The Meaning of 1 Corinthians 12:3 Explained

1 Corinthians 12:3

KJV: Wherefore I give you to understand, that no man speaking by the Spirit of God calleth Jesus accursed: and that no man can say that Jesus is the Lord, but by the Holy Ghost.

YLT: wherefore, I give you to understand that no one, in the Spirit of God speaking, saith Jesus is anathema, and no one is able to say Jesus is Lord, except in the Holy Spirit.

Darby: I give you therefore to know, that no one, speaking in the power of the Spirit of God, says, Curse on Jesus; and no one can say, Lord Jesus, unless in the power of the Holy Spirit.

ASV: Wherefore I make known unto you, that no man speaking in the Spirit of God saith, Jesus is anathema; and no man can say, Jesus is Lord, but in the Holy Spirit.

What does 1 Corinthians 12:3 Mean?

Verse Meaning

Enthusiasm or ecstasy or "inspired" utterance do not necessarily indicate spirituality. By "inspired" utterance I mean any utterance that the speaker claimed came from God, not necessarily a truly inspired new revelation from God. Paul"s original readers needed to pay attention to what the person speaking in such a state said.
"Not the manner but the content of ecstatic speech determines its authenticity." [1]
What the person said about Jesus Christ was especially important. No one the Holy Spirit motivated would curse Jesus Christ. Probably no one in the Corinthian church had. In the Septuagint anathema means a thing devoted to God without being redeemed, doomed to destruction ( Leviticus 27:28-29; Joshua 6:17; Joshua 7:12). [2] Anathema is an Aramaic term carried over from the church"s Jewish background. Likewise no one would sincerely acknowledge that Jesus is Lord, Savior and or Sovereign, unless the Holy Spirit had some influence over him or her. This was true regardless of whether the person was speaking in an ecstatic condition or in plain speech. Paul was not enabling his readers to test the spirits to see if they were of God (cf. 1 John 4:1-3). His point was that "inspired" utterance as such does not indicate that the Holy Spirit is leading a person.
The Holy Spirit leads those under His control to glorify Jesus Christ, not dumb idols, with their speech (cf. 1 Corinthians 2:10-13).
"The ultimate criterion of the Spirit"s activity is the exaltation of Jesus as Lord. Whatever takes away from that, even if they be legitimate expressions of the Spirit, begins to move away from Christ to a more pagan fascination with spiritual activity as an end in itself." [3]

Context Summary

1 Corinthians 12:1-11 - Differing Spiritual Gifts
Each believer, being an heir of God, has the same amount of grace placed to his credit in the heavenly bank, on which he can draw in time of need. This is the parable of the pounds. Each servant received the same amount. But there are great diversities in the gifts with which we are endowed. Some have five talents, others two, and large numbers only one. A full enumeration of these gifts is made in 1 Corinthians 12:8-11, and it is a comfort to learn that to everyone something is allotted, 1 Corinthians 12:7; 1 Corinthians 12:11.
Notice that the allotment is made by the Holy Spirit acting sovereignly as He will, 1 Corinthians 12:11. We are not informed when it is made-perhaps it is at the moment of our regeneration or adoption-but it is important to bear in mind that our gifts will probably correspond with our natural endowment. Hence our Lord tells us that to every man was given according to his several ability, Matthew 25:15.
Mark the allusion to the Divine Trinity: the same Spirit, 1 Corinthians 12:4; the same Lord, 1 Corinthians 12:5; the same God, 1 Corinthians 12:6. The Spirit directs, the Savior is the channel of supply, and the Father is the fountain of all. [source]

Chapter Summary: 1 Corinthians 12

1  Spiritual gifts,
4  are diverse,
7  yet to profit all
8  And to that end are diversely bestowed;
12  as the members of a natural body tend all to the mutual decency,
22  service,
26  and helpfulness of the same body;
27  so we should do for one another, to make up the body of Christ

Greek Commentary for 1 Corinthians 12:3

Wherefore I give you to understand [διο γνωριζω υμιν]
Causative idea (only in Aeschylus in old Greek) in papyri (also in sense of recognize) and N.T., from root γνω — gnō in γινωσκω — ginōskō to know. [source]
Speaking in the Spirit of God [εν πνευματι τεου λαλων]
Either sphere or instrumentality. No great distinction here between λαλεω — laleō (utter sounds) and λεγω — legō (to say). Jesus is anathema (ανατεμα Ιησους — anathema Iēsous). On distinction between ανατεμα — anathema (curse) and ανατημα — anathēma (offering, Luke 21:5) see discussion. In lxx ανατημα — anathēma means a thing devoted to God without being redeemed, doomed to destruction (Leviticus 27:28f.; Joshua 6:17; 7:12). See note on 1 Corinthians 16:22; note. on Galatians 1:8; note on Romans 9:3. This blasphemous language against Jesus was mainly by the Jews (Acts 13:45; Acts 18:6). It is even possible that Paul had once tried to make Christians say Ανατεμα Ιησους — Anathema Iēsous (Acts 26:11). Jesus is Lord The term Κυριος — Kurios as we have seen, is common in the lxx for God. The Romans used it freely for the emperor in the emperor worship. “Most important of all is the early establishment of a polemical parallelism between the cult of Christ and the cult of Caesar in the application of the term Κυριος — Kurios ‹lord.‘The new texts have here furnished quite astonishing revelations” (Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East, p. 349). Inscriptions, ostraca, papyri apply the term to Roman emperors, particularly to Nero when Paul wrote this very letter (ib., p. 353f.): “One with ‹Nero Kurios‘ quite in the manner of a formula (without article, like the ‹Kurios Jesus‘ in 1 Corinthians 12:3.” “The battle-cries of the spirits of error and of truth contending at Corinth” (Findlay). One is reminded of the demand made by Polycarp that he say Κυριος Χαεσαρ — Kurios Caesar and how each time he replied Κυριος Ιησους — Kurios Iēsous He paid the penalty for his loyalty with his life. Lighthearted men today can say “Lord Jesus” in a flippant or even in an irreverent way, but no Jew or Gentile then said it who did not mean it. [source]
Jesus is anathema [ανατεμα Ιησους]
On distinction between ανατεμα — anathema (curse) and ανατημα — anathēma (offering, Luke 21:5) see discussion. In lxx ανατημα — anathēma means a thing devoted to God without being redeemed, doomed to destruction (Leviticus 27:28f.; Joshua 6:17; 7:12). See note on 1 Corinthians 16:22; note. on Galatians 1:8; note on Romans 9:3. This blasphemous language against Jesus was mainly by the Jews (Acts 13:45; Acts 18:6). It is even possible that Paul had once tried to make Christians say Ανατεμα Ιησους — Anathema Iēsous (Acts 26:11). [source]
Jesus is Lord [Κυριος Ιησους]
The term Κυριος — Kurios as we have seen, is common in the lxx for God. The Romans used it freely for the emperor in the emperor worship. “Most important of all is the early establishment of a polemical parallelism between the cult of Christ and the cult of Caesar in the application of the term Κυριος — Kurios ‹lord.‘The new texts have here furnished quite astonishing revelations” (Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East, p. 349). Inscriptions, ostraca, papyri apply the term to Roman emperors, particularly to Nero when Paul wrote this very letter (ib., p. 353f.): “One with ‹Nero Kurios‘ quite in the manner of a formula (without article, like the ‹Kurios Jesus‘ in 1 Corinthians 12:3.” “The battle-cries of the spirits of error and of truth contending at Corinth” (Findlay). One is reminded of the demand made by Polycarp that he say Κυριος Χαεσαρ — Kurios Caesar and how each time he replied Κυριος Ιησους — Kurios Iēsous He paid the penalty for his loyalty with his life. Lighthearted men today can say “Lord Jesus” in a flippant or even in an irreverent way, but no Jew or Gentile then said it who did not mean it. [source]
Calleth Jesus accursed [λέγει Ἁνάθεμα Ἱησοῦς]
Lit., saith Anathema Jesus. Rev., preserving the formula, saith Jesus is Anathema. Compare Acts 18:6, and see on offerings, Luke 21:5. Paul uses only the form ἀνάθεμα , and always in the sense of accursed. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for 1 Corinthians 12:3

