The Meaning of Romans 6:6 Explained

Romans 6:6

KJV: Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.

YLT: this knowing, that our old man was crucified with him, that the body of the sin may be made useless, for our no longer serving the sin;

Darby: knowing this, that our old man has been crucified with him, that the body of sin might be annulled, that we should no longer serve sin.

ASV: knowing this, that our old man was crucified with him , that the body of sin might be done away, that so we should no longer be in bondage to sin;

What does Romans 6:6 Mean?

Study Notes

old self
The expression occurs elsewhere, in Ephesians 4:22 ; Colossians 3:9 and always means the man of old, corrupt human nature, the inborn tendency to evil in all men. In Romans 6:6 it is the natural man himself; in; Ephesians 4:22 ; Colossians 3:9 his ways. Positionally, in the reckoning of God, the old man is crucified, and the believer is exhorted to make this good in experience, reckoning it to be so by definitely "putting off" the old man and "putting on" the new; Colossians 3:8-14 ; Colossians 3:4 ; Colossians 3:24 , , note 3.
new man
The new man is the regenerate man as distinguished from the old man (See Scofield " Romans 6:6 ") and is a new man as having become a partaker of the divine nature and life 2 Peter 1:4 ; Colossians 3:3 ; Colossians 3:4 and in no sense the old man made over, or improved; 2 Corinthians 5:17 ; Galatians 6:15 ; Ephesians 2:10 ; Colossians 3:10 . The new man is Christ, "formed" in the believer; Galatians 2:20 ; Galatians 4:19 ; Colossians 1:27 ; 1 John 4:12 .
righteousness (See Scofield " Romans 10:10 ") .

Verse Meaning

As we sinned in Adam, so we died with Christ (cf. Galatians 2:20). Paul said it is important that we "know" this because it is crucial to understanding our relationship to sin as believers.
"Christian living depends on Christian learning; duty is always founded on doctrine. If Satan can keep a Christian ignorant, he can keep him impotent." [1]
"Satan"s great device is to drive earnest souls back to beseeching God for what God says has already been done!" [2]
Our old "man" or "self" refers to the person we were before we experienced justification. That person was crucified with Christ (cf. Colossians 3:9). That person is now dead; he no longer exists as he once was. Nevertheless we can adopt his or her old characteristics if we choose to do so (cf. Ephesians 4:22). The believer is not the same person he or she used to be before justification (cf. 2 Corinthians 5:17).
The old man (old self) is not the same as the old nature. [3] The old nature refers to our sinful human nature that every human being possesses as long as he or she lives. The old nature is the same as the flesh (cf. Romans 7:5).
""The flesh," which is sin entrenched in the body, is unchangeably evil, and will war against us till Christ comes. Only the Holy Spirit has power over "the flesh" (Chapter81)." [4]
Even though the old man has died, the old nature lives on. I am not the same person I was before justification because sin no longer can dominate me, but I still have a sinful human nature.
I prefer not to use the term "new nature." It does not appear in Scripture. The New Testament presents the Christian not as a person with two natures warring within him or her. It presents the Christian as a person with one sinful nature (the flesh) that is in conflict with the indwelling Holy Spirit (cf. Galatians 5:16-23). It also speaks of the Christian as struggling with the decision to live as the new man that he or she now is. Our alternative is to live as the old man who we were but are no longer (cf. Romans 7:13-24).
"What we were "in Adam" is no more; but, until heaven, the temptation to live in Adam always remains." [5]
Our "body of sin" is not the same as a sinful body since the body itself is not sinful (cf. Mark 7:21-23). Probably the body in this expression represents the whole person (cf. Romans 6:12-13). We express our sinfulness through our bodies. The result of our crucifixion with Christ was that the body no longer needs to be an instrument that we use to sin since we are no longer slaves of sin.

Context Summary

Romans 6:1-11 - "dead Unto Sin, But Alive Unto God"
It is not sufficient merely to apprehend, however clearly, our standing in Christ; we must see to it that the doctrine issues in a holy life. Nothing is more hurtful than to hold a truth intellectually, without giving it expression in character. Many who fight for the minute points of doctrinal accuracy are careless of the great demands of Christ for a life of godlike love. Therefore, after the Apostle's massive statements of doctrine, he now turns to discuss the way of a holy life. The work of Christ for us must lead to His work in us and deliverance from the power of sin.
All who believe in Christ are reckoned as having been included in His death. They did not make atonement for sin; but they died to the life of self-will, of self-pleasing, of subjection to the world-spirit, of citizenship in the earth-sphere, and passed with Him into the life of resurrection glory. This is the significance of the rite of baptism. "Mark that seal!" cries the Apostle. "You belong to the resurrection side of death. Live in union with the risen Redeemer." [source]

