The Meaning of Matthew 14:22 Explained

Matthew 14:22

KJV: And straightway Jesus constrained his disciples to get into a ship, and to go before him unto the other side, while he sent the multitudes away.

YLT: And immediately Jesus constrained his disciples to go into the boat, and to go before him to the other side, till he might let away the multitudes;

Darby: And immediately he compelled the disciples to go on board ship, and to go on before him to the other side, until he should have dismissed the crowds.

ASV: And straightway he constrained the disciples to enter into the boat, and to go before him unto the other side, till he should send the multitudes away.

What does Matthew 14:22 Mean?

Verse Meaning

As soon as the people had finished eating, Jesus "immediately compelled" (Gr. eutheos enagkasen) His disciples to enter a boat and depart for the other side of the lake. There appear to have been several reasons for His unusual action. First, this miracle appears to have refueled the enthusiasm of some in the crowd to draft Jesus and to force Him to lead the nation (cf. John 6:15). Perhaps Jesus wanted to spare His disciples from this attractive temptation. [1] Second, Jesus wanted to get away to pray ( Matthew 14:23). Third, He wanted to prepare to get some rest ( Mark 6:31-32). Fourth, He had an important lesson to teach them.
". . . there are two kinds of storms: storms of correction, when God disciplines us; and storms of perfection, when God helps us to grow. Jonah was in a storm because he disobeyed God and had to be corrected. The disciples were in a storm because they obeyed Christ and had to be perfected." [2]
Evidently Jesus sent the disciples up the eastern Galilee coast toward Bethsaida Julias with orders to wait for Him but not beyond a certain time ( John 6:17). [3] He planned to travel north by foot. They proceeded west across the lake by boat when He did not appear by the prearranged deadline.

Context Summary

Matthew 14:22-36 - Help In The Hour Of Need
Jesus always comes in the storm. It had been a great relief to escape from the pressure of the crowd to His place of prayer, on heights swept by the evening breeze and lighted by the holy stars. But He tore Himself away because His friends needed Him. He is watching you also in the storm and will certainly come to your help.
He uses the element we dread as the path for His approach. The waves were endangering the boat, but Jesus walked on them. In our lives are people and circumstances we dread, but it is through these that the greatest blessing of our lives will come, if we look through them to Christ.
His coming is sometimes delayed. The gray dawn was already beginning to spread over the scene. The disciples' strength was spent. He was not too late to be of service, but just in time to save them from despair. Be of good cheer, and if Jesus bids you come to Him on the water, always believe that His commands are enabling. Keep looking to Him, not at the storm. [source]

Chapter Summary: Matthew 14

1  Herod's opinion of Jesus
3  Wherefore John Baptist was beheaded
13  Jesus departs into a solitary place,
15  where he feeds five thousand men with five loves and two fishes
22  He walks on the sea to his disciples;
34  and landing at Gennesaret,
35  heals the sick who touch of the hem of his garment

Greek Commentary for Matthew 14:22

Constrained [ηναγκασεν]
Literally, “compelled” or “forced.” See this word also in Luke 14:23. The explanation for this strong word in Mark 6:45 and Matthew 14:22 is given in John 6:15. It is the excited purpose of the crowd to take Jesus by force and to make him national king. This would be political revolution and would defeat all the plans of Jesus about his kingdom. Things have reached a climax. The disciples were evidently swept off their feet by the mob psychology for they still shared the Pharisaic hope of a political kingdom. With the disciples out of the way Jesus could handle the crowd more easily, till he should send the multitudes away The use of the aorist subjunctive with εως — heōs or εως ου — heōs hou is a neat and common Greek idiom where the purpose is not yet realized. So in Matthew 18:30; Matthew 26:36. “While” sometimes renders it well. The subjunctive is retained after a past tense instead of the change to the optative of the ancient Attic. The optative is very rare anyhow, but Luke uses it with πριν η — prin ē in Acts 25:16. [source]
Constrained []
Implying the disciples' reluctance to leave him behind. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Matthew 14:22

