The Meaning of Luke 2:25 Explained

Luke 2:25

KJV: And, behold, there was a man in Jerusalem, whose name was Simeon; and the same man was just and devout, waiting for the consolation of Israel: and the Holy Ghost was upon him.

YLT: And lo, there was a man in Jerusalem, whose name is Simeon, and this man is righteous and devout, looking for the comforting of Israel, and the Holy Spirit was upon him,

Darby: And behold, there was a man in Jerusalem whose name was Simeon; and this man was just and pious, awaiting the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Spirit was upon him.

ASV: And behold, there was a man in Jerusalem whose name was Simeon; and this man was righteous and devout, looking for the consolation of Israel: and the Holy Spirit was upon him.

What does Luke 2:25 Mean?

Study Notes

just and devout
righteousness
The O.T. righteousness. Summary: In the O.T. "righteous" and "just" are English words used to translate the Hebrew words yasher, "upright"; tsadiq, "just"; tsidkah, "righteous." In all of these words but one idea inheres: the righteous, or just, man is so called, because he is right with God; and he is right with God because he has walked "in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless" Luke 1:6 ; Romans 10:5 ; Philippians 3:6 . The O.T. righteous man was not sinless Ecclesiastes 7:20 , but one who, for all his sins, resorted to the ordinances, and offered in faith the required sacrifice (e.g.) Leviticus 4:27-35 CF. "Righteousness (N.T.), and Paul's contrast, Philippians 3:4-9 .
righteousness
Righteousness here, and in the passages which refer to Romans 10:10 , means that righteousness of God which is judicially reckoned to all who believe on the Lord Jesus Christ; believers are the righteous.
(See Scofield " Romans 3:21 ") .

Context Summary

Luke 2:25-39 - The Aged Simeon's Prophetic Blessing
Two aged watchers welcomed the King; but no one else, of all the crowds who went and came, guessed that the Messenger of the Covenant had suddenly come to His Temple, Malachi 3:1-3.
In the Arctic Circle in summer the visitor will behold the magnificent spectacle, on the same sky, of the hues of sunset and of dawn. Dipping only for a brief period beneath the horizon, the setting sun leaves the glorious trail of sunset, and rising, bathes the eastern clouds with the radiance of dawn. So, when Simeon embraced Christ, sunset and sunrise met. There was the glory of the age that was passing, and the glory of the new Christian age that shall ever stand at perfect noon.
Note the concentric circles of Simeon's character: a man; a man in Jerusalem-i.e., a Jew; righteous toward his fellows; devout toward God; looking; Spirit-anointed; to whom it was revealed; Christ in his arms. What more could be said? [source]

Chapter Summary: Luke 2

1  Augustus taxes all the Roman empire
6  The nativity of Jesus
8  An angel relates it to the shepherds, and many sing praises to God for it
15  The shepherds glorify God
21  Jesus is circumcised
22  Mary purified
25  Simeon and Anna prophesy of Jesus,
39  who increases in wisdom,
41  questions in the temple with the teachers,
51  and is obedient to his parents

Greek Commentary for Luke 2:25

Devout [ευλαβης]
Used only by Luke (Acts 2:5; Acts 8:2; Acts 22:12) in the N.T. Common in ancient Greek from Plato on. It means taking hold well or carefully (ευ — eu and λαβειν — labein) and so reverently, circumspectly. [source]
Looking for the consolation of Israel [προσδεχομενος παρακλησιν του Ισραελ]
Old Greek verb to admit to one‘s presence (Luke 15:2) and then to expect as here and of Anna in Luke 2:38. επ αυτον — Parakle4sin here means the Messianic hope (Isaiah 11:10; Isaiah 40:1), calling to one‘s side for cheer.Upon him (ep' auton). This is the explanation of his lively Messianic hope. It was due to the Holy Spirit. Simeon and Anna are representatives of real piety in this time of spiritual dearth and deadness. [source]
Upon him [ep' auton)]
This is the explanation of his lively Messianic hope. It was due to the Holy Spirit. Simeon and Anna are representatives of real piety in this time of spiritual dearth and deadness. [source]
Devout [εὐλαβής]
Used by Luke only. The kindred word, εὐλάβεια ,godly-fear, occurs twice' Hebrews 5:7; Hebrews 12:28. From εὖ , well, and λαμβάνω ,to take hold of. Hence of a circumspect or cautious person who takes hold of things carefully. As applied to morals and religion, it emphasizes the element of circumspection, a cautious, careful observance of divine law; and is thus peculiarly expressive of Old Testament piety, with its minute attention to precept and ceremony. Compare Acts 2:5. [source]
Consolation of Israel []
Compare hope of Israel, Acts 28:20, and Isaiah 40:1. The Messianic blessing of the nation. Of the Messiah himself, Rest. See Isaiah 11:10. A common form of adjuration among the Jews was, So may I see the consolation [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Luke 2:25

