The Meaning of 1 Corinthians 15:24 Explained

1 Corinthians 15:24

KJV: Then cometh the end, when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he shall have put down all rule and all authority and power.

YLT: then -- the end, when he may deliver up the reign to God, even the Father, when he may have made useless all rule, and all authority and power --

Darby: Then the end, when he gives up the kingdom to him who is God and Father; when he shall have annulled all rule and all authority and power.

ASV: Then cometh the end, when he shall deliver up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he shall have abolished all rule and all authority and power.

What does 1 Corinthians 15:24 Mean?

Study Notes

kingdom
Kingdom (N.T.), Summary: See "Kingdom (O.T.)" Genesis 1:26-28 . Kingdom truth is developed in the N.T. in the following order:
(1) The promise of the kingdom to David and his seed, and described in the prophets 2 Samuel 7:8-17 ,; Zechariah 12:8 enters the N.T. absolutely unchanged. Luke 1:31-33 . The King was born in Bethlehem; Matthew 2:1 ; Micah 5:2 of a virgin.; Matthew 1:18-25 ; Isaiah 7:14 .
(2) The kingdom announced as "at hand" , by John the Baptist, by the King, and by the Twelve, was rejected by the Jews, first morally, See Scofield " Matthew 11:20 ", and afterward officially Matthew 21:42 ; Matthew 21:43 and the King, crowned with thorns, was crucified.
(3) In anticipation of His official rejection and crucifixion, the King revealed the "mysteries" of the kingdom of heaven, to be fulfilled in the interval between His rejection and His return in glory Matthew 13:1-50 .
(4) Afterward He announced His purpose to "build" His church Matthew 16:18 another "mystery" revealed through Paul which is being fulfilled contemporaneously with the mysteries of the kingdom. The "mysteries of the kingdom of heaven" and the "mystery" of the church Ephesians 3:9-11 occupy, historically, the same period, i.e, this present age.
(5) The mysteries of the kingdom will be brought to an end by "the harvest" Matthew 13:39-43 ; Matthew 13:49 ; Matthew 13:50 at the return of the King in glory, the church having previously been caught up to meet Him in the air 1 Thessalonians 4:14-17 .
(6) Upon His return the King will restore the Davidic monarchy in His own person, re- gather dispersed Israel, establish His power over all the earth, and reign one thousand years Matthew 24:27-30 ; Luke 1:31-33 ; Acts 15:14-17 ; Revelation 20:1-10 .
(7) The kingdom of heaven thus established under David's divine Son, has for its object the restoration of the divine authority in the earth, which may be regarded as a revolted province of the great kingdom of God See Scofield " Matthew 6:33 ". When this is done ( 1 Corinthians 14:24 ; 1 Corinthians 14:25 ) the Son will deliver up the kingdom (of heaven), Matthew 3:2 to "God, even the Father," that "God" (i.e. the triune God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit) "may be all in all" ( 1 Corinthians 14:28 ). The eternal throne is that "of God, and of the Lamb" Revelation 22:1 . The kingdom-age constitutes the seventh Dispensation, See Scofield " Genesis 12:1-3 ".
Then cometh Then, finally, when he delivers up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he has done away with every rule, and every authority and power (for he must reign till he has put all enemies under his feet), the last enemy, death, is destroyed.
angel
( See Scofield Hebrews 1:4 ).
David
Kingdom in Old Testament, Summary:
I. Dominion over the earth before the call of Abraham
(1) Dominion over creation was given to the first man and woman ( Genesis 1:26 ); ( Genesis 1:28 ). Through the fall this dominion was lost, Satan becoming "prince of this world"; ( Matthew 4:8-10 ); ( John 14:30 ).
(2) After the flood, the principle of human government was established under the covenant with Noah
( See Scofield Genesis 9:1 ).
Biblically this is still the charter of all Gentile government.
II. The Theocracy in Israel. The call of Abraham involved, with much else, the creation of a distinctive people through whom great purposes of God toward the race might be worked out.
(see "Israel" ( Ephesians 1:10 ); ( Romans 11:26 ).
Among these purposes is the establishment of a universal kingdom. The order of the development of Divine rule in Israel is:
(1) The mediatorship of Moses ( Exodus 3:1-10 ); ( Exodus 19:9 ); ( Exodus 24:12 ).
(2) The leadership of Joshua ( Joshua 1:1-5 ).
(3) The institution of Judges ( Judges 2:16-18 ).
(4) The popular rejection of the Theocracy, and choice of a king -- Saul, ( 1 Samuel 8:1-7 ); ( 1 Samuel 9:12-17 ).
III. The Davidic kingdom
(1) The divine choice of David ( 1 Samuel 16:1-13 ).
(2) The giving of the Davidic Covenant ( 2 Samuel 7:8-16 ); ( Psalms 89:3 ); ( Psalms 89:4 ); ( Psalms 89:20 ); ( Psalms 89:21 ); ( Psalms 89:28-37 ).
(3) The exposition of the David Covenant by the prophets ( Isaiah 1:25 ); ( Isaiah 1:26 ); ( Zechariah 12:6-8 ).
See margin reference, "Kingdom" and references.
( See Scofield Isaiah 1:25 )
The kingdom as described by the prophets is:
