The Meaning of Matthew 6:25 Explained

Matthew 6:25

KJV: Therefore I say unto you, Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on. Is not the life more than meat, and the body than raiment?

YLT: 'Because of this I say to you, be not anxious for your life, what ye may eat, and what ye may drink, nor for your body, what ye may put on. Is not the life more than the nourishment, and the body than the clothing?

Darby: For this cause I say unto you, Do not be careful about your life, what ye should eat and what ye should drink; nor for your body what ye should put on. Is not the life more than food, and the body than raiment?

ASV: Therefore I say unto you, be not anxious for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on. Is not the life more than the food, and the body than the raiment?

What does Matthew 6:25 Mean?

Verse Meaning

"Therefore" draws a conclusion from what has preceded ( Matthew 6:19-24). Since God has given us life and a body, He will certainly also provide what we need to maintain them (cf. Luke 12:22-31; Philippians 4:6-7; Hebrews 13:5; 1 Peter 5:7). This argument is a fortiori, or qal wahomer, "How much more ...?" It is wrong, therefore, for a disciple to fret about such things. We should simply trust and obey God and get on with fulfilling our divinely revealed calling in life.

Context Summary

Matthew 6:19-26 - What To Seek And Whom To Serve
What is in our inner life which answers to the eye of the body? Some have said that it is the intellect; others the heart. But it is truer to say that it is the inner purpose and intention of the soul.
When our physical eye is in an unhealthy condition, the image is doubled and blurred. To use a common expression, it has a squint, such as affected the noble face of Edward Irving, the noted English clergyman. We are told that as a babe he was laid in a wooden cradle, in the side of which was a small hole through which he watched what was going on. This distorted his vision through life. So we may look two ways at once.
The endeavor to serve God and mammon, to stand well with both worlds, to lay up treasures on earth and at the same time be rich toward God, is a spiritual squint. John Bunyan tells of Mr. Facing-Both-Ways, who kept one eye on heaven and the other on earth; who sincerely professed one thing and sincerely did another. He tried to cheat God and Devil, but in the end cheated only himself and his neighbors. [source]

Chapter Summary: Matthew 6

1  Giving to the Needy
5  The Lord's Prayer
16  Proper Fasting
19  Store up Treasures in Heaven
25  Do Not Worry
33  but seek God's kingdom

Greek Commentary for Matthew 6:25

Be not anxious for your life [μη μεριμνατε τηι πσυχηι μων]
This is as good a translation as the Authorized Version was poor; “Take no thought for your life.” The old English word “thought” meant anxiety or worry as Shakespeare says:“The native hue of resolution Is sicklied o‘er with the pale cast of thought.”Vincent quotes Bacon (Henry VII): “Harris, an alderman of London, was put in trouble and died with thought and anguish.” But words change with time and now this passage is actually quoted (Lightfoot) “as an objection to the moral teaching of the Sermon on the Mount, on the ground that it encouraged, nay, commanded, a reckless neglect of the future.” We have narrowed the word to mere planning without any notion of anxiety which is in the Greek word. The verb μεριμναω — merimnaō is from μερισ μεριζω — meris class="normal greek">παγωμεν πιωμεν περιβαλωμετα — merizō because care or anxiety distracts and divides. It occurs in Christ‘s rebuke to Martha for her excessive solicitude about something to eat (Luke 10:41). The notion of proper care and forethought appears in 1 Corinthians 7:32; 1 Corinthians 12:25; Philemon 2:20. It is here the present imperative with the negative, a command not to have the habit of petulant worry about food and clothing, a source of anxiety to many housewives, a word for women especially as the command not to worship mammon may be called a word for men. The command can mean that they must stop such worry if already indulging in it. In Matthew 6:31 Jesus repeats the prohibition with the ingressive aorist subjunctive: “Do not become anxious,” “Do not grow anxious.” Here the direct question with the deliberative subjunctive occurs with each verb (περιβαλωμετα — phagōmen class="normal greek">ενδυσηστε — piōmen class="normal greek">τηι πσυχηι — peribalōmetha). This deliberative subjunctive of the direct question is retained in the indirect question employed in Matthew 6:25. A different verb for clothing occurs, both in the indirect middle (πσυχηι — peribalōmetha fling round ourselves in Matthew 6:31, σωμα — endusēsthe put on yourselves in Matthew 6:25).For your life (Πσυχη — tēi psuchēi). “Here καρδια — psuchēi stands for the life principle common to man and beast, which is embodied in the διανοια — sōma the former needs food, the latter clothing” (McNeile). πνευμα — Psuchē in the Synoptic Gospels occurs in three senses (McNeile): either the life principle in the body as here and which man may kill (Mark 3:4) or the seat of the thoughts and emotions on a par with πσυχη — kardia and dianoia (Matthew 22:37) and pneuma (Luke 1:46; cf. John 12:27; John 13:21) or something higher that makes up the real self (Matthew 10:28; Matthew 16:26). In Matthew 16:25 (Luke 9:25) psuchē appears in two senses paradoxical use, saving life and losing it. -DIVIDER-
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[source]

