The Meaning of Ephesians 1:3 Explained

Ephesians 1:3

KJV: Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ:

YLT: Blessed is the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who did bless us in every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ,

Darby: Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenlies in Christ;

ASV: Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ:

What does Ephesians 1:3 Mean?

Study Notes

in heavenly places
Literally, the heavenlies. The same Greek word is used in John 3:12 where "things" is added. In both places the word signifies that which is heavenly in contradistinction to that which is earthy. In Ephesians "places" is especially misleading. "The heavenlies" may be defined as the sphere of the believer's spiritual experience as identified with Christ in nature. 2 Peter 1:4 , life,; Colossians 3:4 ; 1 John 5:12 , relationships; John 20:17 ; Hebrews 2:11 service,; John 17:18 ; Matthew 28:20 , suffering; Philippians 1:29 ; Philippians 3:10 ; Colossians 1:24 inheritance Romans 8:16 ; Romans 8:17 and future glory in the kingdom; Romans 8:18-21 ; 1 Peter 2:9 ; Revelation 1:6 ; Revelation 5:10 . The believer is a heavenly man, and a stranger and pilgrim on the earth.; Hebrews 3:1 ; 1 Peter 2:11 .

Verse Meaning

"This verse marks not only the introduction but also the main sentence of the eulogy. It is in essence a summary of the whole eulogy." [1]
God is blessed because He has blessed believers. However, Christians should also bless or praise (Gr. eulogetos, speak well of) God the Father for bestowing these blessings. Paul was thinking of God as both the Father of believers ( Ephesians 1:2) and the Father of His Son ( Ephesians 1:3). God has already blessed believers in the ways the apostle proceeded to identify. This blessing happened before creation, as will become evident in the following verses. "Spiritual" blessings are benefits that relate to our spiritual life in contrast to our physical life. In Israel God"s promised blessings were mainly physical, but in the church they are mainly spiritual. Since God has already given us these things, we do not need to ask for them but should appropriate them by faith and give thanks for them.
"When you were born again into God"s family, you were born rich." [2]
"In the heavenly places" or "realms" refers to the location from which these blessings come. The heavenly realms are where Paul spoke of the believer as being presently in his or her spiritual life. Whereas physically we are on the earth, spiritually we are already with Christ in the heavens (cf. Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12). God has united us with Jesus Christ so we are in that sense with Him where He is now. When we die, our immaterial part will go into Christ"s presence ( 2 Corinthians 5:6-8). When God resurrects our bodies they will go into His presence and unite with our immaterial part. Presently our lives are already with the Lord in the heavenly realms spiritually. We are there because of our present union with Christ. We are "in Christ." The expression "in Christ" and its parallels occur36 times in Ephesians. [3]
Union with Christ by saving faith places us in the heavenly realms. Ouranos (heaven or heavenly) appears in Ephesians 1:10; Ephesians 3:15; Ephesians 4:10; and Ephesians 6:9, while epouanios (heaven or heavenly realms) occurs in Ephesians 1:3; Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; and Ephesians 6:12.
"En tois epouraniois [4] is the location of the current conflict in which believers participate through their presence there "in" Christ. But hoi epouranioi [5] in Ephesians is primarily viewed as the location of the exalted Christ, the place where He now is and from which He exercises His universal sovereignty in the present age." [6]
"The key thought of Ephesians is the gathering together of all things in Jesus Christ." [7]
" Ephesians 1:3 tells much about God"s blessings on believers: (a) when: eternity past; (b): with what: every spiritual [8] blessing; (c): where: in the heavenly realms; (d): how: in Christ." [6]4
"Ephesus was considered the bank of Asia. One of the seven wonders of the world, the great temple of Diana, was in Ephesus, and was not only a center for idolatrous worship, but also a depository for wealth....
"Paul"s letter to the Ephesians is as carefully structured as that great temple of Diana, and it contains greater beauty and wealth!" [4]4