a) Davidic, to be established under an heir of David, who is to be born of a virgin, therefore truly man, but also "Immanuel," "the mighty God, the everlasting Father, the Prince of Peace" ( Isaiah 7:13 ); ( Isaiah 7:14 ); ( Isaiah 9:6 ); ( Isaiah 9:7 ); ( Isaiah 11:1 ); ( Jeremiah 23:5 ); ( Ezekiel 34:23 ); ( Ezekiel 37:24 ); ( Hosea 3:4 ); ( Hosea 3:5 ).
b) A kingdom heavenly in origin, principle, and authority ( Daniel 2:34 ); ( Daniel 2:35 ); ( Daniel 2:44 ); ( Daniel 2:45 ) but set up on the earth, with Jerusalem as the capital; ( Isaiah 2:2-4 ); ( Isaiah 4:3 ); ( Isaiah 4:5 ); ( Isaiah 24:23 ); ( Isaiah 33:20 ); ( Isaiah 62:1-7 ); ( Jeremiah 23:5 ); ( Jeremiah 31:38-40 ); ( Joel 3:1 ); ( Joel 3:16 ); ( Joel 3:17 ).
c) The kingdom is to be established first over regathered, restored, and converted Israel, and then to become universal ( Psalms 2:6-8 ); ( Psalms 22:1-31 ); ( Psalms 22:1-10 ); ( Isaiah 1:2 ); ( Isaiah 1:3 ); ( Isaiah 11:1 ); ( Isaiah 11:10-16 ); ( Isaiah 11:12 ); ( Jeremiah 23:5-8 ); ( Jeremiah 30:7-11 ); ( Ezekiel 20:33-40 ); ( Ezekiel 37:21-25 ); ( Zechariah 9:10 ); ( Zechariah 14:16-19 ).
d) The moral characteristics of the kingdom are to be righteousness and peace. The meek, not the proud, will inherit the earth; longevity will be greatly increased; the knowledge of the Lord will be universal; beast ferocity will be removed; absolute equity will be enforced; and outbreaking sin visited with instant judgment; while the enormous majority of earth's inhabitants will be saved ( Isaiah 11:4 ); ( Isaiah 11:6-9 ); ( Isaiah 65:20 ); ( Psalms 2:9 ); ( Isaiah 26:9 ); ( Zechariah 14:16-21 ). The New Testament ( Revelation 20:1-5 ); adds a detail of immense significance -- the removal of Satan from the scene. It is impossible to conceive to what heights of spiritual, intellectual, and physical perfection humanity will attain in this, its coming age of righteousness and peace. ( Isaiah 11:4-9 ); ( Psalms 72:1-10 ).
e) The kingdom is to be established by power, not persuasion, and is to follow divine judgment upon the Gentile world-powers ( Psalms 2:4-9 ); ( Isaiah 9:7 ); ( Daniel 2:35 ); ( Daniel 2:44 ); ( Daniel 2:45 ); ( Daniel 7:26 ); ( Daniel 7:27 ); ( Zechariah 14:1-19 ) ( See Scofield Zechariah 6:11 ).
f) The restoration of Israel and the establishment of the kingdom are connected with an advent of the Lord, yet future ( Deuteronomy 30:3-5 ); ( Psalms 2:1-9 ); ( Zechariah 14:4 ).
g) The chastisement reserved for disobedience in the house of David ( 2 Samuel 7:14 ); ( Psalms 89:30-33 ) fell in the captivities and world-wide dispersion, since which time, though a remnant returned under prince Zerubbabel, Jerusalem has been under the overlordship of Gentile. But the Davidic Covenant has not been abrogated ( Psalms 89:33-37 ) but is yet to be fulfilled. ( Acts 15:14-17 ).
angel
( See Scofield Hebrews 1:4 ).
kingdom See note 2, (See Scofield " Matthew 5:2 ") .
is at hand (See Scofield " Matthew 3:2 ") . For Another Point of View: See Topic 301207
at hand
"At hand" is never a positive affirmation that the person or thing said to be "at hand" will immediately appear, but only that no known or predicted event must intervene. When Christ appeared to the Jewish people, the next thing in the order of revelation as it then stood, should have been the setting up of the Davidic kingdom. In the knowledge of God, not yet disclosed, lay the rejection of the kingdom (and King), the long period of the mystery-form of the kingdom, the world-wide preaching of the cross, and the out-calling of the Church. But this was as yet locked up in the secret counsels of God. Matthew 13:11 ; Matthew 13:17 ; Ephesians 3:3-10 .
kingdom See note 2, (See Scofield " Matthew 5:2 ") .
is at hand (See Scofield " Matthew 3:2 ") . For Another Point of View: See Topic 301207
mysteries
A "mystery" in Scripture is a previously hidden truth, now divinely revealed; but in which a supernatural element still remains despite the revelation. The greater mysteries are:
(1) The mysteries of the kingdom of heaven Matthew 13:3-50 .
(2) the mystery of Israel's blindness during this age Romans 11:25 (with context);
(3) the mystery of the translation of living saints at the end of this age 1 Corinthians 15:51 ; 1 Corinthians 15:52 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:14-17 .
(4) the mystery of N.T. church as one body composed of Jew and Gentile Ephesians 3:1-11 ; Romans 16:25 ; Ephesians 6:19 ; Colossians 4:3 .
(5) the mystery of the church as the bride of Christ Ephesians 5:28-32 .
(6) the mystery of the inliving Christ Galatians 2:20 ; Colossians 1:26 ; Colossians 1:27 .
(7) the "mystery of God even Christ," i.e. Christ as the incarnate fullness of the Godhead embodied, in whom all the divine wisdom for man subsists Colossians 2:2 ; Colossians 2:9 ; 1 Corinthians 2:7 .
(8) the mystery of the processes by which godlikeness is restored to man 1 Timothy 3:16 .
(9) the mystery of iniquity 2 Thessalonians 2:7 ; Matthew 13:33 .
(10) the mystery of the seven stars Revelation 1:20 .
(11) the mystery of Babylon Revelation 17:5 ; Revelation 17:7 .
kingdom (See Scofield " Matthew 3:2 ") .

