The Meaning of John 14:16 Explained

John 14:16

KJV: And I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter, that he may abide with you for ever;

YLT: and I will ask the Father, and another Comforter He will give to you, that he may remain with you -- to the age;

Darby: And I will beg the Father, and he will give you another Comforter, that he may be with you for ever,

ASV: And I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter, that he may be with you for ever,

What does John 14:16 Mean?

Study Notes

Comforter
G. Parakletos, "one called alongside to help." Translated "advocate," 1 John 2:1 . Christ is the believer's Paraclete with the Father when he sins; the Holy Spirit the believer's indwelling Paraclete to help his ignorance and infirmity and to make intercession Romans 8:26 ; Romans 8:27 .
(See "Holy Spirit," N.T. doctrine,) Matthew 1:18 .
And I will .
Holy Ghost
The Holy Spirit, N.T. Summary (see Malachi 2:15 , note): (See Scofield " Malachi 2:15 ") .
(1) The Holy Spirit is revealed as a divine Person. This is expressly declared (e.g.) John 14:16 ; John 14:17 ; John 14:26 ; John 15:26 ; John 16:7-15 ; Matthew 28:19 and everywhere implied.
(2) The revelation concerning Him is progressive
(a) In the O.T. (See Scofield " Malachi 2:15 ") . He comes upon whom He will, apparently without reference to conditions in them
(b) During His earth-life, Christ taught His disciples Luke 11:13 that they might receive the Spirit through prayer to the Father.
(c) At the close of His ministry He promised that He would Himself pray the Father, and that in answer to prayer the Comforter would come to abide John 14:16 ; John 14:17 .
(d) On the evening of His resurrection He came to the disciples in the upper room, and breathed on them saying, "Receive ye the Holy Ghost" John 20:22 but instructed them to wait before beginning their ministry till the Spirit should come upon them; Luke 24:49 ; Acts 1:8 .
(e) On the day of Pentecost the Spirit came upon the whole body of believers Acts 2:1-4
(f) After Pentecost, so long as the Gospel was preached to Jews only, the Spirit was imparted to such as believed by the laying on of hands Acts 8:17 ; Acts 9:17 .
(g) When Peter opened the door of the kingdom to the Gentiles (Acts 10.), the Holy Spirit, without delay, or other condition than faith, was given to those who believed. Acts 10:44 ; Acts 11:15-18 . This is the permanent fact for the entire church age. Every believer is born of the Spirit; John 3:3 ; John 3:6 ; 1 John 5:1 indwelt by the Spirit, whose presence makes the believer's body a temple; 1 Corinthians 6:19 ; Romans 8:9-15 ; 1 John 2:27 ; Galatians 4:6 and baptized by the Spirit; 1 Corinthians 12:12 ; 1 Corinthians 12:13 ; 1 John 2:20 ; 1 John 2:27 thus sealing him for God; Ephesians 1:13 ; Ephesians 4:30 .
(3) The N.T. distinguishes between having the Spirit, which is true of all believers, and being filled with the Spirit, which is the believer's privilege and duty (cf) Acts 2:4 with; Acts 4:29-31 ; Ephesians 1:13 ; Ephesians 1:14 with Ephesians 5:18 . --"One baptism, many fillings."
(4) The Holy Spirit is related to Christ in His Conception Matthew 1:18-20 ; Luke 1:35 baptism; Matthew 3:16 ; Mark 1:10 ; Luke 3:22 ; John 1:32 ; John 1:33 walk and service Luke 4:1 ; Luke 4:14 resurrection Romans 8:11 , and as His witness throughout this age; John 15:26 ; John 16:8-11 ; John 16:13 ; John 16:14 .
