The Meaning of Romans 7:2 Explained

Romans 7:2

KJV: For the woman which hath an husband is bound by the law to her husband so long as he liveth; but if the husband be dead, she is loosed from the law of her husband.

YLT: for the married woman to the living husband hath been bound by law, and if the husband may die, she hath been free from the law of the husband;

Darby: For the married woman is bound by law to her husband so long as he is alive; but if the husband should die, she is clear from the law of the husband:

ASV: For the woman that hath a husband is bound by law to the husband while he liveth; but if the husband die, she is discharged from the law of the husband.

What does Romans 7:2 Mean?

Context Summary

Romans 7:1-13 - The Law Makes Sin Known
To make his meaning clear the Apostle now enters upon a parable drawn from domestic life. He says that we are married to the Law as our first husband, and seek, through union with it, to bring forth fruit unto God. Every convert earnestly endeavors, in the first impulse of the new life, to be good and to form, by incessant effort, a life that is pleasing to God. Like Cain we bring the fruit of the ground, extorted from the soil by the sweat of the brow.
But we are soon disappointed in the result. Our laborious care ends in failure. Sinful desires are too masterful. As Luther said, "The old Adam is too strong for the young Melanchthon." Then we see that the Cross has put death between us and our painful effort. We learn that the marriage contract which bound us to our first husband, the Law, has been dissolved. We are set free to enter into marriage union with the blessed Lord, and He, by His indwelling Spirit, effects in us what our own energies have failed to produce. We are joined to Him that was raised up from the dead, and bring forth fruit unto God. [source]

Chapter Summary: Romans 7

1  No law has power over a man longer than he lives
4  But we are dead to the law
7  Yet is not the law sin;
12  but holy, just and good;
16  as I acknowledge, who am grieved because I cannot keep it

Greek Commentary for Romans 7:2

The wife that hath a husband [η υπανδρος γυνη]
Late word, under (in subjection to) a husband. Here only in N.T. [source]
Is bound [δεδεται]
Perfect passive indicative, stands bound. By law (νομωι — nomōi). Instrumental case. To the husband while he liveth “To the living husband,” literally. But if the husband die (εαν δε αποτανηι ο ανηρ — ean de apothanēi ho anēr). Third class condition, a supposable case (εαν — ean and the second aorist active subjunctive). She is discharged Perfect passive indicative of καταργεω — katargeō to make void. She stands free from the law of the husband. Cf. Romans 6:6. [source]
By law [νομωι]
Instrumental case. [source]
To the husband while he liveth [τωι ζωντι ανδρι]
“To the living husband,” literally. But if the husband die (εαν δε αποτανηι ο ανηρ — ean de apothanēi ho anēr). Third class condition, a supposable case (εαν — ean and the second aorist active subjunctive). She is discharged Perfect passive indicative of καταργεω — katargeō to make void. She stands free from the law of the husband. Cf. Romans 6:6. [source]
But if the husband die [εαν δε αποτανηι ο ανηρ]
Third class condition, a supposable case (εαν — ean and the second aorist active subjunctive). [source]
She is discharged [κατηργηται]
Perfect passive indicative of καταργεω — katargeō to make void. She stands free from the law of the husband. Cf. Romans 6:6. [source]
That hath a husband [ὕπανδρος]
Lit., under or subject to a husband. The illustration is selected to bring forward the union with Christ after the release from the law, as analogous to a new marriage (Romans 7:4). [source]
Is loosed [κατήργηται]
Rev., discharged. See on Romans 3:3, Lit., she has been brought to nought as respects the law of the husband. [source]
The law of the husband []
Her legal connection with him She dies to that law with the husband's death. There is an apparent awkwardness in carrying out the figure. The law, in Romans 7:1, Romans 7:2, is represented by the husband who rules (hath dominion ). On the death of the husband the woman is released. In Romans 7:4, the wife (figuratively) dies. “Ye are become dead to the law that ye should be married to another.” But as the law is previously represented by the husband, and the woman is released by the husband's death, so, to make the figure consistent, the law should be represented as dying in order to effect the believer's release. The awkwardness is relieved by taking as the middle term of comparison the idea of dead in a marriage relation. When the husband dies the wife dies (is brought to nought ) so far as the marriage relation is concerned. The husband is represented as the party who dies because the figure of a second marriage is introduced with its application to believers (Romans 7:4). Believers are made dead to the law as the wife is maritally dead - killed in respect of the marriage relation by her husband's death. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Romans 7:2

