The Meaning of 1 Corinthians 2:13 Explained

1 Corinthians 2:13

KJV: Which things also we speak, not in the words which man's wisdom teacheth, but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; comparing spiritual things with spiritual.

YLT: which things also we speak, not in words taught by human wisdom, but in those taught by the Holy Spirit, with spiritual things spiritual things comparing,

Darby: which also we speak, not in words taught by human wisdom, but in those taught by the Spirit, communicating spiritual things by spiritual means.

ASV: Which things also we speak, not in words which man's wisdom teacheth, but which the Spirit teacheth; combining spiritual things with spiritual words .

What does 1 Corinthians 2:13 Mean?

Study Notes

words
(1) The writers of Scripture invariably affirm, where the subject is mentioned by them at all, that the words of their writings are divinely taught. This, of necessity, refers to the original documents, not to translations and versions; but the labours of competent scholars have brought our English versions to a degree of perfection so remarkable that we may confidently rest upon them as authoritative.
(2) 1 Corinthians 2:9-14 gives the process by which a truth passes from the mind of God to the minds of His people.
(a) The unseen things of God are undiscoverable by the natural man ( 1 Corinthians 2:9 ). (b) These unseen things God has revealed to chosen men ( 1 Corinthians 2:10-12 ). (c) The revealed things are communicated in Spirit-taught words ( 1 Corinthians 2:13 ). This implies neither mechanical dictation nor the effacement of the writer's personality, but only that the Spirit infallibly guides in the choice of words from the writer's own vocabulary ( 1 Corinthians 2:13 ). (d) These Spirit-taught words, in which the revelation has been expressed, are discerned, as to their true spiritual content, only by the spiritual among believers; 1 Corinthians 2:15 ; 1 Corinthians 2:16 ; .
life Eternal life, Summary of the teaching:
(1) The life is called "eternal" because it was from the eternity which is past unto the eternity which is to come--it is the life of God revealed in Jesus Christ, who is God John 1:4 ; John 5:26 ; 1 John 1:1 ; 1 John 1:2
(2) This life of God, which was revealed in Christ, is imparted in a new birth by the Holy Spirit, acting upon the word of God, to every believer on the Lord Jesus Christ John 3:3-15 .
(3) The life thus imparted was from the beginning." But the recipient is a "new creation" 2 Corinthians 5:17 ; Galatians 6:15 .
(4) The life of God which is the believer is an unsevered part of the life which eternally was, and eternally is, in Christ Jesus--one life, in Him and in the believer--Vine and branches; Head and members 1 Corinthians 6:17 ; Galatians 2:20 ; Colossians 1:27 ; Colossians 3:3 ; Colossians 3:4 ; 1 John 5:11 ; 1 John 5:12 ; John 15:1-5 , 1 Corinthians 12:12-14

Verse Meaning

Paul and the other apostles spoke the truths that the Holy Spirit had helped them understand (cf. 1 Corinthians 2:6-7). They did not choose their words because of what people generally regarded as the best ones to persuade. They did not rely on the rhetorical forms that the orators used either. The Holy Spirit guided them in their communication of divine truth as well as in their perception of it. Spiritual thoughts or truths are concepts the Holy Spirit enables us to understand. Spiritual words are those He guides us to use in expressing these thoughts. The Spirit enables us to speak in language appropriate to the message rather than with human wisdom. In short, the Holy Spirit plays an indispensable role both in understanding and in communicating God"s revelation.

Context Summary

1 Corinthians 2:6-16 - God's Wisdom Spiritually Revealed
The perfect are those who are full grown and matured in Christian experience. They need strong meat. For them there are blessed unveilings of the secret things of God, such as the profoundest thinkers of this world have never reached. The words in 1 Corinthians 2:9 must not be applied to heaven alone; in their first intention they belong to us in this mortal life. The human eye that has seen the fairest of earth's things, and the ear that has heard the sweetest strains of human melody, have never experienced the depths of enjoyment of those who have found the love of God in Christ. They who know Christ should not be content with the mere rudiments of the gospel, but should follow on to know those deeper things which evade men who are merely clever, but are revealed to those who are really good.
There are two types of men. There is the spiritual man, whose spirit is the temple and dwelling-place of the Spirit of God. He knows the thoughts of God, because he has a living union with the eternal Mind. And there is the natural man, possessing merely the intellect and conscience of ordinary humanity. [source]