(5) The Spirit forms the church Matthew 16:18 (See Scofield " Hebrews 12:23 ") by baptizing all believers into the body of Christ 1 Corinthians 12:12 ; 1 Corinthians 12:13 imparts gifts for service to every member of that body 1 Corinthians 12:7-11 ; 1 Corinthians 12:27 ; 1 Corinthians 12:30 guide the members in their service; Luke 2:27 ; Luke 4:1 ; Acts 16:6 ; Acts 16:7 and is Himself the power of that service; Acts 1:8 ; Acts 2:4 ; 1 Corinthians 2:4 .
(6) The Spirit abides in the company of believers who constitute a local church, making of them, corporately, a temple 1 Corinthians 3:16 ; 1 Corinthians 3:17 .
(7) Christ indicates a threefold personal relationship of the Spirit to the believer: "With", "In", "upon" John 14:17 ; Luke 24:49 ; Acts 1:8 . "With" indicates the approach of God to the soul, convicting of sin John 16:9 presenting Christ as the object of faith John 16:14 imparting faith Ephesians 2:8 and regenerating John 3:3-16 . "In" describes the abiding presence of the Spirit in the believer's body 1 Corinthians 6:19 to give victory over the flesh; Romans 8:2-4 ; Galatians 5:16 ; Galatians 5:17 to create the Christian character Galatians 5:22 ; Galatians 5:23 to help infirmities Romans 8:26 to inspire prayer Ephesians 6:18 to give conscious access to God Ephesians 2:18 to actualize to the believer his sonship Galatians 4:6 to apply the Scripture in cleansing and sanctification; Ephesians 5:26 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:13 ; 1 Peter 1:2 to comfort and intercede; Acts 9:31 ; Romans 8:26 and to reveal Christ John 16:14 .
(8) Sins against the Spirit committed by unbelievers are: To blaspheme Matthew 12:31 , resist Acts 7:51 , insult Hebrews 10:29 , "despite," lit. insult). Believers' sins against the Spirit are: To grieve Him by allowing evil in heart or life Ephesians 4:30 ; Ephesians 4:31 and to quench Him by disobedience 1 Thessalonians 5:19 .
The right attitude toward the Spirit is yieldedness to His sway in walk and service, and in constant willingness that He shall "put away" whatever grieves Him or hinders His power Ephesians 4:31 .
(9) The symbols of the Spirit are: (a) oil John 3:34 ; Hebrews 1:9 (b) water, John 7:38 ; John 7:39 (c) wind; Acts 2:2 ; John 3:8 , (d) fire Acts 2:3 , (e) a dove Matthew 3:16 , (f) a seal; Ephesians 1:13 ; Ephesians 4:30 , (g) an earnest or pledge Ephesians 1:14 .
give
It is evident that none of the disciples, with the possible exception of Mary of Bethany, asked for the Spirit in the faith of this promise. It was a new and staggering thing to a Jew that, in advance of the fulfilment of Joel 2:28 ; Joel 2:29 all might receive the Spirit. Mary alone of the disciples understood Christ's repeated declaration concerning His own death and resurrection John 12:3-7 . Save Mary, not one of the disciples but Peter, and he only in the great confession Matthew 16:16 manifested a spark of spiritual intelligence till after the resurrection of Christ and the impartation of the Spirit; John 20:22 ; Acts 2:1-4 . To go back to the promise of Luke 11:13 , is to forget Pentecost, and to ignore the truth that now every believer has the indwelling Spirit; Romans 8:9 ; Romans 8:15 ; 1 Corinthians 6:19 ; Galatians 4:6 ; 1 John 2:20 ; 1 John 2:27 . (See Scofield " Acts 2:4 ")