Romans 7:8 Wrought [κατειργάσατο]
The compound verb with κατά downthrough always signifies the bringing to pass or accomplishment. See 1 Timothy 2:9; 1 Corinthians 5:3; 2 Corinthians 7:10. It is used both of evil and good. See especially Romans 7:15, Romans 7:17, Romans 7:18, Romans 7:20. “To man everything forbidden appears as a desirable blessing; but yet, as it is forbidden, he feels that his freedom is limited, and now his lust rages more violently, like the waves against the dyke” (Tholuck). [source]
Romans 8:1 Therefore now []
Connecting with Romans 7:25. Being freed through Jesus Christ, there is therefore no condemnation now. [source]
Romans 7:6 We are delivered [κατηργήθημεν]
Rev., have been discharged, as the woman, Romans 7:2. See on Romans 3:3. [source]
Romans 7:22 The inward man [τὸν ἔσω ἄνθρωπον]
The rational and moral I, the essence of the man which is conscious of itself as an ethical personality. Not to be confounded with the new man (Ephesians 4:24; Colossians 3:10). It is substantially the same with the mind (Romans 7:23). [source]
Romans 7:2 The law of the husband []
Her legal connection with him She dies to that law with the husband's death. There is an apparent awkwardness in carrying out the figure. The law, in Romans 7:1, Romans 7:2, is represented by the husband who rules (hath dominion ). On the death of the husband the woman is released. In Romans 7:4, the wife (figuratively) dies. “Ye are become dead to the law that ye should be married to another.” But as the law is previously represented by the husband, and the woman is released by the husband's death, so, to make the figure consistent, the law should be represented as dying in order to effect the believer's release. The awkwardness is relieved by taking as the middle term of comparison the idea of dead in a marriage relation. When the husband dies the wife dies (is brought to nought ) so far as the marriage relation is concerned. The husband is represented as the party who dies because the figure of a second marriage is introduced with its application to believers (Romans 7:4). Believers are made dead to the law as the wife is maritally dead - killed in respect of the marriage relation by her husband's death. [source]
Romans 7:18 In me []
The entire man in whom sin and righteousness struggle, in whose unregenerate condition sin is the victor, having its domain in the flesh. Hence in me considered as carnal (Romans 7:14). That another element is present appears from “to will is present with me;” but it is the flesh which determines his activity as an unregenerate man. There is good in the I, but not in the I considered as carnal. This is brought out in Romans 7:25, “With the flesh (I serve) the law of sin.” Hence there is added that is, in my flesh. [source]
Romans 7:15 I would [θέλω]
See on Matthew 1:19. Rather desire than will in the sense of full determination, as is shown by I consent (Romans 7:16), and I delight in (Romans 7:22). [source]
Romans 6:6 He that is dead [ὁ ἀποθανὼν]
Rev., literally, he that hath died. In a physical sense. Death and its consequences are used as the general illustration of the spiritual truth. It is a habit of Paul to throw in such general illustrations. See Romans 7:2. [source]
Romans 12:2 Mind [νοός]
See on Romans 7:23. Agreeing with reasonable service. [source]
Romans 12:1 Bodies []
Literally, but regarded as the outward organ of the will. So, expressly, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. Compare Romans 7:5, Romans 7:23. Hence the exhortation to glorify God in the body (1 Corinthians 6:20; compare Philemon 1:20; 2 Corinthians 4:10). So the body is called the body of sin (Romans 6:6; compare Colossians 2:11). In later Greek usage slaves were called σώματα bodiesSee Revelation 18:13. [source]
Romans 1:8 Through Jesus Christ []
As the medium of his thanksgiving: “As one who is present to his grateful thoughts; in so far, namely, as that for which he thanks God is vividly perceived and felt by him to have been brought about through Christ.” Compare Romans 7:25; Colossians 3:17; Ephesians 5:20. In penitence and in thanksgiving alike, Jesus Christ is the one mediator through whom we have access to God. [source]
Romans 6:6 The body of sin [τὸ σῶμα τῆς ἁμαρτίας]
Σῶμα in earlier classical usage signifies a corpse. So always in Homer and often in later Greek. So in the New Testament, Matthew 6:25; Mark 5:29; Mark 14:8; Mark 15:43. It is used of men as slaves, Revelation 18:13. Also in classical Greek of the sum-total. So Plato: τὸ τοῦ κόσμου σῶμα thesum-total of the world (“Timaeus,” 31). The meaning is tinged in some cases by the fact of the vital union of the body with the immaterial nature, as being animated by the ψυξή soulthe principle of individual life. Thus Matthew 6:25, where the two are conceived as forming one organism, so that the material ministries which are predicated of the one are predicated of the other, and the meanings of the two merge into one another. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In Paul it can scarcely be said to be used of a dead body, except in a figurative sense, as Romans 8:10, or by inference, 2 Corinthians 5:8. Commonly of a living body. It occurs with ψυχή soulonly 1 Thessalonians 5:23, and there its distinction from ψυχή rather than its union with it is implied. So in Matthew 10:28, though even there the distinction includes the two as one personality. It is used by Paul:-DIVIDER-
1. Of the living human body, Romans 4:19; 1 Corinthians 6:13; 1 Corinthians 9:27; 1 Corinthians 12:12-26. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
2. Of the Church as the body of Christ, Romans 12:5; 1 Corinthians 12:27; Ephesians 1:23; Colossians 1:18, etc. Σάρξ fleshnever in this sense. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
3. Of plants and heavenly bodies, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:40. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
4. Of the glorified body of Christ, Philemon 3:21. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
5. Of the spiritual body of risen believers, 1 Corinthians 15:44. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It is distinguished from σάρξ fleshas not being limited to the organism of an earthly, living body, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38. It is the material organism apart from any definite matter. It is however sometimes used as practically synonymous with σάρξ , 1 Corinthians 7:16, 1 Corinthians 7:17; 2 Corinthians 4:10-120 Ephesians 5:31; 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11. Compare 1 Corinthians 5:3with Colossians 2:5. An ethical conception attaches to it. It is alternated with μέλη membersand the two are associated with sin (Romans 1:24; Romans 6:6; Romans 7:5, Romans 7:24; Romans 8:13; Colossians 3:5), and with sanctification (Romans 12:1; 1 Corinthians 6:19sq.; compare 1 Thessalonians 4:4; 1 Thessalonians 5:23). It is represented as mortal, Romans 8:11; 2 Corinthians 10:10; and as capable of life, 1 Corinthians 13:3; 2 Corinthians 4:10. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In common with μέλη membersit is the instrument of feeling and willing rather than σάρξ , because the object in such cases is to designate the body not definitely as earthly, but generally as organic, Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. Hence, wherever it is viewed with reference to sin or sanctification, it is the outward organ for the execution of the good or bad resolves of the will. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The phrase body of sin denotes the body belonging to, or ruled by, the power of sin, in which the members are instruments of unrighteousness (Romans 6:13). Not the body as containing the principle of evil in our humanity, since Paul does not regard sin as inherent in, and inseparable from, the body (see Romans 6:13; 1635339490_91; 2 Corinthians 7:1. Compare Matthew 15:19), nor as precisely identical with the old man, an organism or system of evil dispositions, which does not harmonize with Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, where Paul uses body in the strict sense. “Sin is conceived as the master, to whom the body as slave belongs and is obedient to execute its will. As the slave must perform his definite functions, not because he in himself can perform no others, but because of His actually subsistent relationship of service he may perform no others, while of himself he might belong as well to another master and render other services; so the earthly σῶμα bodybelongs not of itself to the ἁμαρτία sinbut may just as well belong to the Lord (1 Corinthians 6:13), and doubtless it is de facto enslaved to sin, so long as a redemption from this state has not set in by virtue of the divine Spirit” (Romans 7:24: Dickson).DestroyedSee on Romans 3:3.He that is dead ( ὁ ἀποθανὼν )Rev., literally, he that hath died. In a physical sense. Death and its consequences are used as the general illustration of the spiritual truth. It is a habit of Paul to throw in such general illustrations. See Romans 7:2. [source]

