The Meaning of 1 Corinthians 5:3 Explained

1 Corinthians 5:3

KJV: For I verily, as absent in body, but present in spirit, have judged already, as though I were present, concerning him that hath so done this deed,

YLT: for I indeed, as being absent as to the body, and present as to the spirit, have already judged, as being present, him who so wrought this thing:

Darby: For I, as absent in body but present in spirit, have already judged as present,

ASV: For I verily, being absent in body but present in spirit, have already as though I were present judged him that hath so wrought this thing,

What does 1 Corinthians 5:3 Mean?

Verse Meaning

Paul had spoken earlier about not judging others ( 1 Corinthians 4:5). That kind of judging had to do with one"s degree of faithfulness to the Lord. Here the issue was blatant immorality. This needed dealing with, and Paul had already determined what the Corinthian Christians should do in this case even though he was not present. The case was so clear that he did not need to be present to know the man was guilty of a serious offense that required strong treatment.

Context Summary

1 Corinthians 5:1-13 - Removing Germs Of Evil
The sin referred to in this chapter has been condoned by the Corinthian church, and this proved that the prevalent standard of morals was low. A man had married his father's second wife-his father having probably died. Such an alliance could not be tolerated. A condemnation of the sin must be pronounced by the whole body of believers, acting in concert with the Holy Spirit resident among them. "It seemed good to the Holy Ghost and to us," Acts 15:28.
Paul compares the Corinthian church to the Children of Israel, who, after sprinkling the blood, kept the feast of joy within closed doors-a careful search having been made for any atom of leaven that had hitherto escaped scrutiny. So we should put away from our lives, homes, and churches everything that would offend the gracious Paraclete. Since Christ has been slain for us, we must daily feed on Him with festal joy. Our loins must be girded as becomes those about to depart at a moment's notice. We must be ever on the alert to detect the summons for an exodus out of this dark Egyptian world into the world that is to come. [source]

Chapter Summary: 1 Corinthians 5

1  The sexual immorality person,
6  is cause rather of shame unto them than of rejoicing
7  The old leaven is to be purged out
10  Heinous offenders are to be shamed and avoided

Greek Commentary for 1 Corinthians 5:3

For I verily [εγω μεν γαρ]
Emphatic statement of Paul‘s own attitude of indignation, εγω — egō in contrast with υμεις — humeis He justifies his demand for the expulsion of the man. [source]
Being absent [απων]
Have already judged (κρινω — ēdē kekrika). Perfect active indicative of ως παρων — krinō I have already decided or judged, as though present (συναχτεντων υμων — hōs parōn). Paul felt compelled to reach a conclusion about the case and in a sentence of much difficulty seems to conceive an imaginary church court where the culprit has been tried and condemned. There are various ways of punctuating the clauses in this sentence in 1 Corinthians 5:3-5. It is not merely Paul‘s individual judgment. The genitive absolute clause in 1 Corinthians 5:4, ye being gathered together (συναγω — sunachthentōn humōn first aorist passive participle of και του εμου πνευματος — sunagō in regular assembly) and my spirit (εν τωι ονοματι του Κυριου ημων Ιησου — kai tou emou pneumatos) with the assembly (he means) and meeting in the name of our Lord Jesus (συν τηι δυναμει του Κυριου ημων Ιησου — en tōi onomati tou Kuriou ̣hēmōň Iēsou) with the power of the Lord Jesus (παραδουναι — sun tēi dunamei tou Kuriou hēmōn Iēsou), though this clause can be taken with the infinitive to deliver (συναχτεντων — paradounai). It makes good syntax and sense taken either way. The chief difference is that, if taken with “gathered together” (sunachthentōn) Paul assumes less apostolic prerogative to himself. But he did have such power and used it against Elymas (Acts 13:8.) as Peter did against Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1.). [source]
Have already judged [κρινω]
Perfect active indicative of ως παρων — krinō I have already decided or judged, as though present Paul felt compelled to reach a conclusion about the case and in a sentence of much difficulty seems to conceive an imaginary church court where the culprit has been tried and condemned. There are various ways of punctuating the clauses in this sentence in 1 Corinthians 5:3-5. It is not merely Paul‘s individual judgment. The genitive absolute clause in 1 Corinthians 5:4, ye being gathered together It makes good syntax and sense taken either way. The chief difference is that, if taken with “gathered together” (sunachthentōn) Paul assumes less apostolic prerogative to himself. But he did have such power and used it against Elymas (Acts 13:8.) as Peter did against Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1.). [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for 1 Corinthians 5:3