Chapter Summary: Romans 6

1  We may not live in sin;
2  for we are dead unto it;
3  as appears by our baptism
12  Let not sin reign anymore;
18  because we have yielded ourselves to the service of righteousness;
23  and because death is the wages of sin

Greek Commentary for Romans 6:6

Our old man [ο παλαιος ημων αντρωπος]
Only in Paul (here, Colossians 3:9; Ephesians 4:22). [source]
Was crucified with him [συνεσταυρωτη]
See note on Galatians 2:20 for this boldly picturesque word. This took place not at baptism, but only pictured there. It took place when “we died to sin” (Romans 6:1). The body of sin (to sōma tēs hamartias). “The body of which sin has taken possession” (Sanday and Headlam), the body marked by sin. That so we should no longer be in bondage to sin Purpose clause with το σωμα της αμαρτιας — tou and the present active infinitive of του μηκετι δουλευειν ημας τηι αμαρτιαι — douleuō continue serving sin (as slaves). Adds “slavery” to living in sin (Romans 6:2). [source]
The body of sin [to sōma tēs hamartias)]
“The body of which sin has taken possession” (Sanday and Headlam), the body marked by sin. [source]
That so we should no longer be in bondage to sin [tou mēketi douleuein hēmas tēi hamartiāi)]
Purpose clause with το σωμα της αμαρτιας — tou and the present active infinitive of του μηκετι δουλευειν ημας τηι αμαρτιαι — douleuō continue serving sin (as slaves). Adds “slavery” to living in sin (Romans 6:2). [source]
Destroyed []
See on Romans 3:3. [source]
The body of sin [τὸ σῶμα τῆς ἁμαρτίας]
Σῶμα in earlier classical usage signifies a corpse. So always in Homer and often in later Greek. So in the New Testament, Matthew 6:25; Mark 5:29; Mark 14:8; Mark 15:43. It is used of men as slaves, Revelation 18:13. Also in classical Greek of the sum-total. So Plato: τὸ τοῦ κόσμου σῶμα thesum-total of the world (“Timaeus,” 31). The meaning is tinged in some cases by the fact of the vital union of the body with the immaterial nature, as being animated by the ψυξή soulthe principle of individual life. Thus Matthew 6:25, where the two are conceived as forming one organism, so that the material ministries which are predicated of the one are predicated of the other, and the meanings of the two merge into one another. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In Paul it can scarcely be said to be used of a dead body, except in a figurative sense, as Romans 8:10, or by inference, 2 Corinthians 5:8. Commonly of a living body. It occurs with ψυχή soulonly 1 Thessalonians 5:23, and there its distinction from ψυχή rather than its union with it is implied. So in Matthew 10:28, though even there the distinction includes the two as one personality. It is used by Paul:-DIVIDER-
1. Of the living human body, Romans 4:19; 1 Corinthians 6:13; 1 Corinthians 9:27; 1 Corinthians 12:12-26. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
2. Of the Church as the body of Christ, Romans 12:5; 1 Corinthians 12:27; Ephesians 1:23; Colossians 1:18, etc. Σάρξ fleshnever in this sense. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
3. Of plants and heavenly bodies, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:40. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
4. Of the glorified body of Christ, Philemon 3:21. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
5. Of the spiritual body of risen believers, 1 Corinthians 15:44. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It is distinguished from σάρξ fleshas not being limited to the organism of an earthly, living body, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38. It is the material organism apart from any definite matter. It is however sometimes used as practically synonymous with σάρξ , 1 Corinthians 7:16, 1 Corinthians 7:17; Ephesians 5:28, Ephesians 5:31; 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11. Compare 1 Corinthians 5:3with Colossians 2:5. An ethical conception attaches to it. It is alternated with μέλη membersand the two are associated with sin (Romans 1:24; Romans 6:6; Romans 7:5, Romans 7:24; Romans 8:13; Colossians 3:5), and with sanctification (Romans 12:1; 1 Corinthians 6:19sq.; compare 1 Thessalonians 4:4; 1 Thessalonians 5:23). It is represented as mortal, Romans 8:11; 2 Corinthians 10:10; and as capable of life, 1 Corinthians 13:3; 2 Corinthians 4:10. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In common with μέλη membersit is the instrument of feeling and willing rather than σάρξ , because the object in such cases is to designate the body not definitely as earthly, but generally as organic, Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. Hence, wherever it is viewed with reference to sin or sanctification, it is the outward organ for the execution of the good or bad resolves of the will. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The phrase body of sin denotes the body belonging to, or ruled by, the power of sin, in which the members are instruments of unrighteousness (Romans 6:13). Not the body as containing the principle of evil in our humanity, since Paul does not regard sin as inherent in, and inseparable from, the body (see Romans 6:13; 2 Corinthians 4:10-12; 2 Corinthians 7:1. Compare Matthew 15:19), nor as precisely identical with the old man, an organism or system of evil dispositions, which does not harmonize with Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, where Paul uses body in the strict sense. “Sin is conceived as the master, to whom the body as slave belongs and is obedient to execute its will. As the slave must perform his definite functions, not because he in himself can perform no others, but because of His actually subsistent relationship of service he may perform no others, while of himself he might belong as well to another master and render other services; so the earthly σῶμα bodybelongs not of itself to the ἁμαρτία sinbut may just as well belong to the Lord (1 Corinthians 6:13), and doubtless it is de facto enslaved to sin, so long as a redemption from this state has not set in by virtue of the divine Spirit” (Romans 7:24: Dickson).DestroyedSee on Romans 3:3.He that is dead ( ὁ ἀποθανὼν )Rev., literally, he that hath died. In a physical sense. Death and its consequences are used as the general illustration of the spiritual truth. It is a habit of Paul to throw in such general illustrations. See Romans 7:2. [source]

