The Meaning of Luke 4:18 Explained

Luke 4:18

KJV: The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised,

YLT: The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, Because He did anoint me; To proclaim good news to the poor, Sent me to heal the broken of heart, To proclaim to captives deliverance, And to blind receiving of sight, To send away the bruised with deliverance,

Darby: The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to preach glad tidings to the poor; he has sent me to preach to captives deliverance, and to the blind sight, to send forth the crushed delivered,

ASV: The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, Because he anointed me to preach good tidings to the poor: He hath sent me to proclaim release to the captives, And recovering of sight to the blind, To set at liberty them that are bruised,

What does Luke 4:18 Mean?

Study Notes

Lord
Adonai Jehovah. Isaiah 61:1

Context Summary

Luke 4:14-30 - "his Own Received Him Not"
A wide gap occurs here, embracing the important transactions of John 1:29-51; John 2:1-25; John 3:1-36; John 4:1-54.
What a flutter in Mary's heart when she saw her son sitting in the teacher's place of His native synagogue! How gratified at the reception given to the opening sentences! What a sword pierced her heart at the sudden revulsion of feeling! They were jealous that He performed only a few private miracles; but He could not do more because of their unbelief. See Mark 6:5.
Note that our Lord here sounded forth the silver trumpet of jubilee. Seizing on the imagery of the gladdest festival of Hebrew life, He likened Himself to a priest proclaiming the acceptable year of the Lord. Not yet the day of vengeance! Compare Luke 4:19 with Isaiah 61:1-2. This is Christ's program for the present age. [source]

Chapter Summary: Luke 4

1  The fasting and temptation of Jesus
14  He begins to preach
16  The people of Nazareth marvel at words, but seek to kill him
33  He cures one possessed of a demon,
38  Peter's mother-in-law,
40  and various other sick persons
41  The demons acknowledge Jesus, and are reproved for it
42  He preaches through the cities of Galilee