Romans 8:4 The Spirit [πνεῦμα]
From πνέω tobreathe or blow. The primary conception is wind or breath. Breath being the sign and condition of life in man, it comes to signify life. In this sense, physiologically considered, it is frequent in the classics. In the psychological sense, never. In the Old Testament it is ordinarily the translation of ruach It is also used to translate chai life, Isaiah 38:12; nbreath, 1 Kings 17:17. In the New Testament it occurs in the sense of wind or breath, John 3:8; 2 Thessalonians 2:8; Hebrews 1:7. Closely related to the physiological sense are such passages as 1 Samuel 16:14-16,; James 2:26; Revelation 13:15. Pauline Usage: 1. Breath, 2 Thessalonians 2:8. 2. The spirit or mind of man; the inward, self-conscious principle which feels and thinks and wills (1 Corinthians 2:11; 1 Corinthians 5:3; 1 Corinthians 7:34; Colossians 2:5). In this sense it is distinguished from σῶμα bodyor accompanied with a personal pronoun in the genitive, as my, our, his spirit (Romans 1:9; Romans 8:16; 1 Corinthians 5:4; 1 Corinthians 16:18, etc.). It is used as parallel with ψυχή souland καρδία heartSee 1 Corinthians 5:3; 1 Thessalonians 2:17; and compare John 13:21and John 12:27; Matthew 26:38and Luke 1:46, Luke 1:47. But while ψυχή soulis represented as the subject of life, πνεύμα spiritrepresents the principle of life, having independent activity in all circumstances of the perceptive and emotional life, and never as the subject. Generally, πνεύμα spiritmay be described as the principle, ψυχή soulas the subject, and καρδία heartas the organ of life. 3. The spiritual nature of Christ. Romans 1:4; 1 Corinthians 15:45; 1 Timothy 3:16. 4. The divine power or influence belonging to God, and communicated in Christ to men, in virtue of which they become πνευματικοί spiritual - recipientsand organs of the Spirit. This is Paul's most common use of the word. Romans 8:9; 1 Corinthians 2:13; Galatians 4:6; Galatians 6:1; 1 Thessalonians 4:8. In this sense it appears as: a. Spirit of God. Romans 8:9, Romans 8:11, Romans 8:14; 1 Corinthians 2:10, 1 Corinthians 2:11, 1 Corinthians 2:12, 1 Corinthians 2:14; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 6:11; 1 Corinthians 7:40; 2 Corinthians 3:3; Ephesians 3:16. b. Spirit of Christ. Romans 8:9; 2 Corinthians 3:17, 2 Corinthians 3:18; Galatians 4:6; Philemon 1:19. c. Holy Spirit. Romans 5:5; 1 Corinthians 6:19; 1 Corinthians 12:3; Ephesians 1:13; 1 Thessalonians 1:5, 1 Thessalonians 1:6; 1 Thessalonians 4:8, etc. d. Spirit. With or without the article, but with its reference to the Spirit of God or Holy Spirit indicated by the context. Romans 8:16, Romans 8:23, Romans 8:26, Romans 8:27; 1 Corinthians 2:4, 1 Corinthians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 12:4, 1 Corinthians 12:7, 1 Corinthians 12:8, 1 Corinthians 12:9; Ephesians 4:3; 2 Thessalonians 2:13, etc. 5. A power or influence, the character, manifestations, or results of which are more peculiarly defined by qualifying genitives. Thus spirit of meekness, faith, power, wisdom. Romans 8:2, Romans 8:15; 1 Corinthians 4:21; 2 Corinthians 4:13; Galatians 6:1; Ephesians 1:17; 2 Timothy 1:7, etc. These combinations with the genitives are not mere periphrases for a faculty or disposition of man. By the spirit of meekness or wisdom, for instance, is not meant merely a meek or wise spirit; but that meekness, wisdom, power, etc., are gifts of the Spirit of God. This usage is according to Old Testament analogy. Compare Exodus 28:3; Exodus 31:3; Exodus 35:31; Isaiah 11:2. 