The Meaning of John 14:30 Explained

John 14:30

KJV: Hereafter I will not talk much with you: for the prince of this world cometh, and hath nothing in me.

YLT: I will no more talk much with you, for the ruler of this world doth come, and in me he hath nothing;

Darby: I will no longer speak much with you, for the ruler of the world comes, and in me he has nothing;

ASV: I will no more speak much with you, for the prince of the world cometh: and he hath nothing in me;

What does John 14:30 Mean?

Context Summary

John 14:25-31 - Christ's Gift Of Peace
Our Lord gives the fourfold basis of His peace: (1) The vision of the Father. Throughout these wonderful chapters He seems able to speak of nothing else. If we lived in the thought and consciousness of God, our peace also would be as a river. Let us wrap that thought around us, as a man his overcoat on a stormy day. (2) Disentanglement from the world. We must stand clear of the ambitions of the world, of its fear and favor, of its craving for wealth and fear of poverty. The world must have no charms for us. (3) A constraining love, as in John 14:31. (4) Obedience to God's supreme authority. When we put the government on His shoulder, He sets up the inward reign as Prince of Peace.
What a contrast to the world's peace, which consists in the absence of untoward circumstances and the possession of material goods! Where the Holy Spirit is, there the peace of God rests. The world may be in arms, death may be imminent, and the prince of this world intent to injure; but the heart which reposes on the will of God is free from alarm and fear. The peace He leaves is that of forgiveness; the peace He bequeaths, that of His own indwelling. "Arise, let us go hence!" [source]

Chapter Summary: John 14

1  Jesus comforts his disciples with the hope of heaven;
5  professes himself the way, the truth, and the life, and one with the Father;
13  assures their prayers to be effectual;
15  requires obedience;
16  promises the Comforter;
27  and leaves his peace with them

Greek Commentary for John 14:30

The prince of the world [ο του κοσμου αρχων]
Satan as in John 12:31 which see. [source]
Hereafter I will not talk [οὐκ ἔπι λαλήσω]
Rev., more correctly, I will no more speak. [source]
The prince of this world []
The best texts read, “of the world.” [source]
Hath nothing in me []
No right nor power over Christ which sin in Him could give. The Greek order is, in me he hath nothing. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for John 14:30