Context Summary

Ephesians 1:1-14 - Our Riches In Christ
This has been called the "Epistle of In-ness,"because it is so full of the preposition in. Saints are flesh and blood like ourselves, and we may be saints. The word means "set apart." We are in Christ and He is in us, and any goodness we have is due to our giving room and scope to Him to realize His own ideals. To be in the heavenlies, Ephesians 1:3, means to live a spiritual life and to draw our reinforcements from the unseen and eternal world, which is focused in our Lord. We are in Him so far as justification is concerned-that is our standing; and He is in us for sanctification-that is the source of a holy and useful life. The condition of a blessed life is the conscious maintenance of this oneness.
The source of all we are, and have, and hope to be, so far as salvation is concerned, is the will of God for us; but the stream flows to us through our Lord, and the end to which all things are moving is the summing-up of all in Christ. As He was the Alpha, so He will be the Omega. The sealing of the Holy Spirit is of incalculable advantage, because it means that we are stamped with the likeness of Christ and so kept inviolate among all the vicissitudes of life. See Esther 8:8; John 6:27. [source]

Chapter Summary: Ephesians 1

1  After Paul's salutation,
3  and thanksgiving for the Ephesians,
4  he treats of our election,
6  and adoption by grace;
11  which is the true and proper fountain of man's salvation
13  And because the height of this mystery cannot be easily attained unto,
16  he prays that they may come to the full knowledge and possession thereof in Christ