Matthew 14:22 Constrained [ηναγκασεν]
Literally, “compelled” or “forced.” See this word also in Luke 14:23. The explanation for this strong word in Mark 6:45 and Matthew 14:22 is given in John 6:15. It is the excited purpose of the crowd to take Jesus by force and to make him national king. This would be political revolution and would defeat all the plans of Jesus about his kingdom. Things have reached a climax. The disciples were evidently swept off their feet by the mob psychology for they still shared the Pharisaic hope of a political kingdom. With the disciples out of the way Jesus could handle the crowd more easily, till he should send the multitudes away The use of the aorist subjunctive with εως — heōs or εως ου — heōs hou is a neat and common Greek idiom where the purpose is not yet realized. So in Matthew 18:30; Matthew 26:36. “While” sometimes renders it well. The subjunctive is retained after a past tense instead of the change to the optative of the ancient Attic. The optative is very rare anyhow, but Luke uses it with πριν η — prin ē in Acts 25:16. [source]
Mark 6:45 While he himself sendeth the multitude away [εως αυτος απολυει τον οχλον]
Matthew 14:22 has it “till he should send away” (εως ου απολυσηι — heōs hou apolusēi) with the aorist subjunctive of purpose. Mark with the present indicative απολυει — apoluei pictures Jesus as personally engaged in persuading the crowds to go away now. John 6:41. explains this activity of Jesus. The crowds had become so excited that they were in the mood to start a revolution against the Roman government and proclaim Jesus king. He had already forced in reality the disciples to leave in a boat to go before him (προαγειν — proagein) in order to get them out of this atmosphere of overwrought excitement with a political twist to the whole conception of the Messianic Kingdom. They were in grave danger of being swept off their feet and falling heedlessly into the Pharisaic conception and so defeating the whole teaching and training of Jesus with them. See note on Matthew 14:22, Matthew 14:23. To this pass things had come one year before the Crucifixion. He had done his best to help and bless the crowds and lost his chance to rest. No one really understood Jesus, not the crowds, not the disciples. Jesus needed the Father to stay and steady him. The devil had come again to tempt him with world dominion in league with the Pharisees, the populace, and the devil in the background. [source]
Mark 6:45 to go before him [προαγειν]
(προαγειν — proagein) in order to get them out of this atmosphere of overwrought excitement with a political twist to the whole conception of the Messianic Kingdom. They were in grave danger of being swept off their feet and falling heedlessly into the Pharisaic conception and so defeating the whole teaching and training of Jesus with them. See note on Matthew 14:22, Matthew 14:23. To this pass things had come one year before the Crucifixion. He had done his best to help and bless the crowds and lost his chance to rest. No one really understood Jesus, not the crowds, not the disciples. Jesus needed the Father to stay and steady him. The devil had come again to tempt him with world dominion in league with the Pharisees, the populace, and the devil in the background. [source]
Luke 14:23 Compel []
Compare constrained, Matthew 14:22; Acts 26:11; Galatians 6:12. Not to use force, but to constrain them against the reluctance which such poor creatures would feel at accepting the invitation of a great lord. [source]
Luke 14:23 Hedges []
is fenced in places from πρασσω — phrassō to fence in (Romans 3:19).Compel (αναγκασον — anagkason). First aorist active imperative of αναγκαζω — anagkazō from αναγκη — anagkē (Luke 14:18). By persuasion of course. There is no thought of compulsory salvation. “Not to use force, but to constrain them against the reluctance which such poor creatures would feel at accepting the invitation of a great lord” (Vincent). As examples of such “constraint” in this verb, see note on Matthew 14:22; Acts 26:11; Galatians 6:12.That my house may be filled First aorist passive subjunctive of γεμιζω — gemizō to fill full, old verb from γεμω — gemō to be full. Effective aorist. Subjunctive with ινα — hina in final clause. The Gentiles are to take the place that the Jews might have had (Romans 11:25). Bengel says: Nec natura nec gratia patitur vacuum. [source]
Luke 14:23 Compel [αναγκασον]
First aorist active imperative of αναγκαζω — anagkazō from αναγκη — anagkē (Luke 14:18). By persuasion of course. There is no thought of compulsory salvation. “Not to use force, but to constrain them against the reluctance which such poor creatures would feel at accepting the invitation of a great lord” (Vincent). As examples of such “constraint” in this verb, see note on Matthew 14:22; Acts 26:11; Galatians 6:12. [source]
John 6:14 That should come [ὁ ἐρχόμενος]
Literally, the one coming. Rev., that cometh. John 6:15-21. Compare Matthew 14:22-36; Mark 6:45-52. [source]
John 6:15 Perceiving [γνους]
Second aorist active participle of γινωσκω — ginōskō It was not hard for Christ to read the mind of this excited mob. They were about Present active indicative of μελλω — mellō Probably the leaders were already starting. Take him by force Present active infinitive of αρπαζω — harpazō old verb for violent seizing (Matthew 11:12; Matthew 13:19). There was a movement to start a revolution against Roman rule in Palestine by proclaiming Jesus King and driving away Pilate. To make him king Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the first aorist active subjunctive of ποιεω — poieō with βασιλεα — basilea as predicate accusative. It was a crisis that called for quick action. Himself alone At first he had the disciples with him (John 6:3). But he sent them hurriedly by boat to the western side (Mark 6:45.; Matthew 14:22.) because clearly the apostles were sympathetic with the revolutionary impulse of the crowd. Then Jesus sent the multitudes away also and went up into the mountain alone. He was alone in every sense, for no one but the Father understood him at this stage, not even his own disciples. He went up to pray (Mark 6:46; Matthew 14:23). [source]
John 6:22 Which stood [ο εστηκως]
Perfect active (intransitive) participle of ιστημι — histēmi to put, to stand. Jesus had sent the multitudes away the evening before (Mark 6:45; Matthew 14:22), but evidently some did not go very far, still lingering in excitement on the eastern side of the lake next morning. Boat Diminutive of πλοιον — ploion little boat (Mark 3:9). Entered not with Second aorist active of the double compound verb συνεισερχομαι — suneiserchomai followed by associative instrumental case ματηταις — mathētais Went away alone Second aorist active indicative of απερχομαι — aperchomai to go away or off. Μονοι — Monoi is predicate nominative. These people noted these three items. [source]
1 Timothy 5:24 Going before to judgment [προάγουσαι εἰς κρίσιν]
Προάγειν , oP. In N.T. habitually with a local meaning, either intransitive, as Matthew href="/desk/?q=mt+2:9&sr=1">Matthew 2:9; Matthew 14:22; Mark 11:9; or transitive, as Acts 12:6; Acts 17:5. The meaning here is that these open sins go before their perpetrator to the judgment-seat like heralds, proclaiming their sentence in advance. Κρίσιν , not specifically of the judgment of men or of the final judgment of God, or of the sentence of an ecclesiastical court - but indefinitely. The writer would say: no judicial utterance is necessary to condemn them of these sins. The word in Paul, only 2 Thessalonians 1:5. [source]

