The Meaning of Ephesians 6:12 Explained

Ephesians 6:12

KJV: For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.

YLT: because we have not the wrestling with blood and flesh, but with the principalities, with the authorities, with the world-rulers of the darkness of this age, with the spiritual things of the evil in the heavenly places;

Darby: because our struggle is not against blood and flesh, but against principalities, against authorities, against the universal lords of this darkness, against spiritual power of wickedness in the heavenlies.

ASV: For our wrestling is not against flesh and blood, but against the principalities, against the powers, against the world-rulers of this darkness, against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places .

What does Ephesians 6:12 Mean?

Verse Meaning

If we want to obey God and resist the devil, we are in for a struggle. It is not easy to become a mature Christian nor is it automatic. It takes diligent, sustained effort (cf. Philippians 2:12-13). This is part of our human responsibility in progressive sanctification.
This struggle does not take place on the physical level primarily, though saying no to certain temptations may involve certain physical behavior. It is essentially warfare on the spiritual level with an enemy that we cannot see. This enemy is Satan and his hosts as well as the philosophies and feelings he promotes that people implement. Stott refuted the view that the principalities and powers are only structures of thought, especially embodied in the state and its institutions. [1]
Some commentators believe that Paul described four different orders of angelic beings here. Probably the four terms used of our spiritual enemies in this verse do not identify four separate kinds of adversaries as much as they point out four characteristics of all of them. "Rulers" stresses their authority and "powers" or "authorities" their strength. "World forces of this darkness" or "powers of this dark world" point to their wide influence in the world, and forces "of wickedness" or "spiritual forces of evil" relate to their evil character. They operate in the heavenly realms ( Ephesians 1:3; Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10). Presently Satan and his hosts have access to God in the sense that they can communicate with Him but not in the sense that they can coexist in fellowship with Him (cf. Job 1-2).
The idea that certain demons have special authority over specific territories comes from Daniel 10:13 where we read that the "prince [2] of Persia" withstood Michael, one of the "chief princes [3]." It is impossible to know whether all demons have territorial authority and whether all territories have demonic heads because we do not have sufficient revelation. Clearly some demons have territorial assignments, but it seems unwarranted to conclude that all of them do.
"Nowhere in the NT do we find a territorial view of demons. Jesus never casts out a territorial demon or attributes the resistance of Nazareth or Jerusalem to such entities. Paul never refers to territorial spirits, nor does he attribute power to them-despite the paganism of cities where he established churches." [4]
John Armstrong refuted from Scripture several of the teachings of some modern deliverance ministries. He wrote the following.
"In the face of growing citizen militia groups, committed to arming themselves in order to defend personal freedoms, it seems ironic that the church has forgotten that she is spiritually armed for an entirely different battle. As the church, in response to various culture wars, increasingly turns to numerous battles "with flesh and blood" rather than to the primary battle with "the spiritual forces of wickedness in the heavenly places" ( Ephesians 6:12), one must wonder if we have forgotten the teaching of the New Testament itself." [5]

Context Summary

Ephesians 6:1-12 - Children And Parents Servants And Masters
Where our religion is true, it will affect every relationship in life. The love of Christ must find its manifestation in nursery and in kitchen, in workshop and in municipal chamber. But notice that its duties are reciprocal. We must give on our side, just as we expect others to give on theirs.
The first duty of children is obedience. They must be taught to obey because it is right, and their conscience bears witness to the rightness. Never plead with a child to do what is right, nor bribe it by a reward. Take your stand on that primeval sense of right and wrong, which is the foundation of morals and will be the stay of the child's whole after-life, when once its supremacy is established. But parents should help their children by removing irritation or passion from their own speech. Slaves formed a large proportion of the early Church. Their obedience must be explicit, and they were taught to believe that Christ took their faithful service to their earthly owner as service to Himself. But masters must ever deal with their servants as liable to be called to account by the great Master of all. The center of all authority is Christ, and He will demand an account of our treatment of every servant He has sent into our homes. [source]

Chapter Summary: Ephesians 6

1  The duty of children toward their parents;
5  of servants toward their masters
10  Our life is a warfare, not only against flesh and blood, but also spiritual enemies
13  The complete armor of a Christian;
18  and how it ought to be used
21  Tychicus is commended

