The Meaning of Romans 3:24 Explained

Romans 3:24

KJV: Being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus:

YLT: being declared righteous freely by His grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus,

Darby: being justified freely by his grace through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus;

ASV: being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus:

What does Romans 3:24 Mean?

Study Notes

Redemption
Redemption, "to deliver by paying a price." The N.T. doctrine. The N.T. records the fulfilment of the O.T. types and prophecies of redemption through the sacrifice of Christ. The completed truth is set forth in the three words which are translated redemption
(1) agorazo, "to purchase in the market." The underlying thought is of a slave-market. The subjects of redemption are "sold under sin" Romans 7:14 but are, moreover, under sentence of death; Ezekiel 18:4 ,; John 3:18 ; John 3:19 ; Romans 3:19 ; Galatians 3:10 , and the purchase price is the blood of the Redeemer who dies in their stead; Galatians 3:13 ; 2 Corinthians 5:21 ; Matthew 20:28 ,; Mark 10:45 ; 1 Timothy 2:6 ; 1 Peter 1:18 .
(2) exagorazo, "to buy out of the market." The redeemed are never again to be exposed to sale;
(3) lutroo, "to loose," "to set free by paying a price" John 8:32 ; Galatians 4:4 ; Galatians 4:5 ; Galatians 4:31 ; Galatians 5:13 ; Romans 8:21 . Redemption is by sacrifice and by power Christ paid the price, the Holy Spirit makes deliverance actual in experience Romans 8:2 .
. See Scofield " Romans 1:16 ".
grace Grace (in salvation), Romans 4:4-16 ; Romans 3:24 .
Thus the Lord saved Israel
Redemption: (Exodus type) Summary. Exodus is the book of redemption and teaches:
(1) redemption is wholly of God Exodus 3:7 ; Exodus 3:8 ; John 3:16 .
(2) redemption is through a person. (See Scofield " Exodus 2:2 ") . John 3:16 ; John 3:17 .
(3) redemption is by blood Exodus 12:13 ; Exodus 12:23 ; Exodus 12:27 ; 1 Peter 1:18 .
(4) redemption is by power Exodus 6:6 ; Exodus 13:14 ; Romans 8:2 .
(See Scofield " Isaiah 59:20 ") . See Scofield " Romans 3:24 ".
The blood of Christ redeems the believer from the guilt and penalty of sin. 1 Peter 1:18 as the power of the Spirit delivers from the dominion of sin.; Romans 8:2 ; Ephesians 2:2 .
Redeemer
Redemption: Kinsman type, summary. The goel, or Kinsman-Redeemer, is a beautiful type of Christ.
(1) The kinsman redemption was of persons, and an inheritance Leviticus 25:48 ; Leviticus 25:25 ; Galatians 4:5 ; Ephesians 1:7 ; Ephesians 1:11 ; Ephesians 1:14
(2) The Redeemer must be a kinsman Leviticus 25:48 ; Leviticus 25:49 ; Ruth 3:12 ; Ruth 3:13 ; Galatians 4:4 ; Hebrews 2:14 ; Hebrews 2:15 .
(3) The Redeemer must be able to redeem Ruth 4:4-6 ; Jeremiah 50:34 ; John 10:11 ; John 10:18
(4) Redemption is effected by the goel paying the just demand in full Leviticus 25:27 ; 1 Peter 1:18 ; 1 Peter 1:19 ; Galatians 3:13 . (See Scofield " Acts 15:14-17 ") See Scofield " Romans 3:24 "
come to Zion
The time when the "Redeemer shall come to Zion" is fixed, relatively, by Romans 11:23-29 as following the completion of the Gentile Church. That is also the order of the great dispensational passage, Exodus 14:30 .
In both, the return of the Lord to Zion follows the outcalling of the Church.
come to Zion
The time when the "Redeemer shall come to Zion" is fixed, relatively, by Romans 11:23-29 as following the completion of the Gentile Church. That is also the order of the great dispensational passage, Acts 15:14-17 .
In both, the return of the Lord to Zion follows the outcalling of the Church.
grace
Grace. Summary:
(1) Grace is "the kindness and love of God our Saviour toward man.. . not by works of righteousness which we have done" Titus 3:4 ; Titus 3:5 .
It is, therefore, constantly set in contrast to law, under which God demands righteousness from man, as, under grace, he gives righteousness to man Romans 3:21 ; Romans 3:22 ; Romans 8:4 ; Philippians 3:9 . Law is connected with Moses and works; grace with Christ and faith; John 1:17 ; Romans 10:4-10 . Law blesses the good; grace saves the bad; Exodus 19:5 ; Ephesians 2:1-9 . Law demands that blessings be earned; grace is a free gift; Deuteronomy 28:1-6 ; Ephesians 2:8 ; Romans 4:4 ; Romans 4:5 .
(2) As a dispensation, grace begins with the death and resurrection of Christ Romans 3:24-26 , Romans 4:24 ; Romans 4:25 . The point of testing is no longer legal obedience as the condition of salvation, but acceptance or rejection of Christ, with good works as a fruit of salvation,; John 1:12 ; John 1:13 ; John 3:36 ; Matthew 21:37 ; Matthew 22:24 ; John 15:22 ; John 15:25 ; Hebrews 1:2 ; 1 John 5:10-12 . The immediate result of this testing was the rejection of Christ by the Jews, and His crucifixion by Jew and Gentile Acts 4:27 . The predicted end of the testing of man under grace is the apostasy of the professing church: See "Apostasy" (See Scofield " 2 Timothy 3:1 ") 2 Timothy 3:1-8 and the resultant apocalyptic judgments.
(3) Grace has a twofold manifestation: in salvation Romans 3:24 and in the walk and service of the saved Romans 6:15 .
See, for the other six dispensations:
Innocence, (See Scofield " Genesis 1:28 ")
Conscience, (See Scofield " Genesis 3:23 ")
Human Government, (See Scofield " Genesis 8:21 ")
Promise, (See Scofield " Genesis 12:1 ")
Law, (See Scofield " Exodus 19:8 ")
Kingdom, (See Scofield " Ephesians 1:10 ") .