Romans 15:14 I myself also [και αυτος εγω]
See note on Romans 7:25 for a like emphasis on himself, here in contrast with “ye yourselves” The argument of the Epistle has been completed both in the main line (chapters 1-8) and the further applications (9:1-15:13). Here begins the Epilogue, the personal matters of importance. [source]
Romans 3:16 Misery [ταλαιπωρια]
Common word from ταλαιπωρος — talaipōros (Romans 7:24), only here in the N.T. [source]
Romans 5:18 So then [αρα ουν]
Conclusion of the argument. Cf. Romans 7:3, Romans 7:25; Romans 8:12, etc. Paul resumes the parallel between Adam and Christ begun in Romans 5:12 and interrupted by explanation (Romans 5:13.) and contrast (Romans 5:15-17). [source]
Romans 7:5 In the flesh [εν τηι σαρκι]
Same sense as in Romans 6:19 and Romans 7:18, Romans 7:25. The “flesh” is not inherently sinful, but is subject to sin. It is what Paul means by being “under the law.” He uses σαρχ — sarx in a good many senses. [source]
Romans 7:23 The law of my mind [τωι νομωι του νοος]
The reflective intelligence Paul means by νοος — noos “the inward man” of Romans 7:22. It is this higher self that agrees that the law of God is good (Romans 7:12, Romans 7:16, Romans 7:22). [source]
Romans 7:23 Bringing me into captivity [αιχμαλωτιζοντα]
See note on this late and vivid verb for capture and slavery Luke 21:24; note on 2 Corinthians 10:5. Surely it is a tragic picture drawn by Paul with this outcome, “sold under sin” (Romans 7:14), “captivity to the law of sin” (Romans 7:23). The ancient writers (Plato, Ovid, Seneca, Epictetus) describe the same dual struggle in man between his conscience and his deeds. [source]
Romans 1:8 Through [δια]
As the mediator or medium of thanksgiving as in Romans 7:25. For (περι — peri). Concerning, about. That Or because. Either declarative or causal οτι — hoti makes sense here. Your faith (η πιστις υμων — hē pistis humōn). “Your Christianity” (Sanday and Headlam). Is proclaimed Present passive indicative of καταγγελλω — kataggellō to announce See also αναγγελλω — anaggellō to bring back news (John 5:15), απαγγελλω — apaggellō to announce from one as the source (Matthew 2:8), προκαταγγελλω — prokataggellō to announce far and wide beforehand (Acts 3:18). Throughout all the world (εν ολωι τωι κοσμωι — en holōi tōi kosmōi). Natural hyperbole as in Colossians 1:6; Acts 17:6. But widely known because the church was in the central city of the empire. [source]
Romans 7:23 Warring against [αντιστρατευομενον]
Rare verb (Xenophon) to carry on a campaign against. Only here in N.T. The law of my mind (τωι νομωι του νοος — tōi nomōi tou noos). The reflective intelligence Paul means by νοος — noos “the inward man” of Romans 7:22. It is this higher self that agrees that the law of God is good (Romans 7:12, Romans 7:16, Romans 7:22). Bringing me into captivity See note on this late and vivid verb for capture and slavery Luke 21:24; note on 2 Corinthians 10:5. Surely it is a tragic picture drawn by Paul with this outcome, “sold under sin” (Romans 7:14), “captivity to the law of sin” (Romans 7:23). The ancient writers (Plato, Ovid, Seneca, Epictetus) describe the same dual struggle in man between his conscience and his deeds. [source]
Romans 8:1 Therefore now [αρα νυν]
Two particles. Points back to the triumphant note in Romans 7:25 after the preceding despair. [source]
Romans 8:7 Neither indeed can it be [ουδε γαρ δυναται]
“For it is not even able to do otherwise.” This helpless state of the unregenerate man Paul has shown above apart from Christ. Hope lies in Christ (Romans 7:25) and the Spirit of life (Romans 8:2). [source]
1 Corinthians 7:39 Be dead [κοιμηθῇ]
Lit., have fallen asleep. See on Acts 7:60; see on 2 Peter 3:4; compare Romans 7:2, where the usual word for die, ἀποθάνῃ is used. In that passage Paul is discussing the abstract question. Here the inference is more personal, which is perhaps the reason for his using the more tender expression. [source]
1 Corinthians 2:16 Mind [νοῦν]
See on Romans 7:23. The understanding of the Lord. The divine counsels or purposes which are the results of the divine thought. See on Romans 11:34. [source]
1 Corinthians 14:14 Understanding [νοῦς]
See on Romans 7:23. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:10 Mind [νοΐ̀]
See on Romans 7:23. [source]
1 Corinthians 15:57 But thanks be to God [τωι δε τεωι χαρις]
Exultant triumph through Christ over sin and death as in Romans 7:25. [source]
1 Corinthians 7:27 Art thou bound to a wife? [δεδεσαι γυναικι]
Perfect passive indicative of δεω — deō to bind, with dative case γυναικι — gunaiki Marriage bond as in Romans 7:2. [source]
2 Corinthians 4:16 Our outward man [ο εχω ημων αντρωπος]
In Romans 7:22; Colossians 3:9; Ephesians 4:22., we have the inward man and the outward for the higher and the lower natures (the spirit and the flesh). “Here the decay Plato (Republ. ix, p. 589) has ο εντος αντρωπος — ho entos anthrōpos Cf. “the hidden man of the heart” (1 Peter 3:4). Day by day (ημεραι και ημεραι — hēmerāi kai hēmerāi). This precise idiom is not in lxx nor rest of N.T. It may be colloquial use of locative in repetition. [source]
2 Corinthians 4:16 our inward man [ο εσω ημων]
In Romans 7:22; Colossians 3:9; Ephesians 4:22., we have the inward man and the outward for the higher and the lower natures (the spirit and the flesh). “Here the decay Plato (Republ. ix, p. 589) has ο εντος αντρωπος — ho entos anthrōpos Cf. “the hidden man of the heart” (1 Peter 3:4). Day by day (ημεραι και ημεραι — hēmerāi kai hēmerāi). This precise idiom is not in lxx nor rest of N.T. It may be colloquial use of locative in repetition. [source]
Galatians 5:4 Christ is become of no effect unto you [κατηργήθητε ἀπὸ Χριστοῦ]
Incorrect. Lit. ye were brought to nought from Christ. Comp. Romans 7:2, Romans 7:6. Your union with Christ is dissolved. The statement is compressed and requires to be filled out. “Ye were brought to nought and so separated from Christ.” For similar instances see Romans 9:3; Romans 11:3. The ἀπὸ fromproperly belongs to the supplied verb of separation. For the verb καταργεῖν see on Romans 3:3. [source]
Galatians 3:1 Foolish [ἀνόητοι]
See on Luke 24:25. In N.T. and lxx always in an active sense. See Luke 24:25; Romans 1:14; 1 Timothy 6:9; Titus 3:3. Νοῦς is used by Paul mainly with an ethical reference, as the faculty of moral judgment. See on Romans 7:23. Ἀνόητος therefore indicates a folly which is the outgrowth of a moral defect. Paul is not alluding to a national characteristic of the Galatians. [source]
