The Meaning of Hosea 13:14 Explained

Hosea 13:14

KJV: I will ransom them from the power of the grave; I will redeem them from death: O death, I will be thy plagues; O grave, I will be thy destruction: repentance shall be hid from mine eyes.

YLT: From the hand of Sheol I do ransom them, From death I redeem them, Where is thy plague, O death? Where thy destruction, O Sheol? Repentance is hid from Mine eyes.

Darby: I will ransom them from the power of Sheol. I will redeem them from death: where, O death, are thy plagues? where, O Sheol, is thy destruction? Repentance shall be hid from mine eyes.

ASV: I will ransom them from the power of Sheol; I will redeem them from death: O death, where are thy plagues? O Sheol, where is thy destruction? repentance shall be hid from mine eyes.

What does Hosea 13:14 Mean?

Study Notes

death , 1 Corinthians 15:55 .
O grave Heb. "Sheol," also in preceding clause.
hell
Sheol is, in the O.T., the place to which the dead go.
(1) Often, therefore, it is spoken of as the equivalent of the grave, merely, where all human activities cease; the terminus toward which all human life moves (e.g. Genesis 42:38 grave Job 14:13 grave Psalms 88:3 grave
(2) To the man "under the sun," the natural man, who of necessity judges from appearances, sheol seems no more than the grave-- the end and total cessation, not only of the activities of life, but of life itself. Ecclesiastes 9:5 ; Ecclesiastes 9:10
(3) But Scripture reveals sheol as a place of sorrow 2 Samuel 22:6 ; Psalms 18:5 ; Psalms 116:3 ; in which the wicked are turned Psalms 9:17 and where they are fully conscious; Isaiah 14:9-17 ; Ezekiel 32:21 see, especially, Jonah 2:2 what the belly of the great fish was to Jonah that sheol is to those who are therein). The sheol of the O.T. and hades of the N.T. (See Scofield " Luke 16:23 ") are identical.
redeem Heb. goel, Redemp. (Kinsman type). (See Scofield " Isaiah 59:20 ") .
death , 1 Corinthians 15:55 .
O grave Heb. "Sheol," also in preceding clause.
hell
Sheol is, in the O.T., the place to which the dead go.
(1) Often, therefore, it is spoken of as the equivalent of the grave, merely, where all human activities cease; the terminus toward which all human life moves (e.g. Genesis 42:38 grave Job 14:13 grave Psalms 88:3 grave
(2) To the man "under the sun," the natural man, who of necessity judges from appearances, sheol seems no more than the grave-- the end and total cessation, not only of the activities of life, but of life itself. Ecclesiastes 9:5 ; Ecclesiastes 9:10
(3) But Scripture reveals sheol as a place of sorrow 2 Samuel 22:6 ; Psalms 18:5 ; Psalms 116:3 ; in which the wicked are turned Psalms 9:17 and where they are fully conscious; Isaiah 14:9-17 ; Ezekiel 32:21 see, especially, Jonah 2:2 what the belly of the great fish was to Jonah that sheol is to those who are therein). The sheol of the O.T. and hades of the N.T. (See Scofield " Luke 16:23 ") are identical.

Verse Meaning

The Lord asked rhetorically if He would buy the Israelites back out of death"s hand. Would He pay a price for their redemption? No, compassion would be hidden from His sight; He would have no pity on them. He appealed for death (like a thorn bush) to torment the Israelites, as though thorns tore their flesh. He called on the grave (as a hornet) to sting them fatally.
Later in history God did provide a ransom for His people from the power of the grave, and He redeemed them from death. He did this when Jesus Christ died on the cross and rose again. God"s future redemptive work for His people meant that death would not be the end for Israel even though judgment in the near future was inevitable.
The Apostle Paul quoted the famous couplet in this verse in 1 Corinthians 15:55 and applied it to the effect of Christ"s redemption on all of God"s people. Death and the grave are not the final judgment and home of the believer because God did provide a ransom and redeemed His people. God has a glorious future beyond His punishment for sin for His own, both for national Israel and for Christians. Paul"s use of this passage does not support the view that the church fulfills God"s promises concerning Israel. Here in Hosea the promise is that Israel would indeed suffer death and the grave, not that she would escape it. Paul turned the passage around and showed that Jesus Christ"s resurrection overcame the judgment and death that are inevitable for sinners. [1]