6. In the plural, used of spiritual gifts or of those who profess to be under spiritual influence, 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 14:12. 7. Powers or influences alien or averse from the divine Spirit, but with some qualifying word. Thus, the spirit of the world; another spirit; spirit of slumber. Romans 11:8; 1 Corinthians 2:12; 2 Corinthians 11:4; Ephesians 2:2; 2 Timothy 1:7. Where these expressions are in negative form they are framed after the analogy of the positive counterpart with which they are placed in contrast. Thus Romans 8:15: “Ye have not received the spirit of bondage, but of adoption. In other cases, as Ephesians 2:2, where the expression is positive, the conception is shaped according to Old-Testament usage, where spirits of evil are conceived as issuing from, and dependent upon, God, so far as He permits their operation and makes them subservient to His own ends. See Judges 9:23; Luke 8:55 1 Samuel 16:23; 1 Samuel 18:10; 1 Kings 22:21sqq.; Isaiah 19:4. Spirit is found contrasted with letter, Romans 2:29; Romans 7:6; 2 Corinthians 3:6. With flesh, Romans 8:1-13; Galatians 5:16, Galatians 5:24. It is frequently associated with the idea of power (Romans 1:4; Romans 15:13, Romans 15:19; 1 Corinthians 2:4; Galatians 3:5; Ephesians 3:16; 2 Timothy 1:7); and the verb ἐνεργεῖν , denoting to work efficaciously, is used to mark its special operation (1 Corinthians 12:11; Ephesians 3:20; Philemon 2:13; Colossians 1:29). It is also closely associated with life, Romans 8:2, Romans 8:6, Romans 8:11, Romans 8:13; 1 Corinthians 15:4, 1 Corinthians 15:5; 2 Corinthians 3:6; Galatians 5:25; Galatians 6:8. It is the common possession of the Church and its members; not an occasional gift, but an essential element and mark of the christian life; not appearing merely or mainly in exceptional, marvelous, ecstatic demonstrations, but as the motive and mainspring of all christian action and feeling. It reveals itself in confession (1 Corinthians 12:3); in the consciousness of sonship (Romans 8:16); in the knowledge of the love of God (Romans 5:5); in the peace and joy of faith (Romans 14:17; 1 Thessalonians 1:6); in hope (Romans 5:5; Romans 15:13). It leads believers (Romans 8:14; Galatians 5:18): they serve in newness of the Spirit (Romans 7:6) They walk after the Spirit (Romans 8:4, Romans 8:5; Galatians 5:16-25). Through the Spirit they are sanctified (2 Thessalonians 2:13). It manifests itself in the diversity of forms and operations, appearing under two main aspects: a difference of gifts, and a difference of functions. See Romans 8:9; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 5:1, 1 Corinthians 5:11; 1 Corinthians 12:13; Ephesians 1:13; Ephesians 4:3, Ephesians 4:4, Ephesians 4:30; Philemon 2:1; [source]
Romans 7:8 Wrought [κατειργάσατο]
The compound verb with κατά downthrough always signifies the bringing to pass or accomplishment. See 1 Timothy 2:9; 1 Corinthians 5:3; 2 Corinthians 7:10. It is used both of evil and good. See especially Romans 7:15, Romans 7:17, Romans 7:18, Romans 7:20. “To man everything forbidden appears as a desirable blessing; but yet, as it is forbidden, he feels that his freedom is limited, and now his lust rages more violently, like the waves against the dyke” (Tholuck). [source]
Romans 7:5 In the flesh [ἐν τῇ σαρκί]
