The Meaning of John 6:14 Explained

John 6:14

KJV: Then those men, when they had seen the miracle that Jesus did, said, This is of a truth that prophet that should come into the world.

YLT: The men, then, having seen the sign that Jesus did, said -- 'This is truly the Prophet, who is coming to the world;'

Darby: The men therefore, having seen the sign which Jesus had done, said, This is truly the prophet which is coming into the world.

ASV: When therefore the people saw the sign which he did, they said, This is of a truth the prophet that cometh into the world.

What does John 6:14 Mean?

Study Notes

world
kosmos = mankind.
The Greek word kosmos means "order," "arrangement," and so, with the Greeks, "beauty"; for order and arrangement in the sense of system are at the bottom of the Greek conception of beauty.
When used in the N.T. of humanity, the "world" of men, it is organized humanity-- humanity in families, tribes, nations--which is meant. The word for chaotic, unorganized humanity--the mere mass of man is thalassa, the "sea" of men (e.g.) Revelation 13:1 (See Scofield " Revelation 13:8 ") . For "world" (kosmos) in the bad ethical sense, "world system" John 7:7 .

Verse Meaning

The Jews who enjoyed Jesus" provision concluded that He must be the prophet whom Moses had predicted ( Deuteronomy 18:15-19; cf. John 1:21; John 7:40; John 7:52). Jesus had fed the Israelites in a wilderness area ( Matthew 14:15; Mark 6:35) as Moses had with bread that came from heaven.

Context Summary

John 6:1-14 - The Multitude Satisfied With Food
In this chapter we have a further illustration of John's method in selecting for his purpose the miracles which became the texts of our Lord's discourses. These multitudes had evidently gathered on their way to Jerusalem to celebrate the Passover; and the imminence of that great festival, when the worshipers not only sacrificed but partook of the slain lamb, gave point to much that our Lord said after this memorable feeding of the multitude.
Christ often tests us to see what we shall say and do in the presence of overwhelming difficulty, but He always knows the way out. We at once begin to calculate our paltry resources, and to confess their inadequacy. We come back to explain that when we have done our utmost, we can provide very little. Then He steps in, determined that everyone shall be filled, with an ample supply left over. He makes His guests sit down in comfort on the grass, because there is plenty of time, as well as an abundance of food, for a happy and comfortable meal. We must bring Him what we have, however slender; must enter into His great plan and arrange the people for the banquet; must distribute the food and gather up the broken pieces. The world is to be fed by the cooperation of Christ and His Church. [source]

Chapter Summary: John 6

1  Jesus feeds five thousand men with five loaves and two fishes
15  Thereupon the people would have made him king;
16  but withdrawing himself, he walks on the sea to his disciples;
26  reproves the people flocking after him, and all the fleshly hearers of his word;
32  declares himself to be the bread of life to believers
66  Many disciples depart from him
68  Peter confesses him
70  Judas is a devil

Greek Commentary for John 6:14

Saw the sign which he did [ιδοντες α εποιησεν σημεια]
“Signs” oldest MSS. have. This sign added to those already wrought (John 6:2). Cf. John 2:23; John 3:2. They said Inchoative imperfect, began to say. Of a truth Common adverb (from αλητης — alēthēs) in John (John 7:40). The prophet that cometh There was a popular expectation about the prophet of Deuteronomy 18:15 as being the Messiah (John 1:21; John 11:27). The phrase is peculiar to John, but the idea is in Acts (Acts 3:22; Acts 7:37). The people are on the tiptoe of expectation and believe that Jesus is the political Messiah of Pharisaic hope. [source]
That should come [ὁ ἐρχόμενος]
Literally, the one coming. Rev., that cometh. John 6:15-21. Compare Matthew 14:22-36; Mark 6:45-52. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for John 6:14