Greek Commentary for Ephesians 6:12

Our wrestling is not [ουκ εστιν ημιν η παλη]
“To us the wrestling is not.” Παλη — Palē is an old word from παλλω — pallō to throw, to swing (from Homer to the papyri, though here only in N.T.), a contest between two till one hurls the other down and holds him down Note προς — pros again (five times) in sense of “against,” face to face conflict to the finish. [source]
The world-rulers of this darkness [τους κοσμοκρατορας του σκοτους τουτου]
This phrase occurs here alone. In John 14:30 Satan is called “the ruler of this world” In 2 Corinthians 4:4 he is termed “the god of this age” The word κοσμοκρατωρ — kosmokratōr is found in the Orphic Hymns of Satan, in Gnostic writings of the devil, in rabbinical writings (transliterated) of the angel of death, in inscriptions of the Emperor Caracalla. These “world-rulers” are limited to “this darkness” here on earth. The spiritual hosts of wickedness (τα πνευματικα της πονηριας — ta pneumatika tēs ponērias). No word for “hosts” in the Greek. Probably simply, “the spiritual things (or elements) of wickedness.” Πονηρια — Ponēria (from πονηρος — ponēros) is depravity (Matthew 22:18; 1 Corinthians 5:8). In the heavenly places Clearly so here. Our “wrestling” is with foes of evil natural and supernatural. We sorely need “the panoply of God” (furnished by God). [source]
The spiritual hosts of wickedness [τα πνευματικα της πονηριας]
No word for “hosts” in the Greek. Probably simply, “the spiritual things (or elements) of wickedness.” Πονηρια — Ponēria (from πονηρος — ponēros) is depravity (Matthew 22:18; 1 Corinthians 5:8). [source]
In the heavenly places [εν τοις επουρανιοις]
Clearly so here. Our “wrestling” is with foes of evil natural and supernatural. We sorely need “the panoply of God” (furnished by God). [source]
We wrestle [ἔστιν ἡμῖν ἡ πάλη]
Rev., more literally and correctly, our wrestling is. Πάλη wrestlingonly here. [source]
Flesh and blood []
The Greek reverses the order. [source]
Principalities and powers []
See on Colossians 1:16. [source]
Rulers of the darkness of this world [κοσμοκράτορας τοῦ σκότους τούτου]
Rev., more correctly, world-rulers of this darkness. World-Rulers only here. Compare John 14:30; John 16:11; 1 John 5:19; 2 Corinthians 4:4. [source]
Spiritual wickedness [τὰ πνευματικὰ τῆς πονηρίας]
Lit., the spiritual things of wickedness. Rev., spiritual hosts of wickedness. The phrase is collective, of the evil powers viewed as a body. Wickedness is active evil, mischief. Hence Satan is called ὁ πονηρός thewicked one. See on Luke 3:19; see on Luke 7:21; see on 1 John 2:13. [source]
In high places [ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις]
Rev., more literally, in the heavenly places. Used in the general sense of the sky or air. See on Ephesians 2:2. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Ephesians 6:12