Galatians 1:4 Out of this present evil world [ἐκ τοῦ αἰῶνος τοῦ ἐνεστῶτος πονηροῦ]
Lit. out of the world, the present (world which is ) evil. For αἰών ageor period, see John 1:9, and additional note on 2 Thessalonians 1:9. Here it has an ethical sense, the course and current of this world's affairs as corrupted by sin. Comp. 2 Corinthians 4:4. Ἑνεστῶτος , present, as contrasted with the world to come. Elsewhere we have ὁ νῦν αἰών thenow world (1 Timothy 6:17); ὁ αἰὼν τοῦκοσμοῦ theperiod of this world (Ephesians 2:2); ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος thisworld or age (Romans 7:2). Ἑνεστῶτος , not impending, as some expositors, - the period of wickedness and suffering preceding the parousia (2 Thessalonians 2:3), which would imply a limitation of Christ's atoning work to that period. Comp. 2 Thessalonians 2:2; 2 Timothy 3:1; 1 Corinthians 7:26. The sense of present as related to future is clear in Romans 8:38; 1 Corinthians 3:22; Hebrews 9:9. For the evil character of the present world as conceived by Paul, see Romans 12:2; 1 Corinthians 2:6; 2 Corinthians 4:4; Ephesians 2:2. [source]
Galatians 2:20 No longer I [ουκετι εγω]
So complete has become Paul‘s identification with Christ that his separate personality is merged into that of Christ. This language helps one to understand the victorious cry in Romans 7:25. It is the union of the vine and the branch (John 15:1-6). Which is in the Son of God (τηι του υιου του τεου — tēi tou huiou tou theou). The objective genitive, not the faith of the Son of God. For me Paul has the closest personal feeling toward Christ. “He appropriates to himself, as Chrysostom observes, the love which belongs equally to the whole world. For Christ is indeed the personal friend of each man individually” (Lightfoot). [source]
Galatians 5:4 Ye are severed from Christ [κατηργητητε απο Χριστου]
First aorist passive of καταργεω — katargeō to make null and void as in Romans 7:2, Romans 7:6. [source]
Ephesians 4:17 Vanity of their mind [ματαιότητι τοῦ νοὸς αὐτῶν]
For vanity see on Romans 1:21; see on Romans 8:20. For mind, see on Romans 7:23. [source]
Ephesians 3:16 In the inward man [εἰς τὸν ἔσω ἄνθρωπον]
The force of the preposition is into: might entering into the inmost personality. Inward man: compare outward man, 2 Corinthians 4:16. It is the rational and moral I; the essence of the man which is conscious of itself as a moral personality. In the unregenerate it is liable to fall under the power of sin (Romans 7:23); and in the regenerate it needs constant renewing and strengthening by the Spirit of God, as here. Compare the hidden man of the heart, 1 Peter 3:4. [source]
Ephesians 3:16 That ye may be strengthened [κραταιος]
First aorist passive infinitive of κρατος — krataioō late and rare (lxx, N.T.) from δυναμει — krataios late form from εις τον εσω αντρωπον — kratos (strength). See note on Luke 1:80. Paul adds εχω — dunamei (with the Spirit). Instrumental case. In the inward man (eis ton esō anthrōpon). Same expression in 2 Corinthians 4:16 (in contrast with the outward exō man) and in Romans 7:22. [source]
Ephesians 3:16 In the inward man [eis ton esō anthrōpon)]
Same expression in 2 Corinthians 4:16 (in contrast with the outward exō man) and in Romans 7:22. [source]
Philippians 4:7 Which passeth all understanding [ἡ ὑπερέχουσα πάντα νοῦν]
Either, which passes all power of comprehension, compare Ephesians 3:20; or, better, which surpasses every (human ) reason, in its power to relieve anxiety. Compare Matthew 6:31, Matthew 6:32. For understanding, see on Romans 7:23. [source]
Colossians 3:23 Heartily [ἐκ ψυχῆς]
Lit., from the soul. With a personal interest. Note that the apostle uses both heart ( καρδίας , Colossians 3:22) and soul ( ψυχῆς ); and in Ephesians 6:7, adds μετ ' εὐνοίας withgood disposition (A.V., good will ). See on Romans 11:3; see on Romans 7:23; see on Romans 1:21. Compare σύμψυχοι ofone accord, Philemon 2:2; ἰσόψυχον like-minded Philemon 2:20; μιᾷ ψυχῇ withone mind, Philemon 1:27. [source]
Colossians 2:18 By his fleshly mind [ὑπὸ τοῦ νοὸς τῆς σαρκὸς αὐτοῦ]
Lit., by the mind of his flesh. The intellectual faculty in its moral aspects as determined by the fleshly, sinful nature. See on Romans 8:23. Compare Romans 7:22-25; Romans 8:7. The teachers boasted that they were guided by the higher reason. Paul describes their higher reason as carnal. [source]
1 Thessalonians 5:23 Spirit, soul, body [πνεῦμα, ψυχὴ σῶμα]
It is useless to attempt to draw from these words a technical, psychological statement of a threefold division of the human personality. If Paul recognized any such technical division, it was more probably twofold; the body or material part, and the immaterial part with its higher and lower sides - πνεῦμα and ψυχὴ . See on Romans 6:6; see on Romans 7:5, Romans 7:23; see on Romans 8:4; see on Romans 11:3and footnote. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:2 In mind [ἀπὸ τοῦ νοὸς]
More correctly, from your mind. Νοῦς signifies the judgment, sober sense. Comp. 1 Corinthians 14:15, and see on Romans 7:23. They are to “keep their heads” under the temptation to fanatical extravagances concerning the Lord's appearing. [source]
2 Thessalonians 3:13 But ye, brethren, be not weary in well-doing [υμεις δε αδελποι μη ενκακησητε καλοποιουντες]
Emphatic position of εν κακος — humeis in contrast to these piddlers. καλοποιεω — Mē and the aorist subjunctive is a prohibition against beginning an act (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 851-4). It is a late verb and means to behave badly in, to be cowardly, to lose courage, to flag, to faint, It occurs in Polybius. The late verb αγατοποιεω — kalopoieō to do the fair (kalos) or honourable thing occurs nowhere else in the N.T., but is in the lxx and a late papyrus. Paul uses to kalon poiein in 2 Corinthians 13:7; Galatians 6:9; Romans 7:21 with the same idea. He has agathopoieō to do good, in 1 Timothy 6:18. [source]
1 Timothy 3:2 The husband of one wife [μιᾶς γυναικὸς ἄνδρα]