Mark 8:29 Thou art the Christ [Συ ει ο Χριστος]
Mark does not give “the Son of the living God” (Matthew 16:16) or “of God” (Luke 9:20). The full confession is the form in Matthew. Luke‘s language means practically the same, while Mark‘s is the briefest. But the form in Mark really means the full idea. Mark omits all praise of Peter, probably because Peter had done so in his story of the incident. For criticism of the view that Matthew‘s narrative is due to ecclesiastical development and effort to justify ecclesiastical prerogatives, see discussion on Matthew 16:16, Matthew 16:18. The disciples had confessed him as Messiah before. Thus John 1:41; John 4:29; John 6:69; Matthew 14:33. But Jesus had ceased to use the word Messiah to avoid political complications and a revolutionary movement (John 6:14.). But did the disciples still believe in Jesus as Messiah after all the defections and oppositions seen by them? It was a serious test to which Jesus now put them. [source]
Luke 19:38 The king cometh [ο ερχομενοσ ο βασιλευς]
The Messianic hopes of the people were now all ablaze with expectation of immediate realization. A year ago in Galilee he had frustrated their plans for a revolutionary movement “to take him by force to make him king” (John 6:15). The phrase “the coming king” like “the coming prophet” (John 6:14; Deuteronomy 18:15) expressed the hope of the long-looked-for Messiah. They are singing from the Hallel in their joy that Jesus at last is making public proclamation of his Messiahship. [source]
John 1:9 That was the true light, etc. []
This passage is differently interpreted. Some join coming ( ἐρχόμενον ) with man ( ἄνθρωπον ), and render every man that cometh, as A.V. Others join coming with light, and render, as Rev., the true light - coming into the world. The latter is the preferable rendering, and is justified by John's frequent use of the phrase coming into the world, with reference to our Lord. See John 3:19; John 6:14; John 9:39; John 11:27; John 12:46; John 16:28; John 18:37. In John 3:19and John 12:46, it is used as here, in connection with light. Note especially the latter, where Jesus himself says, “I am come a light into the world.” Was ( ἦν ) is to be taken independently, there was, and not united in a single conception with coming ( ἐρχόμενον ), so as to mean was coming. The light was, existed, when the Baptist appeared as a witness. Up to the time of his appearance it was all along coming: its permanent being conjoined with a slow, progressive coming, a revelation “at sundry times and in diverse manners” (Hebrews 1:1). “From the first He was on His way to the world, advancing toward the incarnation by preparatory revelations” (Westcott). Render therefore as Rev., “There was the true light, even the light which lighteth every man, coming into the world.” [source]
John 1:21 Art thou that prophet? []
Rev., “the prophet.” According to the Greek order, the prophet art thou. See Deuteronomy 18:15, and compare Acts 3:22; Acts 7:37; John 1:46; John 6:14. [source]
John 10:24 Came round about him [εκυκλωσαν αυτον]
Aorist active indicative of κυκλοω — kukloō old verb from κυκλος — kuklos (cycle, circle). See Acts 14:20 for the circle of disciples around Paul when stoned. Evidently the hostile Jews cherished the memory of the stinging rebuke given them by Jesus when here last, particularly the allegory of the Good Shepherd (10:1-19), in which he drew so sharply their own picture. How long dost thou hold us in suspense? Literally, “Until when dost thou lift up our soul?” But what do they mean by this metaphor? Αιρω — Airō is common enough to lift up the eyes (John 11:41), the voice (Luke 17:13), and in Psalm 25:1; Psalm 86:4 (Josephus, Ant. III. ii. 3) we have “to lift up the soul.” We are left to the context to judge the precise meaning. Clearly the Jews mean to imply doubt and suspense. The next remark makes it clear. If thou art the Christ Condition of first class assumed to be true for the sake of argument. Tell us plainly Conclusion with ειπον — eipon rather than the usual ειπε — eipe as if first aorist active imperative like λυσον — luson The point is in “plainly” Jesus declined to use the word Χριστος — Christos (Messiah) then as now because of the political bearing of the word in their minds. The populace in Galilee had once tried to make him king in opposition to Pilate (John 6:14.). When Jesus does confess on oath before Caiaphas that he is the Christ the Son of God (Mark 14:61.; Matthew 26:63.), the Sanhedrin instantly vote him guilty of blasphemy and then bring him to Pilate with the charge of claiming to be king as a rival to Caesar. Jesus knew their minds too well to be caught now. [source]
John 11:27 Yea, Lord [Ναι κυριε]
Martha probably did not understand all that Jesus said and meant, but she did believe in the future resurrection, in eternal life for believers in Christ, in the power of Christ to raise even the dead here and now. She had heroic faith and makes now her own confession of faith in words that outrank those of Peter in Matthew 16:16 because she makes hers with her brother dead now four days and with the hope that Jesus will raise him up now. I have believed (πιστευω — pepisteuka). Perfect active indicative of οτι συ ει ο Χριστος ο υιος του τεου — pisteuō It is my settled and firm faith. Peter uses this same tense in John 6:69. That thou art the Son of God (ο εις τον κοσμον ερχομενος — hoti su ei ho Christos ho huios tou theou). The Messiah or the Christ (John 1:41) was to be also “the Son of God” as the Baptist said he had found Jesus to be (John 1:34), as Peter confessed on Hermon for the apostles (Matthew 16:16), as Jesus claimed to be (John 11:41) and confessed on oath before Caiaphas that he was (Matthew 26:63.), and as John stated that it was his purpose to prove in his Gospel (John 20:31). But no one said it under more trying circumstances than Martha. Even he that cometh into the world (ho eis ton kosmon erchomenos). No “even” in the Greek. This was a popular way of putting the people‘s expectation (John 6:14; Matthew 11:3). Jesus himself spoke of his coming into the world (John 9:39; John 16:28; John 8:37). [source]