Romans 7:5 In the flesh [ἐν τῇ σαρκί]
Σάρξ fleshoccurs in the classics in the physical sense only. Homer commonly uses it in the plural as denoting all the flesh or muscles of the body. Later the singular occurs in the same sense. Paul's use of this and other psychological terms must be determined largely by the Old-Testament usage as it appears in the Septuagint. 1. In the physical sense. The literal flesh. In the Septuagint τὰ κρέα flesh(plural) is used where the reference is to the parts of animals slain, and αἱ σάρκες , flesh (plural) where the reference is to flesh as the covering of the living body. Hence Paul uses κρέα in Romans 14:21; 1 Corinthians 8:13, of the flesh of sacrificed animals. Compare also the adjective σάρκιμος fleshy 2 Corinthians 3:3; and Ezekiel 11:19; Ezekiel 36:26, Sept. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
2. Kindred. Denoting natural or physical relationship, Romans 1:3; Romans 9:3-8; Romans 11:14; Galatians 4:23, Galatians 4:29; 1 Corinthians 10:18; Philemon 1:16. This usage forms a transition to the following sense: the whole human body. Flesh is the medium in and through which the natural relationship of man manifests itself. Kindred is conceived as based on community of bodily substance. Therefore:-DIVIDER-
3. The body itself. The whole being designated by the part, as being its main substance and characteristic, 1 Corinthians 6:16; 1 Corinthians 7:28; 2 Corinthians 4:11; 2 Corinthians 7:5; 2 Corinthians 10:3; 2 Corinthians 12:7. Romans 2:28; Galatians 6:13, etc. Paul follows the Septuagint in sometimes using σῶμα bodyand sometimes σάρξ fleshin this sense, so that the terms occasionally seem to be practically synonymous. Thus 1 Corinthians 6:16, 1 Corinthians 6:17, where the phrase one body is illustrated and confirmed by one flesh. See Genesis 2:24; Ephesians 5:28, Ephesians 5:31, where the two are apparently interchanged. Compare 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11; 1 Corinthians 5:3, and Colossians 2:5. Σάρξ , however, differs from σῶμα in that it can only signify the organism of an earthly, living being consisting of flesh and bones, and cannot denote “either an earthly organism that is not living, or a living organism that is not earthly” (Wendt, in Dickson). Σῶμα not thus limited. Thus it may denote the organism of the plant (1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38) or the celestial bodies (1 Corinthians 15:40). Hence the two conceptions are related as general and special: σῶμα bodybeing the material organism apart from any definite matter (not from any sort of matter), σάρξ , flesh, the definite, earthly, animal organism. The two are synonymons when σῶμα is used, from the context, of an earthly, animal body. Compare Philemon 1:22; 2 Corinthians 5:1-8. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Σῶμα bodyand not σάρξ fleshis used when the reference is to a metaphorical organism, as the church, Romans 12:4sqq.; 1 Corinthians 10:16; 12:12-27; Ephesians 1:23; Ephesians 2:16; Colossians 1:18, etc. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The σάρξ is described as mortal (2 Corinthians 4:11); subject to infirmity (Galatians 4:13; 2 Corinthians 12:7); locally limited (Colossians 2:15); an object of fostering care (Ephesians 5:29). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
4. Living beings generally, including their mental nature, and with a correlated notion of weakness and perishableness. Thus the phrase πᾶσα σάρξ allflesh (Genesis 6:12; Isaiah 49:26; Isaiah 49:23). This accessory notion of weakness stands in contrast with God. In Paul the phrase all flesh is cited from the Old Testament (Romans 3:20; Galatians 2:16) and is used independently (1 Corinthians 1:29). In all these instances before God is added. So in Galatians 1:16, flesh and blood implies a contrast of human with divine wisdom. Compare 1 Corinthians 15:50; Ephesians 6:12. This leads up to-DIVIDER-
5. Man “either as a creature in his natural state apart from Christ, or the creaturely side or aspect of the man in Christ.” Hence it is correlated with ἄνθρωπος man 1 Corinthians 3:3; Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:17. Compare Romans 6:6; Ephesians 4:22; Colossians 3:9; Galatians 5:24. Thus the flesh would seem to be interchangeable with the old man. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It has affections and lusts (Galatians 5:24); willings (Ephesians 2:3; Romans 8:6, Romans 8:7); a mind (Colossians 2:18); a body (Colossians 2:11). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It is in sharp contrast with πνεῦμα spirit(Galatians 3:3, Galatians 3:19; Galatians 5:16, Galatians 5:17, Galatians 5:19-24; Galatians 6:8; Romans 8:4). The flesh and the spirit are thus antagonistic. Σάρξ fleshbefore or in contrast with his reception of the divine element whereby he becomes a new creature in Christ: the whole being of man as it exists and acts apart from the influence of the Spirit. It properly characterizes, therefore, not merely the lower forms of sensual gratification, but all - the highest developments of the life estranged from God, whether physical, intellectual, or aesthetic. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It must be carefully noted:-DIVIDER-
1. That Paul does not identify flesh and sin. Compare, flesh of sin, Romans 8:3. See Romans 7:17, Romans 7:18; 2 Corinthians 7:1; Galatians 2:20. -DIVIDER-
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2. That Paul does not identify σάρξ withthe material body nor associate sin exclusively and predominantly with the body. The flesh is the flesh of the living man animated by the soul ( ψυχή ) as its principle of life, and is distinctly used as coordinate with ἄνθρωπος manAs in the Old Testament, “it embraces in an emphatic manner the nature of man, mental and corporeal, with its internal distinctions.” The spirit as well as the flesh is capable of defilement (2 Corinthians 7:1; compare 1 Corinthians 7:34). Christian life is to be transformed by the renewing of the mind (Romans 12:2; compare Ephesians 4:23). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
3. That Paul does not identify the material side of man with evil. The flesh is not the native seat and source of sin. It is only its organ, and the seat of sin's manifestation. Matter is not essentially evil. The logical consequence of this would be that no service of God is possible while the material organism remains. See Romans 12:1. The flesh is not necessarily sinful in itself; but as it has existed from the time of the introduction of sin through Adam, it is recognized by Paul as tainted with sin. Jesus appeared in the flesh, and yet was sinless (2 Corinthians 5:21).The motions of sins ( τὰ παθήματα τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν )Motions used in earlier English for emotions or impulses. Thus Bacon: “He that standeth at a stay where others rise, can hardly avoid motions of envy” (“Essay” xiv.). The word is nearly synonymous with πάθος passion(Romans 1:26, note). From πάθειν tosuffer; a feeling which the mind undergoes, a passion, desire. Rev., sinful passions: which led to sins.Did work ( ἐνηργεῖτο )Rev., wrought. See 2 Corinthians 1:6; 2 Corinthians 4:12; Ephesians 3:20; Galatians 5:6; Philemon 2:13; Colossians 1:29. Compare Mark 6:14, and see on power, John 1:12. [source]

