The Meaning of 2 Corinthians 5:1 Explained

2 Corinthians 5:1

KJV: For we know that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dissolved, we have a building of God, an house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.

YLT: For we have known that if our earthly house of the tabernacle may be thrown down, a building from God we have, an house not made with hands -- age-during -- in the heavens,

Darby: For we know that if our earthly tabernacle house be destroyed, we have a building from God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.

ASV: For we know that if the earthly house of our tabernacle be dissolved, we have a building from God, a house not made with hands, eternal, in the heavens.

What does 2 Corinthians 5:1 Mean?

Verse Meaning

As a tentmaker, Paul compared the human body to a tent. Jesus referred to His body as a temple, and He predicted that God would raise it up ( Mark 14:58; John 2:19-22). Since God had raised up Jesus" "temple," Paul believed that He would also raise our "tents." In ancient times a tent was a familiar symbol of what was transitory. [1] Our physical bodies are only temporary structures, but God is preparing new bodies for us that are superior to anything that human hands can produce and maintain.
Paul earlier indicated that he expected that the Lord would probably return before he died ( 1 Thessalonians 4:15; 1 Thessalonians 4:17; 1 Corinthians 15:51). Here he said that he might die before Jesus Christ returns for His own. Perhaps his recent brush with death in Ephesus made this possibility fresh in his mind ( 2 Corinthians 1:8-11). No Christian can ever be sure which will come first, the Rapture or death. These statements indicate that Paul believed in Jesus" imminent return to take Christians to heaven ( John 14:1-3).
Imminent means overhanging. The doctrine of imminency does not teach that Jesus Christ will come soon but that He could come soon, even before we die. If the Tribulation must precede the Rapture, the Rapture must be at least seven years away, years that will be full of terrible trouble for believers and the whole world. This is not the picture that Paul"s references to the Rapture seem to present.

Context Summary

2 Corinthians 5:1-10 - Longing To Be "at Home With The Lord"
This mortal life is a pilgrimage, and our body is a tent, so slight, so transitory, so easily taken down; but what does it matter, since there is awaiting us a mansion prepared by God? Often in this veil of flesh we groan. It cages us, anchors us down to earth, hampers us with its needs, obstructs our vision, and becomes the medium of temptation. How good it would be if our physical body could be suddenly transmuted into the glorified ethereal body which should be like the resurrection body of our Lord! It would be sweet to escape the wrench of death. But if not, then through death we shall carry with us the germ of the glorified body. That which shall be quickened will first die, but God will give it a body as it shall please Him.
The gate of death may look gloomy on this side, but on the other it is of burnished gold, and opens directly into the presence-chamber of Jesus. We long to see Him and to be with Him; and such desires are the work of the Holy Spirit and the first fruits of heaven. But remember that just inside the door there is Christ's judgment seat, where He will adjudge our life and apportion our reward. Prepare, my soul, to give an account of thy talents! [source]

Chapter Summary: 2 Corinthians 5

1  That in his assured hope of immortal glory,
9  and in expectation of it, he labors to keep a good conscience;
12  not that he may boast of himself,
14  but as one that, having received life from Christ,
17  endeavors to live as a new creature to Christ only,
18  and by his ministry of reconciliation, to reconcile others also in Christ to God

Greek Commentary for 2 Corinthians 5:1

If - be dissolved [εανκαταλυτηι]
Third class condition, εαν — ean and first aorist passive subjunctive. The very word used (καταλυω — kataluō) for striking down a tent. [source]
The earthly house of our tabernacle [η επιγειος ημων οικια του σκηνους]
Rather, “If our earthly (see note on 1 Corinthians 15:40 for επιγειος — epigeios) house of the tent Present indicative. We possess the title to it now by faith. “Faith is the title-deed (υποστασις — hupostasis) to things hoped for” (Hebrews 11:7). A building from God This οικοδομη — oikodomē (found in Aristotle, Plutarch, lxx, etc., and papyri, though condemned by Atticists) is more substantial than the σκηνος — skēnos Not made with hands (αχειροποιητον — acheiropoiēton). Found first in Mark 14:58 in charge against Jesus before the Sanhedrin (both the common verbal χειροποιητον — cheiropoiēton and the newly made vernacular αχειροποιητον — acheiropoiēton same verbal with α — a privative). Elsewhere only here and Colossians 2:11. Spiritual, eternal home. [source]
We have [εχομεν]
Present indicative. We possess the title to it now by faith. “Faith is the title-deed (υποστασις — hupostasis) to things hoped for” (Hebrews 11:7). [source]
A building from God [οικοδομην εκ τεου]
This οικοδομη — oikodomē (found in Aristotle, Plutarch, lxx, etc., and papyri, though condemned by Atticists) is more substantial than the σκηνος — skēnos Not made with hands (αχειροποιητον — acheiropoiēton). Found first in Mark 14:58 in charge against Jesus before the Sanhedrin (both the common verbal χειροποιητον — cheiropoiēton and the newly made vernacular αχειροποιητον — acheiropoiēton same verbal with α — a privative). Elsewhere only here and Colossians 2:11. Spiritual, eternal home. [source]
Not made with hands [αχειροποιητον]
Found first in Mark 14:58 in charge against Jesus before the Sanhedrin (both the common verbal χειροποιητον — cheiropoiēton and the newly made vernacular αχειροποιητον — acheiropoiēton same verbal with α — a privative). Elsewhere only here and Colossians 2:11. Spiritual, eternal home. [source]
Our earthly house of this tabernacle [ἡ ἐπίγειος ἡμῶν οἰκία τοῦ σκήνους]
Earthly, not, made of earth, which would be χοΐ́κός as 1 Corinthians 15:47; but upon the earth, terrestrial, as 1 Corinthians 15:40; Philemon 2:10. Tabernacle ( σκῆνος ) tent or hut. In later writers, especially the Platonists, Pythagoreans, and medical authors, used to denote the body. Thus Hippocrates: “A great vein by which the whole body ( σκῆνος ) is nourished.” Some expositors think that Paul uses the word here simply in this sense - the house which is the body. But while Paul does mean the body, he preserves the figurative sense of the word tabernacle; for he never uses this term elsewhere as synonymous with the body. The figure of the tent suits the contrast with the building, and would naturally suggest itself to the tent-maker. The phrase earthly house of the tabernacle expresses a single conception - the dwelling which is, or consists in the tabernacle, the tent-house. The transient character of the body is thus indicated. Compare houses of clay, Job 4:19. See on the kindred words σκήνωμα tabernacle 2 Peter 1:13; and σκηνόω todwell in or to fix a tabernacle, John 1:14. Tabernacle is so habitually associated with a house of worship, and is so often applied to durable structures, that the original sense of a tent is in danger of being lost. It would be better to translate here by tent. The word tabernacle is a diminutive of the Latin taberna a hut or shed, which appears in tavern. Its root is ta, tan, to stretch or spread out. [source]
Dissolved [καταλυθῇ]
Lit., loosened down. Appropriate to taking down a tent. See on Mark 13:2; see on Luke 9:12; see on Acts 5:38; and compare 2 Peter 3:11, 2 Peter 3:12, and the figure of the parting of the silver cord on which the lamp is suspended, Ecclesiastes 12:6. Also Job 4:21, where the correct rendering is: Is not their tent-cord plucked up within them? So Rev. O.T. [source]
We have []
The building from God is an actual possession in virtue of the believer's union with Christ. It is just as we say of a minor, before he comes into possession of his property, that he has so much. Compare Matthew 19:21. [source]
Building of God [οἰκοδομὴν ἐκ Θεοῦ]
In contrast with tent. The reference is to the resurrection body. Compare the city which hath the foundations, Hebrews 11:10. For of God, read, as Rev., from, God; proceeding from ( ἐκ ) Heinrici, von Gott her: compare God giveth, 1 Corinthians 15:38, and ἔχετε ἀπὸ Θεοῦ yehave from God, where the reference is to the natural body, 1 Corinthians 6:19. Construe from God with building, not with we have. [source]
In the heavens []
Construe with we have. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for 2 Corinthians 5:1

Matthew 5:17 I came not to destroy, but to fulfil [ουκ ηλτον καταλυσαι αλλα πληρωσαι]
The verb “destroy” means to “loosen down” as of a house or tent (2 Corinthians 5:1). Fulfil is to fill full. This Jesus did to the ceremonial law which pointed to him and the moral law he kept. “He came to fill the law, to reveal the full depth of meaning that it was intended to hold” (McNeile). [source]
Mark 14:58 Made with hands [χειροποιητον]
In Mark alone. An old Greek word. The negative form αχειροποιητον — acheiropoiēton here occurs elsewhere only in 2 Corinthians 5:1; Colossians 2:11. In Hebrews 9:11 the negative ου — ou is used with the positive form. It is possible that a real λογιον — logion of Jesus underlies the perversion of it here. Mark and Matthew do not quote the witnesses precisely alike. Perhaps they quoted Jesus differently and therein is shown part of the disagreement, for Mark adds Mark 14:59 (not in Matthew). “And not even so did their witness agree together,” repeating the point of Mark 14:57. Swete observes that Jesus, as a matter of fact, did do what he is quoted as saying in Mark: “He said what the event has proved to be true; His death destroyed the old order, and His resurrection created the new.” But these witnesses did not mean that by what they said. The only saying of Jesus at all like this preserved to us is that in John 2:19, when he referred not to the temple in Jerusalem, but to the temple of his body, though no one understood it at the time. [source]
Mark 3:21 His friends [οι παρ αυτου]
The phrase means literally “those from the side of him (Jesus).” It could mean another circle of disciples who had just arrived and who knew of the crowds and strain of the Galilean ministry who now come at this special juncture. But the idiom most likely means the kinspeople or family of Jesus as is common in the lxx. The fact that in Mark 3:31 “his mother and his brothers” are expressly mentioned would indicate that they are “the friends” alluded to in Mark 3:21. It is a mournful spectacle to think of the mother and brothers saying, He is beside himself Second aorist active indicative intransitive. The same charge was brought against Paul (Acts 26:24; 2 Corinthians 5:13). We say that one is out of his head. Certainly Mary did not believe that Jesus was in the power of Beelzebub as the rabbis said already. The scribes from Jerusalem are trying to discount the power and prestige of Jesus (Mark 3:22). See notes on Matthew 9:32-34; and note on Matthew 10:25; and note on Matthew 12:24 for Beelzebub and Beelzebul. Mary probably felt that Jesus was overwrought and wished to take him home out of the excitement and strain that he might get rest and proper food. See my The Mother of Jesus: Her Problems and Her Glory. The brothers did not as yet believe the pretensions and claims of Jesus (John 7:5). Herod Antipas will later consider Jesus as John the Baptist redivivus, the scribes treat him as under demonic possession, even the family and friends fear a disordered mind as a result of overstrain. It was a crucial moment for Jesus. His family or friends came to take him home, to lay hold of him (kratēsai), forcibly if need be. [source]
Luke 4:38 Taken [συνεχομένη]
Rev., holden. So Wyc. See on Matthew 4:24. The word is used nine times by Luke, and only three times elsewhere. Paul uses it of the constraining of Christ's love (2 Corinthians 5:14), and of being in a strait (Philemon 1:23). In Acts 28:8, it is joined with fever, as here, and is a common medical term in the same sense. [source]
Luke 12:50 Am I straitened []
See on Luke 4:38, and compare 2 Corinthians 5:14; Philemon 1:23. Wyc., constrained. [source]
Luke 6:20 Kingdom of God [ἡ βασιλεία τοῦ θεοῦ]
Matthew has kingdom of heaven, or of the heavens ( τῶν οὐρανῶν )a phrase used by him only, and most frequently employed by Christ himself to describe the kingdom; though Matthew also uses, less frequently, kingdom of God. The two are substantially equivalent terms, though the pre-eminent title was kingdom of God, since it was expected to be fully realized in the Messianic era, when God should take upon himself the kingdom by a visible representative. Compare Isaiah 40:9, “Behold your God. ” The phrase kingdom of Heaven was common in the Rabbinical writings, and had a double signification: the historical kingdom and the spiritual and moral kingdom. They very often understood by it divine worship; adoration of God; the sum of religious duties; but also the Messianic kingdom. The kingdom of God is, essentially, the absolute dominion of God in the universe, both in a physical and a spiritual sense. It is “an organic commonwealth which has the principle of its existence in the will of God” (Tholuck). It was foreshadowed in the Jewish theocracy. The idea of the kingdom advanced toward clearer definition from Jacob's prophecy of the Prince out of Judah (Genesis 49:10), through David's prophecy of the everlasting kingdom and the king of righteousness and peace (Daniel 7:14-27; Daniel 4:25; Daniel 2:44). In this sense it was apprehended by John the Baptist. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
The ideal kingdom is to be realized in the absolute rule of the eternal Son, Jesus Christ, by whom all things are made and consist (John 1:3; Colossians 1:16-20), whose life of perfect obedience to God and whose sacrificial offering of love upon the cross reveal to men their true relation to God, and whose spirit works to bring them into this relation. The ultimate idea of the kingdom is that of “a redeemed humanity, with its divinely revealed destiny manifesting itself in a religious communion, or the Church; asocial communion, or the state; and an aesthetic communion, expressing itself in forms of knowledge and art.”-DIVIDER-
This kingdom is both present (Matthew 11:12; Matthew 12:28; Matthew 16:19; Luke 11:20; Luke 16:16; Luke 17:21; see, also, the parables of the Sower, the Tares, the Leaven, and the Drag-net; and compare the expression “theirs, or yours, is the kingdom,” Matthew 5:3; Luke 6:20) and future (Daniel 7:27; Matthew 13:43; Matthew 19:28; Matthew 25:34; Matthew 26:29; Mark 9:47; 2 Peter 1:11; 1 Corinthians 6:9; Revelation 20:1-15 sq.). As a present kingdom it is incomplete and in process of development. It is expanding in society like the grain of mustard seed (Matthew 13:31, Matthew 13:32); working toward the pervasion of society like the leaven in the lump (Matthew 13:33). God is in Christ reconciling the world unto himself, and the Gospel of Christ is the great instrument in that process (2 Corinthians 5:19, 2 Corinthians 5:20). The kingdom develops from within outward under the power of its essential divine energy and law of growth, which insures its progress and final triumph against all obstacles. Similarly, its work in reconciling and subjecting the world to God begins at the fountain-head of man's life, by implanting in his heart its own divine potency, and thus giving a divine impulse and direction to the whole man, rather than by moulding him from without by a moral code. The law is written in his heart. In like manner the State and the Church are shaped, not by external pressure, like the Roman empire and the Roxnish hierarchy, but by the evolution of holy character in men. The kingdom of God in its present development is not identical with the Church. It is a larger movement which includes the Church. The Church is identified with the kingdom to the degree in which it is under the power of the spirit of Christ. “As the Old Testament kingdom of God was perfected and completed when it ceased to be external, and became internal by being enthroned in the heart, so, on the other hand, the perfection of the New Testament kingdom will consist in its complete incarnation and externalization; that is, when it shall attain an outward manifestation, adequately expressing, exactly corresponding to its internal principle” (Tholuck). The consummation is described in Revelation 21,22. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
[source]