Take no thought [μὴ μεριμνᾶτε]
The cognate noun is μέριμνα , care, which was formerly derived from μερίς , a part; μερίζω , to divide; and was explained accordingly as a dividing care, distracting the heart from the true object of life, This has been abandoned, however, and the word is placed in a group which carries the common notion of earnest thoughtfulness. It may include the ideas of worry and anxiety, and may emphasize these, but not necessarily. See, for example, “careth for the things of the Lord” (1 Corinthians 7:32). “That the members should have the same care one for another” (1 Corinthians 12:25). “Who will care for your state?” (Philemon 2:20). In all these the sense of worry would be entirely out of place. In other cases that idea is prominent, as, “the care of this world,” which chokes the good seed (Matthew 13:22; compare Luke 8:14). Of Martha; “Thou art careful ” (Luke 10:41). Take thought, in this passage, was a truthful rendering when the A. V. was made, since thought was then used as equivalent to anxiety or solicitude. So Shakspeare (“Hamlet”):“The native hue of resolutionIs sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought. ” And Bacon (Henry VII.): “Hawis, an alderman of London, was put in trouble, and died with thought and anguish.” Somers' “Tracts” (in Queen Elizabeth's reign): “Queen Catherine Parr died rather of thought. ” The word has entirely lost this meaning. Bishop Lightfoot (“On a Fresh Revision of the New Testament”) says: “I have heard of a political economist alleging this passage as an objection to the moral teaching of the sermon on the mount, on the ground that it encouraged, nay, commanded, a reckless neglect of the future.” It is uneasiness and worry about the future which our Lord condemns here, and therefore Rev. rightly translates be not anxious. This phase of the word is forcibly brought out in 1 Peter 5:7, where the A. V. ignores the distinction between the two kinds of care. “Casting all your care ( μέριμναν , Rev., anxiety )-DIVIDER-
upon Him, for He careth ( αὐτῷ μέλει )-DIVIDER-
for you,” with a fatherly, tender, and provident care.”-DIVIDER-
[source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Matthew 6:25

Matthew 10:19 Take no thought [μὴ μεριμνήσητε]
Rev., Be not anxious. See on Matthew 6:25. [source]
Matthew 6:25 Be not anxious for your life [μη μεριμνατε τηι πσυχηι μων]
This is as good a translation as the Authorized Version was poor; “Take no thought for your life.” The old English word “thought” meant anxiety or worry as Shakespeare says:“The native hue of resolution Is sicklied o‘er with the pale cast of thought.”Vincent quotes Bacon (Henry VII): “Harris, an alderman of London, was put in trouble and died with thought and anguish.” But words change with time and now this passage is actually quoted (Lightfoot) “as an objection to the moral teaching of the Sermon on the Mount, on the ground that it encouraged, nay, commanded, a reckless neglect of the future.” We have narrowed the word to mere planning without any notion of anxiety which is in the Greek word. The verb μεριμναω — merimnaō is from μερισ μεριζω — meris class="normal greek">παγωμεν πιωμεν περιβαλωμετα — merizō because care or anxiety distracts and divides. It occurs in Christ‘s rebuke to Martha for her excessive solicitude about something to eat (Luke 10:41). The notion of proper care and forethought appears in 1 Corinthians 7:32; 1 Corinthians 12:25; Philemon 2:20. It is here the present imperative with the negative, a command not to have the habit of petulant worry about food and clothing, a source of anxiety to many housewives, a word for women especially as the command not to worship mammon may be called a word for men. The command can mean that they must stop such worry if already indulging in it. In Matthew 6:31 Jesus repeats the prohibition with the ingressive aorist subjunctive: “Do not become anxious,” “Do not grow anxious.” Here the direct question with the deliberative subjunctive occurs with each verb (περιβαλωμετα — phagōmen class="normal greek">ενδυσηστε — piōmen class="normal greek">τηι πσυχηι — peribalōmetha). This deliberative subjunctive of the direct question is retained in the indirect question employed in Matthew 6:25. A different verb for clothing occurs, both in the indirect middle (πσυχηι — peribalōmetha fling round ourselves in Matthew 6:31, σωμα — endusēsthe put on yourselves in Matthew 6:25).For your life (Πσυχη — tēi psuchēi). “Here καρδια — psuchēi stands for the life principle common to man and beast, which is embodied in the διανοια — sōma the former needs food, the latter clothing” (McNeile). πνευμα — Psuchē in the Synoptic Gospels occurs in three senses (McNeile): either the life principle in the body as here and which man may kill (Mark 3:4) or the seat of the thoughts and emotions on a par with πσυχη — kardia and dianoia (Matthew 22:37) and pneuma (Luke 1:46; cf. John 12:27; John 13:21) or something higher that makes up the real self (Matthew 10:28; Matthew 16:26). In Matthew 16:25 (Luke 9:25) psuchē appears in two senses paradoxical use, saving life and losing it. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