Comp. 1 Timothy 3:12; Titus 1:6. Is the injunction aimed (a) at immoralities respecting marriage - concubinage, etc., or (b) at polygamy, or (c) at remarriage after death or divorce? The last is probably meant. Much of the difficulty arises from the assumption that the Pastorals were written by Paul. In that case his views seem to conflict. See Romans 7:2, Romans 7:3; 1 Corinthians 7:39; 1 Corinthians 8:8, 1 Corinthians 8:9, where Paul declares that widows are free to marry again, and puts widows and virgins on the same level; and comp. 1 Timothy 5:9, according to which a widow is to be enrolled only on the condition of having been the wife of but one man. The Pauline view is modified in detail by the writer of the Pastorals. Paul, while asserting that marriage is right and honorable, regards celibacy as the higher state (1 Corinthians 7:1, 1 Corinthians 7:7, 1 Corinthians 7:26, 1 Corinthians 7:34, 1 Corinthians 7:37, 1 Corinthians 7:38). In this the Pastoral writer does not follow him (see 1 Timothy 2:15; 1 Timothy 3:4, 1 Timothy 3:12; 1 Timothy 4:3; 1 Timothy 5:10, 1 Timothy 5:14). The motive for marriage, namely, protection against incontinency, which is adduced by Paul in 1 Corinthians 7:2, 1 Corinthians 7:9, is given in 1 Timothy 5:11-14. As in Paul, the married state is honorable, for Bishops, Deacons, and Presbyters are married (1 Timothy 3:2, 1 Timothy 3:12; Titus 1:6), and the honor of childbearing conferred upon the mother of our Lord is reflected in the Christian woman of later times (1 Timothy 2:15). While Paul advises against second marriages (1 Corinthians 7:8, 1 Corinthians 7:9, 1 Corinthians 7:27, 1 Corinthians 7:39, 1 Corinthians 7:40), in the Pastorals emphasis is laid only on the remarriage of church-officers and church-widows. In the Pastorals we see a reflection of the conditions of the earlier post-apostolic age, when a non-Pauline asceticism was showing itself (see 1 Timothy 4:3, 1 Timothy 4:4, 1 Timothy 4:8; Titus 1:15). The opposition to second marriage became very strong in the latter part of the second century. It was elevated into an article of faith by the Montanists, and was emphasized by Tertullian, and by Athenagoras, who called second marriage “a specious adultery” ( εὐπρεπής μοιχεία )|Vigilant ( νηφάλιον )|Only in the Pastorals. See 1 Timothy 3:11, and Titus 2:2. olxx. The kindred verb νήφειν means to be sober with reference to drink, and, in a metaphorical sense, to be sober and wary; cool and unimpassioned. Thus Epicharmus, νᾶφε καὶ μέμνας ἀπιστεῖν bewary and remember not to be credulous. See on 1 Thessalonians 5:6. In N.T. the meaning of the verb is always metaphorical, to be calm, dispassionate, and circumspect. The A.V. vigilant is too limited. Wise caution may be included; but it is better to render sober, as A.V. in 1 Timothy 3:11and Titus 2:2, in the metaphorical sense as opposed to youthful levity.|Of good behavior ( κόσμιον )|oP. Only here and 1 Timothy 2:9, see note. Rend. orderly.|Given to hospitality ( φιλόξενον )|oP. Comp. Titus 1:8; 1 Peter 4:9. See note on pursuing hospitality, Romans 12:13.|Apt to teach ( διδακτικόν )|oP. Only here and 2 Timothy 2:24. olxx, oClass. In the Pastorals the function of teaching pertains to both Bishops and Elders (see 1 Timothy 5:17; Titus 1:9). It is at this point that the tendency to confound and identify the two reveals itself. Bishops and Presbyters are not identical. Earlier, the teaching function does not seem to have attached to the position of ἐπίσκοπος. The office acquired a different character when it assumed that function, which is not assigned to it in Clement's Epistle to the Corinthians. In the Didache or Teaching of the Twelve Apostles (about 100 a.d.) the ministry of teaching is to be assumed by the Bishops only in the absence of the Prophets and Teachers (xiii., xv).| [source]
1 Timothy 1:15 Acceptation [πρωτος]
Genitive case with ην — axios (worthy of). Late word (Polybius, Diod., Jos.) in N.T. only here and 1 Timothy 4:9. Chief (ειμι — prōtos). Not ελαχιστος των αποστολων — ēn (I was), but τωι ελαχιστοτερωι παντων αγιων — eimi (I am). “It is not easy to think of any one but St. Paul as penning these words” (White). In 1 Corinthians 15:9 he had called himself “the least of the apostles” (elachistos tōn apostolōn). In Ephesians 3:8 he refers to himself as “the less than the least of all saints” (tōi elachistoterōi pantōn hagiōn). On occasion Paul would defend himself as on a par with the twelve apostles (Galatians 2:6-10) and superior to the Judaizers (2 Corinthians 11:5.; 2 Corinthians 12:11). It is not mock humility here, but sincere appreciation of the sins of his life (cf. Romans 7:24) as a persecutor of the church of God (Galatians 1:13), of men and even women (Acts 22:4.; Acts 26:11). He had sad memories of those days. [source]
1 Timothy 1:15 Chief [ειμι]
Not ελαχιστος των αποστολων — ēn (I was), but τωι ελαχιστοτερωι παντων αγιων — eimi (I am). “It is not easy to think of any one but St. Paul as penning these words” (White). In 1 Corinthians 15:9 he had called himself “the least of the apostles” In Ephesians 3:8 he refers to himself as “the less than the least of all saints” On occasion Paul would defend himself as on a par with the twelve apostles (Galatians 2:6-10) and superior to the Judaizers (2 Corinthians 11:5.; 2 Corinthians 12:11). It is not mock humility here, but sincere appreciation of the sins of his life (cf. Romans 7:24) as a persecutor of the church of God (Galatians 1:13), of men and even women (Acts 22:4.; Acts 26:11). He had sad memories of those days. [source]
2 Timothy 2:9 But the word of God is not bound [ἀλλὰ ὁ λόγος τοῦ θεοῦ οὐ δέδεται]
Nevertheless, although I am in bonds, the gospel which I preach will prevail in spite of all human efforts to hinder it. Word of God often in Paul. In Pastorals, 1 Timothy 4:5; Titus 2:5. Bound, in Paul metaphorically, as here, Romans 7:2; 1 Corinthians 7:27, 1 Corinthians 7:39. [source]
2 Timothy 1:3 I thank [χαριν εχω]
“I have gratitude.” As in 1 Timothy 1:12. Robinson cites examples of this phrase from the papyri. It occurs also in Luke 17:9; Acts 2:47. Χαρις — Charis in doxologies Paul uses (1 Corinthians 15:57; 2 Corinthians 2:14; 2 Corinthians 8:16; 2 Corinthians 9:15; Romans 6:17; Romans 7:25). His usual idiom is ευχαριστω — eucharistō (1 Corinthians 1:4; Romans 1:8; Philemon 1:4; Philemon 1:3) or ευχαριστουμεν — eucharistoumen (1 Thessalonians 1:2; Colossians 1:3) or ου παυομαι ευχαριστων — ou pauomai eucharistōn (Ephesians 1:16) or ευχαριστειν οπειλομεν — eucharistein opheilomen (2 Thessalonians 1:3). [source]
