The Meaning of Mark 6:46 Explained

Mark 6:46

KJV: And when he had sent them away, he departed into a mountain to pray.

YLT: and having taken leave of them, he went away to the mountain to pray.

Darby: And, having dismissed them, he departed into the mountain to pray.

ASV: And after he had taken leave of them, he departed into the mountain to pray.

What does Mark 6:46 Mean?

Verse Meaning

This is the second of the three crises, all at night, that moved Jesus to pray that Mark recorded (cf. Mark 1:35; Mark 14:32-36). Evidently the desire of the multitudes to take Jesus by force to make Him king drove Him to pray (Gr. proseuchomai, cf. John 6:15). This was another temptation to secure Israel"s leadership without the Cross. References to Jesus praying always show His humanity and His dependence on His Father. The mountain contrasts with the shore where Jesus left the disciples.

Context Summary

Mark 6:30-56 - The Sympathy And Compassion Of Jesus
When the Apostles returned they had much to tell. Some were flushed with success, others radiant with victory over demons, others, perhaps, overstrained and weary, and all needing the quiet, holy influence of repose and silence in the Lord's company. And in those quiet hours or days, as the fever passed out of them, He taught them memorable lessons of how He would feed the world by His Church, and how His people would be safe amid the storms that swept the sea, for always he would watch them from the height, and come to them at the moment when His help was most needed. Christ sits as host at the great table of the Church, and the meager resources of His servants yield the starting point for His multiplication of bread. He bids us go and consider how little we have, that we may properly estimate the greatness of His help. Notice how the upward look precedes the breaking and giving. There is enough for each, not of bread alone, but of fish; and the disciples are refreshed by another kind of ministry. So the Lord recreates us by turning exhausted energies into new channels. What threatens to overpower us brings Christ to our side. But His footsteps must be arrested, if we would have His company. Where Jesus is, storms cease and the sick are made whole. [source]

Chapter Summary: Mark 6

1  Jesus is a prophet without honor in his own country
7  He gives the twelve power over unclean spirits
14  Various opinions of Jesus
16  John the Baptist is imprisoned, beheaded, and buried
30  The apostles return from preaching
34  The miracle of five loaves and two fishes
45  Jesus walks on the sea;
53  and heals all who touch him

Greek Commentary for Mark 6:46

When he had sent them away [ἀποτάξαμενος]
Rev., more correctly, after he had taken leave. Unclassical, and used in this sense only in later Greek. So in Luke 9:61; Acts 18:18; 2 Corinthians 2:13. [source]