Chapter Summary: 1 Corinthians 2

1  Paul declares that his preaching,
4  though it bring not excellence of speech, or of human wisdom,
5  yet consists in the power of God;
6  and so far excels the wisdom of this world, that the natural man cannot understand it

Greek Commentary for 1 Corinthians 2:13

Which things also we speak [α και λαλουμεν]
This onomatopoetic verb λαλεω — laleō (from λαλα — lȧla), to utter sounds. In the papyri the word calls more attention to the form of utterance while λεγω — legō refers more to the substance. But λαλεω — laleō in the N.T. as here is used of the highest and holiest speech. Undoubtedly Paul employs the word purposely for the utterance of the revelation which he has understood. That is to say, there is revelation (1 Corinthians 2:10), illumination (1 Corinthians 2:12), and inspiration (1 Corinthians 2:13). Paul claims therefore the help of the Holy Spirit for the reception of the revelation, for the understanding of it, for the expression of it. Paul claimed this authority for his preaching (1 Thessalonians 4:2) and for his epistles (2 Thessalonians 3:14). [source]
Not in words which man‘s wisdom teacheth [ουκ εν διδακτοις αντρωπινης σοπιας λογοις]
Literally, “not in words taught by human wisdom.” The verbal adjective διδακτοις — didaktois (from διδασκω — didaskō to teach) is here passive in idea and is followed by the ablative case of origin or source as in John 6:45, εσονται παντες διδακτοι τεου — esontai pantes didaktoi theou (from Isaiah 54:13), “They shall all be taught by God.” The ablative in Greek, as is well known, has the same form as the genitive, though quite different in idea (Robertson, Grammar, p. 516). So then Paul claims the help of the Holy Spirit in the utterance Clearly Paul means that the help of the Holy Spirit in the utterance of the revelation extends to the words. No theory of inspiration is here stated, but it is not mere human wisdom. Paul‘s own Epistles bear eloquent witness to the lofty claim here made. They remain today after nearly nineteen centuries throbbing with the power of the Spirit of God, dynamic with life for the problems of today as when Paul wrote them for the needs of the believers in his time, the greatest epistles of all time, surcharged with the energy of God. Comparing spiritual things with spiritual (πνευματικοις πνευματικα συνκρινοντες — pneumatikois pneumatika sunkrinontes). Each of these words is in dispute. The verb συνκρινω — sunkrinō originally meant to combine, to join together fitly. In the lxx it means to interpret dreams (Genesis 40:8, 22; 41:12) possibly by comparison. In the later Greek it may mean to compare as in 2 Corinthians 10:12. In the papyri Moulton and Milligan (Vocabulary) give it only for “decide,” probably after comparing. But “comparing,” in spite of the translations, does not suit well here. So it is best to follow the original meaning to combine as do Lightfoot and Ellicott. But what gender is πνευματικοις — pneumatikois Is it masculine or neuter like πνευματικα — pneumatika If masculine, the idea would be “interpreting (like lxx) spiritual truths to spiritual persons” or “matching spiritual truths with spiritual persons.” This is a possible rendering and makes good sense in harmony with 1 Corinthians 2:14. If πνευματικοις — pneumatikois be taken as neuter plural (associative instrumental case after συν — sun in συνκρινοντες — sunkrinontes), the idea most naturally would be, “combining spiritual ideas (πνευματικα — pneumatika) with spiritual words” (πνευματικοις — pneumatikois). This again makes good sense in harmony with the first part of 1 Corinthians 2:13. On the whole this is the most natural way to take it, though various other possibilities exist. [source]
Comparing spiritual things with spiritual [πνευματικοις πνευματικα συνκρινοντες]
Each of these words is in dispute. The verb συνκρινω — sunkrinō originally meant to combine, to join together fitly. In the lxx it means to interpret dreams (Genesis 40:8, 22; 41:12) possibly by comparison. In the later Greek it may mean to compare as in 2 Corinthians 10:12. In the papyri Moulton and Milligan (Vocabulary) give it only for “decide,” probably after comparing. But “comparing,” in spite of the translations, does not suit well here. So it is best to follow the original meaning to combine as do Lightfoot and Ellicott. But what gender is πνευματικοις — pneumatikois Is it masculine or neuter like πνευματικα — pneumatika If masculine, the idea would be “interpreting (like lxx) spiritual truths to spiritual persons” or “matching spiritual truths with spiritual persons.” This is a possible rendering and makes good sense in harmony with 1 Corinthians 2:14. If πνευματικοις — pneumatikois be taken as neuter plural (associative instrumental case after συν — sun in συνκρινοντες — sunkrinontes), the idea most naturally would be, “combining spiritual ideas This again makes good sense in harmony with the first part of 1 Corinthians 2:13. On the whole this is the most natural way to take it, though various other possibilities exist. [source]
Not in the words which man's wisdom teacheth []
Lit., not in the taught words of human wisdom. Compare Plato: “Through love all the intercourse and speech of God with man, whether awake or asleep, is carried on. The wisdom which understands this is spiritual; all other wisdom, such as that of arts and handicrafts, is mean and vulgar” (“Symposium,” 203). [source]
Which the Spirit teacheth [ἐν διδακτοῖς πνεύματος]
Lit., in the taught (words ) of the Spirit. Taught; not mechanically uttered, but communicated by a living Spirit. [source]
Comparing spiritual things with spiritual [πνευματικοῖς πνευματικὰ συγκρίνοντες]
Notice the paronomasia. See on Romans 1:29, Romans 1:31. The dispute on this verse arises over the meanings of συγκρίνοντες , A.V., comparing, and πνευματικοῖς spiritualAs to the latter, whether the reference is to spiritual men, things, or words; as to the former, whether the meaning is adapting, interpreting, proving, or comparing. The principal interpretations are: adapting spiritual words to spiritual things; adapting spiritual things to spiritual men; interpreting spiritual things to spiritual men; interpreting spiritual things by spiritual words. Συγκρίνοντες occurs only here and 2 Corinthians 10:12, where the meaning is clearly compare. In classical Greek the original meaning is to compound, and later, to compare, as in Aristotle and Plutarch, and to interpret, used of dreams, and mainly in Septuagint. See Genesis 40:8. The most satisfactory interpretation is combining spiritual things with spiritual words. After speaking of spiritual things (1 Corinthians 2:11, 1 Corinthians 2:12, 1 Corinthians 2:13), Paul now speaks of the forms in which they are conveyed - spiritual forms or words answering to spiritual matters, and says, we combine spiritual things with spiritual forms of expression. This would not be the case if we uttered the revelations of the Spirit in the speech of human wisdom. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for 1 Corinthians 2:13

