What does Death mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
θανάτου the death of the body. / metaph. / the miserable state of the wicked dead in hell. / in the widest sense 52
θάνατον the death of the body. / metaph. / the miserable state of the wicked dead in hell. / in the widest sense 23
θάνατος the death of the body. / metaph. / the miserable state of the wicked dead in hell. / in the widest sense 22
יוּמָֽת to die 20
θανάτῳ the death of the body. / metaph. / the miserable state of the wicked dead in hell. / in the widest sense 14
מָֽוֶת death 13
מָ֑וֶת death 8
יוּמַ֖ת to die 7
יוּמָ֑ת to die 7
מ֣וֹת to die 6
מוֹתֽוֹ death 5
מוֹת֙ death 4
מָ֣וֶת death 4
מ֥וֹת death 4
הַמָּֽוֶת death 4
לָמ֑וּת to die 4
מ֔וֹת to die 3
הַמָּ֔וֶת death 3
מָ֔וֶת death 3
מִמָּֽוֶת death 3
יוּמַ֥ת to die 3
θανατώσουσιν to put to death. 3
בְּמ֣וֹת death 3
צַלְמָֽוֶת death-shadow 3
לְהָמִ֔ית to die 2
מָ֝֗וֶת death 2
בַּמָּ֣וֶת death 2
לַמָּ֣וֶת death 2
לַמָּ֙וֶת֙ death 2
מוֹתִֽי death 2
מ֖וֹת death 2
כַמָּ֙וֶת֙ death 2
מָ֗וֶת death 2
מָ֙וֶת֙ death 2
לָמֽוּת to die 2
וְצַלְמָֽוֶת death-shadow 2
צַלְמָ֑וֶת death-shadow 2
ἀναιρεθῆναι to take up 2
מָ֖וֶת death 2
יוּמָ֔ת to die 2
וְצַלְמָ֑וֶת death-shadow 2
מִמָּ֣וֶת death 2
יוּמְת֖וּ to die 2
יוּמָ֖תוּ to die 2
מָ֤וֶת death 2
ἀνεῖλεν to take up 2
מָ֥וֶת death 2
צַלְמָ֔וֶת death-shadow 2
θανατῶσαι to put to death. 2
וְהַמָּ֙וֶת֙ death 1
מוֹתֵ֧י death 1
לַמָּ֜וֶת death 1
מֹת֔וֹ death 1
וּבְמוֹתָ֖ם death 1
הַמָּ֥וֶת death 1
؟ מוֹתִֽי death 1
לְמָ֙וֶת֙ death 1
מֻתָ֖ן death 1
מִמָּ֗וֶת death 1
מוֹתָֽהּ death 1
מוֹתִי֙ death 1
הַמָּ֖וֶת death 1
ἀνεῖλαν to take up 1
מִמָּ֑וֶת death 1
؟ מִמָּ֖וֶת death 1
מִמָּוֶת֮ death 1
יִרְצַ֖ח to murder 1
וּ֠רְגָמֻהוּ to stone 1
בְצַלְמָֽוֶת death-shadow 1
צַלְמָ֡וֶת death-shadow 1
צַלְמָ֣וֶת death-shadow 1
וְ֭צַלְמָוֶת death-shadow 1
צַ֭לְמָוֶת death-shadow 1
וְצַלְמָ֔וֶת death-shadow 1
לְצַלְמָ֔וֶת death-shadow 1
סַבֹּ֔תִי to turn 1
؟ מָּ֑וֶת death 1
לְמוֹתָ֗ם death 1
לַ֝מָּ֗וֶת death 1
וְ֝לַמָּ֗וֶת death 1
הַמָּ֙וֶת֙ death 1
הַ֝מָּ֗וְתָה death 1
מִ֫מָּ֥וֶת death 1
וָמָֽוֶת death 1
לַמָּ֑וֶת death 1
בְמוֹת֣וֹ death 1
מָֽוֶת‪‬ death 1
לְמוֹתֽוֹ death 1
כַּמָּֽוֶת death 1
בְּמוֹת֔וֹ death 1
וָ֭מָוֶת death 1
מוֹת֑וֹ death 1
לַמָּ֗וֶת death 1
לַמָּ֤וֶת death 1
בְּמֹתָ֑יו death 1
בְמוֹת֔וֹ death 1
יוּמָ֑תוּ to die 1
מוֹת֗וֹ death 1
אֲמִֽיתְךָ֖ to die 1
νέκρωσιν putting to death 1
τελευτῆς the end of life 1
ἐφονεύσατε to kill 1
אִמּֽוֹ mother. 1
(מָ֨וֶת ׀) desolation. 1
יָמִ֥ית to die 1
אֲמִיתֶ֗ךָ to die 1
νεκροῖς properly. 1
וּנְמִיתֵֽם to die 1
מוּתָ֗הּ to die 1
יָמ֨וּתוּ to die 1
יוּמְת֨וּ to die 1
(יוּמָֽת) to die 1
וַיְמִיתֵ֛ם to die 1
νεκρώσατε to make dead 1
θανατωθεὶς to put to death. 1
הֻמְת֜וּ to die 1
ἀπαχθῆναι to lead away. 1
ἀνείλατε to take up 1
ἀναιρουμένων to take up 1
ἀνελεῖν to take up 1
ἀνῃρέθη to take up 1
ἀνεῖλες to take up 1
ἀνέλωσιν to take up 1
ἀποκτεῖναι to kill in any way whatever. 1
θανατούμεθα to put to death. 1
ἀπέκτεινεν to kill in any way whatever. 1
ἐπιθανατίους doomed to death. 1
θάνατε the death of the body. / metaph. / the miserable state of the wicked dead in hell. / in the widest sense 1
θανατώσωσιν to put to death. 1
ἐθανατώθητε to put to death. 1
θανατοῦτε to put to death. 1
י֤וּמַת to die 1
יוּמָ֗ת to die 1
מוֹת֔וֹ death 1
לָמ֖וּת to die 1
אֲמִיתֶ֔ךָ to die 1
נְמִיתֶ֑ךָ to die 1
לְהָמִ֣ית to die 1
וַיְמִתֵ֛ם to die 1
לָמ֔וּת to die 1
וּנְמִיתֵ֔ם to die 1
יוּמְת֥וּ to die 1
י֣וּמַת to die 1
יָמִ֖ית to die 1
יְמִיתֶֽנּוּ to die 1
יָמִ֛ית to die 1
מֽוּת death. 1
לַבֵּ֗ן death. 1
לְמוֹת֙ death. 1
؟ תְּמִיתֵ֑נִי to die 1
לַהֲמִיתֽוֹ to die 1
לַהֲמִית֑וֹ to die 1
וָמֵ֔תָה to die 1
וָמֵֽתוּ to die 1
יוּמַ֣ת to die 1
הַמֵּ֑ת to die 1
יוּמַ֔ת to die 1
לַהֲמִית֔וֹ to die 1
וְהוּמָ֑ת to die 1
וָמֵתוּ֒ to die 1
הֲמִית֑וֹ to die 1
יוּמְת֤וּ to die 1
יוּמָֽתוּ to die 1
וָמֵ֑ת to die 1
מְמוֹתֵ֥י to die 1
תְּמֻת֔וּן to die 1
מְמִתִ֣ים to die 1
؟ הֱ֠מִתֻהוּ to die 1
תְמוּתָֽה death. 1

Definitions Related to Death

G2288


   1 the Death of the body.
      1a that separation (whether natural or violent) of the soul and the body by which the life on earth is ended.
      1b with the implied idea of future misery in hell.
         1b1 the power of Death.
      1c since the nether world, the abode of the dead, was conceived as being very dark, it is equivalent to the region of thickest darkness i.e. figuratively, a region enveloped in the darkness of ignorance and sin.
   2 metaph.
   , the loss of that life which alone is worthy of the name,.
      2a the misery of the soul arising from sin, which begins on earth but lasts and increases after the Death of the body in hell.
   3 the miserable state of the wicked dead in hell.
   4 in the widest sense, Death comprising all the miseries arising from sin, as well physical Death as the loss of a life consecrated to God and blessed in him on earth, to be followed by wretchedness in hell.
   

H4191


   1 to die, kill, have one executed.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to die.
         1a2 to die (as penalty), be put to Death.
         1a3 to die, perish (of a nation).
         1a4 to die prematurely (by neglect of wise moral conduct).
      1b (Polel) to kill, put to Death, dispatch.
      1c (Hiphil) to kill, put to Death.
      1d (Hophal).
         1d1 to be killed, be put to Death.
            1d1a to die prematurely.
            

H4194


   1 Death, dying, Death (personified), realm of the dead.
      1a Death.
      1b Death by violence (as a penalty).
      1c state of Death, place of Death.
      

H6757


   1 Death-shadow, deep shadow, deep darkness, shadow of Death.
      1a Death-shadow.
      1b Death-shadow, deep shadow, darkness.
      1c Death-shadow (of distress, extreme danger) (fig).
      1d Death-shadow (of place of the dead) (fig).
      

G2289


   1 to put to Death.
   2 metaph.
      2a to make to die i.e. destroy, render extinct.
      2b by Death to be liberated from the bond of anything, literally to be made dead in relation to (something).
      

G337


   1 to take up, to lift up (from the ground).
      1a to take up for myself as mine.
      1b to own (an exposed infant).
   2 to take away, abolish.
      2a to do away with or abrogate customs or ordinances.
      2b to put out of the way, kill slay a man.
      

H7523


   1 to murder, slay, kill.
      1a (Qal) to murder, slay.
         1a1 premeditated.
         1a2 accidental.
         1a3 as avenger.
         1a4 slayer (intentional) (participle).
      1b (Niphal) to be slain.
      1c (Piel).
         1c1 to murder, assassinate.
         1c2 murderer, assassin (participle)(subst).
      1d (Pual) to be killed.
      

H517


   1 mother.
      1a of humans.
      1b of Deborah’s relationship to the people (fig.
      ).
      1c of animals.
   2 point of departure or division.
   

G3499


   1 to make dead, to put to Death, slay.
   2 worn out.
      2a of an impotent old man.
   3 to deprive of power, destroy the strength of.
   

H4192


   1 Death.
      1a meaning dubious.
      

H8546


   1 Death.
   

G3498


   1 properly.
      1a one that has breathed his last, lifeless.
      1b deceased, departed, one whose soul is in Hades.
      1c destitute of life, without life, inanimate.
   2 metaph.
      2a spiritually dead.
         2a1 destitute of a life that recognises and is devoted to God, because given up to trespasses and sins.
         2a2 inactive as respects doing right.
      2b destitute of force or power, inactive, inoperative.
      

G615


   1 to kill in any way whatever.
      1a to destroy, to allow to perish.
   2 metaph.
   to extinguish, abolish.
      2a to inflict mortal Death.
      2b to deprive of spiritual life and procure eternal misery in hell.
      

G3500


   1 putting to Death, killing.
   2 being put to Death.
   3 the dead state, utter sluggishness.
      3a of bodily members and organs.
      

G1935


   1 doomed to Death.
   

G520


   1 to lead away.
      1a esp.
      of those who are led off to trial, prison, or punishment.
      

G5054


   1 the end of life, decease, Death.
   

H5437


   1 to turn, turn about or around or aside or back or towards, go about or arou nd, surround, encircle, change direction.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to turn, turn about, be brought round, change.
         1a2 to march or walk around, go partly around, circle about, skirt, make a round, make a circuit, go about to, surround, encompass.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to turn oneself, close round, turn round.
         1b2 to be turned over to.
      1c (Piel) to turn about, change, transform.
      1d (Poel).
         1d1 to encompass, surround.
         1d2 to come about, assemble round.
         1d3 to march, go about.
         1d4 to enclose, envelop.
      1e (Hiphil). 1e1 to turn, cause to turn, turn back, reverse, bring over, turn into, bring round. 1e2 to cause to go around, surround, encompass.
      1f (Hophal).
         1f1 to be turned.
         1f2 to be surrounded.
         

H4193


   1 Death.
   

H7275


   1 to stone, slay or kill by stoning.
      1a (Qal) to stone.
      

G5407


   1 to kill, slay, murder.
   2 to commit murder.
   

Frequency of Death (original languages)

Frequency of Death (English)