Acts 14:23 And when they had appointed for them elders in every church [χειροτονησαντες δε αυτοις κατ εκκλησιαν πρεσβυτερους]
They needed also some form of organization, though already churches. Note distributive use of κατα — kata with εκκλησιαν — ekklēsian (Acts 2:46; Acts 5:42; Titus 1:5). Χειροτονεω — Cheirotoneō (from χειροτονος — cheirotonos extending the hand, χειρ — cheir hand, and τεινω — teinō to stretch) is an old verb that originally meant to vote by show of the hands, finally to appoint with the approval of an assembly that chooses as in 2 Corinthians 8:19, and then to appoint without regard to choice as in Josephus (Ant. XIII. 2, 2) of the appointment of Jonathan as high priest by Alexander. So in Acts 10:41 the compound προχειρατονεω — procheiratoneō is used of witnesses appointed by God. But the seven (deacons) were first selected by the Jerusalem church and then appointed Elder Hovey rightly holds against Hackett that teaching was a normal function of these elders, pastors or bishops as they were variously called (1 Timothy 3:2; Titus 1:9; 1 Corinthians 12:28, 1 Corinthians 12:30; Ephesians 4:11). [source]
Acts 25:26 Unto my lord [τωι κυριωι]
Augustus (Octavius) and Tiberius refused the title of κυριος — kurios (lord) as too much like rex (king) and like master and slave, but the servility of the subjects gave it to the other emperors who accepted it (Nero among them). Antoninus Pius put it on his coins. Deissmann (Light from the Ancient East, p. 105) gives an ostracon dated Aug. 4, a.d. 63 with the words “in the year nine of Nero the lord” Deissmann (op. cit., pp. 349ff.) runs a most interesting parallel “between the cult of Christ and the cult of Caesar in the application of the term κυριος — kurios lord” in ostraca, papyri, inscriptions. Beyond a doubt Paul has all this fully in mind when he says in 1 Corinthians 12:3 that “no one is able to say Κυριος Ιησους — Kurios Iēsous except in the Holy Spirit” (cf. also Philemon 2:11). The Christians claimed this word for Christ and it became the test in the Roman persecutions as when Polycarp steadily refused to say “ Lord Caesar” and insisted on saying “Lord Jesus” when it meant his certain death. Before you (επ υμων — eph' humōn). The whole company. In no sense a new trial, but an examination in the presence of these prominent men to secure data and to furnish entertainment and pleasure to Agrippa (Acts 25:22). Especially before thee Out of courtesy. It was the main reason as Acts 25:22 shows. Agrippa was a Jew and Festus was glad of the chance to see what he thought of Paul‘s case. After examination had (της ανακρισεως γενομενης — tēs anakriseōs genomenēs). Genitive absolute, “the examination having taken place.” Ανακρισις — Anakrisis from ανακρινω — anakrinō (cf. Acts 12:19; Acts 24:8; Acts 28:18) is a legal term for preliminary examination. Only here in the N.T. Inscriptions and papyri give it as examination of slaves or other property. That I may have somewhat to write Ingressive aorist subjunctive σχω — schō (may get) with οπως — hopōs (final particle like ινα — hina). Τι γραπσω — Ti grapsō in indirect question after σχω — schō is either future indicative or aorist subjunctive (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1045). Festus makes it plain that this is not a “trial,” but an examination for his convenience to help him out of a predicament. [source]
Romans 8:4 The Spirit [πνεῦμα]
From πνέω tobreathe or blow. The primary conception is wind or breath. Breath being the sign and condition of life in man, it comes to signify life. In this sense, physiologically considered, it is frequent in the classics. In the psychological sense, never. In the Old Testament it is ordinarily the translation of ruach It is also used to translate chai life, Isaiah 38:12; nbreath, 1 Kings 17:17. In the New Testament it occurs in the sense of wind or breath, Romans 8:1-136; 2 Thessalonians 2:8; Hebrews 1:7. Closely related to the physiological sense are such passages as Luke 8:55; James 2:26; Revelation 13:15. Pauline Usage: 1. Breath, 2 Thessalonians 2:8. 2. The spirit or mind of man; the inward, self-conscious principle which feels and thinks and wills (1 Corinthians 2:11; 1 Corinthians 5:3; 1 Corinthians 7:34; Colossians 2:5). In this sense it is distinguished from σῶμα bodyor accompanied with a personal pronoun in the genitive, as my, our, his spirit (Romans 1:9; Romans 8:16; 1 Corinthians 5:4; 1 Corinthians 16:18, etc.). It is used as parallel with ψυχή souland καρδία heartSee 1 Corinthians 5:3; 1 Thessalonians 2:17; and compare John 13:21and John 12:27; Matthew 26:38and Luke 1:46, Luke 1:47. But while ψυχή soulis represented as the subject of life, πνεύμα spiritrepresents the principle of life, having independent activity in all circumstances of the perceptive and emotional life, and never as the subject. Generally, πνεύμα spiritmay be described as the principle, ψυχή soulas the subject, and καρδία heartas the organ of life. 3. The spiritual nature of Christ. Romans 1:4; 1 Corinthians 15:45; 1 Timothy 3:16. 4. The divine power or influence belonging to God, and communicated in Christ to men, in virtue of which they become πνευματικοί spiritual - recipientsand organs of the Spirit. This is Paul's most common use of the word. Romans 8:9; 1 Corinthians 2:13; Galatians 4:6; Galatians 6:1; 1 Thessalonians 4:8. In this sense it appears as: a. Spirit of God. Romans 8:9, Romans 8:11, Romans 8:14; 1 Corinthians 2:10, 1 Corinthians 2:11, 1 Corinthians 2:12, 1 Corinthians 2:14; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 6:11; 1 Corinthians 7:40; 2 Corinthians 3:3; Ephesians 3:16. b. Spirit of Christ. Romans 8:9; 2 Corinthians 3:17, 2 Corinthians 3:18; Galatians 4:6; Philemon 1:19. c. Holy Spirit. Romans 5:5; 1 Corinthians 6:19; 1 Corinthians 12:3; Ephesians 1:13; 1 Thessalonians 1:5, 1 Thessalonians 1:6; 1 Thessalonians 4:8, etc. d. Spirit. With or without the article, but with its reference to the Spirit of God or Holy Spirit indicated by the context. Romans 8:16, Romans 8:23, Romans 8:26, Romans 8:27; 1 Corinthians 2:4, 1 Corinthians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 12:4, 1 Corinthians 12:7, 1 Corinthians 12:8, 1 Corinthians 12:9; Ephesians 4:3; 2 Thessalonians 2:13, etc. 5. A power or influence, the character, manifestations, or results of which are more peculiarly defined by qualifying genitives. Thus spirit of meekness, faith, power, wisdom. Romans 8:2, Romans 8:15; 1 Corinthians 4:21; 2 Corinthians 4:13; Galatians 6:1; Ephesians 1:17; 2 Timothy 1:7, etc. These combinations with the genitives are not mere periphrases for a faculty or disposition of man. By the spirit of meekness or wisdom, for instance, is not meant merely a meek or wise spirit; but that meekness, wisdom, power, etc., are gifts of the Spirit of God. This usage is according to Old Testament analogy. Compare Exodus 28:3; Exodus 31:3; Exodus 35:31; Isaiah 11:2. 6. In the plural, used of spiritual gifts or of those who profess to be under spiritual influence, 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 14:12. 7. Powers or influences alien or averse from the divine Spirit, but with some qualifying word. Thus, the spirit of the world; another spirit; spirit of slumber. Romans 11:8; 1 Corinthians 2:12; 2 Corinthians 11:4; Ephesians 2:2; 2 Timothy 1:7. Where these expressions are in negative form they are framed after the analogy of the positive counterpart with which they are placed in contrast. Thus Romans 8:15: “Ye have not received the spirit of bondage, but of adoption. In other cases, as Ephesians 2:2, where the expression is positive, the conception is shaped according to Old-Testament usage, where spirits of evil are conceived as issuing from, and dependent upon, God, so far as He permits their operation and makes them subservient to His own ends. See Judges 9:23; 1 Samuel 16:14-16, 1 Samuel 16:23; 1 Samuel 18:10; 1 Kings 22:21sqq.; Isaiah 19:4. Spirit is found contrasted with letter, Romans 2:29; Romans 7:6; 2 Corinthians 3:6. With flesh, 1618179084_36; Galatians 5:16, Galatians 5:24. It is frequently associated with the idea of power (Romans 1:4; Romans 15:13, Romans 15:19; 1 Corinthians 2:4; Galatians 3:5; Ephesians 3:16; 2 Timothy 1:7); and the verb ἐνεργεῖν , denoting to work efficaciously, is used to mark its special operation (1 Corinthians 12:11; Ephesians 3:20; Philemon 2:13; Colossians 1:29). It is also closely associated with life, Romans 8:2, Romans 8:6, Romans 8:11, Romans 8:13; 1 Corinthians 15:4, 1 Corinthians 15:5; 2 Corinthians 3:6; Galatians 5:25; Galatians 6:8. It is the common possession of the Church and its members; not an occasional gift, but an essential element and mark of the christian life; not appearing merely or mainly in exceptional, marvelous, ecstatic demonstrations, but as the motive and mainspring of all christian action and feeling. It reveals itself in confession (1 Corinthians 12:3); in the consciousness of sonship (Romans 8:16); in the knowledge of the love of God (Romans 5:5); in the peace and joy of faith (Romans 14:17; 1 Thessalonians 1:6); in hope (Romans 5:5; Romans 15:13). It leads believers (Romans 8:14; Galatians 5:18): they serve in newness of the Spirit (Romans 7:6) They walk after the Spirit (Romans 8:4, Romans 8:5; Galatians 5:16-25). Through the Spirit they are sanctified (2 Thessalonians 2:13). It manifests itself in the diversity of forms and operations, appearing under two main aspects: a difference of gifts, and a difference of functions. See Romans 8:9; 1 Corinthians 3:16; 1 Corinthians 5:1, 1 Corinthians 5:11; 1 Corinthians 12:13; Ephesians 1:13; Ephesians 4:3, Ephesians 4:4, Ephesians 4:30; Philemon 2:1; [source]