John 6:45 Taught of God [διδακτοι τεου]
A free quotation from Isaiah 54:13 with this phrase in the lxx. There is here the ablative case τεου — theou with the passive verbal adjective διδακτοι — didaktoi (Robertson, Grammar, p. 516). In 1 Thessalonians 4:9 we have the compound verbal τεοδιδακτοι — theodidaktoi The same use of διδακτος — didaktos with the ablative occurs in 1 Corinthians 2:13. And hath learned Second aorist active participle of μαντανω — manthanō It is not enough to hear God‘s voice. He must heed it and learn it and do it. This is a voluntary response. This one inevitably comes to Christ. [source]
Romans 8:4 The Spirit [πνεῦμα]
From πνέω tobreathe or blow. The primary conception is wind or breath. Breath being the sign and condition of life in man, it comes to signify life. In this sense, physiologically considered, it is frequent in the classics. In the psychological sense, never. In the Old Testament it is ordinarily the translation of ruach It is also used to translate chai life, Isaiah 38:12; nbreath, 1 Kings 17:17. In the New Testament it occurs in the sense of wind or breath, John 3:8; 2 Thessalonians 2:8; Hebrews 1:7. Closely related to the physiological sense are such passages as Luke 8:55; James 2:26; Revelation 13:15. Pauline Usage: 1. Breath, 2 Thessalonians 2:8. 2. The spirit or mind of man; the inward, self-conscious principle which feels and thinks and wills (1 Corinthians 2:11; 1 Corinthians 5:3; 1 Corinthians 7:34; Colossians 2:5). In this sense it is distinguished from σῶμα bodyor accompanied with a personal pronoun in the genitive, as my, our, his spirit (Romans 1:9; Romans 8:16; 1 Corinthians 5:4; 1 Corinthians 16:18, etc.). It is used as parallel with ψυχή souland καρδία heartSee 1 Corinthians 5:3; 1 Thessalonians 2:17; and compare John 13:21and John 12:27; Matthew 26:38and Luke 1:46, Luke 1:47. But while ψυχή soulis represented as the subject of life, πνεύμα spiritrepresents the principle of life, having independent activity in all circumstances of the perceptive and emotional life, and never as the subject. Generally, πνεύμα spiritmay be described as the principle, ψυχή soulas the subject, and καρδία heartas the organ of life. 3. The spiritual nature of Christ. Romans 1:4; 1 Corinthians 15:45; 1 Timothy 3:16. 4. The divine power or influence belonging to God, and communicated in Christ to men, in virtue of which they become πνευματικοί spiritual - recipientsand organs of the Spirit. This is Paul's most common use of the word. Romans 8:9; 1 Corinthians 2:13; Galatians 4:6; Galatians 6:1; 1 Thessalonians 4:8. In this sense it appears as: a. Spirit of God. Romans 8:9, Romans 8:11, Romans 8:14; 1 Corinthians 2:10, 1 Corinthians 2:11, 1 Corinthians 2:12, 1 Corinthians 2:14; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 6:11; 1 Corinthians 7:40; 2 Corinthians 3:3; Ephesians 3:16. b. Spirit of Christ. Romans 8:9; 2 Corinthians 3:17, 2 Corinthians 3:18; Galatians 4:6; Philemon 1:19. c. Holy Spirit. Romans 5:5; 1 Corinthians 6:19; 1 Corinthians 12:3; Ephesians 1:13; 1 Thessalonians 1:5, 1 Thessalonians 1:6; 1 Thessalonians 4:8, etc. d. Spirit. With or without the article, but with its reference to the Spirit of God or Holy Spirit indicated by the context. Romans 8:16, Romans 8:23, Romans 8:26, Romans 8:27; 1 Corinthians 2:4, 1 Corinthians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 12:4, 1 Corinthians 12:7, 1 Corinthians 12:8, 1 Corinthians 12:9; Ephesians 4:3; 2 Thessalonians 2:13, etc. 5. A power or influence, the character, manifestations, or results of which are more peculiarly defined by qualifying genitives. Thus spirit of meekness, faith, power, wisdom. Romans 8:2, Romans 8:15; 1 Corinthians 4:21; 2 Corinthians 4:13; Galatians 6:1; Ephesians 1:17; 2 Timothy 1:7, etc. These combinations with the genitives are not mere periphrases for a faculty or disposition of man. By the spirit of meekness or wisdom, for instance, is not meant merely a meek or wise spirit; but that meekness, wisdom, power, etc., are gifts of the Spirit of God. This usage is according to Old Testament analogy. Compare Exodus 28:3; Exodus 31:3; Exodus 35:31; Isaiah 11:2. 