Greek Commentary for Ephesians 1:3

Blessed [ευλογητος]
Verbal of ευλογεω — eulogeō common in the lxx for Hebrew baruk (Vulgate benedictus) and applied usually to God, sometimes to men (Genesis 24:31), but in N.T. always to God (Luke 1:68), while ευλογημενος — eulogēmenos (perfect passive participle) is applied to men (Luke 1:42). “While ευλογημενος — eulogēmenos points to an isolated act or acts, ευλογητος — eulogētos describes the intrinsic character” (Lightfoot). Instead of the usual ευχαριστουμεν — eucharistoumen (Colossians 1:3) Paul here uses ευλογητος — eulogētos elsewhere only in 2 Corinthians 1:3 in opening, though in a doxology in Romans 1:25; Romans 9:5; 2 Corinthians 11:31. The copula here is probably εστιν — estin (is), though either εστω — estō (imperative) or ειη — eiē (optative as wish) will make sense. [source]
The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ [ο τεος και πατηρ του Κυριου ημων Ιησου Χριστου]
Και — Kai is genuine here, though not in Colossians 1:3. The one article First aorist active participle of ευλογεω — eulogeō the same word, antecedent action to the doxology (ευλογητος — eulogētos). With So-called instrumental use of εν — en though in is clear. Every spiritual blessing (πασηι ευλογιαι πνευματικηι — pasēi eulogiāi pneumatikēi). Third use of the root ευλογ — eulog (verbal, verb, substantive). Paul lovingly plays with the idea. The believer is a citizen of heaven and the spiritual blessings count for most to him. In the heavenly places in Christ In four other places in Ephesians (Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12). This precise phrase (with εν — en) occurs nowhere else in the N.T. and has a clearly local meaning in Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10, doubtful in Ephesians 6:12, but probably so here. In Ephesians 2:6 the believer is conceived as already seated with Christ. Heaven is the real abode of the citizen of Christ‘s kingdom (Philemon 3:20) who is a stranger on earth (Philemon 1:27; Ephesians 2:19). The word επουρανιος — epouranios (heavenly) occurs in various passages in the N.T. in contrast with τα επιγεια — ta epigeia (the earthly) as in John 3:12; 1 Corinthians 15:40, 1 Corinthians 15:48, 1 Corinthians 15:49; Philemon 2:10, with πατρις — patris (country) in Hebrews 11:16, with κλησις — klēsis (calling) in Hebrews 3:1, with δωρεα — dōrea (gift) in Hebrews 6:4, with βασιλεια — basileia (kingdom) in 2 Timothy 4:18. [source]
Who hath blessed us [ο ευλογησας υμας]
First aorist active participle of ευλογεω — eulogeō the same word, antecedent action to the doxology (ευλογητος — eulogētos). [source]
With [εν]
So-called instrumental use of εν — en though in is clear. Every spiritual blessing (πασηι ευλογιαι πνευματικηι — pasēi eulogiāi pneumatikēi). Third use of the root ευλογ — eulog (verbal, verb, substantive). Paul lovingly plays with the idea. The believer is a citizen of heaven and the spiritual blessings count for most to him. In the heavenly places in Christ In four other places in Ephesians (Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12). This precise phrase (with εν — en) occurs nowhere else in the N.T. and has a clearly local meaning in Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10, doubtful in Ephesians 6:12, but probably so here. In Ephesians 2:6 the believer is conceived as already seated with Christ. Heaven is the real abode of the citizen of Christ‘s kingdom (Philemon 3:20) who is a stranger on earth (Philemon 1:27; Ephesians 2:19). The word επουρανιος — epouranios (heavenly) occurs in various passages in the N.T. in contrast with τα επιγεια — ta epigeia (the earthly) as in John 3:12; 1 Corinthians 15:40, 1 Corinthians 15:48, 1 Corinthians 15:49; Philemon 2:10, with πατρις — patris (country) in Hebrews 11:16, with κλησις — klēsis (calling) in Hebrews 3:1, with δωρεα — dōrea (gift) in Hebrews 6:4, with βασιλεια — basileia (kingdom) in 2 Timothy 4:18. [source]
in []