Romans 1:11 Some spiritual gift [τι χάρισμα]
Note the modesty in some. Χάρισμα is a gift of grace ( χάρις ) a favor received without merit on the recipient's part. Paul uses it both in this ordinary sense (Romans 5:15, Romans 5:16; Romans 6:23), and in a special, technical sense, denoting extraordinary powers bestowed upon individuals by the Holy Spirit, such as gifts of healing, speaking with tongues, prophecy, etc. See Romans 12:6; 1 Corinthians 1:7; 1 Corinthians 12:4, 1 Corinthians 12:31; 1 Peter 4:10. In 1 Timothy 4:14; 2 Timothy 1:6, it is used of the sum of the powers requisite for the discharge of the office of an evangelist. [source]
Romans 10:9 With thy mouth Jesus as Lord [εν τωι στοματι σου Κυριον Ιησουν]
This is the reading of nearly all the MSS. But B 71 Clem of Alex. read το ρημα εν τωι στοματι σου οτι Κυριος Ιησους — to rēma en tōi stomati sou hoti Kurios Iēsous (the word in thy mouth that Jesus is Lord). The idea is the same, the confession of Jesus as Lord as in 1 Corinthians 12:3; Philemon 2:11. No Jew would do this who had not really trusted Christ, for Κυριος — Kurios in the lxx is used of God. No Gentile would do it who had not ceased worshipping the emperor as Κυριος — Kurios The word Κυριος — Kurios was and is the touchstone of faith. And shalt believe (και πιστευσηις — kai pisteusēis). Same construction. Faith precedes confession, of course. [source]
Romans 7:13 That it might be shown [ινα πανηι]
Final clause, ινα — hina and second aorist passive subjunctive of παινω — phainō to show. The sinfulness of sin is revealed in its violations of God‘s law. By working death to me (μοι κατεργαζομενη τανατον — moi katergazomenē thanaton). Present middle participle, as an incidental result. Might become exceedingly sinful Second aorist middle subjunctive of γινομαι — ginomai with ινα — hina in final clause. On κατ υπερβολην — kath' huperbolēn see note on 1 Corinthians 12:31. Our hyperbole is the Greek υπερβολη — huperbolē The excesses of sin reveal its real nature. Only then do some people get their eyes opened. [source]
Romans 7:13 Might become exceedingly sinful [γενηται κατ υπερβολην αμαρτωλος]
Second aorist middle subjunctive of γινομαι — ginomai with ινα — hina in final clause. On κατ υπερβολην — kath' huperbolēn see note on 1 Corinthians 12:31. Our hyperbole is the Greek υπερβολη — huperbolē The excesses of sin reveal its real nature. Only then do some people get their eyes opened. [source]
Romans 9:3 Anathema [ανατεμα]
See for this word as distinct from ανατημα — anathēma (offering) 1 Corinthians 12:3; Galatians 1:8. I myself (αυτος εγω — autos egō). Nominative with the infinitive ειναι — einai and agreeing with subject of ηυχομην — ēuchomēn According to the flesh As distinguished from Paul‘s Christian brethren. [source]
Romans 9:3 Accursed from Christ [ἀνάθεμα ἀπὸ τοῦ χριστοῦ]
Compare Galatians 1:8, Galatians 1:9; 1 Corinthians 12:3; 1 Corinthians 16:22. See on offerings, Luke 21:5. Set apart to destruction and so separated from Christ (Philemon 1:21; Philemon 3:8, Philemon 3:20). An expression of deep devotion. “It is not easy to estimate the measure of love in a Moses and a Paul. For our limited reason does not grasp it, as the child cannot comprehend the courage of warriors” (Bengel). Compare Moses, Exodus 32:32. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:10 Divers kinds of tongues [γένη γλωσσῶν]
I. Passages Relating to the Gift of Tongues. Mark 16:17; Acts href="/desk/?q=ac+10:46&sr=1">Acts 10:46; Acts 19:6; 1 Corinthians 12:10, 1 Corinthians 12:28; 1 Corinthians 13:1; 14. Possibly Ephesians 5:18; 1 Peter 4:11. II. Terms Employed. New tongues (Mark 16:17): other or different tongues ( ἕτεραι , Acts 2:4): kinds ( γένη ) of tongues (1 Corinthians 12:10): simply tongues or tongue ( γλῶσσαι γλῶσσα , Acts href="/desk/?q=ac+2:4&sr=1">Acts 2:4; Acts 10:46; Acts 19:6; 1 Corinthians 14:2, 1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:13, 1 Corinthians 14:14, 1 Corinthians 14:19, 1 Corinthians 14:27): to pray in a tongue ( προσεύχεσθαι γλώσσῃ , 1 Corinthians 14:14, 1 Corinthians 14:15), equivalent to praying in the spirit as distinguished from praying with the understanding: tongues of men and angels (1 Corinthians 13:1). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
III. Recorded Facts in the New Testament. (1.) The first recorded bestowment of the gift was at Pentecost (Acts href="/desk/?q=ac+10:44-46&sr=1">Acts 10:44-46. (3.) Certain disciples at Ephesus, who received the Holy Spirit in the laying on of Paul's hands, spake with tongues and prophesied, Acts 19:6. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
IV. Meaning of the Term “Tongue.” The various explanations are: the tongue alone, inarticulately: rare, provincial, poetic, or archaic words: language or dialect. The last is the correct definition. It does not necessarily mean any of the known languages of men, but may mean the speaker's own tongue, shaped in a peculiar manner by the Spirit's influence; or an entirely new spiritual language. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
V. Nature of the Gift in the Corinthian Church. (1.) The gift itself was identical with that at Pentecost, at Caesarea, and at Ephesus, but differed in its manifestations, in that it required an interpreter. 1 Corinthians 12:10, 1 Corinthians 12:30; 1 Corinthians 14:5, 1 Corinthians 14:13, 1 Corinthians 14:26, 1 Corinthians 14:27. (2.) It was closely connected with prophesying: 1 Corinthians 14:1-6, 1 Corinthians 14:22, 1 Corinthians 14:25; Acts 2:16-18; Acts 19:6. Compare 1 Thessalonians 5:19, 1 Thessalonians 5:20. It was distinguished from prophesying as an inferior gift, 1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:5; and as consisting in expressions of praise or devotion rather than of exhortation, warning, or prediction, 1 Corinthians 14:14-16. (3.) It was an ecstatic utterance, unintelligible to the hearers, and requiring interpretation, or a corresponding ecstatic condition on the part of the hearer in order to understand it. It was not for the edification of the hearer but of the speaker, and even the speaker did not always understand it, 1 Corinthians 14:2, 1 Corinthians 14:19. It therefore impressed unchristian bystanders as a barbarous utterance, the effect of madness or drunkenness, Acts 2:13, Acts 2:15; 1 Corinthians 14:11, 1 Corinthians 14:23. Hence it is distinguished from the utterance of the understanding, 1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:14-16, 1 Corinthians 14:19, 1 Corinthians 14:27. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
VI. Paul's Estimate of the Gift. He himself was a master of the gift (1 Corinthians 14:18), but he assigned it an inferior position (1 Corinthians 14:4, 1 Corinthians 14:5), and distinctly gave prophesying and speaking with the understanding the preference (1 Corinthians 14:2, 1 Corinthians 14:3, 1 Corinthians 14:5, 1 Corinthians 14:19, 1 Corinthians 14:22). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
VII. Results and Permanence. Being recognized distinctly as a gift of the Spirit, it must be inferred that it contributed in some way to the edification of the Church; but it led to occasional disorderly outbreaks (1 Corinthians 14:9, 1 Corinthians 14:11, 1 Corinthians 14:17, 1 Corinthians 14:20-23, 1 Corinthians 14:26-28, 1 Corinthians 14:33, 1 Corinthians 14:40). As a fact it soon passed away from the Church. It is not mentioned in the Catholic or Pastoral Epistles. A few allusions to it occur in the writings of the fathers of the second century. Ecstatic conditions and manifestations marked the Montanists at the close of the second century, and an account of such a case, in which a woman was the subject, is given by Tertullian. Similar phenomena have emerged at intervals in various sects, at times of great religious excitement, as among the Camisards in France, the early Quakers and Methodists, and especially the Irvingites. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