Σάρξ fleshoccurs in the classics in the physical sense only. Homer commonly uses it in the plural as denoting all the flesh or muscles of the body. Later the singular occurs in the same sense. Paul's use of this and other psychological terms must be determined largely by the Old-Testament usage as it appears in the Septuagint. 1. In the physical sense. The literal flesh. In the Septuagint τὰ κρέα flesh(plural) is used where the reference is to the parts of animals slain, and αἱ σάρκες , flesh (plural) where the reference is to flesh as the covering of the living body. Hence Paul uses κρέα in Romans 14:21; 1 Corinthians 8:13, of the flesh of sacrificed animals. Compare also the adjective σάρκιμος fleshy 2 Corinthians 3:3; and Ezekiel 11:19; Ezekiel 36:26, Sept. -DIVIDER-
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2. Kindred. Denoting natural or physical relationship, Romans 1:3; Romans 9:3-8; Romans 11:14; Galatians 4:23, Galatians 4:29; 1 Corinthians 10:18; Philemon 1:16. This usage forms a transition to the following sense: the whole human body. Flesh is the medium in and through which the natural relationship of man manifests itself. Kindred is conceived as based on community of bodily substance. Therefore:-DIVIDER-
3. The body itself. The whole being designated by the part, as being its main substance and characteristic, 1 Corinthians 6:16; 1 Corinthians 7:28; 2 Corinthians 4:11; 2 Corinthians 7:5; 2 Corinthians 10:3; 2 Corinthians 12:7. Romans 2:28; Galatians 6:13, etc. Paul follows the Septuagint in sometimes using σῶμα bodyand sometimes σάρξ fleshin this sense, so that the terms occasionally seem to be practically synonymous. Thus 1 Corinthians 6:16, 1 Corinthians 6:17, where the phrase one body is illustrated and confirmed by one flesh. See Genesis 2:24; Ephesians 5:28, Ephesians 5:31, where the two are apparently interchanged. Compare 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11; 1 Corinthians 5:3, and Colossians 2:5. Σάρξ , however, differs from σῶμα in that it can only signify the organism of an earthly, living being consisting of flesh and bones, and cannot denote “either an earthly organism that is not living, or a living organism that is not earthly” (Wendt, in Dickson). Σῶμα not thus limited. Thus it may denote the organism of the plant (1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38) or the celestial bodies (1 Corinthians 15:40). Hence the two conceptions are related as general and special: σῶμα bodybeing the material organism apart from any definite matter (not from any sort of matter), σάρξ , flesh, the definite, earthly, animal organism. The two are synonymons when σῶμα is used, from the context, of an earthly, animal body. Compare Philemon 1:22; 2 Corinthians 5:1-8. -DIVIDER-
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Σῶμα bodyand not σάρξ fleshis used when the reference is to a metaphorical organism, as the church, Romans 12:4sqq.; 1 Corinthians 10:16; 12:12-27; Ephesians 1:23; Ephesians 2:16; Colossians 1:18, etc. -DIVIDER-
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The σάρξ is described as mortal (2 Corinthians 4:11); subject to infirmity (Galatians 4:13; 2 Corinthians 12:7); locally limited (Colossians 2:15); an object of fostering care (Ephesians 5:29). -DIVIDER-
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4. Living beings generally, including their mental nature, and with a correlated notion of weakness and perishableness. Thus the phrase πᾶσα σάρξ allflesh (Genesis 6:12; Isaiah 49:26; Isaiah 49:23). This accessory notion of weakness stands in contrast with God. In Paul the phrase all flesh is cited from the Old Testament (Romans 3:20; Galatians 2:16) and is used independently (1 Corinthians 1:29). In all these instances before God is added. So in Galatians 1:16, flesh and blood implies a contrast of human with divine wisdom. Compare 1 Corinthians 15:50; Ephesians 6:12. This leads up to-DIVIDER-