Context Summary

1 Corinthians 15:12-28 - Christ's Resurrection Assures Ours
The argument here goes to show, first, that our resurrection is intimately connected with Christ's. There must be such a thing, because he, as the representative of humanity, arose from the dead, in a human body which, though more ethereal in its texture, was easily recognizable by those who had known Him previously. Mary was recalled by the well-known intonations of her Master's voice. Thomas was compelled to believe, in spite of his protestations to the contrary. In fact, all of our Lord's friends were convinced against themselves. They credited the tidings of the risen Lord as idle tales. Therefore, says the Apostle, it is far easier to admit that man will rise than to face the difficulties of a still buried Christ, a vain faith, a vain gospel, and a false testimony from so many accredited witnesses.
What a burst of music breaks forth in 1 Corinthians 15:20-28! The first fruit sheaf is the forerunner and specimen of all the harvest. In Christ the whole Church was presented to God, and we may judge of the whole by Him. Note the divine order in 1 Corinthians 15:23 : first, Christ; then, His own; lastly, the end, when death itself shall be destroyed, all enemies conquered, and the kingdom of an emancipated universe finally handed back by the Mediator to the Father. [source]

Chapter Summary: 1 Corinthians 15

1  By Christ's resurrection,
12  he proves the necessity of our resurrection,
16  against all such as deny the resurrection of the body
21  The fruit,
35  and the manner thereof;
51  and of the resurrection of those who shall be found alive at the last day

Greek Commentary for 1 Corinthians 15:24

Then cometh the end [ειτα το τελος]
No verb γινεται — ginetai in the Greek. Supply “at his coming,” the end or consummation of the age or world (Matthew 13:39, Matthew 13:49; 1 Peter 4:7), When he shall deliver up Present active subjunctive (not optative) of παραδιδωμι — paradidōmi with οταν — hotan whenever, and so quite indefinite and uncertain as to time. Present subjunctive rather than aorist παραδωι — paradōi because it pictures a future proceeding. [source]
To God, even the Father [τωι τεωι και πατρι]
Better, “to the God and Father” or to “His God and Father.” The Kingdom belongs to the Father. When he shall have abolished (οταν καταργησηι — hotan katargēsēi). First aorist active subjunctive with οταν — hotan indefinite future time. Simply, “whenever he shall abolish,” no use in making it future perfect, merely aorist subjunctive. On καταργεω — katargeō see note on 1 Corinthians 6:13; note on 1 Corinthians 13:8; 1 Corinthians 13:10; noteon 1 Corinthians 13:11.Rule All forms of power opposing the will of God. Constative aorist tense covering the whole period of conflict with final victory as climax. [source]
When he shall have abolished [οταν καταργησηι]
First aorist active subjunctive with οταν — hotan indefinite future time. Simply, “whenever he shall abolish,” no use in making it future perfect, merely aorist subjunctive. On καταργεω — katargeō see note on 1 Corinthians 6:13; note on 1 Corinthians 13:8; 1 Corinthians 13:10; noteon 1 Corinthians 13:11. [source]
Rule [αρχην]
All forms of power opposing the will of God. Constative aorist tense covering the whole period of conflict with final victory as climax. [source]
authority [εχουσιαν]
All forms of power opposing the will of God. Constative aorist tense covering the whole period of conflict with final victory as climax. [source]
power [δυναμιν]
All forms of power opposing the will of God. Constative aorist tense covering the whole period of conflict with final victory as climax. [source]
Rule - authority - power [ἀρχὴν , ἐξουσίαν , δύναμιν]
Abstract terms for different orders of spiritual and angelic powers; as Ephesians 1:21; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12; Colossians 1:16. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for 1 Corinthians 15:24