Greek Commentary for Luke 4:18

Anointed me [εχρισεν με]
First aorist active indicative of the verb χριω — chriō from which Christ (Χριστος — Christos) is derived, the Anointed One. Isaiah is picturing the Jubilee year and the release of captives and the return from the Babylonian exile with the hope of the Messiah through it all. Jesus here applies this Messianic language to himself. “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me” as was shown at the baptism (Luke 3:21) where he was also “anointed” for his mission by the Father‘s voice (Isaiah 3:22). [source]
To the poor [πτωχοις]
Jesus singles this out also as one of the items to tell John the Baptist in prison (Luke 7:22). Our word Gospel is a translation of the Greek Ευαγγελιον — Euaggelion and it is for the poor.He hath sent me (απεσταλκεν με — apestalken me). Change of tense to perfect active indicative. He is now on that mission here. Jesus is God‘s Apostle to men (John 17:3, Whom thou didst send).Proclaim As a herald like Noah (2 Peter 2:5).To the captives (αιχμαλωτοις — aichmalōtois). Prisoners of war will be released (αιχμη — aichmē a spear point, and αλωτος — halōtos from αλισκομαι — haliskomai to be captured). Captured by the spear point. Common word, but here only in the N.T.Set at liberty First aorist active infinitive of αποστελλω — apostellō Same verb as απεσταλκεν — apestalken above. Brought in here from Isaiah 58:6. Plummer suggests that Luke inserts it here from memory. But Jesus could easily have turned back the roll and read it so.Them that are bruised (τετραυσμενους — tethrausmenous). Perfect passive participle of τραυω — thrauō an old verb, but here only in the N.T. It means to break in pieces broken in heart and often in body as well. One loves to think that Jesus felt it to be his mission to mend broken hearts like pieces of broken earthenware, real rescue-mission work. Jesus mends them and sets them free from their limitations. [source]
He hath sent me [απεσταλκεν με]
Change of tense to perfect active indicative. He is now on that mission here. Jesus is God‘s Apostle to men (John 17:3, Whom thou didst send). [source]
Proclaim [κηρυχαι]
As a herald like Noah (2 Peter 2:5).To the captives (αιχμαλωτοις — aichmalōtois). Prisoners of war will be released (αιχμη — aichmē a spear point, and αλωτος — halōtos from αλισκομαι — haliskomai to be captured). Captured by the spear point. Common word, but here only in the N.T.Set at liberty First aorist active infinitive of αποστελλω — apostellō Same verb as απεσταλκεν — apestalken above. Brought in here from Isaiah 58:6. Plummer suggests that Luke inserts it here from memory. But Jesus could easily have turned back the roll and read it so.Them that are bruised (τετραυσμενους — tethrausmenous). Perfect passive participle of τραυω — thrauō an old verb, but here only in the N.T. It means to break in pieces broken in heart and often in body as well. One loves to think that Jesus felt it to be his mission to mend broken hearts like pieces of broken earthenware, real rescue-mission work. Jesus mends them and sets them free from their limitations. [source]
To the captives [αιχμαλωτοις]
Prisoners of war will be released Captured by the spear point. Common word, but here only in the N.T. [source]
Set at liberty [αποστειλαι]
First aorist active infinitive of αποστελλω — apostellō Same verb as απεσταλκεν — apestalken above. Brought in here from Isaiah 58:6. Plummer suggests that Luke inserts it here from memory. But Jesus could easily have turned back the roll and read it so.Them that are bruised (τετραυσμενους — tethrausmenous). Perfect passive participle of τραυω — thrauō an old verb, but here only in the N.T. It means to break in pieces broken in heart and often in body as well. One loves to think that Jesus felt it to be his mission to mend broken hearts like pieces of broken earthenware, real rescue-mission work. Jesus mends them and sets them free from their limitations. [source]
Them that are bruised [τετραυσμενους]
Perfect passive participle of τραυω — thrauō an old verb, but here only in the N.T. It means to break in pieces broken in heart and often in body as well. One loves to think that Jesus felt it to be his mission to mend broken hearts like pieces of broken earthenware, real rescue-mission work. Jesus mends them and sets them free from their limitations. [source]
Anointed []
See on Christ, Matthew 1:1. [source]
To preach good tidings []
See on Gospel, Superscription of Matthew. [source]
To the poor [πτωχοῖς]
See on Matthew 5:3. [source]
To heal the broken-hearted []
The best texts omit. So Rev. [source]
To preach [κηρύξαι]
Better as Rev., proclaim, as a herald. See on 2 Peter 2:5. [source]
To the captives [αἰχμαλώτοις]
From αἰχμή , a spear-point, and ἁλίσκομαι ,to be taken or conquered. Hence, properly, of prisoners of war. Compare Isaiah 42:7: “To bring out captives from the prison, and those who sit in darkness from the house of restraint.” The allusion is to Israel, both as captive exiles and as prisoners of Satan in spiritual bondage. Wyc. has caytifs, which formerly signified captives. [source]
To set at liberty [ἀποστεῖλαι]
Lit., to send away in discharge. Inserted from the Sept. of Luke 3:3, and James 5:15. [source]
Them that are bruised [τεθραυσμένοις]
Lit., broken in pieces. Only here in New Testament. Wyc., to deliver broken men into remission. The same Hebrew word is used in Isaiah 42:3: “a crushed reed shall he not break,” which the Septuagint translates by τεθλασμένον , a word which does not occur in the New Testament. In the citation of this latter passage (Matthew 12:20, on which see) the word for bruised is συντρίβω , which the Septuagint uses for break. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Luke 4:18

