The Meaning of Luke 12:1 Explained

Luke 12:1

KJV: In the mean time, when there were gathered together an innumerable multitude of people, insomuch that they trode one upon another, he began to say unto his disciples first of all, Beware ye of the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy.

YLT: At which time the myriads of the multitude having been gathered together, so as to tread upon one another, he began to say unto his disciples, first, 'Take heed to yourselves of the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy;

Darby: In those times, the myriads of the crowd being gathered together, so that they trod one on another, he began to say to his disciples first, Beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy;

ASV: In the mean time, when the many thousands of the multitude were gathered together, insomuch that they trod one upon another, he began to say unto his disciples first of all, Beware ye of the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy.

What does Luke 12:1 Mean?

Verse Meaning

Luke set the scene for the following teaching by explaining that it happened when Pharisaic hostility had become intense ( Luke 11:53-54). What Jesus proceeded to tell His disciples had opposition and persecution in view. In spite of this antagonism, Jesus had a very large following (Gr. myriadon, lit. ten thousand, but used here as a superlative, cf. Acts 19:19; Acts 21:20). Evidently its size kept increasing (cf. Luke 11:29). However the lesson that follows was for His disciples (cf. Luke 20:45).
Leaven or yeast (Gr. zymes) has a pervasive effect and therefore is a good illustration of the influence of hypocrisy. Elsewhere Jesus warned the disciples of the teaching of the Pharisees that He likened to leaven ( Matthew 16:6; Matthew 16:12; Mark 8:15). Here he used leaven as an example of their hypocrisy. Leaven, as hypocrisy, starts small but expands and affects everything it touches.

Context Summary

Luke 12:1-12 - The Secret Of Fearlessness
The program of this paragraph seems dark. The leaven of evil always at work; the body tortured and killed; confession difficult, denial easy; the trials before synagogues and rulers; the anxiety of witnessing a good confession. The Lord never hesitated in stating the heavy tribulation through which His disciples must come to the Kingdom.
But what infinite compensations! Not forgotten by God; our hairs numbered; confessed before the angels; taught how to speak; all sin forgiven! With such comforts, who of us need fear, except only the power of Satan! What infinite sympathy and care our Father has for us! He knows our sorrows, marks every lurch of the boat, and will supply His gracious comfort and help. Why should we flinch before a world in arms, so long as the Son of man stands for us, as He did for Stephen, at "the right hand of God?" The outward man may decay, but the inward man is renewed day by day. [source]

Chapter Summary: Luke 12

1  Jesus preaches to his apostles to avoid hypocrisy
13  and warns against covetousness, by the parable of the man who set up greater barns
22  We must not worry about earthly things,
31  but seek the kingdom of God;
33  give alms;
35  be ready at a knock to open to our Lord whensoever he comes
41  Jesus' disciples are to see to their charges,
49  and look for persecution
54  The people must take this time of grace;
57  because it is a fearful thing to die without reconciliation

Greek Commentary for Luke 12:1

In the meantime [εν οις]
It is a classic idiom to start a sentence or even a paragraph as here with a relative, “in which things or circumstances,” without any expressed antecedent other than the incidents in Luke 11:53. In Luke 12:3 Luke actually begins the sentence with two relatives αντ ων οσα — anth' hōn hosa (wherefore whatsoever). [source]
Many thousands [μυριαδων]
Genitive absolute with επισυναχτεισων — episunachtheisōn (first aorist passive participle feminine plural because of μυριαδων — muriadōn), a double compound late verb, επισυναγω — episunagō to gather together unto. The word “myriads” is probably hyperbolical as in Acts 21:20, but in the sense of ten thousand, as in Acts 19:19, it means a very large crowd apparently drawn together by the violent attacks of the rabbis against Jesus.Insomuch that they trode one upon another (ωστε καταπατειν αλληλους — hōste katapatein allēlous). The imagination must complete the picture of this jam.Unto his disciples first of all This long discourse in Luke 12 is really a series of separate talks to various groups in the vast crowds around Jesus. This particular talk goes through Luke 12:12.Beware of (προσεχετε εαυτοις απο — prosechete heautois apo). Put your mind (νουν — noun understood) for yourselves (dative) and avoid (απο — apo with the ablative).The leaven of the Pharisees which is hypocrisy In Mark 8:15 Jesus had coupled the lesson of the Pharisees with that of Herod, in Matthew 16:6 with that of the Sadducees also. He had long ago called the Pharisees hypocrites (Matthew 6:2, Matthew 6:5, Matthew 6:16). The occasion was ripe here for this crisp saying. In Matthew 13:33 leaven does not have an evil sense as here. See note on Matthew 23:13 for hypocrites. Hypocrisy was the leading Pharisaic vice (Bruce) and was a mark of sanctity to hide an evil heart. [source]
Insomuch that they trode one upon another [ωστε καταπατειν αλληλους]
The imagination must complete the picture of this jam. [source]
Unto his disciples first of all [προς τους ματητας αυτου πρωτον]
This long discourse in Luke 12 is really a series of separate talks to various groups in the vast crowds around Jesus. This particular talk goes through Luke 12:12.Beware of (προσεχετε εαυτοις απο — prosechete heautois apo). Put your mind (νουν — noun understood) for yourselves (dative) and avoid (απο — apo with the ablative).The leaven of the Pharisees which is hypocrisy In Mark 8:15 Jesus had coupled the lesson of the Pharisees with that of Herod, in Matthew 16:6 with that of the Sadducees also. He had long ago called the Pharisees hypocrites (Matthew 6:2, Matthew 6:5, Matthew 6:16). The occasion was ripe here for this crisp saying. In Matthew 13:33 leaven does not have an evil sense as here. See note on Matthew 23:13 for hypocrites. Hypocrisy was the leading Pharisaic vice (Bruce) and was a mark of sanctity to hide an evil heart. [source]
Beware of [προσεχετε εαυτοις απο]
Put your mind (νουν — noun understood) for yourselves (dative) and avoid (απο — apo with the ablative). [source]
The leaven of the Pharisees which is hypocrisy [της ζυμης ητις εστιν υποχρισις των Παρισαιων]
In Mark 8:15 Jesus had coupled the lesson of the Pharisees with that of Herod, in Matthew 16:6 with that of the Sadducees also. He had long ago called the Pharisees hypocrites (Matthew 6:2, Matthew 6:5, Matthew 6:16). The occasion was ripe here for this crisp saying. In Matthew 13:33 leaven does not have an evil sense as here. See note on Matthew 23:13 for hypocrites. Hypocrisy was the leading Pharisaic vice (Bruce) and was a mark of sanctity to hide an evil heart. [source]
An innumerable multitude [τῶν μυριάδων τοῦ ὄχλου]
The word μυρίας strictly means a number of ten thousand. It is our word myriad. Hence, generally, of any countless number. [source]
First of all []
Many connect this with what follows: “first of all beware,” etc. [source]
Leaven []
See on Matthew 13:33. [source]
Which [ἥτις]
Classifying the leaven: which belongs to the category of hypocrisy. [source]
Hypocrisy []
See on hypocrites, Matthew 23:13. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Luke 12:1