Verse Meaning

It is all who believe ( Romans 3:22), not all who have sinned ( Romans 3:23), who receive justification ( Romans 3:24). [1] Justification is an Acts , not a process. And it is something God does, not man. As mentioned previously, justification is a forensic (legal) term. On the one hand it means to acquit ( Exodus 23:7; Deuteronomy 25:1; Acts 13:39). On the other positive side it means to declare righteous. It does not mean to make righteous.
"The word never means to make one righteous, or holy; but to account one righteous. Justification is not a change wrought by God in us, but a change of our relation to God." [2]
Justification describes a person"s status in the sight of the law, not the condition of his or her character. The condition of one"s character and conduct is that with which sanctification deals.
"Do not confuse justification and sanctification. Sanctification is the process whereby God makes the believer more and more like Christ. Sanctification may change from day to day. Justification never changes. When the sinner trusts Christ, God declares him righteous, and that declaration will never be repealed. God looks on us and deals with us as though we had never sinned at all!" [3]
God, the Judges , sees the justified sinner "in Christ" (i.e, in terms of his relation to His Son) with whom the Father is well pleased ( Romans 8:1; cf. Philippians 3:8-9; 1 Corinthians 1:30; 2 Corinthians 5:21). Justification includes forgiveness but is larger than forgiveness.
"God declares that He reckons righteous the ungodly man who ceases from all works, and believes on Him (God), as the God who, on the ground of Christ"s shed blood, "justifies the ungodly" (45). He declares such an one righteous: reckoning to him all the absolute value of Christ"s work,-of His expiating death, and of His resurrection, and placing him in Christ: where he is the righteousness of God: for Christ is that! ...
"We do not need therefore a personal "standing" before God at all. This is the perpetual struggle of legalistic theology,-to state how we can have a "standing" before God. But to maintain this is still to think of us as separate from Christ (instead of dead and risen with Him), and needing such a "standing." But if we are in Christ in such an absolute way that Christ Himself has been made unto us righteousness, we are immediately relieved from the need of having any "standing." Christ is our standing, Christ Himself! And Christ being the righteousness of God, we, being thus utterly and vitally in Christ before God, have no other place but in Him. We are "the righteousness of God in Christ."" [4]
God bestows justification freely as a gift. The basis for His giving it is His own grace, not anything in the sinner.
"Grace means pure unrecompensed kindness and favor." [5]
Grace (Gr. charis) is the basis for joy (chara), and it leads to thanksgiving (eucharistia).
The redemption that is in (i.e, came by) Christ Jesus is the means God used to bring the gift of justification to human beings. The Greek word for redemption used here (apolutroseos) denotes a deliverance obtained by purchase (cf. Matthew 20:28; 1 Timothy 2:6; 1 Peter 1:18; 1 Corinthians 6:20; 1 Corinthians 7:23; Galatians 3:13). Everywhere in the New Testament this Greek word, when used metaphorically, refers to "deliverance effected through the death of Christ for the retributive wrath of a holy God and the merited penalty of sin ..." [6]
Paul"s use of "Christ Jesus," rather than the normal "Jesus Christ," stresses the fact that God provided redemption by supplying the payment. That payment was the Messiah (Christ) promised in the Old Testament who was Jesus of Nazareth.
Though the question of who received the ransom price has divided scholars, Scripture is quite clear that Jesus Christ offered Himself as a sacrifice to God ( Luke 23:46).
"Before you leave Romans 3:24, apply it to yourself, if you are a believer. Say of yourself: "God has declared me righteous without any cause in me, by His grace, through the redemption from sin"s penalty that is in Christ Jesus." It is the bold, believing use for ourselves of the Scripture we learn, that God desires; and not merely the knowledge of Scripture." [7]