Luke 4:38 Into the house of Simon [εις την οικιαν Σιμωνος]
“Peter‘s house” (Matthew 8:14). “The house of Simon and Andrew” (Mark 1:29). Paul‘s reference to Peter‘s wife (1 Corinthians 9:5) is pertinent. They lived together in Capernaum. This house came also to be the Capernaum home of Jesus.Simon‘s wife‘s mother (πεντερα του Σιμωνος — penthera tou Simōnos). The word πεντερα — penthera for mother-in-law is old and well established in usage. Besides the parallel passages (Mark 1:30; Matthew 8:14; Luke 4:38) it occurs in the N.T. only in Luke 12:53. The corresponding word πεντερος — pentheros father-in-law, occurs in John 18:13 alone in the N.T.Was holden with a great fever Periphrastic imperfect passive, the analytical tense accenting the continuous fever, perhaps chronic and certainly severe. Luke employs this verb nine times and only three others in the N.T. (Matthew 4:24 passive with diseases here; 2 Corinthians 5:14 active; Philemon 1:23 passive). In Acts 28:8 the passive “with dysentery” is like the construction here and is a common one in Greek medical writers as in Greek literature generally. Luke uses the passive with “fear,” Luke 8:37, the active for holding the hands over the ears (Acts 7:57) and for pressing one or holding together (Luke 8:45; Luke 19:43; Luke 22:63), the direct middle for holding oneself to preaching (Acts 18:5). It is followed here by the instrumental case. Hobart (Medical Language of Luke, p. 3) quotes Galen as dividing fevers into “great” (μεγαλοι — megaloi) and “small” (σμικροι — smikroi). [source]
Luke 4:38 Was holden with a great fever [ην συνεχομενη πυρετωι μεγαλωι]
Periphrastic imperfect passive, the analytical tense accenting the continuous fever, perhaps chronic and certainly severe. Luke employs this verb nine times and only three others in the N.T. (Matthew 4:24 passive with diseases here; 2 Corinthians 5:14 active; Philemon 1:23 passive). In Acts 28:8 the passive “with dysentery” is like the construction here and is a common one in Greek medical writers as in Greek literature generally. Luke uses the passive with “fear,” Luke 8:37, the active for holding the hands over the ears (Acts 7:57) and for pressing one or holding together (Luke 8:45; Luke 19:43; Luke 22:63), the direct middle for holding oneself to preaching (Acts 18:5). It is followed here by the instrumental case. Hobart (Medical Language of Luke, p. 3) quotes Galen as dividing fevers into “great” (μεγαλοι — megaloi) and “small” (σμικροι — smikroi). [source]
John 21:1 Shewed [ἐφανέρωσεν]
This rendering might easily convey merely the sense of appearing; but its meaning is much deeper. Occurring frequently in the New Testament, it is used most frequently of God and Christ, or of men in their relation to these. Thus, of Christ in person while upon earth (Mark 16:12, Mark 16:14; John 1:31; John 2:11; 1 Peter 1:20; 1 John 1:2). Of the works of Christ (John 2:11; John 9:3; 1 John 3:5). Of Christ in redemption (1 John 3:5). Of Christ in His second coming (1 John 2:28). Of Christ in glory (1 John 3:2; Colossians 3:4). It is used of God. Of His revelation to men of the knowledge of Himself (Romans 1:19). Of His manifestation in Christ (1 Timothy 3:16). Of His righteousness (Romans 3:21). Of His love (1 John 4:9). It is used of men. As epistles manifesting the character and spirit of Christ (2 Corinthians 3:3; 2 Corinthians 5:11). In the judgment (2 Corinthians 5:10). In all these cases the appearing is not merely an appeal to sense, but is addressed to spiritual perception, and contemplates a moral and spiritual effect. It is the setting forth of the law or will or character of God; of the person or work of Christ; of the character or deeds of men, with a view to the disclosure of their quality and to the producing of a moral impression. Rev., manifested. [source]
John 1:14 Dwelt [ἐσκήνωσεν]
Literally, tabernacled, fixed, or had His tabernacle: from σκηνή , a tent or tabernacle. The verb is used only by John: in the Gospel only here, and in Revelation 7:15; Revelation 12:12; Revelation 13:6; Revelation 21:3. It occurs in classical writings, as in Xenophon, ἐν τῷ πεδίῳ ἐσκήνου , he pitched his tent in the plain (“Anabasis,” vii., 4,11). So Plato, arguing against the proposition that the unjust die by the inherent destructive power of evil, says that “injustice which murders others keeps the murderer alive - aye, and unsleeping too; οὕτω πόῤῥω του ὡς ἔοικεν ἐσκήνωται τοῦ θανάσιμος εἶναι , i.e., literally, so far has her tent been spread from being a house of death” (“Republic,” 610). The figure here is from the Old Testament (Leviticus 27:11; 2 Samuel 7:6; Psalm 78:67sqq.; Ezekiel 37:27). The tabernacle was the dwelling-place of Jehovah; the meeting-place of God and Israel. So the Word came to men in the person of Jesus. As Jehovah adopted for His habitation a dwelling like that of the people in the wilderness, so the Word assumed a community of nature with mankind, an embodiment like that of humanity at large, and became flesh. “That which was from the beginning, we heard, we saw, we beheld, we handled. Our fellowship is with the Father, and with his Son Jesus Christ” (1 John 1:1-3. Compare Philemon 2:7, Philemon 2:8). Some find in the word tabernacle, a temporary structure (see the contrast between σκῆνος , tabernacle, and οἰκοδομή , building, in 2 Corinthians 5:1), a suggestion of the transitoriness of our Lord's stay upon earth; which may well be, although the word does not necessarily imply this; for in Revelation 21:3, it is said of the heavenly Jerusalem “the tabernacle of God is with men, and He will set up His tabernacle ( σκηνώσει ) with them.”-DIVIDER-
Dante alludes to the incarnation in the seventh canto of the “Paradiso:”- “the human species down belowLay sick for many centuries in great error, Till to descend it pleased the Word of God-DIVIDER-
To where the nature, which from its own Maker-DIVIDER-
Estranged itself, He joined to Him in personBy the sole act of His eternal love.” [source]

John 15:13 Than this [ταυτης]
Ablative case after the comparative adjective μειζονα — meizona and feminine agreeing with της αγαπης — tēs agapēs (love) understood. That a man lay down his life Object clause (non-final use of ινα — hina in apposition with the ablative pronoun ταυτης — tautēs and the second aorist active subjunctive of τιτημι — tithēmi). For the phrase see John 10:11 of the good shepherd. Cf. 1 John 3:16; Romans 5:7. For his friends “In behalf of his friends” and so “in place of his friends.” “Self-sacrifice is the high-water mark of love” (Dods). For this use of υπερ — huper see John 11:50; Galatians 3:13; 2 Corinthians 5:14.; Romans 5:7. [source]
John 5:28 In the tombs [εν τοις μνημειοις]
Ταπος — Taphos (grave) presents the notion of burial Jesus claims not only the power of life (spiritual) and of judgment, but of power to quicken the actual dead at the Last Day. They will hear his voice and come out A general judgment and a general bodily resurrection we have here for both good and bad as in Matthew 25:46; Acts 24:15; 2 Corinthians 5:10 and as often implied in the words of Jesus (Matthew 5:29.; Matthew 10:28; Luke 11:32). In John 6:39 Jesus asserts that he will raise up the righteous. [source]
John 8:15 After the flesh [κατα την σαρκα]
According to the standards of the flesh (2 Corinthians 5:16). The Baptist had said: “There stands one among you whom ye know not” (John 1:26). The Light of the World had come, but they loved darkness rather than light (John 3:19), because the god of this age had blinded their thoughts so that they could not see the illumination of the gospel of the glory of Christ who is the image of God (2 Corinthians 4:4). [source]
John 11:50 That it is expedient for you [οτι συμπερει υμιν]
Indirect discourse with present active indicative of συμπερω — sumpherō used with the ινα — hina clause as subject. It means to bear together, to be profitable, with the dative case as here It is to your interest and that is what they cared most for. That one man die Sub-final use of ινα — hina with second aorist active subjunctive of αποτνησκω — apothnēskō as subject clause with συμπερει — sumpherei See John 16:7; John 18:7 for the same construction. For the people υπερ — Huper simply means over, but can be in behalf of as often, and in proper context the resultant idea is “instead of” as the succeeding clause shows and as is clearly so in Galatians 3:13 of the death of Christ and naturally so in 2 Corinthians 5:14.; Romans 5:6. In the papyri υπερ — huper is the usual preposition used of one who writes a letter for one unable to write. And that the whole nation perish not Continuation of the ινα — hina construction with μη — mē and the second aorist subjunctive of απολλυμι — apollumi What Caiaphas has in mind is the giving of Jesus to death to keep the nation from perishing at the hands of the Romans. Politicians are often willing to make a sacrifice of the other fellow. [source]
John 3:16 For so [ουτως γαρ]
This use of γαρ — gar is quite in John‘s style in introducing his comments (John 2:25; John 4:8; John 5:13, etc.). This “Little Gospel” as it is often called, this “comfortable word” (the Anglican Liturgy), while not a quotation from Jesus is a just and marvellous interpretation of the mission and message of our Lord. In John 3:16-21 John recapitulates in summary fashion the teaching of Jesus to Nicodemus. Loved First aorist active indicative of αγαπαω — agapaō the noble word so common in the Gospels for the highest form of love, used here as often in John (John 14:23; John 17:23; 1 John 3:1; 1 John 4:10) of God‘s love for man (cf. 2 Thessalonians 2:16; Romans 5:8; Ephesians 2:4). In John 21:15 John presents a distinction between αγαπαω — agapaō and πιλεω — phileō Αγαπαω — Agapaō is used also for love of men for men (John 13:34), for Jesus (John 8:42), for God (1 John 4:10). The world The whole cosmos of men, including Gentiles, the whole human race. This universal aspect of God‘s love appears also in 2 Corinthians 5:19; Romans 5:8. That he gave The usual classical construction with ωστε — hōste and the indicative (first aorist active) practical result, the only example in the N.T. save that in Galatians 2:13. Elsewhere ωστε — hōste with the infinitive occurs for actual result (Matthew 13:32) as well as purpose (Matthew 10:1), though even this is rare. His only begotten Son “The Son the only begotten.” For this word see note on John 1:14, note on John 1:18; and John 3:18. The rest of the sentence, the purpose clause with ιναεχηι — hina -εις αυτον — echēi precisely reproduces the close of John 3:15 save that εν αυτωι — eis auton takes the place of πιστευων — en autōi (see John 1:12) and goes certainly with εχηι — pisteuōn (not with εν αυτωι — echēi as μη αποληται αλλα — en autōi in John 3:15) and the added clause “should not perish but” The same contrast between “perish” and “eternal life” (for this world and the next) appears also in John 10:28. On “perish” see also John 17:12. [source]
John 6:51 The living bread [ο αρτος ο ζων]
“The bread the living.” Repetition of the claim in John 6:35, John 6:41, John 6:48, but with a slight change from ζωης — zōēs to ζων — zōn (present active participle of ζαω — zaō). It is alive and can give life. See John 4:10 for living water. In Revelation 1:17 Jesus calls himself the Living One For ever Eternally like αιωνιον — aiōnion with ζωην — zōēn in John 6:47. I shall give Emphasis on εγω — egō (I). Superior so to Moses. Is my flesh See note on John 1:14 for σαρχ — sarx the Incarnation. This new idea creates far more difficulty to the hearers who cannot grasp Christ‘s idea of self-sacrifice. For the life of the world Over, in behalf of, υπερ — huper means, and in some connexions instead of as in John 11:50. See John 1:30 for the Baptist‘s picture of Christ as the Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world. See also John 3:17; John 4:42; 1 John 3:16; Matthew 20:28; Galatians 3:13; 2 Corinthians 5:14.; Romans 5:8. Jesus has here presented to this Galilean multitude the central fact of his atoning death for the spiritual life of the world. [source]
Acts 5:38 It will come to naught [καταλυθήσεται]
Lit., be loosened down. Used of the dilapidation of the temple (Luke 21:6), and of the dissolution of the body under the figure of striking a tent (2 Corinthians 5:1). See on Mark 13:2. [source]
Acts 13:43 Urged [πειτω]
Imperfect active of peithō either descriptive (were persuading) or conative (were trying to persuade). Paul had great powers of persuasion (Acts 18:4; Acts 19:8, Acts 19:26; Acts 26:28; Acts 28:23; 2 Corinthians 5:11; Galatians 1:10). These Jews “were beginning to understand for the first time the true meaning of their national history” (Furneaux), “the grace of God” to them. [source]
Acts 22:3 Brought up [ανατετραμμενος]
Perfect passive participle again of ανατρεπω — anatrephō to nurse up, to nourish up, common old verb, but in the N.T. only here, Acts 7:20., and MSS. in Luke 4:16. The implication is that Paul was sent to Jerusalem while still young, “from my youth” (Acts 26:4), how young we do not know, possibly thirteen or fourteen years old. He apparently had not seen Jesus in the flesh (2 Corinthians 5:16). [source]
Acts 13:43 Of the devout proselytes [των σεβομενων προσηλυτων]
Of the worshipping proselytes described in Acts 13:16, Acts 13:25 as “those who fear God” (cf. Acts 16:14) employed usually of the uncircumcised Gentiles who yet attended the synagogue worship, but the word προσηλυτοι — prosēlutoi Yet the rabbis used it also of proselytes of the gate who had not yet become circumcised, probably the idea here. In the N.T. the word occurs only in Matthew 23:15; Acts 2:10; Acts 6:5; Acts 13:43. Many (both Jews and proselytes) followed Imperfect active of peithō either descriptive (were persuading) or conative (were trying to persuade). Paul had great powers of persuasion (Acts 18:4; Acts 19:8, Acts 19:26; Acts 26:28; Acts 28:23; 2 Corinthians 5:11; Galatians 1:10). These Jews “were beginning to understand for the first time the true meaning of their national history” (Furneaux), “the grace of God” to them. [source]
Acts 18:5 Was constrained by the word [συνειχετο τωι λογωι]
This is undoubtedly the correct text and not τωι πνευματι — tōi pneumati of the Textus Receptus, but συνειχετο — suneicheto is in my opinion the direct middle imperfect indicative, not the imperfect passive as the translations have it (Robertson, Grammar, p. 808). Paul held himself together or completely to the preaching instead of just on Sabbaths in the synagogue (Acts 18:4). The coming of Silas and Timothy with the gifts from Macedonia (1 Thessalonians 3:6; 2 Corinthians 11:9; Philemon 4:15) set Paul free from tent-making for a while so that he began to devote himself (inchoative imperfect) with fresh consecration to preaching. See the active in 2 Corinthians 5:14. He was now also assisted by Silas and Timothy (2 Corinthians 1:19). [source]
Acts 20:32 I commend [παρατιτεμαι]
Present middle indicative of παρατιτημι — paratithēmi old verb to place beside, middle, to deposit with one, to interest as in 1 Timothy 1:18; 2 Timothy 2:2. Paul can now only do this, but he does it hopefully. Cf. 1 Peter 4:19. The word of his grace (τωι λογωι της χαριτος αυτου — tōi logōi tēs charitos autou). The instrumentality through preaching and the Holy Spirit employed by God. Cf. Colossians 4:6; Ephesians 4:29. Which is able to build up God works through the word of his grace and so it is able to build up (edify); a favourite Pauline word (1 Corinthians 3:10-14; 1 Corinthians 3:9; 2 Corinthians 5:1; Ephesians 2:20-22; 2 Timothy 3:15; etc.), and James 1:21. The very words “build” and “inheritance among the sanctified” will occur in Ephesians 1:11; Ephesians 3:18 and which some may recall on reading. Cf. Colossians 1:12. Stephen in Acts 7:5 used the word “inheritance” (κληρονομιαν — klēronomian), nowhere else in Acts, but in Ephesians 1:14, Ephesians 1:18; Ephesians 5:5. In Ephesians 1:18 the very expression occurs “his inheritance among the saints “ (την κληρονομιαν αυτου εν τοις αγιοις — tēn klēronomian autou en tois hagiois). [source]
Acts 20:32 Which is able to build up [τωι δυναμενωι οικοδομησαι]
God works through the word of his grace and so it is able to build up (edify); a favourite Pauline word (1 Corinthians 3:10-14; 1 Corinthians 3:9; 2 Corinthians 5:1; Ephesians 2:20-22; 2 Timothy 3:15; etc.), and James 1:21. The very words “build” and “inheritance among the sanctified” will occur in Ephesians 1:11; Ephesians 3:18 and which some may recall on reading. Cf. Colossians 1:12. Stephen in Acts 7:5 used the word “inheritance” (κληρονομιαν — klēronomian), nowhere else in Acts, but in Ephesians 1:14, Ephesians 1:18; Ephesians 5:5. In Ephesians 1:18 the very expression occurs “his inheritance among the saints “ (την κληρονομιαν αυτου εν τοις αγιοις — tēn klēronomian autou en tois hagiois). [source]
Acts 22:3 Born [γεγεννημενος]
Perfect passive participle of γενναω — gennaō See above in Acts 21:39 for the claim of Tarsus as his birth-place. He was a Hellenistic Jew, not an Aramaean Jew (cf. Acts 6:1). Brought up (ανατετραμμενος — anatethrammenos). Perfect passive participle again of ανατρεπω — anatrephō to nurse up, to nourish up, common old verb, but in the N.T. only here, Acts 7:20., and MSS. in Luke 4:16. The implication is that Paul was sent to Jerusalem while still young, “from my youth” (Acts 26:4), how young we do not know, possibly thirteen or fourteen years old. He apparently had not seen Jesus in the flesh (2 Corinthians 5:16). At the feet of Gamaliel The rabbis usually sat on a raised seat with the pupils in a circle around either on lower seats or on the ground. Paul was thus nourished in Pharisaic Judaism as interpreted by Gamaliel, one of the lights of Judaism. For remarks on Gamaliel see chapter Acts 5:34. He was one of the seven Rabbis to whom the Jews gave the highest title αββαν — Rabban (our Rabbi). αββι — Rabbi (my teacher) was next, the lowest being αβ — Rab (teacher). “As Aquinas among the schoolmen was called Doctor Angelicus, and Bonaventura Doctor Seraphicus, so Gamaliel was called the Beauty of the Law ” (Conybeare and Howson). Instructed (πεπαιδευμενος — pepaideumenos). Perfect passive participle again (each participle beginning a clause), this time of παιδευω — paideuō old verb to train a child (παις — pais) as in Acts 7:22 which see. In this sense also in 1 Timothy 1:20; Titus 2:12. Then to chastise as in Luke 23:16, Luke 23:22 (which see); 2 Timothy 2:25; Hebrews 12:6. According to the strict manner Old word, only here in N.T. Mathematical accuracy, minute exactness as seen in the adjective in Acts 26:5. See also Romans 10:2; Galatians 1:4; Philemon 3:4-7. Of our fathers (πατρωιου — patrōiou). Old adjective from πατερ — pater only here and Acts 24:14 in N.T. Means descending from father to son, especially property and other inherited privileges. Πατρικος — Patrikos (patrician) refers more to personal attributes and affiliations. Being zealous for God Not adjective, but substantive zealot (same word used by James of the thousands of Jewish Christians in Jerusalem, Acts 21:20 which see) with objective genitive του τεου — tou theou (for God). See also Acts 21:14; Acts 28:17; 2 Timothy 1:3 where he makes a similar claim. So did Peter (Acts 3:13; Acts 5:30) and Stephen (Acts 7:32). Paul definitely claims, whatever freedom he demanded for Gentile Christians, to be personally “a zealot for God” “even as ye all are this day” In his conciliation he went to the limit and puts himself by the side of the mob in their zeal for the law, mistaken as they were about him. He was generous surely to interpret their fanatical frenzy as zeal for God. But Paul is sincere as he proceeds to show by appeal to his own conduct. [source]
Romans 7:8 Occasion [ἀφορμὴν]
Emphatic, expressing the relation of the law to sin. The law is not sin, but sin found occasion in the law. Used only by Paul. See 2 Corinthians 5:12; Galatians 5:13; 1 Timothy 5:14. The verb ἀφορμάω means to make a start from a place. Ἁφορμή is therefore primarily a starting-point, a base of operations. The Lacedaemonians agreed that Peloponnesus would be ἀφορμὴν ἱκανὴν agood base of operations (Thucydides, i., 90). Thus, the origin, cause, occasion, or pretext of a thing; the means with which one begins. Generally, resources, as means of war, capital in business. Here the law is represented as furnishing sin with the material or ground of assault, “the fulcrum for the energy of the evil principle.” Sin took the law as a base of operations. [source]
Romans 6:6 The body of sin [τὸ σῶμα τῆς ἁμαρτίας]
Σῶμα in earlier classical usage signifies a corpse. So always in Homer and often in later Greek. So in the New Testament, Matthew 6:25; Mark 5:29; Mark 14:8; Mark 15:43. It is used of men as slaves, Revelation 18:13. Also in classical Greek of the sum-total. So Plato: τὸ τοῦ κόσμου σῶμα thesum-total of the world (“Timaeus,” 31). The meaning is tinged in some cases by the fact of the vital union of the body with the immaterial nature, as being animated by the ψυξή soulthe principle of individual life. Thus Matthew 6:25, where the two are conceived as forming one organism, so that the material ministries which are predicated of the one are predicated of the other, and the meanings of the two merge into one another. -DIVIDER-
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In Paul it can scarcely be said to be used of a dead body, except in a figurative sense, as Romans 8:10, or by inference, 2 Corinthians 5:8. Commonly of a living body. It occurs with ψυχή soulonly 1 Thessalonians 5:23, and there its distinction from ψυχή rather than its union with it is implied. So in Matthew 10:28, though even there the distinction includes the two as one personality. It is used by Paul:-DIVIDER-
1. Of the living human body, Romans 4:19; 1 Corinthians 6:13; 1 Corinthians 9:27; 1 Corinthians 12:12-26. -DIVIDER-
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2. Of the Church as the body of Christ, Romans 12:5; 1 Corinthians 12:27; Ephesians 1:23; Colossians 1:18, etc. Σάρξ fleshnever in this sense. -DIVIDER-
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3. Of plants and heavenly bodies, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:40. -DIVIDER-
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4. Of the glorified body of Christ, Philemon 3:21. -DIVIDER-
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5. Of the spiritual body of risen believers, 1 Corinthians 15:44. -DIVIDER-
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It is distinguished from σάρξ fleshas not being limited to the organism of an earthly, living body, 1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38. It is the material organism apart from any definite matter. It is however sometimes used as practically synonymous with σάρξ , 1 Corinthians 7:16, 1 Corinthians 7:17; Ephesians 5:28, Ephesians 5:31; 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11. Compare 1 Corinthians 5:3with Colossians 2:5. An ethical conception attaches to it. It is alternated with μέλη membersand the two are associated with sin (Romans 1:24; Romans 6:6; Romans 7:5, Romans 7:24; Romans 8:13; Colossians 3:5), and with sanctification (Romans 12:1; 1 Corinthians 6:19sq.; compare 1 Thessalonians 4:4; 1 Thessalonians 5:23). It is represented as mortal, Romans 8:11; 2 Corinthians 10:10; and as capable of life, 1 Corinthians 13:3; 2 Corinthians 4:10. -DIVIDER-
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In common with μέλη membersit is the instrument of feeling and willing rather than σάρξ , because the object in such cases is to designate the body not definitely as earthly, but generally as organic, Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. Hence, wherever it is viewed with reference to sin or sanctification, it is the outward organ for the execution of the good or bad resolves of the will. -DIVIDER-
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The phrase body of sin denotes the body belonging to, or ruled by, the power of sin, in which the members are instruments of unrighteousness (Romans 6:13). Not the body as containing the principle of evil in our humanity, since Paul does not regard sin as inherent in, and inseparable from, the body (see Romans 6:13; 2 Corinthians 4:10-12; 2 Corinthians 7:1. Compare Matthew 15:19), nor as precisely identical with the old man, an organism or system of evil dispositions, which does not harmonize with Romans 6:12, Romans 6:13, where Paul uses body in the strict sense. “Sin is conceived as the master, to whom the body as slave belongs and is obedient to execute its will. As the slave must perform his definite functions, not because he in himself can perform no others, but because of His actually subsistent relationship of service he may perform no others, while of himself he might belong as well to another master and render other services; so the earthly σῶμα bodybelongs not of itself to the ἁμαρτία sinbut may just as well belong to the Lord (1 Corinthians 6:13), and doubtless it is de facto enslaved to sin, so long as a redemption from this state has not set in by virtue of the divine Spirit” (Romans 7:24: Dickson).DestroyedSee on Romans 3:3.He that is dead ( ὁ ἀποθανὼν )Rev., literally, he that hath died. In a physical sense. Death and its consequences are used as the general illustration of the spiritual truth. It is a habit of Paul to throw in such general illustrations. See Romans 7:2. [source]