Luke 10:21 In that same hour [εν αυτηι τηι ωραι]
Literally, “at the hour itself,” almost a demonstrative use of αυτος — autos (Robertson, Grammar, p. 686) and in Luke alone in the N.T. (Luke 2:38; Luke 10:21; Luke 12:12; Luke 20:19). Matthew 11:25 uses the demonstrative here, “at that time” (εν εκεινωι τωι καιρωι — en ekeinōi tōi kairōi). [source]
Luke 10:41 Art anxious [μεριμναις]
An old verb for worry and anxiety from μεριζω — merizō (μερις — meris part) to be divided, distracted. Jesus had warned against this in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 6:25, Matthew 6:28, Matthew 6:31, Matthew 6:34. See also Luke 12:11, Luke 12:22, Luke 12:26). [source]
Luke 12:1 Many thousands [μυριαδων]
Genitive absolute with επισυναχτεισων — episunachtheisōn (first aorist passive participle feminine plural because of μυριαδων — muriadōn), a double compound late verb, επισυναγω — episunagō to gather together unto. The word “myriads” is probably hyperbolical as in Acts 21:20, but in the sense of ten thousand, as in Acts 19:19, it means a very large crowd apparently drawn together by the violent attacks of the rabbis against Jesus.Insomuch that they trode one upon another (ωστε καταπατειν αλληλους — hōste katapatein allēlous). The imagination must complete the picture of this jam.Unto his disciples first of all This long discourse in Luke 12 is really a series of separate talks to various groups in the vast crowds around Jesus. This particular talk goes through Luke 12:12.Beware of (προσεχετε εαυτοις απο — prosechete heautois apo). Put your mind (νουν — noun understood) for yourselves (dative) and avoid (απο — apo with the ablative).The leaven of the Pharisees which is hypocrisy In Mark 8:15 Jesus had coupled the lesson of the Pharisees with that of Herod, in Matthew 16:6 with that of the Sadducees also. He had long ago called the Pharisees hypocrites (Matthew 6:2, Matthew 6:5, Matthew 6:16). The occasion was ripe here for this crisp saying. In Matthew 13:33 leaven does not have an evil sense as here. See note on Matthew 23:13 for hypocrites. Hypocrisy was the leading Pharisaic vice (Bruce) and was a mark of sanctity to hide an evil heart. [source]
Luke 12:13 Bid my brother [ειπε τωι αδελπωι μου]
This volunteer from the crowd draws attention to the multitude (Luke 12:13-21). He does not ask for arbitration and there is no evidence that his brother was willing for that. He wants a decision by Jesus against his brother. The law (Deuteronomy 21:17) was two-thirds to the elder, one-third to the younger. [source]
Luke 12:14 A judge or a divider [κριτην η μεριστην]
Jesus repudiates the position of judge or arbiter in this family fuss. The language reminds one of Exodus 2:14. Jesus is rendering unto Caesar the things of Caesar (Luke 20:25) and shows that his kingdom is not of this world (John 18:36). The word for divider or arbiter (μεριστης — meristēs) is a late word from μεριζομαι — merizomai (Luke 12:13) and occurs here only in the N.T. [source]
Luke 12:16 A parable unto them [παραβολην προς αυτους]
The multitude of Luke 12:13, Luke 12:15. A short and pungent parable suggested by the covetousness of the man of Luke 12:13. [source]
Luke 12:18 My barns [μου τας αποτηκας]
From αποτιτημι — apotithēmi to lay by, to treasure. So a granary or storehouse, an old word, six times in the N.T. (Matthew 3:12; Matthew 6:26; Matthew 13:30; Luke 3:17; Luke 12:18, Luke 12:24).All my corn (παντα τον σιτον — panta ton siton). Better grain (wheat, barley), not maize or Indian corn.My goods Like the English, my good things. So the English speak of goods (freight) train. [source]
Luke 12:1 Unto his disciples first of all [προς τους ματητας αυτου πρωτον]
This long discourse in Luke 12 is really a series of separate talks to various groups in the vast crowds around Jesus. This particular talk goes through Luke 12:12.Beware of (προσεχετε εαυτοις απο — prosechete heautois apo). Put your mind (νουν — noun understood) for yourselves (dative) and avoid (απο — apo with the ablative).The leaven of the Pharisees which is hypocrisy In Mark 8:15 Jesus had coupled the lesson of the Pharisees with that of Herod, in Matthew 16:6 with that of the Sadducees also. He had long ago called the Pharisees hypocrites (Matthew 6:2, Matthew 6:5, Matthew 6:16). The occasion was ripe here for this crisp saying. In Matthew 13:33 leaven does not have an evil sense as here. See note on Matthew 23:13 for hypocrites. Hypocrisy was the leading Pharisaic vice (Bruce) and was a mark of sanctity to hide an evil heart. [source]
Luke 12:20 Is thy soul required of thee [την πσυχην σου αιτουσιν απο σου]
Plural active present, not passive: “They are demanding thy soul from thee.” The impersonal plural (aitousin) is common enough (Luke 6:38; Luke 12:11; Luke 16:9; Luke 23:31). The rabbis used “they” to avoid saying “God.” [source]
Luke 12:41 Peter said [Ειπεν δε ο Πετρος]