Context Summary

Romans 3:21-31 - All Freely Justified By Grace
From the universal need the Apostle turns to the all-sufficient remedy. The Law and the Prophets hinted dimly at justification by faith, but did not unveil it. God's way of justification is to impute righteousness to the believer. He places us in that position in law, before proceeding by the Holy Spirit to bring us into the condition of holiness. The perfect day is imputed to the dawn, the perfect flower to the seed, the finished picture to the crude sketch. As soon as we trust in Jesus we are viewed as standing in Him and justified before the Law; but before us lies the great work of assimilation to His perfect likeness by the indwelling of the Holy Spirit.
It is sin to come short, Romans 3:23; and who among us has fulfilled his possibilities of godlikeness? Romans 3:24; Genesis 1:26-27. Though justification costs us nothing but the sacrifice of our pride, it has cost Christ His own blood, Romans 3:25. The propitiatory, or mercy seat, was the golden lid of the Ark which the high priest sprinkled with blood. See Hebrews 9:5. Faith has no room in her household for vaunting and boasting, Romans 3:27. The Law is best honored when the Lawgiver, dwelling within us, fulfills it through us. [source]

Chapter Summary: Romans 3

1  The Jews prerogative;
3  which they have not lost;
9  howbeit the law convinces them also of sin;
20  therefore no one is justified by the law;
28  but all, without difference, by faith, only;
31  and yet the law is not abolished

Greek Commentary for Romans 3:24

Being justified [δικαιουμενοι]
Present passive participle of δικαιοω — dikaioō to set right, repeated action in each case, each being set right. [source]
Freely [δωρεαν]
As in Galatians 2:21. By his grace (τηι αυτου χαριτι — tēi autou chariti). Instrumental case of this wonderful word χαρις — charis which so richly expresses Paul‘s idea of salvation as God‘s free gift. Through the redemption A releasing by ransom God did not set men right out of hand with nothing done about men‘s sins. We have the words of Jesus that he came to give his life a ransom τηι εν Χριστωι Ιησου — Lutron is common in the papyri as the purchase-money in freeing slaves (Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East, pp. 327f.). That is in Christ Jesus (tēi en Christōi Iēsou). There can be no mistake about this redemption. It is like John 3:16. [source]
By his grace [τηι αυτου χαριτι]
Instrumental case of this wonderful word χαρις — charis which so richly expresses Paul‘s idea of salvation as God‘s free gift. [source]
Through the redemption [δια της απολυτρωσεως]
A releasing by ransom God did not set men right out of hand with nothing done about men‘s sins. We have the words of Jesus that he came to give his life a ransom τηι εν Χριστωι Ιησου — Lutron is common in the papyri as the purchase-money in freeing slaves (Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East, pp. 327f.). That is in Christ Jesus (tēi en Christōi Iēsou). There can be no mistake about this redemption. It is like John 3:16. [source]
That is in Christ Jesus [tēi en Christōi Iēsou)]
There can be no mistake about this redemption. It is like John 3:16. [source]
Being justified []
The fact that they are justified in this extraordinary way shows that they must have sinned. [source]
Freely [δωρεὰν]
Gratuitously. Compare Matthew 10:8; John 15:25; 2 Corinthians 11:7; Revelation 21:6. [source]
Grace [χάριτι]
See on Luke 1:30. [source]
Redemption [ἀπολυτρώσεως]
From ἀπολυτρόω toredeem by paying the λύτρον priceMostly in Paul. See Luke 21:28; Hebrews 9:15; Hebrews 11:35. The distinction must be carefully maintained between this word and λύτρον ransomThe Vulgate, by translating both redemptio, confounds the work of Christ with its result. Christ's death is nowhere styled λύτρωσις redemptionHis death is the λύτρον ransomfiguratively, not literally, in the sense of a compensation; the medium of the redemption, answering to the fact that Christ gave Himself for us. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Romans 3:24