Verse Meaning

Love for Jesus would result in the disciples" obedience to His commands. It would also result in Jesus" requesting another (Gr. allon, another of the same kind) Helper to take His place in His absence from them (cf. John 14:26; John 15:26; John 16:7-15; 1 John 2:1). The Greek word translated "Helper" or "Counselor" is parakletos. Both of these English words have connotations that are absent from the Greek word. Helper connotes an inferior, which the Holy Spirit is not. Counselor can call to mind a camp counselor or a marriage counselor whereas a legal counselor is more in harmony with the Greek idea. [1] In secular contexts parakletos often referred to a legal assistant, an advocate, or simply a helper (e.g, a witness or a representative in court). [2] The verbal form of this word, parakaleo, literally means to call alongside and, therefore, to encourage or to strengthen. Muslims typically believe that Mohammed is the fulfillment of Jesus" promise that He would sent another counselor.
Jesus spoke of the Trinity in the following relationships. The Son would request that the Father send the Spirit to take the Son"s place as the believer"s encourager and strengthener. It was hard for these Jewish believers who had grown up believing that there is but one God to grasp that Jesus was God. It must have been even more difficult for them to think of the Spirit of God as a person rather than as God"s influence. Nevertheless New Testament revelation is clear that there are three Persons within the Godhead (e.g, 2 Corinthians 13:14). Most non-Christian religions deny the triunity of God (e.g, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, et al.).
The Spirit of God had come on Old Testament believers temporarily to give them strength, but normally He did not remain with them (cf. Psalm 51:11). What Jesus spoke of here was an abiding relationship in which the Spirit remained with believers for the rest of their lives (cf. Romans 8:9). This new relationship to the Holy Spirit is one of the distinctive differences between the church age and former dispensations. It is a blessing few Christians appreciate as we should.

Context Summary

John 14:12-24 - The Spirit Of Truth
There is no adequate translation for the word Paraclete. It may be rendered "interpreter," "comforter," "advocate," but no one word suffices. The Greek means "one whom you call to your side in the battle or law-court." His advent depends upon the praying Christ (I will pray the Father), and upon the praying Church (ye shall ask). The Holy Spirit must be a person, or He could not be compared as "another" to Christ. It is characteristic of this dispensation that He shall be in us, and His indwelling brings with it that of the Father and the Son.
"We will"¦ make our abode." That word abode is the same Greek word as is rendered mansions in the former part of this chapter. God prepares a mansion for those who believe in Christ, and asks in return that we shall prepare our hearts as guest chambers for Him to dwell in. As He enters the loving, cleansed, and believing heart, we hear Him say: "This is my rest for ever: here will I dwell; for I have desired it," Psalms 132:14. And what a word is that, my Father will love him. That He should love the world is wonderful, but that He should love us would be incredible, were He not infinite, and did He not see us in Jesus Christ our Lord. [source]

Chapter Summary: John 14

1  Jesus comforts his disciples with the hope of heaven;
5  professes himself the way, the truth, and the life, and one with the Father;
13  assures their prayers to be effectual;
15  requires obedience;
16  promises the Comforter;
27  and leaves his peace with them

Greek Commentary for John 14:16

And I will pray the Father [καγω ερωτησω τον πατερα]
Ερωταω — Erōtaō for prayer, not question (the old use), also in John 16:23 (prayer to Jesus in same sense as αιτεω — aiteō), John 14:26 (by Jesus as here); John 17:9 (by Jesus), “make request of.” Another Comforter Another of like kind This old word (Demosthenes), from παρακαλεω — parakaleō was used for legal assistant, pleader, advocate, one who pleads another‘s cause (Josephus, Philo, in illiterate papyrus), in N.T. only in John‘s writings, though the idea of it is in Romans 8:26-34. Cf. Deissmann, Light, etcp. 336. So the Christian has Christ as his Paraclete with the Father, the Holy Spirit as the Father‘s Paraclete with us (John 14:16, John 14:26; John 15:26; John 16:7; 1 John 2:1). For ever This the purpose See John 4:14 for the idiom. [source]
I will pray [ἐρωτήσω]
See on John 11:22. [source]
Comforter [παράκλητον]
Only in John's Gospel and First Epistle (John 14:16, John 14:26; John 15:26; John 16:7; 1 John 2:13. From παρά , to the side of, and καλέω , to summon. Hence, originally, one who is called to another's side to aid him, as an advocate in a court of justice. The later, Hellenistic use of παρακαλεῖν and παράκλησις , to denote the act of consoling and consolation, gave rise to the rendering Comforter, which is given in every instance in the Gospel, but is changed to advocate in 1 John 2:1, agreeably to its uniform signification in classical Greek. The argument in favor of this rendering throughout is conclusive. It is urged that the rendering Comforter is justified by the fact that, in its original sense, it means more than a mere consoler, being derived from the Latin confortare, to strengthen, and that the Comforter is therefore one who strengthens the cause and the courage of his client at the bar: but, as Bishop Lightfoot observes, the history of this interpretation shows that it is not reached by this process, but grew out of a grammatical error, and that therefore this account can only be accepted as an apology after the fact, and not as an explanation of the fact. The Holy Spirit is, therefore, by the word παράκλητος , of which Paraclete is a transcription, represented as our Advocate or Counsel, “who suggests true reasonings to our minds, and true courses of action for our lives, who convicts our adversary, the world, of wrong, and pleads our cause before God our Father.” It is to be noted that Jesus as well as the Holy Spirit is represented as Paraclete. The Holy Spirit is to be another Paraclete, and this falls in with the statement in the First Epistle, “we have an advocate with God, even Jesus Christ.” Compare Romans 8:26. See on Luke 6:24. Note also that the word another is ἄλλον , and not ἕτερον , which means different. The advocate who is to be sent is not different from Christ, but another similar to Himself. See on Matthew 6:24. [source]
With you [μεθ ' ὑμῶν]
Notice the three prepositions used in this verse to describe the Spirit's relation to the believer. With you ( μετά ), in fellowship; by you ( παρά ), in His personal presence; in you ( ἐν ), as an indwelling personal energy, at the springs of the life. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for John 14:16