This whole paragraph from verse 22-40 had been addressed directly to the disciples. Hence it is not surprising to find Peter putting in a question. This incident confirms also the impression that Luke is giving actual historical data in the environment of these discourses. He is certain that the Twelve are meant, but he desires to know if others are included, for he had spoken to the multitude in Luke 12:13-21. Recall Mark 13:37. This interruption is somewhat like that on the Mount of Transfiguration (Luke 9:33) and is characteristic of Peter. Was it the magnificent promise in Luke 12:37 that stirred Peter‘s impulsiveness? It is certainly more than a literary device of Luke. Peter‘s question draws out a parabolic reply by Jesus (Luke 12:42). [source]
Luke 12:44 Over all [επι πασιν]
See Matthew 24:47 for επι — epi with locative in this sense. Usually with genitive as in Luke 12:42 and sometimes with accusative as in Luke 12:14. [source]
Luke 12:54 To the multitudes also [και τοις οχλοις]
After the strong and stirring words just before with flash and force Jesus turns finally in this series of discourses to the multitudes again as in Luke 12:15. There are similar sayings to these Luke 12:54-59 in Matthew 16:1; Matthew 5:25. There is a good deal of difference in phraseology whether that is due to difference of source or different use of the same source (Q or Logia) we do not know. Not all the old MSS. give Matthew 16:2, Matthew 16:3. In Matthew the Pharisees and Sadducees were asking for a sign from heaven as they often did. These signs of the weather, “a shower” (ομβρος — ombros Luke 12:54) due to clouds in the west, “a hot wave” (καυσων — kausōn Luke 12:55) due to a south wind (νοτον — noton) blowing, “fair weather” (ευδια — eudia Matthew 16:2) when the sky is red, are appealed to today. They have a more or less general application due to atmospheric and climatic conditions. [source]
Luke 14:18 To make excuse [παραιτεισται]
This common Greek verb is used in various ways, to ask something from one (Mark 15:6), to deprecate or ask to avert (Hebrews 12:19), to refuse or decline (Acts 25:11), to shun or to avoid (2 Timothy 2:23), to beg pardon or to make excuses for not doing or to beg (Luke 14:18). All these ideas are variations of αιτεω — aiteō to ask in the middle voice with παρα — para in composition.The first (ο πρωτος — ho prōtos). In order of time. There are three of the “many” (“all”), whose excuses are given, each more flimsy than the other.I must needs I have necessity. The land would still be there, a strange “necessity.”Have me excused (εχε με παρηιτημενον — eche me parēitēmenon). An unusual idiom somewhat like the English perfect with the auxiliary “have” and the modern Greek idiom with εχω — echō but certainly not here a Greek periphrasis for παρηιτησο — parēitēso This perfect passive participle is predicate and agrees with με — me See a like idiom in Mark 3:1; Luke 12:19 (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 902f.). The Latin had a similar idiom, habe me excusatum. Same language in Luke 14:19. [source]
Luke 14:18 I must needs [εχω αναγκην]
I have necessity. The land would still be there, a strange “necessity.”Have me excused (εχε με παρηιτημενον — eche me parēitēmenon). An unusual idiom somewhat like the English perfect with the auxiliary “have” and the modern Greek idiom with εχω — echō but certainly not here a Greek periphrasis for παρηιτησο — parēitēso This perfect passive participle is predicate and agrees with με — me See a like idiom in Mark 3:1; Luke 12:19 (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 902f.). The Latin had a similar idiom, habe me excusatum. Same language in Luke 14:19. [source]
Luke 14:18 Have me excused [εχε με παρηιτημενον]
An unusual idiom somewhat like the English perfect with the auxiliary “have” and the modern Greek idiom with εχω — echō but certainly not here a Greek periphrasis for παρηιτησο — parēitēso This perfect passive participle is predicate and agrees with με — me See a like idiom in Mark 3:1; Luke 12:19 (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 902f.). The Latin had a similar idiom, habe me excusatum. Same language in Luke 14:19. [source]
Luke 16:19 woven air []
” (Vincent). Here only in the N.T. for the adjective βυσσινος — bussinos occurs in Revelation 18:12; Revelation 19:8, Revelation 19:14.Faring sumptuously (ευπραινομενος λαμπρως — euphrainomenos lamprōs).Making merry brilliantly. The verb ευπραινομαι — euphrainomai we have already had in Luke 12:19; Luke 15:23, Luke 15:25, Luke 15:32. Λαμπρως — Lamprōs is an old adverb from λαμπρος — lampros brilliant, shining, splendid, magnificent. It occurs here only in the N.T. This parable apparently was meant for the Pharisees (Luke 16:14) who were lovers of money. It shows the wrong use of money and opportunity. [source]
Luke 16:19 Making merry brilliantly []