Matthew 1:19 A Righteous Man [δικαιος]
Or just, not benignant or merciful. The same adjective is used of Zacharias and Elizabeth (Luke 1:6) and Simeon (Luke 2:25). “An upright man,” the Braid Scots has it. He had the Jewish conscientiousness for the observance of the law which would have been death by stoning (Deuteronomy 22:23). Though Joseph was upright, he would not do that. “As a good Jew he would have shown his zeal if he had branded her with public disgrace” (McNeile). [source]
Mark 15:43 Looking for the Kingdom of God [ην προσδεχομενος την βασιλειαν του τεου]
Periphrastic imperfect. Also Luke 23:51. The very verb used by Luke of Simeon and Anna (Luke 2:25, Luke 2:38). Matthew 27:57 calls him “Jesus‘ disciple” while John 19:38 adds “secretly for fear of the Jews.” He had evidently taken no public stand for Jesus before now.Boldly (τολμησας — tolmēsas). Aorist (ingressive) active participle, becoming bold. It is the glory of Joseph and Nicodemus, secret disciples of Jesus, that they took a bold stand when the rest were in terror and dismay. That is love psychology, paradoxical as it may seem. [source]
Luke 6:24 Consolation [παράκλησις]
From παρά , to the side of, and καλέω , to call or summon. Literally, a calling to one's side to help; and therefore entreaty, passing on into the sense of exhortation, and thence into that of consolatory exhortation; and so coming round to mean that which one is summoned to give to a suppliant - consolation. Thus it embodies the call for help, and the response to the call. Its use corresponds with that of the kindred verb παρακαλέω , to exhort or console. In its original sense of calling for aid the noun appears in the New Testament only in 2 Corinthians 8:4: with much entreaty. The verb appears frequently in this sense, rendered beseech, pray (Matthew 8:34; Matthew 14:36; Mark 1:40; Mark 5:12, etc.). In the sense of consolation or comfort the noun occurs in Luke 2:25; Luke 6:24; 2 Corinthians 1:3; 2 Corinthians 7:4; Philemon 1:7. The verb, in Matthew 2:18; Matthew 5:4:; Luke 16:25; 2 Corinthians 1:4. In some instances, however, the meaning wavers between console and exhort. In the sense of exhortation or counsel, the noun may be found in Acts 13:15; Romans 12:8; Hebrews 13:22. The verb, in Acts 2:40; Acts 11:23; Acts 14:22; Romans 12:8; Titus 2:15. Neither the noun nor the verb appear in the writings of John, but the kindred word παράκλητος the Paraclete, Comforter, or Advocate, is peculiar to him. On this word, see on John 14:16. It should be noted, however, that the word comfort goes deeper than its popular conception of soothing. It is from the later Latin confortare, to make strong. Thus Wycliffe renders Luke 1:80, “the child waxed, and was comforted in spirit” (A. V., waxed strong )and Tyndale, Luke 22:43, “there appeared an angel from heaven comforting him” (A. V., strengthening )The comfort which Christ gives is not always soothing. The Holy Spirit, the Comforter, is to convince of sin and ofjudgment. Underlying the word is the sense of a wise counsel or admonition which rouses and braces the moral nature and encourages and strengthens it to do and to endure. When, therefore, Christ says “they that mourn shall be comforted,” he speaks in recognition of the fact that all sorrow is the outcome of sin, and that true comfort is given, not only in pardon for the past, but in strength to fight and resist and overcome sin. The atmosphere of the word, in short, is not the atmosphere of the sick-chamber, but the tonic breath of the open world, of moral struggle and victory; the atmosphere for him that climbs and toils and fights. [source]
Luke 2:38 Gave thanks [ἀνθωμολογεῖτο]
The verb originally means to make a mutual agreement; and the idea of reciprocity is retained in the expression “to return thanks” for something received. Compare Sept., Luke 2:25. Compare Luke 1:68, and see Isaiah 40:2. [source]
Luke 1:6 Righteous before God [δικαιοι εναντιον του τεου]
Old Testament conception and idiom. Cf. Luke 2:25 about Simeon. Expanded in Old Testament language. Picture of “noblest product of Old Testament education” (Ragg) is Zacharias and Elisabeth, Mary and Joseph, Simeon and Anna who were “privileged to see with clear eyes the dawn of the New Testament revelation.” [source]