Old man [ὁ παλαιὸς ἄνθρωπος]
Only in Paul, and only three times; here, Ephesians 4:22; Colossians 3:9. Compare John 3:3; Titus 3:5. The old, unrenewed self. Paul views the Christian before his union with Christ, as, figuratively, another person. Somewhat in the same way he regards himself in ch. 7. [source]
He that is dead [ὁ ἀποθανὼν]
Rev., literally, he that hath died. In a physical sense. Death and its consequences are used as the general illustration of the spiritual truth. It is a habit of Paul to throw in such general illustrations. See Romans 7:2. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Romans 6:6

Romans 7:5 In the flesh [ἐν τῇ σαρκί]
Σάρξ fleshoccurs in the classics in the physical sense only. Homer commonly uses it in the plural as denoting all the flesh or muscles of the body. Later the singular occurs in the same sense. Paul's use of this and other psychological terms must be determined largely by the Old-Testament usage as it appears in the Septuagint. 1. In the physical sense. The literal flesh. In the Septuagint τὰ κρέα flesh(plural) is used where the reference is to the parts of animals slain, and αἱ σάρκες , flesh (plural) where the reference is to flesh as the covering of the living body. Hence Paul uses κρέα in Romans 14:21; 1 Corinthians 8:13, of the flesh of sacrificed animals. Compare also the adjective σάρκιμος fleshy 2 Corinthians 3:3; and Ezekiel 11:19; Ezekiel 36:26, Sept. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
2. Kindred. Denoting natural or physical relationship, Romans 1:3; Romans 9:3-8; Romans 11:14; Galatians 4:23, Galatians 4:29; 1 Corinthians 10:18; Philemon 1:16. This usage forms a transition to the following sense: the whole human body. Flesh is the medium in and through which the natural relationship of man manifests itself. Kindred is conceived as based on community of bodily substance. Therefore:-DIVIDER-
3. The body itself. The whole being designated by the part, as being its main substance and characteristic, 1 Corinthians 6:16; 1 Corinthians 7:28; 2 Corinthians 4:11; 2 Corinthians 7:5; 2 Corinthians 10:3; 2 Corinthians 12:7. Romans 2:28; Galatians 6:13, etc. Paul follows the Septuagint in sometimes using σῶμα bodyand sometimes σάρξ fleshin this sense, so that the terms occasionally seem to be practically synonymous. Thus 1 Corinthians 6:16, 1 Corinthians 6:17, where the phrase one body is illustrated and confirmed by one flesh. See Genesis 2:24; Ephesians 5:28, Ephesians 5:31, where the two are apparently interchanged. Compare 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11; 1 Corinthians 5:3, and Colossians 2:5. Σάρξ , however, differs from σῶμα in that it can only signify the organism of an earthly, living being consisting of flesh and bones, and cannot denote “either an earthly organism that is not living, or a living organism that is not earthly” (Wendt, in Dickson). Σῶμα not thus limited. Thus it may denote the organism of the plant (1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38) or the celestial bodies (1 Corinthians 15:40). Hence the two conceptions are related as general and special: σῶμα bodybeing the material organism apart from any definite matter (not from any sort of matter), σάρξ , flesh, the definite, earthly, animal organism. The two are synonymons when σῶμα is used, from the context, of an earthly, animal body. Compare Philemon 1:22; 2 Corinthians 5:1-8. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Σῶμα bodyand not σάρξ fleshis used when the reference is to a metaphorical organism, as the church, Romans 12:4sqq.; 1 Corinthians 10:16; 12:12-27; Ephesians 1:23; Ephesians 2:16; Colossians 1:18, etc. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The σάρξ is described as mortal (2 Corinthians 4:11); subject to infirmity (Galatians 4:13; 2 Corinthians 12:7); locally limited (Colossians 2:15); an object of fostering care (Ephesians 5:29). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