1 Corinthians 1:5 In all utterance and all knowledge [εν παντι λογωι και πασηι γνωσει]
One detail in explanation of the riches in Christ. The outward expression (λογωι — logōi) here is put before the inward knowledge (γνωσει — gnōsei) which should precede all speech. But we get at one‘s knowledge by means of his speech. Chapters 1 Corinthians 12-14 throw much light on this element in the spiritual gifts of the Corinthians (the gift of tongues, interpreting tongues, discernment) as summed up in 1 Corinthians 13:1, 1 Corinthians 13:2, the greater gifts of 1 Corinthians 12:31. It was a marvellously endowed church in spite of their perversions. [source]
1 Corinthians 14:1 Follow after love [διωκετε την αγαπην]
As if a veritable chase. Paul comes back to the idea in 1 Corinthians 12:31 (same use of ζηλουτε — zēloute) and proves the superiority of prophecy to the other spiritual gifts not counting faith, hope, love of 1 Corinthians 13:13. [source]
1 Corinthians 14:5 Except he interpret [εκτος ει μη διερμηνευηι]
Pleonastic combination of εκτος — ektos (preposition except) and ει μη — ei mē (if not, unless) as in 1 Corinthians 15:2; 1 Timothy 5:19. For use of ει — ei with subjunctive rather than εαν — ean see note on Philemon 3:12 (common enough in the Koiné, Robertson, Grammar, pp. 1017f., condition of third class). On the verb see 1 Corinthians 12:30; Luke 24:27; Acts 9:36. [source]
1 Corinthians 15:1 I make known [γνωριζω]
See note on 1 Corinthians 12:3 for this common verb. As if in reproach. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:5 Ye were enriched in him [επλουτιστητε εν αυτωι]
First aorist passive indicative of πλουτιζω — ploutizō old causative verb from πλουτος — ploutos wealth, common in Attic writers, dropped out for centuries, reappeared in lxx. In N.T. only three times and alone in Paul (1 Corinthians 1:5; 2 Corinthians 6:10, 2 Corinthians 6:11). The Christian finds his real riches in Christ, one of Paul‘s pregnant phrases full of the truest mysticism. In all utterance and all knowledge (εν παντι λογωι και πασηι γνωσει — en panti logōi kai pasēi gnōsei). One detail in explanation of the riches in Christ. The outward expression (λογωι — logōi) here is put before the inward knowledge (γνωσει — gnōsei) which should precede all speech. But we get at one‘s knowledge by means of his speech. Chapters 1 Corinthians 12-14 throw much light on this element in the spiritual gifts of the Corinthians (the gift of tongues, interpreting tongues, discernment) as summed up in 1 Corinthians 13:1, 1 Corinthians 13:2, the greater gifts of 1 Corinthians 12:31. It was a marvellously endowed church in spite of their perversions. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:3 Speaking in the Spirit of God [εν πνευματι τεου λαλων]
Either sphere or instrumentality. No great distinction here between λαλεω — laleō (utter sounds) and λεγω — legō (to say). Jesus is anathema (ανατεμα Ιησους — anathema Iēsous). On distinction between ανατεμα — anathema (curse) and ανατημα — anathēma (offering, Luke 21:5) see discussion. In lxx ανατημα — anathēma means a thing devoted to God without being redeemed, doomed to destruction (Leviticus 27:28f.; Joshua 6:17; 7:12). See note on 1 Corinthians 16:22; note. on Galatians 1:8; note on Romans 9:3. This blasphemous language against Jesus was mainly by the Jews (Acts 13:45; Acts 18:6). It is even possible that Paul had once tried to make Christians say Ανατεμα Ιησους — Anathema Iēsous (Acts 26:11). Jesus is Lord The term Κυριος — Kurios as we have seen, is common in the lxx for God. The Romans used it freely for the emperor in the emperor worship. “Most important of all is the early establishment of a polemical parallelism between the cult of Christ and the cult of Caesar in the application of the term Κυριος — Kurios ‹lord.‘The new texts have here furnished quite astonishing revelations” (Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East, p. 349). Inscriptions, ostraca, papyri apply the term to Roman emperors, particularly to Nero when Paul wrote this very letter (ib., p. 353f.): “One with ‹Nero Kurios‘ quite in the manner of a formula (without article, like the ‹Kurios Jesus‘ in 1 Corinthians 12:3.” “The battle-cries of the spirits of error and of truth contending at Corinth” (Findlay). One is reminded of the demand made by Polycarp that he say Κυριος Χαεσαρ — Kurios Caesar and how each time he replied Κυριος Ιησους — Kurios Iēsous He paid the penalty for his loyalty with his life. Lighthearted men today can say “Lord Jesus” in a flippant or even in an irreverent way, but no Jew or Gentile then said it who did not mean it. [source]
1 Corinthians 12:3 Jesus is Lord [Κυριος Ιησους]
The term Κυριος — Kurios as we have seen, is common in the lxx for God. The Romans used it freely for the emperor in the emperor worship. “Most important of all is the early establishment of a polemical parallelism between the cult of Christ and the cult of Caesar in the application of the term Κυριος — Kurios ‹lord.‘The new texts have here furnished quite astonishing revelations” (Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East, p. 349). Inscriptions, ostraca, papyri apply the term to Roman emperors, particularly to Nero when Paul wrote this very letter (ib., p. 353f.): “One with ‹Nero Kurios‘ quite in the manner of a formula (without article, like the ‹Kurios Jesus‘ in 1 Corinthians 12:3.” “The battle-cries of the spirits of error and of truth contending at Corinth” (Findlay). One is reminded of the demand made by Polycarp that he say Κυριος Χαεσαρ — Kurios Caesar and how each time he replied Κυριος Ιησους — Kurios Iēsous He paid the penalty for his loyalty with his life. Lighthearted men today can say “Lord Jesus” in a flippant or even in an irreverent way, but no Jew or Gentile then said it who did not mean it. [source]
1 Corinthians 13:1 But have not love [αγαπην δε μη εχω]