Romans 5:11 We have now received the atonement [νῦν τὴν καταλλαγὴν ἐλάβομεν]
Now, in contrast with future glory. Atonement, Rev., properly, reconciliation, the noun being etymologically akin to the verb to reconcile. Atonement at the time of the A.V. signified reconciliation, at-one-ment, the making two estranged parties at one. So Shakespeare:“He and Aufidius can no more atoneThan violenist contrarieties.”“Coriolanus,” iv., 6.Fuller: “His first essay succeeded so well, Moses would adventure on a second design to atone two Israelites at variance.” The word at present carries the idea of satisfaction rather than of reconciliation, and is therefore inappropriate here. The article points to the reconciliation in Romans 5:10. See on Romans 3:24-26. [source]
Romans 8:28 According to his purpose [κατα προτεσιν]
Old word, seen already in Acts 27:13 and for “shewbread” in Matthew 12:4. The verb προτιτημι — protithēmi Paul uses in Romans 3:24 for God‘s purpose. Paul accepts fully human free agency but behind it all and through it all runs God‘s sovereignty as here and on its gracious side (Romans 9:11; Romans 3:11; 2 Timothy 1:9). [source]
Romans 3:20 Be justified [δικαιωθήσεται]
For the kindred adjective δίκαιος righteoussee on Romans 1:17. 1. Classical usage. The primitive meaning is to make right. This may take place absolutely or relatively. The person or thing may be made right in itself, or with reference to circumstances or to the minds of those who have to do with them. Applied to things or acts, as distinguished from persons, it signifies to make right in one's judgment. Thus Thucydides, ii. 6,7. “The Athenians judged it right to retaliate on the Lacedaemonians.” Herodotus, i., 89, Croesus says to Cyrus: “I think it right to shew thee whatever I may see to thy advantage.”-DIVIDER-
A different shade of meaning is to judge to be the case. So Thucydides, iv., 122: “The truth concerning the revolt was rather as the Athenians, judged the case to be.” Again, it occurs simply in the sense to judge. Thucydides, v., 26: “If anyone agree that the interval of the truce should be excluded, he will not judge correctly “In both these latter cases the etymological idea of right is merged, and the judicial element predominates. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
In ecclesiastical usage, to judge to be right or to decide upon in ecclesiastical councils. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Applied to persons, the meaning is predominantly judicial, though Aristotle (“Nichomachaean Ethics,” v., 9) uses it in the sense of to treat one rightly. There is no reliable instance of the sense to make right intrinsically; but it means to make one right in some extrinsic or relative manner. Thus Aeschylus, “Agamemnon,” 390-393: Paris, subjected to the judgment of men, tested ( δικαιωθεὶς ) is compared to bad brass which turns black when subjected to friction. Thus tested or judged he stands in right relation to men's judgments. He is shown in the true baseness of his character. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Thus the verb acquires the meaning of condemn; adjudge to be bad. Thucydides, iii., 40: Cleon says to the Athenians, “If you do not deal with the Mitylenaeans as I advise, you will condemn yourselves.” From this readily arises the sense of punish; since the punishment of a guilty man is a setting him in right relation to the political or moral system which his conduct has infringed. Thus Herodotus, i., 100: “Deioces the Mede, if he heard of any act of oppression, sent for the guilty party and punished him according to his offense.” Compare Plato, “Laws,” ii., 934. Plato uses δικαιωτήρια to denote places of punishment or houses of correction (“Phaedrus,” 249). According to Cicero, δικαιόω was used by the Sicilians of capital punishment: “ Ἑδικαιώθησαν , that is, as the Sicilians say, they were visited with punishment and executed” (“Against Verres,” v., 57). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
To sum up the classical usage, the word has two main references: 1, to persons; 2, to things or acts. In both the judicial element is dominant. The primary sense, to make right, takes on the conventional meanings to judge a thing to be right, to judge, to right a person, to treat rightly, to condemn, punish, put to death. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