1 Corinthians 15:26 The last enemy that shall be abolished is death [εσχατος εχτρος καταργειται ο τανατος]
A rather free translation. Literally, “death (note article, and so subject) is done away (prophetic or futuristic use of present tense of same verb as in 1 Corinthians 15:24), the last enemy” (predicate and only one “last” and so no article as in 1 John 2:18). [source]
Galatians 4:3 Elements of the world [τὰ στοιχεῖα τοῦ κόσμου]
For the word στοιχεῖα in N.T. see Colossians 2:8, Colossians 2:20; Hebrews 5:12; 2 Peter 3:10, 2 Peter 3:12. See on 2 Peter 3:10. Interpretations differ. 1. Elements of knowledge, rudimentary religious ideas. See Hebrews 5:12. The meaning of world will then be, the material as distinguished from the spiritual realm. Elements of the world will be the crude beginnings of religion, suited to the condition of children, and pertaining to those who are not Christians: elementary religious truths belonging to mankind in general. Thus the Jewish economy was of the world as appealing to the senses, and affording only the first elements of a spiritual system. The child-heir was taught only faint outlines of spiritual truth, and was taught them by worldly symbols. 2. Elements of nature - of the physical world, especially the heavenly bodies. See 2 Peter 3:10, 2 Peter 3:12; Wisd. 7:17. According to this explanation, the point would be that the ordering of the religious life was regulated by the order of nature; “the days, months, times,” etc. (Galatians 4:10), as well as the heathen festivals, being dependent on the movements of the heavenly bodies. This was the patristic view (Ambrose, Augustine, Chrysostom, Theodoret). 3. The elements of the world are the personal, elemental spirits. This seems to be the preferable explanation, both here and in Colossians 2:8. According to Jewish ideas, all things had their special angels. In the Book of Jubilees, chapter 2, appear, the angel of the presence (comp. Isaiah 63:9); the angel of adoration; the spirits of the wind, the clouds, darkness, hail, frost, thunder and lightning, winter and spring, cold and heat. In the Book of Enoch, 82:10-14, appear the angels of the stars, who keep watch that the stars may appear at the appointed time, and who are punished if the stars do not appear (18:15). In the Revelation of John we find four angels of the winds (14:18); the angel of the waters (16:5); the angel in the sun (19:17). In Hebrews 1:7we read, “who maketh his angels winds.” Paul also recognizes elemental forces of the spiritual world. The thorn is “a messenger of Satan” (2 Corinthians 12:7); Satan prevents his journey to Thessalonica (1 Thessalonians 2:18); the Corinthian offender is to be “delivered to Satan” (1 Corinthians 5:5); the Kingdom of God is opposed by “principalities and powers” (1 Corinthians 15:24); Christians wrestle against “the rulers of the darkness of this world; against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the upper regions” (Ephesians 6:12). In this passage the elements of the world are compared with overseers and stewards. This would seem to require a personal interpretation. In Galatians 4:8, “did service to them which by nature are no gods,” appears to be = “in bondage under the elements,” suggesting a personal interpretation of the latter. The Galatians had turned again to the observance of times and seasons (Galatians 4:10), which were controlled by the heavenly bodies and their spirits. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