Reverse Greek Commentary Search for Mark 6:46

Mark 3:7 Withdrew []
Mark alone notes no less than eleven occasions on which Jesus retired from his work, in order to escape his enemies or to pray in solitude, for rest, or for private conference with his disciples. See Mark 1:12; Mark 3:7; Mark 6:31, Mark 6:46; Mark 7:24, Mark 7:31; Mark 9:2; Mark 10:1; Mark 14:34. [source]
Mark 3:7 Withdrew to the sea [ανεχωρησεν εις την ταλασσαν]
Evidently Jesus knew of the plot to kill him, “perceiving it” (Matthew 12:15). “He and His would be safer by the open beach” (Swete). He has the disciples with him. Vincent notes that on eleven occasions Mark mentions the withdrawals of Jesus to escape his enemies, for prayer, for rest, for private conference with his disciples (Mark 1:12; Mark 3:7; Mark 6:31, Mark 6:46; Mark 7:24, Mark 7:31; Mark 9:2; Mark 10:1; Mark 14:34). But, as often, a great multitude (πολυ πλητος — polu plēthos) from Galilee followed him. [source]
Luke 9:61 To bid farewell [ἀποτάξασθαι]
In this sense the word is used only in later Greek. In classical Greek it signifies to set apart or assign, as a soldier to his post or an official to his office, and later to detach soldiers. Hence to dismiss one with orders. This latter sense may, as Kypke suggests, be included in the meaning of the word in this passage; the man desiring to return home, not merely to take formal leave, but also to give his final instructions to his friends and servants. Similarly, Acts 18:18, of Paul taking leave of the brethren at Corinth, and, presumably, giving them instructions at parting. In the New Testament the word is used invariably in the sense of bidding farewell. Mark 6:46 is rendered by Rev. after he had taken leave of them. See note there, and compare Luke 14:33; 2 Corinthians 2:13. [source]
Luke 9:61 To bid farewell to them that are at my house [αποταχασται τοις εις τον οικον μου]
In itself that was a good thing to do. This first aorist middle infinitive is from αποτασσω — apotassō an old verb, to detach, to separate, to assign as a detachment of soldiers. In the N.T. it only appears in the middle voice with the meaning common in late writers to bid adieu, to separate oneself from others. It is used in Acts 18:18 of Paul taking leave of the believers in Corinth. See also Mark 6:46; 2 Corinthians 2:13. It is thus a formal function and this man meant to go home and set things in order there and then in due time to come and follow Jesus. [source]
Luke 9:61 But first [πρωτον δε]
He also had something that was to come “first.”To bid farewell to them that are at my house (αποταχασται τοις εις τον οικον μου — apotaxasthai tois eis ton oikon mou). In itself that was a good thing to do. This first aorist middle infinitive is from αποτασσω — apotassō an old verb, to detach, to separate, to assign as a detachment of soldiers. In the N.T. it only appears in the middle voice with the meaning common in late writers to bid adieu, to separate oneself from others. It is used in Acts 18:18 of Paul taking leave of the believers in Corinth. See also Mark 6:46; 2 Corinthians 2:13. It is thus a formal function and this man meant to go home and set things in order there and then in due time to come and follow Jesus. [source]
John 17:1 Lifting up [επαρας]
First aorist active participle of επαιρω — epairō old and common verb with οπταλμους — ophthalmous (eyes) as in John 4:35; John 6:5; John 11:41. Father Vocative form as in John 16:5, John 16:11; John 11:41, Christ‘s usual way of beginning his prayers. It is inconceivable that this real Lord‘s Prayer is the free composition of a disciple put into the mouth of Jesus. It is rather “the tenacious memory of an old man recalling the greatest days of his life” (Bernard), aided by the Holy Spirit promised for this very purpose (John 14:26; John 16:13.). Jesus had the habit of prayer (Mark 1:35; Mark 6:46; Matthew 11:25.; Luke 3:21; Luke 5:16; Luke 6:12; Luke 9:18, Luke 9:28; Luke 11:22, Luke 11:42; Luke 23:34, Luke 23:46; John 11:41; John 12:27). He prayed here for himself (John 17:1-5), for the disciples (John 17:6-19), for all believers (John 17:20-26). The prayer is similar in spirit to the Model Prayer for us in Matthew 6:9-13. The hour for his glorification has come as he had already told the disciples (John 13:31.; John 12:23). Glorify thy Son First aorist active imperative of δοχαζω — doxazō the only personal petition in this prayer. Jesus had already used this word δοχαζω — doxazō for his death (John 13:31.). Here it carries us into the very depths of Christ‘s own consciousness. It is not merely for strength to meet the Cross, but for the power to glorify the Father by his death and resurrection and ascension, “that the Son may glorify thee” Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the first aorist active subjunctive. [source]
John 6:3 Into the mountain [εις το ορος]
From the level of the Jordan valley up into the high hill on the eastern side. Mark (Mark 6:46) and Matthew (Matthew 14:23) mention that after the miracle Jesus went further up into the mountain to pray. Sat Imperfect middle of κατημαι — kathēmai was sitting, a picture of repose. [source]
John 8:29 Is with me [μετ εμου εστιν]