Romans 3:20 Flesh [σάρξ]
Equivalent to man. It is often used in the sense of a living creature - man or beast. Compare 1 Peter 1:24; Matthew 24:22; Luke 3:6. Generally with a suggestion of weakness, frailty, mortality; Septuagint, Jeremiah 17:5; Psalm 78:39; Ephesians 6:12. The word here has no doctrinal bearing. [source]
1 Corinthians 8:5 Gods - lords []
Superhuman beings to whom these titles are given, as Ephesians 6:12; 2 Corinthians 4:4; John 12:31; John 14:30. [source]
1 Corinthians 15:24 Rule - authority - power [ἀρχὴν , ἐξουσίαν , δύναμιν]
Abstract terms for different orders of spiritual and angelic powers; as Ephesians 1:21; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12; Colossians 1:16. [source]
1 Corinthians 10:20 To demons, and not to God [δαιμονιοις και ου τεωι]
Referring to lxx text of Deuteronomy 32:17. It is probable that by ου τεωι — ou theōi Paul means “to a no-god” as also in Deuteronomy 32:21 επ ουκ ετνει — ep' ouk ethnei (by a no-people). This is Paul‘s reply to the heathen who claimed that they worshipped the gods represented by the images and not the mere wood or stone or metal idols. The word δαιμονια — daimonia is an adjective δαιμονιος — daimonios from δαιμων — daimōn an inferior deity, and with same idea originally, once in this sense in N.T. (Acts 17:18). Elsewhere in N.T. it has the notion of evil spirits as here, those spiritual forces of wickedness (Ephesians 6:12) that are under the control of Satan. The word δαιμονια — daimonia so common in the Gospels, occurs in Paul‘s writings only here and 1 Timothy 4:1. Demonology is a deep and dark subject here pictured by Paul as the explanation of heathenism which is a departure from God (Romans 1:19-23) and a substitute for the worship of God. It is a terrible indictment which is justified by the licentious worship associated with paganism then and now. [source]
2 Corinthians 4:4 The god of this world [ὁ θεὸς τοῦ αἰῶνος τούτου]
The phrase occurs only here. Compare Ephesians 2:2; Ephesians 6:12; John 12:31; John 14:30. Satan is called god in the rabbinical writings. “The first God is the true God; but the second god is Samael.” “The matron said, 'Our god is greater than thy God; for when thy God appeared to Moses in the bush, he hid his face; when, however, he saw the serpent, which is my god, he fled.”' [source]
2 Corinthians 4:4 The god of this world [ο τεος του αιωνος τουτου]
“Age,” more exactly, as in 1 Corinthians 1:20. Satan is “the god of this age,” a phrase nowhere else in the N.T., but Jesus uses the same idea in John 12:31; John 14:30 and Paul in Ephesians 2:2; Ephesians 6:12 and John in 1 John 5:19. Satan claimed the rule over the world in the temptations with Jesus. [source]
Galatians 4:3 Elements of the world [τὰ στοιχεῖα τοῦ κόσμου]
For the word στοιχεῖα in N.T. see Colossians 2:8, Colossians 2:20; Hebrews 5:12; 2 Peter 3:10, 2 Peter 3:12. See on 2 Peter 3:10. Interpretations differ. 1. Elements of knowledge, rudimentary religious ideas. See Hebrews 5:12. The meaning of world will then be, the material as distinguished from the spiritual realm. Elements of the world will be the crude beginnings of religion, suited to the condition of children, and pertaining to those who are not Christians: elementary religious truths belonging to mankind in general. Thus the Jewish economy was of the world as appealing to the senses, and affording only the first elements of a spiritual system. The child-heir was taught only faint outlines of spiritual truth, and was taught them by worldly symbols. 2. Elements of nature - of the physical world, especially the heavenly bodies. See 2 Peter 3:10, 2 Peter 3:12; Wisd. 7:17. According to this explanation, the point would be that the ordering of the religious life was regulated by the order of nature; “the days, months, times,” etc. (Galatians 4:10), as well as the heathen festivals, being dependent on the movements of the heavenly bodies. This was the patristic view (Ambrose, Augustine, Chrysostom, Theodoret). 3. The elements of the world are the personal, elemental spirits. This seems to be the preferable explanation, both here and in Colossians 2:8. According to Jewish ideas, all things had their special angels. In the Book of Jubilees, chapter 2, appear, the angel of the presence (comp. Isaiah 63:9); the angel of adoration; the spirits of the wind, the clouds, darkness, hail, frost, thunder and lightning, winter and spring, cold and heat. In the Book of Enoch, 82:10-14, appear the angels of the stars, who keep watch that the stars may appear at the appointed time, and who are punished if the stars do not appear (18:15). In the Revelation of John we find four angels of the winds (14:18); the angel of the waters (16:5); the angel in the sun (19:17). In Hebrews 1:7we read, “who maketh his angels winds.” Paul also recognizes elemental forces of the spiritual world. The thorn is “a messenger of Satan” (2 Corinthians 12:7); Satan prevents his journey to Thessalonica (1 Thessalonians 2:18); the Corinthian offender is to be “delivered to Satan” (1 Corinthians 5:5); the Kingdom of God is opposed by “principalities and powers” (1 Corinthians 15:24); Christians wrestle against “the rulers of the darkness of this world; against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the upper regions” (Ephesians 6:12). In this passage the elements of the world are compared with overseers and stewards. This would seem to require a personal interpretation. In Galatians 4:8, “did service to them which by nature are no gods,” appears to be = “in bondage under the elements,” suggesting a personal interpretation of the latter. The Galatians had turned again to the observance of times and seasons (Galatians 4:10), which were controlled by the heavenly bodies and their spirits. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