This is the crux of the chapter. Love is the way par excellence of 1 Corinthians 12:31. It is not yet clearly certain that αγαπη — agapē (a back-formation from αγαπαω — agapaō) occurs before the lxx and the N.T. Plutarch used αγαπησις — agapēsis Deissmann (Bible Studies, p. 198) once suspected it on an inscription in Pisidia. It is still possible that it occurs in the papyri (Prayer to Isis). See Light from the Ancient East, p. 75 for details. The rarity of αγαπη — agapē made it easier for Christians to use this word for Christian love as opposed to ερως — erōs (sexual love). See also Moffatt‘s Love in the N.T. (1930) for further data. The word is rare in the Gospels, but common in Paul, John, Peter, Jude. Paul does not limit αγαπη — agapē at all (both toward God and man). Charity (Latin caritas) is wholly inadequate. “Intellect was worshipped in Greece, and power in Rome; but where did St. Paul learn the surpassing beauty of love?” (Robertson and Plummer). Whether Paul had ever seen Jesus in the flesh, he knows him in the spirit. One can substitute Jesus for love all through this panegyric. I am become (γεγονα — gegona). Second perfect indicative in the conclusion rather than the usual future indicative. It is put vividly, “I am already become.” Sounding brass (χαλχος ηχων — chalchos ēchōn). Old words. Brass was the earliest metal that men learned to use. Our word echoing is ηχων — ēchōn present active participle. Used in Luke 21:25 of the roaring of the sea. Only two examples in N.T. Clanging cymbal Cymbal old word, a hollow basin of brass. Αλαλαζω — Alalazō old onomatopoetic word to ring loudly, in lament (Mark 5:38), for any cause as here. Only two N.T. examples. [source]
1 Corinthians 16:22  []
Ανατεμα — AnathemaThe word seems a bit harsh to us, but the refusal to love Christ (ου πιλει — ou philei) on the part of a nominal Christian deservesανατεμα — anathema(see note on1 Corinthians 12:3for this word).Μαραν ατα — Maran athaThis Aramaic phrase means “Our Lord (μαραν — maran) cometh (ατα — atha)” or, used as a proleptic perfect, “has come.” It seems to be a sort of watchword (cf.1 Thessalonians 4:14.;James 5:7.;Philemon 4:5;Revelation 1:7;Revelation 3:11;Revelation 22:20), expressing the lively hope that the Lord will come. It was a curious blunder in the King James Version that connectedΜαραν ατα — Maran athawithΑνατεμα — Anathemasa120 [source]
1 Corinthians 13:4 Suffereth long [μακροτυμει]
Late Koiné{[28928]}š word (Plutarch) from μακρος — makros long, τυμος — thumos passion, ardour. Cf. James 5:7. Is kind (χρηστευεται — chrēsteuetai). From χρηστος — chrēstos (useful, gracious, kind) and that from χραομαι — chraomai to use. Not found elsewhere save in Clement of Rome and Eusebius. “Perhaps of Paul‘s coining” (Findlay). Perhaps a vernacular word ready for Paul. Gentle in behaviour. Envieth not Present active indicative of ζηλοω — zēloō (contraction οειοι — oeîoi same as subjunctive and optative forms). Bad sense of ζηλος — zēlos from ζεω — zeō to boil, good sense in 1 Corinthians 12:31. Love is neither jealous nor envious (both ideas). Vaunteth not itself (ου περπερευεται — ou perpereuetai). From περπερος — perperos vainglorious, braggart (Polybius, Epictetus) like Latin perperus. Only here in N.T. and earliest known example. It means play the braggart. Marcus Anton. 1 Corinthians 13:5 uses it with αρεσκευομαι — areskeuomai to play the toady. Is not puffed up Present direct middle indicative of πυσιοω — phusioō from πυσις — phusis (late form for πυσαω πυσιαω — phusaōπυσα — phusiaō from phusa bellows), to puff oneself out like a pair of bellows. This form in Herodas and Menander. Is not arrogant. See note on 1 Corinthians 4:6. [source]
1 Corinthians 13:4 Envieth not [ου ζηλοι]
Present active indicative of ζηλοω — zēloō (contraction οειοι — oeîoi same as subjunctive and optative forms). Bad sense of ζηλος — zēlos from ζεω — zeō to boil, good sense in 1 Corinthians 12:31. Love is neither jealous nor envious (both ideas). Vaunteth not itself (ου περπερευεται — ou perpereuetai). From περπερος — perperos vainglorious, braggart (Polybius, Epictetus) like Latin perperus. Only here in N.T. and earliest known example. It means play the braggart. Marcus Anton. 1 Corinthians 13:5 uses it with αρεσκευομαι — areskeuomai to play the toady. Is not puffed up Present direct middle indicative of πυσιοω — phusioō from πυσις — phusis (late form for πυσαω πυσιαω — phusaōπυσα — phusiaō from phusa bellows), to puff oneself out like a pair of bellows. This form in Herodas and Menander. Is not arrogant. See note on 1 Corinthians 4:6. [source]
2 Corinthians 1:8 In Asia [εν Ασιαι]
Probably in Ephesus, but what it was we do not know whether sickness or peril. We do know that the disciples and the Asiarchs would not allow Paul to face the mob in the amphitheatre gathered by Demetrius (Acts 20:30.). In Romans 16:4 Paul says that Prisca and Aquila laid down their necks for him, risked their very lives for him. It may have been a later plot to kill Paul that hastened his departure from Ephesus (Acts 20:1). He had a trial so great that “we were weighed down exceedingly beyond our power” Old verb from βαρος — baros weight, βαρυς — barus weighty. First aorist passive indicative. See note on 1 Corinthians 12:31 for kath' huperbolēn (cf. our hyperbole). It was beyond Paul‘s power to endure if left to himself. Insomuch that we despaired even of life (hōste exaporēthēnai hēmas kai tou zēin). Usual clause of result with κατ υπερβολην — hōste and the infinitive. First aorist passive infinitive ωστε εχαπορητηναι ημας και του ζηιν — exaporēthēnai late compound for utter despair (perfective use of ωστε — ex and at a complete loss, εχαπορητηναι — a privative and εχ — poros way). There seemed no way out. Of life Ablative case of the articular infinitive, of living. [source]
2 Corinthians 4:7 In earthen vessels [εν οστρακινοις σκευεσιν]