5. Man “either as a creature in his natural state apart from Christ, or the creaturely side or aspect of the man in Christ.” Hence it is correlated with ἄνθρωπος man 1 Corinthians 3:3; Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:17. Compare Romans 6:6; Ephesians 4:22; Colossians 3:9; Galatians 5:24. Thus the flesh would seem to be interchangeable with the old man. -DIVIDER-
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It has affections and lusts (Galatians 5:24); willings (Ephesians 2:3; Romans 8:6, Romans 8:7); a mind (Colossians 2:18); a body (Colossians 2:11). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It is in sharp contrast with πνεῦμα spirit(Galatians 3:3, Galatians 3:19; Galatians 5:16, Galatians 5:17, Galatians 5:19-24; Galatians 6:8; Romans 8:4). The flesh and the spirit are thus antagonistic. Σάρξ fleshbefore or in contrast with his reception of the divine element whereby he becomes a new creature in Christ: the whole being of man as it exists and acts apart from the influence of the Spirit. It properly characterizes, therefore, not merely the lower forms of sensual gratification, but all - the highest developments of the life estranged from God, whether physical, intellectual, or aesthetic. -DIVIDER-
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It must be carefully noted:-DIVIDER-
1. That Paul does not identify flesh and sin. Compare, flesh of sin, Romans 8:3. See Romans 7:17, Romans 7:18; 2 Corinthians 7:1; Galatians 2:20. -DIVIDER-
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2. That Paul does not identify σάρξ withthe material body nor associate sin exclusively and predominantly with the body. The flesh is the flesh of the living man animated by the soul ( ψυχή ) as its principle of life, and is distinctly used as coordinate with ἄνθρωπος manAs in the Old Testament, “it embraces in an emphatic manner the nature of man, mental and corporeal, with its internal distinctions.” The spirit as well as the flesh is capable of defilement (2 Corinthians 7:1; compare 1 Corinthians 7:34). Christian life is to be transformed by the renewing of the mind (Romans 12:2; compare Ephesians 4:23). -DIVIDER-
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3. That Paul does not identify the material side of man with evil. The flesh is not the native seat and source of sin. It is only its organ, and the seat of sin's manifestation. Matter is not essentially evil. The logical consequence of this would be that no service of God is possible while the material organism remains. See Romans 12:1. The flesh is not necessarily sinful in itself; but as it has existed from the time of the introduction of sin through Adam, it is recognized by Paul as tainted with sin. Jesus appeared in the flesh, and yet was sinless (2 Corinthians 5:21).The motions of sins ( τὰ παθήματα τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν )Motions used in earlier English for emotions or impulses. Thus Bacon: “He that standeth at a stay where others rise, can hardly avoid motions of envy” (“Essay” xiv.). The word is nearly synonymous with πάθος passion(Romans 1:26, note). From πάθειν tosuffer; a feeling which the mind undergoes, a passion, desire. Rev., sinful passions: which led to sins.Did work ( ἐνηργεῖτο )Rev., wrought. See 2 Corinthians 1:6; 2 Corinthians 4:12; Ephesians 3:20; Galatians 5:6; Philemon 2:13; Colossians 1:29. Compare Mark 6:14, and see on power, John 1:12. [source]