Galatians 3:17 Confirmed beforehand by God [προκεκυρωμενην υπο του τεου]
Perfect passive participle of προκυροω — prokuroō in Byzantine writers and earliest use here. Nowhere else in N.T. The point is in προ — pro and υπο του τεου — hupo tou theou (by God) and in μετα — meta (after) as Burton shows. Four hundred and thirty years after (μετα τετρακοσια και τριακοντα ετη — meta tetrakosia kai triakonta etē). Literally, “after four hundred and thirty years.” This is the date in Exodus 12:40 for the sojourn in Egypt (cf. Genesis 15:13). But the lxx adds words to include the time of the patriarchs in Canaan in this number of years which would cut the time in Egypt in two. Cf. Acts 7:6. It is immaterial to Paul‘s argument which chronology is adopted except that “the longer the covenant had been in force the more impressive is his statement” (Burton). Doth not disannul Late verb ακυροω — akuroō in N.T. only here and Matthew 15:6; Mark 7:13 (from α — a privative and κυρος — kuros authority). On καταργησαι — katargēsai see 1 Corinthians 1:28; 1 Corinthians 2:6; 1 Corinthians 15:24, 1 Corinthians 15:26. [source]
Galatians 3:17 Doth not disannul [ουκ ακυροι]
Late verb ακυροω — akuroō in N.T. only here and Matthew 15:6; Mark 7:13 (from α — a privative and κυρος — kuros authority). On καταργησαι — katargēsai see 1 Corinthians 1:28; 1 Corinthians 2:6; 1 Corinthians 15:24, 1 Corinthians 15:26. [source]
Ephesians 1:21 Principality, power, etc. []
These words usually refer to angelic powers; either good, as Ephesians 3:10; Colossians 1:16; Colossians 2:10; or bad, as Ephesians 6:12; 1 Corinthians 15:24; Colossians 2:15; or both, as Romans 8:38. See on Colossians 1:16; see on Colossians 2:15. Here probably good, since the passage relates to Christ's exaltation to glory rather than to His victory over evil powers. [source]
Colossians 1:16 Thrones, dominions, principalities, powers [θρόνοι, κυριότητες, ἀρχαὶ, ἐξουσίαι]
Compare Ephesians 1:21; Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12; 1 Corinthians 15:24; Romans 8:38; Colossians 2:10, Colossians 2:15; Titus 3:1. In Titus 3:1, they refer to earthly dignities, and these are probably included in 1 Corinthians 15:24. It is doubtful whether any definite succession of rank is intended. At any rate it is impossible to accurately define the distinctions. It has been observed that wherever principalities ( ἀρχαὶ ) and powers ( ἐξουσίαι ) occur together, principalities always precedes, and that δύναμις power(see Ephesians 1:21) when occurring with either of the two, follows it; or, when occurring with both, follows both. The primary reference is, no doubt, to the celestial orders; but the expressions things on earth, and not only in this world in the parallel passage, Ephesians 1:21, indicate that it may possibly include earthly dignities. Principalities and powers are used of both good and evil powers. See Ephesians 3:10; Ephesians 6:12; Colossians 2:15. The passage is aimed at the angel-worship of the Colossians (see Introduction); showing that while they have been discussing the various grades of angels which fill the space between God and men, and depending on them as media of communion with God, they have degraded Christ who is above them all, and is the sole mediator. Compare Hebrews 1:5-14, where the ideas of the Son as Creator and as Lord of the angels are also combined. Thrones occurs only here in enumerations of this kind. It seems to indicate the highest grade. Compare Revelation 4:4, θρόνοι thronesA.V. seats, and see note. Thrones here probably means the enthroned angels. Dominions or dominations, also Ephesians 1:21. Principalities or princedoms. In Romans 8:38, this occurs without powers which usually accompanies it. [source]