2 Timothy 2:9 I suffer hardship [κακοπατω]
“I suffer evil.” Old compound “Up to bonds.” A common experience with Paul (2 Corinthians 11:23; Philemon 1:7, Philemon 1:13, Philemon 1:14; Colossians 4:18). As a malefactor One of the charges made against Paul. Is not bound (ou dedetai). Perfect passive indicative of deō to bind. Old verb. See note on 1 Corinthians 7:27, 1 Corinthians 7:39; Romans 7:2. I am bound with a chain, but no fetters are on the word of God (Pauline phrase; 1 Thessalonians 2:13; 1 Corinthians 14:36; 2 Corinthians 2:17; Philemon 1:14; Titus 2:5). [source]
2 Timothy 2:9 As a malefactor [κακον εργω]
One of the charges made against Paul. Is not bound (ou dedetai). Perfect passive indicative of deō to bind. Old verb. See note on 1 Corinthians 7:27, 1 Corinthians 7:39; Romans 7:2. I am bound with a chain, but no fetters are on the word of God (Pauline phrase; 1 Thessalonians 2:13; 1 Corinthians 14:36; 2 Corinthians 2:17; Philemon 1:14; Titus 2:5). [source]
2 Timothy 2:9 Is not bound [ou dedetai)]
Perfect passive indicative of deō to bind. Old verb. See note on 1 Corinthians 7:27, 1 Corinthians 7:39; Romans 7:2. I am bound with a chain, but no fetters are on the word of God (Pauline phrase; 1 Thessalonians 2:13; 1 Corinthians 14:36; 2 Corinthians 2:17; Philemon 1:14; Titus 2:5). [source]
2 Timothy 3:6 Take captive [αιχμαλωτιζοντες]
“Taking captive.” Present active participle of αιχμαλωτιζω — aichmalōtizō for which see note on 2 Corinthians 10:5; Romans 7:23. Silly women (γυναικαρια — gunaikaria). Literally, “little women” (diminutive of γυνη — gunē), found in Diocles (comedian of 5 century b.c.) and in Epictetus. The word here is neuter (grammatical gender) plural. Used contemptuously here (only N.T. example). Ramsay suggests “society ladies.” It is amazing how gullible some women are with religious charlatans who pose as exponents of “new thought.” Laden with sins Perfect passive participle of σωρευω — sōreuō old word from Aristotle down (from σωρος — sōros a heap) to heap up. In N.T. only here and Romans 12:20. Associative instrumental case αμαρτιαις — hamartiais Divers (ποικιλαις — poikilais). Many coloured. See note on Titus 3:3. One has only to recall Schweinfurth, the false Messiah of forty odd years ago with his “heavenly harem” in Illinois and the recent infamous “House of David” in Michigan to understand how these Gnostic cults led women into licentiousness under the guise of religion or of liberty. The priestesses of Aphrodite and of Isis were illustrations ready to hand. Αγομενα — Agomena (present passive participle) means “continually led astray or from time to time.” [source]
Titus 1:15 Mind and conscience [ὁ νοῦς καὶ ἡ συνείδησις]
For νοῦς see on Romans 7:23: for συνείδησις , see on 1 Peter 3:16. [source]
Hebrews 7:16 The law of a carnal commandment [νόμον ἐντολῆς σαρκίνης]
The phrase N.T.o Νόμον thenorm or standard, as Romans 7:21, Romans 7:23. Εντολῆς, the specific precept of the Mosaic law regarding Levitical priests. Comp. Ephesians 2:15. Σαρκίνης fleshlyindicates that the conditions of the Levitical priesthood had reference to the body. Fitness for office was determined largely by physical considerations. The priest must be of proper descent, without bodily blemish, ceremonially pure. See Hebrews 9:1-5, Hebrews 9:10, and comp. Romans 8:3. Such a priesthood cannot be eternal. [source]
James 4:1 That war [στρατευομένων]
The thought of wars and rightings is carried into the figurative description of the sensuality which arrays its forces and carries on its campaign in the members. The verb does not imply mere fighting, but all that is included in military service. A remarkable parallel occurs in Plato, “Phaedo,” 66: “For whence come wars and rightings and factions? Whence but from the body and the lusts of the body?” Compare 1 Peter 2:11; Romans 7:23. [source]
James 4:9 Be afflicted [ταλαιπωρησατε]
First aorist active imperative ταλαιπωρεω — talaipōreō old verb from ταλαιπωρος — talaipōros (Romans 7:24), to endure toils, here only in N.T. Cf. ταλαιπωριαις — talaipōriais in James 5:1. [source]
James 5:1 Weep and howl [κλαυσατε ολολυζοντες]
“Burst into weeping (ingressive aorist active imperative of κλαιω — klaiō as in James 4:9), howling with grief” (present active participle of the old onomatopoetic verb ολολυζω — ololuzō here only in N.T., like Latin ululare, with which compare αλαλαζω — alalazō in Matthew 5:38.For your miseries (επι ταις ταλαιπωριαις υμων — epi tais talaipōriais humōn). Old word from ταλαιπωρος — talaipōros (Romans 7:24) and like ταλαιπωρεω — talaipōreō in James 4:9 (from τλαω — tlaō to endure and πωρος — pōros a callus).That are coming upon you Present middle participle of the old compound επερχομαι — eperchomai to come upon, used here in futuristic prophetic sense. [source]
James 5:1 For your miseries [επι ταις ταλαιπωριαις υμων]
Old word from ταλαιπωρος — talaipōros (Romans 7:24) and like ταλαιπωρεω — talaipōreō in James 4:9 (from τλαω — tlaō to endure and πωρος — pōros a callus). [source]
1 Peter 3:4 But the hidden man of the heart [αλλ ο κρυπτος της καρδιας αντρωπος]
Here αντρωπος — anthrōpos is in contrast with κοσμος — kosmos just before. See Paul‘s use of αντρωπος — anthrōpos for the outer and old, the inner and new man (2 Corinthians 4:16; Romans 7:22; Colossians 3:9; Ephesians 3:16; Ephesians 4:22, Ephesians 4:24). See also the Jew εν κρυπτωι — en kruptōi (Romans 2:29) and what Jesus said about God seeing “in secret” (Matthew 6:4, Matthew 6:6). [source]
Revelation 17:9 The mind [ὁ νοῦς]
I. Νοῦς is the organ of mental perception and apprehension - of conscious life, the mind, comprising the faculties of perceiving and understanding, of feeling, judging, determining. (a) The intellectual faculty or understanding (Luke 24:45). So here, according to some. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(b) The reason, regarded as the faculty of perceiving divine things: of recognizing goodness and hating evil (Romans 1:28; Romans 7:23; Ephesians 4:17). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
(c) The power of calm and impartial judgment (2 Thessalonians 2:2). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
II. Νοῦς isa particular mode of thinking and judging: moral consciousness as a habit of mind or opinion. Hence thoughts, feelings, purposes (Romans 14:5; 1 Corinthians 1:10). Some render here meaning. [source]