Dictionary

Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Death: of a Believer
Old Mr. Lyford being desired, a little before his death, to let his friends know in what condition his soul was, and what his thoughts were about that eternity to which he seemed very near, he answered with a cheerfulness suitable to a believer and a minister, 'I will let you know how it is with me;' and then, stretching out a hand that was withered and consumed with age and sickness: 'Here is,' said he 'the grave, the wrath of God, and devouring flames, the just punishment of sin, on the one side; and here am I, a poor sinful soul, on the other side; but this is my comfort, the covenant of grace which is established on so many sure promises, has saved me from all. There is an act of oblivion 5assed in heaven. I will forgive their iniquities, and their sins will I remember no more. This is the blessed privilege of all within the covenant, among whom I am one.'– From T. Rogers, on 'Trouble of Mind.'
Webster's Dictionary - Black Death
A pestilence which ravaged Europe and Asia in the fourteenth century.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Death
A cessation of bodily life, caused by the separation of the soul from the body (bodily or physical death). Death is, in general, universal (Hebrews 9; Romans 5). As to the debt (debitum mortis) it extends to all defiled by sin, therefore to all except the God-man and the Immacmate Virgin; as to the fact (factum mortis), it certainly extends to all except those who will be living at the second coming of Christ. Concerning these latter, theologians are not agreed (1 Corinthians 15; 1 Thessalonians 4). Death is a punishment for sin. "By one man sin entered into this world, and by sin death" (Romans 5), and though the character of punishment is wiped away in Baptism, death itself remains as an effect of sin (prenalitas). Death marks the end of time for merit and demerit (Luke 23; Council of Florence, "Decretum pro Grrecis"). Besides bodily death there is spiritual death, i.e.,a privation of sanctifying grace; and eternal death, i.e.,damnation, called also "second' death" (Apocalypse 2; 20; 21). Christ by His atonement took away the second death, eternal damnation, but not physical death.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fathers of a Good Death
A religious order founded at Rome in 1582 by Saint Camillus de Lellis to tend the plague-stricken and to minister to the sick in their homes. It was approved by Pope Sixtus V in 1586 and erected into an order by Pope Gregory XIV in 1591. The Order maintains a web site.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Death, Second
Final separation from God; spiritual death following physical death. Revelation describes the second death with the images of the lake of fire (John 20:14 ) and a lake burning with fire and sulphur (John 21:8 ). The second death has no power over those who remain faithful in persecution (John 2:11 ), who are martyred (John 20:6 ), or for those whose names are written in the book of life (John 20:15 ). Some stress everlasting punishment in literal fire. Others stress the spiritual state of separation from God. Still others interpret the second death in terms of anihilation on the basis of comparison with Matthew 10:28 . The alternative is eternal life with God.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Dance of Death
Originally a spectacular play which has been traced to the 14th century when the Black Death and other epidemics had impressed the popular imagination. These plays were given in the churchyard; they were opened by a sermon on death, then a series of figures resembling skeletons would appear. The dancing movement was a later development. Traces of these plays are found in Germany, France, England, and Italy. Pictorial representations were made on walls of cemeteries, etc. In engraving the most famous versions are those of Holbein and Dürer.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Death, Dance of
Originally a spectacular play which has been traced to the 14th century when the Black Death and other epidemics had impressed the popular imagination. These plays were given in the churchyard; they were opened by a sermon on death, then a series of figures resembling skeletons would appear. The dancing movement was a later development. Traces of these plays are found in Germany, France, England, and Italy. Pictorial representations were made on walls of cemeteries, etc. In engraving the most famous versions are those of Holbein and Dürer.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Death of Christ
See Cross, Crucifixion ; Christ; Jesus.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Death
Unlike the Greeks, who largely understood a person as a soul entrapped in a body, the ancient Hebrews depicted the person as a psychosomatic (body-soul) unity. When this body-soul union failed in death, the Hebrews did not visualize the escape of the soul from the body, but the actual death of the self.
The Old Testament does not, however, teach that persons were annihilated at death. Rather, the dead in some sense remained in Sheol, the place of the dead located deep beneath the earth. This belief is expressed in the Genesis 25:8 report of Abraham's death. Abraham survived after a fashion with and in the vicinity of his ancestors because he was buried in the family grave ( Genesis 15:15 ; Genesis 35:29 ; Judges 8:32 ). Existence in Sheol was a “shade” existence, symbolized by the bones which remained and survived in the grave.
To the Israelite, death and Sheol were both acceptable and unacceptable. Especially when life was long and blessed (Abraham, Genesis 25:8 ; David, 1 Chronicles 29:28 ), the Israelites accepted death with some degree of grace. They found consolation in long life, many children, remembrance of the family name, and burial in the family grave (Genesis 15:15 ).
When death occurred in the prime of life or without children or without proper burial, it was strictly understood as a curse. In fact, because of the Hebrews' love of life and conviction that Yahweh was the Author of life, death and Sheol always represented either a potential or actual threat. The Old Testament calls Sheol “the pit” (Isaiah 38:17-18 ; Ezekiel 26:19-21 ; Jonah 2:1-6 ), personifies it as “the king of terrors” (Job 18:13-14 ), and describes it as a house or city with bars (Job 17:16 ) where gloomy darkness prevails (Psalm 88:12 ).
Furthermore, because of the Hebrews' emphasis on group identity, death could be accepted in that the group survived. Injustice could be accepted in individual lives (for example, prosperity among the wicked, misfortune among the righteous) because it was assumed that justice eventually prevailed in the group . By the time of the Babylonian Exile, this pattern of passive acceptance began to change. Job and Ecclesiastes questioned the idea that justice is always served in this life. Ezekiel and Jeremiah affirmed that God's justice could not be satisfied simply by reference to the group, but had to apply to the individual (Jeremiah 31:29-30 ,Jeremiah 31:29-30,31:33-34 ; Ezekiel 18:19-20 ). Finally, the Book of Daniel teaches that to serve justice in individual lives, the dead had to be raised by God, “some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt” (Daniel 12:2 ). Some Bible students see resurrection hope suggested or even clearly taught in other Old Testament passages. See Resurrection .
The Old Testament recognized the theological meaning of death as well as its physical meaning. The account of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:1;b13 ) clearly points to sin as the reason humans must experience death (Genesis 2:17 ; Romans 5:12-217 ). Other passages echo the same teaching (Numbers 18:22 ; Proverbs 6:12-19 ; Jeremiah 31:29-30 ; Ezekiel 18:1-32 ).
Death in the Synoptic Gospels and Acts Several passages in the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) and Acts imply a positive, or at least neutral, attitude toward death. In Luke's birth narrative, for example, Simeon asked God to let him “depart in peace” because he had seen God's salvation (Luke 2:29 ). Similar to the Old Testament accounts of some of the partriarchs, Simeon's death would be the peaceful resignation of a life dedicated to God. In a Sermon on the Mount saying (Matthew 6:27 ; Luke 12:25 ), Jesus counseled His hearers with a rhetorical question, “and which of you by being anxious can add a single cubit to his life's span?” (NAS). If this translation is correct (some interpreters prefer “stature” to “span of life”), the teaching implies that mortality is a fact which must be accepted by Jesus' followers and entrusted to God.
In other passages death is seen as ominous and threatening. In the account of the stilling of the storm (Matthew 8:23-27 ; Mark 4:35-41 ; Luke 8:22-25 ), the disciples cried out desperately against the raging water. In Acts 5:1-11 Ananias and Sapphira died because they committed perjury against the Holy Spirit. Luke 1:79 and Matthew 4:16 use the phrase “shadow of death” as a negative image. In Luke 7:22-23 , Jesus vindicated His ministry in the face of John the Baptist's question by revealing His power against the realm of death: the dead are raised, the demons are cast out, the lame walk, the deaf hear, the blind see.
The most striking feature of the Synoptic Gospels' understanding of death is the central place given to Jesus' death. In His death the positive and negative aspects just discussed come together: Jesus overturned death in the community and ran toward His own death; He agonized over His fate in Jerusalem and wished it were already accomplished; He announced with word and deed the Resurrection Age, but He could not completely welcome His own accursed death which resurrection would vindicate. Above all else, death in the Synoptic Gospels is interpreted by the paradoxical death of the Servant who found life through the means of death.
Death in the Letters of Paul Paul's understanding of Jesus' death and resurrection determined his depiction of death as a quality of human existence. The most fundamental facet of this understanding is that death has been defeated (1 Corinthians 15:26 ; 2 Timothy 1:8-10 ). Paul's conviction was confirmed: (1) through his assurances to the Thessalonians that their dead were not disadvantaged (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 ); (2) through his concept of the firstfruits (Romans 8:23 ; 1 Corinthians 5:20 ); (3) through his doctrine of the eventual transformation of the resurrection body (1 Corinthians 15:35-58 ), and (4) through his conviction that the proper Christian response to death and all of its signs is an indomitable hope (Romans 8:31-38 ; 1 Corinthians 15:58 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:18 ). Simply put, Paul pictures the Christian's death as nonfinal and nonthreatening.
Death is nonetheless an enemy. It is intimately connected with sin (Romans 3:23 ; 1618882878_80 ). Paul used death imagery to characterize sinful existence (Romans 6:13 , Romans 7:7-25 , Romans 8:6-8 ; Ephesians 2:1 , Ephesians 2:5 ; Colossians 2:13 ). If the “old” existence should be thought of as death, conversion to Christ is nothing less than rebirth (Romans 6:5-11 ; Galatians 2:20 ). Paul's image of rebirth is realistic to the extent that he acknowledged the incompleteness of our death and resurrection with Christ. In the same paragraph that he announced our union with Christ, he felt compelled to remind Christians that they should consider themselves dead to sin but alive to God in Christ (Romans 6:11 ).
Death in the Writings of John As much or more than Paul, John redefined death (and life) in relationship to Jesus. In the fourth Gospel especially, how the hearers respond to Jesus is a matter of life and death: “Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life” (John 5:24 ). The account of Lazarus' resuscitation in John 11:1 makes this point more dramatically. Jesus waited until Lazarus had been dead four days and declared to Martha, “I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: And whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die” ( John 11:25-26 ). Jesus went on to call Lazarus from the tomb; but in doing so, he ironically sealed His own death in the plans of the Jewish authorities (John 11:45-53 ).
Conclusions The New Testament assumed the Old Testament concept of body-soul unity and the late Old Testament and intertestamental concept of resurrection. Unlike Greek philosophers who downplayed the significance of death by emphasizing the immortality of the soul, the biblical writers affirmed that death is real. Because the Bible also affirms the value of life as a gift from God, death is sometimes depicted as threatening and never entirely desirable. The doctrine of resurrection is an affirmation that even the realm of the dead belongs to God and that death is overcome only at His gracious command.
The distinctive contribution of the New Testament is that it relentlessly defines human life, death, and resurrection in light of Jesus' life, death, and resurrection. Thus death is removed from its normal context at the end of life and placed in the very middle of life; in Christ we die and are raised as we commit our lives to Him.
Joe Haag
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Death, Mortality
Death is the absence or withdrawal of breath and the life force that makes movement, metabolism, and interrelation with others possible.
The Old Testament. The Nature of Death . Life and death are totally under Yahweh's sovereignty. God is the source of all life (Psalm 36:9 ). There are no organisms anywhere who have not received their life force from him: "In his hand is the life of every creature, and the breath of all mankind" (Job 12:10 ). The number of the days of our life is written in God's book before one of them comes to be (Job 14:5 ; Psalm 139:16 ).
The Hebrew verb gawa [ Job 34:14-15 ).
In the Bible, death is more than the cessation of all physiological processes. By divine command (Psalm 90:3 ), the body returns to dust and the spirit goes back to God who gave it (Genesis 2:7 ; Ecclesiastes 12:7 ). Those who die are said to be gathered to their people (Genesis 25:8 ; 35:29 ; 49:33 ).
This gathering is often seen as a reference to the central repository of the family tomb where eventually everyone's bones were thrown. Abraham's people, however, were buried around Haran (Genesis 24:4,10 ). Only he and Sarah were buried in Canaan (Genesis 23:19 ; 25:9 ). Jacob is gathered to his people at death, but not buried until at least seven weeks later (49:33; 50:3,10).
When Jacob says he is "going down" to Joseph (Genesis 37:35 ), he cannot be referring to a common burial since no one knew where Joseph's body was. Deceased Samuel told Saul he and his sons would be with him the next day (1 Samuel 28:19 ). He could not have meant they would all be buried together the next day since Saul's headless body was buried in Jabesh Gilead some time after his death (1 Samuel 31:9-11 ). David said of his dead son, "I will go to him, but he will not return to me" (2 Samuel 12:23 ).
Samuel was buried in his house at Ramah (1 Samuel 25:1 ); but in 28:13,15, he comes up from the earth to Saul at Endor protesting that he has been disturbed. The intense emotional reaction of Saul and the medium, as well as their remarks about Samuel, indicate that they believed they had actually seen his departed spirit. Had this been some sort of demonic delusion, the narrator would certainly have been obligated to call this to the attention of his audience.
It is difficult to avoid the fact that in the Old Testament people believed a person's physical remains were interred in one place, and that part of the person capable of consciousness and personality went to another location. The gathering to one's people was an event taking place before burial at the time of death.
The Origin of Death . Unlike the ancient Mesopotamian concept, death was not originally built into human constitution. People were created for life, not for death. They had access to both the tree of life and the tree of knowledge of good and evil. They were told they would certainly die if they ate from the latter (Genesis 2:17 ). Humankind was not tricked out of eternal life as in the Adapa myth, nor was it stolen from them as in the Gilgamesh epic. They partook of the forbidden tree with full awareness of the consequences. Apparently from close observation of the plant and animal kingdom they would have been able to know what death was.
Mortality . In the Old Testament death is an unavoidable reality. From a human point of view death was just as final as spilled water (2 Samuel 14:14 ) and a pot broken at the well (Ecclesiastes 12:6 ). Death is so ominous and powerful it can be compared to a fortified city with gates and bars (Psalm 9:13 ; 107:18 ).
Our days are numbered (Genesis 6:3 ; Psalm 90:10 ). They pass swiftly like the life of a flower (Psalm 90:6 ; Isaiah 40:6 ). Thus the psalmist prays that we might number our days so as to live our lives carefully and wisely (Psalm 90:12 ).
Life in the biblical world was very fragile. There was the constant fear that one might not survive until tomorrow. Death stalked on all sides (Psalm 91:5-7 ). Pestilence, malnutrition, an accidental fall, famine, war, ambush by enemies, being denounced by an enemy to a ruler, complications in childbirth, and even minor infections could all prove fatal. Death indeed, like fire, seemed never to be satisfied (Proverbs 30:16 ). It seemed as though it had cords and snares that could pull a person down to the grave (Psalm 18:5 ).
Responses to Mortality . Israelites were not helpless pawns at the mercy of a capricious fate. They could respond to their own mortality with God-given resources. They knew God made the steps of a righteous man firm (Psalm 37:23 ). Unlike most of the ancient Near Eastern peoples, they did not have to worry that they might bring death down on themselves by unknowingly offending some minor deity. God had written a law telling clearly what pleased him. They knew if they meditated on this law day and night, they could be like a luxuriant tree (Psalm 1 ). Sages wrote inspired proverbs telling the people how to escape dangerous situations. They could even find emotional and spiritual release by writing laments to God.
Sometimes people seemed to respond rather pessimistically to death. Old Testament saints saw through a glass darkly. They could see mainly what happened to the physical body. Thus they could not see any productive activity beyond this life. The living know that they will die, but the dead do not know anything (Ecclesiastes 9:5,10 ). Men like Hezekiah could reason with God that they should go on living because no one worships God in death (Isaiah 28:18-19 ).
The Preacher even extols the advantages of death (Ecclesiastes 4:2 ; cf. Job 3:13-19 ). He is not, however, as negative in his stance as is commonly supposed. Since death is quick and inevitable, mortals should live life intensely to the fullest, enjoying every minute of everything they do (Ecclesiastes 9:10 ). God has given them gifts of accepting their portion and finding satisfaction in their work (Ecclesiastes 3:13 ; 5:17-18 ; 9:7 ). Since material things perish, we can best respond by orienting ourselves to the significant others God has given us (Ecclesiastes 9:9 ).
Fatalism is never a response to mortality. A live dog is better than a dead lion (Ecclesiastes 9:4 ). Taking one's life is never recommended. Even in the Book of Job it is never taken up as an option. The only victims of suicide in the Old Testament were men (Ahithophel and Saul) who were faced with imminent, unavoidable death anyway. These men believed they were choosing a better manner of death than their enemies would select for them (1 Samuel 31:1-6 ; 2 Samuel 17:23 ).
Victory over Death . The ancient Israelites knew they could find refuge in times of natural disaster under the wings of the Almighty (Psalm 91:1 ). They knew the valley of the shadow of death was unavoidable, but they also knew that in the end the Shepherd would walk it with them (Psalm 23:4 ). They knew that something about the day of death was better than the day of birth (Ecclesiastes 7:1 ).
Even though God has set limits on human life, it is still valuable and sacred to him. "Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of his saints" (Psalm 116:15 ). Murderers are to receive the sentence of capital punishment (Genesis 9:5-6 ) because we are made in the image of God. God takes no pleasure even in the death of the wicked (Ezekiel 18:32 ).
There is evidence that in the Old Testament death is not as final as is sometimes supposed. True there was no price even a rich man could pay to avoid it (Psalm 49:7-8 ). Death comes like a shepherd to lead us into the grave. But the psalmist affirms in faith that God will himself pay the redemption price for release from the power of death (Psalm 49:15 ). In Psalm 73 the singer believes that though his frail flesh and heart may fail, God will be his portion forever and receive him to glory ( Psalm 73:24,26 ).
For God death is not an insurmountable obstacle. The death, indecision, barrenness, old age, and confusion of Genesis 11 actually becomes the stage on which God begins to play out his drama of redemption. Out of all this hopelessness and despair comes the life-giving blessing of Genesis 12:1-3 .
Isaiah looks forward to a day when the death shroud will be removed, and death will be permanently swallowed up (25:7-8). A day will come when deadly forces that hurt and destroy will not exist in God's holy mountain (11:6-9).
The New Teastament . Figurative Meanings . The New Testament broadens the term "death" to include various figurative meanings. But the widow who lives for pleasure, says Paul, "is dead even while she lives" (1 Timothy 5:6 ). People who are alive physically may be dead in trespasses and sins (Ephesians 2:1 ). Even weak Christians may be considered dead (Revelation 3:1 ).
In a positive sense believers may be said to be "dead to sin" (Romans 6:1 ) and crucified with Christ (Galatians 2:20 ). Even becoming a disciple requires a new radical reorientation to death and a taking up of the cross daily (Matthew 16:24 ). In the New Testament way of thinking death is necessary for life and fruitfulness (John 12:24 ).
The Origin of Death . The New Testament enlarges our understanding of the origin of death. Death passed on all men because of one man's disobedience so that in Adam all die (Romans 5:12-17 ; 1Col 15:22). The wages of sin is death (Romans 6:23 ). Even the mind set on the flesh is death (Romans 8:6 ). The letter of the law kills by giving knowledge about sin (Romans 7:7-12 ). Thus the law is considered the ministry of death (2 Corinthians 3:6-7 ).
The Second Death . The New Testament delineates a deeper, more sombre meaning to death. Death is appointed to all men, but after that comes judgment (2Col 5:10; Hebrews 9:27 ). In death people do not live in a sort of nebulous twilight zone. The righteous are comforted, and the wicked are tormented (Luke 16:22-25 ). The final destiny of death and Hades is to be cast into the lake of fire. This lake of fire is the second death (Revelation 20:14-15 ). Jesus said that we are not to fear those who can kill the body but those who can kill both body and soul in hell (Matthew 10:28 ). The second death is a metaphorical term for eternal separation from the presence and glory of God (2 Thessalonians 1:7-10 ; Revelation 2:11 ; 20:6,14-15 ).
Triumph over Death . While the New Testament makes the agony of death more intense and fearsome, it shows a greater triumph over it. It is not the second death but the death of Christ that occupies the center of attention. Through death he destroyed the devil, who had the power over death, and emptied death of its fear (Hebrews 2:14-15 ). By dying Christ destroyed death and brought immortality to light (2 Timothy 1:10 ). In this event we are reconciled and brought to God (Romans 5:10 ).
Even at the beginning of Christ's ministry light shone in the valley of the shadow of death (Matthew 4:16 ). Now being himself loosed from the pains of death (Acts 2:24 ) and crowned with glory and honor (Hebrews 2:9 ), he has the keys of death and hell (Revelation 1:18 ).
Christians still die but their death is gain because they are now with Christ (2Col 5:6; Philippians 1:20-21 ). Even death cannot separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus (Romans 8:38-39 ). In death Christians are given comfort, rest, and assurance (Luke 16:22-25 ; Revelation 6:9-11 ).
The dead are in Christ, asleep (1 Thessalonians 4:14 ), waiting for a day when death will be completely swallowed up by life (2 Corinthians 5:4 ). Then mortality will put on immortality (1 Corinthians 15:53 ). Death, the last enemy, will itself be destroyed (1 Corinthians 15:26 ). There will be no more death or sorrow, and God will wipe all tears from all faces (Revelation 21:4 ).
For those who overcome and attain to the resurrection of Christ, the second death has no power (Revelation 2:11 ; 20:6 ). Those who believe in Christ will not see death (John 8:51-52 ).
Paul Ferguson
See also Grave ; Second Death
Bibliography . L. R. Bailey, Sr., Biblical Perspectives on Death ; A. Heidel, The Gilgamesh Epic and Old Testament Parallels ; O. Kaiser and E. Lohse, Death and Life ; J. B. Payne, Theology of the Older Testament ; K. Rahner, On the Theology of Death ; E. F. Sutcliffe, The Old Testament and Future Life ; N. J. Tromp, Primitive Conceptions of Death and the Nether World in the Old Testament .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Eternal Death
The miserable fate of the wicked in hell (Matthew 25:46 ; Mark 3:29 ; Hebrews 6:2 ; 2 th 1:9 ; Matthew 18:8 ; 25:41 ; Jude 1:7 ). The Scripture as clearly teaches the unending duration of the penal sufferings of the lost as the "everlasting life," the "eternal life" of the righteous. The same Greek words in the New Testament (aion, aionios, aidios) are used to express (1) the eternal existence of God (1 Timothy 1:17 ; Romans 1:20 ; 16:26 ); (2) of Christ (Revelation 1:18 ); (3) of the Holy Ghost (Hebrews 9:14 ); and (4) the eternal duration of the sufferings of the lost (Matthew 25:46 ; Jude 1:6 ). Their condition after casting off the mortal body is spoken of in these expressive words: "Fire that shall not be quenched" (Mark 9:45,46 ), "fire unquenchable" (Luke 3:17 ), "the worm that never dies," the "bottomless pit" (Revelation 9:1 ), "the smoke of their torment ascending up for ever and ever" (Revelation 14:10,11 ).
The idea that the "second death" (Revelation 20:14 ) is in the case of the wicked their absolute destruction, their annihilation, has not the slightest support from Scripture, which always represents their future as one of conscious suffering enduring for ever.
The supposition that God will ultimately secure the repentance and restoration of all sinners is equally unscriptural. There is not the slightest trace in all the Scriptures of any such restoration. Sufferings of themselves have no tendency to purify the soul from sin or impart spiritual life. The atoning death of Christ and the sanctifying power of the Holy Spirit are the only means of divine appointment for bringing men to repentance. Now in the case of them that perish these means have been rejected, and "there remaineth no more sacrifice for sins" (Hebrews 10:26,27 ).
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Death of Christ
The Place in the Gospels . In the records of Jesus that the Gospels give us, it is clear that a place of supreme significance is given to the death—and the resurrectionof Christ. The story of the events of Jesus' last few days, culminating in the crucifixion, is given a considerable proportion of each Gospel (Matthew 21-27 ; Mark 11-15 ; Luke 19-23 ; John 12-19 ), and the record of the journey to Jerusalem and to the cross begins respectively in Matthew 20:17 , Mark 10:32 , Luke 9:51 , and John 11:7 .
In each of the Synoptic Gospels Jesus specifically predicts his suffering and death three times (Mark 8:34-35 ; 17:22-23 ; 20:17-19 ; Mark 8:31 ; 9:31 ; 10:32-34 ; Luke 9:21-22 ; 9:44 ; 18:31-33 ). Intimations of his death are also given in his words about his anointing in Bethany being a preparation for his burial (Matthew 26:12 ; Mark 14:8 ; John 12:7 ), in the parable of the wicked tenants (Matthew 21:33-39 ; Mark 12:1-12 ; Luke 20:9-17 ), at the transfiguration when Moses and Elijah spoke with him "about his departure, which he was about to bring to fulfillment at Jerusalem" (Luke 9:31 ), in the words about the bridegroom being taken away (Matthew 9:15 ; Mark 2:20 ; Luke 5:35 ), and right back in the words of Simeon to Mary about the anguish that would come to her (Luke 2:35 ). In John there is reference to the destruction of the temple of Jesus' body (2:19-22), and frequent reference to the "hour" (8:20; 12:23,27; 13:1; 16:32; 17:1) of his being "lifted up" (3:14; 8:28; 12:32,34), the hour of his crucifixion to which the whole of Jesus' ministry inexorably moved.
The Reasons . When we consider the Gospels as written for the early church and related to its life and mission we can appreciate three supremely important reasons for this emphasis on the death of Christ:
The centrality of the crossand resurrectionin the preaching of the good news of Jesus.
The centrality of the deathand resurrectionin the worship of the church, especially in relation to its ordinances of baptism and the Lord's Supper.
The centrality of the suffering and death of Christ for the meaning of Christian discipleship.