Mark 13:11 Take no thought beforehand [μὴ προμεριμνᾶτε]
See on Matthew 6:25. [source]
Mark 13:11 Be not anxious beforehand what ye shall speak [μη προμεριμνατε τι λαλησητε]
Negative with present imperative to make a general prohibition or habit. Jesus is not here referring to preaching, but to defences made before these councils and governors. A typical example is seen in the courage and skill of Peter and John before the Sanhedrin in Acts. The verb μεριμναω — merimnaō is from μεριζω — merizō (μερις — meris), to be drawn in opposite directions, to be distracted. See Matthew 6:25. They are not to be stricken with fright beforehand, but to face fearlessly those in high places who are seeking to overthrow the preaching of the gospel. There is no excuse here for the lazy preacher who fails to prepare his sermon out of the mistaken reliance upon the Holy Spirit. They will need and will receive the special help of the Holy Spirit (cf. John 14-16). [source]
Luke 21:34 Cares [μερίμναις]
See on Matthew 6:25. [source]
Luke 12:22 Take no thought []
See on Matthew 6:25. [source]
Luke 10:41 Thou art anxious [μεριμνᾷς]
See on Matthew 6:25. [source]
Luke 11:3 Daily bread [τὸν ἄρτον τὸν ἐπιούσιον]
Great differences of opinion exist among commentators as to the strict meaning of the word rendered daily. The principal explanations are the following:1.From ἐπιέναι , to come on. Hence,a. The coming, or to-morrow's bread. b.Daily: regarding the days in their future succession. -DIVIDER-
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c.Continual. d.Yet to come, applied to Christ, the Bread of life, who is to come hereafter.2.From ἐπί and οὐσία , being. Hence,a.For our sustenance (physical), and so necessary. b. For our essential life (spiritual). -DIVIDER-
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c. Above all being, hence pre-eminent, excellent. -DIVIDER-
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d. Abundant.It would be profitless to the English reader to go into the discussion. A scholar is quoted as saying that the term is “the rack of theologians and grammarians.” A satisfactory discussion must assume the reader's knowledge of Greek. Those who are interested in the question will find it treated by Tholuck (“Sermon on the Mount”), and also very exhaustively by Bishop Lightfoot (“On a Fresh Revision of the New Testament”). The latter adopts the derivation from ἐπιέναι , to come on, and concludes by saying, “the familiar rendering, daily, which has prevailed uninterruptedly in the Western Church from the beginning, is a fairly adequate representation of the original; nor, indeed, does the English language furnish any one word which would answer the purpose so well.” The rendering in the margin of Rev. is, our bread for the coming day. It is objected to this that it contradicts the Lord's precept in Matthew 6:34:, not to be anxious for the morrow. But the word does not necessarily mean the morrow. “If the prayer were said in the evening, no doubt it would mean the following day; but supposing it to be used before dawn, it would designate the day then breaking” (the coming day). “And further, if the command not to be anxious is tantamount to a prohibition against prayer for the object about which we are forbidden to be anxious, then not only must we not pray for to-morrow's food, but we must not pray for food at all; since the Lord bids us (Matthew 6:25) not to be anxious for our life ” (Lightfoot, condensed). [source]