2. New Testament usage. This is not identical with the classical usage. In the New Testament the word is used of persons only. In Matthew 11:19; Luke 7:35, of a quality, Wisdom, but the quality is personified. It occurs thirty-nine times in the New Testament; twenty-seven in Paul; eight in the Synoptists and Acts; three in James; one in the Revelation. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
A study of the Pauline passages shows that it is used by Paul according to the sense which attaches to the adjective δίκαιος , representing a state of the subject relatively to God. The verb therefore indicates the act or process by which a man is brought into a right state as related to God. In the A.V. confusion is likely to arise from the variations in translation, righteousness, just, justifier, justify. See Romans 3:24, Romans 3:26, Romans 3:28, Romans 3:30; Romans 4:2; Romans 5:1, Romans 5:9; Galatians 2:16; Galatians 3:8, Galatians 3:11, Galatians 3:24; Titus 3:7. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The word is not, however, to be construed as indicating a mere legal transaction or adjustment between God and man, though it preserves the idea of relativity, in that God is the absolute standard by which the new condition is estimated, whether we regard God's view of the justified man, or the man's moral condition when justified. The element of character must not only not be eliminated from it; it must be foremost in it. Justification is more than pardon. Pardon is an act which frees the offender from the penalty of the law, adjusts his outward relation to the law, but does not necessarily effect any change in him personally. It is necessary to justification, but not identical with it. Justification aims directly at character. It contemplates making the man himself right; that the new and right relation to God in which faith places him shall have its natural and legitimate issue in personal rightness. The phrase faith is counted for righteousness, does not mean that faith is a substitute for righteousness, but that faith is righteousness; righteousness in the germ indeed, but still bona fide righteousness. The act of faith inaugurates a righteous life and a righteous character. The man is not made inherently holy in himself, because his righteousness is derived from God; neither is he merely declared righteous by a legal fiction without reference to his personal character; but the justifying decree, the declaration of God which pronounces him righteous, is literally true to the fact in that he is in real, sympathetic relation with the eternal source and norm of holiness, and with the divine personal inspiration of character. Faith contains all the possibilities of personal holiness. It unites man to the holy God, and through this union he becomes a partaker of the divine nature, and escapes the corruption that is in the world through lust (2 Peter 1:4). The intent of justification is expressly declared by Paul to be conformity to Christ's image (Romans 8:29, Romans 8:30). Justification which does not actually remove the wrong condition in man which is at the root of his enmity to God, is no justification. In the absence of this, a legal declaration that the man is right is a fiction. The declaration of righteousness must have its real and substantial basis in the man's actual moral condition. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Hence justification is called justification of life (Romans 5:18); it is linked with the saving operation of the life of the risen Christ (Romans 4:25; Romans 5:10); those who are in Christ Jesus “walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit” (Romans 8:1); they exhibit patience, approval, hope, love (Romans 5:4, Romans 5:5). Justification means the presentation of the self to God as a living sacrifice; non-conformity to the world; spiritual renewal; right self-estimate - all that range of right practice and feeling which is portrayed in the twelfth chapter of this Epistle. See, further, on Romans 4:5.Knowledge ( ἐπίγνωσις )Clear and exact knowledge. Always of a knowledge which powerfully influences the form of the religions life, and hence containing more of the element of personal sympathy than the simple γνῶσις knowledgewhich may be concerned with the intellect alone without affecting the character. See Romans 1:28; Romans 10:2; Ephesians 4:13. Also Philemon 1:9, where it is associated with the abounding of love; Colossians 3:10; Philemon 1:6, etc. Hence the knowledge of sin here is not mere perception, but an acquaintance with sin which works toward repentance, faith, and holy character. [source]