John 6:26 Not because ye saw signs [ουχ οτι ειδετε σημεια]
Second aorist active indicative of the defective verb οραω — horaō They had seen the “signs” wrought by Jesus (John 6:2), but this one had led to wild fanaticism (John 6:14) and complete failure to grasp the spiritual lessons. But because ye ate of the loaves Second aorist active indicative of εστιω — esthiō defective verb. Ye were filled First aorist passive indicative of χορταζω — chortazō from χορτος — chortos (grass) as in John 6:10, to eat grass, then to eat anything, to satisfy hunger. They were more concerned with hungry stomachs than with hungry souls. It was a sharp and deserved rebuke. [source]
John 12:13 Took [ελαβον]
Second aorist active indicative of λαμβανω — lambanō The branches of the palm trees Ποινιχ — Phoinix is an old word for palm tree (Revelation 7:9 for the branches) and in Acts 27:12 the name of a city. αιον — Baion is apparently a word of Egyptian origin, palm branches, here only in N.T., but in the papyri and 1Macc 13:51. Here we have “the palm branches of the palm trees.” The use in 1Macc 13:51 (cf. 2Macc 10:7) is in the account of Simon‘s triumphal entry into Jerusalem. Bernard notes that to carry palms was a mark of triumphant homage to a victor or a king (Revelation 7:9). Palm trees grew on the Mount of Olives (Mark 11:8) on the road from Bethany to Jerusalem. The crowds (one in front and one behind, Mark 11:9; Matthew 21:9; John 2:18) cut the branches as they came (Matthew 21:8). To meet him Literally, for a meeting It was a scene of growing excitement. And cried out Imperfect active of κραυγαζω — kraugazō old and rare verb (from κραυγη — kraugē) as in Matthew 12:19; John 19:15. Hosannah Transliteration of the Hebrew word meaning “Save now.” The lxx renders it by Σωσον δη — Sōson dē (Save now). Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord Perfect passive participle of ευλογεω — eulogeō Quotation from Psalm 118:25., written, some think, for the dedication of the second temple, or, as others think, for the feast of tabernacles after the return (Ezra 3:1.). It was sung in the processional recitation then as a welcome to the worshippers. Here the words are addressed to the Messiah as is made plain by the addition of the words, “even the king of Israel” Jesus is here hailed by the multitudes as the long-looked for Messiah of Jewish hope and he allows them so to greet him (Luke 19:38-40), a thing that he prevented a year before in Galilee (John 6:14.). It is probable that “in the name of the Lord” should be taken with “blessed” as in Deuteronomy 21:5; 2 Samuel 6:18; 1 Kings 22:16; 2 Kings 2:24. The Messiah was recognized by Martha as the Coming One (John 11:27) and is so described by the Baptist (Matthew 11:3). Mark (Mark 11:10) adds “the kingdom that cometh” while Luke (John 19:38) has “the king that cometh.” “It was this public acclamation of Jesus as King of Israel or King of the Jews which was the foundation of the charge made against him before Pilate (John 18:33)” (Bernard). [source]
John 16:13 Howbeit [δε]
One of the most delicate and difficult particles to translate, varying from “and” to “but.” When he, the Spirit of truth, is come Indefinite relative clause (ερχομαι — hotan and the second aorist active subjunctive of εκεινος — erchomai no futurum exactum), “whenever he comes.” Note πνευμα — ekeinos (masculine demonstrative pronoun, though followed by neuter οδηγησει υμας — pneuma in apposition. See John 15:26 for this phrase about the Holy Spirit. He shall guide you (οδηγεω — hodēgēsei humas). Future active of old verb οδηγος — hodēgeō (from οδος — hodēgos from ηγεομαι — hodos way, οδηγησον με εις την αλητειαν σου — hēgeomai to lead). See Psalm 24:5 for “lead me into thy truth” (απ εαυτου — hodēgēson me eis tēn alētheian sou). Christ is both the Way and the Truth (John 14:6) and the Holy Spirit is the Guide who shows the way to the Truth (John 16:14). This he does gradually. We are still learning the truth in Christ. From himself (αναγγελει — aph' heautou). In this he is like Christ (John 1:26; John 12:49; John 14:10). He shall declare (αναγγελλω — anaggelei). Future active of τα ερχομενα — anaggellō as in John 4:25. See it also repeated in John 16:14. The things that are yet to come (ερχομαι — ta erchomena). Neuter plural articular participle of ο ερχομενος — erchomai “the coming things.” This phrase only here in the N.T. The things already begun concerning the work of the Kingdom (Luke 7:19.; Luke 18:30) not a chart of future history. See Luke 7:20; John 6:14; John 11:27 for ho erchomenos (the coming one) used of the Messiah. [source]
John 16:13 When he, the Spirit of truth, is come [οταν ελτηι εκεινοσ το πνευμα της αλητειας]
Indefinite relative clause (ερχομαι — hotan and the second aorist active subjunctive of εκεινος — erchomai no futurum exactum), “whenever he comes.” Note πνευμα — ekeinos (masculine demonstrative pronoun, though followed by neuter οδηγησει υμας — pneuma in apposition. See John 15:26 for this phrase about the Holy Spirit. He shall guide you (οδηγεω — hodēgēsei humas). Future active of old verb οδηγος — hodēgeō (from οδος — hodēgos from ηγεομαι — hodos way, οδηγησον με εις την αλητειαν σου — hēgeomai to lead). See Psalm 24:5 for “lead me into thy truth” (απ εαυτου — hodēgēson me eis tēn alētheian sou). Christ is both the Way and the Truth (John 14:6) and the Holy Spirit is the Guide who shows the way to the Truth (John 16:14). This he does gradually. We are still learning the truth in Christ. From himself (αναγγελει — aph' heautou). In this he is like Christ (John 1:26; John 12:49; John 14:10). He shall declare (αναγγελλω — anaggelei). Future active of τα ερχομενα — anaggellō as in John 4:25. See it also repeated in John 16:14. The things that are yet to come (ερχομαι — ta erchomena). Neuter plural articular participle of ο ερχομενος — erchomai “the coming things.” This phrase only here in the N.T. The things already begun concerning the work of the Kingdom (Luke 7:19.; Luke 18:30) not a chart of future history. See Luke 7:20; John 6:14; John 11:27 for ho erchomenos (the coming one) used of the Messiah. [source]