The Preaching of the Early Church . The New Testament very clearly indicates that the death of Christ had central significance in Christian preaching. Paul could say to the Corinthian Christians, "I resolved to know nothing while I was with you except Jesus Christ and him crucified" (1 Corinthians 2:2 ). The gospel for him was "the message of the cross, " even though a "stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles" (1 Corinthians 1:18,23 ). He sums up what he received and passed on to others "as of first importance: that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day according to the Scriptures" (1 Corinthians 15:3-4 ). To the Galations he says, "before your very eyes Jesus Christ was clearly portrayed as crucified" (Galatians 3:1 ).
In the records that the Acts of the Apostles gives us of the preaching of apostles Peter and Paul, we find that the death of Christ always has a place of central importance (2:23; 3:13-15,17-18; 4:10; 5:30; 7:52; 8:32-35; 10:39; 13:27-29; 17:2-3). In this preaching the human responsibility for the death of Christ is laid at the door of the Jews who handed him over to be crucified and of Pilate who condemned him to death, but it is also made clear that it was in fulfillment of the purpose of God expressed in the Scriptures (3:18). He was "handed over by God's set purpose and foreknowledge" (2:23). His enemies did only what God's own "power and will had decided beforehand should happen" (4:28).
Opposition Described in the Gospels . When we turn back to the Gospels we find it made abundantly clear that the death of Jesus was, from the human standpoint, the culmination of opposition to him. In Mark a major section early in the Gospel (2:1-3:6) shows some of the reasons for such opposition, and that section concludes by saying, "the Pharisees went out and began to plot with the Herodians how they might kill Jesus." Luke (4:29) tells of an attempt on Jesus' life made in Nazareth in what appears to have been a very early stage in his ministry. Later Luke (13:31) tells how Herod wanted to kill him. In John's Gospel much is said about the constant opposition of "the Jews" to Jesus, because of his attitude to the Sabbath and because of the claims that he was making for himself (5:16,18; 8:59; 10:31-32). John 7:1 speaks of his "purposely staying away from Judea because the Jews there were waiting to take his life." Then there was an occasion when "the chief priests and the Pharisees sent temple guards to arrest him" ( John 7:32 ), but were not able to do so. All four Gospels tell of the plans ultimately made by the Jewish leaders, the part played by Judas, the arrest and the trials.
The Purpose of God Fulfilled . As in the preaching in the Acts of the Apostles, so much more in the Gospels, it is made clear that the reason for the death of Jesus was not just the opposition of his enemies. It was the purpose of God. The words spoken to Jesus at his baptism (Matthew 3:17 ; Mark 1:11 ; Luke 3:22 ), and his attitude in his temptations and often subsequently in his ministry make clear that Jesus was conscious of his messianic vocation, but that that vocation was to be fulfilled by him as Suffering Servant. So it was that as soon as Peter, in the presence of the other disciples, had confessed him as the Christ, Jesus "began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders, chief priests and teachers of the law, and that he must be killed" (Mark 8:31 ; cf. Matthew 16:21 ; Luke 9:22 ).
There is a repeated emphasis also on the fulfillment of the Scriptures. This is especially the case in the passion narratives themselves. In Matthew (26:52-56) there is the possibility at Jesus' arrest of force being used by his followers to prevent his being taken. Moreover, it could be said that "twelve legions of angels" were at his disposal, but Jesus' response to the thought of either human or angelic opposition was, "how then would the Scriptures be fulfilled that say it must happen in this way?" In fact he could say, "this has all taken place that the writings of the prophets might be fulfilled." In Luke (24:26-27,44-47) the risen Christ said to the perplexed disciples, on the basis of the Scriptures, "Did not the Christ have to suffer these things and then enter his glory?" "Then he opened their minds so that they could understand the Scriptures. He told them, This is what is written: The Christ will suffer and rise from the dead on the third day, and repentance and forgiveness of sins will be preached in his name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem.'" In the case of John's Gospel there is a constant emphasis on the fulfillment of Scripture, and that God is "glorified" in the "lifting up" of Jesus to die on the cross (12:23-24,32-33; 13:31-32; 17:1-4). The prophecy of Caiaphas, in a way that that high priest could not himself realize, indicated the purpose of God that was to be fulfilled, "to have one man die for the people" (11:50-52; 18:13). When, immediately prior to his being handed over by Pilate to be crucified (19:11), Jesus said that Pilate would have no power to crucify him "if it were not given from above, " he was not just speaking of political power being delegated by God (in the sense of Romans 13 ), but rather that Pilate was just doing what was being brought about according to the will and authority of God. (For the emphasis in Acts of the death of Christ being the fulfillment of Scripture, see 3:18; 8:32-35; 13:27; 17:2-3; 26:22-23).
The Death of Christ and the Forgiveness of Sins . When we follow what is said in the New Testament about the meaning and purpose of the death of Christ we find, in a number of different ways, that it is specifically related to the forgiveness of sins.
Most simply, and without any further amplification, it is said often that he "died for us, " "for all, " or "for others." The death of Christ is the supreme expression of the love of God and the love of Jesus himself (Hebrews 2:14-156 ; Romans 5:8 ; Ephesians 5:2,25 ; 1 John 3:16 ; 4:10 ). In the language of John 10 Jesus is the Good Shepherd who gave his life for the sheep. He died in our place ( Matthew 20:28 ; Galatians 3:10-13 ), meaning that he died a sin-bearing death so that we might not have to. There are a number of places where it says simply that he "died for our sins" or for us as sinners (Romans 4:25 ; 5:6-8 ; 1Col 15:3; 2Col 5:21; Galatians 1:4 ; 1 Peter 3:17-18 ).
Jesus' death as sin-bearing is explicitly referred to in Matthew 26:1-2,171 : "Christ was sacrificed once to take away the sins of many people." First Peter 2:24 puts it, "He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree"; implicit in the reference to the cross as a "tree" (cf. Acts 5:30 ; 10:39 ; 13:29 ) is what is made explicit in Mark 10:45 . We all in failing to keep the law of God are under a "curse, " not in our own contemporary use of that term, but as stated in the Deuteronomic Law"Cursed is everyone who does not continue to do every thing written in the Book of the Law." But "Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us, for it is written: Cursed is everyone who is hung on a tree.'"
Thinking in these terms takes us back to the Gospels. In particular it is hard for us to begin to understand the agony of our Lord Jesus Christ in Gethsemane, and his words about the drinking of the "cup, " other than through his consciousness of approaching, not just the physical pain and the shame of crucifixion, but the reality of what it meant for him to be the Suffering Servant, "pierced for our transgressions, crushed for our iniquities, " and "the iniquity of us all" "laid on him" (Isaiah 53:5-6 ). The same must be said in relation to the cry from the cross, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" (of 4:14-16 ; Romans 6:2-70 ).
The benefits of the death of Christ for those who believe are thus spoken of in a number of ways. They are the forgiveness of sins ( Acts 5:31 ; 13:38 ; 26:18 ; Romans 4:7 ; Ephesians 1:7 ; Colossians 1:14 ; Hebrews 9:22 ; 1 John 1:9 ; 2:12 ), our cleansing from sin ( Ephesians 5:26 ; Hebrews 9:14 ; 10:22 ; 1 John 1:7,9 ), our healing ( 1 Peter 2:24 ), our salvation ( 1 Corinthians 1:18 ), our life ( John 6:51-56 ; 12:24 ; Matthew 16:21 ), our justification ( Romans 5:9 ; 8:33 ) or being granted God's righteousness as a gift of grace (2 Corinthians 5:21 ), and our sanctification or being made holy ( Hebrews 13:12 ).
Reconciliation . The forgiveness of God means that rebel humanity is reconciled to God. Romans 5:1 puts it, "since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, " which means that through him "we have now received reconciliation" ( Romans 5:11 ). Paul expresses this most powerfully in 2 Corinthians 5:18-20 . More briefly Colossians 1:22 puts it, "now he has reconciled you by Christ's physical body through death." That reconciliation is a matter of his "making peace through his blood, shed on the cross" ( Colossians 1:20 ). This theme is developed in Ephesians 2:11-22 , where it is made plain that peace with God and peace with one another through Christ belong together. "He himself is our peace, " breaking down "the dividing wall of hostility" between Jew and Gentile, "making peace, " and in one body reconciling both to God by the cross.
This in turn leads to the kindred thought that we "have access to the Father by one Spirit" ( Ephesians 2:18 ; cf. Romans 5:2 ), or in terms of 1 Timothy 2:5-6 , "There is one God and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus, who gave himself as a ransom for all." That openness of access to God is expressed symbolically in the tearing of the curtain in the temple at the very time Jesus died (Matthew 27:51 ; Mark 15:38 ). Song of Solomon 1 pe 3:18 speaks of Christ dying for us "to bring [1] to God." In an essentially similar way the work of Christ's death is described in Hebrews 10:19-22 : "we have confidence to enter the Most Holy Place by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way opened for us. "Since we have a great priest over the house of God, " the writer of that epistle continues, "let us draw near to God." This brings us to the language of priesthood, the dominant theme of Hebrews that is summed up in the words Matthew 27:46: "Since we have a great high priest let us then approach the throne of grace with confidence."
Sacrifice . Inevitably the concept of priesthood links with that of sacrifice. Sacrifices were offered in Old Testament ritual as sin-offerings, in the making of a covenant, and in relation to the celebration of the Passover. All of these have a place in the New Testament in the explanation given of the meaning of the death of Christ.
The work for which Jesus came into our human life was to "make atonement for the sins of the people" (Hebrews 2:17 ) and this he did when "he sacrificed for their sins once for all when he offered himself" (7:27). Hebrews develops this theme in detail, showing the death of Christ to be the fulfillment and the replacement of the sacrifices of Old Testament times. When in the different strands of New Testament testimony we have reference to the "blood" of Christ, that word speaks of his sacrificial death (e.g., Romans 5:9 ; Ephesians 1:7 ; 2:13 ; Colossians 1:20 ; 1 Peter 1:2 ; 1 John 1:7 ; 5:6 ; Revelation 1:5 ; 5:9 ). Paul penetrates more deeply into the meaning of that sacrificial death as he speaks of it "as a sacrifice of atonement" ("as a propitiation" KJV), since, because Christ bore our sins, there was no longer the "passing over of sins, " but in what Christ did on the cross, God is shown to be "just and the one who justifies" those who have faith in Jesus. Human sins are not just swept aside as inconsequential; God's justice is shown in that they are borne by the sinless Son of God, and because they are borne, those who have faith in him are justified (Romans 3:24-26 ). The same language of "propitiation" is used in 1 John 2:2,4:10 .
We have noticed the place that Hebrews gives to the understanding of the sacrifice of Christ as making possible the making of a new covenant, a personal relationship with God based on forgiveness. This is an understanding that goes back to Jesus himself, in particular, to the way that he spoke at his institution of the Lord's Supper: "This is my blood of the covenant which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins" (Matthew 26:28 ; cf. Mark 14:24 ; Luke 22:20 ; 1Col 11:25; Hebrews 13:20 ).
When Jesus is spoken of as "the Lamb of God" (John 1:29,35 ), it is not clear whether we should think of the daily sacrifice of lambs offered in the temple or the Passover lamb as background. It is abundantly clear, however, that the fulfillment of the Passover was prominent in the thought of Jesus himself as he approached his death (in all the Gospel records of the crucifixion this is evident: see Galatians 3:14-19 ; Mark 14:1-2,12-16 ; Luke 22:1-2,7-16 ; John 11:55 ; 12:1 ; 13:1 ; 19:14 ), and so the early Christian understanding was expressed in these terms: "Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed" (1 Corinthians 5:7 ).
This in turn links with the language of redemption, as the Passover stood for the redemption of the people from their slavery in Egypt and was celebrated with the hope of a new and greater redemption. "Redemption through his blood, " Ephesians 1:7 puts it, and that "redemption" ( Romans 3:24 ; 1618882878_88 ) means freedom from sin and evil and from the power of death (Galatians 1:4 ; Titus 2:14 ; 1618882878_59 ; Revelation 1:5 ). For the death of Christ is a triumph over evil and over all the forces of evil (Colossians 2:15 ). Alluding to his imminent death Jesus says in John 12:31 , "Now is the time for judgment on this world; now the prince of this world will be driven out." Victory thus means redemption, but the New Testament also speaks of the costliness of our redemption (1 Peter 1:18-19 ). Jesus speaks of the Son of Man giving himself "as a ransom for many" (Matthew 20:28 ; Mark 10:45 ), and Paul can speak of our being "bought at a price" (1Col 6:20; 7:23; cf. Acts 20:28 ; Revelation 5:9 ; 14:4 ), although the metaphor is never pressed to the point of to whom the price was paid.
The Death of Christ and Discipleship . In all the many ways listed, and more, the death of Christ is spoken of as the way of salvation, of our acceptance with God, of pardon and peace. It is also the indication of the way of discipleship. Thus Jesus spoke repeatedly to his disciples about taking up the cross and following him (Matthew 10:38 ; 16:24-25 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:10 ; Luke 9:23 ; 14:27 ). Baptism expresses the commitment of the believer to die (with Christ) to the old sinful way of life (1618882878_66 ). "I have been crucified with Christ" says Paul (Galatians 2:20 ); the things of the old life are put to death (Colossians 3:5-8 ; cf. Galatians 5:24 ; 1 Peter 4:1 ). This also means a willingness to suffer as Christ suffered. The Acts of the Apostles indicates many parallels between the sufferings of the early Christians and the sufferings of Christ (Acts 7:56-60 ; 9:5 ; 12:1-4 ; 21:13 ). "I die every day, " says Paul (1Col 15:31; cf. 2Col 1:5; 4:10-12). Paul can even speak of his sufferings as in some way filling up "what is still lacking in regard to Christ's afflictions, for the sake of his body, which is the church" (Colossians 1:24 ). It is also a death to self: "he died for all, that those who live should no longer live for themselves but for him who died for them and was raised again" (2 Corinthians 5:15 ); and it is a death to the world, as the apostle says, "May I never boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world" (Galatians 6:14 ).
In these ways the death of Christ is an example for the Christian. Yet in no place in the New Testament is the example of Christ's suffering and death presented without the emphasis also being on what was done in his death "for us." Thus the sacraments of the gospel indicate the lifestyle to which Christians are called, but also indicate and recall (requiring the response of repentance and faith) what Jesus Christ did once and for all for us by his death and resurrection. The Lord's Supper is nothing less than the constant proclaiming of the Lord's death until he comes (1 Corinthians 11:26 ). Baptism is an identifying with Christ in his death and resurrection, speaking of the whole lifestyle of the Christian as (in Christ's name) a dying to self and living for him who has loved us and given himself for us (Galatians 2:20 ). Life, as long as it lasts on earth, is to be lived to the praise of the crucified and risen Lord, and the praise of heaven is of "the Lamb who was slain" as "worthyto receive power and wealth and wisdom and strength and honour and glory and praise" (Revelation 5:12 ).
Francis Foulkes
See also Atonement ; Cross, Crucifixion ; Jesus Christ ; Lamb, Lamb of God
Bibliography. E. Brandenburger, NIDNTT, 1:389-403; J. Denney, The Death of Christ ; M. Hengel, The Cross of the Son of God ; L. Morris, The Apostolic Preaching of the Cross ; idem, The Cross in the New Testament ; J. Schneider, TDNT, 7:572-84; J. Stott, The Cross of Christ ; R. S. Wallace, The Atoning Death of Christ .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Life And Death
1. Life.-In a consideration of the subject of life as dealt with in the Acts and Epistles, three Gr. words-βίος, ψυχή, and ζωή-require to be distinguished.
(1) βίος denotes life in the outward and visible sense-its period or course (cf. ‘the time past of our life,’ 1 Peter 4:3), its means of living (hence in 1 John 3:17 the Revised Version renders ‘goods’), the manner in which it is spent (cf. ‘that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life,’ 1 Timothy 2:2), its relation to worldly affairs (2 Timothy 2:4) and to the world’s love of pomp and show (1 John 2:16).
(2) ψυχή (fr. [1] ψύχω, ‘breathe’) originally means the breath of life, and in such an expression as ‘his life is in him’ (Acts 20:10) would quite adequately be rendered ‘breath.’ But, as breathing is the sign of the presence in the body of an animating vital force, ψυχή (cf. Lat. anima) comes to mean ‘life’ in the sense of the animal soul, and especially the life of the individual as distinguished from other individual lives. This is the life that may be injured or lost through a shipwreck (Acts 27:10; Acts 27:22), counted dear or willingly surrendered (Acts 20:24, Revelation 12:11); the life which Jesus Christ laid down for His people (1 John 3:16), and which they should be prepared to lay down for Him (Acts 15:26) or for one another (Romans 16:4, Philippians 2:30, 1 John 3:16). From meaning the animal soul or life (anima), however, ψυχή comes to be used for the individualized life in its moral and spiritual aspects, the ‘soul’ in the deeper significance of that word (Lat. animus), the part of man which thinks and feels and wills (Acts 2:27, Romans 2:9, 2 Corinthians 1:23, etc). See, further, Soul.
(3) But of the three words for life ζωή for the purposes of the present article is much the most important. Occasionally it is employed in a way that makes it practically equivalent to βίος (1 Corinthians 15:19, ‘If in this life only we have hoped in Christ’; cf. Luke 16:25, ‘in thy lifetime’ [2]), and more frequently in connexions not far removed from those of ψυχή in the sense of the vital energy or animal soul (e.g. Acts 17:25, James 4:14), though even in these cases it is noticeable that ζωή does not denote, like ψυχή, the life of the individual, but life in a sense that is general and distributed. Ordinarily, however, ζωή stands for a life which is not existence merely, but existence raised to its highest power; not a bare life, but’ life more abundantly’ (John 10:10), a life which St. Paul describes as ‘the life which is life indeed’ (ἡ ὄντως ζωή, 1 Timothy 6:19), a life, i.e., which in its essential nature is full and overflowing, and in its moral and spiritual quality is perfect and complete. In this employment of it, ζωή is very frequently characterized as ‘eternal (αἰώνιος) life’; but the epithet does not impart any real addition to the connotation of the word as elsewhere used without the adjective, much less restrict its reference to the life after death; it only expresses more explicitly the conception of that life as something so full and positive that from its very nature it is unconquerable by death, and consequently everlasting. See, further, Eternal, Everlasting.
(a) In the usage of the NT this ζωή or ζωὴ αἰώνιος is first of all a Divine attribute-a view of it which finds its most complete expression in the Johannine writings. It inheres in God and belongs to His essential nature. ‘The Father hath life in himself’ (John 5:26), the life eternal is ‘with the Father’ (1 John 1:2). The Father, however, imparts it to the Son, so that He also possesses ‘life in himself’ (John 5:26), and possesses it in a manner so copious that this endowment with life is predicated of Him as if it were the most characteristic quality of His being (John 1:4). Thereafter this life which Christ possesses is communicated by Him to those who are willing to receive it, the record being that God gave unto as the eternal life which is in His Son (1 John 5:11), and that he that hath the Son, viz. by believing on His name, hath the life (1 John 5:12 f.)
(b) The ζωή (αἰώνιος) thus becomes a human possession and quality; and it is with the manifestations in human character and experience of this life flowing from God through Christ that the apostolic writers are principally concerned in what they have to say about it. Their references bear chiefly upon the source from which it comes, the means by which it is obtained, its fruits or evidences, its present possession, and its completion in the world to come.
(α) As follows from the fact that this life inheres essentially in God, its primal source is God the Father, from whom it comes as a gift (Romans 6:23, 1 John 5:11) and a grace (1 Peter 3:7). But this gracious gift is manifested and mediated only by Christ (1 John 1:2, 1 Timothy 2:5). According to St. John, the eternal life which men enjoy resides in God’s Son (1 John 5:11), and that in so absolute a sense that ‘he that hath the Son hath the life; he that hath not the Son of God hath not the life’ (1 John 5:12). Similarly St. Paul writes that it is through the Son that the gift of life is bestowed (Romans 6:23), describes Christ as ‘our life’ (Colossians 3:4), and declares that this life of ours ‘is hid with Christ in God’ (Colossians 3:3).
(β) But this gift of life is not bestowed arbitrarily or apart from the fulfilment of certain conditions. It is not thrust upon anyone, but needs to be laid hold of (1 Timothy 6:12; 1 Timothy 6:19). In the symbolic language of the Apocalypse the fruition of the tree of life which is in the Paradise of God is promised to him that overcometh (Revelation 2:7). Various energies and attitudes of the soul are mentioned as conditioning the attainment of life, e.g. patience in well-doing (Romans 2:7), en durance of temptation (James 1:12), sowing to the Spirit (Galatians 6:8), But the fundamental conditions, on which all the others depend, are repentance (Acts 11:18) and faith (Acts 13:48, 1 Timothy 1:16, 1 John 5:10-12). The old life must be renounced if the new life is to begin; that is what is meant by the demand for repentance. And life cannot be self-generated, but can only be received from a living source; that is the explanation of the call for faith.
(γ) Among the fruits or evidences of the possession of life St. Paul includes freedom from the bondage of sin (Romans 6:6) and a way of walking in the world which is new (Romans 6:4) and has God for its object (Romans 6:11). Inwardly the life reveals its presence in a daily experience of renewal (2 Corinthians 4:16), in the possession of a spiritual mind (Romans 8:6), in the consciousness of spiritual liberty (Romans 8:2). Outwardly its fruits are seen in holy living (Romans 6:22) and its signature written even upon the mortal flesh (2 Corinthians 4:11). To St. John the great evidence of life is love to the brethren (1 John 3:14). Everyone that loveth is born of God (1 John 4:7); but the love which is the proof of this Divine birth and consequent Divine life must flow out towards the visible brother as well as towards the invisible God if there is to be any assurance of its reality (1 John 4:12; 1 John 4:20). In the mystical language of the author of the Apocalypse life has the evidence of a written record. The names of those who possess it are written in a book which is called ‘the book of life’ (Revelation 3:5; Revelation 17:8; Revelation 20:12; Revelation 22:19), or more fully ‘the Lamb’s book of life’ (Revelation 13:8; Revelation 21:27). With this may be compared St. Paul’s use of the same figure in Philippians 4:3. See Book of Life.
(δ) To the apostolic writers life or eternal life is a present possession. While distinct from the ordinary forms of earthly existence, with which it is contrasted (1 Timothy 6:19), it is not separated from them in time, but here and now interfused dynamically through them all. This is a conception which is especially characteristic of the Johannine writings. In the Fourth Gospel it occurs constantly (John 3:36; John 17:3 etc.), and in the First Epistle we see it reappearing, as when the writer declares that he that hath the Son hath the life (1 John 5:12), and that those who possess eternal life may know that they possess it (1 John 3:14; 1 John 5:13). But it is evident that St. Paul also conceives of life as a present reality when he proclaims that Christ is out life (Colossians 3:4), and that our life is hid with Christ in God (Colossians 3:3), when he makes our baptism into Christ’s Death, and resurrection in His likeness, determinative of our present walk in newness of life (Romans 6:4), and declares that to be spiritually-minded is life and peace (Romans 8:6).
(ε) And yet this life, though it is a present experience, is not realized in its totality in the present world. The promise given to godliness in 1 Timothy 4:8 is said to be for the life that now is and that which is to come. Similarly it is in ‘the time to come’ that ‘the life which is life indeed’ arrives at its completion (1 Timothy 6:19). St. Paul gives especial prominence to this future aspect of the life in Christ. He anticipates a time when what is mortal shall be swallowed up of life (2 Corinthians 5:4), co-ordinates eternal life with immortality (Romans 2:7; cf. 2 Timothy 1:10), and places it in direct antithesis with death (Romans 6:23) and corruption (Galatians 6:8). And yet, though life for its completeness must wait for the full revelation of the powers of the world to come, which are only tasted here (Hebrews 6:5), the present and the future life are essentially one and the same. It is because the Christian life is hid with Christ in God that it carries the assurance of immortality within itself. As, in St. Peter’s language, it was not possible that Christ should be holden of death (Acts 2:24), so it is impossible that those whose very life Christ is (Colossians 3:4) should not be sharers in His victory over death’s pains and powers. To all who abide in the Son and through Him in the Father there belongs this promise which He promised us, even the life eternal (1 John 2:24 f.). And in this promise there lies enfolded the hope not only of the immortality of the soul but of the resurrection of the body. It is the frailty and imperfection of the earthly body, its domination by the law of sin and death, that hinder the full enjoyment of eternal life in the present world (2 Corinthians 5:2; 2 Corinthians 5:4). But when mortality shall be swallowed up of life, Christ’s people, instead of being ‘unclothed,’ shall be ‘clothed upon’ (2 Corinthians 5:2; 2 Corinthians 5:4). To the natural body will succeed a spiritual body (1 Corinthians 15:44), to the body of death (Romans 7:24) a body instinct with the Lord’s own life, to the house that must be dissolved a house not made with hands, eternal, in the heavens (2 Corinthians 5:1).
2. Death (θἀνατος, to which in its various senses correspond the vb. ἀποθνήσκω, ‘die,’ and the adj. νεκρός, ‘dead’).-Death is frequently used in the apostolic literature in its ordinary, everyday meaning of the end of man’s earthly course (βίος) or the extinction of his animal life (ψυχή) through the separation of the soul from the body (Acts 2:24, 1 Corinthians 3:22, Philippians 2:27). Much more important than this purely physical employment of the word are its various theological uses, the chief of which maybe distinguished as the punitive, the redemptive, the mystical, the spiritual and moral.
(1) For the NT writers, and above all for St. Paul, death has a punitive significance as the judicial sentence pronounced by God upon sin. When St. Paul writes, ‘The wages of sin is death’ (Romans 6:23), or ‘Through one man sin entered into the world, and death through sin; and so death passed unto all men, for that all sinned’ (Romans 5:12); or when the author of Hebrews links together the facts of death and the judgment and relates them to the Death and redeeming Sacrifice of Christ (Hebrews 9:26-28); or when St. James says, ‘He which converteth a sinner from the error of his way shall save a soul from death and shall cover a multitude of sins’ (James 5:20), death is used to denote the punitive consequences of sin and the state in which man lies as condemned on account of it. For, just as ζωή in the NT means not the earthly existence but the larger life of the Christian salvation, so θάνατος means not the end of the earthly existence merely but the loss of life in the full Christian conception of the word-the whole of the miserable results that flow from sin and constitute its penalty. Among these penal consequences certainly physical death is included, as passages like Romans 5:12; Romans 5:14 and 1 Corinthians 15:21 f. make perfectly clear. More than this, the death of the body is treated as ‘the point of the punitive sentence, about which all the other elements in that sentence are grouped’ (H. Cremer, Bib.-Theol. Lex.3, 1880, p. 284). Death is the wages of sin (Romans 6:23), it is the recompense received by the servants of sin (Romans 6:16). Sin reigns in death (Romans 5:21); it is the sting of death (1 Corinthians 15:56). The saving significance of the Death of Christ is due to this same punitive relation between death and sin. He died for our sins (1 Corinthians 15:3); He bare our sins in His body upon the tree (1 Peter 2:24). And it is through the Death of His Son that we are reconciled to God (Romans 5:10). In including physical death among the penalties of sin, however, the apostolic writers are not to be held as meaning either that man was naturally immortal or that until he fell there was no natural law of death in the physical world. In neither the OT nor the NT is the assertion ever made that death entered into the natural world in consequence of the sin of man (the ‘world’ in Romans 5:12 is the moral world, as the context shows). And when man became liable to death because of sin (Romans 5:12; Romans 5:14; cf. Genesis 2:17), this does not imply that he was not created mortal (cf. Genesis 3:19). But it does imply that, mortal as he was, he differed from the rest of the animal world in a potentiality of exemption from the law of decay and death, owing to the fact that he was a spiritual being made in God’s image; and that by his transgression he lost God’s proffered gift of physical immortality (Romans 5:14, 1 Corinthians 15:21 f.).