Romans 1:17 A righteousness of God [δικαιοσυνη τεου]
Subjective genitive, “a God kind of righteousness,” one that each must have and can obtain in no other way save “from faith unto faith” Is revealed (αποκαλυπτεται — apokaluptetai). It is a revelation from God, this God kind of righteousness, that man unaided could never have conceived or still less attained. In these words we have Paul‘s statement in his own way of the theme of the Epistle, the content of the gospel as Paul understands it. Every word is important: σωτηριαν — sōtērian (salvation), ευαγγελιον — euaggelion (gospel), αποκαλυπτεται — apokaluptetai (is revealed), δικαιοσυνη τεου — dikaiosunē theou (righteousness of God), πιστις — pistis (faith) and πιστευοντι — pisteuonti (believing). He grounds his position on Habakkuk 2:4 (quoted also in Galatians 3:11). By “righteousness” we shall see that Paul means both “justification” and “sanctification.” It is important to get a clear idea of Paul‘s use of δικαιοσυνη — dikaiosunē here for it controls the thought throughout the Epistle. Jesus set up a higher standard of righteousness (δικαιοσυνη — dikaiosunē) in the Sermon on the Mount than the Scribes and Pharisees taught and practised (Matthew 5:20) and proves it in various items. Here Paul claims that in the gospel, taught by Jesus and by himself there is revealed a God kind of righteousness with two ideas in it (the righteousness that God has and that he bestows). It is an old word for quality from δικαιος — dikaios a righteous man, and that from δικη — dikē right or justice (called a goddess in Acts 28:4), and that allied with δεικνυμι — deiknumi to show, to point out. Other allied words are δικαιοω — dikaioō to declare or make δικαιος — dikaios (Romans 3:24, Romans 3:26), δικαιωμα — dikaiōma that which is deemed δικαιος — dikaios (sentence or ordinance as in Romans 1:32; Romans 2:26; Romans 8:4), δικαιωσις — dikaiōsis the act of declaring δικαιος — dikaios (only twice in N.T., Romans 4:25; Romans 5:18). Δικαιοσυνη — Dikaiosunē and δικαιοω — dikaioō are easy to render into English, though we use justice in distinction from righteousness and sanctification for the result that comes after justification (the setting one right with God). Paul is consistent and usually clear in his use of these great words. [source]
Romans 1:17 Is revealed [αποκαλυπτεται]
It is a revelation from God, this God kind of righteousness, that man unaided could never have conceived or still less attained. In these words we have Paul‘s statement in his own way of the theme of the Epistle, the content of the gospel as Paul understands it. Every word is important: σωτηριαν — sōtērian (salvation), ευαγγελιον — euaggelion (gospel), αποκαλυπτεται — apokaluptetai (is revealed), δικαιοσυνη τεου — dikaiosunē theou (righteousness of God), πιστις — pistis (faith) and πιστευοντι — pisteuonti (believing). He grounds his position on Habakkuk 2:4 (quoted also in Galatians 3:11). By “righteousness” we shall see that Paul means both “justification” and “sanctification.” It is important to get a clear idea of Paul‘s use of δικαιοσυνη — dikaiosunē here for it controls the thought throughout the Epistle. Jesus set up a higher standard of righteousness It is an old word for quality from δικαιος — dikaios a righteous man, and that from δικη — dikē right or justice (called a goddess in Acts 28:4), and that allied with δεικνυμι — deiknumi to show, to point out. Other allied words are δικαιοω — dikaioō to declare or make δικαιος — dikaios (Romans 3:24, Romans 3:26), δικαιωμα — dikaiōma that which is deemed δικαιος — dikaios (sentence or ordinance as in Romans 1:32; Romans 2:26; Romans 8:4), δικαιωσις — dikaiōsis the act of declaring δικαιος — dikaios (only twice in N.T., Romans 4:25; Romans 5:18). Δικαιοσυνη — Dikaiosunē and δικαιοω — dikaioō are easy to render into English, though we use justice in distinction from righteousness and sanctification for the result that comes after justification (the setting one right with God). Paul is consistent and usually clear in his use of these great words. [source]
Romans 3:21 But now apart from the law [νυνι δε χωρις νομου]
He now (νυνι — nuni emphatic logical transition) proceeds carefully in Romans 3:21-31 the nature of the God-kind of righteousness which stands manifested (δικαιοσυνη τεου πεπανερωται — dikaiosunē theou pephanerōtai perfect passive indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō to make manifest), the necessity of which he has shown in 1:18-3:20. This God kind of righteousness is “apart from law” of any kind and all of grace (χαριτι — chariti) as he will show in Romans 3:24. But it is not a new discovery on the part of Paul, but “witnessed by the law and the prophets” (μαρτυρουμενη — marturoumenē present passive participle, υπο του νομου και των προπητων — hupo tou nomou kai tōn prophētōn), made plain continuously by God himself. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:30 Wisdom and righteousness and sanctification and redemption. []
The last three terms illustrate and exemplify the first - wisdom. The wisdom impersonated in Christ manifests itself as righteousness, sanctification, and redemption. For δικαιοσύνη righteousnesssee on Romans 1:17. For ἁγιασμός sanctificationsee on Romans 6:19. For ἀπολύτρωσις redemptionsee on Romans 3:24. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:30 In Christ Jesus [εν Χριστωι Ιησου]