4. Living beings generally, including their mental nature, and with a correlated notion of weakness and perishableness. Thus the phrase πᾶσα σάρξ allflesh (Genesis 6:12; Isaiah 49:26; Isaiah 49:23). This accessory notion of weakness stands in contrast with God. In Paul the phrase all flesh is cited from the Old Testament (Romans 3:20; Galatians 2:16) and is used independently (1 Corinthians 1:29). In all these instances before God is added. So in Galatians 1:16, flesh and blood implies a contrast of human with divine wisdom. Compare 1 Corinthians 15:50; Ephesians 6:12. This leads up to-DIVIDER-
5. Man “either as a creature in his natural state apart from Christ, or the creaturely side or aspect of the man in Christ.” Hence it is correlated with ἄνθρωπος man 1 Corinthians 3:3; Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:17. Compare Romans 6:6; Ephesians 4:22; Colossians 3:9; Galatians 5:24. Thus the flesh would seem to be interchangeable with the old man. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It has affections and lusts (Galatians 5:24); willings (Ephesians 2:3; Romans 8:6, Romans 8:7); a mind (Colossians 2:18); a body (Colossians 2:11). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It is in sharp contrast with πνεῦμα spirit(Galatians 3:3, Galatians 3:19; Galatians 5:16, Galatians 5:17, Galatians 5:19-24; Galatians 6:8; Romans 8:4). The flesh and the spirit are thus antagonistic. Σάρξ fleshbefore or in contrast with his reception of the divine element whereby he becomes a new creature in Christ: the whole being of man as it exists and acts apart from the influence of the Spirit. It properly characterizes, therefore, not merely the lower forms of sensual gratification, but all - the highest developments of the life estranged from God, whether physical, intellectual, or aesthetic. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It must be carefully noted:-DIVIDER-
1. That Paul does not identify flesh and sin. Compare, flesh of sin, Romans 8:3. See Romans 7:17, Romans 7:18; 2 Corinthians 7:1; Galatians 2:20. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
2. That Paul does not identify σάρξ withthe material body nor associate sin exclusively and predominantly with the body. The flesh is the flesh of the living man animated by the soul ( ψυχή ) as its principle of life, and is distinctly used as coordinate with ἄνθρωπος manAs in the Old Testament, “it embraces in an emphatic manner the nature of man, mental and corporeal, with its internal distinctions.” The spirit as well as the flesh is capable of defilement (2 Corinthians 7:1; compare 1 Corinthians 7:34). Christian life is to be transformed by the renewing of the mind (Romans 12:2; compare Ephesians 4:23). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
3. That Paul does not identify the material side of man with evil. The flesh is not the native seat and source of sin. It is only its organ, and the seat of sin's manifestation. Matter is not essentially evil. The logical consequence of this would be that no service of God is possible while the material organism remains. See Romans 12:1. The flesh is not necessarily sinful in itself; but as it has existed from the time of the introduction of sin through Adam, it is recognized by Paul as tainted with sin. Jesus appeared in the flesh, and yet was sinless (2 Corinthians 5:21).The motions of sins ( τὰ παθήματα τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν )Motions used in earlier English for emotions or impulses. Thus Bacon: “He that standeth at a stay where others rise, can hardly avoid motions of envy” (“Essay” xiv.). The word is nearly synonymous with πάθος passion(Romans 1:26, note). From πάθειν tosuffer; a feeling which the mind undergoes, a passion, desire. Rev., sinful passions: which led to sins.Did work ( ἐνηργεῖτο )Rev., wrought. See 2 Corinthians 1:6; 2 Corinthians 4:12; Ephesians 3:20; Galatians 5:6; Philemon 2:13; Colossians 1:29. Compare Mark 6:14, and see on power, John 1:12. [source]