Romans 14:20 Work of God []
The christian brother, whose christian personality is God's work. See 2 Corinthians 5:17; Ephesians 2:10; James 1:18. [source]
Romans 12:1 Bodies []
Literally, but regarded as the outward organ of the will. So, expressly, Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10. Compare Romans 7:5, Romans 7:23. Hence the exhortation to glorify God in the body (1 Corinthians 6:20; compare Philemon 1:20; 2 Corinthians 4:10). So the body is called the body of sin (Romans 6:6; compare Colossians 2:11). In later Greek usage slaves were called σώματα bodiesSee Revelation 18:13. [source]
Romans 7:5 In the flesh [ἐν τῇ σαρκί]
Σάρξ fleshoccurs in the classics in the physical sense only. Homer commonly uses it in the plural as denoting all the flesh or muscles of the body. Later the singular occurs in the same sense. Paul's use of this and other psychological terms must be determined largely by the Old-Testament usage as it appears in the Septuagint. 1. In the physical sense. The literal flesh. In the Septuagint τὰ κρέα flesh(plural) is used where the reference is to the parts of animals slain, and αἱ σάρκες , flesh (plural) where the reference is to flesh as the covering of the living body. Hence Paul uses κρέα in Romans 14:21; 1 Corinthians 8:13, of the flesh of sacrificed animals. Compare also the adjective σάρκιμος fleshy 2 Corinthians 3:3; and Ezekiel 11:19; Ezekiel 36:26, Sept. -DIVIDER-
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2. Kindred. Denoting natural or physical relationship, Romans 1:3; Romans 9:3-8; Romans 11:14; Galatians 4:23, Galatians 4:29; 1 Corinthians 10:18; Philemon 1:16. This usage forms a transition to the following sense: the whole human body. Flesh is the medium in and through which the natural relationship of man manifests itself. Kindred is conceived as based on community of bodily substance. Therefore:-DIVIDER-
3. The body itself. The whole being designated by the part, as being its main substance and characteristic, 1 Corinthians 6:16; 1 Corinthians 7:28; 2 Corinthians 4:11; 2 Corinthians 7:5; 2 Corinthians 10:3; 2 Corinthians 12:7. Romans 2:28; Galatians 6:13, etc. Paul follows the Septuagint in sometimes using σῶμα bodyand sometimes σάρξ fleshin this sense, so that the terms occasionally seem to be practically synonymous. Thus 1 Corinthians 6:16, 1 Corinthians 6:17, where the phrase one body is illustrated and confirmed by one flesh. See Genesis 2:24; Ephesians 5:28, Ephesians 5:31, where the two are apparently interchanged. Compare 2 Corinthians 4:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11; 1 Corinthians 5:3, and Colossians 2:5. Σάρξ , however, differs from σῶμα in that it can only signify the organism of an earthly, living being consisting of flesh and bones, and cannot denote “either an earthly organism that is not living, or a living organism that is not earthly” (Wendt, in Dickson). Σῶμα not thus limited. Thus it may denote the organism of the plant (1 Corinthians 15:37, 1 Corinthians 15:38) or the celestial bodies (1 Corinthians 15:40). Hence the two conceptions are related as general and special: σῶμα bodybeing the material organism apart from any definite matter (not from any sort of matter), σάρξ , flesh, the definite, earthly, animal organism. The two are synonymons when σῶμα is used, from the context, of an earthly, animal body. Compare Philemon 1:22; 2 Corinthians 5:1-8. -DIVIDER-
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Σῶμα bodyand not σάρξ fleshis used when the reference is to a metaphorical organism, as the church, Romans 12:4sqq.; 1 Corinthians 10:16; 12:12-27; Ephesians 1:23; Ephesians 2:16; Colossians 1:18, etc. -DIVIDER-
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The σάρξ is described as mortal (2 Corinthians 4:11); subject to infirmity (Galatians 4:13; 2 Corinthians 12:7); locally limited (Colossians 2:15); an object of fostering care (Ephesians 5:29). -DIVIDER-
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4. Living beings generally, including their mental nature, and with a correlated notion of weakness and perishableness. Thus the phrase πᾶσα σάρξ allflesh (Genesis 6:12; Isaiah 49:26; Isaiah 49:23). This accessory notion of weakness stands in contrast with God. In Paul the phrase all flesh is cited from the Old Testament (Romans 3:20; Galatians 2:16) and is used independently (1 Corinthians 1:29). In all these instances before God is added. So in Galatians 1:16, flesh and blood implies a contrast of human with divine wisdom. Compare 1 Corinthians 15:50; Ephesians 6:12. This leads up to-DIVIDER-
5. Man “either as a creature in his natural state apart from Christ, or the creaturely side or aspect of the man in Christ.” Hence it is correlated with ἄνθρωπος man 1 Corinthians 3:3; Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:17. Compare Romans 6:6; Ephesians 4:22; Colossians 3:9; Galatians 5:24. Thus the flesh would seem to be interchangeable with the old man. -DIVIDER-
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It has affections and lusts (Galatians 5:24); willings (Ephesians 2:3; Romans 8:6, Romans 8:7); a mind (Colossians 2:18); a body (Colossians 2:11). -DIVIDER-
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It is in sharp contrast with πνεῦμα spirit(Galatians 3:3, Galatians 3:19; Galatians 5:16, Galatians 5:17, Galatians 5:19-24; Galatians 6:8; Romans 8:4). The flesh and the spirit are thus antagonistic. Σάρξ fleshbefore or in contrast with his reception of the divine element whereby he becomes a new creature in Christ: the whole being of man as it exists and acts apart from the influence of the Spirit. It properly characterizes, therefore, not merely the lower forms of sensual gratification, but all - the highest developments of the life estranged from God, whether physical, intellectual, or aesthetic. -DIVIDER-
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It must be carefully noted:-DIVIDER-
1. That Paul does not identify flesh and sin. Compare, flesh of sin, Romans 8:3. See Romans 7:17, Romans 7:18; 2 Corinthians 7:1; Galatians 2:20. -DIVIDER-
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2. That Paul does not identify σάρξ withthe material body nor associate sin exclusively and predominantly with the body. The flesh is the flesh of the living man animated by the soul ( ψυχή ) as its principle of life, and is distinctly used as coordinate with ἄνθρωπος manAs in the Old Testament, “it embraces in an emphatic manner the nature of man, mental and corporeal, with its internal distinctions.” The spirit as well as the flesh is capable of defilement (2 Corinthians 7:1; compare 1 Corinthians 7:34). Christian life is to be transformed by the renewing of the mind (Romans 12:2; compare Ephesians 4:23). -DIVIDER-
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3. That Paul does not identify the material side of man with evil. The flesh is not the native seat and source of sin. It is only its organ, and the seat of sin's manifestation. Matter is not essentially evil. The logical consequence of this would be that no service of God is possible while the material organism remains. See Romans 12:1. The flesh is not necessarily sinful in itself; but as it has existed from the time of the introduction of sin through Adam, it is recognized by Paul as tainted with sin. Jesus appeared in the flesh, and yet was sinless (2 Corinthians 5:21).The motions of sins ( τὰ παθήματα τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν )Motions used in earlier English for emotions or impulses. Thus Bacon: “He that standeth at a stay where others rise, can hardly avoid motions of envy” (“Essay” xiv.). The word is nearly synonymous with πάθος passion(Romans 1:26, note). From πάθειν tosuffer; a feeling which the mind undergoes, a passion, desire. Rev., sinful passions: which led to sins.Did work ( ἐνηργεῖτο )Rev., wrought. See 2 Corinthians 1:6; 2 Corinthians 4:12; Ephesians 3:20; Galatians 5:6; Philemon 2:13; Colossians 1:29. Compare Mark 6:14, and see on power, John 1:12. [source]

Romans 5:10 We were reconciled to God [καταλλάγημεν τῷ Θεῷ]
The verb means primarily to exchange; and hence to change the relation of hostile parties into a relation of peace; to reconcile. It is used of both mutual and one-sided enmity. In the former case, the context must show on which side is the active enmity. In the Christian sense, the change in the relation of God and man effected through Christ. This involves, 1. A movement of God toward man with a view to break down man's hostility, to commend God's love and holiness to him, and to convince him of the enormity and the consequence of sin. It is God who initiates this movement in the person and work of Jesus Christ. See Romans 5:6, Romans 5:8; 2 Corinthians 5:18, 2 Corinthians 5:19; Ephesians 1:6; 1 John 4:19. Hence the passive form of the verb here: we were made subjects of God's reconciling 1John href="/desk/?q=1jo+1:3&sr=1">1 John 1:3, 1 John 1:7. Thus there is complete reconciliation. See, further, on Romans 3:25, Romans 3:26. -DIVIDER-
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[source]

Romans 12:7 Ministering [διακονίᾳ]
Let us wait on is supplied. Lit., or ministry in our ministry. The word appears in the New Testament always in connection with the service of the Christian Church, except Luke 10:40, of Martha's serving; Hebrews 1:14, of the ministry of angels, and 2 Corinthians 3:7, of the ministry of Moses. Within this limit it is used, 1. Of service in general, including all forms of christian ministration tending to the good of the christian body (1 Corinthians 12:5; Ephesians 4:13; 2 Timothy 4:11). Hence, 2. Of the apostolic office and its administration; (a) generally (Acts 20:24; 2 Corinthians 4:1; 1 Timothy 1:12); or (b) defined as a ministry of reconciliation, of the word, of the Spirit, of righteousness (2 Corinthians 5:18; Acts 6:4; 2 Corinthians 3:8, 2 Corinthians 3:9). It is not used of the specific office of a deacon; but the kindred word διάκονος occurs in that sense (Philemon 1:1; 1 Timothy 3:8, 1 Timothy 3:12). As the word is employed in connection with both the higher and lower ministrations in the Church (see Acts 6:1, Acts 6:4), it is difficult to fix its precise meaning here; yet as it is distinguished here from prophecy, exhortation, and teaching, it may refer to some more practical, and, possibly, minor form of ministry. Moule says: “Almost any work other than that of inspired utterance or miracle-working may be included in it here.” So Godet: “An activity of a practical nature exerted in action, not in word.” Some limit it to the office of deacon. [source]
Romans 1:21 Heart [καρδία]
The heart is, first, the physical organ, the center of the circulation of the blood. Hence, the seat and center of physical life. In the former sense it does not occur in the New Testament. As denoting the vigor and sense of physical life, see Acts 14:17; James 5:5; Luke 21:34. It is used fifty-two times by Paul. Never used like ψυχή , soul, to denote the individual subject of personal life, so that it can be exchanged with the personal pronoun (Acts 2:43; Acts 3:23; Romans 13:1); nor like πνεῦμα spiritto denote the divinely-given principle of life. -DIVIDER-
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It is the central seat and organ of the personal life ( ψυχή ) of man regarded in and by himself. Hence it is commonly accompanied with the possessive pronouns, my, his, thy, etc. -DIVIDER-
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Like our heart it denotes the seat of feeling as contrasted with intelligence. 2 Corinthians 2:4; Romans 9:2; Romans 10:1; 2 Corinthians 6:11; Philemon 1:7. But it is not limited to this. It is also the seat of mental action, feeling, thinking, willing. It is used - -DIVIDER-
1. Of intelligence, Romans 1:21; 2 Corinthians 3:15; 2 Corinthians 4:6; Ephesians 1:18. -DIVIDER-
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2. Of moral choice, 1 Corinthians 7:37; 2 Corinthians 9:7. -DIVIDER-
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3. As giving impulse and character to action, Romans 6:17; Ephesians 6:5; 2 Corinthians 3:2-3; 1 Timothy 1:5; 2 Timothy 2:22. The work of the law is written on the heart, Romans 2:15. The Corinthian Church is inscribed as Christ's epistle on hearts of flesh, Colossians 3:22. -DIVIDER-
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4. Specially, it is the seat of the divine Spirit, Galatians 4:6; Romans 5:5; 2 Corinthians 1:22. It is the sphere of His various operations, directing, comforting, establishing, etc., Philemon 4:7; Colossians 3:15; 1 Thessalonians 3:13; 2 Thessalonians 2:17; 2 Thessalonians 3:5. It is the seat of faith, and the organ of spiritual praise, Romans 10:9; Ephesians 5:19; Colossians 3:16. -DIVIDER-
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It is equivalent to the inner man, Ephesians 3:16, Ephesians 3:17. Its characteristic is being hidden, Romans 2:28, Romans 2:29; Romans 8:27; 1 Corinthians 4:5; 1 Corinthians 14:25. -DIVIDER-
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It is contrasted with the face, 1 Thessalonians 2:17; 2 Corinthians 5:12; and with the mouth, Romans 10:8. -DIVIDER-
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[source]