Luke 2:38 Gave thanks [αντωμολογειτο]
Imperfect middle of a verb Anna was evidently deeply moved and repeated her thanksgiving and kept speaking These probably all passed away. But they had a happy hour of hope and joy. The late MSS. have “in Jerusalem” but “of Jerusalem” is correct. What they meant by the “redemption of Jerusalem” is not clear, whether political or spiritual or both. Simeon was looking for the consolation of Israel (Luke 2:25) and Zacharias (Luke 1:68) sang of redemption for Israel (Isaiah 40:2). [source]
Acts 9:31 Comfort [παρακλήσει]
From παρακαλέω ,call toward or to one's side for help. The word is rendered in the New Testament both exhortation and consolation. Compare Acts 13:15; Romans 12:8; 2 Corinthians 8:17; Hebrews 12:5; and Luke 2:25(see note); 2 Thessalonians 2:16; Matthew 5:4. In some passages the meaning is disputed, as Philemon 2:1, where, as in 1 Corinthians 14:3, it is joined with παραμύθιον or παραμυθία , the meaning of which also varies between incentive and consolation or assuagement. Here exhortation is the rendering approved by the best authorities, to be construed with was multiplied: was multiplied by the exhortation of the Holy Ghost; i.e., by the Holy Spirit inspiring the preachers, and moving the hearts of the hearers. [source]
Acts 8:2 Devout []
See on Luke 2:25. [source]
Acts 2:5 Devout []
See on Luke 2:25. [source]
Acts 10:22 Righteous [dikaios)]
In the Jewish sense as in Luke 1:6; Luke 2:25. [source]
Acts 2:5 Devout [ευλαβεις]
Reverent See note on Luke 2:25 like Simeon waiting for the consolation of Israel or hoping to die and be buried in the Holy City and also Acts 8:2. [source]
Acts 22:12 A devout man according to the law [ευλαβης κατα τον νομον]
See note on Acts 2:5, note on Acts 8:2, and note on Luke 2:25 for the adjective ευλαβης — eulabēs Paul adds “according to the law” to show that he was introduced to Christianity by a devout Jew and no law-breaker (Lewin). [source]
Acts 8:2 Devout [ευλαβεις]
Only four times in the N.T. (Luke 2:25; Acts 2:5; Acts 8:2; Acts 22:12). Possibly some non-Christian Jews helped. The burial took place before the Christians were chiefly scattered. [source]
Acts 15:14 Symeon [Συμεων]
The Aramaic form of Simon as in 2 Peter 2:1. This little touch would show his affinities with the Jewish Christians (not the Judaizers). This Aramaic form is used also in Luke 2:25, Luke 2:34 of the old prophet in the temple. Possibly both forms (Symeon, Aramaic, and Simon, Greek) were current in Jerusalem. How (κατως — kathōs). Strictly, “according as,” here like ος — hos in indirect discourse somewhat like the epexegetic or explanatory use in 3 Jo Luke 1:3. First Told by Peter in Acts 15:7. James notes, as Peter did, that this experience of Barnabas and Paul is not the beginning of work among the Gentiles. Did visit (επεσκεπσατο — epeskepsato). First aorist middle indicative of επισκεπτομαι — episkeptomai old verb to look upon, to look after, provide for. This same verb occurs in James 1:27 and is one of various points of similarity between this speech of James in Acts and the Epistle of James as shown by Mayor in his Commentary on James. Somehow Luke may have obtained notes of these various addresses. To take from the Gentiles a people for his name Bengel calls this egregium paradoxon, a chosen people This is what is really involved in what took place at Caesarea at the hands of Peter and the campaign of Barnabas and Paul from Antioch. But such a claim of God‘s purpose called for proof from Scripture to convince Jews and this is precisely what James undertakes to give. This new Israel from among the Gentiles is one of Paul‘s great doctrines as set forth in Galatians 3; Romans 9-11. Note the use of God‘s “name” here for “the Israel of God” (Galatians 6:16). [source]
Acts 26:7 Earnestly [εν εκτενειαι]