Revelation 3:17 Have gotten riches [πεπλουτηκα]
Perfect active indicative of πλουτεω — plouteō old verb from πλουτος — ploutos used here of imagined spiritual riches which the church did not possess, just the opposite of church in Smyrna (poor in wealth, rich in grace). This church was in a rich city and was rich in pride and conceit, but poor in grace and ignorant of its spiritual poverty Old adjective from τλαω — tlaō to endure, and πωρος — pōros a callus, afflicted, in N.T. only here and Romans 7:24. Note the one article in the predicate with all these five adjectives unifying the picture of sharp emphasis on “thou” (συ — su), “thou that boastest.”Miserable Pitiable as in 1 Corinthians 15:19.Poor (πτωχος — ptōchos). See Revelation 2:9 for spiritual poverty. Perhaps some local example of self-complacency is in mind.Blind Spiritual blindness as often (Matthew 23:17), and note “eye-salve” in Revelation 3:18.Naked (γυμνος — gumnos). “The figure completes the picture of actual poverty” (Beckwith). See Revelation 3:15, Revelation 3:16. [source]
Revelation 3:17 The wretched one [ο ταλαιπωρος]
Old adjective from τλαω — tlaō to endure, and πωρος — pōros a callus, afflicted, in N.T. only here and Romans 7:24. Note the one article in the predicate with all these five adjectives unifying the picture of sharp emphasis on “thou” (συ — su), “thou that boastest.” [source]