The Incarnation brought separation from the Father in one sense, but in essence there is complete harmony and fellowship as he had already said (John 8:16) and will expand in John 17:21-26. He hath not left me alone First aorist active indicative of απιημι — aphiēmi “He did not leave me alone.” However much the crowds and the disciples misunderstood or left Jesus, the Father always comforted and understood him (Mark 6:46; Matthew 14:23; John 6:15). That are pleasing to him This old verbal adjective, from αρεσκω — areskō to please, in N.T. only here, Acts 6:4; Acts 12:3; 1 John 3:22. The joy of Jesus was in doing the will of the Father who sent him (John 4:34). [source]
John 6:15 Perceiving [γνους]
Second aorist active participle of γινωσκω — ginōskō It was not hard for Christ to read the mind of this excited mob. They were about Present active indicative of μελλω — mellō Probably the leaders were already starting. Take him by force Present active infinitive of αρπαζω — harpazō old verb for violent seizing (Matthew 11:12; Matthew 13:19). There was a movement to start a revolution against Roman rule in Palestine by proclaiming Jesus King and driving away Pilate. To make him king Purpose clause with ινα — hina and the first aorist active subjunctive of ποιεω — poieō with βασιλεα — basilea as predicate accusative. It was a crisis that called for quick action. Himself alone At first he had the disciples with him (John 6:3). But he sent them hurriedly by boat to the western side (Mark 6:45.; Matthew 14:22.) because clearly the apostles were sympathetic with the revolutionary impulse of the crowd. Then Jesus sent the multitudes away also and went up into the mountain alone. He was alone in every sense, for no one but the Father understood him at this stage, not even his own disciples. He went up to pray (Mark 6:46; Matthew 14:23). [source]
Acts 18:18 Took his leave [ἀποταξάμενος]
See on Luke 9:61; and Mark 6:46. [source]
Acts 18:18 Took his leave [αποταχαμενος]
First aorist middle (direct), old verb, to separate oneself, to bid farewell (Vulgate valefacio), as in Acts 18:21; Mark 6:46. Sailed thence (εχεπλει — exeplei). Imperfect active of εκπλεω — ekpleō old and common verb, inchoative imperfect, started to sail. Only Priscilla and Aquila are mentioned as his companions though others may have been in the party. Having shorn his head First aorist middle (causative) of κειρω — keirō old verb to shear (sheep) and the hair as also in 1 Corinthians 11:6. The participle is masculine and so cannot refer to Priscilla. Aquila comes next to the participle, but since mention of Priscilla and Aquila is parenthetical and the two other participles Imperfect active showing the continuance of the vow up till this time in Cenchreae, the port of Corinth when it expired. It was not a Nazarite vow which could be absolved only in Jerusalem. It is possible that the hair was only polled or trimmed, cut shorter, not “shaved” (κειρασται η χυρασται — xuraō as in Acts 21:24) for there is a distinction as both verbs are contrasted in 1 Corinthians 11:6 (keirāsthai ē xurāsthai). It is not clear what sort of a vow Paul had taken nor why he took it. It may have been a thank offering for the outcome at Corinth (Hackett). Paul as a Jew kept up his observance of the ceremonial law, but refused to impose it on the Gentiles. [source]
2 Corinthians 2:13 Taking my leave [ἀποταξάμενος]
The verb means, primarily, to set apart or separate; hence to separate one's self, withdraw, and so to take leave of. The A.V. gives this sense in every case, except Mark 6:46, where it wrongly renders sent away. See Luke 9:61; Acts 18:18, Acts 18:21. Ignatius, ἀποτάξαμενος τῷ βίῳ havingbid farewell to the life, that is, this lower life (Epistle to Philadelphia, 11). [source]
2 Corinthians 2:13 For my spirit [τωι πνευματι μου]
Dative of interest. Because I found not Titus (τωι μη ευρειν με Τιτον — tōi mē heurein me Titon). Instrumental case of the articular infinitive with negative μη — mē and accusative of general reference με — me “by the not finding Titus as to me.” Taking my leave of them First aorist middle participle of αποτασσω — apotassō old verb, to set apart, in middle in late Greek to separate oneself, to bid adieu to as in Mark 6:46. [source]
2 Corinthians 2:13 Taking my leave of them [αποταχαμενος αυτοις]
First aorist middle participle of αποτασσω — apotassō old verb, to set apart, in middle in late Greek to separate oneself, to bid adieu to as in Mark 6:46. [source]

What do the individual words in Mark 6:46 mean?

And having taken leave of them He departed into the mountain to pray
καὶ ἀποταξάμενος αὐτοῖς ἀπῆλθεν εἰς τὸ ὄρος προσεύξασθαι

ἀποταξάμενος  having  taken  leave  of 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Participle Middle, Nominative Masculine Singular
Root: ἀποτάσσω  
Sense: to set apart, separate.
ἀπῆλθεν  He  departed 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Indicative Active, 3rd Person Singular
Root: ἀπέρχομαι  
Sense: to go away, depart.
εἰς  into 
Parse: Preposition
Root: εἰς  
Sense: into, unto, to, towards, for, among.
ὄρος  mountain 
Parse: Noun, Accusative Neuter Singular
Root: ὄρος  
Sense: a mountain.
προσεύξασθαι  to  pray 
Parse: Verb, Aorist Infinitive Middle
Root: προσεύχομαι  
Sense: to offer prayers, to pray.

What are the major concepts related to Mark 6:46?

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