6. In the plural, used of spiritual gifts or of those who profess to be under spiritual influence, 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 14:12. 7. Powers or influences alien or averse from the divine Spirit, but with some qualifying word. Thus, the spirit of the world; another spirit; spirit of slumber. Romans 11:8; 1 Corinthians 2:12; 2 Corinthians 11:4; Ephesians 2:2; 2 Timothy 1:7. Where these expressions are in negative form they are framed after the analogy of the positive counterpart with which they are placed in contrast. Thus Romans 8:15: “Ye have not received the spirit of bondage, but of adoption. In other cases, as Ephesians 2:2, where the expression is positive, the conception is shaped according to Old-Testament usage, where spirits of evil are conceived as issuing from, and dependent upon, God, so far as He permits their operation and makes them subservient to His own ends. See Judges 9:23; 1 Samuel 16:14-16, 1 Samuel 16:23; 1 Samuel 18:10; 1 Kings 22:21sqq.; Isaiah 19:4. Spirit is found contrasted with letter, Romans 2:29; Romans 7:6; 2 Corinthians 3:6. With flesh, Romans 8:1-13; Galatians 5:16, Galatians 5:24. It is frequently associated with the idea of power (Romans 1:4; Romans 15:13, Romans 15:19; 1 Corinthians 2:4; Galatians 3:5; Ephesians 3:16; 2 Timothy 1:7); and the verb ἐνεργεῖν , denoting to work efficaciously, is used to mark its special operation (1 Corinthians 12:11; Ephesians 3:20; Philemon 2:13; Colossians 1:29). It is also closely associated with life, Romans 8:2, Romans 8:6, Romans 8:11, Romans 8:13; 1 Corinthians 15:4, Galatians 5:16-25; 2 Corinthians 3:6; Galatians 5:25; Galatians 6:8. It is the common possession of the Church and its members; not an occasional gift, but an essential element and mark of the christian life; not appearing merely or mainly in exceptional, marvelous, ecstatic demonstrations, but as the motive and mainspring of all christian action and feeling. It reveals itself in confession (1 Corinthians 12:3); in the consciousness of sonship (Romans 8:16); in the knowledge of the love of God (Romans 5:5); in the peace and joy of faith (Romans 14:17; 1 Thessalonians 1:6); in hope (Romans 5:5; Romans 15:13). It leads believers (Romans 8:14; Galatians 5:18): they serve in newness of the Spirit (Romans 7:6) They walk after the Spirit (Romans 8:4, Romans 8:5; 1 Corinthians 15:5). Through the Spirit they are sanctified (2 Thessalonians 2:13). It manifests itself in the diversity of forms and operations, appearing under two main aspects: a difference of gifts, and a difference of functions. See Romans 8:9; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 5:1, 1 Corinthians 5:11; 1 Corinthians 12:13; Ephesians 1:13; Ephesians 4:3, Ephesians 4:4, Ephesians 4:30; Philemon 2:1; [source]
1 Corinthians 10:13 Common to man [ἀνθρώπινος]
The word means what belongs to men, human. It occurs mostly in this epistle; once in Romans 6:19, meaning after the manner of men, popularly (see note). See James 3:7; 1 Peter 2:13; 1 Corinthians 2:4, 1 Corinthians 2:13; 1 Corinthians 4:3. It may mean here a temptation which is human, i.e., incident or common to man, as A.V., or, inferentially, a temptation adapted to human strength; such as man can bear, Rev. The words are added as an encouragement, to offset the warning “let him that thinketh,” etc. They are in danger and must watch, but the temptation will not be beyond their strength. [source]
1 Corinthians 2:13 Comparing spiritual things with spiritual [πνευματικοῖς πνευματικὰ συγκρίνοντες]