Matthew 5:4 Shall be comforted []
See on John 14:16. [source]
Luke 6:24 Consolation [παράκλησις]
From παρά , to the side of, and καλέω , to call or summon. Literally, a calling to one's side to help; and therefore entreaty, passing on into the sense of exhortation, and thence into that of consolatory exhortation; and so coming round to mean that which one is summoned to give to a suppliant - consolation. Thus it embodies the call for help, and the response to the call. Its use corresponds with that of the kindred verb παρακαλέω , to exhort or console. In its original sense of calling for aid the noun appears in the New Testament only in 2 Corinthians 8:4: with much entreaty. The verb appears frequently in this sense, rendered beseech, pray (Matthew 8:34; Matthew 14:36; Mark 1:40; Mark 5:12, etc.). In the sense of consolation or comfort the noun occurs in Luke 2:25; Luke 6:24; 2 Corinthians 1:3; 2 Corinthians 7:4; Philemon 1:7. The verb, in Matthew 2:18; Matthew 5:4:; Luke 16:25; 2 Corinthians 1:4. In some instances, however, the meaning wavers between console and exhort. In the sense of exhortation or counsel, the noun may be found in Acts 13:15; Romans 12:8; Hebrews 13:22. The verb, in Acts 2:40; Acts 11:23; Acts 14:22; Romans 12:8; Titus 2:15. Neither the noun nor the verb appear in the writings of John, but the kindred word παράκλητος the Paraclete, Comforter, or Advocate, is peculiar to him. On this word, see on John 14:16. It should be noted, however, that the word comfort goes deeper than its popular conception of soothing. It is from the later Latin confortare, to make strong. Thus Wycliffe renders Luke 1:80, “the child waxed, and was comforted in spirit” (A. V., waxed strong )and Tyndale, Luke 22:43, “there appeared an angel from heaven comforting him” (A. V., strengthening )The comfort which Christ gives is not always soothing. The Holy Spirit, the Comforter, is to convince of sin and ofjudgment. Underlying the word is the sense of a wise counsel or admonition which rouses and braces the moral nature and encourages and strengthens it to do and to endure. When, therefore, Christ says “they that mourn shall be comforted,” he speaks in recognition of the fact that all sorrow is the outcome of sin, and that true comfort is given, not only in pardon for the past, but in strength to fight and resist and overcome sin. The atmosphere of the word, in short, is not the atmosphere of the sick-chamber, but the tonic breath of the open world, of moral struggle and victory; the atmosphere for him that climbs and toils and fights. [source]
John 14:16 Comforter [παράκλητον]
Only in John's Gospel and First Epistle (John 14:16, John 14:26; John 15:26; John 16:7; 1 John 2:13. From παρά , to the side of, and καλέω , to summon. Hence, originally, one who is called to another's side to aid him, as an advocate in a court of justice. The later, Hellenistic use of παρακαλεῖν and παράκλησις , to denote the act of consoling and consolation, gave rise to the rendering Comforter, which is given in every instance in the Gospel, but is changed to advocate in 1 John 2:1, agreeably to its uniform signification in classical Greek. The argument in favor of this rendering throughout is conclusive. It is urged that the rendering Comforter is justified by the fact that, in its original sense, it means more than a mere consoler, being derived from the Latin confortare, to strengthen, and that the Comforter is therefore one who strengthens the cause and the courage of his client at the bar: but, as Bishop Lightfoot observes, the history of this interpretation shows that it is not reached by this process, but grew out of a grammatical error, and that therefore this account can only be accepted as an apology after the fact, and not as an explanation of the fact. The Holy Spirit is, therefore, by the word παράκλητος , of which Paraclete is a transcription, represented as our Advocate or Counsel, “who suggests true reasonings to our minds, and true courses of action for our lives, who convicts our adversary, the world, of wrong, and pleads our cause before God our Father.” It is to be noted that Jesus as well as the Holy Spirit is represented as Paraclete. The Holy Spirit is to be another Paraclete, and this falls in with the statement in the First Epistle, “we have an advocate with God, even Jesus Christ.” Compare Romans 8:26. See on Luke 6:24. Note also that the word another is ἄλλον , and not ἕτερον , which means different. The advocate who is to be sent is not different from Christ, but another similar to Himself. See on Matthew 6:24. [source]