Context Summary

Hosea 13:1-14 - To Oppose God Is Destruction
Again, a very tender chapter. The lips that speak with trembling betray the heart that God can exalt. But when we turn to Baal, the emblem of self-confidence, we pass as the morning cloud the dew, the chaff, and the smoke.
In Hosea 13:4 we again get the sweet strain of early memory. God had not changed and was waiting to save. They had refused His help and had destroyed themselves, and He who would have done His best for them had been constrained to act as though He were a lion, a leopard, or a bear. In the wilderness we are thankful enough for His help, but when we reach the land of the vine and olive, we follow the devices and desires of our own hearts.
What a magnificent outburst is that which declares the divine intention to ransom even from death and the grave! We all know the New Testament setting of these words. Our Savior by His death destroyed him that had the power of death. He is death's plague and the grave's destruction. The sting of death is sin, but Jesus has borne sin away. The strength of sin is a violated law, but He has fulfilled the law. He is more than conqueror, and the soul that is one with Him shall share His triumph. [source]

Chapter Summary: Hosea 13

1  Ephraim's glory vanishes
4  God's anger
9  God's mercy
15  The judgment of Samaria

What do the individual words in Hosea 13:14 mean?

From the power of Sheol I will ransom them from death I will redeem them I will be your plagues Death your destruction Grave Pity is hidden from My eyes
מִיַּ֤ד שְׁאוֹל֙ אֶפְדֵּ֔ם ؟ מִמָּ֖וֶת אֶגְאָלֵ֑ם אֱהִ֨י דְבָרֶיךָ֜‪‬ מָ֗וֶת קָֽטָבְךָ֙ שְׁא֔וֹל נֹ֖חַם יִסָּתֵ֥ר מֵעֵינָֽי

מִיַּ֤ד  From  the  power 
Parse: Preposition-m, Noun, feminine singular construct
Root: יָד  
Sense: hand.
שְׁאוֹל֙  of  Sheol 
Parse: Noun, common singular
Root: שְׁאֹול  
Sense: sheol, underworld, grave, hell, pit.
אֶפְדֵּ֔ם  I  will  ransom  them 
Parse: Verb, Qal, Imperfect, first person common singular, third person masculine plural
Root: פָּדָה  
Sense: to ransom, redeem, rescue, deliver.
؟ מִמָּ֖וֶת  from  death 
Parse: Preposition-m, Noun, masculine singular
Root: מָוֶת  
Sense: death, dying, Death (personified), realm of the dead.
אֶגְאָלֵ֑ם  I  will  redeem  them 
Parse: Verb, Qal, Imperfect, first person common singular, third person masculine plural
Root: גְּאוּלִים 
Sense: to redeem, act as kinsman-redeemer, avenge, revenge, ransom, do the part of a kinsman.
אֱהִ֨י  I  will  be 
Parse: Interjection
Root: אֱהִי  
Sense: where.
דְבָרֶיךָ֜‪‬  your  plagues 
Parse: Noun, masculine plural construct, second person masculine singular
Root: דֶּבֶר 
Sense: pestilence, plague.
מָ֗וֶת  Death 
Parse: Noun, masculine singular
Root: מָוֶת  
Sense: death, dying, Death (personified), realm of the dead.
קָֽטָבְךָ֙  your  destruction 
Parse: Noun, masculine singular construct, second person masculine singular
Root: קֶטֶב  
Sense: destruction.
שְׁא֔וֹל  Grave 
Parse: Noun, common singular
Root: שְׁאֹול  
Sense: sheol, underworld, grave, hell, pit.
נֹ֖חַם  Pity 
Parse: Noun, masculine singular
Root: נׄחַם  
Sense: repentance, sorrow.
יִסָּתֵ֥ר  is  hidden 
Parse: Verb, Nifal, Imperfect, third person masculine singular
Root: סָתַר  
Sense: to hide, conceal.
מֵעֵינָֽי  from  My  eyes 
Parse: Preposition-m, Noun, cdc, first person common singular
Root: עֹונָה 
Sense: eye.