But, while physical death is the point of the punitive sentence, the sentence of death stretches far beyond it. Just as ζωή has a future and otherworldly as well as a present reference, so is it with θάνατος. Sometimes it plainly refers to a death that is not an earthly experience but a future state of misery which awaits the wicked in the world to come (Romans 1:32, 1 John 3:14; 1 John 5:16). In Revelation 2:11; Revelation 20:6; Revelation 14; Revelation 21:8 this future condition of woe is called ‘the second death,’ in contrast, viz., with the first death by which the life on earth is ended (see Punishment).
(2) At the other extreme from this punitive sense of death is the use of the word with a redemptive meaning. When St. Paul declares in Romans that we died to sin (Revelation 6:2), that we were buried through baptism into death (Revelation 6:4), that he that hath died is justified from sin (Revelation 6:11); or when in Galatians he says of himself, ‘For I through the law died unto the law’ (Revelation 2:19), the death he speaks of, as the last passage shows, is a legal or judicial death which carries with it a deliverance from the state of condemnation into which the sinner has been brought by his sin (Romans 6:7). And when he speaks of this death as a dying with Christ (Romans 6:8), and explains more fully that all died because one died for all (2 Corinthians 5:14), he reminds us that this redemptive death is possible for Christians only because a punitive Death was endured by Christ on their behalf. If they can reckon themselves to be dead unto sin (Romans 6:11), it is because ‘Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures’ (1 Corinthians 15:3).
(3) Side by side with this redemptive death in Christ-a death to the penalty of sin-St. Paul sets a mystical dying-a dying to its power. The Christian’s union with Christ in His redeeming Death is not only the ground of his justification but the secret source and spring of his sanctification. If the transition from the one to the other is not very clearly marked, the reason is that for St. Paul the two were inseparably joined together. He passes at a bound, and as it were unconsciously, from the legal aspect of the Christian’s death in Christ to its mystical aspect, from a death in the eyes of the law against sin to a death to the principle of sin itself (2 Corinthians 5:14 f.). Baptism into Jesus Christ is the symbol and seal of a baptism into His Death, which means not only a dying to the retribution of the of offended law but a crucifixion of the old man, a destruction of ‘the body of sin,’ so that we should no longer be in bondage to sin’s power (Romans 6:2-7; cf. Galatians 2:12). It may be that St. Paul’s view of the body, not indeed as essentially sinful, but as the invariable seat and source of sin in fallen humanity (see article Body) helped him to think of the Crucifixion of Christ as carrying with it a destruction of the polluted flesh (cf. Romans 8:3) through which the way was opened for a new life of holiness. But in any case death to the law meant life unto God, because crucifixion with Christ meant the death of the former self and the substitution for it of a life of faith in the son of God (Galatians 2:19 f.). Nor is it only to sin that the Christian died in Christ, but to the world (Galatians 6:14), to the world’s doctrines and precepts (Colossians 2:20 f.), to the attitude and affections of the mind that is set on earthly things (Colossians 3:2). ‘For ye died,’ the Apostle writes, ‘and your life is hid with Christ in God’ (Colossians 3:3). And in this case, at least, it is plain that the death of which he thinks is not the judicial but the mystical dying, the dying which is at the same time the birth to a new life (cf. John 12:24 f.) that carries with it a putting to death of all that is earthly and evil in the natures of those whom Christ has redeemed (Colossians 3:5).
(4) Once more, death is used to denote the spiritual atrophy and moral inability of fallen man in his unregenerate condition. This is the sense that belongs to it in the expression ‘dead in trespasses and sins’ (Ephesians 2:1; cf. Colossians 2:13), in the summons to the spiritual sleeper to awake and arise from the dead (Ephesians 5:14), in the description of true believers as those that are alive from the dead (Romans 6:13) and of false professors as having a name that they are living when they are really dead (Revelation 3:1), in the statements that the mind of the flesh is death (Romans 8:6) and that the woman who lives in pleasure is dead while she liveth (1 Timothy 5:6). This, especially on the side of moral inability, is the death which St. Paul describes so powerfully in Romans 7:14 ff., from which, conscious of his helplessness, he cries to be delivered (Romans 7:24), and from which he recognizes that no deliverance is possible except through the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus (Romans 8:2).
Literature.-I. Life.-S. D. F. Salmond, The Christian Doctrine of Immortality3, 1895, p. 487ff.; E. White, Life in Christ, 1878; E. van Schrenck, Die johan. Auffassung von ‘Leben,’ 1898; the NT Theologies of B. Weiss (Eng. translation , 1882-83, 2 vols.) and W. Beyschlag (Eng. translation , 1895, 2 vols.), passim; J. R. Illingworth, Sermons preached in a College Chapel, 1882, p. 60; J. Macpherson, in Expositor, 1st. ser. v. [3] 72ff.; J. Massie, in do., 2nd ser. iv. [4] 380ff. II. Death.-J. Laidlaw, The Bible Doctrine of Man, 1895, p. 233ff.; J. Müller, The Christian Doct
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Death, Death-Stroke
A — 1: θάνατος (Strong's #2288 — Noun Masculine — thanatos — than'-at-os ) "death," is used in Scripture of: (a) the separation of the soul (the spiritual part of man) from the body (the material part), the latter ceasing to function and turning to dust, e.g., John 11:13 ; Hebrews 2:15 ; 5:7 ; 7:23 . In Hebrews 9:15 , the AV, "by means of death" is inadequate; the RV, "a death having taken place" is in keeping with the subject. In Revelation 13:3,12 , the RV, "death-stroke" (AV, "deadly wound") is, lit., "the stroke of death:"
(b) the separation of man from God; Adam died on the day he disobeyed God, Genesis 2:17 , and hence all mankind are born in the same spiritual condition, Romans 5:12,14,17,21 , from which, however, those who believe in Christ are delivered, John 5:24 ; 1 John 3:14 . "Death" is the opposite of life; it never denotes nonexistence. As spiritual life is "conscious existence in communion with God," so spiritual "death" is "conscious existence in separation from God."
"Death, in whichever of the above-mentioned senses it is used, is always, in Scripture, viewed as the penal consequence of sin, and since sinners alone are subject to death, Romans 5:12 , it was as the Bearer of sin that the Lord Jesus submitted thereto on the Cross, 1 Peter 2:24 . And while the physical death of the Lord Jesus was of the essence of His sacrifice, it was not the whole. The darkness symbolized, and His cry expressed, the fact that He was left alone in the Universe, He was 'forsaken;' cp. Matthew 27:45,46 ." * [1]
A — 2: ἀναίρεσις (Strong's #336 — Noun Feminine — anairesis — an-ah'ee-res-is ) another word for "death," lit. signifies "a taking up or off" (ana, "up," airo, "to take"), as of the taking of a life, or "putting to death;" it is found in Acts 8:1 , of the murder of Stephen. Some mss. have it in Acts 22:20 . See anaireo, under KILL. In the Sept., Numbers 11:15 ; Judges 15:17 , "the lifting of the jawbone."
A — 3: τελευτή (Strong's #5054 — Noun Feminine — teleute — tel-yoo-tay' ) "an end, limit" (cp. telos, see END), hence, "the end of life, death," is used of the "death" of Herod, Matthew 2:15 .
B — 1: ἐπιθανάτιος (Strong's #1935 — Adjective — epithanatios — ep-ee-than-at'-ee-os ) "doomed to death" (epi, "upon," thanatos, A, No. 1), is said of the apostles, in 1 Corinthians 4:9 .
C — 1: θανατόω (Strong's #2289 — Verb — thanatoo — than-at-o'-o ) "to put to death" (akin to A, No. 1), in Matthew 10:21 ; Mark 13:12 ; Luke 21:16 , is translated "shall ... cause (them) to be put to death," lit., "shall put (them) to death" (RV marg.). It is used of the Death of Christ in Matthew 26:59 ; 27:1 ; Mark 14:55 ; 1 Peter 3:18 . In Romans 7:4 (Passive Voice) it is translated "ye ... were made dead," RV (for AV, "are become"), with reference to the change from bondage to the Law to union with Christ; in Romans 8:13 , "mortify" (marg., "make to die"), of the act of the believer in regard to the deeds of the body; in Romans 8:36 , "are killed;" so in 2 Corinthians 6:9 . See KILL , MORTIFY.
C — 2: ἀναιρέω (Strong's #337 — Verb — anaireo — an-ahee-reh'-o ) lit., "to take or lift up or away" (see A, No. 2), hence, "to put to death," is usually translated "to kill or slay;" in two places "put to death," Luke 23:32 ; Acts 26:10 . It is used 17 times, with this meaning, in Acts. See KILL , SLAY , TAKE.
C — 3: ἀπάγω (Strong's #520 — Verb — apago — ap-ag'-o ) lit., "to lead away" (apo, "away," ago, "to lead"), is used especially in a judicial sense, "to put to death," e.g., Acts 12:19 . See BRING , CARRY , LEAD , TAKE.
C — 4: ἀποκτείνω (Strong's #615 — Verb — apokteino — ap-ok-ti'-no ) "to kill," is so translated in the RV, for the AV, "put to death," in Mark 14:1 ; Luke 18:33 ; in John 11:53 ; 12:10 ; 18:31 , RV, "put to death." See KILL , SLAY.
Note: The phrase eschatos echo, lit., "to have extremely," i.e., "to be in extremity," in extremis, "at the last (gasp), to be at the point of death," is used in Mark 5:23 .
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Faith: a Death Grip
A sea captain related at a prayer-meeting in Boston a short time ago a thrilling incident in his own experience.
'A few years ago,' said he, 'I was sailing by the island Cuba, when the cry ran through the ship, 'Man overboard!' It was impossible to put up the helm of the ship, but I instantly seized a rope and threw it over the ship's stern crying out to the man to seize it as for his life. The sailor caught the rope just as the ship was passing. I immediately took another rope, and making a slip noose of it, attached i to the other, and slid it down to the struggling sailor, an directed him to pass it over his shoulders and under his arms and he would be drawn on board. He was rescued; but h had grasped that rope with such firmness, with such a death grip, that it took hours before his hold relaxed, and his hand could be separated from it. With such eagerness, indeed, had he clutched the object that was to save him, that the strands of the rope became imbedded in the flesh of his hands!'
Reader, has not God let down from heaven a rope to every sinner on the earth, is not every strand a precious promise, and ought we not to lay hold on it as for our very life?: The Family Treasury for 1859.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Death: Desired by Few
Burckhardt states, that although the Arabs are strict predestinarians, yet when the plague visited Medina, many of the townsmen fled to the desert, alleging as an excuse that although the distemper was a messenger from heaven sent to call them to a better world, yet being conscious of their own unworthiness, and that they did not merit this special mark of grace, they thought it more advisable to decline it for the present, and make their escape from the town. If it really came to the point with those of us who talk of longing for death as a great deliverance, should we not cling to life? It is a question perhaps more easily asked than answered.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Death: Differently Viewed by Different Characters
It is a blessed thing to know the Savior, and to feel that your soul is safe. You have been in a ship when it entered the harbor, and you have noticed the different looks of the passengers as they turned their eyes ashore. There was one who, that he might not lose a moment's time, had got everything ready for landing long ago; and now he smiles and beckons to yonder party on the pier, who in their turn, are so eager to meet him, that they almost press over the margin of the quay; and no sooner is the gangway thrown across, than he has hold of the arm of one, and another is triumphant on his shoulder, and all the rest are leaping before and after him on their homeward way. But there is another, who showed no alacrity. He gazed with pensive eye on the nearer coast and seemed to grudge that the trip was over. He was a stranger going amongst strangers, and though sometimes during the voyage he had a momentary hope that something unexpected might occur, and that some friendly face might recognise him in regions where he was going an alien and an adventurer, no such welcoming face is there, and with reluctant steps he quits the vessel, and commits himself to the unknown country. And now that everyone else has disembarked, who is this unhappy man whom they have brought on deck, and whom, groaning in his heavy chains, they are conducting to the dreaded shore? Alas! he is a felon and a runaway, whom they are bringing back to take his trial there; and no wonder he is loath to land.
Now, dear brethren, our ship is sailing fast. We shall soon hear the rasping of the shallows, and the commotion overhead, which bespeak the port in view. When it comes to that, how shall you feel? Are you a stranger, or a convict, or are you going home? Can you say,' I know whom I have believed'? Have you a Friend within the veil? And however much you may enjoy the voyage, and however much you may like your fellow passengers, does your heart sometimes leap up at the prospect of seeing Jesus as he is, and so being ever with the Lord?–James Hamilton, D.D.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Death
May be simply defined as the termination of life. It is represented under a variety of aspects in Scripture:
"The dust shall return to the earth as it was" (Ecclesiastes 12:7 ).
"Thou takest away their breath, they die" (Psalm 104:29 ).
It is the dissolution of "our earthly house of this tabernacle" (2 Corinthians 5:1 ); the "putting off this tabernacle" (2 Peter 1:13,14 ).
Being "unclothed" (2 Corinthians 5:3,4 ).
"Falling on sleep" (Psalm 76:5 ; Jeremiah 51:39 ; Acts 13:36 ; 2 Peter 3:9 .
"I go whence I shall not return" (Job 10:21 ); "Make me to know mine end" (Psalm 39:4 ); "to depart" (Philippians 1:23 ). The grave is represented as "the gates of death" (Job 38:17 ; Psalm 9:13 ; 107:18 ). The gloomy silence of the grave is spoken of under the figure of the "shadow of death" (Jeremiah 2:6 ).
Death is the effect of sin (Hebrews 2:14 ), and not a "debt of nature." It is but once (9:27), universal (Genesis 3:19 ), necessary (Luke 2:28-30 ). Jesus has by his own death taken away its sting for all his followers (1 Corinthians 15:55-57 ).
There is a spiritual death in trespasses and sins, i.e., the death of the soul under the power of sin (Romans 8:6 ; Ephesians 2:1,3 ; Colossians 2:13 ).
The "second death" (Revelation 2:11 ) is the everlasting perdition of the wicked (Revelation 21:8 ), and "second" in respect to natural or temporal death.
THE DEATH OF CHRIST is the procuring cause incidentally of all the blessings men enjoy on earth. But specially it is the procuring cause of the actual salvation of all his people, together with all the means that lead thereto. It does not make their salvation merely possible, but certain (Matthew 18:11 ; Romans 5:10 ; 2 co 5:21 ; Galatians 1:4 ; 3:13 ; Ephesians 1:7 ; 2:16 ; Romans 8:32-35 ).
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Death
Paid the debt of nature.' No; it is not paying a debt; it is rather like bringing a note to the bank to obtain solid gold in exchange for it. In this case you bring this cumbrous body which is nothing worth, and which you could not wish to retain long; you lay it down, and receive for it from the eternal treasures: liberty, victory, knowledge, rapture.: Foster.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Fear of Death
See DEATH.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Death (2)
The hour of death may be fitly likened to that celebrated picture in the National Gallery, of Perseus holding up the head of Medusa. That head turned all persons into stone who looked upon it. There is a warrior represented with a dart in his hand; he stands stiffened, turned into stone, with the javelin even in his fist. There is another with a poignard beneath his robe, about to stab; he is now the statue of an assassin, motionless and cold. Another is creeping along stealthily, like a man in ambuscade, and there he stands a consolidated rock; he has looked only upon that head, and he is frozen into stone. Such is death. What I am when death is held before me, that I must be for ever. When my spirit departs, if God finds me hymning his praise, I shall hymn it in heaven; if he finds me breathing out oaths, I shall follow up those oaths in hell.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Death: Peace in
The late Mr. Young of Jedburgh, was once visiting the death-bed of an aged member of his congregation, who was hourly looking for his last change. 'Well, my friend,' said the minister, 'how do you feel yourself to-day?' 'Very weel, sir,' was the calm and solemn answer, 'Very weel, but just a wee confused wi' the flittin'.'–Children's Missionary Record for 1857.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Death: Its Revealing Power
Today the world is like a masquerade. High carnival is being held, and men wear their masks and dominoes, and strut about, and we think that man a king, and this a mighty Oriental prince, and this a haughty Indian chief. But the time is over for the masque; daylight dawns; strip off your garnishings; every one of you put on your ordinary garments. Who goes out to the unrobing-room with greatest confidence Why, the man who feels that his next dress will be a far more glorious vestment. Who shall go to that disrobing-room with the greatest tremor? Why, those who feel that the splendid character they once wore will give place to beggary and meanness; when for robes they shall have rags; for riches poverty; for honor, shame; and for regal splendor, hissing and reproach. If any of our readers seem to be what they are not, let them be wise enough to think of the spade the shroud, and the silent dust; let every one among us now put his soul into the crucible, and as we shall test ourselves i the silence of the dying hour, so let us judge ourselves now.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Death: Realized
When Bernard Gilpin was privately informed that his enemies had caused thirty-two articles to be drawn up against him in the strongest manner, and presented to Bonner, bishop of London, he said to his favorite domestic, At length they have prevailed against me. I am accused to the bishop of London, from whom there will be no escaping. God forgive, their malice, and grant me strength to undergo the trial.' He then ordered his servant to provide a long garment for him, in which he might go decently to the stake, and desired it might be got ready with all expedition. 'For I know not,' says he, 'how soon I may have occasion for it.' As soon as this garment was provided, it is said, he used to put it on every day, till the bishop's messengers apprehended him. It were well if we all thus realized to ourselves the hour of our departure. We ought by anticipation to sleep in our shrouds, and go to bed in our sepulchers. To put on our cerements now is wisdom.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Now Christ, the Conqueror of Death
Hymn for Lauds on October 7, feast of the Most Holy Rosary. It was written in the 18th century by A. Ricchini. There are six translations. The English title given is by the Benedictines of Stanbrook.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Death
Is generally defined to be the separation of the soul from the body. It is styled, in Scripture language, a departure out of this world to another, 2 Timothy 4:7 . a dissolving of the earthly house of this tabernacle, 2. Cor. 5: 1. a going the way of all the earth, Joshua 23:14 . a returning to the dust, Ecclesiastes 12:7 . a sleep, John 11:11 . Death may be considered as the effect of sin, Romans 5:12 . yet, as our existence is from God, no man has a right to take away his own life, or the life of another, Genesis 9:6 . Satan is said to have the power of death, Hebrews 2:14 ; not that he can at his pleasure inflict death on mankind, but as he was the instrument of first bringing death into the world, John 8:44 ; and as he may be the executioner of God's wrath on impenitent sinners, when God permits him. Death is but once, Hebrews 9:27 . certain, Job 14:1-2 . powerful and terrific, called the king of terrors, Job 18:14 . uncertain as to the time, Proverbs 28:1 . universal, Genesis 5:1-32 : necessary, that God's justice may be displayed, and his mercy manifested; desirable to the righteous, Luke 2:28-30 . The fear of death is a source of uneasiness to the generality, and to a guilty conscience it may indeed be terrible; but to a good man it should be obviated by the consideration that death is the termination of every trouble; that it puts him beyond the reach of sin and temptation: that God has promised to be with the righteous, even to the end, Hebrews 13:5 . that Jesus Christ has taken away the sting, 1 Corinthians 15:54 . and that it introduces him to a state of endless felicity, 2 Corinthians 5:8 . Preparation for death.
This does not consist in bare morality; in an external reformation from gross sins; in attention to a round of duties in our own strength; in acts of charity; in a zealous profession; in possessing eminent gifts: but in reconciliation to God; repentance of sin; faith in Christ; obedience to his word: and all as the effect of regeneration by the Spirit. 3 John 3: 6. 1 Corinthians 11:3 . Titus 3:5 . Bates's four last Things; Hopkins, Drelincourt, Sherlock, and Fellowes, on Death; Bp. Porteus's Poem on DEath; Grove's admirable Sermon on the fear of Death; Watts's World to Come. Spiritual Death is that awful state of ignorance, insensibility, and disobedience, which mankind are in by nature, and which exclude them from the favour and enjoyment of God, Luke 1:79 .
See SIN. Brothers of Death, a denomination usually given to the religious of the order of St. Paul, the first hermit. They are called brothers of death, on account of the figure of a death's head which they were always to have with them, in order to keep perpetually before them the thoughts of death. The order was probably suppressed by pope Urban VIII. Death of Christ. The circumstances attendant on the death of Christ are so well known, that they need not be inserted here. As the subject, however, of all others, is the most important to the Christian, a brief abstract of what has been said on it, from a sermon allowedly one of the best in the English language, shall here be given. "The hour of Christ's death, " says Blair (vol.i. ser. 5.) "was the most critical, the most pregnant with great events, since hours had begun to be numbered, since time had begun to run. It was the hour in which Christ was glorified by his sufferings.
Through the cloud of his humiliation his native lustre often broke forth, but never did it shine so bright as now. It was indeed the hour of distress, and of blood. It is distress which ennobles every great character, and distress was to glorify the Son of God. He was now to teach all mankind, by his example, how to suffer, and how to die. What magnanimity in all his words and actions on the great occasion! No upbraiding, no complaining expression escaped from his lips. He betrayed no symptom of a weak, a discomposed, or impatient mind. With all the dignity of a sovereign, he conferred pardon on a penitent fellow-sufferer: with a greatness of mind beyond example, he spent his last moments in apologies and prayers for those who were shedding his blood. This was the hour in which Christ atoned for the sins of mankind, and accomplished our eternal redemption. It was the hour when that great sacrifice was offered up, the efficacy of which reaches back to the first transgression of man, and extends forward to the end of time: the hour, when, from the cross, as from an high altar, the blood was flowing which washed away the guilt of the nations. In this hour the long series of prophesies, visions, types, and figures were accomplished. This was the centre in which they all met. You behold the law and the prophets standing, if we may speak so, at the foot of the cross, and doing homage. You behold Moses and Aaron bearing the ark of the covenant; David and Elijah presenting the oracle of testimony. You behold all the priests and sacrifices, all the rites and ordinances, all the types and symbols assembled together to receive their consummation. This was the hour of the abolition of the law, and the introduction of the Gospel; the hour of terminating the old and beginning the new dispensation.
It is finished. When he uttered these words he changed the state of the universe. This was the ever-memorable point of time which separated the old and the new world from each other. On one side of the point of separation you behold the law, with its priests, its sacrifices, and its rites, retiring from sight. On the other side you behold the Gospel, with its simple and venerable institutions, coming forward into view. Significantly was the veil of the temple rent in twain; for the glory then departed from between the cherubims. The legal high priest delivered up his Urim and Thummim, his breast-plate, his robes, and his incense; and Christ stood forth as the great high priest of all succeeding generations. Altars on which the fire had blazed for ages were now to smoke no more. Now it was also that he threw down the wall of partition which had so long divided the Gentile from the Jew; and gathered into one all the faithful, out of every kindred and people. This was the hour of Christ's triumph over all the powers of darkness; the hour in which he overthrew dominions and thrones, led captivity captive, and gave gifts unto men; then it was that the foundation of every pagan temple shook; the statue of every false god totterd on its base; the priest fled from his falling shrine, and the heathen oracles became dumb for ever!
This was the hour when our Lord erected that spiritual kingdom which is never to end. His enemies imagined that in this hour they had successfully accomplished their plan for his destruction; but how little did they know that the Almighty was at that moment setting him as a king on the hill of Sion! How little did they know that their badges of mock royalty were at that moment converted into the signals of absolute dominion, and the instruments of irresistible power! The reed which they put into his hands became a rod of iron, with which he was to break in pieces his enemies; a sceptre with which he was to rule the universe in righteousness. The cross, which they thought was to stigmatize him with infamy, became the ensign of his renown. Instead of being the reproach of his followers, it was to be their boast, and their glory. The cross was to shine on palaces and churches throughout the earth. It was to be assumed as the distinction of the most powerful monarchs, and to wave in the banner of victorious armies, when the memory of Herod and Pilate should be accursed; when Jerusalem should be reduced to ashes, and the Jews be vagabonds over all the world."
See ATONEMENT; Person and Barrow on the Creed; Owen's Death of Death in the Death of Christ; Charnock's Works, vol. 2: on the Necessity, Voluntariness, &c. of the Death of Christ.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Second Death
See Death, Second .
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Sin Unto Death
The expression "sin unto death" (1 John 5:16-17 ) appears in a context concerning confident, effective prayer (cf. 1 John 3:21-22 ; 4:17 ). First John 5:14-15 speaks generally about the confidence that God will answer requests made according to his will. Verses 16-17 speak specifically about the confidence that God will answer intercession for believers who are committing a sin not unto death and give life to them. But no such confidence is available when the sins is unto death. While all unrighteousness is sin, not all sin is unto death. Thus, the comment about sin unto death is something of an afterthought.