Luke 10:41 Art anxious [μεριμναις]
An old verb for worry and anxiety from μεριζω — merizō (μερις — meris part) to be divided, distracted. Jesus had warned against this in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 6:25, Matthew 6:28, Matthew 6:31, Matthew 6:34. See also Luke 12:11, Luke 12:22, Luke 12:26). [source]
Luke 12:22 Unto his disciples [προς τους ματητας αυτου]
So Jesus turns from the crowd to the disciples (verses 22-40, when Peter interrupts the discourse). From here to the end of the chapter Luke gives material that appears in Matthew, but not in one connection as here. In Matthew part of it is in the charge to the Twelve on their tour in Galilee, part in the eschatological discourse on the Mount of Olives. None of it is in Mark. Hence Q or the Logia seems to be the source of it. The question recurs again whether Jesus repeated on other occasions what is given here or whether Luke has here put together separate discourses as Matthew is held by many to have done in the Sermon on the Mount. We have no way of deciding these points. We can only say again that Jesus would naturally repeat his favourite sayings like other popular preachers and teachers. So Luke 12:22-31 corresponds to Matthew 6:25-33, which see notes for detailed discussion. The parable of the rich fool was spoken to the crowd, but this exhortation to freedom from care (Luke 12:22) is to the disciples. So the language in Luke 12:22 is precisely that in Matthew 6:25. See there for μη μεριμνατε — mē merimnāte (stop being anxious) and the deliberative subjunctive retained in the indirect question So Luke 12:23 here is the same in Matthew 6:25 except that there it is a question with γαρ — ouch expecting the affirmative answer, whereas here it is given as a reason (gar for) for the preceding command. [source]
Romans 6:6 The body of sin [τὸ σῶμα τῆς ἁμαρτίας]
Σῶμα in earlier classical usage signifies a corpse. So always in Homer and often in later Greek. So in the New Testament, Matthew 6:25; Mark 5:29; Mark 14:8; Mark 15:43. It is used of men as slaves, Revelation 18:13. Also in classical Greek of the sum-total. So Plato: τὸ τοῦ κόσμου σῶμα thesum-total of the world (“Timaeus,” 31). The meaning is tinged in some cases by the fact of the vital union of the body with the immaterial nature, as being animated by the ψυξή soulthe principle of individual life. Thus Matthew 6:25, where the two are conceived as forming one organism, so that the material ministries which are predicated of the one are predicated of the other, and the meanings of the two merge into one another. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In Paul it can scarcely be said to be used of a dead body, except in a figurative sense, as Romans 8:10, or by inference, 2 Corinthians 5:8. Commonly of a living body. It occurs with ψυχή soulonly 1 Thessalonians 5:23, and there its distinction from ψυχή rather than its union with it is implied. So in Matthew 10:28, though even there the distinction includes the two as one personality. It is used by Paul:-DIVIDER-
1. Of the living human body, Romans 4:19; 1 Corinthians 6:13; 1 Corinthians 9:27; 1 Corinthians 12:12-26. -DIVIDER-
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2. Of the Church as the body of Christ, Romans 12:5; 1 Corinthians 12:27; Ephesians 1:23; Colossians 1:18, etc. Σάρξ fleshnever in this sense. -DIVIDER-
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3. Of plants and heavenly bodies, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:40. -DIVIDER-
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4. Of the glorified body of Christ, Philemon 3:21. -DIVIDER-
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5. Of the spiritual body of risen believers, 1 Corinthians 15:44. -DIVIDER-
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It is distinguished from σάρξ fleshas not being limited to the organism of an earthly, living body, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38. It is the material organism apart from any definite matter. It is however sometimes used as practically synonymous with σάρξ , 1 Corinthians 7:16, 1 Corinthians 7:17; Ephesians 5:28, Ephesians 5:31; 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11. Compare 1 Corinthians 5:3with Colossians 2:5. An ethical conception attaches to it. It is alternated with μέλη membersand the two are associated with sin (Romans 1:24; Romans 6:6; Romans 7:5, Romans 7:24; Romans 8:13; Colossians 3:5), and with sanctification (2 Corinthians 4:10-121; 1 Corinthians 6:19sq.; compare 1 Thessalonians 4:4; 1 Thessalonians 5:23). It is represented as mortal, Romans 8:11; 2 Corinthians 10:10; and as capable of life, 1 Corinthians 13:3; 2 Corinthians 4:10. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In common with μέλη membersit is the instrument of feeling and willing rather than σάρξ , because the object in such cases is to designate the body not definitely as earthly, but generally as organic, Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. Hence, wherever it is viewed with reference to sin or sanctification, it is the outward organ for the execution of the good or bad resolves of the will. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The phrase body of sin denotes the body belonging to, or ruled by, the power of sin, in which the members are instruments of unrighteousness (Romans 6:13). Not the body as containing the principle of evil in our humanity, since Paul does not regard sin as inherent in, and inseparable from, the body (see Romans 6:13; 1618395195_53; 2 Corinthians 7:1. Compare Matthew 15:19), nor as precisely identical with the old man, an organism or system of evil dispositions, which does not harmonize with Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, where Paul uses body in the strict sense. “Sin is conceived as the master, to whom the body as slave belongs and is obedient to execute its will. As the slave must perform his definite functions, not because he in himself can perform no others, but because of His actually subsistent relationship of service he may perform no others, while of himself he might belong as well to another master and render other services; so the earthly σῶμα bodybelongs not of itself to the ἁμαρτία sinbut may just as well belong to the Lord (1 Corinthians 6:13), and doubtless it is de facto enslaved to sin, so long as a redemption from this state has not set in by virtue of the divine Spirit” (Romans 7:24: Dickson).DestroyedSee on Romans 3:3.He that is dead ( ὁ ἀποθανὼν )Rev., literally, he that hath died. In a physical sense. Death and its consequences are used as the general illustration of the spiritual truth. It is a habit of Paul to throw in such general illustrations. See Romans 7:2. [source]