Luke 4:6 For it hath been delivered unto me [οτι εμοι παραδεδοται]
Perfect passive indicative. Satan here claims possession of world power and Jesus does not deny it. It may be due to man‘s sin and by God‘s permission. Jesus calls Satan the ruler of this world (John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11). [source]
Luke 4:6 And the glory of them [και την δοχαν αυτων]
Matthew 4:8 has this in the statement of what the devil did, not what he said.For it hath been delivered unto me (οτι εμοι παραδεδοται — hoti emoi paradedotai). Perfect passive indicative. Satan here claims possession of world power and Jesus does not deny it. It may be due to man‘s sin and by God‘s permission. Jesus calls Satan the ruler of this world (John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11).To whomsoever I will Present subjunctive with αν — an in an indefinite relative sentence. This audacious claim, if allowed, makes one wonder whether some of the world rulers are not, consciously or unconsciously, agents of the devil. In several American cities there has been proven a definite compact between the police and the underworld of crime. But the tone of Satan here is one of superiority to Jesus in world power. He offers him a share in it on one condition. [source]
John 17:15 From the evil [τοῦ πονηροῦ]
Or, the evil one. This rendering is according to John's usage. See 1 John 2:13, 1 John 2:14; 1 John 3:12; 1 John 5:18, 1 John 5:19; and compare John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11. From ( ἐκ ), literally, out of, means out of the hands of. [source]
John 12:31 The prince of this world [ὁ ἄρχων ροῦ κόσμου τούτου]
The phrase occurs only in the Gospel; here, John 14:30; John 16:11. [source]
John 12:31 The judgment [κρισις]
No article, “A judgment.” The next few days will test this world. The prince of this world This phrase here, descriptive of Satan as in possession of the evil world, occurs again in John 14:30; John 16:11. In the temptations Satan claims power over the world and offers to share it with Jesus (Matthew 4:8-10; Luke 4:5-8). Jesus did not deny Satan‘s power then, but here proclaims final victory over him. Shall be cast out Future passive of εκβαλλω — ekballō Note εχω — exō clean out. The Book of Revelation also proclaims final victory over Satan. [source]
1 Corinthians 8:5 Gods - lords []
Superhuman beings to whom these titles are given, as Ephesians 6:12; 2 Corinthians 4:4; John 12:31; John 14:30. [source]
2 Corinthians 4:4 The god of this world [ὁ θεὸς τοῦ αἰῶνος τούτου]
The phrase occurs only here. Compare Ephesians 2:2; Ephesians 6:12; John 12:31; John 14:30. Satan is called god in the rabbinical writings. “The first God is the true God; but the second god is Samael.” “The matron said, 'Our god is greater than thy God; for when thy God appeared to Moses in the bush, he hid his face; when, however, he saw the serpent, which is my god, he fled.”' [source]
2 Corinthians 4:4 The god of this world [ο τεος του αιωνος τουτου]
“Age,” more exactly, as in 1 Corinthians 1:20. Satan is “the god of this age,” a phrase nowhere else in the N.T., but Jesus uses the same idea in John 12:31; John 14:30 and Paul in Ephesians 2:2; Ephesians 6:12 and John in 1 John 5:19. Satan claimed the rule over the world in the temptations with Jesus. [source]
Ephesians 6:12 Rulers of the darkness of this world [κοσμοκράτορας τοῦ σκότους τούτου]
Rev., more correctly, world-rulers of this darkness. World-Rulers only here. Compare John 14:30; John 16:11; 1 John 5:19; 2 Corinthians 4:4. [source]
Ephesians 6:12 The world-rulers of this darkness [τους κοσμοκρατορας του σκοτους τουτου]
This phrase occurs here alone. In John 14:30 Satan is called “the ruler of this world” In 2 Corinthians 4:4 he is termed “the god of this age” The word κοσμοκρατωρ — kosmokratōr is found in the Orphic Hymns of Satan, in Gnostic writings of the devil, in rabbinical writings (transliterated) of the angel of death, in inscriptions of the Emperor Caracalla. These “world-rulers” are limited to “this darkness” here on earth. The spiritual hosts of wickedness (τα πνευματικα της πονηριας — ta pneumatika tēs ponērias). No word for “hosts” in the Greek. Probably simply, “the spiritual things (or elements) of wickedness.” Πονηρια — Ponēria (from πονηρος — ponēros) is depravity (Matthew 22:18; 1 Corinthians 5:8). In the heavenly places Clearly so here. Our “wrestling” is with foes of evil natural and supernatural. We sorely need “the panoply of God” (furnished by God). [source]
Hebrews 2:14 Are sharers in flesh and blood [κεκοινωνηκεν αιματος και σαρκος]
The best MSS. read “blood and flesh.” The verb is perfect active indicative of κοινωνεω — koinōneō old verb with the regular genitive, elsewhere in the N.T. with the locative (Romans 12:13) or with εν — en or εις — eis “The children have become partners Second aorist active indicative of μετεχω — metechō to have with, a practical synonym for κοινωνεω — koinōneō and with the genitive also That he might bring to naught Purpose of the incarnation clearly stated with ινα — hina and the first aorist active subjunctive of καταργεω — katargeō old word to render idle or ineffective (from κατα αργος — kata class="normal greek">κρατος — argos), causative verb (25 times in Paul), once in Luke (Luke 13:7), once in Hebrews (here). “By means of death” (his own death) Christ broke the power (τουτ εστιν — kratos) of the devil over death (paradoxical as it seems), certainly in men‘s fear of death and in some unexplained way Satan had sway over the realm of death (Zechariah 3:5.). Note the explanatory tout' estin (that is) with the accusative after it as before it. In Revelation 12:7 Satan is identified with the serpent in Eden, though it is not done in the Old Testament. See Romans 5:12; John 8:44; John 14:30; John 16:11; 1 John 3:12. Death is the devil‘s realm, for he is the author of sin. “Death as death is no part of the divine order” (Westcott). [source]
Hebrews 2:14 Partook [μετεσχε]
Second aorist active indicative of μετεχω — metechō to have with, a practical synonym for κοινωνεω — koinōneō and with the genitive also That he might bring to naught Purpose of the incarnation clearly stated with ινα — hina and the first aorist active subjunctive of καταργεω — katargeō old word to render idle or ineffective (from κατα αργος — kata class="normal greek">κρατος — argos), causative verb (25 times in Paul), once in Luke (Luke 13:7), once in Hebrews (here). “By means of death” (his own death) Christ broke the power (τουτ εστιν — kratos) of the devil over death (paradoxical as it seems), certainly in men‘s fear of death and in some unexplained way Satan had sway over the realm of death (Zechariah 3:5.). Note the explanatory tout' estin (that is) with the accusative after it as before it. In Revelation 12:7 Satan is identified with the serpent in Eden, though it is not done in the Old Testament. See Romans 5:12; John 8:44; John 14:30; John 16:11; 1 John 3:12. Death is the devil‘s realm, for he is the author of sin. “Death as death is no part of the divine order” (Westcott). [source]
1 John 2:13 The evil one [τὸν πονηρόν]
See on wickedness, Mark 7:22; see on evils, Luke 3:19; see on evil spirits, Luke 7:21. The prince of darkness is styled by John ὁ διάβολος thefalse accuser (John 8:44; John 13:2; 1 John 3:8, 1 John 3:10. See on Matthew 4:1): ὁ Σατανᾶς Satanthe adversary (John 13:27; compare ὁ κατήγωρ theaccuser, properly, in court, Revelation 12:10): ὁ πονηρός theevil one (John 17:15; 1 John 2:13, 1 John 2:14; 1 John 3:12; 1 John 5:18, 1 John 5:19): ὁ ἄρχων τοῦ κόσμου τούτου theruler of this world (John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11). Note the abrupt introduction of the word here, as indicating something familiar. [source]
1 John 4:4 Because [οτι]
The reason for the victory lies in God, who abides in them (1 John 3:20, 1 John 3:24; John 14:20; John 15:4.). God is greater than Satan, “he that is in the world” (ο εν τωι κοσμωι — ho en tōi kosmōi), the prince of this world (John 12:31; John 14:30), the god of this age (2 Corinthians 4:4), powerful as he seems. [source]
Revelation 13:2 The dragon gave him [διδωμι]
First aorist active indicative of αυτωι — didōmi (to give) and dative case autōi (the beast). The dragon works through this beast. The beast is simply Satan‘s agent. Satan claimed this power to Christ (Matthew 4:9; Luke 4:6) and Christ called Satan the prince of this world (John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11). So the war is on. [source]
Revelation 12:7 There was war in heaven [εγενετο πολεμος εν τωι ουρανωι]
“There came to be war in heaven” “Another ταβλεαυ — tableau not a σημειον — sēmeion (Revelation 12:1, Revelation 12:3), but consequent upon the two σημεια — sēmeia which precede it. The birth and rapture of the Woman‘s Son issue in a war which invades the επουρανια — epourania ” (Swete). The reference is not to the original rebellion of Satan, as Andreas held. As the coming of Christ brought on fresh manifestations of diabolic power (Mark 1:13; Luke 22:3, Luke 22:31; John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11), just so Christ‘s return to heaven is pictured as being the occasion of renewed attacks there. We are not to visualize it too literally, but certainly modern airplanes help us to grasp the notion of battles in the sky even more than the phalanxes of storm-clouds (Swete). John even describes this last conflict as in heaven itself. Cf. Luke 10:18; 1 Kings 22:1.; Job 1; Job 2:1-13; Zechariah 3:1. [source]
Revelation 13:2 As the feet of a bear [αρκτος]
Old word, also spelled ως στομα λεοντος — arktos here only in N.T. From Daniel 7:4. No word in the Greek for “feet” before “bear.”As the mouth of a lion (εδωκεν αυτωι ο δρακων — hōs stoma leontos). From Daniel 7:4. This beast combines features of the first three beasts in Daniel 7:2. The strength and brutality of the Babylonian, Median, and Persian empires appeared in the Roman Empire. The catlike vigilance of the leopard, the slow and crushing power of the bear, and the roar of the lion were all familiar features to the shepherds in Palestine (Swete).The dragon gave him First aorist active indicative of αυτωι — didōmi (to give) and dative case autōi (the beast). The dragon works through this beast. The beast is simply Satan‘s agent. Satan claimed this power to Christ (Matthew 4:9; Luke 4:6) and Christ called Satan the prince of this world (John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11). So the war is on. [source]