But what are the nondeadly and deadly sins? Some answers are unconvincing because they stress remote contexts rather than the immediate context in 1John. The view that mortal and venial sins are distinguished is anachronistic. In another approach, death is understood as physical, but in 1John death and life are spiritual (1:1-2; 2:25; 3:14-15; 4:9; 5:11-13). Another view connects 1 John 5:16-17 with the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit ( Matthew 12:31-32 ; Mark 3:28-30 ), but 1John says nothing about attributing the miracles of Jesus to Satan's power. Yet another theory sees the sin unto death as apostasy (cf. Hebrews 2:3 ; 6:6 ; 10:29-31 ), but 1 John 2:19 indicates that "apostates" were never really in the community to begin with. Thus, another solution must be sought.
The polemic of 1John views sin very seriously (1:7-10; 2:12; 3:4-5,8-9; 4:10; 5:18). While believers do sin occasionally (1:7,9; 2:1; 5:16), they do not persist in ethical disobedience (2:4), social bigotry (2:9; 3:14-17; 4:20-21), or christological heresy (2:18-29; 4:1-3). In this qualified sense they do not sin (3:6,9; 5:18); in other words, their sin is not deadly (5:16-17). But those who walk in darkness while claiming to be in the light (1:6), who hate believers (2:9), and who deny that Jesus is the Messiah (2:22) are committing deadly sins. Thus, the polemic admits the reality of believers' sinning against the opponents' perfectionistic claims, but it also stresses the ideal of sinlessness. In this setting, the community is commanded to intercede for fellow believers who occasionally sin, but it is not commanded to pray for the deadly sins of those outside the community.
David L. Turner
See also Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit ; Sin
Bibliography . R. E. Brown, The Epistles of John ; I. A. Busenitz, The Master's Seminary Journal 1 (1990): 17-31; R. Law, The Tests of Life ; I. H. Marshall, The Epistles of John ; S. M. Reynolds, Reformation Review 20 (1973): 130-39; D. M. Scholer, Current Issues in Biblical and Pastristic Interpretation, pp. 230-46; S. S. Smalley, 1,2, 3, John .
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Second Death
This phrase is found only in Revelation 2:11,20:6,20:14 , and 21:8. The Targums use it (Deuteronomy 33:6 ; Psalm 49:11 ). Philo uses the term to refer to all miseries arising from sin causing physical death followed by hopelessness in the afterlife (Rewards and Punishments 2.419). Revelation 2:10-11 contrasts it with the life given to the faithful. Death is the loss of the only kind of life worthy of the name.
The word used for "eternal punishment" in Matthew 25:46 is kolasis [1]. According to Bauer writers during the New Testament period used it only of temporal torture and conscious torment in the afterlife. No other idea for koine Greek is recognized. Moulton and Milligan can find only examples in papyrus where kolasis [1] involves the person actually feeling the punishment. It is used elsewhere in the New Testament only in 1 John 4:18 , which says fear has torment.
The second death is to be cast into the lake of fire (Revelation 20:14 ). This is a permanent state (Revelation 14:11 ), where in anything that would qualify as "life" is forever absent.
Paul Ferguson
See also Eternal Punishment ; Judgment ; Lake of Fire
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - State After Death
STATE AFTER DEATH.—See Dead and Eschatology, I. (A.) § 5 (c).
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Preacher: Should be Faithful Unto Death
The minister of Christ should feel like the old keeper of Eddystone lighthouse. Life was failing fast, but summoning all his strength, he crept round once more to trim the lights before he died. May the Holy Ghost enable his servants to keep the beacon fire blazing, to warn sinners of the rocks, shoals, and quicksands which surround them.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Preachers: Speak After Death
There are strange legends extant of churches which have been swallowed by earthquakes, or buried beneath fallen mountains. The rustics declare that they have heard the bells still ringing, far down in the bowels of the earth, just as they did when they hung aloft in the tower. Take the bells to be preachers and the legend is true, for being dead they yet speak, and from their graves they sound forth lessons not less powerful than those with which they made their pulpits resound while they were yet with us.
Webster's Dictionary - Death
(1):
(v. i.) The cessation of all vital phenomena without capability of resuscitation, either in animals or plants.
(2):
(v. i.) Total privation or loss; extinction; cessation; as, the death of memory.
(3):
(v. i.) Manner of dying; act or state of passing from life.
(4):
(v. i.) Cause of loss of life.
(5):
(v. i.) Loss of spiritual life.
(6):
(v. i.) Anything so dreadful as to be like death.
(7):
(v. i.) Personified: The destroyer of life, - conventionally represented as a skeleton with a scythe.
(8):
(v. i.) Danger of death.
(9):
(v. i.) Murder; murderous character.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Happy Death Confraternity, the
(Happy Death) Founded, 1648, in the church of the Gesti, Rome, by Reverend Vincent Caraffa, seventh General of the Society of Jesus. It was raised to an archconfraternity by Benedict XIII who authorized the erection of such confraternities in all Jesuit churches; this privilege was extended to other churches in 1827. Its object is the preparation of members for a happy death by a well regulated life, and particularly through devotion to the Passion of Christ and the sorrows of Mary. The practises of the association, and the indulgences granted may be found in the manual of the confraternity (New York, 1896).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Death
DEATH
I. In the OT. 1. The Heb. term mâweth and our corresponding word ‘death’ alike spring from primitive roots belonging to the very beginnings of speech. One of man’s first needs was a word to denote that stark fact of experience the final cessation of life to which he and the whole animated creation, and the very trees and plants, were all subject. It is, of course, in this ordinary sense of the term as denoting a physical fact that the expressions ‘death’ and ‘die’ are mostly used in the Scriptures.
2. The Scriptures have nothing directly to say as to the place of death in the economy of nature. St. Paul’s words in Romans 5:12 ff. as to the connexion between sin and death must be explained in harmony with this fact; and, for that matter, in harmony also with his own words in Romans 6:23 , where death, the ‘wages of sin,’ cannot be simply physical death. The Creation narratives are silent on this point, yet in Genesis 2:17 man is expected to know what it is to die. We are not to look for exact information on matters such as this from writings of this kind. If the belief enshrined in the story of the Fall in Genesis 3:1-24 regarded death in the ordinary sense as the penalty of Adam and Eve’s transgression, they at any rate did not die ‘in the day’ of their transgression; v. 22 suggests that even then, could he but also eat of ‘the tree of life,’ man might escape mortality. All we can say is that in the dawn of human history man appears as one already familiar with the correlative mysteries of life and death.
3. From the contemplation of the act of dying it is an easy step to the thought of death as a state or condition. This is a distinct stage towards believing in existence of some kind beyond the grave. And to the vast mass of mankind to say ‘he is dead’ has never meant ‘he is non-existent.’
4. Divergent beliefs as to what the state of death is show themselves in the OT. ( a ) In numerous instances death is represented as a condition of considerable activity and consciousness . The dead are regarded as ‘knowing ones,’ able to impart information and counsel to the living. Note, the term translated ‘wizards’ in EV [1] in Leviticus 19:31 ; Leviticus 20:6 , Isaiah 8:19 ; Isaiah 19:3 really denotes departed spirits who are sought unto or inquired of ‘on behalf of the living.’ A vivid instance of this belief is furnished in the story of the Witch of En-dor ( 1 Samuel 28:1-25 ). So also in Isaiah 14:9-10 , where we have a graphic description of the commotion caused in Sheol by the arrival of the king of Babylon, a description with which we may compare the dream of ‘false Clarence’ in Shakespeare’s Rich. III ., i. 4. The reference to the dead under the term ‘gods’ ( elôhim ), as in 1 Samuel 28:13 , is noticeable. Whether in all this we have a relic of ancient Semitic ancestor-worship (as e.g. Charles maintains in his Jowett Lectures on Eschatology ) or no, it seems to represent very primitive beliefs which survived in one form and another, even after the stern Jahwistic prohibition of necromancy was promulgated. They may also have affected the treatment of the dead, just as even yet there are usages in existence amongst us in regard to behaviour towards the dead which are probably traceable to very primitive pre-Christian ideas and beliefs.
( b ) Jahwism might well forbid resort to necromancers with their weird appeals to the dead for guidance and information, for in its view the state of death was one of unconsciousness, forgetfulness, and silence (see Psalms 88:12 ; Psalms 94:17 ; Psalms 115:17 etc.). The present world is emphatically ‘the land of the living’ ( Psalms 27:13 ; Psalms 116:9 etc.). Those that are in Sheol have no communion with Jahweh; see the Song of Hezekiah in Isaiah 38:1-22 , and elsewhere. Sheol appears inviting to a soul in distress because it is a realm of unconscious rest ( Job 3:17 ff.); and there is nothing to be known or to be done there ( Ecclesiastes 9:10 ). It is true that here and there glimpses of a different prospect for the individual soul show themselves ( e.g. Job 19:25 ff. and probably Psalms 16:10 f.); but the foregoing was evidently the prevalent view in a period when the individual was altogether subservient to the nation, and the religious concerns of the latter were rigorously limited to the present life.
( c ) Other ideas of death as not terminating man’s existence and interests were, however, reached in later prophetic teaching, mainly through the thought of the worth of the individual, the significance of his conscious union with God, and of the covenant relations established by God with His people ( Jeremiah 31:1-40 ; cf. Ezekiel 18:1-32 ). ‘Thou wilt not leave us in the dust.’
5. Death as standing in penal relation to man’s sin and unrighteousness is frequently insisted on. That this is something more than natural death is clear from such an antithesis as we have in Deuteronomy 30:15 ; Deuteronomy 30:19 (‘life and good: death and evil’), and this set in strict relation to conduct. Cf. the burden of Ezekiel 18:1-32 , ‘the soul that sinneth it shall die,’ with the correlative promise of life: similarly Proverbs 15:10 . All this points to some experience in the man himself and to conditions outlasting the present life. On the other hand, the thought of dying ‘the death of the righteous’ ( Numbers 23:10 ) as a desirable thing looks in the same direction. And why has the righteous ‘hope in his death’ ( Proverbs 14:32 )?
6. As minor matters, OT poetical uses of references to death may be merely pointed out. ‘Chambers of death,’ Proverbs 7:27 ; ‘gates,’ Psalms 9:13 (= state); ‘bitterness of death,’ 1 Samuel 15:32 , Ecclesiastes 7:26 ; ‘terrors,’ Psalms 55:4 ; ‘sorrows,’ Psalms 116:3 (= man’s natural dread); ‘shadow of death,’ Job, Ps., the Prophets, passim (= any experience of horror and gloom, as well as with reference to death itself); ‘the sleep of death,’ Psalms 13:3 (to be distinguished from later Christian usage); ‘snares of death,’ Prov. passim , etc. (= things leading to destruction); the phrase ‘to death,’ as ‘vexed unto death,’ Judges 13:7 ; ‘sick,’ 2 Kings 20:1 (= to an extreme degree).
II. In the Apocrypha. The value of the Apocrypha in connexion with the study of Scriptural teaching and usage here is not to be overlooked. Notice e.g. Wisdom chs. 1 5, with its treatment of the attitude of the ungodly towards death (‘Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die’), of the problem of the early, untimely death of the good, and of immortality in relation to the ungodly and the righteous; Sirach , in which no clear conception of immortality appears, the best that can be said, to alleviate sorrow for the dead, being that ‘the dead is at rest’ ( Sir 38:23 ): in which also the fear of death is spoken of as besetting all ranks of men (40), and we are told who they are to whom death comes as a dread foe, and again who may welcome death as a friend (41).
III. In the NT
1. The teaching of Jesus .
( a ). It is noticeable that our Lord has nothing to say directly concerning death as a physical phenomenon . He offers no explanation touching those matters in the experience of death which have always excited the curiosity of men, and in this respect His attitude is in strong contrast with that found in Rabbinical writings. He makes no use of the conception of ‘the angel of death,’ so characteristic of the latter, and traceable perhaps in language such as that of 1 Corinthians 15:26 , Hebrews 2:14 , and Revelation 20:13-14 .
( b ) No stress is laid on death as an evil in itself . In the few stories which we have in the Gospels of His raising the dead to life, the raising is never represented as a deliverance and a good for the person brought back. Compassion for the sorrows of those bereaved is the prime motive: in the case of Lazarus, it is expressly added that the restoration was ‘for the glory of God’ ( John 11:4 ; John 11:40 ). Still, those aspects of death which make the living and active shrink from it are incidentally recognized. Jesus in Rabbinic phrase speaks of tasting death ( Mark 9:1 ||) and of seeing death ( John 8:51-52 ): and the feeling underlying such expressions is the very antithesis of that attaching to ‘seeing life’ and ‘seeing many days.’ Death is to common human feeling an unwelcome, though inevitable, draught. This gives point also to our Lord’s promise that the believer shall never die ( John 11:26 ). At the same time, there is no reference in His teaching to natural death as the solemn end of life’s experiences and opportunities, unless an exception be found in the saying about working ‘while it is day’ ( John 9:4 ): but contrast with this as to tone a passage like Ecclesiastes 9:10 .
( c ) Jesus speaks of death as a sleep ( Mark 5:39 , John 11:11-13 ); but the same euphemistic use is found in OT and in extra-Biblical writers. It did not of itself necessarily lessen the terrors of death (see Psalms 13:3 ); but we owe it to Christ and the Christian faith mainly that such a representation of death has come to mitigate its bitterness, such a use as is also found elsewhere in NT ( e.g. 1 Thessalonians 4:13 ff.). This conception of death is, of course, to be limited to its relation to the activities and interests of this world. It is a falling asleep after life’s day and ‘we sleep to wake’: but there is nothing here to shed light on such questions as to whether that sleep is a prolonged period of unconsciousness or no.
( d ) Natural death is lost sight of in the much larger and more solemn conception of the condition of man resulting from sin , which in the Fourth Gospel is particularly described as ‘death’ (see John 5:24 ; John 6:50 ; John 8:21 ; John 8:24 ). The exemption and deliverance promised in John 11:25 f. relate to this spiritual death, and by that deliverance natural death is shorn of its real terrors. This condition, resulting from sin and separation from God, may he regarded as incipient here and tending to a manifest consummation hereafter, with physical death intervening as a moment of transition and deriving a solemn significance from its association with the course and state of sin (see Beyschlag, NT Theol ., Eng. tr. [2] ii. p. 56 f.). The corresponding language of 1 Ep. of John is not to be overlooked ( 1 John 3:14 ) as exemplifying Johannine phraseology. The conception, however, is not found exclusively in the Johannine writings. Note the saying in Luke 9:60 as bearing on this point. In Matthew 7:13 f. ‘destruction’ is the antithesis of ‘life’ (and cf. Matthew 5:29 f., Matthew 18:11 , Mark 8:35 , John 3:16 etc.); but the conception of ‘perishing’ covers the deep experience of spiritual death, the loss of all that really makes the man.
(The phrase ‘die the death’ in EV [1] , in Mark 7:10 and parallel, may be noticed as being not a literal translation of the Greek, but a mid-English emphatic expression,’ now archaic.)
2. The rest of the NT . We may notice the following points: ( a ) The Pauline doctrine that natural death is the primitive consequence of sin , already referred to, is to be explained as the common Jewish interpretation of the OT account of the Fall, and finds no direct support in the Gospels. The feeling that ‘the sting of death is sin’ is, however, widely existent in NT. ( b ) The use of the term ‘death’ as denoting a certain spiritual state in which men may live and he still destitute of all that is worth calling ‘life,’ is quite common ( Ephesians 2:1 ; Ephesians 2:5 ; Ephesians 5:14 , Colossians 2:13 , 1 Timothy 5:6 , James 1:15 , Judges 1:12 , Revelation 3:1 ). ( c ) A mystical and figurative use of the notion of death as denoting the change from a sinful to a new life is noticeable. The believer, the man spiritually alive, is also ‘dead to sin’ ( Romans 6:2 , 1 Peter 2:24 ), is ‘dead with Christ’ ( Romans 6:8 , Colossians 2:20 etc.). ( d ) The expression ‘ eternal death ’ is found nowhere in NT, common as its use is in religious and theological language. It is the correlative, easily suggested by the expression ‘eternal life’ which is so conspicuous a topic of NT teaching, and it serves loosely as an equivalent for the antitheses to ‘life’ or ‘eternal life’ that actually occur, such as ‘destruction’ ( Matthew 7:13 ), ‘the eternal fire’ ( Matthew 18:8 ), ‘eternal punishment’ ( Matthew 25:46 ). Cf. also ‘the second death’ in Revelation 21:8 . If we substitute for ‘eternal’ some other rendering such as ‘of the ages’ or ‘æonian,’ it but serves to remind us of the profound difficulties attaching to the predication of eternity in relation to the subject of man’s destiny or doom.
J. S. Clemens.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Death
Romans 7:13 (a) This describes the effect of wickedness and sinfulness upon the natural human heart and soul in the sight of GOD. Our sinful natures in our natural state send up sins, trespasses, transgressions, evils, wickedness and iniquities until they form a thick, dark cloud between the soul and GOD. (See Isaiah 44:22).
Romans 8:6 (a) Here we see the result of setting the mind on the things of earth so that it cannot receive nor comprehend the things of Heaven.
2 Corinthians 4:12 (a) Paul uses the word here in order to describe the crushing and destructive effects of persecution and prosecution of his own life.
1 John 3:14 (a) This describes the state of being unsaved and without eternal life. (See also under "DEAD").
Revelation 20:14 (a) The first death is the death of the body because of which the person cannot longer enjoy the earthly blessings of life. This second death is called by that name because the body and the soul have at the Great White Throne been brought before GOD for a final judgment. The individual is taken away from this short appearance in GOD's presence to be eternally and forever shut out of ever seeking GOD again.
Here are some references to death as used in the Scriptures:
Dead to sin - Romans 6:2
Dead with CHRIST - Romans 6:8.
Dead in sin - Ephesians 2:1
Dead to the world - Galatians 6:14.
Dead to GOD - Luke 9:60
Dead works - Hebrews 6:1.
Dead to this life - Romans 5:12 Hebrews 9:14.
Paul said "I die daily" 1 Corinthians 15:31. By this he was showing that he himself was fulfilling Romans 6:11. The meaning of all of this evidently is that the believer in CHRIST JESUS takes his place with CHRIST in His rejection from the world, and identifies himself with this rejected Lord. He does not now take part in, nor love, the things that this world offers to the unsaved.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Death of Christ
DEATH OF CHRIST
I. In the Gospels.—The aim of the present article is to examine the place of the death of Christ in the moral order of the world. What is the moral order of the world? The question may be answered as follows:—The will and purpose of God are in the way of coming to realization in the individual and social life and destiny of humanity. They are still very far from having attained to universal realization, but they are destined to reach it in the perfected kingdom of God. This is what is here understood as the moral order of the world. It began to exist and to be evolved on the earth with man’s appearance as a being with a moral nature and created for a moral destiny. Its evolution is still very incomplete, but it is certainly though slowly making for a predestined end in which all men in Christ shall be morally perfect as God is; and in the moral relations of God to men, and of men to God and to one another, an order of perfect moral unity and universality shall reign for ever.
In this order of things, then, and its evolution, the death of Christ occupies a place of the highest importance and value. It is only from the point of view of this moral order of things and its evolution that the essential merits of His death can be properly understood. A consideration of it from the same point of view is called for by the methods of modern thought and inquiry. And it is only thus that the cultured Christian conscience can find true, adequate, abiding moral satisfaction. But it is necessary, in order to prevent confusion of ideas, to mark the important distinction that exists in the nature of things as they now are in man’s moral history, between the moral order of the world and the moral course of the world. The moral order of the world as just defined is only one of the constituent factors of the world’s moral course. Besides it there are two more. There is, on the one hand, the factor which consists of all those facts or phenomena in the individual and social life and history of mankind which fall under the designation of sin or moral evil; and, on the other, the moral government of God, which presides immanently, persistently, and universally over the relations between sin and the moral order of things or the order of righteousness. These three factors constitute that actual moral course that the world is ever following; and the predestined end of their relation to one another will be realized in the complete and eternal victory and triumph of righteousness over sin, through the unerring and all-sufficient administrative judgments of God’s moral government of the world (Matthew 13:41-43, 1 Corinthians 15:24-28). It is the moral course of the world as so understood that explains the nature and methods of the historical revelation, contained in the Bible, of God’s will and purpose in their relation to man’s moral life and destiny. The course of the world as so understood occupied a determinative place in our Lord’s conceptions of man’s moral life and destiny (See Progress). And it was from the point of view of Sin, Righteousness, and Judgment that He contemplated the fullest and profoundest significance of His obedience unto death. It was on the place of His death in the moral order of the world, and as therein related to man’s sin and God’s governmental judgment, that He depended for the victory and triumph of Righteousness over Sin in the dispensation of the Spirit (John 17:7-11). From the point of view here raised His death may be considered in various aspects.
1. He was put to death on the Cross. How did this happen? What were His leading thoughts about it as so viewed? He lived and died without sin. He fulfilled all righteousness in the course of His obedience unto death, freely and perfectly uniting Himself and all the activities of His will and life with the will and purpose of God, and with Him His Father was well pleased. This means that although He appeared and lived and died in the moral course of the world, He was not of the world, had absolutely no fellowship with it in so far as it was under the domination of sin. He loved sinners in their character as moral beings with perfect love. But sin He hated with perfect hatred; and He lived and died to save men and the moral course of the world from it. His life of perfect union with His Father’s will and purpose in all things implied not only that He lived entirely on the side and in the interests of the moral order of the world, but also that the latter found in Him, for the first time on earth, the One Individual moral Being in whom it had secured its perfect form of manifest realization, in so far as this was possible in one life in human form. It was this fact, on the one hand, and the hatred of the men over whom the world’s sin had gained complete domination on the other, that determined His way to His destiny on Calvary. This conjunction of righteousness and sin, and their creative influence on His earthly history and experience, affected Him in three ways, each of which should have a regulative effect on every one’s thoughts as to the meaning and value of His death.
(1) He regarded the existence of the sin that arose and developed in increasing antagonism against Himself and His mission, in the course of His ministry, as a thing that ought not to be. Saying after saying of His, bearing on this point, seems almost to convey the impression that He must have regarded this sinful and guilty opposition, without which He would not have been put to death, as not required by the interests and objects of the moral task which He had come into the world to accomplish (Matthew 23:33-39, Luke 13:31-35; Luke 23:23-27, John 7:19; John 8:21-59; John 15:17-27; John 19:10-11). (2) Then, again, His own words show that the inward ‘moral’ struggles and agonies of His life arose out of the prospect and contemplation of the development of the manifestations of the world’s sin and unbelief against Him and against His claim to be entirely identified with His Father’s will and purpose in all His words and deeds. His experience of inward crushing sorrow, arising from the cause alluded to, reached its culmination in the Garden of Gethsemane. But before the hour which He spent there in anguish and bloody sweat, He had foretastes of the terrible bitterness of the Passion which He knew was awaiting Him as His destiny (Matthew 20:22; Matthew 26:36-45, John 12:27). (3) In spite of these two facts as to our Lord’s thought and experience in connexion with His death, He always cherished perfectly optimistic confidence and hope as to the issues of the latter. Through the discipline of experience and through prayer He became strong enough to be obedient even unto death. He had perfect faith in His Father as the Lord of heaven and earth. He knew that all the future interests and objects of His mission and work on earth were absolutely safe in His hands. He knew before He died that His death could not hinder, but would be made to further these objects and interests (John 12:24; John 12:32; John 16:7-11), and the first word He spoke about His death after He had risen from the dead was, ‘Ought not Christ to have suffered these things, and to enter into his glory?’ (Luke 24:26).
2. The question now arises as to the nature, meaning, and value of our Lord’s unique achievement on earth, which reached its perfect accomplishment in His death on the cross. This achievement from beginning to end was made by Him in His position as internally related to the moral order of the world, and through it to the world in its character, aspirations, and activities as under the domination of sin. His achievement, as so viewed, consisted in the perfect realization of His Father’s will and purpose in His unique moral Individuality, and in all the manifestations of the latter in His relations with God and with men. It is to be observed, then, for one thing of highest importance, that this achievement of His, in its nature, meaning, and value, was purely, entirely, exclusively moral. There are two considerations which place this fact in the region of absolute certainty.
In the first place, the fact has its validity in the established nature of the moral order of the world and in Christ’s own place in this order. This is an order of things which has its foundations in the moral nature of God; in the moral nature of man as made in the image of God as a Moral Being; in the fact and in the nature of the moral relations between God and men and between man and man; and also in the fact that Christ as the Son of God came into the world to qualify Himself for occupying His momentous position of mediation within the sphere of the moral relations of God to men and of men to God. These are all indisputable facts, and they make it certain that the essential nature and objects of our Lord’s earthly achievement, which culminated in the manner in which He met His death on the cross, were absolutely and exclusively moral. That it was so in our Lord’s own way of conceiving of the nature, meaning, and value of His life of obedience unto death, is manifest from His own words, e.g., in John 16:7-11.