Romans 6:6 The body of sin [τὸ σῶμα τῆς ἁμαρτίας]
Σῶμα in earlier classical usage signifies a corpse. So always in Homer and often in later Greek. So in the New Testament, Matthew 6:25; Mark 5:29; Mark 14:8; Mark 15:43. It is used of men as slaves, Revelation 18:13. Also in classical Greek of the sum-total. So Plato: τὸ τοῦ κόσμου σῶμα thesum-total of the world (“Timaeus,” 31). The meaning is tinged in some cases by the fact of the vital union of the body with the immaterial nature, as being animated by the ψυξή soulthe principle of individual life. Thus Matthew 6:25, where the two are conceived as forming one organism, so that the material ministries which are predicated of the one are predicated of the other, and the meanings of the two merge into one another. -DIVIDER-
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In Paul it can scarcely be said to be used of a dead body, except in a figurative sense, as Romans 8:10, or by inference, 2 Corinthians 5:8. Commonly of a living body. It occurs with ψυχή soulonly 1 Thessalonians 5:23, and there its distinction from ψυχή rather than its union with it is implied. So in Matthew 10:28, though even there the distinction includes the two as one personality. It is used by Paul:-DIVIDER-
1. Of the living human body, Romans 4:19; 1 Corinthians 6:13; 1 Corinthians 9:27; 1 Corinthians 12:12-26. -DIVIDER-
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2. Of the Church as the body of Christ, Romans 12:5; 1 Corinthians 12:27; Ephesians 1:23; Colossians 1:18, etc. Σάρξ fleshnever in this sense. -DIVIDER-
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3. Of plants and heavenly bodies, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:40. -DIVIDER-
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4. Of the glorified body of Christ, Philemon 3:21. -DIVIDER-
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5. Of the spiritual body of risen believers, 1 Corinthians 15:44. -DIVIDER-
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It is distinguished from σάρξ fleshas not being limited to the organism of an earthly, living body, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38. It is the material organism apart from any definite matter. It is however sometimes used as practically synonymous with σάρξ , 1 Corinthians 7:16, 1 Corinthians 7:17; Ephesians 5:28, Ephesians 5:31; 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11. Compare 1 Corinthians 5:3with Colossians 2:5. An ethical conception attaches to it. It is alternated with μέλη membersand the two are associated with sin (Romans 1:24; Romans 6:6; Romans 7:5, Romans 7:24; Romans 8:13; Colossians 3:5), and with sanctification (Romans 12:1; 1 Corinthians 6:19sq.; compare 1 Thessalonians 4:4; 1 Thessalonians 5:23). It is represented as mortal, Romans 8:11; 2 Corinthians 10:10; and as capable of life, 1 Corinthians 13:3; 2 Corinthians 4:10. -DIVIDER-
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In common with μέλη membersit is the instrument of feeling and willing rather than σάρξ , because the object in such cases is to designate the body not definitely as earthly, but generally as organic, Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. Hence, wherever it is viewed with reference to sin or sanctification, it is the outward organ for the execution of the good or bad resolves of the will. -DIVIDER-
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The phrase body of sin denotes the body belonging to, or ruled by, the power of sin, in which the members are instruments of unrighteousness (Romans 6:13). Not the body as containing the principle of evil in our humanity, since Paul does not regard sin as inherent in, and inseparable from, the body (see Romans 6:13; 2 Corinthians 4:10-12; 2 Corinthians 7:1. Compare Matthew 15:19), nor as precisely identical with the old man, an organism or system of evil dispositions, which does not harmonize with Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, where Paul uses body in the strict sense. “Sin is conceived as the master, to whom the body as slave belongs and is obedient to execute its will. As the slave must perform his definite functions, not because he in himself can perform no others, but because of His actually subsistent relationship of service he may perform no others, while of himself he might belong as well to another master and render other services; so the earthly σῶμα bodybelongs not of itself to the ἁμαρτία sinbut may just as well belong to the Lord (1 Corinthians 6:13), and doubtless it is de facto enslaved to sin, so long as a redemption from this state has not set in by virtue of the divine Spirit” (Romans 7:24: Dickson).DestroyedSee on Romans 3:3.He that is dead ( ὁ ἀποθανὼν )Rev., literally, he that hath died. In a physical sense. Death and its consequences are used as the general illustration of the spiritual truth. It is a habit of Paul to throw in such general illustrations. See Romans 7:2. [source]