Romans 12:3 Not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think [μη υπερπρονειν παρ ο δει προνειν]
Indirect negative command after λεγω — legō (I say). Play on the two infinitives προνειν — phronein to think, and υπερπρονειν — huperphronein (old verb from υπερπρων — huperphrōn over-proud, here only in N.T.) to “over-think” with παρ ο — par' ho (beyond what) added. Then another play on προνειν — phronein and σωπρονειν — sōphronein (old verb from σωπρων — sōphrōn sober-minded), to be in one‘s right mind (Mark 5:15; 2 Corinthians 5:13). Self-conceit is here treated as a species of insanity. [source]
Romans 14:10 Or thou again [η και συ]
Referring to the “strong” brother. Shall stand before (παραστησομετα — parastēsometha). Future middle of παριστημι — paristēmi and intransitive, to stand beside (παρα — para) with the locative case (τωι βεματι — tōi bemati the judgment seat) as in Acts 27:24. See the same figure of God in 2 Corinthians 5:10. [source]
Romans 14:10 Shall stand before [παραστησομετα]
Future middle of παριστημι — paristēmi and intransitive, to stand beside (παρα — para) with the locative case (τωι βεματι — tōi bemati the judgment seat) as in Acts 27:24. See the same figure of God in 2 Corinthians 5:10. [source]
Romans 2:5 Wrath [οργην]
For such a Jew as already stated for the Gentile (Romans 1:18). There is a revelation See note on 2 Thessalonians 1:5 for δικαιας κρισεως — dikaias kriseōs Paul looks to the judgment day as certain (cf. 2 Corinthians 5:10-12), the day of the Lord (2 Corinthians 1:14). [source]
Romans 5:10 We were reconciled to God [κατηλλαγημεν τωι τεωι]
Second aorist passive indicative of καταλλασσω — katallassō for which great Pauline word see note on 2 Corinthians 5:18. The condition is the first class. Paul does not conceive it as his or our task to reconcile God to us. God has attended to that himself (Romans 3:25.). We become reconciled to God by means of the death of God‘s Son. “Much more” again we shall be saved “by his life” “In his life,” for he does live, “ever living to intercede for them” (Hebrews 7:25). [source]
Romans 7:8 Finding occasion [απορμην λαβουσα]
See note on 2 Corinthians 5:12; 2 Corinthians 11:12; Galatians 5:13 for απορμην — aphormēn a starting place from which to rush into acts of sin, excuses for doing what they want to do. Just so drinking men use the prohibition laws as “occasions” for violating them. [source]
Romans 9:11 Neither having done anything good or bad [μηδε πραχαντων τι αγατον η παυλον]
Genitive absolute again with first active participle of πρασσω — prassō On παυλον — phaulon see note on 2 Corinthians 5:10. The purpose of God (η προτεσις του τεου — hē prothesis tou theou). See note on Romans 8:28 for προτεσις — prothesis According to election Old word from εκλεγω — eklegō to select, to choose out. See note on 1 Thessalonians 1:4. Here it is the purpose Not of merit. [source]
Romans 12:1 By the mercies [δια των οικτιρμων]
“By means of the mercies of God” as shown in his argument and in our lives. See note on 2 Corinthians 1:3 for “the Father of mercies.” To present (παραστησαι — parastēsai). First aorist active infinitive of παριστημι — paristēmi for which verb see note on Romans 6:13, a technical term for offering a sacrifice (Josephus, Ant. IV. 6, 4), though not in the O.T. Used of presenting the child Jesus in the temple (Luke 2:22), of the Christian presenting himself (Romans 6:13), of God presenting the saved (Ephesians 5:27), of Christ presenting the church (Colossians 1:28). Bodies So literally as in Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10 and in contrast with νους — nous (mind) in Romans 12:2. A living sacrifice (τυσιαν ζωσαν — thusian zōsan). In contrast with the Levitical sacrifices of slain animals. Cf. Romans 6:8, Romans 6:11, Romans 6:13. Not a propitiatory sacrifice, but one of praise. Acceptable “Well-pleasing.” See note on 2 Corinthians 5:9. Which is your reasonable service (tēn logikēn humōn latreian). “Your rational (spiritual) service (worship).” For latreia see note on Romans 9:4. την λογικην υμων λατρειαν — Logikos is from λατρεια — logos reason. The phrase means here “worship rendered by the reason (or soul).” Old word, in N.T. only here and 1 Peter 2:2 Λογικος — to logikon gala (not logical milk, but the milk nourishing the soul). [source]
Romans 12:1 Bodies [σωματα]
So literally as in Romans 6:13, Romans 6:19; 2 Corinthians 5:10 and in contrast with νους — nous (mind) in Romans 12:2. A living sacrifice (τυσιαν ζωσαν — thusian zōsan). In contrast with the Levitical sacrifices of slain animals. Cf. Romans 6:8, Romans 6:11, Romans 6:13. Not a propitiatory sacrifice, but one of praise. Acceptable “Well-pleasing.” See note on 2 Corinthians 5:9. Which is your reasonable service (tēn logikēn humōn latreian). “Your rational (spiritual) service (worship).” For latreia see note on Romans 9:4. την λογικην υμων λατρειαν — Logikos is from λατρεια — logos reason. The phrase means here “worship rendered by the reason (or soul).” Old word, in N.T. only here and 1 Peter 2:2 Λογικος — to logikon gala (not logical milk, but the milk nourishing the soul). [source]
Romans 2:5 And impenitent heart [και αμετανοητον καρδιαν]
See μετανοιαν — metanoian just before. “Thy unreconstructed heart,” “with no change in the attitude of thy heart.” Treasurest up for thyself (τησαυριζεις σεαυτωι — thēsaurizeis seautōi). See for τησαυριζω — thēsaurizō on Matthew 6:19.; Luke 12:21; 2 Corinthians 12:14. Dative case σεαυτωι — seautōi (for thyself) with a touch of irony (Vincent). Wrath For such a Jew as already stated for the Gentile (Romans 1:18). There is a revelation See note on 2 Thessalonians 1:5 for δικαιας κρισεως — dikaias kriseōs Paul looks to the judgment day as certain (cf. 2 Corinthians 5:10-12), the day of the Lord (2 Corinthians 1:14). [source]
1 Corinthians 9:27 Bring it into subjection [δουλαγωγῶ]
Rev., bring in into bondage. Metaphor of captives after battle. Not of leading the vanquished round the arena (so Godet), a custom of which there is no trace, and which, in most cases, the condition of the vanquished would render impossible. It is rather one of those sudden changes and mixtures of metaphor so frequent in Paul's writings. See, for instance, 2 Corinthians 5:1, 2 Corinthians 5:2. [source]
1 Corinthians 15:53 This corruptible []
As if pointing to his own body. Compare these hands, Acts 20:34; this tabernacle, 2 Corinthians 5:1. [source]
1 Corinthians 5:7 A new lump [νεον πυραμα]
Make a fresh start as a new community with the contamination removed. Νεος — Neos is the root for νεανισκος — neaniskos a young man, not yet old So new wine Καινος — Kainos is fresh as compared with the ancient See the distinction in Colossians 3:10; Ephesians 4:22.; 2 Corinthians 5:17. Unleavened (αζυμοι — azumoi). Without (α — a privative) leaven, the normal and ideal state of Christians. Rare word among the ancients (once in Plato). They are a new creation (καινη κτισις — kainē ktisis), “exemplifying Kant‘s maxim that you should treat a man as if he were what you would wish him to be” (Robertson and Plummer). For our passover also hath been sacrificed, even Christ First aorist passive indicative of τυω — thuō old verb to sacrifice. Euphony of consonants, τ — th to τ — t because of τη — ̇thē Reference to the death of Christ on the Cross as the Paschal Lamb (common use of πασχα — pascha as Mark 14:12; Luke 22:7), the figure used long before by the Baptist of Jesus (John 1:29). Paul means that the Lamb was already slain on Calvary and yet you have not gotten rid of the leaven. [source]
1 Corinthians 7:11 Or else be reconciled to her husband [η τωι ανδρι καταλλαγητω]
Second aorist (ingressive) passive imperative of καταλλασσω — katallassō old compound verb to exchange coins as of equal value, to reconcile. One of Paul‘s great words for reconciliation with God (2 Corinthians 5:18-20; Romans 5:10). Διαλλασσω — Diallassō (Matthew 5:24 which see) was more common in the older Greek, but καταλλασσω — katallassō in the later. The difference in idea is very slight, δια — diȧ accents notion of exchange, κατ — kaṫ the perfective idea (complete reconciliation). Dative of personal interest is the case of ανδρι — andri This sentence is a parenthesis between the two infinitives χωριστηναι — chōristhēnai and απιεναι — aphienai (both indirect commands after παραγγελλω — paraggellō). And that the husband leave not his wife (και ανδρα μη απιεναι — kai andra mē aphienai). This is also part of the Lord‘s command (Mark 10:11). Απολυω — Apoluō occurs in Mark of the husband‘s act and απιεναι — aphienai here, both meaning to send away. Bengel actually stresses the difference between χωριστηναι — chōristhēnai of the woman as like separatur in Latin and calls the wife “pars ignobilior” and the husband “nobilior.” I doubt if Paul would stand for that extreme. [source]
2 Corinthians 5:2 From heaven [ἐξ οὐρανοῦ]
As from God, 2 Corinthians 5:1. [source]
2 Corinthians 5:2 House [οἰκητήριον]
Not οἰκία houseas 2 Corinthians 5:1. This word regards the house with special reference to its inhabitant. The figure links itself with building, 2 Corinthians 5:1, as contrasted with the unstable tent. [source]
2 Corinthians 5:19 God []
Emphatic. It was God, as in 2 Corinthians 5:18. [source]
2 Corinthians 6:8 Deceivers []
See 2 Corinthians 2:17; 2 Corinthians 4:2. The opinions concerning Paul as a deceiver are mirrored in the Clementine Homilies and Recognitions, spurious writings, ascribed to Clement of Rome, but emanating from the Ebionites, a Judaizing sect, in the latter half of the second century. In these Paul is covertly attacked, though his name is passed over in silence. His glory as the apostle to the Gentiles is passed over to Peter. The readers are warned, in the person of Peter, to beware of any teacher who does not conform to the standard of James, and come with witnesses (compare 2 Corinthians 3:1; 2 Corinthians 5:12; 2 Corinthians 10:12-18). Paul is assailed under the guise of Simon Magus, and with the same words as those in this passage, deceiver and unknown. [source]
2 Corinthians 1:11 By means of many [εκ πολλων προσωπων]
Προσωπον — Prosōpon means face The word is common in all Greek. The papyri use it for face, appearance, person. It occurs twelve times in II Corinthians. It certainly means face in eight of them (2 Corinthians 3:7, 2 Corinthians 3:13, 2 Corinthians 3:18; 2 Corinthians 8:24; 2 Corinthians 10:1, 2 Corinthians 10:7; 2 Corinthians 11:20). In 2 Corinthians 5:12 it means outward appearance. It may mean face or person here, 2 Corinthians 2:10; 2 Corinthians 4:6. It is more pictorial to take it here as face “that out of many upturned faces” thanks may be given It is indeed a difficult sentence to understand. [source]
2 Corinthians 11:12 That I may cut off occasion [ινα εκκοπσω την απορμην]
Purpose clause with ινα — hina and first aorist active subjunctive of εκκοπτω — ekkoptō old verb to cut out or off (Matthew 3:10; Matthew 5:30). See note on 2 Corinthians 5:12 for απορμην — aphormēn [source]
2 Corinthians 5:11 The fear of the Lord [τον ποβον του Κυριου]
Many today regard this a played-out motive, but not so Paul. He has in mind 2 Corinthians 5:10 with the picture of the judgment seat of Christ. [source]
2 Corinthians 5:14 The love of Christ [η αγαπη του Χριστου]
Subjective genitive, Christ‘s love for Paul as shown by 2 Corinthians 5:15. [source]
2 Corinthians 7:14 If - I have gloried [εικεκαυχημαι]
Condition of first class. On this verb see note on 1 Corinthians 3:21; 2 Corinthians 5:12. [source]
2 Corinthians 5:16 After the flesh [κατα σαρκα]
According to the flesh, the fleshy way of looking at men. He, of course, knows men “in the flesh Concessive clause (ει και — ei kai if even or also) with perfect active indicative. Paul admits that he had once looked at Christ κατα σαρκα — kata sarka but now no longer does it. Obviously he uses κατα σαρκα — kata sarka in precisely the same sense that he did in 2 Corinthians 5:15 about men. He had before his conversion known Christ κατα σαρκα — kata sarka according to the standards of the men of his time, the Sanhedrin and other Jewish leaders. He had led the persecution against Jesus till Jesus challenged and stopped him (Acts 9:4). That event turned Paul clean round and he no longer knows Christ in the old way κατα σαρκα — kata sarka Paul may or may not have seen Jesus in the flesh before his death, but he says absolutely nothing on that point here. [source]
Galatians 6:15 A new creature [καινὴ κτίσις]
Comp. 2 Corinthians 5:17. For καινὴ newsee on Matthew 26:29. For κτίσις see on Romans 8:19; see on 2 Corinthians 5:17. Here of the thing created, not of the act of creating. The phrase was common in Jewish writers for one brought to the knowledge of the true God. Comp. Ephesians 2:10, Ephesians 2:15. [source]
Galatians 2:6 God accepteth no man's person []
Or more strictly, accepteth not the person of man. Parenthetical. Λαμβάνειν πρόσωπον toreceive or accept the face is a Hebraism. See on James 2:1. In O.T. both in a good and a bad sense; to be gracious, and to show favor from personal or partisan motives. In N.T. only here and Luke 20:21, both in a bad sense. Similar Hebraistic expressions are βλέπειν εἰς πρόσωπον tolook at the face, Matthew 22:16: θαυμάζειν πρόσωπα toadmire the countenances, Judges 1:16: καυχᾶσθαι ἐν προσώπῳ toglory in the face, 2 Corinthians 5:12. [source]
Galatians 2:18 I make myself [ἐμαυτὸν συνιστάνω]
Better, prove myself. The verb originally means to put together: thence to put one person in contact with another by way of introducing him and bespeaking for him confidence and approval. To commend, as Romans 16:1; comp. Romans 5:8; 2 Corinthians 3:1; 2 Corinthians 4:2; 2 Corinthians 5:12. As proof, or exhibition of the true state of a case is furnished by putting things together, the word comes to mean demonstrate, exhibit the fact, as here, Romans 3:5; 2 Corinthians 6:11. [source]
Galatians 2:18 I build again the things which I destroyed [ἃ κατέλυσα ταῦτα πάλιν οἰκοδομῶ]
Peter, by his Christian profession, had asserted that justification was by faith alone; and by his eating with Gentiles had declared that the Mosaic law was no longer binding upon him. He had thus, figuratively, destroyed or pulled down the Jewish law as a standard of Christian faith and conduct. By his subsequent refusal to eat with Gentiles he had retracted this declaration, had asserted that the Jewish law was still binding upon Christians, and had thus built again what he had pulled down. Building and pulling down are favorite figures with Paul. See Romans 14:20; Romans 15:20; 1 Corinthians 8:1, 1 Corinthians 8:10; 1 Corinthians 10:23; 1 Corinthians 14:17; Ephesians 2:20f. For καταλύειν destroysee on Romans 14:20; see on 2 Corinthians 5:1. [source]
Galatians 1:10 Am I persuading? [πειτω]
Conative present, trying to persuade like ζητω αρεσκειν — zētō areskein (seeking to please) where the effort is stated plainly. See note on 2 Corinthians 5:11. [source]
Galatians 5:13 Only use not [μονον μη]
No word for “use” in the Greek. Probably supply τρεπετε — trepete or στρεπετε — strephete “turn not your liberty into an occasion for the flesh” (εις απορμην τηι σαρκι — eis aphormēn tēi sarki), as a spring board for license. On απορμη — aphormē see note on 2 Corinthians 5:12. Liberty so easily turns to license. [source]
Galatians 6:14 Hath been crucified unto me [εμοι εσταυρωται]
Perfect passive indicative of σταυροω — stauroō stands crucified, with the ethical dative again This is one of the great sayings of Paul concerning his relation to Christ and the world in contrast with the Judaizers. Cf. Galatians 2:19.; Galatians 3:13; Galatians 4:4.; 1 Corinthians 1:23.; Romans 1:16; Romans 3:21.; Romans 4:25; Romans 5:18. World (κοσμος — kosmos) has no article, but is definite as in 2 Corinthians 5:19. Paul‘s old world of Jewish descent and environment is dead to him (Philemon 3:3.). [source]
Galatians 6:14 World [κοσμος]
(κοσμος — kosmos) has no article, but is definite as in 2 Corinthians 5:19. Paul‘s old world of Jewish descent and environment is dead to him (Philemon 3:3.). [source]
Galatians 6:15 A new creature [καινη κτισις]
For this phrase see note on 2 Corinthians 5:17. [source]
Philippians 3:19 Earthly things [τὰ ἐπίγεια]
See on 2 Corinthians 5:1. Compare Colossians 3:2. [source]
Philippians 1:23 I am in a strait betwixt two [συνέχομαι ἐκ τῶν δύο]
See on 2 Corinthians 5:14. The picture is that of a man pressed on both sides. Lit. I am held together, so that I cannot incline either way. Betwixt two, lit., from the two. The pressure comes from both sides. Note the article, the two, the two considerations just mentioned, departing or abiding in the flesh. [source]
Philippians 1:21 Gain []
As consummating the union with Christ. Compare Colossians 3:4; 2 Corinthians 5:1-8.“Declare unto him if the light wherewithBlossoms your substance shall remain with you Eternally the same that it is now,-DIVIDER-
And if it do remain, say in what manner,-DIVIDER-
After ye are again made visible,-DIVIDER-
It can be that it injure not your sight. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
As by a greater gladness urged and drawn-DIVIDER-
They who are dancing in a ring sometimes-DIVIDER-
Uplift their voices and their motions quicken;-DIVIDER-
So, at that orison devout and prompt,-DIVIDER-
The holy circles a new joy displayed-DIVIDER-
In their revolving and their wondrous song. -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
Who so lamenteth him that here we die-DIVIDER-
That we may live above, has never there-DIVIDER-
Seen the refreshment of the eternal rain.”Dante, “Paradiso,” 14, 13-27. [source]