But, secondly, the same conclusion follows from His attitude of resistance to the whole system of legalism which He found Judaism had developed and set up, as an order of fixed and unchangeable conditions, in the relations between God and men—between Him and them as individuals, and between Him and the Jewish nation at large as His own peculiar covenant people. The effect of this system, as being both theoretically and administratively legal, was conceived and opposed by our Lord as subversive of that moral order of things in which inward, direct, universal, and eternal relations are established between God and men (Mark 7:1-23). And it is a fact written broadly and deeply in all the Gospels, that if there was anything that He ever attempted more manifestly, strenuously, uncompromisingly, and more persistently than another, it was this, viz.: to overthrow completely and for ever the entire order of ideas which rested upon the stupendous error that the direct relations between God and men are legal, that they are founded on legal conditions, that they are to be maintained, administered, and mediated by legal means, and that, therefore, they are not inward but external (Matthew 5-7; Matthew 15:1-20; Matthew 15:23, Luke 11:38-54, John 5:5-17; John 7:37-53; John 8:31-59; John 12:37-50). What, then, does His attitude of unreserved and bold antagonism to the legal system of Judaism imply in the point of view here considered? (1) It implies that in His position in the moral order of the world He stood on the eternal fact and truth that the direct relations between God as a Moral Being and men as moral beings are inward and therefore essentially moral. (2) It implies, again, that He stood upon the predestined fact and truth that His position and work of mediation within the domain of these relations were also essentially moral and therefore anti-legal.
3. But, further, it follows from the nature of our Lord’s earthly task that the achievement of it in the manner in which He lived and died was a moral unity. His personality or moral individuality was a unity. His will was a moral unity, and the entire series of the manifold inward and outward free moral activities of His life until His last moment on the cross, were related to one another as a perfectly consistent order of moral unity. He came into the world, as He Himself always represented, on one entirely homogeneous moral undertaking; and when this undertaking was fulfilled, He spoke of it in terms which show that He regarded the finished task as one homogeneous moral result (John 17:4; John 19:28). In other words, our Lord’s obedience in His manner of living and dying followed the law of moral continuity. His obedience unto death was regulated, on His part, by one determinative moral principle; but there was diversity of incidental moral significance and value in the various positions in which His moral vocation summoned Him to act, and to be faithful and loyal to this principle.
(1) What was the principle which constituted the perfect moral unity of His obedience unto death? It was perfect love, manifesting itself in perfect self-sacrifice and service, and, in doing this, ever paying perfectly wise and loyal regard to the moral requirements of human life and destiny on the one hand, and to the moral requirements of God’s holy will and purpose in relation to those human requirements on the other (Matthew 20:28; Matthew 26:39, Mark 10:45, John 10:17-18; John 13:1-17; John 3:13-21; John 4:34; John 5:17-44; John 8:49-50; John 8:54-55; John 17:1-7; John 17:23; John 17:26). From such sayings of our Lord’s as are here referred to, it is obvious that the principle which regulated all the moral activities of His life was, in effect, of the nature and compass just defined. There are no words of His reported in any of the Gospels which justify the making of any essential distinction between the nature of His obedience or moral achievement during the time of the Passion, and the nature of it prior to the hour when He allowed Himself to fall into the power of His enemies. The period of His Passion was indeed unique in two things as regards His own part in it. From the moment that He began to pray in Gethsemane till the moment when He said ‘It is finished,’ on the cross, He endured unspeakable suffering, physical and moral, altogether unparalleled in His antecedent experience. Again, it was precisely during this period of His extremest suffering that all His powers of moral activity were subjected to their severest strain, and that they, under this strain, reached the highest possible point of their morally victorious, triumphant achievement. But these two facts, so distinctive of His Passion, made no real breach in the moral continuity and unity of the moral achievement of His life as a whole. His moral suffering did not begin with the last tragic hours of His life. There was an element of moral suffering in the compassion with which He was so often moved. He had looked forward to His predestined ‘hour’; and His words, ‘I have a baptism to be baptized with; and how am I straitened till it be accomplished!’ (Luke 12:50), suggest that, in anticipation of His cross, He may have spent many an hour in painful moral wrestling, in view of His destiny, long before His anticipations began actually to be realized. In any case, it may be taken as certain that there was no form of inward moral activity called forth in Him during the hours of His Passion, which had not been evoked many times over in previous situations of His life. But on the cross these moral activities of His, in the superlative degree of their strenuousness and in the transcendent magnitude of their victory over sin and temptation, eclipsed all the moral achievements of His past life. And yet in reality He died, in the sense of all that was essentially moral, as He had lived. He lived and died determined by the same moral principle, in the same spirit of love and self-sacrifice and service, and in the same spirit of perfectly wise and loyal regard to all the demands of God’s will and purpose on Him, and to all the demands on Him of the world’s moral needs.
This view of the moral unity of the achievement of Christ’s earthly activities is the truth as it was in His own thought. His thought was this: ‘Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life (ἐγὼ τίθημι τὴν ψυχήν μον), that I might take it again. No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father’ (John 10:17-18). Now there is absolutely nothing in these words to justify any theologian in limiting the application of them to what our Lord did during the hours of His Passion. What He did then, in the exercise of His powers of moral activity, was to submit, in a way perfectly pleasing to God, to the sort of death predestined for Him. Again, for Him who was in God, and who had God in Him, ‘it was not death to die.’ He never was more alive, in the highest and deepest sense of the word as applied to a perfect moral being, than in the very moment on the cross when He cried with a loud voice, saying, ‘Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit’ (Luke 23:46). He did indeed lay down His life in submitting to His death, which He indisputably contemplated in the same way as St. Peter did in the words, ‘Him … ye have taken, and by wicked hands have crucified and slain’ (Acts 2:23, cf. Matthew 16:21, John 7:19; John 8:37). But how did it come to pass that He was able to lay down His life in dying, doing so in such a manner that His Father loved Him in the doing of it and for the doing of it? It so came to pass because He had never done anything else but lay down His life (ψυχή) in living. All the moral powers of holy love, self-sacrifice, and service that were individualized in Him as the incarnate Son of God and man’s Redeemer,—these powers, which were His life, He laid down, consecrated, employed, every moment and in every situation of His life of free activity, in order perfectly to fullil His life’s vocation as determined for Him by His Father’s will and purpose, and by the moral necessities of the world which He had come to save. And it was because He did all this in living that He was able so successfully and triumphantly to do it all in dying. And the effect of this truth is neither to dim the moral splendour nor to detract from the moral value of our Lord’s death, but rather to reveal how great was the moral splendour and value of all the activities, words, and deeds of His life.
(2) But if His life prepared Him for dying, His death on the cross raised the moral splendour and value of His whole life to its highest powers of revelation and effect in the human soul and in the moral history of the world. The supreme distinction of the cross, as our Lord Himself understood it and trusted and hoped in it, as related to man’s redemption, was the unique, stupendous, tragic conjunction of sin and righteousness and judgment, a moral tragedy of which the cross was but the outward visible symbol. The complex event for which the cross stands is the most momentous and the most creative moral event in the history of the world’s moral course. In the tragic moral truth of this event God and Christ and man, God’s righteousness and love in Christ, man’s sin and salvation, and eternal judgment, were and are all directly concerned in the highest degree. The fact of Christ’s death is thus pregnant with all the inexhaustible powers necessary for the moral regeneration of the individual human soul and of the human race. Out of this fact springs the inspiration necessary to illuminate the human conscience with divinest moral ideas, and to make it live in the divinest power of moral sentiment. And it is in this internal moral renewal and its manifestations that the soul finds its true redemption and its highest life; so Christ Himself evidently thought (John 16:7-11).
4. It now remains to note, from the standpoint of the moral order of the world, some features of our Lord’s place and work therein, as the Mediator between God and men. His work of mediation in the flesh ended with His death on the cross, and it was preliminary to His mediation in the Spirit (John 14:12-26; John 16:7-11). His mediation in the Spirit, which will be continued until the Kingdom of God is perfected, is dependent for its existence and efficiency on the moral and historical conditions provided in His earthly life of obedience unto death, and in the revelation of sin, righteousness, and judgment in which the completion of His work in the flesh issued. What, then, are the nature, the objects, and the methods of our Lord’s mediation?
(1) Its general object is to save individuals from their sin by reconciling them to God, to perfect them as individuals in their moral nature and life, and to unite all who are thus saved in a life of eternal oneness with God, and with one another in Him.—(2) The sphere within which the mediation of Christ is carried on with a view to that end is that of the inward and immediate moral relations of God as a moral Being to men, and of men as moral beings to God. It was so even during the time of His earthly life and ministry in so far as His mediation took real saving effect in the moral nature and life of any of His disciples. It is so still in the current dispensation of the Spirit by whose agency His mediation is brought to saving effect in souls. All the methods of the Spirit’s work and all the moral effects that result from it imply the existence of internal, direct, living, moral relations between the soul and God in Christ.—(3) The mediation of Christ, as brought to effect by the Spirit’s work, is in every case a relation of His mediation to the individual. For the Spirit cannot work in any number of individuals as a body unless in so far as He works in the moral nature and life of each.—(4) The mediation of Christ operates through the Spirit’s agency by means of moral illumination and power—and moral illumination is always moral power.—(5) The moral means in question consist in the revelation of the holy gracious love or righteousness of God as realized by Christ, and manifested in His life and death of perfect self-sacrifice for the world’s salvation. The best name for all this is ‘grace’—the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, or the grace of God in Christ, which was and is no other thing than the sum of the living activities of God as holy love, evoked by men’s need of salvation from sin—men as moral beings. And this grace of God in Christ is moral. It is the highest and grandest form of the self-manifestation of God as a perfect moral Being.—(6) Hence it is only by means of appropriate moral conditions, existing in the individual’s own moral nature and inner life, that he can enter into and abide in a saving relation to the grace of God as mediated by Christ through the work of His Spirit. And these internal moral conditions are repentance, faith, and the spirit of free and loyal obedience to Christ or to God, all of which are essentially related to one another, in every one of which the whole of the individual’s moral nature comes to forms of manifestation in harmony with the will of God, and all together have the effect of uniting the individual directly and inwardly with God in Christ.—(7) This internal, immediate union of the individual with Christ, and therefore with God, is the true way of salvation and life for man (John 14:6) This secures not only forgiveness, but every moral or spiritual blessing that the individual needs for this world and the next, every blessing that God has to give or that it is possible for Him to bestow in Christ and through the work of His Spirit in the heart. The inward, direct union of the individual with Christ through repentance, faith, and the spirit of obedience, means that the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made him free from the law of sin and death (Death (2)
DEATH.—It belongs to the profoundly spiritual character of our Lord’s thinking that He says comparatively little on the subject of physical death. His attitude towards it is indicated in the words, ‘She is not dead but slecpeth’ (Matthew 9:28 = Mark 5:35, Luke 8:52). He recognized that man’s true being was something apart from the mere bodily existence, and death thus resolved itself into a natural incident, analogous to sleep, which broke the continuity of life only in seeming. The idea is presented more definitely in the charge to the disciples, ‘Fear not them that kill the body, and after that have no more that they can do,’ etc. (Luke 12:4 = Matthew 10:28), where it is expressly declared that life resides in the soul, over which God alone has power. The accident of death, of the separation of the soul from its material body, can make little difference to the essential man.
The three recorded miracles of raising from the dead are, in the last resort, concrete illustrations of this side of our Lord’s teaching. The Johannine account of the raising of Lazarus is indeed bound up with a more complex theological doctrine; but the Synoptic miracles, in so far as they are more than works of compassion or exhibitions of Divine power, are indicative of the transient nature of death. Jesus awakens the daughter of Jairus and the youth of Nain as if from ordinary sleep. The life which to outward appearance had ceased, had only been withdrawn from the body, and could be reunited with it at the Divine word.
Attempts have been made to connect these miracles and the whole conception of death as sleep, with the contemporary Jewish belief that for three days the soul still lingered in the neighbourhood of the dead body. The earliest stage of death might therefore be regarded as a condition of trance or slumber from which the spirit could yet be recalled. It is in view, probably, of this belief that St. John emphasizes the ‘four days’ that had elapsed since the death of Lazarus, whose soul must thus have finally departed from his body when Jesus revived him. But we have no indication that our Lord Himself took any account of the popular superstition, much less that He was influenced by it. His conception of death as a passing sleep was derived solely from His certainty that man, being a child of God, was destined to an immortal life. Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob cannot be permanently dead, for God is not the God of the dead but of the living (Matthew 22:31 = Mark 12:26). In virtue of their relation to God they must have passed into a more perfect life through apparent death.
The traditional view of death as something evil and unnatural had therefore no place in the thought of Jesus. He nowhere suggests the idea which St. Paul took over from the OT and elaborated in his theology, that death is the punishment of sin. This prevailing Jewish belief is indeed expressly contradicted in the words concerning the slaughtered Galilaeans and the eighteen on whom the tower of Siloam fell (Luke 13:1-4). Jesus there insists that death, even when it comes prematurely and violently, is not to be regarded as a Divine judgment. Sin is punished, not by physical death in this world, but by a spiritual death hereafter. This is doubtless the true interpretation of the warning, ‘Except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish.’ Destruction is in store for all sinners; and the punishment cannot therefore consist in death by violence, which falls on few. Much less can it consist in natural death, from which the good can escape no more than the wicked.
While thus regarding death as nothing but one of the incidents in man’s earthly existence, our Lord anticipates a time when it will be done away. In the perfected Messianic, kingdom ‘they cannot die any more’ (Luke 20:36). Those who survive until the Son of man returns in glory ‘will not taste of death’ (Matthew 16:28), since they will have entered on the new age in which it is abolished. Even in such passages, however, it is not suggested that death is an evil. The idea is rather that it forms part of a lower, imperfect order of things, and that this will give place entirely to a higher. Those who inherit the kingdom cannot die, ‘because they are equal unto the angels’ (Luke 20:36), and have so entered on another condition, governed by different laws. The cessation of death is conjoined with that of marriage (Luke 20:35-36). As the marriage relation is natural and necessary to man’s earthly state, but has no place in the life of higher spirits, so with death.
Jesus, it is thus evident, has broken away from the Jewish conception, according to which the death of the body possessed a religious significance as the effect of sin. His own idea of its spiritual import is of an altogether different nature, and can be gathered with sufficient clearness from certain explicit sayings. (1) The willingness to endure death for His sake is the supreme test of faith (cf. ‘Can ye drink of the cup that I shall drink of?’ etc. [1]; ‘If a man hate not … his own life also,’ etc. [2]). (2) Death is the fixed limit appointed by God to all earthly pleasures and activities. The thought of it ought therefore to guard us against over-anxiety about the things of this world, and to keep us always watchful, and mindful of the true issues of life (‘This night thy soul shall be required of thee’ [3]; parable of Rich Man and Lazarus [4]). (3) Above all, death marks the beginning of the true and eternal life with God. This higher life can be obtained only by sacrificing the lower, and surrendering it altogether, if need be, at the call of Christ (‘He that loseth his life for my sake shall find it’ [5]).
In several Synoptic passages Jesus speaks of a death which is spiritual rather than physical. He recognizes that the mass of men are in a condition of moral apathy and estrangement from God, and out of this ‘death’ He seeks to deliver them. His message to John the Baptist, ‘The dead are raised up’ (Matthew 11:5 = Luke 7:22), would seem, in the light of the context, to bear this reference, as also the charge to the disciples, ‘Raise the dead’ (Matthew 10:8). The same thought is expressed more unmistakably in the saying, ‘Let the dead bury their dead’ (Matthew 8:21 = Luke 9:60), and in the words of the parable, ‘This my son was dead and is alive again’ (Luke 15:24). Such allusions are not to be explained as simply figurative. As ‘life,’ to the mind of Jesus, consists in moral obedience and communion with God, so in the opposite condition He perceives the true death. It involves that ‘destruction both of soul and body’ which is far more to be feared than mere bodily death.
The view represented by the Fourth Gospel gives a further development to this aspect of our Lord’s teaching. Death as conceived by St. John is something wholly spiritual. The idea is enforced in its full extent that physical death is only a ‘taking rest in sleep,’ and in no wise affects the real life (John 11:4; John 11:11-14). Lazarus, although he has lain four days in the tomb, has never truly died; for ‘he that believeth in me, when he is dead, continues to live’ (John 11:25-26). The miracle by which he is ‘awakened out of sleep’ is meant to show forth, under the forms of sense, the inward and spiritual work of Jesus. He is ‘the resurrection and the life.’ He has come to raise men out of the state of death in which they find themselves, and to make them inheritors, even now, of the life of God.
To understand the Evangelist’s conception, we have to remember that here as elsewhere he converts into present reality what is future and apocalyptic in the Synoptic teaching. Jesus had spoken of life as a reward laid up in ‘the world to come,’ and had contrasted it with the ‘casting out’ or ‘destruction’ (ἀπώλεια) which is reserved for the wicked. These ideas reappear in the Fourth Gospel, divested of their pictorial, eschatological form. Life is a spiritual possession here and now, and has its counterpart in ‘death,’ which is likewise realized in the present world. St. John, indeed, contemplates a future in which the life, and by implication the death, will become complete and final (John 6:39; John 6:44; John 6:54); but they will continue the same in essence as they already are on earth.
Death is thus regarded not as a single incident but as a condition, in which the soul remains until, through the power of Christ, it passes into the opposite condition of life. It is not, however, a state of moral apathy and disobedience, or at least does not primarily bear this ethical character. Life, in the view of St. John, is the absolute, Divine life, in which man, as a creature of earth, does not participate (See Life). His natural state is one of ‘death,’ not because of his moral sinfulness, but because he belongs to a lower world, and the life he possesses is therefore relative and unreal. It is life only in a physical sense, and is more properly described as ‘death.’ The work of Christ is to deliver men from the state of privation in which they are involved by their earthly nature (John 3:6). As the Word made flesh, He communicates to them His own higher essence, and makes possible for them the mysterious transition ‘from death unto life’ (John 5:24).
In this Johannine doctrine Greek-philosophical ideas, transmitted through Philo, have blended with the original teaching of Jesus as recorded in the Synoptics. The simple ethical distinction has become a distinction of two kinds of being,—earthly and spiritual, phenomenal and real. Jesus ‘raises the dead’ in the sense that He effects a miraculous change in the very constitution of man’s nature. At the same time the ethical idea, while not directly emphasized, is everywhere implied. It is assumed that the state of exclusion from the true life is also a state of moral darkness, into which men have fallen ‘because their deeds are evil’ (John 3:19). The ‘freedom’ which Jesus promises is described in one passage (in which, however, the borrowed Pauline ideas are imperfectly assimilated) as freedom from sin (John 5:33-36). In the great verse, ‘God so loved the world,’ etc. (John 3:16), the ethical conception almost completely overpowers the theological. Men were ‘perishing’ through their estrangement from God, and from this death God sought to deliver them by His love revealed in Christ.
For the teaching of Jesus in regard to the significance of His own death see the following article.
Literature.—Cremer, Lex. s.v. θάνατος; Titius, Die neutest. Lehre von der Seligkeit (1895–1900), esp. i. 57–87, iii. 17–31; Fries, ‘Jesu Vorstellungen von der Auferstehung der Toten,’ ZNTW [6] (Dec. 1900); Schrenck, Die johanneische Ansch. vom Leben (1898). See also the literature mentioned in art. Life.
E. F. Scott.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Death
See Life and Death.
King James Dictionary - Death
DEATH, n. deth.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Death
The word "death" is used in two main ways in the Bible. First, it is used to describe the cessation of life. Second, death is used in reference to the lost. This refers to their eternal separation from God as a result of sin (Isaiah 59:2), in a conscious state of damnation without hope (1 Thessalonians 4:13; Revelation 20:10; Rev 20:14-15).
Death to humans is unnatural. When God created Adam and Eve, death was not part of the created order. It was not until they sinned that death entered the scene (Romans 5:12; Rom 6:23). Death will be destroyed when Christ returns and the believers receive their resurrected bodies.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Death
DEAD, DEATH
There is a threefold sense of death; natural, spiritual, and eternal. That which is natural, respects the separation of soul and body. "The body without the Spirit is dead." (James 2:16) Spiritual death means, the soul unquickened by the Holy Ghost. "And you hath he quickened, who were dead in trespasses and sins." (Ephesians 2:1) And eternal death implies the everlasting separation both of soul and body from God to all eternity. "I will forewarn you whom ye shall fear: Fear him, which after he hath killed, hath power to cast into hell; yea, I say unto you, Fear him." (Luke 12:5)
See Hardness of Heart.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Announcements of Death
ANNOUNCEMENTS OF DEATH.—It is certain that we have words from Jesus concerning His death; for such ruthless criticism as that of Schmiedel (Encyc. Bibl. ‘Gospels’), who admits only nine genuine sayings of the Master, is uncritical and unscientific. These words appear in the Synoptics as well as in the Fourth Gospel. The genuineness of the latter is here assumed, though there is a wide difference in character between it and the Synoptics.
The main point in the announcements of His death by Jesus rests on the time of their utterance. Hence the chronological grouping of these sayings of Jesus must be followed. If He spoke of His death only as a disappointed man after He saw the manifest hate of the rulers, there would be little ground for claiming Messianic consciousness concerning His death as an atonement for sin. And the heart of the whole problem turns on the Messianic consciousness. When did He become conscious of His death? Why did He expect a violent death? What did He think was to be accomplished by His death? Was His death a voluntary sacrifice, or merely a martyr’s crown? These and similar questions can be answered only by a careful and comprehensive survey of Christ’s own words upon the subject. It is noteworthy that Jesus put the emphasis in His career on His death rather than on His incarnation. That is so out of the ordinary as at once to challenge attention. Here is One who came to give life by dying. That is in deepest harmony with nature, but not in harmony with man’s view of his own life.
1. The first foreshadowings.—(a) Jesus first exhibits knowledge of His death at the time of the Temptation, immediately after the Baptism and the formal entrance upon the Messianic ministry. The word ‘death’ or ‘cross’ is not mentioned between Jesus and Satan, but the point at issue was the easy or the hard road to conquest of the world. It is the unexpressed idea in this struggle for the mastery of men. Hence, before Jesus began to teach men, He had already wrestled with His Messianic destiny and chosen the path that led to the cross. This tone of high moral conflict is never absent from Jesus till the end. The Synoptic Gospels thus give the first account of Christ’s consciousness of His struggle to the death for the spiritual mastery of men.
(b) Another* [1] occasion for the mention of His death by our Lord grew out of the failure of Nicodemus to understand the new birth and the spiritual nature of the kingdom of God (John 3:9). If the teacher of Israel could not apprehend these aspects of what took place in the kingdom on earth, now could he lay hold of the purposes of God in heaven (John 3:12) about the work of the kingdom? One of the chief of these ‘heavenly things’ is the necessity of the death of Christ for the sin of the world. The brazen serpent of the older history serves as an illustration (John 3:14), but ‘das göttliche “δεῖ” Todesschicksals’ (Schwartzkopff, Die Weissagungen Jesu Christi, p. 20) is grounded in the eternal love of God for the world (John 3:16). The Son of Man (John 3:14) who ‘must’ be lifted up is the Son of God (John 3:16). It is not perfectly certain that John 3:16 is a word of Jesus and not of the Evangelist, but at any rate it is a correct interpretation of the preceding argument. The high religious necessity for His death, of which Jesus is here conscious, could come to Him by revelation from the Father (Schwartzkopff; l.c. p. 22). The consciousness of Jesus is clear, but He finds in Nicodemus an inability to grasp this great truth. The word ‘lifted up’ (ὑψωθῆναι) refers to the cross, as is made plain afterwards (John 8:28; John 12:32 f.). Even when the multitudes heard Jesus use the word just before His death, they did not understand it (John 12:34), though the Evangelist gives the correct interpretation in the light of the after history (John 12:33). In itself the word could refer to spiritual glory (Paulus) or heavenly glory (Bleek), but not in view of the later developments. So then the cross is consciously before Jesus from the very beginning of His ministry.