Notice the paronomasia. See on Romans 1:29, Romans 1:31. The dispute on this verse arises over the meanings of συγκρίνοντες , A.V., comparing, and πνευματικοῖς spiritualAs to the latter, whether the reference is to spiritual men, things, or words; as to the former, whether the meaning is adapting, interpreting, proving, or comparing. The principal interpretations are: adapting spiritual words to spiritual things; adapting spiritual things to spiritual men; interpreting spiritual things to spiritual men; interpreting spiritual things by spiritual words. Συγκρίνοντες occurs only here and 2 Corinthians 10:12, where the meaning is clearly compare. In classical Greek the original meaning is to compound, and later, to compare, as in Aristotle and Plutarch, and to interpret, used of dreams, and mainly in Septuagint. See Genesis 40:8. The most satisfactory interpretation is combining spiritual things with spiritual words. After speaking of spiritual things (1 Corinthians 2:11, 1 Corinthians 2:12, 1 Corinthians 2:13), Paul now speaks of the forms in which they are conveyed - spiritual forms or words answering to spiritual matters, and says, we combine spiritual things with spiritual forms of expression. This would not be the case if we uttered the revelations of the Spirit in the speech of human wisdom. [source]
1 Corinthians 2:13 Which things also we speak [α και λαλουμεν]
This onomatopoetic verb λαλεω — laleō (from λαλα — lȧla), to utter sounds. In the papyri the word calls more attention to the form of utterance while λεγω — legō refers more to the substance. But λαλεω — laleō in the N.T. as here is used of the highest and holiest speech. Undoubtedly Paul employs the word purposely for the utterance of the revelation which he has understood. That is to say, there is revelation (1 Corinthians 2:10), illumination (1 Corinthians 2:12), and inspiration (1 Corinthians 2:13). Paul claims therefore the help of the Holy Spirit for the reception of the revelation, for the understanding of it, for the expression of it. Paul claimed this authority for his preaching (1 Thessalonians 4:2) and for his epistles (2 Thessalonians 3:14). [source]
1 Corinthians 2:13 Not in words which man‘s wisdom teacheth [ουκ εν διδακτοις αντρωπινης σοπιας λογοις]
Literally, “not in words taught by human wisdom.” The verbal adjective διδακτοις — didaktois (from διδασκω — didaskō to teach) is here passive in idea and is followed by the ablative case of origin or source as in John 6:45, εσονται παντες διδακτοι τεου — esontai pantes didaktoi theou (from Isaiah 54:13), “They shall all be taught by God.” The ablative in Greek, as is well known, has the same form as the genitive, though quite different in idea (Robertson, Grammar, p. 516). So then Paul claims the help of the Holy Spirit in the utterance Clearly Paul means that the help of the Holy Spirit in the utterance of the revelation extends to the words. No theory of inspiration is here stated, but it is not mere human wisdom. Paul‘s own Epistles bear eloquent witness to the lofty claim here made. They remain today after nearly nineteen centuries throbbing with the power of the Spirit of God, dynamic with life for the problems of today as when Paul wrote them for the needs of the believers in his time, the greatest epistles of all time, surcharged with the energy of God. Comparing spiritual things with spiritual (πνευματικοις πνευματικα συνκρινοντες — pneumatikois pneumatika sunkrinontes). Each of these words is in dispute. The verb συνκρινω — sunkrinō originally meant to combine, to join together fitly. In the lxx it means to interpret dreams (Genesis 40:8, 22; 41:12) possibly by comparison. In the later Greek it may mean to compare as in 2 Corinthians 10:12. In the papyri Moulton and Milligan (Vocabulary) give it only for “decide,” probably after comparing. But “comparing,” in spite of the translations, does not suit well here. So it is best to follow the original meaning to combine as do Lightfoot and Ellicott. But what gender is πνευματικοις — pneumatikois Is it masculine or neuter like πνευματικα — pneumatika If masculine, the idea would be “interpreting (like lxx) spiritual truths to spiritual persons” or “matching spiritual truths with spiritual persons.” This is a possible rendering and makes good sense in harmony with 1 Corinthians 2:14. If πνευματικοις — pneumatikois be taken as neuter plural (associative instrumental case after συν — sun in συνκρινοντες — sunkrinontes), the idea most naturally would be, “combining spiritual ideas (πνευματικα — pneumatika) with spiritual words” (πνευματικοις — pneumatikois). This again makes good sense in harmony with the first part of 1 Corinthians 2:13. On the whole this is the most natural way to take it, though various other possibilities exist. [source]