What do the individual words in John 6:14 mean?

The therefore people having seen what He had done [the] sign were saying - This is truly the Prophet who is coming into the world
Οἱ οὖν ἄνθρωποι ἰδόντες ἐποίησεν σημεῖον ἔλεγον ὅτι Οὗτός ἐστιν ἀληθῶς προφήτης ἐρχόμενος εἰς τὸν κόσμον

ἄνθρωποι  people 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: ἄνθρωπος  
Sense: a human being, whether male or female.
ἰδόντες  having  seen 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Active, Nominative Masculine Plural
Root: εἶδον 
Sense: to see with the eyes.
ἐποίησεν  He  had  done 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ποιέω  
Sense: to make.
σημεῖον  [the]  sign 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: σημεῖον  
Sense: a sign, mark, token.
ἔλεγον  were  saying 
Parse: Verb, Imperfect Indicative Active, 3rd Person Plural
Root: λέγω  
Sense: to speak, say.
ὅτι  - 
Parse: Conjunction
Root: ὅτι  
Sense: that, because, since.
Οὗτός  This 
Parse: Demonstrative Pronoun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: οὗτος  
Sense: this.
ἀληθῶς  truly 
Parse: Adverb
Root: ἀληθῶς  
Sense: truly, of a truth, in reality, most certainly.
προφήτης  Prophet 
Parse: Noun, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: προφήτης  
Sense: in Greek writings, an interpreter of oracles or of other hidden things.
ἐρχόμενος  is  coming 
Parse: Verb, Present Participle Middle or Passive, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἔρχομαι  
Sense: to come.
εἰς  into 
Parse: Preposition
Root: εἰς  
Sense: into, unto, to, towards, for, among.
κόσμον  world 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Masculine Singular
Root: κόσμος  
Sense: an apt and harmonious arrangement or constitution, order, government.