(c) It is possibly nearly a year before we have the next allusion by the Master to His death. Again in parabolic phrase Jesus calls Himself the bridegroom who will be taken away from the disciples (Mark 2:20, Matthew 9:15, Luke 5:35). The Pharisees from Jerusalem (Luke 5:17) are now in Galilee watching the movements of Jesus, so as to gain a case against Him. On this occasion they are finding fault because the disciples of Jesus do not observe stated seasons of fasting. The answer of Jesus is luminous in marking off the wide difference in spirit between a ceremonial system like Judaism and a vital personal spiritual religion like Christianity. There is a time to fast, but it is a time of real, not perfunctory, sorrow. Such a time will come to the disciples of Jesus when He is taken away. By itself this reference might allude merely to the death that would come to Christ as to other men, but the numerous other clear passages of a different nature preclude that idea here. Gould is right (Internat. Crit. Com. on Mark 2:20) in saying that ‘even as a premonition it is not premature,’ though there is more in it than this, for Jesus understood the significance of His death. Soon the historical developments confirm the prejudgment of Jesus, for the enmity of the historical conspiracy grows apace. At the next feast at which Jesus appears in Jerusalem (John 5:1) the rulers make a definite attempt to kill Him as a Sabbath-breaker and blasphemer, also for claiming equality with God the Father (John 5:18). This decision to kill Jesus soon reappears in Galilee (Mark 3:6), and often in Jerusalem during the closing six months of the ministry.
(d) The use of the cross as a metaphor, as in Matthew 10:38 (see also Mark 8:24, Matthew 16:24, Luke 14:27), would not of itself constitute an allusion to the death of Jesus, since death on the cross was so common at this time. But in the light of the many allusions by Jesus Himself to His death, the background of the metaphor would seem to be personal, and so to imply His own actual cross. He is Himself the supreme example of saving life by losing it. Meyer, in loco, considers that this verse was transferred from the later period; but this is unnecessary; for it is eminently pertinent that in the directions to the Twelve, who are now sent out on their first mission, they should be urged to self-sacrifice by the figure of His own death on the crass. In this same address occurs an apocalyptic saying that presupposes the death of Christ (Matthew 10:23). It is not an anachronism (J. Weiss) to find self-sacrifice and self-realization in the words of Jesus about losing life and finding it (Matthew 10:39), for Jesus Himself gives the historical background of this image in the sublime justification of His own death in His resurrection (John 12:24).
(e) It is just a year (John 6:4) before the death of Jesus that He is addressing the Galilaean populace in the synagogue at Capernaum. He explains that He is the bread of heaven, the true manna, the spiritual Messiah. It is the climax of the Galilaean ministry, for but yesterday they had tried to make Him king (John 6:15). To-day Jesus tests their enthusiasm by the supreme revelation of His gift of Himself ‘for the life of the world’ (John 6:51), a clear allusion to His atoning death on the cross. Thus will it be possible for men to make spiritual appropriation of Christ as the living bread. The people and many of the so-called disciples fall back at this saying (John 6:66), and thus justify the wisdom of Jesus in having said no more as yet concerning His death, and life by His death. For at the first dim apprehension of this basal truth the people left Him. But it was time for the truth to be told to the flippant multitudes. Here Jesus reveals His consciousness of the character and work of Judas as the betrayer, a very devil (John 6:70 f.). The bald truth of the betrayal is not at this point told to the Twelve, for John’s comment is made afterwards; but Jesus expressly says that one of them is a devil. Jesus clearly knows more than He tells. There is this bitterness in His cup at the very time that the people desert Him. The shadow of the cross is growing closer and darker, but Christ will go on to meet His hour.
2. The definite announcements.—(a) The new departure at Caesarea Philippi. Just after the renewed confession by Peter that Jesus is the Messiah, St. Matthew says that ‘from that time began Jesus to show unto his disciples how that he must go unto Jerusalem, and suffer many things of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and the third day be raised up’ (Matthew 16:21). St. Mark (Mark 8:31) also says that ‘he began to teach them.’ Clearly, then, this was an epoch in the teaching of Jesus concerning His death. When He withdrew from Galilee this last summer, he devoted Himself chiefly to the disciples, and especially to preparing them for His departure. The specific teaching concerning His death follows, therefore, the searching test of their fidelity to Him as the Messiah. This is not a new idea to Jesus, as we have already seen. It has been the keynote of His mission all the time, but He had to speak of it in veiled and restrained language till now, when ‘he spake the saying openly’ (Mark 8:32). Now Jesus told the details of His death, the place and the persecutors. He repeats the necessity (δεῖ) of His death as He had proclaimed it in John 3:14. The disciples are still unprepared for this plain truth, and Peter even dares to rebuke Jesus for such despondency (Matthew 16:22). The sharp rebuke of Peter by Jesus (Matthew 16:23) shows how strong a hold the purpose to die had on His very nature. Peter had renewed the attack of Satan in the Temptation. The Gospels record the dulness of the disciples, thus disproving the late invention of these sayings attributed to Jesus. The principle of self-giving is a basal one for Jesus and for all His followers (Luke 9:23-25). The disciples could not yet, any more than Nicodemus, grasp the moral necessity of the death of Jesus. They recoiled at the bare fact.
(b) On the Mount of Transfiguration a week later, somewhere on the spurs of Hermon, Peter, James, and John get a fresh word from Jesus about His death (Mark 9:9). It is not necessary to suppose that they understood or even heard the conversation of Jesus with Moses and Elijah about ‘his decease which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem’ (Luke 9:31). Most likely they did not, if Peter’s remarks are a criterion (Luke 9:32 f.). There is a fitness both from the manner of the deaths of Moses and Elijah, and from their respective positions in law and prophecy, that these two should talk with Jesus about His atoning and predicted sacrificial death. This exalted scene lifts the curtain a little for us, so that we catch some glimpse of the consciousness of Jesus concerning His death, as He held high converse with Moses and Elijah. But the remark of Jesus (Matthew 17:9) was a caution to the three disciples to keep to themselves what they had seen till His resurrection, when they would need it. But the lesson of strength was lost on them for the present. Even the chosen three questioned helplessly with each other about the rising from the dead (Mark 9:10). They could not understand a dying Messiah now or later till the risen Christ had made it clear.
(c) In Galilee Jesus renewed His earnest words about the certainty of His death (Mark 9:31, Matthew 17:22 f., Luke 9:44). He concealed His presence in Galilee as far as possible (Mark 9:30), but He was very insistent in urging, ‘Let these words sink into your ears: for the Son of Man shall be delivered up into the hands of men’ (Luke 9:44). But it was to no purpose, for they understood it not (Mark 9:32). St. Luke (Luke 9:45), in fact, says that it was concealed from them, thus raising a problem of God’s purpose and their responsibility. They were sorry (Matthew 17:23), but afraid to ask Jesus (Luke 9:45). Hence Jesus has not yet succeeded in making the disciples understand His purpose to die for men. So then He will have no human sympathy, and will have to tread the path to Calvary alone.
(d) At the feast of Tabernacles, or a few days afterwards, just six months before the end, in the midst of the hostile atmosphere of Jerusalem, Jesus emphasizes the voluntary character of His death for His sheep (John 10:15). He does this to distinguish between Himself and the Pharisees, who have been vehemently attacking Him. They are robbers, wolves, and hirelings, while Jesus is the Good Shepherd. He is not merely caught in the maelstrom of historic forces, nor is He the victim of time and circumstance, for He has voluntarily put Himself into the vortex of sin (John 10:17 f.). The Father has given the Son the power or right (ἐξουσία) to lay down and to take up His life again. It was a ‘commandment’ from the Father, but not to the exclusion of the voluntary nature of His death; just as the necessity of His death was an inward necessity of love, not an outward compulsion of law. It is in the realm of spirit that we find the true value of the death of Jesus for our sins (Hebrews 9:14), and the moral grandeur of it is seen in the fact that He made a voluntary offering of His life for those who hated Him (Romans 5:8).
(e) As the time draws nearer, Jesus even manifests eagerness to meet His death (Luke 12:49 f.). It is only some three months till the end. However we take τί, whether as interrogative or exclamation, we see clearly the mingled eagerness and dread with which Jesus contemplated His death. It is a fire that will burn, but also attracts. He had come just for this purpose, to make this fire. It will be a relief when it is kindled. It is a baptism of death that presses as a Divine compulsion upon Him, like the ‘must’ of the earlier time (John 3:14, Mark 8:31). Here we feel the inward glow of the heart of Christ as it bursts out for a moment like a flame from the crater, unable to be longer restrained. So Jesus had a double point of view about His death, one of joy and one of shrinking, but He did not go now one way and now the other. He will pursue His way steadily, and as the time draws nigh, His view of His death will amount to rapture (John 17:1; John 17:24). But Jesus was never more conscious and sane than when He spoke thus about His death. It was, in fact, His inner self speaking out. He thus gave us not only a new view of His own death, but a new view of death itself.
(f) Jesus even tells His enemies that He expects to be put to death in Jerusalem (Luke 13:33). They were posing as His friends, but were either representatives of Herod Antipas or of the Jerusalem Pharisees. Jesus asserted His independence of ‘that fox’ and of them, but announced the inward necessity (‘I must’) that He should ultimately at the right time meet the fate of other prophets in Jerusalem. His lament over Jerusalem reveals the depth of His love for that city, and demands a Judaean ministry such as that described by John.
(g) It is not till the death of Lazarus that the disciples realize that Jesus may be put to death (John 11:8); and then as a dread growing out of the last attempt of the Jews to kill Him at the feast of Dedication (John 10:39). Thomas has the courage of despair (John 11:16) in the gloomy situation, but Jesus speaks of His own glorification (John 11:4; John 11:40). One item in this glorification was the formal decision of the Sanhedrin to put Jesus to death (John 11:53). With this formal decision resting over Him, Jesus withdrew to the hills of Ephraim, near where in the beginning He had refused Satan’s offer of a compromise, and had chosen His own way and the Father’s. Had He made a mistake?
3. Facing the end.—(a) The relation between the death of Christ and the consummation of the kingdom. It is in the last journey to Jerusalem that the Pharisees ask when the kingdom of God comes (Luke 17:20). They are thinking of the apocalyptic conception current in their literature. There are two difficulties thus raised. One is their utter failure to understand the nature of the kingdom, for it is inner and spiritual, not external (the Papyri show that ἐντός means ‘within,’ not ‘among’).* [2], 387.] But, though the kingdom had already come in this sense, there would be in the end a fuller and completer realization of the work of the kingdom. It is in this sense that Jesus addresses the disciples in Luke 17:25. The day when the Son of Man shall be revealed (Luke 17:30) will be the end. ‘But first must be suffer many things, and be rejected of this generation.’ Thus Jesus separates His own death from the final stage of the Messianic work on earth. The other difficulty is raised by the disciples, and concerns the place where the Son will manifest Himself (Luke 17:37). He will come when there are people for Him to come for.
(b) Jesus uses the word ‘crucify’ before He reaches Jericho on this last journey to Jerusalem (Matthew 20:19). Stapfer scouts this item as put in post eventum (Jesus Christ during His Ministry, p. 202), because it is expressly used by Christ only twice before His death (see also Matthew 26:2); but the Master particularizes beforehand other details, such as the mocking, scourging, spitting, delivering to the Gentiles (these all now mentioned for the first time, Mark 10:33 f., Matthew 20:19, Luke 18:32 f.). Besides, now for the first time also Jesus claims that His death will be in fulfilment of the prophetic writings concerning the Son of Man (Luke 18:31). See later Matthew 21:42, John 13:18, Mark 14:27, Luke 22:37; Luke 24:27. Jesus is not, however, playing a part just to fulfil the Scripture, but He sees this objective confirmation of the inner witness of His spirit to the Father’s will concerning His death. Besides, on this occasion Jesus had made a special point of talking about His coming death, taking the Twelve apart (Matthew 20:17 f.), and explaining that He does so now because they are near Jerusalem. There was an unusual look on the Master’s face, so much so that the disciples were amazed and afraid (Mark 10:32). But with all this pain, they were hopelessly dull on this subject (Luke 18:34).
(c) There is strange pathos in the next occasion Jesus had for speaking concerning His death. James and John and their mother (Matthew 20:20, Mark 10:35) seem hardly able to wait for the Master to cease telling about His death before they come and ask for the chief positions in the temporal kingdom for which they are still looking. It was a shock to Jesus. Waiving their ignorance, He asked if they could drink His cup of death and take His baptism of blood (Matthew 20:22, Mark 10:38). They actually said that they were able. And James was the first of the Twelve to die a martyr’s death, and John the last; for Jesus had said that they would have His cup and baptism (Mark 10:39).
(d) It was on the same occasion, as Jesus proceeded to give the disciples a needed lesson in true greatness and taught the dignity of service, that He set forth in plain speech the purpose of His death (Matthew 20:28, Mark 10:45). Certainly Jesus had the right to tell the purpose of His voluntary death. Λύτρον is obviously ‘ransom,’ but it need not be said that this word exhausts all the content in the death of Christ. Jesus Himself elsewhere spoke of the vital connexion between Himself and the believer (John 15:1 ff.). This view of the redemptive death of Christ is further emphasized by the symbol of Baptism and also of the Supper, in both of which the vital aspect of mystic union is expressed. Ἀντί is here used to express the idea of substitution, though ὑπέρ is more common in this sense in the NT (John 11:50) and in the earlier Greek (Alcestis, for instance). It is a ransom instead of many.
A distinction needs to be made between the atoning death of Christ as a basis for reconciliation and the consummation of reconciliation in the individual case by the Holy Spirit’s work in the heart. The doctrine of the substitutionary atoning death of Jesus, with vital and mystic union of the believer with Him, is not a rabbinic and legal refinement of St. Paul. He simply echoes the words of the Master more at length, while true to the heart of the matter.
(e) The request of the Greeks during the last week brought forth one of the deepest words of Jesus concerning the necessity of His death (John 12:23-25). He gives, in fact, the philosophy of grace about His death, which is, in truth, the same as the law of nature. It is the law of self-giving. Thus the wheat grows, and thus will Jesus establish the kingdom. By His death the middle wall of partition between Jew and Gentile, and between both and God, will be broken down (Ephesians 2:14-18). The agitation of Jesus on this occasion is surpassed only by that in the Garden of Gethsemane, and the cause is the same. In facing His death He shrinks from it, but instantly submits to the Father (John 12:26 f.), and is comforted by the Father’s voice. To the multitude Jesus boldly announces that His lifting up (on the cross) will be the means of drawing all men (Gentile as well as Jew) to Him (John 12:32). And it has been so. Jesus gloried in His own cross as the means of saving the lost world.
(f) In the famous controversy with the Jewish rulers in the temple on the last Tuesday, Jesus identified Himself as the rejected Stone in the Messianic prophecy in Psalms 118:22, and pronounced condemnation on those who collided with the rejected Stone (Matthew 21:44). At every turn during these last days the death of Jesus is in the back ground of His words and deeds; especially is this true of the great eschatological discourse (Matthew 24 f.), as well as of the third lament over Jerusalem (Matthew 23:37-39), and the previous defiance of His enemies (Matthew 23:32).
(g) It is on Tuesday night (beginning of Jewish Wednesday) that Jesus definitely foretells the time of His death (Matthew 26:2). It will be at the feast of the Passover, which begins after two days. Strangely enough, on this very night the rulers were in conference, and had decided, owing to the popularity of Jesus with the multitude at the feast, as shown by the triumphal entry and the temple teaching, to postpone the effort to kill Him till after the feast (Matthew 26:3-5). And so it would have been but for the treachery of one of Christ’s own disciples, who this very night, after the doleful announcement by Jesus of His near death, and after a stern rebuke for his covetous stinginess (John 12:6 f.), went in disgust and showed the Sanhedrin how to seize Him during the feast (Luke 22:6). But Jesus saw in the beautiful act of Mary a prophecy of His burial (John 12:7).
(h) Jesus is fully conscious that the Paschal meal which He is celebrating is His last, is, in fact, taking place on the very day of His death (John 13:31-33; John 13:38). The material is now so rich and full, as the great tragedy draws near, that it can only be alluded to briefly. He is eager to eat this meal before He suffers (Luke 22:15 f.). He knows that now at last His hour has come (John 13:1), and that He will conquer death (John 13:3). The contentious spirit of the Twelve at such a time occasions the object-lesson in humility. Jesus points out the betrayer, who leaves the room; comforts the disciples, and warns them of their peril, though all fail to grasp the solemn fact or the moral greatness of the tragedy that is coming swiftly on them, actually producing two swords for a fight under the new policy of resistance now announced by Jesus (Luke 22:36-38).
Pfleiderer (Evolution and Theology, p. 179) seeks to reconstruct the whole story of Jesus’ attitude towards His death by the answer of Jesus, ‘It is enough.’ He forgets that this answer may be neither irony nor sober earnest, but rather an inability to make the disciples understand more about the matter before the time. It is chimerical for Pfleiderer to set up his view of this one passage against all the cl
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Death
Mâveth (מָוֶת, Strong's #4194), “death.” This word appears 150 times in the Old Testament. The word mâveth occurs frequently as an antonym of hayyim (“life”): “I call heaven and earth to record this day against you, that I have set before you life and death, blessing and cursing: therefore choose life, that both thou and thy seed may live …” (Deut. 30:19). In the poetic language, mâveth is used more often than in the historical books: Job-Proverbs (about 60 times), Joshua-Esther (about 40 times); but in the major prophets only about 25 times.
“Death” is the natural end of human life on this earth; it is an aspect of God’s judgment on man: “But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die” (Gen. 2:17). Hence all men die: “If these men die the common death of all men … then the Lord hath not sent me” (Num. 16:29). The Old Testament uses “death” in phrases such as “the day of death” (Gen. 27:2) and “the year of death” (Isa. 6:1), or to mark an event as occurring before (Gen. 27:7, 10) or after (Gen. 26:18) someone’s passing away.
“Death” may also come upon someone in a violent manner, as an execution of justice: “And if a man have committed a sin worthy of death and he be to be put to death, and thou hang him on a tree: his body shall not remain all night upon the tree …” (Deut. 21:22-23). Saul declared David to be a “son of death” because he intended to have David killed (1 Sam. 20:31; cf. Prov. 16:14). In one of his experiences, David composed a psalm expressing how close an encounter he had had with death: “When the waves of death compassed me, the floods of ungodly men made me afraid; the sorrows of hell compassed me about; the snares of death prevented me” (2 Sam. 22:5-6; cf. Ps. 18:5-6). Isaiah predicted the Suffering Servant was to die a violent death: “And he made his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death; because he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth” (Isa. 53:9).
Associated with the meaning of “death” is the meaning of “death by a plague.” In a besieged city with unsanitary conditions, pestilence would quickly reduce the weakened population. Jeremiah alludes to this type of death as God’s judgment on Egypt (43:11); note that “death” refers here to “death of famine and pestilence.” Lamentations describes the situation of Jerusalem before its fall: “… Abroad the sword bereaveth, at home there is as death” (Lam. 1:20; cf. also Jer. 21:8-9).
Finally, the word mâveth denotes the “realm of the dead” or che’ol. This place of death has gates (Ps. 9:13; 107:18) and chambers (Prov. 7:27); the path of the wicked leads to this abode (Prov. 5:5).
Isaiah expected “death” to be ended when the Lord’s full kingship would be established: “He will swallow up death in victory; and the Lord God will wipe away tears from off all faces; and the rebuke of his people shall he take away from off all the earth: for the Lord hath spoken it” (Isa. 25:8). Paul argued on the basis of Jesus’ resurrection that this event had already taken place (1 Cor. 15:54), but John looked forward to the hope of the resurrection when God would wipe away our tears (Rev. 21:4).
Teumtah means “death.” One occurrence is in Ps. 79:11: “Let the sighing of the prisoner come before thee; according to the greatness of thy power preserve thou those that are appointed to die [1]” (cf. Ps. 102:20).
Mâmoth refers to “death.” Mâmoth appears in Jer. 16:4: “They shall die of grievous deaths …” (cf. Ezek. 28:8).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Death
This is referred to in scripture under various aspects.
1. The general appointment for sinful man — the death of the body by the separation of the soul from it. Hebrews 9:27 ; Romans 5:14 ; Romans 6:23 .
2. The spiritual condition of fallen man, 'dead in trespasses and sins.' Ephesians 2:1,5 ; Romans 7:24 .
3. Death personified as a power of Satan: the last enemy to be destroyed. 1 Corinthians 15:26 ; Revelation 20:13,14 .
4. THE SECOND DEATH:eternal punishment. Revelation 2:11 ; Revelation 20:14 ; Revelation 21:8 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Death
Is taken in Scripture, first, for the separation of body and soul, the first death, Genesis 25:11 ; secondly, for alienation from God, and exposure to his wrath, 1 John 3:14 , etc.; thirdly, for the second death, that of eternal damnation. Death was the penalty affixed to Adam's transgression, Genesis 2:17 3:19 ; and all his posterity are transgressors, and share the curse inflicted upon him. Romans 5:12-21 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 .
Natural death is described as a yielding up of the breath, or spirit, expiring, Psalm 104:29 ; as a return to our original dust, Genesis 3:19 Ecclesiastes 12:7 ; as the soul's laying off the body, its clothing, 2 Corinthians 5:3,4 , or the tent in which it has dwelt, 2 Corinthians 5:1 2 Peter 1:13,14 . The death of the believer is a departure, a going home, a falling asleep in Jesus, Philippians 1:23 Matthew 26:24 John 11:11 .
The term death is also sometimes used for any great calamity, or imminent danger threatening life, as persecution, 2 Corinthians 1:10 . "The gates of death," Job 38:17 , signify the unseen world occupied by departed spirits. Death is also figuratively used to denote the insensibility of Christians to the temptations of a sinful world, Colossians 3:3 .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Death
The Bible teaches that human death is a result of sin (Genesis 2:17; Romans 5:12). God does not desire death for those he created in his image. Death is therefore the enemy of God as well as the enemy of the human race (1 Corinthians 15:26; Hebrews 2:15).
Results of Adam’s sin
Physical and spiritual death are not completely separate. When sin entered the world through Adam, it changed everything. All human life is now affected by the certainty of death (Romans 5:12-17). This involves physical death and spiritual death. The truth of this is demonstrated by the fact that the work of Christ, which reverses the effects of sin, brings the gift of spiritual life now (Genesis 2:15-165) and in the end will bring victory even over physical death (1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:44-45).
Some may think that since human beings are creatures of the natural world, physical death is inevitable. After all, death was apparently part of the world of nature before Adam sinned – leaves fell off trees, fruit was picked, and animals lived by eating other forms of life (1618882878_51; Genesis 3:1). But it is not death in general that is the result of Adam’s sin; it is human death. The truth that the Bible emphasizes is that human beings are not merely creatures of the natural world like the other animals. They are related to God in a way that makes them different from all other created things. They are unique, for they are made in God’s image (Genesis 1:27).
If physical death were merely the end of existence, people would have no need to fear it. The reason they fear it is their awareness that, when they die, they do not escape the consequences of his sin, but go to face them (Hebrews 9:27; see also SHEOL).
It has been suggested that, before Adam and Eve sinned, the spiritual life within them was so dominant that it prevented the natural physical deterioration that we today might expect. But when sin overcame them, it so changed human life that the spirit no longer had control over the body, and physical deterioration resulted. Physical death was at the same time completely natural and completely the result of sin (Genesis 3:19 b). Physical effort and bodily functions that should have brought pleasure brought pain and hardship instead (Genesis 3:16-19).
There is no need to imagine the chaos of an over-populated world had human beings never sinned and no one ever died. It is death, not the termination of earthly existence, that is the enemy; and it is sin that makes death so hateful (1 Corinthians 15:26; 1 Corinthians 15:55-56). There are examples to suggest that God could readily have brought a person’s earthly existence to an end without the person having to pass through death (Genesis 5:24; 2 Kings 2:11; 1 Corinthians 15:51; Hebrews 11:5; cf. Acts 1:9).
Present experience; future victory
The Bible uses the picture of an evil ruler to denote both death and the devil. Death is a sphere in which the devil rules (Hebrews 2:15). All people, being sinners, are slaves of sin and therefore under its power (Romans 5:14). They are not free to decide whether they will die or not. Physically they are condemned to death, and spiritually they are dead already (Ephesians 2:1; Ephesians 2:5; Colossians 2:13; 1 John 3:14). They are so under the dominion of death that their tendency towards sin is itself called death (Romans 7:24; Romans 8:6; Romans 8:10). Sin cannot exist without death as its consequences (Romans 6:16; Romans 6:21; Romans 7:5; Romans 7:13; James 1:15). To continue in sin is to continue in death; for sinners are in the sphere of death till they are saved out of it (Romans 8:23; 1 Corinthians 15:54).
Although this connection between sin and death may seem natural and inevitable, it can be broken. People are not the helpless victims of mechanical laws, but the subjects of divine compassion. The same God who sends death as sin’s penalty can give life as his gift (Romans 6:23).
Through the death of Jesus Christ, God has completely dealt with sin and death. Jesus died in the place of sinners to take away their sin and deliver them from the sphere of death (Romans 6:9-10; 2 Corinthians 5:21; Hebrews 2:9; Hebrews 2:14; 1 Peter 2:24). Satan uses death to bind people in fear, but God uses death to release them from Satan’s power. Christ came to conquer death, and he did this by means of his own death. All who by faith belong to Christ share the benefits of that death (Romans 6:3-8; 2 Corinthians 5:14; Colossians 2:12-15). All who refuse Christ die in their sins, and so ensure for themselves an unalterable destiny that the Bible calls eternal destruction, outer darkness, the lake of fire and the second death (Matthew 8:12; Matthew 25:46; John 8:24; Revelation 20:14; see HELL).
Christ’s saving work means that believers need no longer fear death. They know that one day it will be destroyed (Romans 6:9; 1 Corinthians 15:26; 1 Corinthians 15:54-57; Revelation 2:11; Revelation 20:6; Revelation 21:4). Although they still live in the sphere of death’s influence, they have already passed out of death into life. They are free from the law of sin and death (John 5:24; Romans 8:2; 2 Timothy 1:10; 1 John 3:14). Like other people, they may experience physical death, but they will never die in the sense that really matters (John 11:25-26; see HEAVEN).