What do the individual words in John 14:30 mean?

No longer much I will speak with you comes for the of this world ruler and in Me not he has nothing
Οὐκέτι πολλὰ λαλήσω μεθ’ ὑμῶν ἔρχεται γὰρ τοῦ κόσμου ἄρχων καὶ ἐν ἐμοὶ οὐκ ἔχει οὐδέν

Οὐκέτι  No  longer 
Parse: Adverb
Root: οὐκέτι  
Sense: no longer, no more, no further.
πολλὰ  much 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root: πολύς  
Sense: many, much, large.
λαλήσω  I  will  speak 
Parse: Verb, Future Indicative Active, 1st Person Singular
Root: ἀπολαλέω 
Sense: to utter a voice or emit a sound.
ἔρχεται  comes 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Middle or Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἔρχομαι  
Sense: to come.
τοῦ  of  this 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
κόσμου  world 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: κόσμος  
Sense: an apt and harmonious arrangement or constitution, order, government.
ἄρχων  ruler 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἄρχων  
Sense: a ruler, commander, chief, leader.
ἐμοὶ  Me 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Dative 1st Person Singular
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
ἔχει  he  has 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἔχω  
Sense: to have, i.e. to hold.
οὐδέν  nothing 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: οὐδείς 
Sense: no one, nothing.