. The verb ευπραινομαι — euphrainomai we have already had in Luke 12:19; Luke 15:23, Luke 15:25, Luke 15:32. Λαμπρως — Lamprōs is an old adverb from λαμπρος — lampros brilliant, shining, splendid, magnificent. It occurs here only in the N.T. This parable apparently was meant for the Pharisees (Luke 16:14) who were lovers of money. It shows the wrong use of money and opportunity. [source]
Luke 16:19 Purple [πορπυραν]
This purple dye was obtained from the purple fish, a species of mussel or μυρεχ — murex (1 Maccabees 4:23). It was very costly and was used for the upper garment by the wealthy and princes (royal purple). They had three shades of purple (deep violet, deep scarlet or crimson, deep blue). See also Mark 15:17, Mark 15:20; Revelation 18:12.Fine linen (βυσσον — busson).Byssus or Egyptian flax (India and Achaia also). It is a yellowed flax from which fine linen was made for undergarments. It was used for wrapping mummies. “Some of the Egyptian linen was so fine that it was called woven air” (Vincent). Here only in the N.T. for the adjective βυσσινος — bussinos occurs in Revelation 18:12; Revelation 19:8, Revelation 19:14.Faring sumptuously (ευπραινομενος λαμπρως — euphrainomenos lamprōs).Making merry brilliantly. The verb ευπραινομαι — euphrainomai we have already had in Luke 12:19; Luke 15:23, Luke 15:25, Luke 15:32. Λαμπρως — Lamprōs is an old adverb from λαμπρος — lampros brilliant, shining, splendid, magnificent. It occurs here only in the N.T. This parable apparently was meant for the Pharisees (Luke 16:14) who were lovers of money. It shows the wrong use of money and opportunity. [source]
Luke 16:19 Byssus []
or Egyptian flax (India and Achaia also). It is a yellowed flax from which fine linen was made for undergarments. It was used for wrapping mummies. “Some of the Egyptian linen was so fine that it was called woven air” (Vincent). Here only in the N.T. for the adjective βυσσινος — bussinos occurs in Revelation 18:12; Revelation 19:8, Revelation 19:14.Faring sumptuously (ευπραινομενος λαμπρως — euphrainomenos lamprōs).Making merry brilliantly. The verb ευπραινομαι — euphrainomai we have already had in Luke 12:19; Luke 15:23, Luke 15:25, Luke 15:32. Λαμπρως — Lamprōs is an old adverb from λαμπρος — lampros brilliant, shining, splendid, magnificent. It occurs here only in the N.T. This parable apparently was meant for the Pharisees (Luke 16:14) who were lovers of money. It shows the wrong use of money and opportunity. [source]
John 8:53 Which is dead [ὅστις]
The compound pronoun ὅστις , which, is used explicatively, according to a familiar New Testament usage, instead of the simple relative. The sense is, seeing that he is dead. The compound relative properly indicates the class or kind to which an object belongs. Art thou greater than Abraham, who is himself one of the dead? So Colossians 3:5. “Mortify covetousness, seeing it is ( ἥτις ἐστὶν ) idolatry.” See on Matthew 13:52; see on Matthew 21:41; see on Mark 12:18; see on Luke 12:1; see on Acts 7:53; see on Acts 10:41; see on 1 Peter 2:11. [source]
John 14:26 Whom [ο]
Grammatical neuter, but “whom” is correct translation. The Father will send the Holy Spirit (John 14:16; Luke 24:49; Acts 2:33), but so will the Son (John 15:26; John 16:7) as Jesus breathes the Holy Spirit upon the disciples (John 20:22). There is no contradiction in this relation of the Persons in the Trinity (the Procession of the Holy Spirit). Here the Holy Spirit (full title as in Mark 3:29; Matthew 12:32; Luke 12:10) is identified with the Paraclete. He Emphatic demonstrative pronoun and masculine like παρακλητος — paraklētos Shall teach you all things The Holy Spirit knows “the deep things of God” (1 Corinthians 2:10) and he is our Teacher in the Dispensation of the Holy Spirit of both new truth (John 14:25) and old. Bring to your remembrance Future active indicative of υπομιμνησκω — hupomimnēskō old verb to remind, to recall, here only in this Gospel (cf. 3 John 1:10; 2 Timothy 2:14) and with two accusatives (person and thing). After pentecost the disciples will be able better to recall and to understand what Jesus had said (how dull they had been at times) and to be open to new revelations from God (cf. Peter at Joppa and Caesarea). [source]
Acts 11:4 Began []
Graphically indicating the solemn purport of the speech (compare Luke 12:1), or perhaps, in connection with expounded, his beginning with the first circumstances and going through the whole list of incidents. [source]
Acts 20:28 Take heed unto yourselves [προσεχετε εαυτοις]
The full phrase had τον νουν — ton noun hold your mind on yourselves (or other object in the dative), as often in old writers and in Job 7:17. But the ancients often used the idiom with νουν — noun understood, but not expressed as here and Acts 5:35; Luke 12:1; Luke 17:3; Luke 21:34; 1 Timothy 1:4; 1 Timothy 3:8; 1 Timothy 4:13. Επεχε — Epeche is so used in 1 Timothy 4:16. [source]
Acts 21:20 How many thousands [ποσαι μυριαδες]