A late word from εκτεινω — ekteinō to stretch out, only here in N.T., but in papyri and inscriptions. Page refers to Simeon and Anna (Luke 2:25-28) as instances of Jews looking for the coming of the Messiah. Note the accusative of νυκτα και ημεραν — nukta kai hēmeran as in Acts 20:31. Hope to attain (ελπιζει καταντησαι — elpizei katantēsai). This Messianic hope had been the red thread running through Jewish history. Today, alas, it is a sadly worn thread for Jews who refuse to see the Messiah in Jesus. I am accused by Jews The very word used in Acts 23:28 (ενεκαλουν — enekaloun) which see, and by Jews of all people in the world whose mainspring was this very “hope.” It is a tremendously effective turn. [source]
Titus 2:13 Looking for [προσδεχομενοι]
Present middle participle of προσδεχομαι — prosdechomai old verb, the one used of Simeon (Luke 2:25) and others (Luke 2:38) who were looking for the Messiah. [source]
Titus 2:13 Looking for [προσδεχόμενοι]
In Pastorals only here. Comp. Mark 15:43; Luke 2:25; Luke 12:36. In this sense not in Paul. Primarily, to receive to one's self, admit, accept. So Luke 15:2; Romans 16:2; Philemon 2:29. That which is accepted in faith, is awaited expectantly. [source]
Hebrews 10:34 Took joyfully [μετὰ χαρᾶς προσεδέξασθε]
The verb primarily to receive to one's self, accept, as here. Comp. Luke 15:2; Philemon 2:29. Mostly, in N.T. however, to wait for, expect, as Mark 15:43; Luke 2:25, Luke 2:38; Acts 23:21. [source]
Hebrews 5:7 To save him from death [σωζειν εκ τανατου]
A reference to the cry of Jesus in Gethsemane (Matthew 26:39). Having been heard for his godly fear Old word from ευλαβης — eulabēs (taking hold well, Luke 2:25 from ευ λαμβανω — eu class="normal greek">ευλαβεομαι — lambanō the verb eulabeomai in N.T. only in Hebrews 11:7), in N.T. only here and Hebrews 12:28. Fine picture of Christ‘s attitude toward the Father in the prayer in Gethsemane and in all his prayers. Jesus in Gethsemane at once surrendered his will to that of the Father who heard his plea and enabled him to acquiesce in the Father‘s will. [source]
Hebrews 5:7 Having been heard for his godly fear [εισακουστεις απο της ευλαβειας]
Old word from ευλαβης — eulabēs (taking hold well, Luke 2:25 from ευ λαμβανω — eu class="normal greek">ευλαβεομαι — lambanō the verb eulabeomai in N.T. only in Hebrews 11:7), in N.T. only here and Hebrews 12:28. Fine picture of Christ‘s attitude toward the Father in the prayer in Gethsemane and in all his prayers. Jesus in Gethsemane at once surrendered his will to that of the Father who heard his plea and enabled him to acquiesce in the Father‘s will. [source]
Hebrews 5:7 In the days of his flesh [εν ταις ημεραις της σαρκος αυτου]
Here (Hebrews 5:7-9) the author turns to the other requirement of a high priest (human sympathy). Since Jesus was “without sin” (Hebrews 4:15) he did not have to offer sacrifices “for himself,” yet in all other points he felt the sympathy of the human high priest, even more so by reason of his victory over sin. Having offered up Second aorist active (-α — a form) participle of προσπερω — prospherō (cf. Hebrews 5:3). An allusion to the Agony of Christ in Gethsemane. Supplications Socrates, Polybius, Job (Job 40:22) combine this word with δεησεις — deēseis (prayers) as here. The older form was ικεσια — hikesia The word ικετηριος — hiketērios is an adjective from ικετης — hiketēs (a suppliant from ικω — hikō to come to one) and suggests one coming with an olive branch Here only in the N.T. With strong crying and tears See Luke 22:44. for a picture of the scene in Gethsemane (anguish and pathos). No doubt the writer has in mind other times when Jesus shed tears (John 11:35; Luke 19:41), but Gethsemane chiefly. To save him from death A reference to the cry of Jesus in Gethsemane (Matthew 26:39). Having been heard for his godly fear Old word from ευλαβης — eulabēs (taking hold well, Luke 2:25 from ευ λαμβανω — eu class="normal greek">ευλαβεομαι — lambanō the verb eulabeomai in N.T. only in Hebrews 11:7), in N.T. only here and Hebrews 12:28. Fine picture of Christ‘s attitude toward the Father in the prayer in Gethsemane and in all his prayers. Jesus in Gethsemane at once surrendered his will to that of the Father who heard his plea and enabled him to acquiesce in the Father‘s will. [source]