Philippians 2:1 Comfort of love [παραμύθιον]
Rev., consolation. Only here in the New Testament. From παρά besideand μῦθος speechor word. Παρὰ has the same force as in παράκλησις exhortation(see on Luke 6:24); a word which comes to the side of one to stimulate or comfort him; hence an exhortation, an encouragement. So Plato: “Let this, then, be our exhortation concerning marriage” (“Laws,” 773). A motive of persuasion or dissuasion. Plato, speaking of the fear of disgrace, or of ill-repute, says. “The obedient nature will readily yield to such incentives ” (“Laws,” 880). Also an assuagement or abatement. So Sophocles: “Offspring of the noble, ye are come as the assuagement of my woes” (“Electra,” 130). Plato: “They say that to the rich are many consolations ” (“Republic,” 329). Plato also calls certain fruits stimulants ( παραμυθία ) of a sated appetite (“Critias,” 115). Here in the sense of incentive. As related to exhortation, exhortation uses incentive as a ground of appeal. Christ exhorts, appealing to love. Compare Phlippians 1:9sqq. See Romans 5:8; 1 Corinthians 13:4; 2 Corinthians 5:14; Galatians 5:13; Ephesians 5:2; 1 John 4:16, etc. The two verbs kindred to exhortation and incentive occur together at 1 Thessalonians 2:11. See on 1 Corinthians 14:3. Render here, if any incentive of love. [source]
Philippians 1:23 To depart [ἀναλῦσαι]
The verb means originally to unloose, undo again. So of Penelope's web: “During the night she undid it” (Homer, “Odyssey,” ii., 105). Of loosing a ship from her moorings: of breaking up a camp. So 2Corinthians href="/desk/?q=2co+5:1&sr=1">2 Corinthians 5:1, where the metaphor is the striking of a tent. Some prefer the nautical image, casting off from shore; but Paul's circumstances naturally suggested military figures; and, what is somewhat strange in the case of one so familiar with the sea, nautical metaphors are rare in his writings. There is one at 1 Timothy 1:19, of those “who concerning the faith have made shipwreck;” at Ephesians 4:14, “tossed as by waves, and borne about by every wind.” Κυβερνήσεις governments 1 Corinthians 12:28(see note), is from κυβερνάω tosteer. [source]
Philippians 1:23 To depart [εις το αναλυσαι]
Purpose clause, εις το — eis to and the aorist active infinitive αναλυσαι — analusai old compound verb, to unloose (as threads), to break up, to return (Luke 12:36, only other N.T. example), to break up camp (Polybius), to weigh anchor and put out to sea, to depart (often in old Greek and papyri). Cf. καταλυω — kataluō in 2 Corinthians 5:1 for tearing down the tent. [source]
Philippians 1:23 Betwixt the two [εκ των δυο]
“From the two (sides).” Pressure to live on, pressure to die and be with Christ. To depart (εις το αναλυσαι — eis to analusai). Purpose clause, εις το — eis to and the aorist active infinitive αναλυσαι — analusai old compound verb, to unloose (as threads), to break up, to return (Luke 12:36, only other N.T. example), to break up camp (Polybius), to weigh anchor and put out to sea, to depart (often in old Greek and papyri). Cf. καταλυω — kataluō in 2 Corinthians 5:1 for tearing down the tent. Very far better Double comparative (triple Lightfoot calls it because of πολλωι — pollōi) like Isocrates and the Koiné{[28928]}š often. See note on 2 Corinthians 7:13 for περισσοτερως μαλλον — perissoterōs mallon Πολλωι — Pollōi is the instrumental case of measure (by much). [source]
Colossians 2:11 Not made with hands []
Compare Mark 14:58; 2 Corinthians 5:1. In allusion to the literal circumcision insisted on by the false teachers. [source]
Colossians 1:23 To every creature [ἐν πάσῃ κτίσει]
Rev, correctly, in all creation. See on 2 Corinthians 5:17, and compare Colossians 1:15. [source]
Colossians 1:15 The first born of every creature [πρωτότοκος πασῆς κτίσεως]
Rev., the first-born of all creation. For first-born, see on Revelation 1:5; for creation, see on 2 Corinthians 5:17. As image points to revelation, so first-born points to eternal preexistence. Even the Rev. is a little ambiguous, for we must carefully avoid any suggestion that Christ was the first of created things, which is contradicted by the following words: in Him were all things created. The true sense is, born before the creation. Compare before all things, Colossians 1:17. This fact of priority implies sovereignty. He is exalted above all thrones, etc., and all things are unto ( εἰς ) Him, as they are elsewhere declared to be unto God. Compare Psalm 89:27; Hebrews 1:2. [source]
Colossians 1:19 It pleased the Father that in Him should all fullness dwell [ἐν αὐτῷ εὐδόκησεν πᾶν τὸ πλήρωμα κατοικῆσαι]
Εὐδοκέω tothink it good, to be well pleased is used in the New Testament, both of divine and of human good-pleasure; but, in the former case, always of God the Father. So Matthew 3:17; Luke 12:32; 1 Corinthians 1:21. The subject of was well pleased, God, is omitted as in James 1:12, and must be supplied; so that, literally, the passage would read, God was well pleased that in Him, etc. Rev., it was the good pleasure of the Father. Fullness, Rev, correctly, the fullness. See on Romans 11:12; see on John 1:16. The word must be taken in its passive sense - that with which a thing is filled, not that which fills. The fullness denotes the sum-total of the divine powers and attributes. In Christ dwelt all the fullness of God as deity. The relation of essential deity to creation and redemption alike, is exhibited by John in the very beginning of his gospel, with which this passage should be compared. In John the order is: 1. The essential nature of Christ; 2. Creation; 3. Redemption. Here it is: 1. Redemption (Colossians 1:13); 2. Essential being of the Son (Colossians 1:15); 3. The Son as Creator (Colossians 1:16); 4. The Church, with Christ as its head (Colossians 1:18). Compare 2 Corinthians 5:19; Ephesians 1:19, Ephesians 1:20, Ephesians 1:23. Paul does not add of the Godhead to the fullness, as in Colossians 2:9since the word occurs in direct connection with those which describe Christ's essential nature, and it would seem not to have occurred to the apostle that it could be understood in any other sense than as an expression of the plenitude of the divine attributes and powers. Thus the phrase in Him should all the fullness dwell gathers into a grand climax the previous statements - image of God, first-born of all creation, Creator, the eternally preexistent, the Head of the Church, the victor over death, first in all things. On this summit we pause, looking, like John, from Christ in His fullness of deity to the exhibition of that divine fullness in redemption consummated in heaven (Colossians 1:20-22). -DIVIDER-
-DIVIDER-
There must also be taken into the account the selection of this word fullness with reference to the false teaching in the Colossian church, the errors which afterward were developed more distinctly in the Gnostic schools. Pleroma fullness was used by the Gnostic teachers in a technical sense, to express the sum-total of the divine powers and attributes. “From the pleroma they supposed that all those agencies issued through which God has at any time exerted His power in creation, or manifested His will through revelation. These mediatorial beings would retain more or less of its influence, according as they claimed direct parentage from it, or traced their descent through successive evolutions. But in all cases this pleroma was distributed, diluted, transformed, and darkened by foreign admixture. They were only partial and blurred images, often deceptive caricatures, of their original, broken lights of the great Central Light” (Lightfoot). Christ may have been ranked with these inferior images of the divine by the Colossian teachers. Hence the significance of the assertion that the totality of the divine dwells in Him. [source]

