὤσπερ ἀπὸ τῶν ἰδίων ὁ θεός]
Rend. as God (did ) from his own. Ἰδίων ownsignifies more than mere possession. Rather, works peculiarly his own, thus hinting at the perfect nature of the original works of creation as corresponding with God's nature and bearing his impress. The blessing of the Sabbath-rest is thus put as a cessation from labors. The basis of the conception is Jewish, the rest of the Sabbath being conceived as mere abstinence from labor, and not according to Christ's conception of the Sabbath, as a season of refreshment and beneficent activity, Mark 2:27; John 5:17. Our writer's conception is not the rabbinical conception of cessation of work, but rather of the cessation of the weariness and pain which accompany human labor. Comp. Revelation 14:13; Revelation 21:4; Luke 11:7; Luke 18:5; Galatians 6:17. [source]

What do the individual words in Mark 2:2 mean?

And were gathered together many so that no more to have space not even - at the door He was speaking to them the word
καὶ συνήχθησαν πολλοὶ ὥστε μηκέτι χωρεῖν μηδὲ τὰ πρὸς τὴν θύραν ἐλάλει αὐτοῖς τὸν λόγον

συνήχθησαν  were  gathered  together 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Passive, 3rd Person Plural
Root: συνάγω  
Sense: to gather together, to gather.
πολλοὶ  many 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: πολύς  
Sense: many, much, large.
ὥστε  so  that 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ὥστε  
Sense: so that, insomuch that.
μηκέτι  no  more 
Parse: Adverb
Root: μηκέτι  
Sense: no longer, no more, not hereafter.
χωρεῖν  to  have  space 
Parse: Verb, Present Infinitive Active
Root: χωρέω  
Sense: to leave space (which may be filled or occupied by another), to make room, give place, yield.
μηδὲ  not  even 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: μηδέ  
Sense: and not, but not, nor, not.
τὰ  - 
Parse: Article, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
πρὸς  at 
Parse: Preposition
Root: πρός  
Sense: to the advantage of.
θύραν  door 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: θύρα  
Sense: a door.
ἐλάλει  He  was  speaking 
Parse: Verb, Imperfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἀπολαλέω 
Sense: to utter a voice or emit a sound.
αὐτοῖς  to  them 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Dative Masculine 3rd Person Plural
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
λόγον  word 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: λόγος  
Sense: of speech.