1 Corinthians 2:13 Comparing spiritual things with spiritual [πνευματικοις πνευματικα συνκρινοντες]
Each of these words is in dispute. The verb συνκρινω — sunkrinō originally meant to combine, to join together fitly. In the lxx it means to interpret dreams (Genesis 40:8, 22; 41:12) possibly by comparison. In the later Greek it may mean to compare as in 2 Corinthians 10:12. In the papyri Moulton and Milligan (Vocabulary) give it only for “decide,” probably after comparing. But “comparing,” in spite of the translations, does not suit well here. So it is best to follow the original meaning to combine as do Lightfoot and Ellicott. But what gender is πνευματικοις — pneumatikois Is it masculine or neuter like πνευματικα — pneumatika If masculine, the idea would be “interpreting (like lxx) spiritual truths to spiritual persons” or “matching spiritual truths with spiritual persons.” This is a possible rendering and makes good sense in harmony with 1 Corinthians 2:14. If πνευματικοις — pneumatikois be taken as neuter plural (associative instrumental case after συν — sun in συνκρινοντες — sunkrinontes), the idea most naturally would be, “combining spiritual ideas This again makes good sense in harmony with the first part of 1 Corinthians 2:13. On the whole this is the most natural way to take it, though various other possibilities exist. [source]
2 Corinthians 1:12 Not in fleshly wisdom [ouk en sophiāi sarkikēi)]
See 1 Corinthians 1:17; 1 Corinthians 2:4, 1 Corinthians 2:13. Paul uses sarkikos five times and it occurs only twice elsewhere in N.T. See note on 1 Corinthians 3:3. We behaved ourselves (ουκ εν σοπιαι σαρκικηι — anestraphēmen). Second aorist passive indicative of anastrephō old verb, to turn back, to turn back and forth, to walk. Here the passive is used as in late Greek as if middle. More abundantly to you-ward They had more abundant opportunity to observe how scrupulous Paul was (Acts 18:11). [source]
2 Corinthians 10:12 To number or compare ourselves [ενκριναι η συνκριναι]
Paronomasia here, play on the two words. Ενκριναι — Enkrinai is first aorist active infinitive of old verb, but here only in N.T., to judge among, to judge one as worthy to be numbered among as here. The second verb συνκριναι — sunkrinai (first aorist active infinitive of συνκρινω — sunkrinō old verb, in N.T. only here and 1 Corinthians 2:13) originally meant to combine as in 1 Corinthians 2:13 (which see), but here it has the sense of “compare” not found in the old Greek. The papyri use it to mean to decide. Plummer suggests “to pair and compare” for the play on the words here. [source]
2 Corinthians 1:12 The testimony of our conscience [το μαρτυριον της συνειδησεως ημων]
In apposition with καυχησις — kauchēsis Sincerity of God (ειλικρινειαι του τεου — eilikrineiāi tou theou). Like δικαιοσυνη τεου — dikaiosunē theou (Romans 1:17; Romans 3:21), the God-kind of righteousness. So the God-kind (genitive case) of sincerity. Late word from ειλικρινης — eilikrinēs See note on 1 Corinthians 5:8. Not in fleshly wisdom See 1 Corinthians 1:17; 1 Corinthians 2:4, 1 Corinthians 2:13. Paul uses sarkikos five times and it occurs only twice elsewhere in N.T. See note on 1 Corinthians 3:3. We behaved ourselves (ουκ εν σοπιαι σαρκικηι — anestraphēmen). Second aorist passive indicative of anastrephō old verb, to turn back, to turn back and forth, to walk. Here the passive is used as in late Greek as if middle. More abundantly to you-ward They had more abundant opportunity to observe how scrupulous Paul was (Acts 18:11). [source]