Galatians 1:16 Flesh and blood []
Always in N.T. with a suggestion of human weakness or ignorance. See Matthew 16:17; 1 Corinthians 15:50; Ephesians 6:12. [source]
Ephesians 1:3 In the heavenly places [ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις]
Another keyword; one of the dominant thoughts of the epistle being the work of the ascended Christ. Places is supplied, the Greek meaning in the heavenlies. Some prefer to supply things, as more definitely characterizing spiritual blessing. But in the four other passages where the phrase occurs, Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12, the sense is local, and ἐπουράνιος heavenlyis local throughout Paul's epistles. The meaning is that the spiritual blessings of God are found in heaven and are brought thence to us. Compare Philemon 3:20. [source]
Ephesians 1:21 Principality, power, etc. []
These words usually refer to angelic powers; either good, as Ephesians 3:10; Colossians 1:16; Colossians 2:10; or bad, as Ephesians 6:12; 1 Corinthians 15:24; Colossians 2:15; or both, as Romans 8:38. See on Colossians 1:16; see on Colossians 2:15. Here probably good, since the passage relates to Christ's exaltation to glory rather than to His victory over evil powers. [source]
Ephesians 1:3 The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ [ο τεος και πατηρ του Κυριου ημων Ιησου Χριστου]
Και — Kai is genuine here, though not in Colossians 1:3. The one article First aorist active participle of ευλογεω — eulogeō the same word, antecedent action to the doxology (ευλογητος — eulogētos). With So-called instrumental use of εν — en though in is clear. Every spiritual blessing (πασηι ευλογιαι πνευματικηι — pasēi eulogiāi pneumatikēi). Third use of the root ευλογ — eulog (verbal, verb, substantive). Paul lovingly plays with the idea. The believer is a citizen of heaven and the spiritual blessings count for most to him. In the heavenly places in Christ In four other places in Ephesians (Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12). This precise phrase (with εν — en) occurs nowhere else in the N.T. and has a clearly local meaning in Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10, doubtful in Ephesians 6:12, but probably so here. In Ephesians 2:6 the believer is conceived as already seated with Christ. Heaven is the real abode of the citizen of Christ‘s kingdom (Philemon 3:20) who is a stranger on earth (Philemon 1:27; Ephesians 2:19). The word επουρανιος — epouranios (heavenly) occurs in various passages in the N.T. in contrast with τα επιγεια — ta epigeia (the earthly) as in John 3:12; 1 Corinthians 15:40, 1 Corinthians 15:48, 1 Corinthians 15:49; Philemon 2:10, with πατρις — patris (country) in Hebrews 11:16, with κλησις — klēsis (calling) in Hebrews 3:1, with δωρεα — dōrea (gift) in Hebrews 6:4, with βασιλεια — basileia (kingdom) in 2 Timothy 4:18. [source]
Ephesians 1:3 With [εν]
So-called instrumental use of εν — en though in is clear. Every spiritual blessing (πασηι ευλογιαι πνευματικηι — pasēi eulogiāi pneumatikēi). Third use of the root ευλογ — eulog (verbal, verb, substantive). Paul lovingly plays with the idea. The believer is a citizen of heaven and the spiritual blessings count for most to him. In the heavenly places in Christ In four other places in Ephesians (Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12). This precise phrase (with εν — en) occurs nowhere else in the N.T. and has a clearly local meaning in Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10, doubtful in Ephesians 6:12, but probably so here. In Ephesians 2:6 the believer is conceived as already seated with Christ. Heaven is the real abode of the citizen of Christ‘s kingdom (Philemon 3:20) who is a stranger on earth (Philemon 1:27; Ephesians 2:19). The word επουρανιος — epouranios (heavenly) occurs in various passages in the N.T. in contrast with τα επιγεια — ta epigeia (the earthly) as in John 3:12; 1 Corinthians 15:40, 1 Corinthians 15:48, 1 Corinthians 15:49; Philemon 2:10, with πατρις — patris (country) in Hebrews 11:16, with κλησις — klēsis (calling) in Hebrews 3:1, with δωρεα — dōrea (gift) in Hebrews 6:4, with βασιλεια — basileia (kingdom) in 2 Timothy 4:18. [source]