This adjective is common in the lxx with σκευοσ αγγος — skeuosαγγειον — aggos and σκευη — aggeion It occurs again in 2 Timothy 2:20 with σκευος — skeuē It is found also in the papyri with οστρακον — skeuos as here. It is from οστεον — ostrakon baked clay (same root as η υπερβολη — osteon bone), so many fragments of which are found in Egypt with writing on them. We are but earthen jars used of God for his purposes (Romans 9:20.) and so fragile. The exceeding greatness (hē huperbolē). See note on 1 Corinthians 12:31 for this word, “the preeminence of the power.” This is God‘s purpose (hinȧ̇ēi). God, not man, is the dynamo (ιναηι — dunamis). It comes from God (δυναμις — tou theou ablative) and does not originate with us (του τεου — mē ex hēmōn). [source]
2 Corinthians 4:7 The exceeding greatness [hē huperbolē)]
See note on 1 Corinthians 12:31 for this word, “the preeminence of the power.” This is God‘s purpose God, not man, is the dynamo It comes from God (δυναμις — tou theou ablative) and does not originate with us (του τεου — mē ex hēmōn). [source]
2 Corinthians 4:17 More and more exceedingly [κατ υπερβολην εις υπερβολην]
Like piling Pelion on Ossa, “according to excess unto excess.” See note on 1 Corinthians 12:31. Eternal weight of glory (aiōnion baros doxēs). Careful balancing of words in contrast (affliction vs. glory, lightness vs. weight, for the moment vs. eternal). [source]
Galatians 4:17 They zealously affect you [ζηλοῦσιν ὑμᾶς]
They are zealously paying you court in order to win you over to their side. Affect, in this sense, is obsolete. It is from affectare, to strive after, earnestly desire. So Shaks. Tam. of Shr. I. i. 40:“In brief, sir, study what you most affect.”Ben Johnson, Alchem. iii. 2:“Pray him aloud to name what dish he affects.”As a noun, desire. So Chaucer, Troil. and Cress. iii. 1391:“As Crassus dide for his affectis wronge” (his wrong desires).Comp. 1 Corinthians 12:31; 1 Corinthians 14:1. [source]
Galatians 1:8 Accursed [ἀνάθεμα]
See on Romans 9:3, and see on offerings, Luke 21:5. Comp. κατάρα , curse and see on ἐπικατάρατος cursed Galatians 3:13. In lxx. always curse, except Leviticus 27:28, and the apocryphal books, where it is always gift or offering. By Paul always curse: see Romans 9:3; 1 Corinthians 12:3; 1 Corinthians 16:22. The sense of excommunication, introduced by patristic writers, does not appear in New Testament. [source]
Galatians 1:8 Let him be anathema [ανατεμα εστω]
See note on 1 Corinthians 12:3 for this word. [source]
Philippians 1:10 Things which are excellent [τὰ διαφέροντα]
Unnecessary difficulty has been made in the explanation of this phrase. Love displays itself in knowledge and discernment. In proportion as it abounds it sharpens the moral perceptions for the discernment of what is best. The passage is on the line of 1 Corinthians 12:31, “Covet earnestly the best gifts,” and the “more excellent way” to attain these gifts is love (1 Corinthians 13:1-13). See on Romans 2:18, where the same phrase occurs, but with a different meaning. Some explain things which are morally different. [source]
Philippians 2:11 Lord [Κυριος]
Peter (Acts 2:36) claimed that God made Christ “Lord.” See also 1 Corinthians 8:6; 1 Corinthians 12:3; Romans 10:9. Kennedy laments that the term Lord has become one of the most lifeless in the Christian vocabulary, whereas it really declares the true character and dignity of Jesus Christ and “is the basis and the object of worship.” [source]
James 2:7 The honourable name [το καλον ονομα]
“The beautiful name.”By the which ye were called (το επικλητεν επ υμας — to epiklēthen eph' humās). “The one called upon you” (first aorist passive articular participle of επικαλεω — epikaleō to put a name upon, to give a surname to, as Acts 10:18). What name is that? Almost certainly the name of Christ as we see it in Acts 11:26; Acts 26:28; 1 Peter 4:14, 1 Peter 4:16. It was blasphemy to speak against Christ as some Jews and Gentiles were doing (Acts 13:45; Acts 18:6; Acts 26:11; 1 Corinthians 12:3; 1 Timothy 1:13). Cf. Acts 15:17. [source]
James 1:1 Servant [δουλος]
Bond-servant or slave as Paul (Romans 1:1; Philemon 1:1; Titus 1:1).Of the Lord Jesus Christ (κυριου Ιησου Χριστου — kuriou Iēsou Christou). Here on a par with God (τεου — theou) and calls himself not αδελπος — adelphos (brother) of Jesus, but δουλος — doulos The three terms here as in James 2:1 have their full significance: Jesus is the Messiah and Lord. James is not an Ebionite. He accepts the deity of Jesus his brother, difficult as it was for him to do so. The word κυριος — kurios is frequent in the lxx for Elohim and Jahweh as the Romans applied it to the emperor in their emperor worship. See 1 Corinthians 12:3 for Κυριος Ιησους — Kurios Iēsous and Philemon 2:11 for Κυριος Ιησους Χριστος — Kurios Iēsous Christos the twelve tribes (ταις δωδεκα πυλαις — tais dōdeka phulais). Dative case. The expression means “Israel in its fulness and completeness” (Hort), regarded as a unity (Acts 26:7) with no conception of any “lost” tribes.Which are of the Dispersion “Those in the Dispersion” (repeated article). The term appears in Deuteronomy 28:25 (lxx) and comes from διασπειρω — diaspeirō to scatter (sow) abroad. In its literal sense we have it in John 7:34, but here and in 1 Peter 1:1 Christian Jews are chiefly, if not wholly, in view. The Jews at this period were roughly divided into Palestinian Jews (chiefly agriculturists) and Jews of the Dispersion (dwellers in cities and mainly traders). In Palestine Aramaic was spoken as a rule, while in the Western Diaspora the language was Greek (Koiné, lxx), though the Eastern Diaspora spoke Aramaic and Syriac. The Jews of the Diaspora were compelled to compare their religion with the various cults around them (comparative religion) and had a wider outlook on life. James writes thus in cultural Koiné but in the Hebraic tone.Greeting (χαιρειν — chairein). Absolute infinitive (present active of χαιρω — chairō) as in Acts 15:23 (the Epistle to Antioch and the churches of Syria and Galatia). It is the usual idiom in the thousands of papyri letters known to us, but in no other New Testament letter. But note χαιρειν λεγετε — chairein legete in 2 John 1:10, 2 John 1:11. [source]