What do the individual words in 1 Corinthians 2:13 mean?

which also we speak not in taught of human wisdom words but in [those] of [the] Spirit by spiritual [means] spiritual things communicating
καὶ λαλοῦμεν οὐκ ἐν διδακτοῖς ἀνθρωπίνης σοφίας λόγοις ἀλλ’ ἐν Πνεύματος πνευματικοῖς πνευματικὰ συνκρίνοντες

καὶ  also 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: καί  
Sense: and, also, even, indeed, but.
λαλοῦμεν  we  speak 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 1st Person Plural
Root: ἀπολαλέω 
Sense: to utter a voice or emit a sound.
διδακτοῖς  taught 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Masculine Plural
Root: διδακτός  
Sense: that can be taught.
ἀνθρωπίνης  of  human 
Parse: Adjective, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: ἀνθρώπινος  
Sense: human.
σοφίας  wisdom 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: σοφία  
Sense: wisdom, broad and full of intelligence; used of the knowledge of very diverse matters.
λόγοις  words 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Plural
Root: λόγος  
Sense: of speech.
ἐν  in  [those] 
Parse: Preposition
Root: ἐν 
Sense: in, by, with etc.
Πνεύματος  of  [the]  Spirit 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Neuter Singular
Root: πνεῦμα  
Sense: a movement of air (a gentle blast.
πνευματικοῖς  by  spiritual  [means] 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Neuter Plural
Root: πνευματικός  
Sense: relating to the human spirit, or rational soul, as part of the man which is akin to God and serves as his instrument or organ.
πνευματικὰ  spiritual  things 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Neuter Plural
Root: πνευματικός  
Sense: relating to the human spirit, or rational soul, as part of the man which is akin to God and serves as his instrument or organ.
συνκρίνοντες  communicating 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: συγκρίνω  
Sense: to joint together fitly, compound, combine.