Ephesians 1:3 in []
is clear. Every spiritual blessing (πασηι ευλογιαι πνευματικηι — pasēi eulogiāi pneumatikēi). Third use of the root ευλογ — eulog (verbal, verb, substantive). Paul lovingly plays with the idea. The believer is a citizen of heaven and the spiritual blessings count for most to him. In the heavenly places in Christ In four other places in Ephesians (Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12). This precise phrase (with εν — en) occurs nowhere else in the N.T. and has a clearly local meaning in Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10, doubtful in Ephesians 6:12, but probably so here. In Ephesians 2:6 the believer is conceived as already seated with Christ. Heaven is the real abode of the citizen of Christ‘s kingdom (Philemon 3:20) who is a stranger on earth (Philemon 1:27; Ephesians 2:19). The word επουρανιος — epouranios (heavenly) occurs in various passages in the N.T. in contrast with τα επιγεια — ta epigeia (the earthly) as in John 3:12; 1 Corinthians 15:40, 1 Corinthians 15:48, 1 Corinthians 15:49; Philemon 2:10, with πατρις — patris (country) in Hebrews 11:16, with κλησις — klēsis (calling) in Hebrews 3:1, with δωρεα — dōrea (gift) in Hebrews 6:4, with βασιλεια — basileia (kingdom) in 2 Timothy 4:18. [source]
Ephesians 1:3 In the heavenly places in Christ [εν τοις επουρανιοις εν Χριστωι]
In four other places in Ephesians (Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12). This precise phrase (with εν — en) occurs nowhere else in the N.T. and has a clearly local meaning in Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10, doubtful in Ephesians 6:12, but probably so here. In Ephesians 2:6 the believer is conceived as already seated with Christ. Heaven is the real abode of the citizen of Christ‘s kingdom (Philemon 3:20) who is a stranger on earth (Philemon 1:27; Ephesians 2:19). The word επουρανιος — epouranios (heavenly) occurs in various passages in the N.T. in contrast with τα επιγεια — ta epigeia (the earthly) as in John 3:12; 1 Corinthians 15:40, 1 Corinthians 15:48, 1 Corinthians 15:49; Philemon 2:10, with πατρις — patris (country) in Hebrews 11:16, with κλησις — klēsis (calling) in Hebrews 3:1, with δωρεα — dōrea (gift) in Hebrews 6:4, with βασιλεια — basileia (kingdom) in 2 Timothy 4:18. [source]
Colossians 1:16 Thrones, dominions, principalities, powers [θρόνοι, κυριότητες, ἀρχαὶ, ἐξουσίαι]
Compare Ephesians 1:21; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12; 1 Corinthians 15:24; Romans 8:38; Colossians 2:10, Colossians 2:15; Titus 3:1. In Titus 3:1, they refer to earthly dignities, and these are probably included in 1 Corinthians 15:24. It is doubtful whether any definite succession of rank is intended. At any rate it is impossible to accurately define the distinctions. It has been observed that wherever principalities ( ἀρχαὶ ) and powers ( ἐξουσίαι ) occur together, principalities always precedes, and that δύναμις power(see Ephesians 1:21) when occurring with either of the two, follows it; or, when occurring with both, follows both. The primary reference is, no doubt, to the celestial orders; but the expressions things on earth, and not only in this world in the parallel passage, Ephesians 1:21, indicate that it may possibly include earthly dignities. Principalities and powers are used of both good and evil powers. See Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12; Colossians 2:15. The passage is aimed at the angel-worship of the Colossians (see Introduction); showing that while they have been discussing the various grades of angels which fill the space between God and men, and depending on them as media of communion with God, they have degraded Christ who is above them all, and is the sole mediator. Compare Hebrews 1:5-14, where the ideas of the Son as Creator and as Lord of the angels are also combined. Thrones occurs only here in enumerations of this kind. It seems to indicate the highest grade. Compare Revelation 4:4, θρόνοι thronesA.V. seats, and see note. Thrones here probably means the enthroned angels. Dominions or dominations, also Ephesians 1:21. Principalities or princedoms. In Romans 8:38, this occurs without powers which usually accompanies it. [source]