is clear. Every spiritual blessing (πασηι ευλογιαι πνευματικηι — pasēi eulogiāi pneumatikēi). Third use of the root ευλογ — eulog (verbal, verb, substantive). Paul lovingly plays with the idea. The believer is a citizen of heaven and the spiritual blessings count for most to him. In the heavenly places in Christ In four other places in Ephesians (Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12). This precise phrase (with εν — en) occurs nowhere else in the N.T. and has a clearly local meaning in Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10, doubtful in Ephesians 6:12, but probably so here. In Ephesians 2:6 the believer is conceived as already seated with Christ. Heaven is the real abode of the citizen of Christ‘s kingdom (Philemon 3:20) who is a stranger on earth (Philemon 1:27; Ephesians 2:19). The word επουρανιος — epouranios (heavenly) occurs in various passages in the N.T. in contrast with τα επιγεια — ta epigeia (the earthly) as in John 3:12; 1 Corinthians 15:40, 1 Corinthians 15:48, 1 Corinthians 15:49; Philemon 2:10, with πατρις — patris (country) in Hebrews 11:16, with κλησις — klēsis (calling) in Hebrews 3:1, with δωρεα — dōrea (gift) in Hebrews 6:4, with βασιλεια — basileia (kingdom) in 2 Timothy 4:18. [source]
Every spiritual blessing [πασηι ευλογιαι πνευματικηι]
Third use of the root ευλογ — eulog (verbal, verb, substantive). Paul lovingly plays with the idea. The believer is a citizen of heaven and the spiritual blessings count for most to him. [source]
In the heavenly places in Christ [εν τοις επουρανιοις εν Χριστωι]
In four other places in Ephesians (Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12). This precise phrase (with εν — en) occurs nowhere else in the N.T. and has a clearly local meaning in Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10, doubtful in Ephesians 6:12, but probably so here. In Ephesians 2:6 the believer is conceived as already seated with Christ. Heaven is the real abode of the citizen of Christ‘s kingdom (Philemon 3:20) who is a stranger on earth (Philemon 1:27; Ephesians 2:19). The word επουρανιος — epouranios (heavenly) occurs in various passages in the N.T. in contrast with τα επιγεια — ta epigeia (the earthly) as in John 3:12; 1 Corinthians 15:40, 1 Corinthians 15:48, 1 Corinthians 15:49; Philemon 2:10, with πατρις — patris (country) in Hebrews 11:16, with κλησις — klēsis (calling) in Hebrews 3:1, with δωρεα — dōrea (gift) in Hebrews 6:4, with βασιλεια — basileia (kingdom) in 2 Timothy 4:18. [source]
Blessed [εὐλογητὸς]
Placed first in the clause for emphasis, as always in the corresponding Hebrew in the Old Testament. The verb is commonly omitted - blessed the God. In the New Testament used of God only. The perfect participle of the verb, εὐλογημένος blessedis used of men. See on 1 Peter 1:3. The word differs from that used in the Beatitudes, μακάριος . which denotes character, while this word denotes repute. Lit., well-spoken of. [source]
Kindred with εὐλογητὸς blessed Spiritual [πνευματικῇ]
Another leading word. Spirit and spiritual occur thirteen times. Paul emphasizes in this epistle the work of the divine Spirit upon the human spirit. Not spiritual as distinguished from bodily, but proceeding from the Holy Spirit. Note the collocation of the words, blessed, blessed, blessing. [source]
God and Father of our Lord, etc. []
Some object to this rendering on the ground that the phrase God of Christ is unusual, occurring nowhere in Paul, except Ephesians 1:17of this chapter. Such render, God who is also the Father, etc. But Christ of God is found Matthew 27:46; and my God, John 20:17; Revelation 3:12. Compare, also, 1 Corinthians 3:23; and the phrase is undoubted in Ephesians 1:17. [source]
Hath blessed [εὐλογήσας]
Kindred with εὐλογητὸς blessedSpiritual ( πνευματικῇ )Another leading word. Spirit and spiritual occur thirteen times. Paul emphasizes in this epistle the work of the divine Spirit upon the human spirit. Not spiritual as distinguished from bodily, but proceeding from the Holy Spirit. Note the collocation of the words, blessed, blessed, blessing. [source]
In the heavenly places [ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις]
Another keyword; one of the dominant thoughts of the epistle being the work of the ascended Christ. Places is supplied, the Greek meaning in the heavenlies. Some prefer to supply things, as more definitely characterizing spiritual blessing. But in the four other passages where the phrase occurs, Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12, the sense is local, and ἐπουράνιος heavenlyis local throughout Paul's epistles. The meaning is that the spiritual blessings of God are found in heaven and are brought thence to us. Compare Philemon 3:20. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Ephesians 1:3