Colossians 1:20 Through him [δι αυτου]
As the sufficient and chosen agent in the work of reconciliation This double compound (απο κατα — apoαλλασσω — kata with καταλλασσω — allassō) occurs only here, Colossians 1:22; Ephesians 2:16, and nowhere else so far as known. Paul‘s usual word for “reconcile” is διαλλασσω — katallassō (2 Corinthians 5:18-20; Romans 5:10), though απο — diallassō (Matthew 5:24) is more common in Attic. The addition of καταλλασσω — apo here is clearly for the idea of complete reconciliation. See note on 2 Corinthians 5:18-20 for discussion of τα παντα — katallassō Paul‘s great word. The use of εις αυτον — ta panta (the all things, the universe) as if the universe were somehow out of harmony reminds us of the mystical passage in Romans 8:19-23 which see for discussion. Sin somehow has put the universe out of joint. Christ will set it right. [source]
Colossians 2:11 Not made with hands [αχειροποιητωι]
This late and rare negative compound verbal occurs only in the N.T. (Mark 14:58; 2 Corinthians 5:1; Colossians 2:11) by merely adding α — a privative to the old verbal χειροποιητος — cheiropoiētos (Acts 7:48; Ephesians 2:11), possibly first in Mark 14:58 where both words occur concerning the temple. In 2 Corinthians 5:1 the reference is to the resurrection body. The feminine form of this compound adjective is the same as the masculine. In the putting off (εν τηι απεκδυσει — en tēi apekdusei). As if an old garment (the fleshly body). From απεκδυομαι — apekduomai (Colossians 2:15, possibly also coined by Paul) and occurring nowhere else so far as known. The word is made in a perfectly normal way by the perfective use of the two Greek prepositions (απο εκ — apoτου Χριστου — ek), “a resource available for and generally used by any real thinker writing Greek” (Moulton and Milligan, Vocabulary). Paul had as much right to mint a Greek compound as any one and surely no one ever had more ideas to express and more power in doing it. Of Christ Specifying genitive, the kind of circumcision that belongs to Christ, that of the heart. [source]
Colossians 2:23 Have indeed a show of wisdom [εστιν λογον μεν εχοντα σοπιας]
Periphrastic present indicative with εστιν — estin in the singular, but present indicative εχοντα — echonta in the plural Λογον σοπιας — Logon sophias is probably “the repute of wisdom” (Abbott) like Plato and Herodotus. Μεν — Men (in deed) has no corresponding δε — de In will-worship (εν ετελοτρησκιαι — en ethelothrēskiāi). This word occurs nowhere else and was probably coined by Paul after the pattern of ετελοδουλεια — ethelodouleia to describe the voluntary worship of angels (see note on Colossians 2:18). And humility Clearly here the bad sense, “in mock humility.” And severity to the body (και απειδιαι σωματος — kai apheidiāi sōmatos). Old word (Plato) from απειδης — apheidēs unsparing (α — a privative, πειδομαι — pheidomai to spare). Here alone in N.T. Ascetics often practice flagellations and other hardnesses to the body. Not of any value Τιμη — Timē usually means honour or price. Against the indulgence of the flesh (προς πλησμονην της σαρκος — pros plēsmonēn tēs sarkos). These words are sharply debated along with τιμη — timē just before. It is not unusual for προς — pros to be found in the sense of “against” rather than “with” or “for.” See προς — pros in sense of against in Colossians 3:13; Ephesians 6:11.; 2 Corinthians 5:12; 1 Corinthians 6:1. Πλησμονη — Plēsmonē is an old word from πιμπλημι — pimplēmi to fill and means satiety. It occurs here only in the N.T. Peake is inclined to agree with Hort and Haupt that there is a primitive corruption here. But the translation in the Revised Version is possible and it is true that mere rules do not carry us very far in human conduct as every father or mother knows, though we must have some regulations in family and state and church. But they are not enough of themselves. [source]
Colossians 2:23 And humility [και ταπεινοπροσυνηι]
Clearly here the bad sense, “in mock humility.” And severity to the body (και απειδιαι σωματος — kai apheidiāi sōmatos). Old word (Plato) from απειδης — apheidēs unsparing (α — a privative, πειδομαι — pheidomai to spare). Here alone in N.T. Ascetics often practice flagellations and other hardnesses to the body. Not of any value Τιμη — Timē usually means honour or price. Against the indulgence of the flesh (προς πλησμονην της σαρκος — pros plēsmonēn tēs sarkos). These words are sharply debated along with τιμη — timē just before. It is not unusual for προς — pros to be found in the sense of “against” rather than “with” or “for.” See προς — pros in sense of against in Colossians 3:13; Ephesians 6:11.; 2 Corinthians 5:12; 1 Corinthians 6:1. Πλησμονη — Plēsmonē is an old word from πιμπλημι — pimplēmi to fill and means satiety. It occurs here only in the N.T. Peake is inclined to agree with Hort and Haupt that there is a primitive corruption here. But the translation in the Revised Version is possible and it is true that mere rules do not carry us very far in human conduct as every father or mother knows, though we must have some regulations in family and state and church. But they are not enough of themselves. [source]
Colossians 2:23 Not of any value [ουκ εν τιμηι τινι]
Τιμη — Timē usually means honour or price. Against the indulgence of the flesh (προς πλησμονην της σαρκος — pros plēsmonēn tēs sarkos). These words are sharply debated along with τιμη — timē just before. It is not unusual for προς — pros to be found in the sense of “against” rather than “with” or “for.” See προς — pros in sense of against in Colossians 3:13; Ephesians 6:11.; 2 Corinthians 5:12; 1 Corinthians 6:1. Πλησμονη — Plēsmonē is an old word from πιμπλημι — pimplēmi to fill and means satiety. It occurs here only in the N.T. Peake is inclined to agree with Hort and Haupt that there is a primitive corruption here. But the translation in the Revised Version is possible and it is true that mere rules do not carry us very far in human conduct as every father or mother knows, though we must have some regulations in family and state and church. But they are not enough of themselves. [source]
Colossians 2:23 Against the indulgence of the flesh [προς πλησμονην της σαρκος]
These words are sharply debated along with τιμη — timē just before. It is not unusual for προς — pros to be found in the sense of “against” rather than “with” or “for.” See προς — pros in sense of against in Colossians 3:13; Ephesians 6:11.; 2 Corinthians 5:12; 1 Corinthians 6:1. Πλησμονη — Plēsmonē is an old word from πιμπλημι — pimplēmi to fill and means satiety. It occurs here only in the N.T. Peake is inclined to agree with Hort and Haupt that there is a primitive corruption here. But the translation in the Revised Version is possible and it is true that mere rules do not carry us very far in human conduct as every father or mother knows, though we must have some regulations in family and state and church. But they are not enough of themselves. [source]
2 Thessalonians 1:9 From the presence [ἀπὸ προσώπου]
Or face. Ἁπὸ fromhas simply the sense of separation. Not from the time of the Lord's appearing, nor by reason of the glory of his presence. Πρόσωπον is variously translated in A.V. Mostly face: also presence, Acts 3:13, Acts 3:19; Acts 5:41: person, Matthew 22:16; Luke 20:21; Galatians 2:6: appearance, 2 Corinthians 5:12; 2 Corinthians 10:1: fashion, James 1:11. The formula ἀπὸ προσώπου or τοῦ προσώπου occurs Acts 3:19; Acts 5:41; Acts 7:45; Revelation 6:16; Revelation 12:14; Revelation 20:11. In lxx, Genesis 3:8; Genesis 4:14, Genesis 4:16; Exodus 14:25, and frequently. [source]
2 Thessalonians 1:8 On them that know not God - obey not the gospel [τοῖς μὴ εἰδόσι θεὸν - τοῖς μὴ ὑπακούουσιν τῷ εὐγγελίῳ]
To know God is to know him as the one, true God as distinguished from false gods; to know his will, his holiness, his hatred of sin, and his saving intent toward mankind. Two words are used of such knowledge, εἰδέναι and γινώσκειν . Both are applied to the heathen and to Christians, and both are used of the Jews' knowledge of God. Ἑιδέναι , of heathen, Galatians 4:8; 1 Thessalonians 4:5; 2 Thessalonians 1:8. Γινώσκειν of heathen, Romans 1:21; 1 Corinthians 1:21. Ἑιδέναι , of Christ and Christians, John 7:29, John 8:19, John 8:55; John 14:7. Γινώσκειν of Christ and Christians, Galatians 4:9; 1 John 2:13, 1 John 2:14; 1 John 4:6, 1 John 4:7, 1 John 4:8; John 10:15; John 17:3. In John, γινώσκειν of Jews who do not know the Father, John 16:3; John 8:55: εἰδέναι , John 7:28; John 8:19; John 15:21. The two are combined, John 1:26; John 7:27; John 8:55; 2 Corinthians 5:16. A distinction is asserted between γινώσκειν as knowledge grounded in personal experience, apprehension of external impressions - and εἰδέμαι purely mental perception in contrast with conjecture or knowledge derived from others. There are doubtless passages which bear out this distinction (see on John 2:24), but it is impossible to carry it rigidly through the N.T. In the two classes, - those who know not God and those who obey not the gospel, - it is not probable that Paul has in mind a distinction between Jews and Gentiles. The Jews were not ignorant of God, yet they are described by John as not knowing him. The Gentiles are described by Paul as knowing God, but as refusing to glorify him as God (Romans 1:21). Paul rather describes here the subjects of God's judgment as one class, but under different aspects. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:2 Ye be not quickly shaken [μη ταχεως σαλευτηναι υμας]
First aorist passive infinitive of σαλευω — saleuō old verb to agitate, to cause to totter like a reed (Matthew 11:7), the earth (Hebrews 12:26). Usual negative μη — mē and accusative of general reference υμας — humas with the infinitive. From your mind (απο του νοος — apo tou noos). Ablative case of nous, mind, reason, sober sense, “from your witte” (Wycliffe), to “keep their heads.” Nor yet be troubled Old verb τροεω — throeō to cry aloud (from τροος — throos clamour, tumult), to be in a state of nervous excitement (present passive infinitive, as if it were going on), “a continued state of agitation following the definite shock received Either by spirit (μητε δια πνευματος — mēte dia pneumatos). By ecstatic utterance (1 Thessalonians 5:10). The nervous fear that the coming was to be at once prohibited by μηδε — mēde Paul divides into three sources by μητε μητε μητε — mēte, μητε δια λογου — mēteμητε δι επιστολης ως δι ημων — mēte No individual claim to divine revelation (the gift of prophecy) can justify the statement. Or by word Oral statement of a conversation with Paul (Lightfoot) to this effect as from us. An easy way to set aside Paul‘s first Epistle by report of a private remark from Paul. Or by epistle as from us (ενιστημι — mēte di' epistolēs hōs di' hēmōn). In 1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:3 Paul had plainly said that Jesus would come as a thief in the night and had shown that the dead would not be left out in the rapture. But evidently some one claimed to have a private epistle from Paul which supported the view that Jesus was coming at once, as that the day of the Lord is now present (τα ενεστωτα — hōs hoti enestēken hē hēmera tou kuriou). Perfect active indicative of τα μελλοντα — enistēmi old verb, to place in, but intransitive in this tense to stand in or at or near. So “is imminent” (Lightfoot). The verb is common in the papyri. In 1 Corinthians 3:22; Romans 8:38 we have a contrast between ως οτι — ta enestōta the things present, and ta mellonta the things future (to come). The use of hōs hoti may be disparaging here, though that is not true in 2 Corinthians 5:19. In the Koiné{[28928]}š it comes in the vernacular to mean simply “that” (Moulton, Proleg., p. 212), but that hardly seems the case in the N.T. (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1033). Here it means “to wit that,” though “as that” or “as if” does not miss it much. Certainly it flatly denies that by conversation or by letter he had stated that the second coming was immediately at hand. “It is this misleading assertion that accounts both for the increased discouragement of the faint-hearted to encourage whom Paul writes 1:3-2:17, and for the increased meddlesomeness of the idle brethren to warn whom Paul writes 3:1-18” (Frame). It is enough to give one pause to note Paul‘s indignation over this use of his name by one of the over-zealous advocates of the view that Christ was coming at once. It is true that Paul was still alive, but, if such a “pious fraud” was so common and easily condoned as some today argue, it is difficult to explain Paul‘s evident anger. Moreover, Paul‘s words should make us hesitate to affirm that Paul definitely proclaimed the early return of Jesus. He hoped for it undoubtedly, but he did not specifically proclaim it as so many today assert and accuse him of misleading the early Christians with a false presentation. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:2 Nor yet be troubled [μηδε τροεισται]
Old verb τροεω — throeō to cry aloud (from τροος — throos clamour, tumult), to be in a state of nervous excitement (present passive infinitive, as if it were going on), “a continued state of agitation following the definite shock received Either by spirit (μητε δια πνευματος — mēte dia pneumatos). By ecstatic utterance (1 Thessalonians 5:10). The nervous fear that the coming was to be at once prohibited by μηδε — mēde Paul divides into three sources by μητε μητε μητε — mēte, μητε δια λογου — mēteμητε δι επιστολης ως δι ημων — mēte No individual claim to divine revelation (the gift of prophecy) can justify the statement. Or by word Oral statement of a conversation with Paul (Lightfoot) to this effect as from us. An easy way to set aside Paul‘s first Epistle by report of a private remark from Paul. Or by epistle as from us (ενιστημι — mēte di' epistolēs hōs di' hēmōn). In 1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:3 Paul had plainly said that Jesus would come as a thief in the night and had shown that the dead would not be left out in the rapture. But evidently some one claimed to have a private epistle from Paul which supported the view that Jesus was coming at once, as that the day of the Lord is now present (τα ενεστωτα — hōs hoti enestēken hē hēmera tou kuriou). Perfect active indicative of τα μελλοντα — enistēmi old verb, to place in, but intransitive in this tense to stand in or at or near. So “is imminent” (Lightfoot). The verb is common in the papyri. In 1 Corinthians 3:22; Romans 8:38 we have a contrast between ως οτι — ta enestōta the things present, and ta mellonta the things future (to come). The use of hōs hoti may be disparaging here, though that is not true in 2 Corinthians 5:19. In the Koiné{[28928]}š it comes in the vernacular to mean simply “that” (Moulton, Proleg., p. 212), but that hardly seems the case in the N.T. (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1033). Here it means “to wit that,” though “as that” or “as if” does not miss it much. Certainly it flatly denies that by conversation or by letter he had stated that the second coming was immediately at hand. “It is this misleading assertion that accounts both for the increased discouragement of the faint-hearted to encourage whom Paul writes 1:3-2:17, and for the increased meddlesomeness of the idle brethren to warn whom Paul writes 3:1-18” (Frame). It is enough to give one pause to note Paul‘s indignation over this use of his name by one of the over-zealous advocates of the view that Christ was coming at once. It is true that Paul was still alive, but, if such a “pious fraud” was so common and easily condoned as some today argue, it is difficult to explain Paul‘s evident anger. Moreover, Paul‘s words should make us hesitate to affirm that Paul definitely proclaimed the early return of Jesus. He hoped for it undoubtedly, but he did not specifically proclaim it as so many today assert and accuse him of misleading the early Christians with a false presentation. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:2 Or by word [ως οτι ενεστηκεν η ημερα του κυριου]
Oral statement of a conversation with Paul (Lightfoot) to this effect as from us. An easy way to set aside Paul‘s first Epistle by report of a private remark from Paul. Or by epistle as from us (ενιστημι — mēte di' epistolēs hōs di' hēmōn). In 1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:3 Paul had plainly said that Jesus would come as a thief in the night and had shown that the dead would not be left out in the rapture. But evidently some one claimed to have a private epistle from Paul which supported the view that Jesus was coming at once, as that the day of the Lord is now present (τα ενεστωτα — hōs hoti enestēken hē hēmera tou kuriou). Perfect active indicative of τα μελλοντα — enistēmi old verb, to place in, but intransitive in this tense to stand in or at or near. So “is imminent” (Lightfoot). The verb is common in the papyri. In 1 Corinthians 3:22; Romans 8:38 we have a contrast between ως οτι — ta enestōta the things present, and ta mellonta the things future (to come). The use of hōs hoti may be disparaging here, though that is not true in 2 Corinthians 5:19. In the Koiné{[28928]}š it comes in the vernacular to mean simply “that” (Moulton, Proleg., p. 212), but that hardly seems the case in the N.T. (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1033). Here it means “to wit that,” though “as that” or “as if” does not miss it much. Certainly it flatly denies that by conversation or by letter he had stated that the second coming was immediately at hand. “It is this misleading assertion that accounts both for the increased discouragement of the faint-hearted to encourage whom Paul writes 1:3-2:17, and for the increased meddlesomeness of the idle brethren to warn whom Paul writes 3:1-18” (Frame). It is enough to give one pause to note Paul‘s indignation over this use of his name by one of the over-zealous advocates of the view that Christ was coming at once. It is true that Paul was still alive, but, if such a “pious fraud” was so common and easily condoned as some today argue, it is difficult to explain Paul‘s evident anger. Moreover, Paul‘s words should make us hesitate to affirm that Paul definitely proclaimed the early return of Jesus. He hoped for it undoubtedly, but he did not specifically proclaim it as so many today assert and accuse him of misleading the early Christians with a false presentation. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:2 as from us []
. An easy way to set aside Paul‘s first Epistle by report of a private remark from Paul. Or by epistle as from us (ενιστημι — mēte di' epistolēs hōs di' hēmōn). In 1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:3 Paul had plainly said that Jesus would come as a thief in the night and had shown that the dead would not be left out in the rapture. But evidently some one claimed to have a private epistle from Paul which supported the view that Jesus was coming at once, as that the day of the Lord is now present (τα ενεστωτα — hōs hoti enestēken hē hēmera tou kuriou). Perfect active indicative of τα μελλοντα — enistēmi old verb, to place in, but intransitive in this tense to stand in or at or near. So “is imminent” (Lightfoot). The verb is common in the papyri. In 1 Corinthians 3:22; Romans 8:38 we have a contrast between ως οτι — ta enestōta the things present, and ta mellonta the things future (to come). The use of hōs hoti may be disparaging here, though that is not true in 2 Corinthians 5:19. In the Koiné{[28928]}š it comes in the vernacular to mean simply “that” (Moulton, Proleg., p. 212), but that hardly seems the case in the N.T. (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1033). Here it means “to wit that,” though “as that” or “as if” does not miss it much. Certainly it flatly denies that by conversation or by letter he had stated that the second coming was immediately at hand. “It is this misleading assertion that accounts both for the increased discouragement of the faint-hearted to encourage whom Paul writes 1:3-2:17, and for the increased meddlesomeness of the idle brethren to warn whom Paul writes 3:1-18” (Frame). It is enough to give one pause to note Paul‘s indignation over this use of his name by one of the over-zealous advocates of the view that Christ was coming at once. It is true that Paul was still alive, but, if such a “pious fraud” was so common and easily condoned as some today argue, it is difficult to explain Paul‘s evident anger. Moreover, Paul‘s words should make us hesitate to affirm that Paul definitely proclaimed the early return of Jesus. He hoped for it undoubtedly, but he did not specifically proclaim it as so many today assert and accuse him of misleading the early Christians with a false presentation. [source]
2 Thessalonians 2:2 Or by epistle as from us [ενιστημι]
In 1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:3 Paul had plainly said that Jesus would come as a thief in the night and had shown that the dead would not be left out in the rapture. But evidently some one claimed to have a private epistle from Paul which supported the view that Jesus was coming at once, as that the day of the Lord is now present Perfect active indicative of τα μελλοντα — enistēmi old verb, to place in, but intransitive in this tense to stand in or at or near. So “is imminent” (Lightfoot). The verb is common in the papyri. In 1 Corinthians 3:22; Romans 8:38 we have a contrast between ως οτι — ta enestōta the things present, and ta mellonta the things future (to come). The use of hōs hoti may be disparaging here, though that is not true in 2 Corinthians 5:19. In the Koiné{[28928]}š it comes in the vernacular to mean simply “that” (Moulton, Proleg., p. 212), but that hardly seems the case in the N.T. (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1033). Here it means “to wit that,” though “as that” or “as if” does not miss it much. Certainly it flatly denies that by conversation or by letter he had stated that the second coming was immediately at hand. “It is this misleading assertion that accounts both for the increased discouragement of the faint-hearted to encourage whom Paul writes 1:3-2:17, and for the increased meddlesomeness of the idle brethren to warn whom Paul writes 3:1-18” (Frame). It is enough to give one pause to note Paul‘s indignation over this use of his name by one of the over-zealous advocates of the view that Christ was coming at once. It is true that Paul was still alive, but, if such a “pious fraud” was so common and easily condoned as some today argue, it is difficult to explain Paul‘s evident anger. Moreover, Paul‘s words should make us hesitate to affirm that Paul definitely proclaimed the early return of Jesus. He hoped for it undoubtedly, but he did not specifically proclaim it as so many today assert and accuse him of misleading the early Christians with a false presentation. [source]
1 Timothy 4:4 Creature [κτίσμα]
Not in Paul. See James 1:18; Revelation 5:13; Revelation 8:9. A created thing. For κτίσις creation or creature, frequent in Paul, see on Romans 8:19; see on 2 Corinthians 5:17; see on Colossians 1:15. Κτίσμα in lxx, Wisd. 9:2; 13:5; 14:11; 3 Maccabees 5:11. [source]
1 Timothy 2:9 With shamefacedness and sobriety [μετὰ αἰδοῦς καὶ σωφροσύνης]
Ἁιδώς N.T. ( αἰδοῦς in Hebrews 12:28is an incorrect reading). In earlier Greek, as in Homer, it sometimes blends with the sense of αἰσχύνη shamethough used also of the feeling of respectful timidity in the presence of superiors, or of penitent respect toward one who has been wronged (see Homer, Il. i. 23). Hence it is connected in Homer with military discipline (Il. v. 531). It is the feeling of a suppliant or an unfortunate in the presence of those from whom he seeks aid; of a younger man toward an older and wiser one. It is a feeling based upon the sense of deficiency, inferiority, or unworthiness. On the other hand, it is the feeling of a superior in position or fortune which goes out to an unfortunate. See Homer, Il. xxiv. 208; Od. xiv. 388; Soph. Oed. Col. 247. In the Attic period, a distinction was recognised between αἰσχύνη and αἰδώς : αἰδώς representing a respectful and reverent attitude toward another, while αἰσχύνη was the sense of shame on account of wrong doing. Thus, “one αἰδεῖται isrespectful to his father, but αἰσχύνεται isashamed because he has been drunk.” Trench (N.T. Synon. § xix.) remarks that “ αἰδώς is the nobler word and implies the nobler motive. In it is involved an innate moral repugnance to the doing of the dishonorable act, which moral repugnance scarcely or not at all exists in the αἰσχύνη . Let the man who is restrained by αἰσχύνη alone be insured against the outward disgrace which he fears his act will entail, and he will refrain from it no longer.” The A.V. shamefacedness is a corruption of the old English shamefastness. So Chaucer:“Schamefast chastite.”Knight's T. 2057.Shakespeare:“'Tis a blushing shamefast spirit that mutinies in a man's bosom.”Richard III. i. 4.It is one of a large class of words, as steadfast, soothfast, rootfast, masterfast, handfast, bedfast, etc. Shamefaced changes and destroys the original force of the word, which was bound or made fast by an honorable shame. Σωφροσύνη sobrietysoP. Once in Acts, Acts 26:25. The kindred verb σωφρονεῖν tobe of sound mind, Romans 12:3-5; 2 Corinthians 5:13; Titus 2:6. Several representatives of this family of words appear in the Pastorals, and with the exception of σωφροσύνη and σωφρονεῖν , nowhere else in N.T. Such are σωφρονίζειν tobe soberminded (Titus 2:4); σωφρονισμός discipline(2 Timothy 1:7); σωφρόνως soberly(Titus 2:12); σώφρων soberminded(1 Timothy 3:2). The word is compounded of σάος or σῶς safesound, and φρήν mindIt signifies entire command of the passions and desires; a self-control which holds the rein over these. So Aristotle (Rhet. i. 9): The virtue by which we hold ourselves toward the pleasures of the body as. the law enjoins.” Comp. 4Macc. 1:31. Euripides calls it “the fairest gift of the gods” (Med. 632). That it appears so rarely in N.T. is, as Trench remarks, “not because more value was attached to it in heathen ethics than in Christian morality, but because it is taken up and transformed into a condition yet higher still, in which a man does not command himself, which is well, but, which is better still, is commanded by God.” The words with shamefastness and sobriety may either be taken directly with adorn themselves, or better perhaps, as indicating moral qualities accompanying ( μετὰ with) the modest apparel. Let them adorn themselves in modest apparel, having along with this shamefastness and sobermindedness. [source]
1 Timothy 2:4 That all men should be saved [παντας αντρωπους σωτηναι]
First aorist passive infinitive of σωζω — sōzō with accusative of general reference. See note on 1 Corinthians 10:33; 2 Corinthians 5:18. To the knowledge (εις επιγνωσιν — eis epignōsin). “The full knowledge” as in Colossians 1:6; Ephesians 4:13 (ten times in Paul). See note on 2 Timothy 3:7 for the whole phrase “full knowledge of the truth” (αλητεια — alētheia 14 times in the Pastorals). Paul is anxious as in Colossians and Ephesians that the Gnostics may not lead the people astray. They need the full intellectual apprehension of Christianity. [source]
1 Timothy 3:16 Believed on in the world [επιστευτη εν κοσμωι]
First aorist indicative passive again of πιστευω — pisteuō to believe (2 Thessalonians 1:10). Cf. 1 Timothy 1:15; 2 Corinthians 5:19. [source]
1 Timothy 3:16 Great [μεγα]
See note on Ephesians 5:32. “A great mystery.” The mystery of godliness (το της ευσεβειας μυστηριον — to tēs eusebeias mustērion). See 1 Timothy 3:9 “the mystery of the faith,” and 1 Timothy 2:2 for ευσεβεια — eusebeia Here the phrase explains “a pillar and stay of the truth” (1 Timothy 3:15). See in particular 1 Corinthians 1:27. “The revealed secret of true religion, the mystery of Christianity, the Person of Christ” (Lock). He who The correct text, not τεος — theos (God) the reading of the Textus Receptus (Syrian text) nor ο — ho (neuter relative, agreeing with μυστηριον — mustērion) the reading of the Western documents. Westcott and Hort print this relative clause as a fragment of a Christian hymn (like Ephesians 5:14) in six strophes. That is probably correct. At any rate ος — hos (who) is correct and there is asyndeton (no connective) in the verbs. Christ, to whom ος — hos refers, is the mystery (Colossians 1:27; Colossians 2:2). Was manifested (επανερωτη — ephanerōthē). First aorist passive indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō to manifest. Here used to describe the incarnation (εν σαρκι — en sarki) of Christ (an answer also to the Docetic Gnostics). The verb is used by Paul elsewhere of the incarnation (Romans 16:26; Colossians 1:26) as well as of the second coming (Colossians 3:4). Justified in the spirit First aorist passive indicative of δικαιοω — dikaioō to declare righteous, to vindicate. Christ was vindicated in his own spirit (Hebrews 9:14) before men by overcoming death and rising from the dead (Romans 1:3.). Seen of angels (ωπτη αγγελοις — ōphthē aggelois). First aorist passive indicative of οραω — horaō to see, with either the instrumental or the dative case of angels (αγγελοις — aggelois). The words were probably suggested by the appearance of Jesus (ωπτη — ōphthē the usual form for the resurrection appearances of Christ) of the angels at the tomb and at the ascension of Christ. See note on Philemon 2:10; 1 Peter 3:22 for the appearance of Jesus to the angels in heaven at the ascension. Some would take “angels” here to be “messengers” (the women). Preached among the nations First aorist passive indicative of κηρυσσω — kērussō to proclaim. The word ετνος — ethnos may mean “all creation” (Colossians 1:23) and not just Gentiles as distinct from Jews. Paul had done more of this heralding of Christ among the Gentiles than any one else. It was his glory (Ephesians 3:1, Ephesians 3:8). Cf. 1 Timothy 2:7. Believed on in the world (επιστευτη εν κοσμωι — episteuthē en kosmōi). First aorist indicative passive again of πιστευω — pisteuō to believe (2 Thessalonians 1:10). Cf. 1 Timothy 1:15; 2 Corinthians 5:19. Received up in glory First aorist passive again (six verbs in the same voice and tense in succession, a rhythmic arrangement like a hymn). Cf. Romans 8:29. This time the verb is αναλαμβανω — analambanō the verb used of the ascension (Acts 1:11, Acts 1:22, which see). In a wonderful way this stanza of a hymn presents the outline of the life of Christ. [source]