Hebrews 8:5 Who serve unto the example and shadow of heavenly things [οἵτινες ὑποδείγματι καί σκιᾷ λατρεύουσιν τῶν ἐπουρανίων]
The connection is, “there are those who offer the gifts according to the law, such as ( οἵτινες ) serve,” etc. For λατρεύουσιν servesee on 2 Timothy 1:3. Omit unto. Rend. serve the copy and shadow, etc., or, as Rev., that which is a copy and shadow. For ὑπόδειγμα copysee on 1 Peter 5:3; see on 2 Peter 2:6. Comp. Hebrews 9:23. Τῶν ἐπουρανίων “of heavenly things.” Τὰ ἐπουράνια in N.T. usually “heavenly places.” See Ephesians 1:3; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12: “heavenly things,” John 3:12; Philemon 2:10; Hebrews 9:23. [source]
Hebrews 1:3 Sat down on the right hand of the majesty on high [ἐκάθισεν ἐν δεξιᾷ τῆς μεγαλωσύνης ἐν ὑψηλοῖς]
Comp. Psalm 110:1, Hebrews 8:1; Hebrews 10:12; Hebrews 12:2; Ephesians 1:20; Revelation 3:21. The verb denotes a solemn, formal act; the assumption of a position of dignity and authority The reference is to Christ's ascension. In his exalted state he will still be bearing on all things toward their consummation, still dealing with sin as the great high priest in the heavenly sanctuary. This is elaborated later. See Hebrews 8:1-13; Hebrews 9:12ff. Μεγαλωσύνη majestyonly here, Hebrews 8:1; Judges 1:25. Quite often in lxx. There is suggested, not a contrast with his humiliation, but his resumption of his original dignity, described in the former part of this verse. Ἐν ὑψηλοῖς , lit. in the high places. Const. with sat down, not with majesty. The phrase N.T.olxx, Psalm 92:4; Psalm 112:5. Ἐν τοῖς ὑψίστοις inthe highest (places ), in the Gospels, and only in doxologies. See Matthew 21:9; Mark 11:10; Luke 2:14. Ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις inthe heavenly (places ), only in Ephesians. See Ephesians 1:3, Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12. [source]
Jude 1:6 Principality [αρχην]
Literally, “beginning,” “rule,” (first place of power as in 1 Corinthians 15:24; Romans 8:38). In Acts 10:11 it is used for “corners” (beginnings) of the sheet. In Ephesians 6:12 the word is used for evil angels. See Deuteronomy 32:8. Both Enoch and Philo (and Milton) discuss the fallen angels. [source]
Jude 1:6 Kept not [μη τηρησαντας]
First aorist active participle with negative μη — mē with play on “kept not” and “he hath kept.”Principality (αρχην — archēn). Literally, “beginning,” “rule,” (first place of power as in 1 Corinthians 15:24; Romans 8:38). In Acts 10:11 it is used for “corners” (beginnings) of the sheet. In Ephesians 6:12 the word is used for evil angels. See Deuteronomy 32:8. Both Enoch and Philo (and Milton) discuss the fallen angels.But left Second aorist active participle of απολειπω — apoleipō old verb, to leave behind (2 Timothy 4:13, 2 Timothy 4:20).Their own proper habitation (το ιδιον οικητηριον — to idion oikētērion). Old word for dwelling-place (from οικητηρ — oikētēr dweller at home, from οικος — oikos), in N.T. only here and 2 Corinthians 5:2 (the body as the abode of the spirit).In everlasting bonds Either locative (in) or instrumental (by, with). Αιδιος — Aidios (from αει — aei always), old adjective, in N.T. only here and Romans 1:20 (of God‘s power and deity). It is synonymous with αιωνιος — aiōnios (Matthew 25:46). Mayor terms αιδιος — aidios an Aristotelian word, while αιωνιος — aiōnios is Platonic.Under darkness (υπο ζοπον — hupo zophon). See 2 Peter 2:4 for ζοπος — zophos In Wisdom 17:2 we find δεσμιοι σκοτους — desmioi skotous (prisoners of darkness).Great Not in 2 Peter 2:9, which see note for discussion. [source]