Romans 15:6 With one mouth [εν ενι στοματι]
Vivid outward expression of the unity of feeling. May glorify (δοχαζητε — doxazēte). Present active subjunctive of δοχαζω — doxazō final clause with ινα — hina “that ye may keep on glorifying.” For “the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” see note on 2 Corinthians 1:3 for discussion; 2 Corinthians 11:31. It occurs also in Ephesians 1:3; 1 Peter 1:3. [source]
Romans 15:6 May glorify [δοχαζητε]
Present active subjunctive of δοχαζω — doxazō final clause with ινα — hina “that ye may keep on glorifying.” For “the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” see note on 2 Corinthians 1:3 for discussion; 2 Corinthians 11:31. It occurs also in Ephesians 1:3; 1 Peter 1:3. [source]
Ephesians 1:4 Even as [καθὼς]
Explaining blessed us, in Ephesians 1:3. His blessing is in conformity with the fact that He chose. [source]
Ephesians 1:17 God of our Lord Jesus Christ []
Compare John 20:17; Matthew 27:46, and see on Ephesians 1:3. [source]
Ephesians 1:4 Before the foundation of the world [προ καταβολης κοσμου]
Old word from καταβαλλω — kataballō to fling down, used of the deposit of seed, the laying of a foundation. This very phrase with προ — pro in the Prayer of Jesus (John 17:24) of love of the Father toward the Son. It occurs also in 1 Peter 1:20. Elsewhere we have απο — apo (from) used with it (Matthew 25:34; Luke 11:50; Hebrews 4:3; Hebrews 9:26; Revelation 13:8; Revelation 17:8). But Paul uses neither phrase elsewhere, though he has απο των αιωνων — apo tōn aiōnōn (from the ages) in Ephesians 3:9. Here in Ephesians 1:3-14. Paul in summary fashion gives an outline of his view of God‘s redemptive plans for the race. That we should be (ειναι ημας — einai hēmās). Infinitive of purpose with the accusative of general reference (ημας — hēmās). See note on Colossians 1:22 for the same two adjectives and also κατενωπιον αυτου — katenōpion autou f0). [source]
Hebrews 8:5 Who serve unto the example and shadow of heavenly things [οἵτινες ὑποδείγματι καί σκιᾷ λατρεύουσιν τῶν ἐπουρανίων]
The connection is, “there are those who offer the gifts according to the law, such as ( οἵτινες ) serve,” etc. For λατρεύουσιν servesee on 2 Timothy 1:3. Omit unto. Rend. serve the copy and shadow, etc., or, as Rev., that which is a copy and shadow. For ὑπόδειγμα copysee on 1 Peter 5:3; see on 2 Peter 2:6. Comp. Hebrews 9:23. Τῶν ἐπουρανίων “of heavenly things.” Τὰ ἐπουράνια in N.T. usually “heavenly places.” See Ephesians 1:3; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12: “heavenly things,” John 3:12; Philemon 2:10; Hebrews 9:23. [source]
Hebrews 1:3 Sat down on the right hand of the majesty on high [ἐκάθισεν ἐν δεξιᾷ τῆς μεγαλωσύνης ἐν ὑψηλοῖς]
Comp. Psalm 110:1, Hebrews 8:1; Hebrews 10:12; Hebrews 12:2; Ephesians 1:20; Revelation 3:21. The verb denotes a solemn, formal act; the assumption of a position of dignity and authority The reference is to Christ's ascension. In his exalted state he will still be bearing on all things toward their consummation, still dealing with sin as the great high priest in the heavenly sanctuary. This is elaborated later. See Hebrews 8:1-13; Hebrews 9:12ff. Μεγαλωσύνη majestyonly here, Hebrews 8:1; Judges 1:25. Quite often in lxx. There is suggested, not a contrast with his humiliation, but his resumption of his original dignity, described in the former part of this verse. Ἐν ὑψηλοῖς , lit. in the high places. Const. with sat down, not with majesty. The phrase N.T.olxx, Psalm 92:4; Psalm 112:5. Ἐν τοῖς ὑψίστοις inthe highest (places ), in the Gospels, and only in doxologies. See Matthew 21:9; Mark 11:10; Luke 2:14. Ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις inthe heavenly (places ), only in Ephesians. See Ephesians 1:3, Ephesians 1:20; Ephesians 2:6; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12. [source]
Hebrews 1:3 Being [ων]
Absolute and timeless existence (present active participle of ειμι — eimi) in contrast with γενομενος — genomenos in Hebrews 1:4 like ην — ēn in John 1:1 (in contrast with εγενετο — egeneto in John 1:14) and like υπαρχων — huparchōn and γενομενος — genomenos in Philemon 2:6. The effulgence of his glory The word απαυγασμα — apaugasma late substantive from απαυγαζω — apaugazō to emit brightness The meaning “effulgence” suits the context better, though it gives the idea of eternal generation of the Son (John 1:1), the term Father applied to God necessarily involving Son. See this same metaphor in 2 Corinthians 4:6. The very image of his substance (Χαρακτηρ — charaktēr tēs hupostaseōs). χαρασσω — Charaktēr is an old word from τηρ — charassō to cut, to scratch, to mark. It first was the agent (note ending = χαραγμα — tēr) or tool that did the marking, then the mark or impress made, the exact reproduction, a meaning clearly expressed by χαρακτηρ — charagma (Acts 17:29; Revelation 13:16.). Menander had already used (Moffatt) υποστασις — charaktēr in the sense of our “character.” The word