John 1:19 And this is the witness of John [και αυτη εστιν η μαρτυρια του Ιωανου]
He had twice already alluded to it (John 1:7. and John 1:15) and now he proceeds to give it as the most important item to add after the Prologue. Just as the author assumes the birth narratives of Matthew and Luke, so he assumes the Synoptic accounts of the baptism of Jesus by John, but adds various details of great interest and value between the baptism and the Galilean ministry, filling out thus our knowledge of this first year of the Lord‘s ministry in various parts of Palestine. The story in John proceeds along the same lines as in the Synoptics. There is increasing unfolding of Christ to the disciples with increasing hostility on the part of the Jews till the final consummation in Jerusalem. When the Jews sent unto him John, writing in Ephesus near the close of the first century long after the destruction of Jerusalem, constantly uses the phrase “the Jews” as descriptive of the people as distinct from the Gentile world and from the followers of Christ (at first Jews also). Often he uses it of the Jewish leaders and rulers in particular who soon took a hostile attitude toward both John and Jesus. Here it is the Jews from Jerusalem who sent Priests and Levites Sadducees these were. Down below in John 1:24 the author explains that it was the Pharisees who sent the Sadducees. The Synoptics throw a flood of light on this circumstance, for in Matthew 3:7 we are told that the Baptist called the Pharisees and Sadducees “offspring of vipers” (Luke 3:7). Popular interest in John grew till people were wondering “in their hearts concerning John whether haply he were the Christ” (Luke 3:15). So the Sanhedrin finally sent a committee to John to get his own view of himself, but the Pharisees saw to it that Sadducees were sent. To ask him Final ινα — hina and the first aorist active subjunctive of ερωταω — erōtaō old verb to ask a question as here and often in the Koiné to ask for something (John 14:16) like αιτεω — aiteō Who art thou? Direct question preserved and note proleptic position of συ — su “Thou, who art thou?” The committee from the Sanhedrin put the question sharply up to John to define his claims concerning the Messiah. [source]
John 16:23 Ye shall ask me nothing [εμε ουκ ερωτησετε]
Either in the sense of question (original meaning of ερωταω — erōtaō) as in John 16:19, John 16:30 since he will be gone or in the sense of request or favours (like αιτεω — aiteō in this verse) as in John 14:16; Acts 3:2. In John 16:26 both αιτεω — aiteō and ερωταω — erōtaō occur in this sense. Either view makes sense here. If ye shall ask Third-class condition, αν — an like εαν — ean with first aorist active subjunctive of αιτεω — aiteō See note on John 14:26 for “in my name.” [source]
John 16:26 I say not [ου λεγω]
“I speak not.” Christ did pray for the disciples before his death (John 14:16; John 17:9, John 17:15, John 17:24) and he prays also for sinners (Luke 23:34; 1 John 2:1). Here it is the special love of God for disciples of Jesus (John 14:21, John 14:23; John 17:23; 1 John 4:19). Note αιτεω — aiteō and ερωταω — erōtaō used in practically the same sense as in John 16:23. [source]
John 14:16 And I will pray the Father [καγω ερωτησω τον πατερα]
Ερωταω — Erōtaō for prayer, not question (the old use), also in John 16:23 (prayer to Jesus in same sense as αιτεω — aiteō), John 14:26 (by Jesus as here); John 17:9 (by Jesus), “make request of.” Another Comforter Another of like kind This old word (Demosthenes), from παρακαλεω — parakaleō was used for legal assistant, pleader, advocate, one who pleads another‘s cause (Josephus, Philo, in illiterate papyrus), in N.T. only in John‘s writings, though the idea of it is in Romans 8:26-34. Cf. Deissmann, Light, etcp. 336. So the Christian has Christ as his Paraclete with the Father, the Holy Spirit as the Father‘s Paraclete with us (John 14:16, John 14:26; John 15:26; John 16:7; 1 John 2:1). For ever This the purpose See John 4:14 for the idiom. [source]
John 14:17 The Spirit of truth [το πνευμα της αλητειας]