2 Timothy 4:18 Unto his heavenly kingdom [εις την βασιλειαν αυτου την επουρανιον]
The future life of glory as in 1 Corinthians 15:24, 1 Corinthians 15:50. He will save No verb in the Greek. Paul‘s final doxology, his Swan Song, to Christ as in Romans 9:5; Romans 16:27. [source]
Hebrews 10:13 Henceforth expecting [το λοιπον εκδεχομενος]
“For the rest” or “for the future” The expectant attitude of Christ here is that of final and certain victory (John 16:33; 1 Corinthians 15:24-28). Till his enemies be made Purpose and temporal clause with εως — heōs and the first aorist passive subjunctive of τιτημι — tithēmi He quotes Psalm 110:1 again. [source]
1 Peter 2:15 The ignorance of foolish men [την των απρονων αντρωπων αγνωσιαν]
Αγνωσια — Agnōsia is late and rare word (in the papyri) from alpha privative and γνωσις — gnōsis (knowledge), in N.T. only here and 1 Corinthians 15:24 (disgraceful ignorance in both instances). Note alliteration. [source]
Jude 1:6 First estate [ἀρχὴν]
The word originally signifies beginning, and so frequently in New Testament, mostly in the Gospels, Acts, Hebrews, Catholic Epistles, and Apocalypse. From this comes a secondary meaning of sovereignty, dominion, magistracy, as being the beginning or first place of power. So mostly by Paul, as principalities (Romans 8:38); rule (1 Corinthians 15:24). Compare Luke 12:11, magistrates; Rev., rulers; and Luke 20:20, power. Rev., rule. A peculiar use of the word occurs at Acts 10:11, “the sheet knit at the four corners ( ἀρχαῖς );” the corners being the beginnings of the sheet. In this passage the A. V. has adopted the first meaning, beginning, in its rendering first estate. Rev. adopts the second, rendering principality. The Jews regarded the angels as having dominion over earthly creatures; and the angels are often spoken of in the New Testament as ἀρχαί , principalities; as Romans 8:38; Ephesians 1:21; so that this term would be appropriate to designate their dignity, which they forsook. [source]
Jude 1:6 Kept not [μη τηρησαντας]
First aorist active participle with negative μη — mē with play on “kept not” and “he hath kept.”Principality (αρχην — archēn). Literally, “beginning,” “rule,” (first place of power as in 1 Corinthians 15:24; Romans 8:38). In Acts 10:11 it is used for “corners” (beginnings) of the sheet. In Ephesians 6:12 the word is used for evil angels. See Deuteronomy 32:8. Both Enoch and Philo (and Milton) discuss the fallen angels.But left Second aorist active participle of απολειπω — apoleipō old verb, to leave behind (2 Timothy 4:13, 2 Timothy 4:20).Their own proper habitation (το ιδιον οικητηριον — to idion oikētērion). Old word for dwelling-place (from οικητηρ — oikētēr dweller at home, from οικος — oikos), in N.T. only here and 2 Corinthians 5:2 (the body as the abode of the spirit).In everlasting bonds Either locative (in) or instrumental (by, with). Αιδιος — Aidios (from αει — aei always), old adjective, in N.T. only here and Romans 1:20 (of God‘s power and deity). It is synonymous with αιωνιος — aiōnios (Matthew 25:46). Mayor terms αιδιος — aidios an Aristotelian word, while αιωνιος — aiōnios is Platonic.Under darkness (υπο ζοπον — hupo zophon). See 2 Peter 2:4 for ζοπος — zophos In Wisdom 17:2 we find δεσμιοι σκοτους — desmioi skotous (prisoners of darkness).Great Not in 2 Peter 2:9, which see note for discussion. [source]
Jude 1:6 Principality [αρχην]
Literally, “beginning,” “rule,” (first place of power as in 1 Corinthians 15:24; Romans 8:38). In Acts 10:11 it is used for “corners” (beginnings) of the sheet. In Ephesians 6:12 the word is used for evil angels. See Deuteronomy 32:8. Both Enoch and Philo (and Milton) discuss the fallen angels. [source]