1 Timothy 3:16 He who [ος]
The correct text, not τεος — theos (God) the reading of the Textus Receptus (Syrian text) nor ο — ho (neuter relative, agreeing with μυστηριον — mustērion) the reading of the Western documents. Westcott and Hort print this relative clause as a fragment of a Christian hymn (like Ephesians 5:14) in six strophes. That is probably correct. At any rate ος — hos (who) is correct and there is asyndeton (no connective) in the verbs. Christ, to whom ος — hos refers, is the mystery (Colossians 1:27; Colossians 2:2). Was manifested (επανερωτη — ephanerōthē). First aorist passive indicative of πανεροω — phaneroō to manifest. Here used to describe the incarnation (εν σαρκι — en sarki) of Christ (an answer also to the Docetic Gnostics). The verb is used by Paul elsewhere of the incarnation (Romans 16:26; Colossians 1:26) as well as of the second coming (Colossians 3:4). Justified in the spirit First aorist passive indicative of δικαιοω — dikaioō to declare righteous, to vindicate. Christ was vindicated in his own spirit (Hebrews 9:14) before men by overcoming death and rising from the dead (Romans 1:3.). Seen of angels (ωπτη αγγελοις — ōphthē aggelois). First aorist passive indicative of οραω — horaō to see, with either the instrumental or the dative case of angels (αγγελοις — aggelois). The words were probably suggested by the appearance of Jesus (ωπτη — ōphthē the usual form for the resurrection appearances of Christ) of the angels at the tomb and at the ascension of Christ. See note on Philemon 2:10; 1 Peter 3:22 for the appearance of Jesus to the angels in heaven at the ascension. Some would take “angels” here to be “messengers” (the women). Preached among the nations First aorist passive indicative of κηρυσσω — kērussō to proclaim. The word ετνος — ethnos may mean “all creation” (Colossians 1:23) and not just Gentiles as distinct from Jews. Paul had done more of this heralding of Christ among the Gentiles than any one else. It was his glory (Ephesians 3:1, Ephesians 3:8). Cf. 1 Timothy 2:7. Believed on in the world (επιστευτη εν κοσμωι — episteuthē en kosmōi). First aorist indicative passive again of πιστευω — pisteuō to believe (2 Thessalonians 1:10). Cf. 1 Timothy 1:15; 2 Corinthians 5:19. Received up in glory First aorist passive again (six verbs in the same voice and tense in succession, a rhythmic arrangement like a hymn). Cf. Romans 8:29. This time the verb is αναλαμβανω — analambanō the verb used of the ascension (Acts 1:11, Acts 1:22, which see). In a wonderful way this stanza of a hymn presents the outline of the life of Christ. [source]
1 Timothy 3:16 Justified in the spirit [εδικαιωτη εν πνευματι]
First aorist passive indicative of δικαιοω — dikaioō to declare righteous, to vindicate. Christ was vindicated in his own spirit (Hebrews 9:14) before men by overcoming death and rising from the dead (Romans 1:3.). Seen of angels (ωπτη αγγελοις — ōphthē aggelois). First aorist passive indicative of οραω — horaō to see, with either the instrumental or the dative case of angels (αγγελοις — aggelois). The words were probably suggested by the appearance of Jesus (ωπτη — ōphthē the usual form for the resurrection appearances of Christ) of the angels at the tomb and at the ascension of Christ. See note on Philemon 2:10; 1 Peter 3:22 for the appearance of Jesus to the angels in heaven at the ascension. Some would take “angels” here to be “messengers” (the women). Preached among the nations First aorist passive indicative of κηρυσσω — kērussō to proclaim. The word ετνος — ethnos may mean “all creation” (Colossians 1:23) and not just Gentiles as distinct from Jews. Paul had done more of this heralding of Christ among the Gentiles than any one else. It was his glory (Ephesians 3:1, Ephesians 3:8). Cf. 1 Timothy 2:7. Believed on in the world (επιστευτη εν κοσμωι — episteuthē en kosmōi). First aorist indicative passive again of πιστευω — pisteuō to believe (2 Thessalonians 1:10). Cf. 1 Timothy 1:15; 2 Corinthians 5:19. Received up in glory First aorist passive again (six verbs in the same voice and tense in succession, a rhythmic arrangement like a hymn). Cf. Romans 8:29. This time the verb is αναλαμβανω — analambanō the verb used of the ascension (Acts 1:11, Acts 1:22, which see). In a wonderful way this stanza of a hymn presents the outline of the life of Christ. [source]
1 Timothy 3:16 Preached among the nations [εκηρυχτη εν ετνεσιν]
First aorist passive indicative of κηρυσσω — kērussō to proclaim. The word ετνος — ethnos may mean “all creation” (Colossians 1:23) and not just Gentiles as distinct from Jews. Paul had done more of this heralding of Christ among the Gentiles than any one else. It was his glory (Ephesians 3:1, Ephesians 3:8). Cf. 1 Timothy 2:7. Believed on in the world (επιστευτη εν κοσμωι — episteuthē en kosmōi). First aorist indicative passive again of πιστευω — pisteuō to believe (2 Thessalonians 1:10). Cf. 1 Timothy 1:15; 2 Corinthians 5:19. Received up in glory First aorist passive again (six verbs in the same voice and tense in succession, a rhythmic arrangement like a hymn). Cf. Romans 8:29. This time the verb is αναλαμβανω — analambanō the verb used of the ascension (Acts 1:11, Acts 1:22, which see). In a wonderful way this stanza of a hymn presents the outline of the life of Christ. [source]
1 Timothy 5:14 The younger widows [νεωτερας]
No article and no word for widows, though that is clearly the idea. Νεωτερας — Neōteras is accusative of general reference with γαμειν — gamein (to marry) the object (present infinitive active) of βουλομαι — boulomai Bear children (τεκνογονειν — teknogonein). A compound verb here only in N.T. and nowhere else save in Anthol. See τεκνογονια — teknogonia in 1 Timothy 2:15. Rule the household Late verb from οικοδεσποτης — oikodespotēs (Mark 14:14), twice in the papyri, only here in N.T. Note that the wife is here put as ruler of the household, proper recognition of her influence, “new and improved position” (Liddon). Occasion (απορμην — aphormēn). Old word (απο ορμη — apoτωι αντικειμενωι — hormē), a base to rush from, Pauline use in 2 Corinthians 5:12; 2 Corinthians 11:12; Galatians 5:13. To the adversary Dative case of the articular participle of λοιδοριας — antikeimai a Pauline idiom (Philemon 1:28). Reviling (λοιδορεω — loidorias). Old word (from χαριν — loidoreō), in N.T. only here and 1 Peter 3:9. Genitive case with charin f0). [source]
1 Timothy 5:14 Rule the household [οικοδεσποτειν]
Late verb from οικοδεσποτης — oikodespotēs (Mark 14:14), twice in the papyri, only here in N.T. Note that the wife is here put as ruler of the household, proper recognition of her influence, “new and improved position” (Liddon). Occasion (απορμην — aphormēn). Old word (απο ορμη — apoτωι αντικειμενωι — hormē), a base to rush from, Pauline use in 2 Corinthians 5:12; 2 Corinthians 11:12; Galatians 5:13. To the adversary Dative case of the articular participle of λοιδοριας — antikeimai a Pauline idiom (Philemon 1:28). Reviling (λοιδορεω — loidorias). Old word (from χαριν — loidoreō), in N.T. only here and 1 Peter 3:9. Genitive case with charin f0). [source]
1 Timothy 5:14 Occasion [απορμην]
Old word (απο ορμη — apoτωι αντικειμενωι — hormē), a base to rush from, Pauline use in 2 Corinthians 5:12; 2 Corinthians 11:12; Galatians 5:13. [source]
2 Timothy 4:6 Departure [ἀναλύσεως]
N.T.oolxx. Comp. ἀναλῦσαι todepart, Philemon 1:23. The figure is explained by some of loosing a ship from its moorings; by others of breaking camp. In Philippians the latter is the more probable explanation, because Paul's situation in the custody of the Praetorians at Rome would naturally suggest a military metaphor, and because he is habitually sparing of nautical metaphors. Comp. 2 Corinthians 5:1, and Clement of Rome, ad Corinth. xliv: “Blessed are the presbyters who have gone before, seeing that their departure ( ἀνάλυσιν ) was fruitful and ripe.” [source]
2 Timothy 4:8 The righteous judge [ο δικαιος κριτης]
“The just judge,” the umpire who makes no mistakes who judges us all (2 Corinthians 5:10). Shall give me (αποδωσει μοι — apodōsei moi). Future active of αποδιδωμι — apodidōmi “Will give back” as in Romans 2:6 and in full. But also to all them that have loved his appearing Dative case of the perfect active participle of αγαπαω — agapaō to love, who have loved and still love his second coming. Επιπανεια — Epiphaneia here can as in 2 Timothy 1:10 be interpreted of Christ‘s Incarnation. [source]
2 Timothy 4:8 There is laid up for me [αποκειται μοι]
Present passive of αποκειμαι — apokeimai old verb, to be laid away. See note on Colossians 1:5 for the hope laid away. Paul‘s “crown of righteousness” That great and blessed day (2 Timothy 1:12, 2 Timothy 1:18). The righteous judge “The just judge,” the umpire who makes no mistakes who judges us all (2 Corinthians 5:10). Shall give me (αποδωσει μοι — apodōsei moi). Future active of αποδιδωμι — apodidōmi “Will give back” as in Romans 2:6 and in full. But also to all them that have loved his appearing Dative case of the perfect active participle of αγαπαω — agapaō to love, who have loved and still love his second coming. Επιπανεια — Epiphaneia here can as in 2 Timothy 1:10 be interpreted of Christ‘s Incarnation. [source]
Titus 2:8 May be ashamed [ινα εντραπηι]
Final clause with ινα — hina and second aorist passive subjunctive of εντρεπω — entrepō to turn, in middle and passive to turn one on himself and so be ashamed (to blush) as in 2 Thessalonians 3:14; 1 Corinthians 4:14. This sense in the papyri. Evil (παυλον — phaulon). Old word, easy (easy morals), worthless; bad, as in 2 Corinthians 5:10. [source]
Titus 2:8 Evil [παυλον]
Old word, easy (easy morals), worthless; bad, as in 2 Corinthians 5:10. [source]
Titus 2:8 Evil thing [φαῦλον]
Only here in Pastorals. In Paul, Romans 9:11; 2 Corinthians 5:10. See on John 3:20. [source]
Titus 2:8 That cannot be condemned [ακαταγνωστον]
Only N.T. example (verbal, α — a privative and καταγνωστος — katagnōstos) and in 4 Maccabees 4:47. Deissmann (Bible Studies, p. 200) quotes it from an inscription and the adverb from a papyrus. He that is of the contrary part (ο εχ εναντιας — ho ex enantias). “The one on the opposite side” (your opponent). Cf. Titus 2:9; 1 Timothy 5:14. May be ashamed Final clause with ινα — hina and second aorist passive subjunctive of εντρεπω — entrepō to turn, in middle and passive to turn one on himself and so be ashamed (to blush) as in 2 Thessalonians 3:14; 1 Corinthians 4:14. This sense in the papyri. Evil (παυλον — phaulon). Old word, easy (easy morals), worthless; bad, as in 2 Corinthians 5:10. [source]
Hebrews 9:11 That is to say not of this building [τοῦτ ' ἔστιν οὐ ταύτης τῆς κτίσεως]
For building rend. creation. See on Romans 8:19; see on 2 Corinthians 5:17; see on Colossians 1:15. The meaning is, not belonging to this natural creation either in its materials or its maker. [source]
Hebrews 7:16 After the power of an endless life [κατὰ δύαναμιν ἀκαταλύτου]
Δύναμιν inherentvirtue. Rend. for endless, indissoluble. Comp. καταλύθῃ looseneddown, of a tent, 2 Corinthians 5:1; of the stones of the temple, Matthew 24:2. Jesus was high priest in virtue of the energy of indissoluble life which dwelt in him, unlike the priests who die, Hebrews 7:8. This truth the writer finds in the Psalm. [source]
Hebrews 4:13 Creature [κτίσις]
See on Romans 8:19; see on 2 Corinthians 5:17; see on Colossians 1:15. Here in the sense of thing created. [source]
Hebrews 8:2 Minister [λειτουργος]
See note on Romans 13:6 and note on Philemon 2:25. Of the sanctuary “Of the holy places” By way of explanation of των αγιων — tōn hagiōn For σκηνη — skēnē see Matthew 17:4 and σκηνος — skēnos (2 Corinthians 5:1), old word used here for the antitype or archetype of the tabernacle in the wilderness in which Aaron served, the ideal tabernacle in heaven of which the earthly tabernacle was a symbol and reproduced in the temple which merely copied the tabernacle. Hence it is the “genuine” tabernacle and see John 1:9 for αλητινος — alēthinos Pitched First aorist active indicative of πηγνυμι — pēgnumi old verb to fasten as the pegs of a tent, here only in the N.T. Cf. Numbers 24:6. [source]
Hebrews 9:11 Having come [παραγενομενος]
Second aorist middle participle of παραγινομαι — paraginomai This is the great historic event that is the crux of history. “Christ came on the scene, and all was changed” (Moffatt). Of the good things to come But B D read γενομενων — genomenōn (that are come). It is a nice question which is the true text. Both aspects are true, for Christ is High Priest of good things that have already come as well as of the glorious future of hope. Westcott prefers γενομενων — genomenōn Moffatt μελλοντων — mellontōn Through the greater and more perfect tabernacle Probably the instrumental use of δια — dia (2 Corinthians 2:4; Romans 2:27; Romans 14:20) as accompaniment, not the local idea (Hebrews 4:14; Hebrews 10:20). Christ as High Priest employed in his work the heavenly tabernacle (Hebrews 8:2) after which the earthly was patterned (Hebrews 9:24). Not made with hands Old compound verbal for which see Mark 14:58; Acts 7:48; Acts 17:24. Cf. Hebrews 8:2. Here in the predicate position. Not of this creation Explanation of ου χιεροποιητου — ou chieropoiētou For κτισις — ktisis see 2 Corinthians 5:17; Romans 8:19. For the idea see 2 Corinthians 4:18; Hebrews 8:2. This greater and more perfect tabernacle is heaven itself (Hebrews 9:24). [source]
1 Peter 1:9 Receiving [κομιζόμενοι]
The verb originally means to take care of or provide for; thence to receive hospitably or entertain; to bring home with a view to entertaining or taking care of. Hence, to carry away so as to preserve, to save, rescue, and so to carry away as a prize or booty. Generally, to receive or acquire. Paul uses it of receiving the awards of judgment (2 Corinthians 5:10; Ephesians 6:8; Colossians 3:25). In Hebrews it is used of receiving the promise (Hebrews 10:36; Hebrews 11:39), and of Abraham receiving back Isaac (Hebrews 11:19). Peter uses it thrice, and in each case of receiving the rewards of righteousness or of iniquity. See 1 Peter 5:4; 2 Peter 2:13. [source]
1 Peter 1:17 According to each man‘s work [κρινοντα]
“According to the deed of each one” God judges (αναστραπητε — krinonta) just as Christ judges also (2 Corinthians 5:10). [source]
1 Peter 4:5 To him that is ready to judge [τωι ετοιμως κρινοντι]
Dative, “to the one readily judging,” correct text, not ετοιμως εχοντι κριναι — hetoimōs echonti krinai “to the one ready to judge,” which “softens the rugged original” (Hart). That is Christ apparently (1 Peter 1:13; 2 Corinthians 5:10), but the Father in 1 Peter 1:17.The quick and the dead (ζωντας και νεκρους — zōntas kai nekrous). “Living and dead.” Those living at the time and those already dead (1 Thessalonians 4:15). [source]
1 Peter 5:10 In Christ [εν Χριστωι]
A Pauline phrase (2 Corinthians 5:17-19), but Petrine also. For God‘s “calling” us Second aorist active participle of πασχω — paschō antecedent to the principal verbs which are future active (καταρτισει — katartisei to mend, Mark 1:19; Galatians 6:1, στηριχει — stērixei for which see Luke 9:51; Luke 22:32, στενωσει — sthenōsei from στενος — sthenos and so far a απαχ λεγομενον — hapax legomenon like ενισχυω — enischuō according to Hesychius). For ολιγον — oligon see 1 Peter 1:6. [source]
1 Peter 1:17 As Father [πατερα]
Predicate accusative in apposition with τονκρινοντα — ton- απροσωπολημπτως — krinonta respect of persons Found nowhere else except in the later Ep. of Clem. of Rome and Ep. of Barn., from alpha privative and προσωπολημπτεω — prosōpolēmptēs (Acts 10:34. See James 2:9 for προσωπολημπσια — prosōpolēmpteō and 1 Peter 1:1 for προσωπον λαμβανω — prosōpolēmpsia) from κατα το εκαστου εργον — prosōpon lambanō (in imitation of the Hebrew).According to each man‘s work (κρινοντα — kata to hekastou ergon). “According to the deed of each one” God judges (αναστραπητε — krinonta) just as Christ judges also (2 Corinthians 5:10).Pass Second aorist passive imperative of τον χρονον — anastrephō metaphorical sense as in 2 Corinthians 1:12; 2 Peter 2:18.The time (της παροικιας υμων — ton chronon). Accusative case of extent of time.Of your sojourning A late word, found in lxx (Psalm 119:5) and in N.T. only here and Acts 13:17 and in ecclesiastical writers (one late Christian inscription). It comes from παροικος — paroikeō old verb, to dwell beside (in one‘s neighbourhood), and so of pilgrims or strangers Peter here recurs to 1 Peter 1:1 (“sojourners of the Dispersion”).In fear (αναστραπητε — en phobōi). Emphatic position at beginning of the clause with anastraphēte at the end. [source]
2 Peter 1:13 Tabernacle [σκηνώματι]
A figurative expression for the body, used also by Paul, 2 Corinthians 5:1, 2 Corinthians 5:4, though he employs the shorter kindred word σκῆνος . Peter also has the same mixture of metaphors which Paul employs in that passage, viz., building and clothing. See next verse. Peter's use of tabernacle is significant in connection with his words at the transfiguration, “Let us make three tabernacle (Matthew 17:4). The word, as well as the entire phrase, carries the idea of brief duration - a frail tent, erected for a night. Compare 2 Peter 1:14. [source]
2 Peter 1:13 Tabernacle [σκηνωματι]
Old word, in literal sense in Deuteronomy 33:18 for the usual σκηνη — skēnē (Peter‘s word at the Transfiguration, Mark 9:5), earliest use (in N.T. only here, 2 Peter 1:14; Acts 7:46 of the tabernacle of the covenant) in this metaphorical sense of life as a pilgrimage (1 Peter 1:1; 1 Peter 2:11), though Paul has σκηνος — skēnos so in 2 Corinthians 5:1, 2 Corinthians 5:4. Peter feels the nearness of death and the urgency upon him. [source]
2 Peter 1:13 So long as [επ οσον]
For this phrase see Matthew 9:15; Romans 11:13.Tabernacle (σκηνωματι — skēnōmati). Old word, in literal sense in Deuteronomy 33:18 for the usual σκηνη — skēnē (Peter‘s word at the Transfiguration, Mark 9:5), earliest use (in N.T. only here, 2 Peter 1:14; Acts 7:46 of the tabernacle of the covenant) in this metaphorical sense of life as a pilgrimage (1 Peter 1:1; 1 Peter 2:11), though Paul has σκηνος — skēnos so in 2 Corinthians 5:1, 2 Corinthians 5:4. Peter feels the nearness of death and the urgency upon him.To stir you up Present active infinitive of διεγειρω — diegeirō late (Arist., Hippocr., Herodian, papyri), perfective Old word, from υπομιμνησκω — hupomimnēskō (2 Peter 1:12), in N.T. only here, 2 Peter 3:1; 2 Timothy 1:5. “By way of reminding you.” [source]
1 John 3:19 Shall assure [πείσομεν]
Two renderings are possible; the primitive meaning persuade (Acts 19:26; Acts 17:4; 2 Corinthians 5:11); or the secondary and consequent sense, assure, quiet, conciliate (Matthew 28:14). Render as A.V., and Rev. as sure. See critical note at the end of the commentary on this Epistle. [source]
1 John 2:2 The propitiation [ἱλασμός]
Only here and 1 John 4:10. From ἱλάσκομαι toappease, to conciliate to one's self, which occurs Luke 18:13; Hebrews 2:17. The noun means originally an appeasing or propitiating, and passes, through Alexandrine usage, into the sense of the means of appeasing, as here. The construction is to be particularly noted; for, in the matter of ( περί ) our sins; the genitive case of that for which propitiation is made. In Hebrews 2:17, the accusative case, also of the sins to be propitiated. In classical usage, on the other hand, the habitual construction is the accusative (direct objective case), of the person propitiated. So in Homer, of the gods. Θεὸν ἱλάσκεσθαι is to make a God propitious to one. See “Iliad,” i., 386,472. Of men whom one wishes to conciliate by divine honors after death. So Herodotus, of Philip of Crotona. “His beauty gained him honors at the hands of the Egestaeans which they never accorded to any one else; for they raised a hero-temple over his grave, and they still propitiate him ( αὐτὸν ἱλάσκονται ) with sacrifices” (v., 47). Again, “The Parians, having propitiated Themistocles ( Θεμιστοκλέα ἱλασάμενοι ) with gifts, escaped the visits of the army” (viii., 112). The change from this construction shows, to quote Canon Westcott, “that the scriptural conception of the verb is not that of appeasing one who is angry, with a personal feeling, against the offender; but of altering the character of that which, from without, occasions a necessary alienation, and interposes an inevitable obstacle to fellowship. Such phrases as 'propitiating God,' and God 'being reconciled' are foreign to the language of the New Testament. Man is reconciled (2 Corinthians 5:18sqq.; Romans 5:10sq.). There is a propitiation in the matter of the sin or of the sinner.” [source]
1 John 2:1 We have [εχομεν]
Present active indicative of εχω — echō in the apodosis, a present reality like εχομεν — echomen in 2 Corinthians 5:1.An advocate (παρακλητον — paraklēton). See note on John 14:16, and John 14:26; and note on John 15:26; and John 16:7 for this word, nowhere else in the N.T. The Holy Spirit is God‘s Advocate on earth with men, while Christ is man‘s Advocate with the Father (the idea, but not the word, in Romans 8:31-39; Hebrews 7:25). As δικαιος — dikaios (righteous) Jesus is qualified to plead our case and to enter the Father‘s presence (Hebrews 2:18). [source]
1 John 2:1 That ye may not sin [ινα μη αμαρτητε]
Purpose (negative) clause with ινα μη — hina mē and the second aorist (ingressive, commit sin) active subjunctive of αμαρτανω — hamartanō to sin. John has no patience with professional perfectionists (1 John 1:8-10), but he has still less with loose-livers like some of the Gnostics who went to all sorts of excesses without shame.If any man sin (εαν τις αμαρτηι — ean tis hamartēi). Third-class condition with εαν — ean and second aorist (ingressive) active subjunctive again, “if one commit sin.”We have Present active indicative of εχω — echō in the apodosis, a present reality like εχομεν — echomen in 2 Corinthians 5:1.An advocate (παρακλητον — paraklēton). See note on John 14:16, and John 14:26; and note on John 15:26; and John 16:7 for this word, nowhere else in the N.T. The Holy Spirit is God‘s Advocate on earth with men, while Christ is man‘s Advocate with the Father (the idea, but not the word, in Romans 8:31-39; Hebrews 7:25). As δικαιος — dikaios (righteous) Jesus is qualified to plead our case and to enter the Father‘s presence (Hebrews 2:18). [source]
1 John 2:2 The propitiation [ιλασμος]
Late substantive from ιλασκομαι — hilaskomai (Luke 18:13; Hebrews 2:17), in lxx, Philo, Plutarch, in N.T. only here and 1 John 4:10. Christ himself is the means of propitiation for It is possible to supply the ellipsis here of των αμαρτιων — tōn hamartiōn (the sins of) as we have it in Hebrews 7:27, but a simpler way is just to regard “the whole world” as a mass of sin (1 John 5:19). At any rate, the propitiation by Christ provides for salvation for all (Hebrews 2:9) if they will only be reconciled with God (2 Corinthians 5:19-21). [source]
1 John 2:2 For the whole world [περι ολου του κοσμου]
It is possible to supply the ellipsis here of των αμαρτιων — tōn hamartiōn (the sins of) as we have it in Hebrews 7:27, but a simpler way is just to regard “the whole world” as a mass of sin (1 John 5:19). At any rate, the propitiation by Christ provides for salvation for all (Hebrews 2:9) if they will only be reconciled with God (2 Corinthians 5:19-21). [source]
Revelation 20:12 Another book which is the book of life [αλλο βιβλιον ο εστιν της ζωης]
This book has already been mentioned (Revelation 3:5; Revelation 13:8; Revelation 17:8). “It is the roll of living citizens of Jerusalem” (Swete), “the church of the first born enrolled in heaven” (Hebrews 12:23). The books are “the vouchers for the book of life” (Alford). We are saved by grace, but character at last (according to their works) is the test as the fruit of the tree (Matthew 7:16, Matthew 7:20; Matthew 10:32.; 25:31-46; John 15:6; 2 Corinthians 5:10; Romans 2:10; Revelation 2:23; Revelation 20:12; Revelation 22:12). [source]
Revelation 22:12 To render [αποδουναι]
Second aorist active infinitive of purpose of αποδιδωμι — apodidōmi to give back. Each will receive the reward according to his own work (Revelation 2:23; 2 Corinthians 5:10; Romans 2:26). [source]
Revelation 20:11 A great white throne [τρονον μεγαν λευκον]
Here μεγαν — megan (great) is added to the throne pictures in Revelation 4:4; Revelation 20:4. The scene is prepared for the last judgment often mentioned in the N.T. (Matt 25:31-46; Romans 14:10; 2 Corinthians 5:10). “The absolute purity of this Supreme Court is symbolized by the colour of the Throne” (Swete) as in Daniel 7:9; Psalm 9:1; Psalm 97:2. The name of God is not mentioned, but the Almighty Father sits upon the throne (Revelation 4:2., Revelation 4:9; Revelation 5:1, Revelation 5:7, Revelation 5:13; Revelation 6:16; Revelation 7:10, Revelation 7:15; Revelation 19:4; Revelation 21:5), and the Son sits there with him (Hebrews 1:3) and works with the Father (John 5:19-21; John 10:30; Matthew 25:31.; Acts 17:31; 2 Corinthians 5:10; 2 Timothy 4:1). [source]
Revelation 20:12 Books were opened [βιβλια ηνοιχτησαν]
First aorist passive of ανοιγω — anoigō Like Daniel 7:10. The record of each human being has been kept in God‘s books.Were judged (εκριτησαν — ekrithēsan). First aorist passive indicative of κρινω — krinō The sentence upon each rests upon written evidence.Another book which is the book of life This book has already been mentioned (Revelation 3:5; Revelation 13:8; Revelation 17:8). “It is the roll of living citizens of Jerusalem” (Swete), “the church of the first born enrolled in heaven” (Hebrews 12:23). The books are “the vouchers for the book of life” (Alford). We are saved by grace, but character at last (according to their works) is the test as the fruit of the tree (Matthew 7:16, Matthew 7:20; Matthew 10:32.; 25:31-46; John 15:6; 2 Corinthians 5:10; Romans 2:10; Revelation 2:23; Revelation 20:12; Revelation 22:12). [source]
Revelation 20:13 Death and Hades [ο τανατος και ο αιδης]
“An inseparable pair” (Swete) as in Revelation 1:18; Revelation 6:8; Revelation 20:14. So in Matthew 16:18 “the gates of Hades” means the power of death. Etymologically Hades is the unseen world where all who die are as opposed to this visible world, but in actual use Hades is sometimes treated as the abode of the unrighteous (Luke 16:23). Charles thinks that this is true here, though there is nothing to show it apart from the personification of death and Hades and the casting of both into the lake of fire in Revelation 20:14. Here again “each man” (εκαστος — hekastos) receives judgment according to his deeds (Matthew 16:27; 1 Corinthians 3:13; 2 Corinthians 5:10; Romans 2:6; Romans 14:12; 1 Peter 1:17; Revelation 2:23). [source]
Revelation 3:5 In white garments [εν ιματιοις λευκοις]
Apparently the spiritual bodies in the risen life as in 2 Corinthians 5:1, 2 Corinthians 5:4 and often in Revelation (Revelation 3:4, Revelation 3:5; Revelation 6:11; Revelation 7:9, Revelation 7:13.; Revelation 19:8).I will in no wise blot out (ου μη εχαλειπσω — ou mē exaleipsō). Strong double negative ου μη — ou mē and the first aorist active (or future) of εχαλειπω — exaleiphō old word, to wipe out (Acts 3:19).Of the book of life Ablative case with εκ — ek This divine register first occurs in Exodus 32:32. and often in the O.T. See Luke 10:20; Philemon 4:3; Revelation 13:8; Revelation 20:15; Revelation 21:27. The book is in Christ‘s hands (Revelation 13:8; Revelation 21:27).His name (το ονομα αυτου — to onoma autou). The name of the one who overcomes (ο νικων — ho nikōn). Clear reminiscence of the words of Christ about confessing to the Father those who confess him here (Matthew 10:32; Mark 8:38; Luke 9:26; Luke 12:8). Whether John knew the Synoptic Gospels (and why not?) he certainly knew such sayings of Jesus. [source]