1 Corinthians 5:3 Being absent [απων]
Have already judged (κρινω — ēdē kekrika). Perfect active indicative of ως παρων — krinō I have already decided or judged, as though present (συναχτεντων υμων — hōs parōn). Paul felt compelled to reach a conclusion about the case and in a sentence of much difficulty seems to conceive an imaginary church court where the culprit has been tried and condemned. There are various ways of punctuating the clauses in this sentence in 1 Corinthians 5:3-5. It is not merely Paul‘s individual judgment. The genitive absolute clause in 1 Corinthians 5:4, ye being gathered together (συναγω — sunachthentōn humōn first aorist passive participle of και του εμου πνευματος — sunagō in regular assembly) and my spirit (εν τωι ονοματι του Κυριου ημων Ιησου — kai tou emou pneumatos) with the assembly (he means) and meeting in the name of our Lord Jesus (συν τηι δυναμει του Κυριου ημων Ιησου — en tōi onomati tou Kuriou ̣hēmōň Iēsou) with the power of the Lord Jesus (παραδουναι — sun tēi dunamei tou Kuriou hēmōn Iēsou), though this clause can be taken with the infinitive to deliver (συναχτεντων — paradounai). It makes good syntax and sense taken either way. The chief difference is that, if taken with “gathered together” (sunachthentōn) Paul assumes less apostolic prerogative to himself. But he did have such power and used it against Elymas (Acts 13:8.) as Peter did against Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1.). [source]
1 Corinthians 5:3 Have already judged [κρινω]
Perfect active indicative of ως παρων — krinō I have already decided or judged, as though present Paul felt compelled to reach a conclusion about the case and in a sentence of much difficulty seems to conceive an imaginary church court where the culprit has been tried and condemned. There are various ways of punctuating the clauses in this sentence in 1 Corinthians 5:3-5. It is not merely Paul‘s individual judgment. The genitive absolute clause in 1 Corinthians 5:4, ye being gathered together It makes good syntax and sense taken either way. The chief difference is that, if taken with “gathered together” (sunachthentōn) Paul assumes less apostolic prerogative to himself. But he did have such power and used it against Elymas (Acts 13:8.) as Peter did against Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1.). [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:12 Know [εἰδέναι]
See on 1 Thessalonians 4:4. Recognize them for what they are, and as entitled to respect because of their office. Comp. ἐπιγινώσκετε acknowledge 1 Corinthians 16:18; and ἐγνώσθης takestknowledge, lxx, Romans href="/desk/?q=ro+12:8&sr=1">Romans 12:8. Used of superintendents of households, 1 Timothy 3:4, 1 Timothy 3:5, 1 Timothy 3:12: of the ruling of elders of the church, 1 Timothy 5:17. It does not indicate a particular ecclesiastical office, but is used functionally. The ecclesiastical nomenclature of the Pauline Epistles is unsettled, corresponding with the fact that the primitive church was not a homogeneous body throughout christendom. The primitive Pauline church consisted of a number of separate fraternities which were self-governing. The recognition of those who ministered to the congregations depended on the free choice of their members. See for instance 1 Corinthians 16:15, 1 Corinthians 16:16. The congregation exercised discipline and gave judgment: 1 Corinthians 5:3-5; 2 Corinthians 2:6, 2 Corinthians 2:7; 2 Corinthians 7:11, 2 Corinthians 7:12; Galatians 6:1. [source]
1 Peter 4:3 To have wrought [κατειργασται]
Perfect middle infinitive of κατεργαζομαι — katergazomai common compound (κατα εργον — kataτο βουλημα — ergon work) as in 1 Corinthians 5:3. [source]
1 Peter 4:3 May suffice [αρκετος]
No copula in the Greek, probably εστιν — estin (is) rather than δυναται — dunatai (can). Late and rare verbal adjective from αρκεω — arkeō to suffice, in the papyri several times, in N.T. only here and Matthew 6:34; Matthew 10:25, apparently referring to Christ‘s words in Matthew 6:34 (possibly an axiom or proverb).To have wrought (κατειργασται — kateirgasthai). Perfect middle infinitive of κατεργαζομαι — katergazomai common compound (κατα εργον — kataτο βουλημα — ergon work) as in 1 Corinthians 5:3.The desire Correct text, not πεπορευμενους — thelēma Either means the thing desired, willed. Jews sometimes fell in with the ways of Gentiles (Romans 2:21-24; Romans 3:9-18; Ephesians 2:1-3) as today some Christians copy the ways of the world.And to have walked (πορευομαι — peporeumenous). Perfect middle participle of κατειργασται — poreuomai in the accusative plural of general reference with the infinitive εν ασελγειαις — kateirgasthai Literally, “having walked or gone.”In lasciviousness All these sins are in the locative case with επιτυμιαις — en “In unbridled lustful excesses” (2 Peter 2:7; 2 Corinthians 12:21).Lusts (οινοπλυγιαις — epithumiais). Cf. 1 Peter 2:11; 1 Peter 4:2.Winebibbings Old compound Old word (from ποτοις — keimai to lie down), rioting drinking parties, in N.T. here and Galatians 5:21; Romans 13:13.Carousings Old word for drinking carousal (from ατεμιτοις ειδωλολατριαις — pinō to drink), here only in the N.T. In the light of these words it seems strange to find modern Christians justifying their “personal liberty” to drink and carouse, to say nothing of the prohibition law. The Greeks actually carried lust and drunkenness into their religious observances (Aphrodite, for instance).Abominable idolatries (ειδωλον λατρεια — athemitois eidōlolatriais). To the Christian all “idolatry,” (τεμιτος — eidōlonτεμιστος — latreia), worship of idols, is “abominable,” not allowed (alpha privative and τεμιζω — themitos ατεμιτος — themistos the old form, verbal of themizō to make lawful), but particularly those associated with drinking and licentiousness. The only other N.T. example of athemitos is by Peter also (Acts 10:28) and about the Mosaic law. That may be the idea here, for Jews often fell into idolatrous practices (Deissmann, Bible Studies, p. 274). [source]