1 Corinthians 7:32 Without carefulness [ἀμερίμνους]
Not a good translation, because carefulness has lost its earlier sense of anxiety. So Latimer: “This wicked carefulness of men, when they seek how to live - like as if there were no God at all.” See on take no thought, Matthew 6:25. Rev., free from cares. Ignatius uses the phrase ἐν ἀμεριμνίᾳ Θεοῦ ingodly carelessness (Polycarp, 7). [source]
Philippians 4:6 Be careful [μεριμνᾶτε]
See on Matthew 6:25. Rev., better, be anxious. [source]
Hebrews 11:4 A more excellent sacrifice [πλείονα θυσίαν]
Greater in value in God's eyes. For πλείων in this sense, see Hebrews 3:3; Matthew 6:25; Luke 11:31; Luke 12:23. In Paul never in this sense. Others explain a more abundant sacrifice, referring to the material character of the offerings. See Genesis 4:4. But the difference between the offerings of Abel and Cain, considered in themselves, is largely a matter of speculation, and, as Lünemann justly remarks, such an interpretation accentuates unduly a purely external feature. [source]
Hebrews 11:4 A more excellent sacrifice [πλειονα τυσιαν]
Literally, “more sacrifice” (comparative of πολυς — polus much). For this rather free use of πλειων — pleiōn with the point implied rather than stated see Matthew 6:25; Luke 10:31; Luke 12:23; Hebrews 3:3. Than Cain For this use of παρα — para after comparative see Hebrews 1:4, Hebrews 1:9. For the incident see Genesis 4:4. Through which The sacrifice He had Witness borne to him First aorist passive indicative of μαρτυρεω — martureō as in Hebrews 11:2, “he was witnessed to.” That he was righteous Infinitive in indirect discourse after εμαρτυρητη — emarturēthē personal construction of δικαιος — dikaios (predicate nominative after ειναι — einai) agreeing with the subject of εμαρτυρητη — emarturēthē (cf. Romans 1:22, ειναι σοποι — einai sophoi). God bearing witness Genitive absolute with present active participle of μαρτυρεω — martureō Through it Through his faith (as shown by his sacrifice). Precisely why Abel‘s sacrifice was better than that of Cain apart from his faith is not shown. Being dead Second aorist active participle of αποτνησκω — apothnēskō “having died.” Yet speaketh Cf. Genesis 4:10; Hebrews 12:24. Speaks still through his faith. [source]
1 Peter 5:7 All your care [πᾶσαν τήν μέριμναν]
The whole of your care. “Not every anxiety as it arises, for none will arise if this transferrence has been effectually made.” Care. See on Matthew 6:25, take no thought. Rev., rightly, anxiety. [source]
1 Peter 5:7 Casting [επιριπσαντες]
First aorist active participle of επιριπτω — epiriptō old verb, to throw upon, in N.T. only here and Luke 19:35 (casting their clothes on the colt), here from Psalm 55:22. For μεριμνα — merimna see Matthew 6:25, Matthew 6:31, Matthew 6:34. [source]
3 John 1:2 Be in health [υγιαινειν]
In Paul this word always means sound teaching (1 Timothy 1:10; 1 Timothy 6:3), but here and in Luke 5:31; Luke 7:10; Luke 15:27, of bodily health. Brooke wonders if Gaius‘ health had caused his friends anxiety.Even as thy soul prospereth (κατως ευοδουται σου η πσυχη — kathōs euodoutai sou hē psuchē). A remarkable comparison which assumes the welfare (present middle indicative of ευοδοω — euodoō) of his soul (πσυχη — psuchē here as the principle of the higher life as in John 12:27, not of the natural life as in Matthew 6:25). [source]
3 John 1:2 In all things [περι παντων]
To be taken with ευοδουσται — euodousthai and like περι — peri in 1 Corinthians 16:1, “concerning all things.”Thou mayest prosper (σε ευοδουσται — se euodousthai). Infinitive in indirect discourse (object infinitive) after ευχομαι — euchomai with accusative of general reference σε — se (as to thee). Ευοδοω — Euodoō is old verb (from ευοδος — euodos ευ — eu and οδος — hodos prosperous in a journey), to have a good journey, to prosper, in lxx, in N.T. only this verse (twice), 1 Corinthians 16:2; Romans 1:10.Be in health In Paul this word always means sound teaching (1 Timothy 1:10; 1 Timothy 6:3), but here and in Luke 5:31; Luke 7:10; Luke 15:27, of bodily health. Brooke wonders if Gaius‘ health had caused his friends anxiety.Even as thy soul prospereth (κατως ευοδουται σου η πσυχη — kathōs euodoutai sou hē psuchē). A remarkable comparison which assumes the welfare (present middle indicative of ευοδοω — euodoō) of his soul (πσυχη — psuchē here as the principle of the higher life as in John 12:27, not of the natural life as in Matthew 6:25). [source]
3 John 1:2 Even as thy soul prospereth [κατως ευοδουται σου η πσυχη]
A remarkable comparison which assumes the welfare (present middle indicative of ευοδοω — euodoō) of his soul (πσυχη — psuchē here as the principle of the higher life as in John 12:27, not of the natural life as in Matthew 6:25). [source]