Old word for ten thousand (Acts 19:19) and then an indefinite number like our “myriads” (this very word) as Luke 12:1; Acts 21:20; Judges 1:14; Revelation 5:11; Revelation 9:16. But it is a surprising statement even with allowable hyperbole, but one may recall Acts 4:4 (number of the men--not women--about five thousand); Acts 5:14 (multitudes both of men and women); Acts 6:7. There were undoubtedly a great many thousands of believers in Jerusalem and all Jewish Christians, some, alas, Judaizers (Acts 11:2; Acts 15:1, Acts 15:5). This list may include the Christians from neighbouring towns in Palestine and even some from foreign countries here at the Feast of Pentecost, for it is probable that Paul arrived in time for it as he had hoped. But we do not have to count the hostile Jews from Asia (Acts 21:27) who were clearly not Christians at all. All zealous for the law (παντες ζηλωται του νομου — pantes zēlōtai tou nomou). Zealots (substantive) rather than zealous (adjective) with objective genitive (του νομου — tou nomou). The word zealot is from ζηλοω — zēloō to burn with zeal, to boil. The Greek used ζηλωτης — zēlōtēs for an imitator or admirer. There was a party of Zealots (developed from the Pharisees), a group of what would be called “hot-heads,” who brought on the war with Rome. One of this party, Simon Zelotes (Acts 1:13), was in the number of the twelve apostles. It is important to understand the issues in Jerusalem. It was settled at the Jerusalem Conference (Acts 15; Galatians 2) that the Mosaic ceremonial law was not to be imposed upon Gentile Christians. Paul won freedom for them, but it was not said that it was wrong for Jewish Christians to go on observing it if they wished. We have seen Paul observing the passover in Philippi (Acts 20:6) and planning to reach Jerusalem for Pentecost (Acts 20:16). The Judaizers rankled under Paul‘s victory and power in spreading the gospel among the Gentiles and gave him great trouble in Galatia and Corinth. They were busy against him in Jerusalem also and it was to undo the harm done by them in Jerusalem that Paul gathered the great collection from the Gentile Christians and brought it with him and the delegates from the churches. Clearly then Paul had real ground for his apprehension of trouble in Jerusalem while still in Corinth (Romans 15:25) when he asked for the prayers of the Roman Christians (Romans 15:30-32). The repeated warnings along the way were amply justified. [source]
Romans 15:10 Rejoice [εὐφράνθητε]
Frequently in the New Testament of merry-making. Luke 12:19; Luke 15:23, Luke 15:24. See on fared sumptuously, Luke 16:19. [source]
Philippians 2:14 Disputings [διαλογισμῶν]
See on Mark 7:21. It is doubtful whether disputings is a legitimate meaning. The kindred verb διαλογίζομαι is invariably used in the sense of to reason or discuss, either with another or in one's own mind, Matthew 16:7; Matthew 21:25; Mark 2:6; Luke 12:17. The noun is sometimes rendered thoughts, as Matthew 15:19; Mark 7:21; but with the same idea underlying it, of a suspicion or doubt, causing inward discussion. See 1 Timothy 2:8. Better here questionings or doubtings. See on Romans 14:1. The murmuring is the moral, the doubting the intellectual rebellion against God. [source]
Colossians 3:17 Do all [παντα]
The imperative ποιειτε — poieite has to be supplied from ποιητε — poiēte in the relative clause. Παντα — Panta is repeated from παν — pān (singular), but in the plural (all things). Παν — Pān is left as a nominative absolute as in Matthew 10:32; Luke 12:10. This is a sort of Golden Rule for Christians “in the name of the Lord Jesus” What follows (directions to the various groups) is in this same vein. Sociological problems have always existed. Paul puts his finger on the sore spot in each group with unerring skill like a true diagnostician. [source]
Titus 1:5 Ordain elders [καταστήσῃς πρεσβυτέρους]
Καθιστάναι appointor constitute. In Paul only Romans 5:19. For the sense here comp. Matthew 24:45, Matthew 24:47; Luke 12:14; Acts 6:3. The meaning of the injunction is, that Titus should appoint, out of the number of elderly men of approved Christian reputation, certain ones to be overseers ( ἐπίσκοποι ) of the churches in the several cities. The eldership was not a distinct church office. See on 1 Timothy 5:1. [source]
Hebrews 12:22 To an innumerable company of angels [μυριάσιν ἀγγέλων]
On this whole passage (Hebrews 12:22-24) it is to be observed that it is arranged in a series of clauses connected by καὶ . Accordingly μυριάσιν tomyriads or tens of thousands stands by itself, and πανηγύρει festalassembly goes with ἀγγέλων angels Μυριάς (see Luke 12:1; Acts 19:19; Revelation 5:11; quite often in lxx) is strictly the number ten thousand. In the plural, an innumerable multitude. So A.V. here. Rend. “to an innumerable multitude,” placing a comma after μυριάσιν , and connecting of angels with the next clause. This use of μυριάσιν without a qualifying genitive is justified by numerous examples. See Genesis 24:60; Deuteronomy 32:30; Deuteronomy 33:2; 1 Samuel 18:7, 1 Samuel 18:8; Psalm 90:7; Song of Solomon 5:10; Daniel 7:10; Daniel 11:12; 2 Maccabees 8:20; Judges href="/desk/?q=jud+1:14&sr=1">Judges 1:14. Χιλιάδες thousandsis used in the same way. See Daniel href="/desk/?q=da+7:10&sr=1">Daniel 7:10. [source]