What do the individual words in 2 Corinthians 5:1 mean?

We know for that if - earthly of us house the tent should be destroyed a building from God we have a house not made with hands eternal in the heavens
Οἴδαμεν γὰρ ὅτι ἐὰν ἐπίγειος ἡμῶν οἰκία τοῦ σκήνους καταλυθῇ οἰκοδομὴν ἐκ Θεοῦ ἔχομεν οἰκίαν ἀχειροποίητον αἰώνιον ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς

Οἴδαμεν  We  know 
Parse: Verb, Perfect Indicative Active, 1st Person Plural
Root: οἶδα  
Sense: to see.
ὅτι  that 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ὅτι  
Sense: that, because, since.
  - 
Parse: Article, Nominative Feminine Singular
Root:  
Sense: this, that, these, etc.
ἐπίγειος  earthly 
Parse: Adjective, Nominative Feminine Singular
Root: ἐπίγειος  
Sense: existing upon the earth, earthly, terrestrial.
ἡμῶν  of  us 
Parse: Personal / Possessive Pronoun, Genitive 1st Person Plural
Root: ἐγώ  
Sense: I, me, my.
οἰκία  house 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Feminine Singular
Root: οἰκία  
Sense: a house.
σκήνους  tent 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Neuter Singular
Root: σκῆνος  
Sense: a tabernacle, a tent.
καταλυθῇ  should  be  destroyed 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Subjunctive Passive, 3rd Person Singular
Root: καταλύω  
Sense: to dissolve, disunite.
οἰκοδομὴν  a  building 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: οἰκοδομή  
Sense: (the act of) building, building up.
Θεοῦ  God 
Parse: Noun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: θεός  
Sense: a god or goddess, a general name of deities or divinities.
ἔχομεν  we  have 
Parse: Verb, Present Indicative Active, 1st Person Plural
Root: ἔχω  
Sense: to have, i.e. to hold.
οἰκίαν  a  house 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: οἰκία  
Sense: a house.
ἀχειροποίητον  not  made  with  hands 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: ἀχειροποίητος  
Sense: not made with hands.
αἰώνιον  eternal 
Parse: Adjective, Accusative Feminine Singular
Root: αἰώνιος  
Sense: without beginning and end, that which always has been and always will be.
οὐρανοῖς  heavens 
Parse: Noun, Dative Masculine Plural
Root: οὐρανός  
Sense: the vaulted expanse of the sky with all things visible in it.