Same phrase in John 15:27; John 16:13; 1 John 4:6, “a most exquisite title” (Bengel). The Holy Spirit is marked by it (genitive case), gives it, defends it (cf. John 1:17), in contrast to the spirit of error (1 John 4:6). Whom Grammatical neuter gender He is a person, not a mere influence. Cannot receive Left to itself the sinful world is helpless (1 Corinthians 2:14; Romans 8:7.), almost Paul‘s very language on this point. The world lacks spiritual insight It failed to recognize Jesus (John 1:10) and likewise the Holy Spirit. Ye know him Emphatic position of υμεις — humeis (ye) in contrast with the world (John 15:19), because they have seen Jesus the Revealer of the Father (John 14:9). Abides Timeless present tense. With you “By your side,” “at home with you,” not merely “with you” In your hearts. So note μετα — meta (John 14:16), παρα εν — para class="translit"> en f0). [source]
John 14:26 Whom [ο]
Grammatical neuter, but “whom” is correct translation. The Father will send the Holy Spirit (John 14:16; Luke 24:49; Acts 2:33), but so will the Son (John 15:26; John 16:7) as Jesus breathes the Holy Spirit upon the disciples (John 20:22). There is no contradiction in this relation of the Persons in the Trinity (the Procession of the Holy Spirit). Here the Holy Spirit (full title as in Mark 3:29; Matthew 12:32; Luke 12:10) is identified with the Paraclete. He Emphatic demonstrative pronoun and masculine like παρακλητος — paraklētos Shall teach you all things The Holy Spirit knows “the deep things of God” (1 Corinthians 2:10) and he is our Teacher in the Dispensation of the Holy Spirit of both new truth (John 14:25) and old. Bring to your remembrance Future active indicative of υπομιμνησκω — hupomimnēskō old verb to remind, to recall, here only in this Gospel (cf. 3 John 1:10; 2 Timothy 2:14) and with two accusatives (person and thing). After pentecost the disciples will be able better to recall and to understand what Jesus had said (how dull they had been at times) and to be open to new revelations from God (cf. Peter at Joppa and Caesarea). [source]
John 15:26 When the Comforter is come [οταν ελτηι ο παρακλητος]
Indefinite temporal clause with οταν — hotan and the second aorist active subjunctive of ερχομαι — erchomai “whenever the Comforter comes.” Whom I will send unto you from the Father As in John 16:7, but in John 14:16, John 14:26 the Father sends at the request of or in the name of Jesus. Cf. Luke 24:49; Acts 2:33. This is the Procession of the Holy Spirit from the Father and from the Son. Which Grammatical neuter to agree with πνευμα — pneuma and should be rendered “who” like ο — ho in John 14:26. Proceedeth from the Father “From beside the Father” as in the preceding clause. He Emphatic masculine pronoun, not neuter Future active of μαρτυρεω — martureō This is the mission of the Paraclete (John 16:14) as it should be ours. [source]
Romans 8:27 According to the will of God [κατα τεον]
See note on 2 Corinthians 7:9-11 for this phrase κατα τεον — kata theon (according to God). The Holy Spirit is the “other Paraclete” (John 14:16) who pleads God‘s cause with us as Christ is our Paraclete with the Father (1 John 2:1). But more is true as here, for the Holy Spirit interprets our prayers to God and “makes intercession for us in accord with God‘s will.” [source]
2 Corinthians 3:17 Now the Lord is that Spirit []
Κύριος theLord is used in Exodus 34:34for Jehovah. The Lord Christ of 2 Corinthians 3:16is the Spirit who pervades and animates the new covenant of which we are ministers (2 Corinthians 3:6), and the ministration of which is with glory (2 Corinthians 3:8). Compare Romans 8:9-11; John 14:16, John 14:18. [source]
2 Corinthians 1:3 All comfort [πάσης παρακλήσεως]
The earliest passage in the New Testament where this word comfort or its kindred verb is applied to God. Compare παράκλητος comforteradvocate, of the Holy Spirit, in John href="/desk/?q=joh+14:16&sr=1">John 14:16, John 14:26, etc. All is better rendered every: the God of every consolation. [source]
2 Corinthians 1:3 The God and Father [ο τεος και πατηρ]
So rightly, only one article with both substantives as in 2 Peter 1:1. Paul gives the deity of Jesus Christ as our Lord Paul adds an item to each word. He is the compassionate Father characterized by mercies (οικτιρμων — oiktirmōn old word from οικτειρω — oikteirō to pity, and here in plural, emotions and acts of pity). He is the God of all comfort (παρακλησεως — paraklēseōs old word from παρακαλεω — parakaleō to call to one‘s side, common with Paul). Paul has already used it of God who gave eternal comfort (2 Thessalonians 2:16). The English word comfort is from the Latin confortis (brave together). The word used by Jesus of the Holy Spirit as the Comforter or Paraklete is this very word (John 14:16; John 16:7). Paul makes rich use of the verb παρακαλεω — parakaleō and the substantive παρακλησις — paraklēsis in this passage (2 Corinthians 1:3-7). He urges all sorrowing and troubled hearts to find strength in God. [source]