In the sphere of Christ Jesus the choice was made. This is God‘s wisdom. Who was made unto us wisdom from God (ος εγενητη σοπια ημιν απο τεου — hos egenēthē sophia hēmin apo theou). Note εγενητη — egenēthē became (first aorist passive and indicative), not ην — ēn was, the Incarnation, Cross, and Resurrection. Christ is the wisdom of God (1 Corinthians 2:2.) “both righteousness and sanctification and redemption” (δικαιοσυνη τε και αγιασμος και απολυτρωσις — dikaiosunē te kai hagiasmos kai apolutrōsis), as is made plain by the use of τεκαικαι — tė̇kai̇̇kai The three words (δικαιοσυνη αγιασμοσ απολυτρωσις — dikaiosunēσοπια — hagiasmosδικαιοσυνη — apolutrōsis) are thus shown to be an epexegesis of απολυτρωσις — sophia (Lightfoot). All the treasures of wisdom and knowledge in Christ Jesus. We are made righteous, holy, and redeemed in Christ Jesus. Redemption comes here last for emphasis though the foundation of the other two. In Romans 1:17 we see clearly Paul‘s idea of the God kind of righteousness (αγιασμος — dikaiosunē) in Christ. In Romans 3:24 we have Paul‘s conception of redemption (apolutrōsis setting free as a ransomed slave) in Christ. In Romans 6:19 we have Paul‘s notion of holiness or sanctification (hagiasmos) in Christ. These great theological terms will call for full discussion in Romans, but they must not be overlooked here. See also Acts 10:35; Acts 24:25; 1 Thessalonians 4:3-7; 1 Corinthians 1:2. [source]
1 Corinthians 1:30 Who was made unto us wisdom from God [ος εγενητη σοπια ημιν απο τεου]
Note εγενητη — egenēthē became (first aorist passive and indicative), not ην — ēn was, the Incarnation, Cross, and Resurrection. Christ is the wisdom of God (1 Corinthians 2:2.) “both righteousness and sanctification and redemption” All the treasures of wisdom and knowledge in Christ Jesus. We are made righteous, holy, and redeemed in Christ Jesus. Redemption comes here last for emphasis though the foundation of the other two. In Romans 1:17 we see clearly Paul‘s idea of the God kind of righteousness (αγιασμος — dikaiosunē) in Christ. In Romans 3:24 we have Paul‘s conception of redemption (apolutrōsis setting free as a ransomed slave) in Christ. In Romans 6:19 we have Paul‘s notion of holiness or sanctification (hagiasmos) in Christ. These great theological terms will call for full discussion in Romans, but they must not be overlooked here. See also Acts 10:35; Acts 24:25; 1 Thessalonians 4:3-7; 1 Corinthians 1:2. [source]
Ephesians 1:7 Redemption [τὴν ἀπολύτρωσιν]
See on Romans 3:24. Note the article: our redemption. [source]
Colossians 1:14 Redemption [ἀπολύτρωσιν]
See on Romans 3:24. Continuing the image of an enslaved and ransomed people. Omit through His blood. [source]
Colossians 1:14 Our redemption [την απολυτρωσιν]
See note on Romans 3:24 for this great word (Koiné{[28928]}š), a release on payment of a ransom for slave or debtor (Hebrews 9:15) as the inscriptions show (Deissmann, Light, etc., p. 327). The forgiveness of our sins (tēn aphesin tōn hamartiōn). Accusative case in apposition with apolutrōsin as in Ephesians 1:7 (remission, sending away, την απεσιν των αμαρτιων — aphesis after the redemption απολυτρωσιν — apolutrōsis buying back). Only here we have απεσις — hamartiōn (sins, from απολυτρωσις — hamartanō to miss) while in Ephesians 1:7 we find αμαρτιων — paraptōmatōn (slips, fallings aside, from αμαρτανω — parapiptō). [source]
2 Thessalonians 3:8 For nought [δωρεὰν]
The word is a noun, meaning a gift. See John 4:10; Acts 2:38; Romans 5:15. The accusative often adverbially as here; as a gift, gratis. Comp. Matthew 10:8; Romans 3:24; Revelation 21:6. [source]
Titus 3:7 Being justified by his grace [δικαιωτεντες τηι εκεινου χαριτι]
First aorist passive participle of δικαιοω — dikaioō and instrumental case of χαρις — charis as in Romans 3:24; Romans 5:1. [source]
Hebrews 9:12 Through his own blood [δια του ιδιου αιματος]
This is the great distinction between Christ as High Priest and all other high priests. They offer blood (Hebrews 9:7), but he offered his own blood. He is both victim and High Priest. See the same phrase in Hebrews 13:12; Acts 20:28. Once for all In contrast to the repeated (annual) entrances of the Levitical high priests (Hebrews 9:7). Into the holy place Here, as in Hebrews 9:8, Hebrews 9:24 heaven itself. Having obtained First aorist middle (indirect) participle of ευρισκω — heuriskō simultaneous action with εισηλτεν — eisēlthen and by or of himself “as the issue of personal labour directed to this end” (Westcott). The value of Christ‘s offering consists in the fact that he is the Son of God as well as the Son of man, that he is sinless and so a perfect sacrifice with no need of an offering for himself, and that it is voluntary on his part (John 10:17). Λυτρωσις — Lutrōsis (from λυτροω — lutroō) is a late word for the act of ransoming (cf. λυτρον — lutron ransom), in O.T. only here and Luke 1:68; Luke 2:38. But απολυτρωσις — apolutrōsis elsewhere (as in Luke 21:28; Romans 3:24; Hebrews 9:15; Hebrews 11:35). For “eternal” (αιωνιαν — aiōnian here feminine form) see Hebrews 6:2. The author now turns to discuss the better sacrifice (9:13-10:18) already introduced. [source]
Revelation 21:6 I am the Alpha and the Omega [Εγω το Αλπα και το Ο]
God is the bountiful Giver (James 1:5, James 1:17) of the Water of Life. See Revelation 7:17; Revelation 22:1, Revelation 22:17 for this metaphor, which is based on Isaiah 55:1. It is God‘s own promise For this partitive use of εκ — ek see Matthew 25:8, without εκ — ek Revelation 2:17.Freely See Matthew 10:8; John 4:10; Romans 3:24; Acts 8:20; Revelation 22:17. [source]
Revelation 21:6 Freely [δωρεαν]
See Matthew 10:8; John 4:10; Romans 3:24; Acts 8:20; Revelation 22:17. [source]