Romans 12:1 Bodies []
Literally, but regarded as the outward organ of the will. So, expressly, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. Compare Romans 7:5, Romans 7:23. Hence the exhortation to glorify God in the body (1 Corinthians 6:20; compare Philemon 1:20; 2 Corinthians 4:10). So the body is called the body of sin (Romans 6:6; compare Colossians 2:11). In later Greek usage slaves were called σώματα bodiesSee Revelation 18:13. [source]
Romans 6:6 The body of sin [τὸ σῶμα τῆς ἁμαρτίας]
Σῶμα in earlier classical usage signifies a corpse. So always in Homer and often in later Greek. So in the New Testament, Matthew 6:25; Mark 5:29; Mark 14:8; Mark 15:43. It is used of men as slaves, Revelation 18:13. Also in classical Greek of the sum-total. So Plato: τὸ τοῦ κόσμου σῶμα thesum-total of the world (“Timaeus,” 31). The meaning is tinged in some cases by the fact of the vital union of the body with the immaterial nature, as being animated by the ψυξή soulthe principle of individual life. Thus Matthew 6:25, where the two are conceived as forming one organism, so that the material ministries which are predicated of the one are predicated of the other, and the meanings of the two merge into one another. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In Paul it can scarcely be said to be used of a dead body, except in a figurative sense, as Romans 8:10, or by inference, 2 Corinthians 5:8. Commonly of a living body. It occurs with ψυχή soulonly 1 Thessalonians 5:23, and there its distinction from ψυχή rather than its union with it is implied. So in Matthew 10:28, though even there the distinction includes the two as one personality. It is used by Paul:-DIVIDER-
1. Of the living human body, Romans 4:19; 1 Corinthians 6:13; 1 Corinthians 9:27; 1 Corinthians 12:12-26. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
2. Of the Church as the body of Christ, Romans 12:5; 1 Corinthians 12:27; Ephesians 1:23; Colossians 1:18, etc. Σάρξ fleshnever in this sense. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
3. Of plants and heavenly bodies, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:40. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
4. Of the glorified body of Christ, Philemon 3:21. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
5. Of the spiritual body of risen believers, 1 Corinthians 15:44. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It is distinguished from σάρξ fleshas not being limited to the organism of an earthly, living body, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38. It is the material organism apart from any definite matter. It is however sometimes used as practically synonymous with σάρξ , 1 Corinthians 7:16, 1 Corinthians 7:17; Ephesians 5:28, Ephesians 5:31; 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11. Compare 1 Corinthians 5:3with Colossians 2:5. An ethical conception attaches to it. It is alternated with μέλη membersand the two are associated with sin (Romans 1:24; Romans 6:6; Romans 7:5, Romans 7:24; Romans 8:13; Colossians 3:5), and with sanctification (Romans 12:1; 1 Corinthians 6:19sq.; compare 1 Thessalonians 4:4; 1 Thessalonians 5:23). It is represented as mortal, Romans 8:11; 2 Corinthians 10:10; and as capable of life, 1 Corinthians 13:3; 2 Corinthians 4:10. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In common with μέλη membersit is the instrument of feeling and willing rather than σάρξ , because the object in such cases is to designate the body not definitely as earthly, but generally as organic, Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. Hence, wherever it is viewed with reference to sin or sanctification, it is the outward organ for the execution of the good or bad resolves of the will. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The phrase body of sin denotes the body belonging to, or ruled by, the power of sin, in which the members are instruments of unrighteousness (Romans 6:13). Not the body as containing the principle of evil in our humanity, since Paul does not regard sin as inherent in, and inseparable from, the body (see Romans 6:13; 2 Corinthians 4:10-12; 2 Corinthians 7:1. Compare Matthew 15:19), nor as precisely identical with the old man, an organism or system of evil dispositions, which does not harmonize with Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, where Paul uses body in the strict sense. “Sin is conceived as the master, to whom the body as slave belongs and is obedient to execute its will. As the slave must perform his definite functions, not because he in himself can perform no others, but because of His actually subsistent relationship of service he may perform no others, while of himself he might belong as well to another master and render other services; so the earthly σῶμα bodybelongs not of itself to the ἁμαρτία sinbut may just as well belong to the Lord (1 Corinthians 6:13), and doubtless it is de facto enslaved to sin, so long as a redemption from this state has not set in by virtue of the divine Spirit” (Romans 7:24: Dickson).DestroyedSee on Romans 3:3.He that is dead ( ὁ ἀποθανὼν )Rev., literally, he that hath died. In a physical sense. Death and its consequences are used as the general illustration of the spiritual truth. It is a habit of Paul to throw in such general illustrations. See Romans 7:2. [source]