2 Corinthians 1:3 The father of mercies [ο πατηρ των οικτιρμων]
Paul adds an item to each word. He is the compassionate Father characterized by mercies He is the God of all comfort Paul has already used it of God who gave eternal comfort (2 Thessalonians 2:16). The English word comfort is from the Latin confortis (brave together). The word used by Jesus of the Holy Spirit as the Comforter or Paraklete is this very word (John 14:16; John 16:7). Paul makes rich use of the verb παρακαλεω — parakaleō and the substantive παρακλησις — paraklēsis in this passage (2 Corinthians 1:3-7). He urges all sorrowing and troubled hearts to find strength in God. [source]
Galatians 4:6 The Spirit of his Son []
The Holy Spirit which animated Jesus in his human life, and which, in the risen Christ, is the life-principle of believers. See 1 Corinthians 15:45, and comp. Romans 8:9-11. The Holy Spirit is called the Spirit of Christ, Romans 8:9, Romans 8:10, where Paul uses Spirit of God, Spirit of Christ and Christ as convertible terms. The phrase Spirit of Jesus Christ only Philemon 1:19. In John 3:34Christ is represented as dispensing the Spirit. He is fully endowed with the Spirit (Mark 1:10; John 1:32): he sends the Spirit from the Father to the disciples, and he is the burden of the Spirit's testimony (John 15:26; John 16:7, John 16:9, John 16:10, John 16:15). The Paraclete is given in answer to Christ's prayer (John 14:16). Christ identifies his own coming and presence with those of the Spirit (John 14:17, John 14:18). Paul identifies him personally with the Spirit (2 Corinthians 3:17). [source]
Colossians 2:2 Comforted [παρακληθῶσιν]
Not so much tranquilized as braced. See on John 14:16. [source]
1 Timothy 4:13 Exhortation [τῇ παρακλήσει]
Often in Paul. See on consolation, Luke 6:24, see on comfort, Acts 9:31, and see on comforter, John 14:16. [source]
1 John 2:1 An advocate [παράκλητον]
See on John 14:16. [source]
1 John 2:1 That ye may not sin [ινα μη αμαρτητε]
Purpose (negative) clause with ινα μη — hina mē and the second aorist (ingressive, commit sin) active subjunctive of αμαρτανω — hamartanō to sin. John has no patience with professional perfectionists (1 John 1:8-10), but he has still less with loose-livers like some of the Gnostics who went to all sorts of excesses without shame.If any man sin (εαν τις αμαρτηι — ean tis hamartēi). Third-class condition with εαν — ean and second aorist (ingressive) active subjunctive again, “if one commit sin.”We have Present active indicative of εχω — echō in the apodosis, a present reality like εχομεν — echomen in 2 Corinthians 5:1.An advocate (παρακλητον — paraklēton). See note on John 14:16, and John 14:26; and note on John 15:26; and John 16:7 for this word, nowhere else in the N.T. The Holy Spirit is God‘s Advocate on earth with men, while Christ is man‘s Advocate with the Father (the idea, but not the word, in Romans 8:31-39; Hebrews 7:25). As δικαιος — dikaios (righteous) Jesus is qualified to plead our case and to enter the Father‘s presence (Hebrews 2:18). [source]
1 John 2:1 We have [εχομεν]
Present active indicative of εχω — echō in the apodosis, a present reality like εχομεν — echomen in 2 Corinthians 5:1.An advocate (παρακλητον — paraklēton). See note on John 14:16, and John 14:26; and note on John 15:26; and John 16:7 for this word, nowhere else in the N.T. The Holy Spirit is God‘s Advocate on earth with men, while Christ is man‘s Advocate with the Father (the idea, but not the word, in Romans 8:31-39; Hebrews 7:25). As δικαιος — dikaios (righteous) Jesus is qualified to plead our case and to enter the Father‘s presence (Hebrews 2:18). [source]
1 John 2:1 An advocate [παρακλητον]
See note on John 14:16, and John 14:26; and note on John 15:26; and John 16:7 for this word, nowhere else in the N.T. The Holy Spirit is God‘s Advocate on earth with men, while Christ is man‘s Advocate with the Father (the idea, but not the word, in Romans 8:31-39; Hebrews 7:25). As δικαιος — dikaios (righteous) Jesus is qualified to plead our case and to enter the Father‘s presence (Hebrews 2:18). [source]
2 John 1:2 Shall be with us [μεθ ' ἡμῶν ἔσται]
With us has the emphatic position in the sentence: and with us it shall be. Note the change from abideth in to shall be with, and see on John 14:16, John 14:17. [source]