What do the individual words in Romans 3:24 mean?

being justified freely by the of Him grace through the redemption that [is] in Christ Jesus
δικαιούμενοι δωρεὰν τῇ αὐτοῦ χάριτι διὰ τῆς ἀπολυτρώσεως τῆς ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ

δικαιούμενοι  being  justified 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Middle or Passive, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: δικαιόω  
Sense: to render righteous or such he ought to be.
δωρεὰν  freely 
Parse: Adverb
Root: δωρεάν  
Sense: freely, undeservedly.
τῇ  by  the 
Parse: Article, Dative Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
αὐτοῦ  of  Him 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Singular
Root: αὐτός  
Sense: himself, herself, themselves, itself.
χάριτι  grace 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: χάρις  
Sense: grace.
διὰ  through 
Parse: Preposition
Root: διά  
Sense: through.
ἀπολυτρώσεως  redemption 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root: ἀπολύτρωσις  
Sense: a releasing effected by payment of ransom.
τῆς  that 
Parse: Article, Genitive Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἐν  [is]  in 
Parse: Preposition
Root: ἐν 
Sense: in, by, with etc.
Χριστῷ  Christ 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: Χριστός  
Sense: Christ was the Messiah, the Son of God.
Ἰησοῦ  Jesus 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: Ἰησοῦς  
Sense: Joshua was the famous captain of the Israelites, Moses’ successor.