Romans 3:3 Make without effect [καταργήσει]
See on Luke 13:7. The word occurs twenty-five times in Paul, and is variously rendered in A.V. make void, destroy, loose, bring to nought, fail, vanish away, put away, put down, abolish, cease. The radical meaning is to make inert or idle. Dr. Morison acutely observes that it negatives the idea of agency or operation, rather than of result or effect. It is rather to make inefficient than to make without effect. So in Luke 13:7, why should the tree be allowed to make the ground idle? 1 Corinthians 13:8, prophecies shall fail, or have no more work to do. 2 Timothy 1:10Christ abolished death. There is no more work for it. Romans 6:6, the body of sin is rendered inactive. Romans 3:31, Do we deprive the law of its work - render it a dead letter? [source]
Romans 6:8 With Christ [συν Χριστωι]
As pictured by baptism, the crucifixion with Christ of Romans 6:6. [source]
Romans 7:2 Is bound [δεδεται]
Perfect passive indicative, stands bound. By law (νομωι — nomōi). Instrumental case. To the husband while he liveth “To the living husband,” literally. But if the husband die (εαν δε αποτανηι ο ανηρ — ean de apothanēi ho anēr). Third class condition, a supposable case (εαν — ean and the second aorist active subjunctive). She is discharged Perfect passive indicative of καταργεω — katargeō to make void. She stands free from the law of the husband. Cf. Romans 6:6. [source]
Romans 7:2 To the husband while he liveth [τωι ζωντι ανδρι]
“To the living husband,” literally. But if the husband die (εαν δε αποτανηι ο ανηρ — ean de apothanēi ho anēr). Third class condition, a supposable case (εαν — ean and the second aorist active subjunctive). She is discharged Perfect passive indicative of καταργεω — katargeō to make void. She stands free from the law of the husband. Cf. Romans 6:6. [source]
Romans 7:2 She is discharged [κατηργηται]
Perfect passive indicative of καταργεω — katargeō to make void. She stands free from the law of the husband. Cf. Romans 6:6. [source]
1 Corinthians 15:35 Body [σώματι]
Organism. The objection assumes that the risen man must exist in some kind of an organism; and as this cannot be the fleshly body which is corrupted and dissolved, resurrection is impossible. Σῶμα bodyis related to σάρξ fleshas general to special; σῶμα denoting the material organism, not apart from any matter, but apart from any definite matter; and σάρξ the definite earthly, animal organism. See on Romans 6:6. The question is not, what will be the substance of the risen body, but what will be its organization (Wendt)? [source]
1 Corinthians 7:22 The Lord‘s freedman [απελευτερος Κυριου]
Απελευτερος — Apeleutheros is an old word for a manumitted slave, ελευτερος — eleutheros from ερχομαι — erchomai to go and so go free, απ — aṗ from bondage. Christ is now the owner of the Christian and Paul rejoices to call himself Christ‘s slave But Christ set us free from sin by paying the ransom Christ is thus the patronus of the libertus who owes everything to his patronus. He is no longer the slave of sin (Romans 6:6, Romans 6:18), but a slave to God (Romans 6:22). [source]
Galatians 5:24 Have crucified the flesh [τὴν σάρκα ἐσταύρωσαν]
The phrase only here. Comp. Galatians 2:20; Galatians 6:14; Romans 6:6. The line of thought as regards death to sin is the same as in Romans 6:2-7, Romans 6:11; as regards death to the law, the same as in Romans 7:1-6. [source]
Galatians 2:20 I am crucified with Christ [Χριστῷ συνεσταύρωμαι]
This compound verb is used by Paul only here and Romans 6:6. In the gospels, Matthew 27:44; Mark 15:32; John 19:32. The statement explains how a believer dies to the law by means of the law itself. In the crucifixion of Christ as one accursed, the demand of the law was met (see Galatians 3:13). Ethically, a believer is crucified with Christ (Romans 6:3-11; Philemon 3:10; 1 Corinthians 15:31; 2 Corinthians 4:10), and thus the demand of the law is fulfilled in him likewise. Paul means that, “owing to his connection with the crucified, he was like him, legally impure, and was thus an outcast from the Jewish church.” He became dead to the law by the law's own act. Of course a Jew would have answered that Christ was justly crucified. He would have said: “If you broke with the law because of your fellowship with Christ, it proved that both he and you were transgressors.” But Paul is addressing Peter, who, in common with himself, believed on Christ (Galatians 2:16). [source]
Galatians 2:20 I have been crucified with Christ [Χριστωι συνεσταυρωμαι]
One of Paul‘s greatest mystical sayings. Perfect passive indicative of συσταυροω — sustauroō with the associative instrumental case Paul uses the same word in Romans 6:6 for the same idea. In the Gospels it occurs of literal crucifixion about the robbers and Christ (Matthew 27:44; Mark 15:32; John 19:32). Paul died to the law and was crucified with Christ. He uses often the idea of dying with Christ (Galatians 5:24; Galatians 6:14; Romans 6:8; Colossians 2:20) and burial with Christ also (Romans 6:4; Colossians 2:12). [source]
Ephesians 4:22 The old man []
See on Romans 6:6. Compare Colossians 3:9. [source]
Colossians 3:9 The old man []
See on Romans 6:6. [source]
Colossians 3:9 Seeing that ye have put off [απεκδυσαμενοι]