occurs in the inscriptions for “person” as well as for “exact reproduction” of a person. The word ψποστασις — hupostasis for the being or essence of God “is a philosophical rather than a religious term” (Moffatt). Etymologically it is the sediment or foundation under a building (for instance). In Hebrews 11:1 μορπη τεου — hypostasis is like the “title-deed” idea found in the papyri. Athanasius rightly used Hebrews 1:1-4 in his controversy with Arius. Paul in Philemon 2:5-11 pictures the real and eternal deity of Christ free from the philosophical language here employed. But even Paul‘s simpler phrase Λογος — morphē theou (the form of God) has difficulties of its own. The use of περων τε — Logos in John 1:1-18 is parallel to Hebrews 1:1-4. And upholding (περω — pherōn te). Present active participle of ων — pherō closely connected with τε — ōn (being) by τωι ρηματι της δυναμεως αυτου — te and like Colossians 1:17 in idea. The newer science as expounded by Eddington and Jeans is in harmony with the spiritual and personal conception of creation here presented. By the word of his power (ρημα — tōi rēmati tēs dunameōs autou). Instrumental case of ρηματι τεου — rēma (word). See Hebrews 11:3 for αυτου — rēmati theou (by the word of God) as the explanation of creation like Genesis, but here καταρισμον των αμαρτιων — autou refers to God‘s Son as in Hebrews 1:2. Purification of sins (Καταρισμος — katharismon tōn hamartiōn). καταριζω — Katharismos is from ποιησαμενος — katharizō to cleanse (Matthew 8:3; Hebrews 9:14), here only in Hebrews, but in same sense of cleansing from sins, 2 Peter 1:9; Job 7:21. Note middle participle ευραμενος — poiēsamenos like εκατισεν — heuramenos in Hebrews 9:12. This is the first mention of the priestly work of Christ, the keynote of this Epistle. Sat down (κατιζω — ekathisen). First aorist active of της μεγαλοσυνης εν υπσηλοις — kathizō “took his seat,” a formal and dignified act. Of the Majesty on high (μεγας — tēs megalosunēs en hupsēlois). Late word from εν υπσηλοις — megas only in lxx (Deut 32:3; 2Sam 7:23, etc.), Aristeas, Hebrews 1:3; Hebrews 8:1; Judges 1:25. Christ resumed his original dignity and glory (John 17:5). The phrase εν υπσιστοις — en hupsēlois occurs in the Psalms (Psalm 93:4), here only in N.T., elsewhere εν τοις επουρανιοις — en hupsistois in the highest (Matthew 21:9; Luke 2:14) or en tois epouraniois in the heavenlies (Ephesians 1:3, Ephesians 1:20). Jesus is here pictured as King (Prophet and Priest also) Messiah seated at the right hand of God. [source]
Hebrews 1:3 The effulgence of his glory [απαυγασμα της δοχης]
The word απαυγασμα — apaugasma late substantive from απαυγαζω — apaugazō to emit brightness The meaning “effulgence” suits the context better, though it gives the idea of eternal generation of the Son (John 1:1), the term Father applied to God necessarily involving Son. See this same metaphor in 2 Corinthians 4:6. The very image of his substance (Χαρακτηρ — charaktēr tēs hupostaseōs). χαρασσω — Charaktēr is an old word from τηρ — charassō to cut, to scratch, to mark. It first was the agent (note ending = χαραγμα — tēr) or tool that did the marking, then the mark or impress made, the exact reproduction, a meaning clearly expressed by χαρακτηρ — charagma (Acts 17:29; Revelation 13:16.). Menander had already used (Moffatt) υποστασις — charaktēr in the sense of our “character.” The word occurs in the inscriptions for “person” as well as for “exact reproduction” of a person. The word ψποστασις — hupostasis for the being or essence of God “is a philosophical rather than a religious term” (Moffatt). Etymologically it is the sediment or foundation under a building (for instance). In Hebrews 11:1 μορπη τεου — hypostasis is like the “title-deed” idea found in the papyri. Athanasius rightly used Hebrews 1:1-4 in his controversy with Arius. Paul in Philemon 2:5-11 pictures the real and eternal deity of Christ free from the philosophical language here employed. But even Paul‘s simpler phrase Λογος — morphē theou (the form of God) has difficulties of its own. The use of περων τε — Logos in John 1:1-18 is parallel to Hebrews 1:1-4. And upholding (περω — pherōn te). Present active participle of ων — pherō closely connected with τε — ōn (being) by τωι ρηματι της δυναμεως αυτου — te and like Colossians 1:17 in idea. The newer science as expounded by Eddington and Jeans is in harmony with the spiritual and personal conception of creation here presented. By the word of his power (ρημα — tōi rēmati tēs dunameōs autou). Instrumental case of ρηματι τεου — rēma (word). See Hebrews 11:3 for αυτου — rēmati theou (by the word of God) as the explanation of creation like Genesis, but here καταρισμον των αμαρτιων — autou refers to God‘s Son as in Hebrews 1:2. Purification of sins (Καταρισμος — katharismon tōn hamartiōn). καταριζω — Katharismos is from ποιησαμενος — katharizō to cleanse (Matthew 8:3; Hebrews 9:14), here only in Hebrews, but in same sense of cleansing from sins, 2 