James 2:7 By the which ye were called [το επικλητεν επ υμας]
“The one called upon you” (first aorist passive articular participle of επικαλεω — epikaleō to put a name upon, to give a surname to, as Acts 10:18). What name is that? Almost certainly the name of Christ as we see it in Acts 11:26; Acts 26:28; 1 Peter 4:14, 1 Peter 4:16. It was blasphemy to speak against Christ as some Jews and Gentiles were doing (Acts 13:45; Acts 18:6; Acts 26:11; 1 Corinthians 12:3; 1 Timothy 1:13). Cf. Acts 15:17. [source]
James 4:2 Ye kill and covet [πονευω]
Present active indicatives of πονευς — phoneuō (old verb from ζηλοω — phoneus murderer) and πονευετε — zēloō to desire hotly to possess (1 Corinthians 12:31). It is possible (perhaps probable) that a full stop should come after επιτυχειν — phoneuete (ye kill) as the result of lusting and not having. Then we have the second situation: “Ye covet and cannot obtain James refers again to δια — ouk echete (ye do not have) in James 4:2. Such sinful lusting will not obtain. “Make the service of God your supreme end, and then your desires will be such as God can fulfil in answer to your prayer” (Ropes). Cf. Matthew 6:31-33. The reason here is expressed by αιτεω — dia and the accusative of the articular present middle infinitive of υμας — aiteō used here of prayer to God as in Matthew 7:7. αιτειστε — Humās (you) is the accusative of general reference. Note the middle voice here as in αιτεω — aiteisthe in James 4:3. Mayor argues that the middle here, in contrast with the active, carries more the spirit of prayer, but Moulton (Prol., p. 160) regards the distinction between αιτεομαι — aiteō and aiteomai often “an extinct subtlety.” [source]
1 John 4:2 Of God []
Compare 1 Corinthians 12:3. [source]
1 John 4:2 That Jesus Christ is come in the flesh [Ιησουν Χριστον εν σαρκι εληλυτοτα]
The correct text (perfect active participle predicate accusative), not the infinitive The predicate participle (see John 9:22 for predicate accusative with ομολογεω — homologeō) describes Jesus as already come in the flesh (his actual humanity, not a phantom body as the Docetic Gnostics held). See this same idiom in 2 John 1:7 with ερχομενον — erchomenon (coming). A like test is proposed by Paul for confessing the deity of Jesus Christ in 1 Corinthians 12:3 and for the Incarnation and Resurrection of Jesus in Romans 10:6-10. [source]
1 John 4:15 Whosoever shall confess [ος εαν ομολογησηι]
Indefinite relative clause with modal εαν — ean (= an) and the first aorist active subjunctive, “whoever confesses.” See 1 John 2:23; 1 John 4:2. for ομολογεω — homologeō Object clause (indirect assertion) after ομολογεω — homologeō This confession of the deity of Jesus Christ implies surrender and obedience also, not mere lip service (cf. 1 Corinthians 12:3; Romans 10:6-12). This confession is proof (if genuine) of the fellowship with God (1 John 1:3.; 1 John 3:24). [source]
3 John 1:7 For the sake of the Name [υπερ του ονοματος]
The name of Jesus. See Acts 5:4; Romans 1:5 for υπερ του ονοματος — huper tou onomatos and James 2:7 for the absolute use of “the name” as in 1 Peter 4:16. “This name is in essence the sum of the Christian creed” (Westcott) as in 1 Corinthians 12:3; Romans 10:9. It is like the absolute use of “the Way” (Acts 9:2; Acts 19:9, Acts 19:23; Acts 24:22). [source]
Revelation 22:20 Yea: I come quickly [Ναι ερχομαι ταχυ]
Affirmation again of the promise in Revelation 22:7, Revelation 22:12. On Αμην ερχου Κυριε Ιησου — Nai (Yes) see Revelation 1:7 for the Lord‘s assent to the call. Then John expresses his absolute belief in the Lord‘s promise: “Amen: come, Lord Jesus” On Ιησου — Amēn see Revelation 1:7. On Μαρανα τα — erchou see Revelation 22:17. Note Kurie with Iēsou As in 1 Corinthians 12:3; Philemon 2:11. For Paul‘s confidence in the deity of Christ and the certainty of his second coming see Titus 2:13; 2 Timothy 4:8. Marana tha (1 Corinthians 16:22). [source]
Revelation 2:13 Holdest fast my name [κρατεω]
Present active indicative of Κυριος Καισαρ — krateō “dost keep on holding,” as in Revelation 2:25, Revelation 3:11. This church refused to say Κυριος Ιησους — Kurios Kaisar (Martyrd. Polyc. 8f.) and continued to say ουκ ηρνησω — Kurios Iēsous (1 Corinthians 12:3). They stood true against the emperor-worship.Didst not deny (αρνεομαι — ouk ērnēsō). First aorist middle second person singular of την πιστιν μου — arneomai Reference to a specific incident not known to us.My faith Objective genitive, “thy faith in me.”Of Antipas (Αντιπα — Antipas). Indeclinable in this form. It is possible that ο μαρτυς μου — Antipa (genitive) was really written, though unimportant as the nominative follows in apposition. Nothing is really known of this early martyr in Pergamum before the writing of the Apocalypse. One legend is that he was burnt to death in a brazen bull. Other martyrs followed him at Pergamum (Agathonice, Attalus, Carpus, Polybus).My witness Nominative in apposition with a genitive as in Revelation 1:5 (with ablative), common solecism in the Apocalypse. “Witness” as Jesus had said they should be (Acts 1:8) and Stephen was (Acts 22:20) and others were (Revelation 17:6). The word later (by third century) took on the modern meaning of martyr.My faithful one (μου — ho pistos mou). Nominative also, with απεκταντη — mou also. Jesus gives Antipas his own title (Swete) as in Revelation 1:5; Revelation 3:14. Faithful unto death.Was killed First aorist passive indicative of παρ υμιν — apokteinō this passive form common in the Apocalypse (Revelation 2:13; Revelation 6:11; Revelation 9:5, Revelation 9:15, Revelation 9:18, Revelation 9:20; Revelation 11:13; Revelation 13:10; Revelation 19:21).Among you (οπου ο Σατανας κατοικει — par humin). By your side. Proof of the throne of Satan, “where Satan dwells” (hopou ho Satanās katoikei), repeated for emphasis. [source]