Hebrews 12:22 But [αλλα]
Sharp contrast to Hebrews 12:18 with same form προσεληλυτατε — proselēluthate Unto Mount Zion Dative case of ορος — oros as with the other substantives. In contrast to Mount Sinai (Hebrews 12:18-21). Paul has contrasted Mount Sinai (present Jerusalem) with the Jerusalem above (heaven) in Galatians 4:21-31. City As in Hebrews 11:10, Hebrews 11:16. Heaven is termed thus a spiritual mountain and city. The heavenly Jerusalem See Hebrews 11:10, Hebrews 11:16; Isaiah 60:14. Innumerable hosts of angels “Myriads of angels.” Μυριας — Murias is an old word (from μυριος — murios 1 Corinthians 4:15) as in Luke 12:1. [source]
James 5:4 Fields [χώρας]
The more general word, place, for ἀγρός , the ordinary word for a field; though the usage is warranted by classical Greek, and occurs Luke 12:16; John 4:35, the only two instances besides this in the New Testament. It implies a larger tract than ἀγρός , as is evident in all the New-Testament passages cited. In two cases it refers to a rich man's estates; and in John 4:35, the Lord directs the attention of the disciples to a broad area or series of fields. [source]
James 2:2 If there come in [εαν εισελτηι]
Condition of third class (supposable case) with εαν — ean and second (ingressive) aorist active subjunctive of εισερχομαι — eiserchomai your synagogue The common word for the gathering of Jews for worship (Luke 12:11) and particularly for the building where they met (Luke 4:15, Luke 4:20, Luke 4:28, etc.). Here the first is the probable meaning as it clearly is in Hebrews 10:25 “A gold-fingered man,” “wearing a gold ring.” The word occurs nowhere else, but Lucian has χρυσοχειρ — chrusocheir (gold-handed) and Epictetus has χρυσους δακτυλιους — chrusous daktulious (golden seal-rings). “Hannibal, after the battle of Cannae, sent as a great trophy to Carthage, three bushels of gold-rings from the fingers of Roman knights slain in battle” (Vincent).In fine clothing “In bright (brilliant) clothing” as in Matthew 11:8; Luke 23:11; Acts 10:30. In contrast with “vile clothing” υπαρος — Ruparos (late word from ρυπος — rupos filth, 1 Peter 3:21) means filthy, dirty. In N.T. only here and Revelation 22:11 (filthy).Poor man (πτωχος — ptōchos). Beggarly mendicant (Matthew 19:21), the opposite of πλουσιος — plousios (rich). [source]
James 5:4 Labourers [εργατων]
Any one who works Genitive plural of the articular first aorist active participle of αμαω — amaō (from αμα — hama together), old verb, to gather together, to reap, here only in N.T.Fields Estates or farms (Luke 12:16).Which is of you kept back by fraud (ο απυστερημενος απ υμων — ho aphusterēmenos aph' humōn). Perfect passive articular participle of απυστερεω — aphustereō late compound (simplex υστερεω — hustereō common as Matthew 19:20), to be behindhand from, to fail of, to cause to withdraw, to defraud. Pitiful picture of earned wages kept back by rich Jews, old problem of capital and labour that is with us yet in acute form.The cries Old word from which βοαω — boaō comes (Matthew 3:3), here only in N.T. The stolen money “cries out” Genitive plural of the articular participle first aorist active of τεριζω — therizō (old verb from τερος — theros summer, Matthew 24:32), to reap, to harvest while summer allows (Matthew 6:26).Have entered Perfect active third person plural indicative of εισερχομαι — eiserchomai old and common compound, to go or come into. This late form is by analogy of the aorist for the usual form in ασι — ̇asi the Lord of Sabaoth “Of the Lord of Hosts,” quotation from Isaiah 5:9 as in Romans 9:29, transliterating the Hebrew word for “Hosts,” an expression for the omnipotence of God like Παντοκρατωρ — Pantokratōr (Revelation 4:8). God hears the cries of the oppressed workmen even if the employers are deaf. [source]
James 5:4 Fields [χωρας]
Estates or farms (Luke 12:16).Which is of you kept back by fraud (ο απυστερημενος απ υμων — ho aphusterēmenos aph' humōn). Perfect passive articular participle of απυστερεω — aphustereō late compound (simplex υστερεω — hustereō common as Matthew 19:20), to be behindhand from, to fail of, to cause to withdraw, to defraud. Pitiful picture of earned wages kept back by rich Jews, old problem of capital and labour that is with us yet in acute form.The cries Old word from which βοαω — boaō comes (Matthew 3:3), here only in N.T. The stolen money “cries out” Genitive plural of the articular participle first aorist active of τεριζω — therizō (old verb from τερος — theros summer, Matthew 24:32), to reap, to harvest while summer allows (Matthew 6:26).Have entered Perfect active third person plural indicative of εισερχομαι — eiserchomai old and common compound, to go or come into. This late form is by analogy of the aorist for the usual form in ασι — ̇asi the Lord of Sabaoth “Of the Lord of Hosts,” quotation from Isaiah 5:9 as in Romans 9:29, transliterating the Hebrew word for “Hosts,” an expression for the omnipotence of God like Παντοκρατωρ — Pantokratōr (Revelation 4:8). God hears the cries of the oppressed workmen even if the employers are deaf. [source]