What do the individual words in Matthew 6:25 mean?

Because of this I say to you not be anxious about the life of you what you should eat or you should drink nor the body you should put on Not the life more is than the food and the body than clothing
Διὰ τοῦτο λέγω ὑμῖν μὴ μεριμνᾶτε τῇ ψυχῇ ὑμῶν τί φάγητε πίητε μηδὲ τῷ σώματι ἐνδύσησθε οὐχὶ ψυχὴ πλεῖόν ἐστιν τῆς τροφῆς καὶ τὸ σῶμα τοῦ ἐνδύματος

Διὰ  Because  of 
Parse: Preposition
Root: διά  
Sense: through.
τοῦτο  this 
Parse: Demonstrative Pronoun, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: οὗτος  
Sense: this.
λέγω  I  say 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 1st Person Singular
Root: λέγω 
Sense: to say, to speak.
ὑμῖν  to  you 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Dative 2nd Person Plural
Root: σύ  
Sense: you.
μεριμνᾶτε  be  anxious  about 
Parse: Verb, Present Imperative Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: μεριμνάω  
Sense: to be anxious.
ψυχῇ  life 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: ψυχή  
Sense: breath.
ὑμῶν  of  you 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive 2nd Person Plural
Root: σύ  
Sense: you.
φάγητε  you  should  eat 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Subjunctive Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: ἐσθίω  
Sense: to eat.
πίητε  you  should  drink 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Subjunctive Active, 2nd Person Plural
Root: πίνω  
Sense: to drink.
μηδὲ  nor 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: μηδέ  
Sense: and not, but not, nor, not.
σώματι  body 
Parse: Noun, Dative Neuter Singular
Root: σῶμα  
Sense: the body both of men or animals.
ἐνδύσησθε  you  should  put  on 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Subjunctive Middle, 2nd Person Plural
Root: ἐνδύω  
Sense: to sink into (clothing), put on, clothe one’s self.
ψυχὴ  life 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Feminine Singular
Root: ψυχή  
Sense: breath.
πλεῖόν  more 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Neuter Singular, Comparative
Root: πολύς  
Sense: greater in quantity.
τῆς  than  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
τροφῆς  food 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: τροφή  
Sense: food, nourishment.
σῶμα  body 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Neuter Singular
Root: σῶμα  
Sense: the body both of men or animals.
τοῦ  than 
Parse: Article, Genitive Neuter Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἐνδύματος  clothing 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Neuter Singular
Root: ἔνδυμα  
Sense: garment, raiment, cloak, an outer garment.