Peter 1:9; Job 7:21. Note middle participle ευραμενος — poiēsamenos like εκατισεν — heuramenos in Hebrews 9:12. This is the first mention of the priestly work of Christ, the keynote of this Epistle. Sat down (κατιζω — ekathisen). First aorist active of της μεγαλοσυνης εν υπσηλοις — kathizō “took his seat,” a formal and dignified act. Of the Majesty on high (μεγας — tēs megalosunēs en hupsēlois). Late word from εν υπσηλοις — megas only in lxx (Deut 32:3; 2Sam 7:23, etc.), Aristeas, Hebrews 1:3; Hebrews 8:1; Judges 1:25. Christ resumed his original dignity and glory (John 17:5). The phrase εν υπσιστοις — en hupsēlois occurs in the Psalms (Psalm 93:4), here only in N.T., elsewhere εν τοις επουρανιοις — en hupsistois in the highest (Matthew 21:9; Luke 2:14) or en tois epouraniois in the heavenlies (Ephesians 1:3, Ephesians 1:20). Jesus is here pictured as King (Prophet and Priest also) Messiah seated at the right hand of God. [source]
1 Peter 1:3 Blessed [εὐλογητὸς]
εὖ , well, λόγος , a word. Well-spoken-of; praised; honored. Used in the New Testament of God only. The kindred verb is applied to human beings, as to Mary (Luke 1:28): “Blessed ( εὐλογημένη ) art thou.” Compare the different word for blessed in Matthew 5:3, etc. ( μακάριοι )and see notes there. The style of this doxological phrase is Pauline. Compare 2 Corinthians 1:3; Ephesians 1:3. [source]
1 Peter 1:3 Blessed be [ευλογητος]
No copula in the Greek The verbal adjective (from ευλογεω — eulogeō) occurs in the N.T. only of God, as in the lxx (Luke 1:68). See also 2 Corinthians 1:3; Ephesians 1:3. [source]
1 Peter 1:3 The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ [ο τεος και πατηρ του κυριου ημων Ιησου Χριστου]
This precise language in 2 Corinthians 1:3; Ephesians 1:3; and part of it in 2 Corinthians 11:31; Romans 15:6. See John 20:17 for similar language by Jesus.Great (πολυ — polu). Much.Begat us again First aorist active articular The Stoics used αναγεννησις — anagennēsis for παλινγενεσια — palingenesia (Titus 3:5). If ανωτεν — anōthen in John 3:3 be taken to mean “again,” the same idea of regeneration is there, and if “from above” it is the new birth, anyhow.Unto a living hope (εις ελπιδα ζωσαν — eis elpida zōsan). Peter is fond of the word “living” (present active participle of ζαω — zaō) as in 1 Peter 1:23; 1 Peter 2:4, 1 Peter 2:5, 1 Peter 2:24; 1 Peter 4:5, 1 Peter 4:6. The Pharisees cherished the hope of the resurrection (Acts 23:6), but the resurrection of Jesus gave it proof and permanence (1 Corinthians 15:14, 1 Corinthians 15:17). It is no longer a dead hope like dead faith (James 2:17, James 2:26). This revival of hope was wrought “by the resurrection of Jesus Christ” (δια αναστασεως — dia anastaseōs). Hope rose up with Christ from the dead, though the disciples (Peter included) were slow at first to believe it. [source]
Revelation 1:6 Unto God and His Father [τῷ Θεῷ καὶ πατρὶ αὐτοῦ]
Lit., to the God and Father of Him. Hence Rev., correctly, His God and Father. For the phrase compare Romans 15:6; 2 Corinthians 1:3; Ephesians 1:3. [source]
Revelation 2:5 And do [και ποιησον]
First aorist active imperative of ποιεω — poieō “Do at once.”The first works (τα πρωτα εργα — ta prōta erga). Including the first love (Acts 19:20; Acts 20:37; Ephesians 1:3.) which has now grown cold (Matthew 24:12).Or else Elliptical condition, the verb not expressed Futuristic present middle (John 14:2.).To thee Dative, as in Revelation 2:16 also.Will move (κινησω — kinēsō). Future active of κινεω — kineō In Ignatius‘ Epistle to Ephesus it appears that the church heeded this warning.Except thou repent Condition of third class with εαν μη — ean mē instead of ει μη — ei mē above, with the first aorist active subjunctive of μετανοεω — metanoeō f0). [source]
Revelation 2:5 The first works [τα πρωτα εργα]
Including the first love (Acts 19:20; Acts 20:37; Ephesians 1:3.) which has now grown cold (Matthew 24:12). [source]
Revelation 2:5 Thou art fallen [πεπτωκες]
Perfect active indicative of πιπτω — piptō state of completion. Down in the valley, look up to the cliff where pure love is and whence thou hast fallen down.And repent (και μετανοησον — kai metanoēson). First aorist active imperative of μετανοεω — metanoeō urgent appeal for instant change of attitude and conduct before it is too late.And do First aorist active imperative of ποιεω — poieō “Do at once.”The first works (τα πρωτα εργα — ta prōta erga). Including the first love (Acts 19:20; Acts 20:37; Ephesians 1:3.) which has now grown cold (Matthew 24:12).Or else Elliptical condition, the verb not expressed Futuristic present middle (John 14:2.).To thee Dative, as in Revelation 2:16 also.Will move (κινησω — kinēsō). Future active of κινεω — kineō In Ignatius‘ Epistle to Ephesus it appears that the church heeded this warning.Except thou repent Condition of third class with εαν μη — ean mē instead of ει μη — ei mē above, with the first aorist active subjunctive of μετανοεω — metanoeō f0). [source]