What do the individual words in Matthew 14:22 mean?

And immediately He compelled the disciples to enter into the boat to go before Him to other side until that He would have dismissed crowds
Καὶ εὐθέως ἠνάγκασεν τοὺς μαθητὰς ἐμβῆναι εἰς τὸ πλοῖον προάγειν αὐτὸν εἰς πέραν ἕως οὗ ἀπολύσῃ ὄχλους

εὐθέως  immediately 
Parse: Adverb
Root: εὐθέως  
Sense: straightway, immediately, forthwith.
ἠνάγκασεν  He  compelled 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἀναγκάζω  
Sense: to necessitate, compel, drive to, constrain.
μαθητὰς  disciples 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: μαθητής  
Sense: a learner, pupil, disciple.
ἐμβῆναι  to  enter 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Infinitive Active
Root: ἐμβαίνω  
Sense: to go into, step into.
εἰς  into 
Parse: Preposition
Root: εἰς  
Sense: into, unto, to, towards, for, among.
πλοῖον  boat 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: πλοῖον  
Sense: a ship.
προάγειν  to  go  before 
Parse: Verb, Present Infinitive Active
Root: προάγω  
Sense: to lead forward, lead forth.
πέραν  other  side 
Parse: Adverb
Root: πέραν  
Sense: beyond, on the other side.
ἕως  until 
Parse: Preposition
Root: ἕως  
Sense: till, until.
οὗ  that 
Parse: Personal / Relative Pronoun, Genitive Masculine Singular
Root: ὅς 
Sense: who, which, what, that.
ἀπολύσῃ  He  would  have  dismissed 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Subjunctive Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἀπολύω  
Sense: to set free.
ὄχλους  crowds 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Plural
Root: ὄχλος  
Sense: a crowd.

What are the major concepts related to Matthew 14:22?

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