Hebrews 5:7 Having offered up [προσενεγκας]
Second aorist active (-α — a form) participle of προσπερω — prospherō (cf. Hebrews 5:3). An allusion to the Agony of Christ in Gethsemane. Supplications Socrates, Polybius, Job (Job 40:22) combine this word with δεησεις — deēseis (prayers) as here. The older form was ικεσια — hikesia The word ικετηριος — hiketērios is an adjective from ικετης — hiketēs (a suppliant from ικω — hikō to come to one) and suggests one coming with an olive branch Here only in the N.T. With strong crying and tears See Luke 22:44. for a picture of the scene in Gethsemane (anguish and pathos). No doubt the writer has in mind other times when Jesus shed tears (John 11:35; Luke 19:41), but Gethsemane chiefly. To save him from death A reference to the cry of Jesus in Gethsemane (Matthew 26:39). Having been heard for his godly fear Old word from ευλαβης — eulabēs (taking hold well, Luke 2:25 from ευ λαμβανω — eu class="normal greek">ευλαβεομαι — lambanō the verb eulabeomai in N.T. only in Hebrews 11:7), in N.T. only here and Hebrews 12:28. Fine picture of Christ‘s attitude toward the Father in the prayer in Gethsemane and in all his prayers. Jesus in Gethsemane at once surrendered his will to that of the Father who heard his plea and enabled him to acquiesce in the Father‘s will. [source]
Hebrews 5:7 Supplications [ικετηριας]
Socrates, Polybius, Job (Job 40:22) combine this word with δεησεις — deēseis (prayers) as here. The older form was ικεσια — hikesia The word ικετηριος — hiketērios is an adjective from ικετης — hiketēs (a suppliant from ικω — hikō to come to one) and suggests one coming with an olive branch Here only in the N.T. With strong crying and tears See Luke 22:44. for a picture of the scene in Gethsemane (anguish and pathos). No doubt the writer has in mind other times when Jesus shed tears (John 11:35; Luke 19:41), but Gethsemane chiefly. To save him from death A reference to the cry of Jesus in Gethsemane (Matthew 26:39). Having been heard for his godly fear Old word from ευλαβης — eulabēs (taking hold well, Luke 2:25 from ευ λαμβανω — eu class="normal greek">ευλαβεομαι — lambanō the verb eulabeomai in N.T. only in Hebrews 11:7), in N.T. only here and Hebrews 12:28. Fine picture of Christ‘s attitude toward the Father in the prayer in Gethsemane and in all his prayers. Jesus in Gethsemane at once surrendered his will to that of the Father who heard his plea and enabled him to acquiesce in the Father‘s will. [source]
Hebrews 5:7 With strong crying and tears [μετα κραυγης ισχυρας και δακρυων]
See Luke 22:44. for a picture of the scene in Gethsemane (anguish and pathos). No doubt the writer has in mind other times when Jesus shed tears (John 11:35; Luke 19:41), but Gethsemane chiefly. To save him from death A reference to the cry of Jesus in Gethsemane (Matthew 26:39). Having been heard for his godly fear Old word from ευλαβης — eulabēs (taking hold well, Luke 2:25 from ευ λαμβανω — eu class="normal greek">ευλαβεομαι — lambanō the verb eulabeomai in N.T. only in Hebrews 11:7), in N.T. only here and Hebrews 12:28. Fine picture of Christ‘s attitude toward the Father in the prayer in Gethsemane and in all his prayers. Jesus in Gethsemane at once surrendered his will to that of the Father who heard his plea and enabled him to acquiesce in the Father‘s will. [source]
2 Peter 1:1 Simon Peter []
Note the addition of Simon, and see on 1 Peter 1:1. The best-attested orthography is Symeon, which is the form of his name in Acts 15:14, where the account probably came from him. This also is the Hebraic form of the name found in the Septuagint, Revelation href="/desk/?q=re+7:7&sr=1">Revelation 7:7; Luke 2:25, Luke 2:34; Luke 3:30; Acts 13:1. The combined name, Simon Peter, is found Luke 5:8; John 13:6; John 20:2; John 21:15, and elsewhere, though in these instances it is given as Simon; Symeon occurring only in Acts 15:14. While his name is given with greater familiarity than in the first epistle, his official title, servant and apostle, is fuller. This combination, servant and apostle, occurs in no other apostolic salutation. The nearest approach to it is Titus 1:1. [source]