1 Peter 4:15 A busybody in other men's matters [ἀλλοτριοεπίσκοπος]
Only here in New Testament. Lit., the overseer of another's matters. One who usurps authority in matters not within his province. Rev., meddler. Compare Luke 12:13, Luke 12:14; 1 Thessalonians 4:11; 2 Thessalonians 3:11. It may refer to the officious interference of Christians in the affairs of their Gentile neighbors, through excess of zeal to conform them to the Christian standard. [source]
1 John 5:16 Sinning a sin [αμαρτανοντα αμαρτιαν]
Present active predicate (supplementary) participle agreeing with αδελπον — adelphon and with cognate accusative αμαρτιαν — hamartian unto death Repeated again with αμαρτανουσιν — hamartanousin and in contrast with αμαρτια προς τανατον — hamartia pros thanaton (sin unto death). Most sins are not mortal sins, but clearly John conceives of a sin that is deadly enough to be called “unto death.” This distinction is common in the rabbinic writings and in Numbers 18:22 the lxx has λαβειν αμαρτιαν τανατηπορον — labein hamartian thanatēphoron “to incur a death-bearing sin” as many crimes then and now bear the death penalty. There is a distinction in Hebrews 10:26 between sinning wilfully after full knowledge and sins of ignorance (Hebrews 5:2). Jesus spoke of the unpardonable sin (Mark 3:29; Matthew 12:32; Luke 12:10), which was attributing to the devil the manifest work of the Holy Spirit. It is possible that John has this idea in mind when he applies it to those who reject Jesus Christ as God‘s Son and set themselves up as antichrists.Concerning this (περι εκεινης — peri ekeinēs). This sin unto death.That he should make request Sub-final use of ινα — hina with the first aorist active subjunctive of ερωταω — erōtaō used here as in John 17:15, John 17:20 (and often) for request rather than for question. John does not forbid praying for such cases; he simply does not command prayer for them. He leaves them to God. [source]
Jude 1:6 First estate [ἀρχὴν]
The word originally signifies beginning, and so frequently in New Testament, mostly in the Gospels, Acts, Hebrews, Catholic Epistles, and Apocalypse. From this comes a secondary meaning of sovereignty, dominion, magistracy, as being the beginning or first place of power. So mostly by Paul, as principalities (Romans 8:38); rule (1 Corinthians 15:24). Compare Luke 12:11, magistrates; Rev., rulers; and Luke 20:20, power. Rev., rule. A peculiar use of the word occurs at Acts 10:11, “the sheet knit at the four corners ( ἀρχαῖς );” the corners being the beginnings of the sheet. In this passage the A. V. has adopted the first meaning, beginning, in its rendering first estate. Rev. adopts the second, rendering principality. The Jews regarded the angels as having dominion over earthly creatures; and the angels are often spoken of in the New Testament as ἀρχαί , principalities; as Romans 8:38; Ephesians 1:21; so that this term would be appropriate to designate their dignity, which they forsook. [source]
Jude 1:14 Enoch the seventh from Adam [εβδομος απο Αδαμ ενωχ]
The genealogical order occurs in Gen 5:4-20, with Enoch as seventh. He is so termed in Enoch 60:8; 93:3.Prophesied (επροπητευσεν — eprophēteusen). First aorist active indicative of προπητευω — prophēteuō If the word is given its ordinary meaning as in 1 Peter 1:10, then Jude terms the Book of Enoch an inspired book. The words quoted are “a combination of passages from Enoch” (Bigg), chiefly from Enoch 1:9.With ten thousand of his holy ones “With (εν — en of accompaniment, Luke 14:31) his holy ten thousands” (μυριας — murias regular word, feminine gender, for ten thousand, Acts 19:19, there an unlimited number like our myriads, Luke 12:1). [source]
Jude 1:14 With ten thousand of his holy ones [εν αγιαις μυριασιν αυτου]
“With (εν — en of accompaniment, Luke 14:31) his holy ten thousands” (μυριας — murias regular word, feminine gender, for ten thousand, Acts 19:19, there an unlimited number like our myriads, Luke 12:1). [source]
Revelation 5:11 Ten thousand times ten thousand [μυρίαδες μυρίαδων]
Lit., ten thousands of ten thousands. Compare Psalm 68:17; Daniel 8:10. Μυριάς , whence the English myriad, means the number ten thousand. So, literally, Acts 19:19, ἀργυρίου μυριάδας πέντε fifty-thousandpieces of silver; lit., five ten-thousands. In the plural used for an unlimited number. See Luke 12:1; Acts 21:20; Hebrews 12:22; Judges 1:14. [source]