What do the individual words in Romans 7:2 mean?

The for married woman to the living husband is bound by law if however should die the husband she is cleared from the law of the husband
γὰρ ὕπανδρος γυνὴ τῷ ζῶντι ἀνδρὶ δέδεται νόμῳ ἐὰν δὲ ἀποθάνῃ ἀνήρ κατήργηται ἀπὸ τοῦ νόμου τοῦ ἀνδρός

ὕπανδρος  married 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Feminine Singular
Root: ὕπανδρος  
Sense: under i.
γυνὴ  woman 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Feminine Singular
Root: γυνή  
Sense: a woman of any age, whether a virgin, or married, or a widow.
τῷ  to  the 
Parse: Article, Dative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ζῶντι  living 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: ζάω  
Sense: to live, breathe, be among the living (not lifeless, not dead).
ἀνδρὶ  husband 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: ἀνήρ  
Sense: with reference to sex.
δέδεται  is  bound 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Indicative Middle or Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: δέω  
Sense: to bind tie, fasten.
νόμῳ  by  law 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: νόμος  
Sense: anything established, anything received by usage, a custom, a law, a command.
δὲ  however 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: δέ  
Sense: but, moreover, and, etc.
ἀποθάνῃ  should  die 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Subjunctive Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἀποθνῄσκω  
Sense: to die.
ἀνήρ  husband 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἀνήρ  
Sense: with reference to sex.
κατήργηται  she  is  cleared 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Indicative Middle or Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: καταργέω  
Sense: to render idle, unemployed, inactivate, inoperative.
νόμου  law 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: νόμος  
Sense: anything established, anything received by usage, a custom, a law, a command.
τοῦ  of  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἀνδρός  husband 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: ἀνήρ  
Sense: with reference to sex.

What are the major concepts related to Romans 7:2?

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