Matthew 1:1 Christ [Χριστός]
Properly an adjective, not a noun, and meaning anointed ( Χρίω , to anoint). It is a translation of the Hebrew Messiah, the king and spiritual ruler from David's race, promised under that name in the Old Testament (Psalm 2:2; Daniel 9:25, Daniel 9:26). Hence Andrew says to Simon, “We have found the Messiah, which is, being interpreted, Christ (John 1:41; compare Acts 4:27; Acts 10:38; Acts 19:28). To us “Christ “has become a proper name, and is therefore written without the definite article; but, in the body of the gospel narratives, since the identity of Jesus with the promised Messiah is still in question with the people, the article is habitually used, and the name should therefore be translated “the Christ.” After the resurrection, when the recognition of Jesus as Messiah has become general, we find the word beginning to be used as a proper name, with or without the article. In this passage it omits the article, because it occurs in the heading of the chapter, and expresses the evangelist's own faith in Jesus as the Messiah. Anointing was applied to kings (1 Samuel 9:16; 1 Samuel 10:1), to prophets (1 Kings 19:16), and to priests (Exodus 29:29; Exodus 40:15; Leviticus 16:32) at their inauguration. “The Lord's anointed” was a common title of the king (1 Samuel 12:3, 1 Samuel 12:5; 2 Samuel 1:14, 2 Samuel 1:16). Prophets are called “Messiahs,” or anointed ones (1 Chronicles 16:22; Psalm 105:15). Cyrus is also called “the Lord's Anointed,” because called to the throne to deliver the Jews out of captivity (Isaiah 45:1). Hence the word” Christ” was representative of our Lord, who united in himself the offices of king, prophet, and priest. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
It is interesting to see how anointing attaches to our Lord in other and minor particulars. Anointing was an act of hospitality and a sign of festivity and cheerfulness. Jesus was anointed by the woman when a guest in the house of Simon the Pharisee, and rebuked his host for omitting this mark of respect toward hint (Luke 7:35, Luke 7:46). In the Epistle to the Hebrews (Hebrews 1:8, Hebrews 1:9), the words of the Messianic psalm (Psalm 45:7) are applied to Jesus, “God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows.”-DIVIDER-
Anointing was practised upon the sick (Mark 6:13; Luke 10:34:; James 5:14). Jesus, “the Great Physician,” is described by Isaiah (Isaiah 61:1, Isaiah 61:2; compare Luke 4:18) as anointed by God to bind up the broken-hearted, and to give the mournful the oil of joy for mourning. He himself anointed the eyes of the blind man (John 9:6, John 9:11); and the twelve, in his name, “anointed with oil many that were sick, and healed them” (Mark 6:13). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Anointing was practised upon the dead. Of her who brake the alabaster upon his head at Bethany, Jesus said, “She hath anointed my body aforehand for the burying” (Mark 14:8; see, also, Luke 23:56). [source]