What do the individual words in Luke 12:1 mean?

In these [times] having been gathered together the myriads of the crowd so as to trample upon one another He began to say to the disciples of Him first Take heed to yourselves of the leaven which is hypocrisy of the Pharisees
Ἐν οἷς ἐπισυναχθεισῶν τῶν μυριάδων τοῦ ὄχλου ὥστε καταπατεῖν ἀλλήλους ἤρξατο λέγειν πρὸς τοὺς μαθητὰς αὐτοῦ πρῶτον Προσέχετε ἑαυτοῖς ἀπὸ τῆς ζύμης ἥτις ἐστὶν ὑπόκρισις τῶν Φαρισαίων

οἷς  these  [times] 
Parse: Personal / Relative Pronoun, Dative Neuter Plural
Root: ὅς 
Sense: who, which, what, that.
ἐπισυναχθεισῶν  having  been  gathered  together 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Passive, Genitive Feminine Plural
Root: ἐπισυνάγω  
Sense: to gather together besides, to bring together to others already assembled.
μυριάδων  myriads 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Feminine Plural
Root: μυριάς  
Sense: ten thousand.
τοῦ  of  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ὄχλου  crowd 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: ὄχλος  
Sense: a crowd.
ὥστε  so  as 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ὥστε  
Sense: so that, insomuch that.
καταπατεῖν  to  trample  upon 
Parse: Verb, Present Infinitive Active
Root: καταπατέω  
Sense: to tread down, trample under foot, to trample on.
ἀλλήλους  one  another 
Parse: Personal / Reciprocal Pronoun, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: ἀλλήλων  
Sense: one another, reciprocally, mutually.
ἤρξατο  He  began 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Middle, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἄρχω  
Sense: to be the first to do (anything), to begin.
λέγειν  to  say 
Parse: Verb, Present Infinitive Active
Root: λέγω 
Sense: to say, to speak.
μαθητὰς  disciples 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: μαθητής  
Sense: a learner, pupil, disciple.
αὐτοῦ  of  Him 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
πρῶτον  first 
Parse: Adverb, Superlative
Root: πρῶτον 
Sense: first in time or place.
Προσέχετε  Take  heed 
Parse: Verb, Present Imperative Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: προσέχω  
Sense: to bring to, bring near.
ἑαυτοῖς  to  yourselves 
Parse: Reflexive Pronoun, Dative Masculine 3rd Person Plural
Root: ἑαυτοῦ  
Sense: himself, herself, itself, themselves.
ζύμης  leaven 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: ζύμη  
Sense: leaven.
ὑπόκρισις  hypocrisy 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Feminine Singular
Root: ὑπόκρισις  
Sense: an answering.
τῶν  of  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Plural
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Φαρισαίων  Pharisees 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Plural
Root: Φαρισαῖος  
Sense: A sect that seems to have started after the Jewish exile.