What do the individual words in 1 Corinthians 12:3 mean?

Therefore I make known to you that no one in [the] Spirit of God speaking says Accursed [is] Jesus and is able to say Lord [is] if not Holy
διὸ γνωρίζω ὑμῖν ὅτι οὐδεὶς ἐν Πνεύματι Θεοῦ λαλῶν λέγει Αναθεμα ΙΗΣΟΥΣ καὶ δύναται εἰπεῖν Κυριος εἰ μὴ Ἁγίῳ

γνωρίζω  I  make  known 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 1st Person Singular
Root: γνωρίζω  
Sense: to make known.
ὑμῖν  to  you 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Dative 2nd Person Plural
Root: σύ  
Sense: you.
ὅτι  that 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ὅτι  
Sense: that, because, since.
οὐδεὶς  no  one 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: οὐδείς 
Sense: no one, nothing.
Πνεύματι  [the]  Spirit 
Parse: Noun, Dative Neuter Singular
Root: πνεῦμα  
Sense: a movement of air (a gentle blast.
Θεοῦ  of  God 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: θεός  
Sense: a god or goddess, a general name of deities or divinities.
λαλῶν  speaking 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἀπολαλέω 
Sense: to utter a voice or emit a sound.
λέγει  says 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: λέγω 
Sense: to say, to speak.
Αναθεμα  Accursed  [is] 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Neuter Singular
Root: ἀνάθεμα  
Sense: a thing set up or laid by in order to be kept.
ΙΗΣΟΥΣ  Jesus 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: Ἰησοῦς  
Sense: Joshua was the famous captain of the Israelites, Moses’ successor.
δύναται  is  able 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Middle or Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: δύναμαι  
Sense: to be able, have power whether by virtue of one’s own ability and resources, or of a state of mind, or through favourable circumstances, or by permission of law or custom.
εἰπεῖν  to  say 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Infinitive Active
Root: λέγω  
Sense: to speak, say.
Κυριος  Lord  [is] 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: κύριος  
Sense: he to whom a person or thing belongs, about which he has power of deciding; master, lord.
Ἁγίῳ  Holy 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Neuter Singular
Root: ἅγιος  
Sense: most holy thing, a saint.