First aorist middle participle (causal sense of the circumstantial participle) of the double compound verb απεκδυομαι — apekduomai for which see note on Colossians 2:15. The απο — apo has the perfective sense (wholly), “having stripped clean off.” The same metaphor as αποτεστε — apothesthe in Colossians 3:8. The old man (τον παλαιον αντρωπον — ton palaion anthrōpon). Here Paul brings in another metaphor (mixes his metaphors as he often does), that of the old life of sin regarded as “the ancient man” of sin already crucified (Romans 6:6) and dropped now once and for all as a mode of life (aorist tense). See same figure in Ephesians 4:22. Παλαιος — Palaios is ancient in contrast with νεος — neos (young, new) as in Matthew 9:17 or καινος — kainos (fresh, unused) as in Matthew 13:52. With his doings Practice must square with profession. [source]
Colossians 3:9 The old man [τον παλαιον αντρωπον]
Here Paul brings in another metaphor (mixes his metaphors as he often does), that of the old life of sin regarded as “the ancient man” of sin already crucified (Romans 6:6) and dropped now once and for all as a mode of life (aorist tense). See same figure in Ephesians 4:22. Παλαιος — Palaios is ancient in contrast with νεος — neos (young, new) as in Matthew 9:17 or καινος — kainos (fresh, unused) as in Matthew 13:52. [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:23 Spirit, soul, body [πνεῦμα, ψυχὴ σῶμα]
It is useless to attempt to draw from these words a technical, psychological statement of a threefold division of the human personality. If Paul recognized any such technical division, it was more probably twofold; the body or material part, and the immaterial part with its higher and lower sides - πνεῦμα and ψυχὴ . See on Romans 6:6; see on Romans 7:5, Romans 7:23; see on Romans 8:4; see on Romans 11:3and footnote. [source]
James 1:15 The lust [η επιτυμια]
Note article, the lust (James 1:14) which one has.When it hath conceived (συλλαβουσα — sullabousa). Second aorist active participle of συλλαμβανω — sullambanō old word to grasp together, in hostile sense (Acts 26:21), in friendly sense of help (Philemon 4:3), in technical sense of a woman taking a man‘s seed in conception (Luke 1:24), here also of lust (as a woman), “having conceived.” The will yields to lust and conception takes place.Beareth sin Present active indicative of τικτω — tiktō to bring forth as a mother or fruit from seed, old verb, often in N.T., here only in James. Sin is the union of the will with lust. See Psalm 7:14 for this same metaphor.The sin (η αμαρτια — hē hamartia). The article refers to αμαρτια — hamartia just mentioned.When it is full-grown First aorist passive participle of αποτελεω — apoteleō old compound verb with perfective use of απο — apo in N.T. only here and Luke 13:32. It does not mean “full-grown” like τελειοω — teleioō but rather completeness of parts or functions as opposed to rudimentary state (Hort) like the winged insect in contrast with the chrysalis or grub (Plato). The sin at birth is fully equipped for its career (Romans 6:6; Colossians 3:5).Bringeth forth death (αποκυει τανατον — apokuei thanaton). Late compound (κυεω — kueō to be pregnant, perfective use of απο — apo) to give birth to, of animals and women, for normal birth (papyrus example) and abnormal birth (Hort). A medical word (Ropes) rather than a literary one like τικτω — tiktō The child of lust is sin, of sin is death, powerful figure of abortion. The child is dead at birth. For death as the fruit of sin see Romans 6:21-23; Romans 8:6. “The birth of death follows of necessity when one sin is fully formed” (Hort). [source]
James 1:15 Beareth sin [τικτει αμαρτιαν]
Present active indicative of τικτω — tiktō to bring forth as a mother or fruit from seed, old verb, often in N.T., here only in James. Sin is the union of the will with lust. See Psalm 7:14 for this same metaphor.The sin (η αμαρτια — hē hamartia). The article refers to αμαρτια — hamartia just mentioned.When it is full-grown First aorist passive participle of αποτελεω — apoteleō old compound verb with perfective use of απο — apo in N.T. only here and Luke 13:32. It does not mean “full-grown” like τελειοω — teleioō but rather completeness of parts or functions as opposed to rudimentary state (Hort) like the winged insect in contrast with the chrysalis or grub (Plato). The sin at birth is fully equipped for its career (Romans 6:6; Colossians 3:5).Bringeth forth death (αποκυει τανατον — apokuei thanaton). Late compound (κυεω — kueō to be pregnant, perfective use of απο — apo) to give birth to, of animals and women, for normal birth (papyrus example) and abnormal birth (Hort). A medical word (Ropes) rather than a literary one like τικτω — tiktō The child of lust is sin, of sin is death, powerful figure of abortion. The child is dead at birth. For death as the fruit of sin see Romans 6:21-23; Romans 8:6. “The birth of death follows of necessity when one sin is fully formed” (Hort). [source]
James 1:15 When it is full-grown [αποτελεστεισα]
First aorist passive participle of αποτελεω — apoteleō old compound verb with perfective use of απο — apo in N.T. only here and Luke 13:32. It does not mean “full-grown” like τελειοω — teleioō but rather completeness of parts or functions as opposed to rudimentary state (Hort) like the winged insect in contrast with the chrysalis or grub (Plato). The sin at birth is fully equipped for its career (Romans 6:6; Colossians 3:5).Bringeth forth death (αποκυει τανατον — apokuei thanaton). Late compound (κυεω — kueō to be pregnant, perfective use of απο — apo) to give birth to, of animals and women, for normal birth (papyrus example) and abnormal birth (Hort). A medical word (Ropes) rather than a literary one like τικτω — tiktō The child of lust is sin, of sin is death, powerful figure of abortion. The child is dead at birth. For death as the fruit of sin see Romans 6:21-23; Romans 8:6. “The birth of death follows of necessity when one sin is fully formed” (Hort). [source]