What do the individual words in 1 Corinthians 15:24 mean?

then the end when He shall hand over the kingdom to the God and Father He shall have annulled all dominion authority power
εἶτα τὸ τέλος ὅταν παραδιδῷ τὴν βασιλείαν τῷ Θεῷ καὶ Πατρί καταργήσῃ πᾶσαν ἀρχὴν ἐξουσίαν δύναμιν

τέλος  end 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Neuter Singular
Root: τέλος  
Sense: end.
παραδιδῷ  He  shall  hand  over 
Parse: Verb, Present Subjunctive Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: παραδίδωμι  
Sense: to give into the hands (of another).
βασιλείαν  kingdom 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: βασιλεία  
Sense: royal power, kingship, dominion, rule.
τῷ  to  the 
Parse: Article, Dative Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Θεῷ  God 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: θεός  
Sense: a god or goddess, a general name of deities or divinities.
Πατρί  Father 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: προπάτωρ 
Sense: generator or male ancestor.
καταργήσῃ  He  shall  have  annulled 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Subjunctive Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: καταργέω  
Sense: to render idle, unemployed, inactivate, inoperative.
ἀρχὴν  dominion 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: ἀρχή  
Sense: beginning, origin.
ἐξουσίαν  authority 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: ἐξουσία  
Sense: power of choice, liberty of doing as one pleases.
δύναμιν  power 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: δύναμις  
Sense: strength power, ability.