What do the individual words in John 14:16 mean?

And I will ask the Father and another Helper He will give you that He may be with you to age
Κἀγὼ ἐρωτήσω τὸν Πατέρα καὶ ἄλλον Παράκλητον δώσει ὑμῖν ἵνα μεθ’ ὑμῶν εἰς αἰῶνα»

Κἀγὼ  And  I 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Nominative 1st Person Singular
Root: κἀγώ  
Sense: and I.
ἐρωτήσω  will  ask 
Parse: Verb, Future Indicative Active, 1st Person Singular
Root: ἐρωτάω  
Sense: to question.
Πατέρα  Father 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: προπάτωρ 
Sense: generator or male ancestor.
ἄλλον  another 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: ἄλλος  
Sense: another, other.
Παράκλητον  Helper 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: παράκλητος  
Sense: summoned, called to one’s side, esp. called to one’s aid.
δώσει  He  will  give 
Parse: Verb, Future Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: διδῶ 
Sense: to give.
ἵνα  that 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ἵνα  
Sense: that, in order that, so that.
  He  may  be 
Parse: Verb, Present Subjunctive Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: εἰμί  
Sense: to be, to exist, to happen, to be present.
αἰῶνα»  age 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: αἰών  
Sense: for ever, an unbroken age, perpetuity of time, eternity.