What do the individual words in Ephesians 6:12 mean?

because not is to us the wrestling against blood and flesh but the rulers authorities the cosmic powers of the darkness this the spiritual [forces] - of evil in the heavenly realms
ὅτι οὐκ ἔστιν ἡμῖν πάλη πρὸς αἷμα καὶ σάρκα ἀλλὰ τὰς ἀρχάς ἐξουσίας τοὺς κοσμοκράτορας τοῦ σκότους τούτου τὰ πνευματικὰ τῆς πονηρίας ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις

ὅτι  because 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ὅτι  
Sense: that, because, since.
ἡμῖν  to  us 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Dative 1st Person Plural
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
πάλη  wrestling 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Feminine Singular
Root: πάλη  
Sense: wrestling (a contest between two in which each endeavours to throw the other, and which is decided when the victor is able to hold his opponent down with his hand upon his neck).
πρὸς  against 
Parse: Preposition
Root: πρός  
Sense: to the advantage of.
αἷμα  blood 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: αἷμα  
Sense: blood.
σάρκα  flesh 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: σάρξ  
Sense: flesh (the soft substance of the living body, which covers the bones and is permeated with blood) of both man and beasts.
ἀρχάς  rulers 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Plural
Root: ἀρχή  
Sense: beginning, origin.
ἐξουσίας  authorities 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Plural
Root: ἐξουσία  
Sense: power of choice, liberty of doing as one pleases.
κοσμοκράτορας  cosmic  powers 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: κοσμοκράτωρ  
Sense: lord of the world, prince of this age.
τοῦ  of  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Neuter Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
σκότους  darkness 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Neuter Singular
Root: σκότος  
Sense: darkness.
τούτου  this 
Parse: Demonstrative Pronoun, Genitive Neuter Singular
Root: οὗτος  
Sense: this.
πνευματικὰ  spiritual  [forces] 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root: πνευματικός  
Sense: relating to the human spirit, or rational soul, as part of the man which is akin to God and serves as his instrument or organ.
τῆς  - 
Parse: Article, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
πονηρίας  of  evil 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: πονηρία  
Sense: depravity, iniquity, wickedness.
ἐπουρανίοις  heavenly  realms 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Neuter Plural
Root: ἐπουράνιος  
Sense: existing in heaven.