Mark 10:51 Rabboni [αββουνει]
The Aramaic word translated Lord (Kurie) in Matthew 20:33 and Luke 18:41. This very form occurs again in John 20:16.That I may receive my sight (ινα αναβλεπσω — hina anablepsō). To recover sight (ανα — anȧ), see again. Apparently he had once been able to see. Here ινα — hina is used though τελω — thelō is not (cf. Mark 10:35). The Messiah was expected to give sight to the blind (Isaiah 61:1; Luke 4:18; Luke 7:22). [source]
Mark 10:51 That I may receive my sight [ινα αναβλεπσω]
To recover sight The Messiah was expected to give sight to the blind (Isaiah 61:1; Luke 4:18; Luke 7:22). [source]
Luke 8:1 Preaching [κηρύσσων]
Or proclaiming, as a herald. Compare Luke 4:18, and see on 2 Peter 2:5. [source]
John 11:2 Anointed [ἀλείψασα]
Three words for anointing are found in the New Testament: ἀλείφω, χρίω , and its compounds, and μυρίζω . The last is used but once, Mark 14:8, of anointing the Lord's body for burying. Between the two others the distinction is strictly maintained. Χρίω , which occurs five times, is used in every case but one of the anointing of the Son by the Father With the Holy Spirit (Luke 4:18; Acts 4:27; Acts 10:38; Hebrews 1:9). In the remaining instance (2 Corinthians 1:21) of enduing Christians with the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Thus the word is confined to sacred anointing. Ἁλείφω is used of all actual anointings. See Matthew 6:17; Mark 6:13; Luke 7:38; James 5:14. The same distinction is generally maintained in the Septuagint, though with a few exceptions, as Numbers 3:3. [source]
John 1:6 Sent [ἀπεσταλμένος]
See on Matthew 10:2, Matthew 10:16; see on Mark 4:29; see on Luke 4:18. The verb carries the sense of sending an envoy with a special commission. Hence it is used of the mission of the Son of God, and of His apostles; the word apostle being directly derived from it. It is thus distinguished from πέμπω , to send, which denotes simply the relation of the sender to the sent. See on John 20:21, and see on 1 John 3:5. The statement is not merely equivalent to was sent. The finite verb and the participle are to be taken separately, as stating two distinct facts, the appearance and the mission of John. There came a man, and that man was sent from God. [source]
John 9:39 For judgment [εις κριμα]
The Father had sent the Son for this purpose (John 3:17). This world He is engaged in that very work by this miracle. They which see not The spiritually blind as well as the physically blind (Luke 4:18; Isaiah 42:18). Purpose clause with ινα — hina and present active subjunctive βλεπωσιν — blepōsin (may keep on seeing). This man now sees physically and spiritually. And that they which see may become blind Another part of God‘s purpose, seen in Matthew 11:25; Luke 10:21, is the curse on those who blaspheme and reject the Son. Note ingressive aorist middle subjunctive of γινομαι — ginomai and predicate nominative. οι βλεποντες — Hoi blepontes are those who profess to see like these Pharisees, but are really blind. Blind guides they were (Matthew 23:16). Complacent satisfaction with their dim light. [source]
Acts 4:27 Whom thou didst anoint [ον εχρισας]
As in Acts 4:26 (cf. Luke 4:18; Isaiah 61:1). Inaugurated as King Messiah. [source]
Romans 7:23 Bringing into captivity [αἰχμαλωτίζοντα]
Only here, 2 Corinthians 10:5, and Luke 21:24. See on captives, Luke 4:18. The warlike figure is maintained. Lit., making me prisoner of war. [source]
Romans 16:7 Fellow prisoners [συναιχμαλώτους]
See on captives, Luke 4:18. [source]
2 Corinthians 10:5 Bringing into captivity [αἰχμαλωτίζοντες]
Or leading away captive. The military metaphor is continued; the leading away of the captives after the storming of the stronghold. See on captives, Luke 4:18. The campaign against the Cilician pirates resulted in the reduction of a hundred and twenty strongholds and the capture of more than ten thousand prisoners. [source]
Ephesians 4:8 Captivity []
Abstract for the body of captives. See on Luke 4:18. The captives are not the redeemed, but the enemies of Christ's kingdom, Satan, Sin, and Death. Compare on Colossians 2:15, and 2 Corinthians 2:14. [source]
Ephesians 4:8 He led captivity captive [ηιχμαλωτευσεν αιχμαλωσιαν]
Cognate accusative of αιχμαλωσιαν — aichmalōsian late word, in N.T. only here and Revelation 13:10. The verb also (αιχμαλωτευω — aichmalōteuō) is from the old word αιχμαλωτος — aichmalōtos captive in war (in N.T. only in Luke 4:18), in lxx and only here in N.T. [source]
2 Timothy 3:6 Lead captive [αἰχμαλωτίζοντες]
Only here in Pastorals. See on captives, Luke 4:18; and see on 2 Corinthians 10:5. [source]
Hebrews 1:9 Hath anointed thee [εχρισεν σε]
First aorist active indicative of χριω — chriō to anoint, from which verb the verbal Χριστος — Christos (Anointed One) comes. See Christ‘s use of εχρισεν — echrisen in Luke 4:18 from Isaiah 66:1. With the oil of gladness Accusative case with εχρισεν — echrisen (second accusative besides σε — se). Perhaps the festive anointing on occasions of joy (Hebrews 12:2). See Luke 1:44. Fellows Old word from μετεχω — metechō partners, sharers, in N.T. only in Hebrews save Luke 5:7. Note παρα — para with accusative here, beside, beyond, above (by comparison, extending beyond). [source]
Hebrews 9:22 And without shedding of blood is no remission [καὶ χωρὶς αἱματεκχυσίας οὐ γίνεται ἄφεσις]
This sentence also is covered by “I may almost say.” It does not state that without shedding of blood there is no remission of sins, which “would be in conflict with the history and literature of the Old Testament.” See exceptions above. Ἁιματεκχυσία sheddingof blood, N.T.oolxx, oClass. Οὐ γίνεται ἄφεσις , lit. remission does not take place or ensue. For ἄφεσις see on James 5:15; most frequent in Luke and Acts. In Hebrews only here and Hebrews 10:18. Commonly with a genitive, in the phrase remission of sins: but sometimes absolutely as here, Mark 3:29; Luke 4:18. [source]

What do the individual words in Luke 4:18 mean?