What do the individual words in Ephesians 1:3 mean?

Blessed [be] the God and Father of the Lord of us Jesus Christ the [One] having blessed us with every blessing spiritual in the heavenly realms Christ
Εὐλογητὸς Θεὸς καὶ Πατὴρ τοῦ Κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ εὐλογήσας ἡμᾶς ἐν πάσῃ εὐλογίᾳ πνευματικῇ ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις Χριστῷ

Εὐλογητὸς  Blessed  [be] 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: εὐλογητός  
Sense: blessed, praised.
Θεὸς  God 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: θεός  
Sense: a god or goddess, a general name of deities or divinities.
Πατὴρ  Father 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: προπάτωρ 
Sense: generator or male ancestor.
τοῦ  of  the 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Κυρίου  Lord 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: κύριος  
Sense: he to whom a person or thing belongs, about which he has power of deciding; master, lord.
ἡμῶν  of  us 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive 1st Person Plural
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
Ἰησοῦ  Jesus 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: Ἰησοῦς  
Sense: Joshua was the famous captain of the Israelites, Moses’ successor.
Χριστοῦ  Christ 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: Χριστός  
Sense: Christ was the Messiah, the Son of God.
  the  [One] 
Parse: Article, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
εὐλογήσας  having  blessed 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: εὐλογέω 
Sense: to praise, celebrate with praises.
ἡμᾶς  us 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Accusative 1st Person Plural
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
πάσῃ  every 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: πᾶς  
Sense: individually.
εὐλογίᾳ  blessing 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: εὐγλωττία 
Sense: praise, laudation, panegyric: of Christ or God.
πνευματικῇ  spiritual 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: πνευματικός  
Sense: relating to the human spirit, or rational soul, as part of the man which is akin to God and serves as his instrument or organ.
ἐπουρανίοις  heavenly  realms 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Neuter Plural
Root: ἐπουράνιος  
Sense: existing in heaven.
Χριστῷ  Christ 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: Χριστός  
Sense: Christ was the Messiah, the Son of God.