What do the individual words in Romans 6:6 mean?

this knowing that - old of us self was crucified with [Him] so that might be annulled the body - of sin [that] no longer are enslaved we - to sin
τοῦτο γινώσκοντες ὅτι παλαιὸς ἡμῶν ἄνθρωπος συνεσταυρώθη ἵνα καταργηθῇ τὸ σῶμα τῆς ἁμαρτίας τοῦ μηκέτι δουλεύειν ἡμᾶς τῇ ἁμαρτίᾳ

τοῦτο  this 
Parse: Demonstrative Pronoun, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: οὗτος  
Sense: this.
γινώσκοντες  knowing 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: γινώσκω  
Sense: to learn to know, come to know, get a knowledge of perceive, feel.
ὅτι  that 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ὅτι  
Sense: that, because, since.
  - 
Parse: Article, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
παλαιὸς  old 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: παλαιός  
Sense: old, ancient.
ἡμῶν  of  us 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive 1st Person Plural
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
ἄνθρωπος  self 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἄνθρωπος  
Sense: a human being, whether male or female.
συνεσταυρώθη  was  crucified  with  [Him] 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: συσταυρόω  
Sense: to crucify alone with.
ἵνα  so  that 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ἵνα  
Sense: that, in order that, so that.
καταργηθῇ  might  be  annulled 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Subjunctive Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: καταργέω  
Sense: to render idle, unemployed, inactivate, inoperative.
σῶμα  body 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Neuter Singular
Root: σῶμα  
Sense: the body both of men or animals.
τῆς  - 
Parse: Article, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἁμαρτίας  of  sin 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: ἁμαρτία  
Sense: equivalent to 264.
τοῦ  [that] 
Parse: Article, Genitive Neuter Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
μηκέτι  no  longer 
Parse: Adverb
Root: μηκέτι  
Sense: no longer, no more, not hereafter.
δουλεύειν  are  enslaved 
Parse: Verb, Present Infinitive Active
Root: δουλεύω  
Sense: to be a slave, serve, do service.
τῇ  - 
Parse: Article, Dative Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἁμαρτίᾳ  to  sin 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: ἁμαρτία  
Sense: equivalent to 264.