What do the individual words in 1 Corinthians 5:3 mean?

I indeed though being absent - in body being present now in spirit already have judged as the [one] so this having produced
Ἐγὼ μὲν γάρ ἀπὼν τῷ σώματι παρὼν δὲ πνεύματι ἤδη κέκρικα ὡς τὸν οὕτως τοῦτο κατεργασάμενον

μὲν  indeed 
Parse: Particle
Root: μέν  
Sense: truly, certainly, surely, indeed.
γάρ  though 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: γάρ  
Sense: for.
ἀπὼν  being  absent 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἄπειμι1  
Sense: to go away, depart.
τῷ  - 
Parse: Article, Dative Neuter Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
σώματι  in  body 
Parse: Noun, Dative Neuter Singular
Root: σῶμα  
Sense: the body both of men or animals.
παρὼν  being  present 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: πάρειμι  
Sense: to be by, be at hand, to have arrived, to be present.
δὲ  now 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: δέ  
Sense: but, moreover, and, etc.
πνεύματι  in  spirit 
Parse: Noun, Dative Neuter Singular
Root: πνεῦμα  
Sense: a movement of air (a gentle blast.
ἤδη  already 
Parse: Adverb
Root: ἤδη  
Sense: now, already.
κέκρικα  have  judged 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Indicative Active, 1st Person Singular
Root: κρίνω  
Sense: to separate, put asunder, to pick out, select, choose.
τὸν  the  [one] 
Parse: Article, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
οὕτως  so 
Parse: Adverb
Root: οὕτως  
Sense: in this manner, thus, so.
τοῦτο  this 
Parse: Demonstrative Pronoun, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: οὗτος  
Sense: this.
κατεργασάμενον  having  produced 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Middle, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: κατεργάζομαι  
Sense: to perform, accomplish, achieve.