[The] Spirit of [the] Lord [is] upon Me of which because He has anointed Me to preach good news to [the] poor He has sent to heal the broken - in heart to proclaim to [the] captives deliverance and to [the] blind recovery of sight to send forth [the] oppressed in deliverance
Πνεῦμα Κυρίου ἐπ’ ἐμέ Οὗ εἵνεκεν ἔχρισέν με Εὐαγγελίσασθαι πτωχοῖς Ἀπέσταλκέν ⧼ἰάσασθαι τοὺς συντετριμμένους τὴν καρδίαν⧽ κηρῦξαι αἰχμαλώτοις ἄφεσιν Καὶ τυφλοῖς ἀνάβλεψιν Ἀποστεῖλαι τεθραυσμένους ἐν ἀφέσει

Πνεῦμα  [The]  Spirit 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Neuter Singular
Root: πνεῦμα  
Sense: a movement of air (a gentle blast.
Κυρίου  of  [the]  Lord  [is] 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: κύριος  
Sense: he to whom a person or thing belongs, about which he has power of deciding; master, lord.
ἐπ’  upon 
Parse: Preposition
Root: ἐπί  
Sense: upon, on, at, by, before.
ἐμέ  Me 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Accusative 1st Person Singular
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
Οὗ  of  which 
Parse: Personal / Relative Pronoun, Genitive Neuter Singular
Root: ὅς 
Sense: who, which, what, that.
εἵνεκεν  because 
Parse: Preposition
Root: εἵνεκεν 
Sense: on account of, for the sake of, for.
ἔχρισέν  He  has  anointed 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: χρίω  
Sense: to anoint.
με  Me 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Accusative 1st Person Singular
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
Εὐαγγελίσασθαι  to  preach  good  news 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Infinitive Middle
Root: εὐαγγελίζω  
Sense: to bring good news, to announce glad tidings.
πτωχοῖς  to  [the]  poor 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Masculine Plural
Root: πτωχός  
Sense: reduced to beggary, begging, asking alms.
Ἀπέσταλκέν  He  has  sent 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἀποστέλλω 
Sense: to order (one) to go to a place appointed.
⧼ἰάσασθαι  to  heal 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Infinitive Middle, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἰάομαι  
Sense: to cure, heal.
συντετριμμένους  broken 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Participle Passive, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: συντρίβω  
Sense: break, to break in pieces, shiver.
τὴν  - 
Parse: Article, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
καρδίαν⧽  in  heart 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: καρδία  
Sense: the heart.
κηρῦξαι  to  proclaim 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Infinitive Active
Root: κηρύσσω  
Sense: to be a herald, to officiate as a herald.
αἰχμαλώτοις  to  [the]  captives 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Plural
Root: αἰχμάλωτος  
Sense: a captive.
ἄφεσιν  deliverance 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: ἄφεσις  
Sense: release from bondage or imprisonment.
τυφλοῖς  to  [the]  blind 
Parse: Adjective, Dative Masculine Plural
Root: τυφλός  
Sense: blind.
ἀνάβλεψιν  recovery  of  sight 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: ἀνάβλεψις  
Sense: recovery of sight.
Ἀποστεῖλαι  to  send  forth 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Infinitive Active
Root: ἀποστέλλω 
Sense: to order (one) to go to a place appointed.
τεθραυσμένους  [the]  oppressed 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Participle Middle or Passive, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: θραύω 
Sense: to break, break in pieces, shatter, smite through.
ἀφέσει  deliverance 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: ἄφεσις  
Sense: release from bondage or imprisonment.