What do the individual words in Luke 2:25 mean?

And behold a man there was in Jerusalem whose name [was] Simeon the man this [was] righteous devout waiting for [the] consolation - of Israel [the] Spirit was Holy upon him
Καὶ ἰδοὺ ἄνθρωπος ἦν ἐν Ἰερουσαλὴμ ὄνομα Συμεών ἄνθρωπος οὗτος δίκαιος εὐλαβής προσδεχόμενος παράκλησιν τοῦ Ἰσραήλ Πνεῦμα ἦν Ἅγιον ἐπ’ αὐτόν

ἰδοὺ  behold 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Imperative Active, 2nd Person Singular
Root: ἰδού  
Sense: behold, see, lo.
ἄνθρωπος  a  man 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἄνθρωπος  
Sense: a human being, whether male or female.
ἦν  there  was 
Parse: Verb, Imperfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: εἰμί  
Sense: to be, to exist, to happen, to be present.
Ἰερουσαλὴμ  Jerusalem 
Parse: Noun, Dative Feminine Singular
Root: Ἰερουσαλήμ  
Sense: denotes either the city itself or the inhabitants.
  whose 
Parse: Personal / Relative Pronoun, Dative Masculine Singular
Root: ὅς 
Sense: who, which, what, that.
ὄνομα  name  [was] 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Neuter Singular
Root: ὄνομα  
Sense: name: univ.
Συμεών  Simeon 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: Συμεών  
Sense: the second son of Jacob by Leah.
ἄνθρωπος  man 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἄνθρωπος  
Sense: a human being, whether male or female.
οὗτος  this 
Parse: Demonstrative Pronoun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: οὗτος  
Sense: this.
δίκαιος  [was]  righteous 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: δίκαιος  
Sense: righteous, observing divine laws.
εὐλαβής  devout 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: εὐλαβής  
Sense: taking hold well.
προσδεχόμενος  waiting  for 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Middle or Passive, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: προσδέχομαι  
Sense: to receive to one’s self, to admit, to give access to one’s self.
παράκλησιν  [the]  consolation 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: παράκλησις  
Sense: a calling near, summons, (esp.
τοῦ  - 
Parse: Article, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
Ἰσραήλ  of  Israel 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: Ἰσραήλ  
Sense: the name given to the patriarch Jacob (and borne by him in addition to his former name).
Πνεῦμα  [the]  Spirit 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Neuter Singular
Root: πνεῦμα  
Sense: a movement of air (a gentle blast.
Ἅγιον  Holy 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Neuter Singular
Root: ἅγιος  
Sense: most holy thing, a saint.
ἐπ’  upon 
Parse: Preposition
Root: ἐπί  
Sense: upon, on, at, by, before.