Sentence search

Death - A cessation of bodily life, caused by the separation of the soul from the body (bodily or physical Death). Death is, in general, universal (Hebrews 9; Romans 5). Death is a punishment for sin. "By one man sin entered into this world, and by sin Death" (Romans 5), and though the character of punishment is wiped away in Baptism, Death itself remains as an effect of sin (prenalitas). Death marks the end of time for merit and demerit (Luke 23; Council of Florence, "Decretum pro Grrecis"). Besides bodily Death there is spiritual Death, i. ,a privation of sanctifying grace; and eternal Death, i. ,damnation, called also "second' Death" (Apocalypse 2; 20; 21). Christ by His atonement took away the second Death, eternal damnation, but not physical Death
Deadly - ) Capable of causing Death; mortal; fatal; destructive; certain or likely to cause Death; as, a deadly blow or wound. ) Subject to Death; mortal. ) In a manner resembling, or as if produced by, Death. ) In a manner to occasion Death; mortally
Mortal - mortalis, from mors, Death, or morior, to die, that is, to fall. Subject to Death destined to die. Deadly destructive to life causing Death, or that must cause Death as a mortal wound mortal poison. The fruit ...
Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste ...
Brought Death into the world, and all our woe-- ...
3. Bringing Death terminating life. Exposing to certain Death incurring the penalty of Death condemned to be punished with Death not venial as a mortal sin. Man a being subject to Death a human being
Mortify - 1: θανατόω (Strong's #2289 — Verb — thanatoo — than-at-o'-o ) "to put to Death" (from thanatos, "death," akin to thnetos, "mortal," see above), is translated "mortify" in Romans 8:13 (Amer. RV, "put to Death"); in Romans 7:4 , "ye were made dead" (Passive Voice), betokens the act of God on the believer, through the Death of Christ; here in Romans 8:13 it is the act of the believer himself, as being responsible to answer to God's act, and to put to Death "the deeds of the body. " See Death , C, No. RV, "put to Death")
Thanatopsis - ) A view of Death; a meditation on the subject of Death
Obit - ) Death; decease; the date of one's Death. ) A service for the soul of a deceased person on the anniversary of the day of his Death
Death - The word "death" is used in two main ways in the Bible. Second, Death is used in reference to the lost. ...
Death to humans is unnatural. When God created Adam and Eve, Death was not part of the created order. It was not until they sinned that Death entered the scene (Romans 5:12; Rom 6:23). Death will be destroyed when Christ returns and the believers receive their resurrected bodies
Deadly - , "death-bearing, deadly" (thanatos, "death," phero, "to bear"), is used in James 3:8 . 1), "belonging to Death, or partaking of the nature of Death," is used in Mark 16:18
Mortal, Mortality - 1: θνητός (Strong's #2349 — Adjective — thnetos — thnay-tos' ) "subject or liable to Death, mortal" (akin to thnesko, "to die"), occurs in Romans 6:12 , of the body, where it is called "mortal," not simply because it is liable to Death, but because it is the organ in and through which Death carries on its Death-producing activities; in Romans 8:11 , the stress is on the liability to Death, and the quickening is not reinvigoration but the impartation of life at the time of the Rapture, as in 1 Corinthians 15:53,54 ; 2 Corinthians 5:4 (RV, "what is mortal;" AV, "mortality"); in 2 Corinthians 4:11 , it is applied to the flesh, which stands, not simply for the body, but the body as that which consists of the element of decay, and is thereby Death-doomed. Christ's followers are in this life delivered unto Death, that His life may be manifested in that which naturally is the seat of decay and Death
Death - The Bible teaches that human Death is a result of sin (Genesis 2:17; Romans 5:12). God does not desire Death for those he created in his image. Death is therefore the enemy of God as well as the enemy of the human race (1 Corinthians 15:26; Hebrews 2:15). ...
Results of Adam’s sin...
Physical and spiritual Death are not completely separate. All human life is now affected by the certainty of Death (Romans 5:12-17). This involves physical Death and spiritual Death. The truth of this is demonstrated by the fact that the work of Christ, which reverses the effects of sin, brings the gift of spiritual life now (Romans 6:23) and in the end will bring victory even over physical Death (1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:44-45). ...
Some may think that since human beings are creatures of the natural world, physical Death is inevitable. After all, Death was apparently part of the world of nature before Adam sinned – leaves fell off trees, fruit was picked, and animals lived by eating other forms of life (Genesis 2:15-16; Genesis 3:1). But it is not Death in general that is the result of Adam’s sin; it is human Death. ...
If physical Death were merely the end of existence, people would have no need to fear it. Physical Death was at the same time completely natural and completely the result of sin (Genesis 3:19 b). It is Death, not the termination of earthly existence, that is the enemy; and it is sin that makes Death so hateful (1 Corinthians 15:26; 1 Corinthians 15:55-56). There are examples to suggest that God could readily have brought a person’s earthly existence to an end without the person having to pass through Death (Genesis 5:24; 2 Kings 2:11; 1 Corinthians 15:51; Hebrews 11:5; cf. ...
Present experience; future victory...
The Bible uses the picture of an evil ruler to denote both Death and the devil. Death is a sphere in which the devil rules (Hebrews 2:15). Physically they are condemned to Death, and spiritually they are dead already (Ephesians 2:1; Ephesians 2:5; Colossians 2:13; 1 John 3:14). They are so under the dominion of Death that their tendency towards sin is itself called Death (Romans 7:24; Romans 8:6; Romans 8:10). Sin cannot exist without Death as its consequences (Romans 6:16; Romans 6:21; Romans 7:5; Romans 7:13; James 1:15). To continue in sin is to continue in Death; for sinners are in the sphere of Death till they are saved out of it (Romans 8:23; 1 Corinthians 15:54). ...
Although this connection between sin and Death may seem natural and inevitable, it can be broken. The same God who sends Death as sin’s penalty can give life as his gift (Romans 6:23). ...
Through the Death of Jesus Christ, God has completely dealt with sin and Death. Jesus died in the place of sinners to take away their sin and deliver them from the sphere of Death (Romans 6:9-10; 2 Corinthians 5:21; Hebrews 2:9; Hebrews 2:14; 1 Peter 2:24). Satan uses Death to bind people in fear, but God uses Death to release them from Satan’s power. Christ came to conquer Death, and he did this by means of his own Death. All who by faith belong to Christ share the benefits of that Death (Romans 6:3-8; 2 Corinthians 5:14; Colossians 2:12-15). All who refuse Christ die in their sins, and so ensure for themselves an unalterable destiny that the Bible calls eternal destruction, outer darkness, the lake of fire and the second Death (Matthew 8:12; Matthew 25:46; John 8:24; Revelation 20:14; see HELL). ...
Christ’s saving work means that believers need no longer fear Death. Although they still live in the sphere of Death’s influence, they have already passed out of Death into life. They are free from the law of sin and Death (John 5:24; Romans 8:2; John 11:25-26; 1 John 3:14). Like other people, they may experience physical Death, but they will never die in the sense that really matters (2 Timothy 1:10; see HEAVEN)
Deathful - ) Liable to undergo Death; mortal. ) Full of Death or slaughter; murderous; destructive; bloody
Mortal - ) Of or pertaining to the time of Death. ) Affecting as if with power to kill; Deathly. ) Subject to Death; destined to die; as, man is mortal. ) Destructive to life; causing or occasioning Death; terminating life; exposing to or deserving Death; deadly; as, a mortal wound; a mortal sin. ) A being subject to Death; a human being; man
Death's-Head - ) A naked human skull as the emblem of Death; the head of the conventional personification of Death
Mortality - Subjection to Death or the necessity of dying. Death. Frequency of Death actual Death of great numbers of men or beasts as a time of great mortality
Coroner - ) An officer of the peace whose principal duty is to inquire, with the help of a jury, into the cause of any violent, sudden or mysterious Death, or Death in prison, usually on sight of the body and at the place where the Death occurred
Mortal - Subject to Death in contrast to God, who is immortal or free from Death (Job 4:17 ; Romans 1:23 ). The mortal body is subject to sin (Romans 6:12 ), to decay (1 Corinthians 15:53-54 ), and to Death (2 Corinthians 4:11 )
Donatio Causa Mortis - A gift made in contemplation of Death, but which becomes irrevocable and valid only after the Death of the giver
Death, Mortality - Death is the absence or withdrawal of breath and the life force that makes movement, metabolism, and interrelation with others possible. The Nature of Death . Life and Death are totally under Yahweh's sovereignty. ...
In the Bible, Death is more than the cessation of all physiological processes. Jacob is gathered to his people at Death, but not buried until at least seven weeks later (49:33; 50:3,10). He could not have meant they would all be buried together the next day since Saul's headless body was buried in Jabesh Gilead some time after his Death (1 Samuel 31:9-11 ). The gathering to one's people was an event taking place before burial at the time of Death. ...
The Origin of Death . Unlike the ancient Mesopotamian concept, Death was not originally built into human constitution. People were created for life, not for Death. Apparently from close observation of the plant and animal kingdom they would have been able to know what Death was. In the Old Testament Death is an unavoidable reality. From a human point of view Death was just as final as spilled water (2 Samuel 14:14 ) and a pot broken at the well (Ecclesiastes 12:6 ). Death is so ominous and powerful it can be compared to a fortified city with gates and bars (Psalm 9:13 ; 107:18 ). Death stalked on all sides (Psalm 91:5-7 ). Death indeed, like fire, seemed never to be satisfied (Proverbs 30:16 ). Unlike most of the ancient Near Eastern peoples, they did not have to worry that they might bring Death down on themselves by unknowingly offending some minor deity. ...
Sometimes people seemed to respond rather pessimistically to Death. Men like Hezekiah could reason with God that they should go on living because no one worships God in Death (Isaiah 28:18-19 ). ...
The Preacher even extols the advantages of Death (Ecclesiastes 4:2 ; cf. Since Death is quick and inevitable, mortals should live life intensely to the fullest, enjoying every minute of everything they do (Ecclesiastes 9:10 ). The only victims of suicide in the Old Testament were men (Ahithophel and Saul) who were faced with imminent, unavoidable Death anyway. These men believed they were choosing a better manner of Death than their enemies would select for them (1 Samuel 31:1-6 ; 2 Samuel 17:23 ). ...
Victory over Death . They knew the valley of the shadow of Death was unavoidable, but they also knew that in the end the Shepherd would walk it with them (Psalm 23:4 ). They knew that something about the day of Death was better than the day of birth (Ecclesiastes 7:1 ). "Precious in the sight of the Lord is the Death of his saints" (Psalm 116:15 ). God takes no pleasure even in the Death of the wicked (Ezekiel 18:32 ). ...
There is evidence that in the Old Testament Death is not as final as is sometimes supposed. Death comes like a shepherd to lead us into the grave. But the psalmist affirms in faith that God will himself pay the redemption price for release from the power of Death (Psalm 49:15 ). ...
For God Death is not an insurmountable obstacle. The Death, indecision, barrenness, old age, and confusion of Genesis 11 actually becomes the stage on which God begins to play out his drama of redemption. ...
Isaiah looks forward to a day when the Death shroud will be removed, and Death will be permanently swallowed up (25:7-8). The New Testament broadens the term "death" to include various figurative meanings. Even becoming a disciple requires a new radical reorientation to Death and a taking up of the cross daily (Matthew 16:24 ). In the New Testament way of thinking Death is necessary for life and fruitfulness (John 12:24 ). ...
The Origin of Death . The New Testament enlarges our understanding of the origin of Death. Death passed on all men because of one man's disobedience so that in Adam all die (Romans 5:12-17 ; 1Col 15:22). The wages of sin is Death (Romans 6:23 ). Even the mind set on the flesh is Death (Romans 8:6 ). Thus the law is considered the ministry of Death (2 Corinthians 3:6-7 ). ...
The Second Death . The New Testament delineates a deeper, more sombre meaning to Death. Death is appointed to all men, but after that comes judgment (2Col 5:10; Hebrews 9:27 ). In Death people do not live in a sort of nebulous twilight zone. The final destiny of Death and Hades is to be cast into the lake of fire. This lake of fire is the second Death (Revelation 20:14-15 ). The second Death is a metaphorical term for eternal separation from the presence and glory of God (2 Thessalonians 1:7-10 ; Revelation 2:11 ; 20:6,14-15 ). ...
Triumph over Death . While the New Testament makes the agony of Death more intense and fearsome, it shows a greater triumph over it. It is not the second Death but the Death of Christ that occupies the center of attention. Through Death he destroyed the devil, who had the power over Death, and emptied Death of its fear (Hebrews 2:14-15 ). By dying Christ destroyed Death and brought immortality to light (2 Timothy 1:10 ). ...
Even at the beginning of Christ's ministry light shone in the valley of the shadow of Death (Matthew 4:16 ). Now being himself loosed from the pains of Death (Acts 2:24 ) and crowned with glory and honor (Hebrews 2:9 ), he has the keys of Death and hell (Revelation 1:18 ). ...
Christians still die but their Death is gain because they are now with Christ (2Col 5:6; Philippians 1:20-21 ). Even Death cannot separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus (Romans 8:38-39 ). In Death Christians are given comfort, rest, and assurance (Luke 16:22-25 ; 1618882878_14 ). ...
The dead are in Christ, asleep (1 Thessalonians 4:14 ), waiting for a day when Death will be completely swallowed up by life (2 Corinthians 5:4 ). Death, the last enemy, will itself be destroyed (1 Corinthians 15:26 ). There will be no more Death or sorrow, and God will wipe all tears from all faces (Revelation 21:4 ). ...
For those who overcome and attain to the resurrection of Christ, the second Death has no power (Revelation 2:11 ; 20:6 ). Those who believe in Christ will not see Death (Romans 6:1 ). ...
Paul Ferguson...
See also Grave ; Second Death ...
Bibliography . , Biblical Perspectives on Death ; A. Lohse, Death and Life ; J. Rahner, On the Theology of Death ; E. Tromp, Primitive Conceptions of Death and the Nether World in the Old Testament
Posthumous - ) Published after the Death of the author; as, posthumous works; a posthumous edition. ) Being or continuing after one's Death; as, a posthumous reputation. ) Born after the Death of the father, or taken from the dead body of the mother; as, a posthumous son or daughter
Death, Second - Final separation from God; spiritual Death following physical Death. Revelation describes the second Death with the images of the lake of fire (John 20:14 ) and a lake burning with fire and sulphur (John 21:8 ). The second Death has no power over those who remain faithful in persecution (John 2:11 ), who are martyred (John 20:6 ), or for those whose names are written in the book of life (John 20:15 ). Still others interpret the second Death in terms of anihilation on the basis of comparison with Matthew 10:28
Ahimoth - (uh hi' mahth) Personal name meaning literally, “My brother is Death” or “my brother is Mot (god of Death)
Dying - ) In the act of dying; destined to Death; mortal; perishable; as, dying bodies. ) Of or pertaining to dying or Death; as, dying bed; dying day; dying words; also, simulating a dying state. ) The act of expiring; passage from life to Death; loss of life
Death, Death-Stroke - A — 1: θάνατος (Strong's #2288 — Noun Masculine — thanatos — than'-at-os ) "death," is used in Scripture of: (a) the separation of the soul (the spiritual part of man) from the body (the material part), the latter ceasing to function and turning to dust, e. In Hebrews 9:15 , the AV, "by means of Death" is inadequate; the RV, "a Death having taken place" is in keeping with the subject. In Revelation 13:3,12 , the RV, "death-stroke" (AV, "deadly wound") is, lit. , "the stroke of Death:" ...
(b) the separation of man from God; Adam died on the day he disobeyed God, Genesis 2:17 , and hence all mankind are born in the same spiritual condition, Romans 5:12,14,17,21 , from which, however, those who believe in Christ are delivered, John 5:24 ; 1 John 3:14 . "Death" is the opposite of life; it never denotes nonexistence. As spiritual life is "conscious existence in communion with God," so spiritual "death" is "conscious existence in separation from God. " ...
"Death, in whichever of the above-mentioned senses it is used, is always, in Scripture, viewed as the penal consequence of sin, and since sinners alone are subject to Death, Romans 5:12 , it was as the Bearer of sin that the Lord Jesus submitted thereto on the Cross, 1 Peter 2:24 . And while the physical Death of the Lord Jesus was of the essence of His sacrifice, it was not the whole. ]'>[1] ...
A — 2: ἀναίρεσις (Strong's #336 — Noun Feminine — anairesis — an-ah'ee-res-is ) another word for "death," lit. signifies "a taking up or off" (ana, "up," airo, "to take"), as of the taking of a life, or "putting to Death;" it is found in Acts 8:1 , of the murder of Stephen. telos, see END), hence, "the end of life, Death," is used of the "death" of Herod, Matthew 2:15 . ...
B — 1: ἐπιθανάτιος (Strong's #1935 — Adjective — epithanatios — ep-ee-than-at'-ee-os ) "doomed to Death" (epi, "upon," thanatos, A, No. ...
C — 1: θανατόω (Strong's #2289 — Verb — thanatoo — than-at-o'-o ) "to put to Death" (akin to A, No. cause (them) to be put to Death," lit. , "shall put (them) to Death" (RV marg. It is used of the Death of Christ in Matthew 26:59 ; 27:1 ; Mark 14:55 ; 1 Peter 3:18 . 2), hence, "to put to Death," is usually translated "to kill or slay;" in two places "put to Death," Luke 23:32 ; Acts 26:10 . , "to lead away" (apo, "away," ago, "to lead"), is used especially in a judicial sense, "to put to Death," e. ...
C — 4: ἀποκτείνω (Strong's #615 — Verb — apokteino — ap-ok-ti'-no ) "to kill," is so translated in the RV, for the AV, "put to Death," in Mark 14:1 ; Luke 18:33 ; in John 11:53 ; 12:10 ; 18:31 , RV, "put to Death. , "to be in extremity," in extremis, "at the last (gasp), to be at the point of Death," is used in Mark 5:23
Death - When this body-soul union failed in Death, the Hebrews did not visualize the escape of the soul from the body, but the actual Death of the self. ...
The Old Testament does not, however, teach that persons were annihilated at Death. This belief is expressed in the Genesis 25:8 report of Abraham's Death. ...
To the Israelite, Death and Sheol were both acceptable and unacceptable. Especially when life was long and blessed (Abraham, Genesis 25:8 ; David, 1 Chronicles 29:28 ), the Israelites accepted Death with some degree of grace. ...
When Death occurred in the prime of life or without children or without proper burial, it was strictly understood as a curse. In fact, because of the Hebrews' love of life and conviction that Yahweh was the Author of life, Death and Sheol always represented either a potential or actual threat. ...
Furthermore, because of the Hebrews' emphasis on group identity, Death could be accepted in that the group survived. ...
The Old Testament recognized the theological meaning of Death as well as its physical meaning. The account of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:1;b13 ) clearly points to sin as the reason humans must experience Death (Genesis 2:17 ; Genesis 3:3 ). ...
Death in the Synoptic Gospels and Acts Several passages in the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) and Acts imply a positive, or at least neutral, attitude toward Death. Similar to the Old Testament accounts of some of the partriarchs, Simeon's Death would be the peaceful resignation of a life dedicated to God. ...
In other passages Death is seen as ominous and threatening. Luke 1:79 and Matthew 4:16 use the phrase “shadow of Death” as a negative image. In Luke 7:22-23 , Jesus vindicated His ministry in the face of John the Baptist's question by revealing His power against the realm of Death: the dead are raised, the demons are cast out, the lame walk, the deaf hear, the blind see. ...
The most striking feature of the Synoptic Gospels' understanding of Death is the central place given to Jesus' Death. In His Death the positive and negative aspects just discussed come together: Jesus overturned Death in the community and ran toward His own Death; He agonized over His fate in Jerusalem and wished it were already accomplished; He announced with word and deed the Resurrection Age, but He could not completely welcome His own accursed Death which resurrection would vindicate. Above all else, Death in the Synoptic Gospels is interpreted by the paradoxical Death of the Servant who found life through the means of Death. ...
Death in the Letters of Paul Paul's understanding of Jesus' Death and resurrection determined his depiction of Death as a quality of human existence. The most fundamental facet of this understanding is that Death has been defeated (1 Corinthians 15:26 ; 2 Timothy 1:8-10 ). Paul's conviction was confirmed: (1) through his assurances to the Thessalonians that their dead were not disadvantaged (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 ); (2) through his concept of the firstfruits (Romans 8:23 ; 1 Corinthians 5:20 ); (3) through his doctrine of the eventual transformation of the resurrection body (1 Corinthians 15:35-58 ), and (4) through his conviction that the proper Christian response to Death and all of its signs is an indomitable hope (Romans 8:31-38 ; 1 Corinthians 15:58 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:18 ). Simply put, Paul pictures the Christian's Death as nonfinal and nonthreatening. ...
Death is nonetheless an enemy. Paul used Death imagery to characterize sinful existence (Romans 6:13 , Romans 7:7-25 , Romans 8:6-8 ; Ephesians 2:1 , Ephesians 2:5 ; Colossians 2:13 ). If the “old” existence should be thought of as Death, conversion to Christ is nothing less than rebirth (Romans 6:5-11 ; Galatians 2:20 ). Paul's image of rebirth is realistic to the extent that he acknowledged the incompleteness of our Death and resurrection with Christ. ...
Death in the Writings of John As much or more than Paul, John redefined Death (and life) in relationship to Jesus. In the fourth Gospel especially, how the hearers respond to Jesus is a matter of life and Death: “Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from Death unto life” (John 5:24 ). Jesus went on to call Lazarus from the tomb; but in doing so, he ironically sealed His own Death in the plans of the Jewish authorities (John 11:45-53 ). Unlike Greek philosophers who downplayed the significance of Death by emphasizing the immortality of the soul, the biblical writers affirmed that Death is real. Because the Bible also affirms the value of life as a gift from God, Death is sometimes depicted as threatening and never entirely desirable. The doctrine of resurrection is an affirmation that even the realm of the dead belongs to God and that Death is overcome only at His gracious command. ...
The distinctive contribution of the New Testament is that it relentlessly defines human life, Death, and resurrection in light of Jesus' life, Death, and resurrection. Thus Death is removed from its normal context at the end of life and placed in the very middle of life; in Christ we die and are raised as we commit our lives to Him
Death - Is taken in Scripture, first, for the separation of body and soul, the first Death, Genesis 25:11 ; secondly, for alienation from God, and exposure to his wrath, 1 John 3:14 , etc. ; thirdly, for the second Death, that of eternal damnation. Death was the penalty affixed to Adam's transgression, Genesis 2:17 3:19 ; and all his posterity are transgressors, and share the curse inflicted upon him. ...
Natural Death is described as a yielding up of the breath, or spirit, expiring, Psalm 104:29 ; as a return to our original dust, Genesis 3:19 Ecclesiastes 12:7 ; as the soul's laying off the body, its clothing, 2 Corinthians 5:3,4 , or the tent in which it has dwelt, 2 Corinthians 5:1 2 Peter 1:13,14 . The Death of the believer is a departure, a going home, a falling asleep in Jesus, Philippians 1:23 Matthew 26:24 John 11:11 . ...
The term Death is also sometimes used for any great calamity, or imminent danger threatening life, as persecution, 2 Corinthians 1:10 . "The gates of Death," Job 38:17 , signify the unseen world occupied by departed spirits. Death is also figuratively used to denote the insensibility of Christians to the temptations of a sinful world, Colossians 3:3
Deicide - ) The act of killing a being of a divine nature; particularly, the putting to Death of Jesus Christ. ) One concerned in putting Christ to Death
Sapphira - ) Three hours only elapsed between Ananias' Death and her lie (she being unaware of her husband's doom) and Death (Acts 5:1; Acts 5:7-10)
Euthanasia - (Greek: eu, well; thanatos, Death) ...
 ...
Easy, tranquil Death. The term is used in two senses: rendering Death easy or painless through anesthetics; putting to Death painlessly the socially unfit, i. The time preceding Death is extremely precious as a preparation for eternity, and moreover, the unlimited use of anesthetics is equivalent to the shortening of life
Knell - ) To sound as a knell; especially, to toll at a Death or funeral; hence, to sound as a warning or evil omen. ) The stoke of a bell tolled at a funeral or at the Death of a person; a Death signal; a passing bell; hence, figuratively, a warning of, or a sound indicating, the passing away of anything
Memento Mori - , that you must die; a warning to be prepared for Death; an object, as a Death's-head or a personal ornament, usually emblematic, used as a reminder of Death
Abner - For seven years after Saul's Death, he supported Ish-bosheth; but being reproved by him for his conduct towards Rizpah, he undertook to unite the whole kingdom under David. He was, however, treacherously slain by Joab, either to revenge the Death of Asahel, Joab's brother, who Abner had formerly killed, or more probably from jealousy. David abhorred this perfidious act, and composed an elegy on his Death, 2 Samuel 2:8 3:33 . He also charged Solomon to punish the crime of Joab with Death, 1 Kings 2:5,6
Death - DEAD, Death...
There is a threefold sense of Death; natural, spiritual, and eternal. " (James 2:16) Spiritual Death means, the soul unquickened by the Holy Ghost. " (Ephesians 2:1) And eternal Death implies the everlasting separation both of soul and body from God to all eternity
Death - Death...
I. term mâweth and our corresponding word ‘death’ alike spring from primitive roots belonging to the very beginnings of speech. It is, of course, in this ordinary sense of the term as denoting a physical fact that the expressions ‘death’ and ‘die’ are mostly used in the Scriptures. The Scriptures have nothing directly to say as to the place of Death in the economy of nature. as to the connexion between sin and Death must be explained in harmony with this fact; and, for that matter, in harmony also with his own words in Romans 6:23 , where Death, the ‘wages of sin,’ cannot be simply physical Death. If the belief enshrined in the story of the Fall in Genesis 3:1-24 regarded Death in the ordinary sense as the penalty of Adam and Eve’s transgression, they at any rate did not die ‘in the day’ of their transgression; v. All we can say is that in the dawn of human history man appears as one already familiar with the correlative mysteries of life and Death. From the contemplation of the act of dying it is an easy step to the thought of Death as a state or condition. Divergent beliefs as to what the state of Death is show themselves in the OT. ( a ) In numerous instances Death is represented as a condition of considerable activity and consciousness . ...
( b ) Jahwism might well forbid resort to necromancers with their weird appeals to the dead for guidance and information, for in its view the state of Death was one of unconsciousness, forgetfulness, and silence (see Psalms 88:12 ; Psalms 94:17 ; Psalms 115:17 etc. ...
( c ) Other ideas of Death as not terminating man’s existence and interests were, however, reached in later prophetic teaching, mainly through the thought of the worth of the individual, the significance of his conscious union with God, and of the covenant relations established by God with His people ( Jeremiah 31:1-40 ; cf. Death as standing in penal relation to man’s sin and unrighteousness is frequently insisted on. That this is something more than natural Death is clear from such an antithesis as we have in Deuteronomy 30:15 ; Deuteronomy 30:19 (‘life and good: Death and evil’), and this set in strict relation to conduct. On the other hand, the thought of dying ‘the Death of the righteous’ ( Numbers 23:10 ) as a desirable thing looks in the same direction. And why has the righteous ‘hope in his Death’ ( Proverbs 14:32 )?...
6. As minor matters, OT poetical uses of references to Death may be merely pointed out. ‘Chambers of Death,’ Proverbs 7:27 ; ‘gates,’ Psalms 9:13 (= state); ‘bitterness of Death,’ 1 Samuel 15:32 , Ecclesiastes 7:26 ; ‘terrors,’ Psalms 55:4 ; ‘sorrows,’ Psalms 116:3 (= man’s natural dread); ‘shadow of Death,’ Job, Ps. , the Prophets, passim (= any experience of horror and gloom, as well as with reference to Death itself); ‘the sleep of Death,’ Psalms 13:3 (to be distinguished from later Christian usage); ‘snares of Death,’ Prov. (= things leading to destruction); the phrase ‘to Death,’ as ‘vexed unto Death,’ Judges 13:7 ; ‘sick,’ 2 Kings 20:1 (= to an extreme degree). 1 5, with its treatment of the attitude of the ungodly towards Death (‘Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die’), of the problem of the early, untimely Death of the good, and of immortality in relation to the ungodly and the righteous; Sirach , in which no clear conception of immortality appears, the best that can be said, to alleviate sorrow for the dead, being that ‘the dead is at rest’ ( Sir 38:23 ): in which also the fear of Death is spoken of as besetting all ranks of men (40), and we are told who they are to whom Death comes as a dread foe, and again who may welcome Death as a friend (41). It is noticeable that our Lord has nothing to say directly concerning Death as a physical phenomenon . He offers no explanation touching those matters in the experience of Death which have always excited the curiosity of men, and in this respect His attitude is in strong contrast with that found in Rabbinical writings. He makes no use of the conception of ‘the angel of Death,’ so characteristic of the latter, and traceable perhaps in language such as that of 1 Corinthians 15:26 , Hebrews 2:14 , and Revelation 20:13-14 . ...
( b ) No stress is laid on Death as an evil in itself . Still, those aspects of Death which make the living and active shrink from it are incidentally recognized. Jesus in Rabbinic phrase speaks of tasting Death ( Mark 9:1 ||) and of seeing Death ( John 8:51-52 ): and the feeling underlying such expressions is the very antithesis of that attaching to ‘seeing life’ and ‘seeing many days. ’ Death is to common human feeling an unwelcome, though inevitable, draught. At the same time, there is no reference in His teaching to natural Death as the solemn end of life’s experiences and opportunities, unless an exception be found in the saying about working ‘while it is day’ ( John 9:4 ): but contrast with this as to tone a passage like Ecclesiastes 9:10 . ...
( c ) Jesus speaks of Death as a sleep ( Mark 5:39 , John 11:11-13 ); but the same euphemistic use is found in OT and in extra-Biblical writers. It did not of itself necessarily lessen the terrors of Death (see Psalms 13:3 ); but we owe it to Christ and the Christian faith mainly that such a representation of Death has come to mitigate its bitterness, such a use as is also found elsewhere in NT ( e. This conception of Death is, of course, to be limited to its relation to the activities and interests of this world. ...
( d ) Natural Death is lost sight of in the much larger and more solemn conception of the condition of man resulting from sin , which in the Fourth Gospel is particularly described as ‘death’ (see John 5:24 ; John 6:50 ; John 8:21 ; John 8:24 ). relate to this spiritual Death, and by that deliverance natural Death is shorn of its real terrors. This condition, resulting from sin and separation from God, may he regarded as incipient here and tending to a manifest consummation hereafter, with physical Death intervening as a moment of transition and deriving a solemn significance from its association with the course and state of sin (see Beyschlag, NT Theol . ); but the conception of ‘perishing’ covers the deep experience of spiritual Death, the loss of all that really makes the man. ...
(The phrase ‘die the Death’ in EV Abishag - After David's Death, his son Adonijah asked to have Abishag for wife, for which Solomon put him to Death
Fear of Death - See Death
Dead - See Death...
Defunction - ) Death
Abishag - After his Death, Adonijah sought her hand to promote his treasonable aspirations, and was punished by Death, 1 Kings 1:1-2:46
Hazarmaveth - Dwelling of Death
Ahimoth - Brother of Death
Second Death - See Death, Second
Mortality - See Death, Mortality ...
...
Deathward - ) Toward Death
Dead - See Death
Achmetha - Brother of Death
Death - Death, n
Sleep - ...
"Sleep" is also used metaphorically of Death. The expression "he slept with his fathers" is a fixed formula in reference to Death, and is used over thirty-five times in the Old Testament. This expression does not continue into New Testament times, although the metaphorical use of sleep for Death does. They, too, experience Death in a stark and crushing way. Death is no pleasant sleep for them, but a final, unending negation. Third, believers are said to fall asleep at Death (1 Corinthians 15:6,18 , 20 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:13,15 ), and in one instance "to fall asleep in Jesus" (1 Thessalonians 4:14 ). Although believers are still occasionally said to die, Death is described as gain (Philippians 1:21 ); it has lost its sting (1 Corinthians 15:54-57 ). Death comes attended by blessedness and rest (Revelation 14:13 ) and a conscious sense of the presence of Christ (2 Corinthians 5:8 ). Death is, in fact, not Death anymore, and those who believe in Jesus will never really die, even though they might still experience what used to be called Death (John 11:25-26 ). So the metaphor of sleep is used to emphasize that we have no more to fear from Death than we do from falling asleep. Fourth, believers are never said to have fallen asleep in the Death of Jesus; rather, we died with him (Colossians 2:20 ; 2 Timothy 2:11 ) or were crucified with him (Galatians 2:20 ). It is only because of Jesus' Death, and our Death in him, that Death no longer holds any terror, becoming instead a peaceful sleep and a blessedness ( Revelation 14:13 ). Fifth, even when believers are punished by the Lord with temporal Death, it is still no longer Death but a falling asleep (1 Corinthians 11:30 ). Finally, not only do believers never experience Death (in the old way) anymore, although they must go through what is metaphorically called sleep; there are some who will not even experience that—that single generation of believers, who are alive at the second coming of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:51 ), they will not sleep, but will be transformed instantaneously into their new unending life. Elwell...
See also Death, Mortality ; Thessalonians, First and Second, Theology of ...
...
Mort - ) Death; esp. , the Death of game in the chase. ) A note or series of notes sounded on a horn at the Death of game
Fatal - ) Foreboding Death or great disaster. ) Causing Death or destruction; deadly; mortal; destructive; calamitous; as, a fatal wound; a fatal disease; a fatal day; a fatal error
Death - The grave is represented as "the gates of Death" (Job 38:17 ; Psalm 9:13 ; 107:18 ). The gloomy silence of the grave is spoken of under the figure of the "shadow of Death" (Jeremiah 2:6 ). ...
Death is the effect of sin (Hebrews 2:14 ), and not a "debt of nature. Jesus has by his own Death taken away its sting for all his followers (1 Corinthians 15:55-57 ). ...
There is a spiritual Death in trespasses and sins, i. , the Death of the soul under the power of sin (Romans 8:6 ; Ephesians 2:1,3 ; Colossians 2:13 ). ...
The "second Death" (Revelation 2:11 ) is the everlasting perdition of the wicked (Revelation 21:8 ), and "second" in respect to natural or temporal Death. ...
THE Death OF CHRIST is the procuring cause incidentally of all the blessings men enjoy on earth
Deathfulness - ) Appearance of Death
Berodach-Baladan - The son of Death
Adramyttium - The court of Death
Passion of Christ - See Death of Christ ...
...
Death - See Life and Death
Meremoth - Bitterness; myrrh of Death
Saul - Demanded; lent; ditch; Death
Thanatoid - ) Deathlike; resembling Death
Kill - See Death; EXECUTION; SACRIFICE
Casualty - ) Any injury of the body from accident; hence, Death, or other misfortune, occasioned by an accident; as, an unhappy casualty. ) Numerical loss caused by Death, wounds, discharge, or desertion
Mortally - ) In an extreme degree; to the point of dying or causing Death; desperately; as, mortally jealous. ) In a mortal manner; so as to cause Death; as, mortally wounded
Abishag - After his Death, Adonijah sought her hand to promote his treasonable schemes, and was punished by Death
Uriah - To save Bathsheba Uriah's wife from Death for adultery, and secure her for himself, David caused Uriah to be exposed to Death, 2 Samuel 11:1-27 ; 12:9 ; 23:29 ; 1 Kings 15:5
Jeremoth - Eminences; one that fears Death
Alamort - ) To the Death; mortally
Methusaleh - He has sent his Death
Azmaveth - Strong Death; a he-goat
Humiliation of Christ - See Jesus, Death and Resurrection; Kenosis
Bashemath - Perfumed; confusion of Death; in desolation
Eternal Life - See Eternal and Life and Death
Jerimoth - He that fears or rejects Death
Undeadly - ) Not subject to Death; immortal
Lethiferous - ) Deadly; bringing Death or destruction
Buchanites - Buchan, of Glasgow, who gave herself out to be the woman spoken of in the Revelations; and that all who believed in her should be taken up to heaven without tasting Death, as the end of the world was near. They never increased much; and the Death of their leader within a year or two afterwards, occasioned their dispersion, by putting an end to their hopes of reaching the New Jerusalem without Death
Martyr - One who, by his Death, bears witness to the truth of the gospel. One who suffers Death in defense of any cause. M`ARTYR, To put to Death for adhering to what one believes to be the truth to sacrifice one on account of his faith or profession
Admatha - A cloud of Death; a mortal vapor
Adaliah - One that draws water; poverty; cloud; Death
Post-Mortem - ) After Death; as, post-mortem rigidity
Deathlike - ) Resembling Death
Abode of the Dead - See Death ; Grave ; Hades ; Hell ; Pit ; Sheol
Michmethah - The gift or Death of a striker
Thanatology - ) A description, or the doctrine, of Death
Die - ” The word is used of physical “death,” with reference to both man and beast. ...
In an intensive stem, this root is used of the last act inflicted upon one who is already near Death. In the usual causative stem, this verb can mean “to cause to die” or “to kill”; God is the one who “puts to Death” and gives life ( Death in this sense may also be inflicted by animals ( Death” in the broadest sense, including war and judicial sentences of execution ( Death (cf. Apparently there was no Death before this time. When the serpent questioned Eve, she associated disobedience with Death ( Death came upon Adam and Eve and their descendants (cf. They experienced spiritual Death immediately, resulting in their shame and their attempt to cover their nakedness ( Death required a covering, but man’s provision was inadequate; so God made a perfect covering in the form of a promised redeemer ( Decease - signifies "a way out" (ex, "out," hodos, "a way"); hence, "a departure," especially from life, "a decease;" in Luke 9:31 , of the Lord's Death, "which He was about to accomplish;" in 2 Peter 1:15 , of Peter's Death (marg. See Death , A, No
Death - ) Total privation or loss; extinction; cessation; as, the Death of memory. ) Anything so dreadful as to be like Death. ) Danger of Death
Mortality - ) Death; destruction. ) The whole sum or number of Deaths in a given time or a given community; also, the proportion of Deaths to population, or to a specific number of the population; Death rate; as, a time of great, or low, mortality; the mortality among the settlers was alarming. ) The condition or quality of being mortal; subjection to Death or to the necessity of dying
Expiation (2) - —See Atonement, Death of Christ, Ransom, Reconciliation, Redemption
Everyman - An English morality play translated from a 15th-century Dutch version attributed to Peter Dorland; a dramatization of the "Ars moriendi," depicting the importance of a good preparation for Death. Everyman, summoned to appear before God, is abandoned by all except his neglected Good Works who alone may accompany him through the valley of Death
Abner ben ner - After Saul's Death he proclaimed Ish Bosheth king. David repudiated the murder and ordered all of Israel to mourn Abner's Death
Vigesimation - ) The act of putting to Death every twentieth man
Death (2) - DEATH. —It belongs to the profoundly spiritual character of our Lord’s thinking that He says comparatively little on the subject of physical Death. He recognized that man’s true being was something apart from the mere bodily existence, and Death thus resolved itself into a natural incident, analogous to sleep, which broke the continuity of life only in seeming. The accident of Death, of the separation of the soul from its material body, can make little difference to the essential man. The Johannine account of the raising of Lazarus is indeed bound up with a more complex theological doctrine; but the Synoptic miracles, in so far as they are more than works of compassion or exhibitions of Divine power, are indicative of the transient nature of Death. ...
Attempts have been made to connect these miracles and the whole conception of Death as sleep, with the contemporary Jewish belief that for three days the soul still lingered in the neighbourhood of the dead body. The earliest stage of Death might therefore be regarded as a condition of trance or slumber from which the spirit could yet be recalled. John emphasizes the ‘four days’ that had elapsed since the Death of Lazarus, whose soul must thus have finally departed from his body when Jesus revived him. His conception of Death as a passing sleep was derived solely from His certainty that man, being a child of God, was destined to an immortal life. In virtue of their relation to God they must have passed into a more perfect life through apparent Death. ...
The traditional view of Death as something evil and unnatural had therefore no place in the thought of Jesus. Paul took over from the OT and elaborated in his theology, that Death is the punishment of sin. Jesus there insists that Death, even when it comes prematurely and violently, is not to be regarded as a Divine judgment. Sin is punished, not by physical Death in this world, but by a spiritual Death hereafter. ’ Destruction is in store for all sinners; and the punishment cannot therefore consist in Death by violence, which falls on few. Much less can it consist in natural Death, from which the good can escape no more than the wicked. ...
While thus regarding Death as nothing but one of the incidents in man’s earthly existence, our Lord anticipates a time when it will be done away. Those who survive until the Son of man returns in glory ‘will not taste of Death’ (Matthew 16:28), since they will have entered on the new age in which it is abolished. Even in such passages, however, it is not suggested that Death is an evil. The cessation of Death is conjoined with that of marriage (Luke 20:35-36). As the marriage relation is natural and necessary to man’s earthly state, but has no place in the life of higher spirits, so with Death. ...
Jesus, it is thus evident, has broken away from the Jewish conception, according to which the Death of the body possessed a religious significance as the effect of sin. (1) The willingness to endure Death for His sake is the supreme test of faith (cf. (2) Death is the fixed limit appointed by God to all earthly pleasures and activities. (3) Above all, Death marks the beginning of the true and eternal life with God. ...
In several Synoptic passages Jesus speaks of a Death which is spiritual rather than physical. He recognizes that the mass of men are in a condition of moral apathy and estrangement from God, and out of this ‘death’ He seeks to deliver them. As ‘life,’ to the mind of Jesus, consists in moral obedience and communion with God, so in the opposite condition He perceives the true Death. It involves that ‘destruction both of soul and body’ which is far more to be feared than mere bodily Death. Death as conceived by St. The idea is enforced in its full extent that physical Death is only a ‘taking rest in sleep,’ and in no wise affects the real life (John 11:4; John 11:11-14). ’ He has come to raise men out of the state of Death in which they find themselves, and to make them inheritors, even now, of the life of God. Life is a spiritual possession here and now, and has its counterpart in ‘death,’ which is likewise realized in the present world. John, indeed, contemplates a future in which the life, and by implication the Death, will become complete and final (John 6:39; John 6:44; John 6:54); but they will continue the same in essence as they already are on earth. ...
Death is thus regarded not as a single incident but as a condition, in which the soul remains until, through the power of Christ, it passes into the opposite condition of life. His natural state is one of ‘death,’ not because of his moral sinfulness, but because he belongs to a lower world, and the life he possesses is therefore relative and unreal. It is life only in a physical sense, and is more properly described as ‘death. As the Word made flesh, He communicates to them His own higher essence, and makes possible for them the mysterious transition ‘from Death unto life’ (John 5:24). Men were ‘perishing’ through their estrangement from God, and from this Death God sought to deliver them by His love revealed in Christ. ...
For the teaching of Jesus in regard to the significance of His own Death see the following article
Salome alexandra - After the Death of her husband Aristobulus I, she freed his brother, Alexander Jannaeus from prison, and married him shortly thereafter, in accordance with the laws of yibbum. After her second husband's Death, she ruled for nine years, during which the Jews prospered both politically and spiritually
Shalomtzion - After the Death of her husband Aristobulus I, she freed his brother, Alexander Jannaeus from prison, and married him shortly thereafter, in accordance with the laws of yibbum. After her second husband's Death, she ruled for nine years, during which the Jews prospered both politically and spiritually
Crucifixion - ) The state of one who is nailed or fastened to a cross; Death upon a cross. ) The act of nailing or fastening a person to a cross, for the purpose of putting him to Death; the use of the cross as a method of capital punishment
Artemius Megalomartyr, Saint - Converted to the Catholic faith after the Death of Constantius, he was accused by heathens of destroying idols, was conducted to Antioch, and after many tortures put to Death
Obituary - ) That which pertains to, or is called forth by, the obit or Death of a person; esp. , an account of a deceased person; a notice of the Death of a person, accompanied by a biographical sketch
Four Last Things - Often spoken of as to be remembered: ...
death
judgment
heaven
hell
Last Things - Often spoken of as to be remembered: ...
death
judgment
heaven
hell
State After Death - STATE AFTER Death
Euthanasia - ) An easy Death; a mode of dying to be desired
Executed - Done performed accomplished carried into effect put to Death
Mortiferous - ) Bringing or producing Death; deadly; destructive; as, a mortiferous herb
Die, Dead, Dying - tense, "to be dead"), in the NT is always used of physical "death," except in 1 Timothy 5:6 , where it is metaphorically used of the loss of spiritual life. words under Death. , the natural "death" of human beings, e. , Matthew 9:24 ; Romans 7:2 ; by reason of descent from Adam, 1 Corinthians 15:22 ; or of violent "death," whether of men or animals; with regard to the latter it is once translated "perished," Matthew 8:32 ; of vegetation, Jude 1:12 ; of seeds, John 12:24 ; 1 Corinthians 15:36 ; it is used of "death" as a punishment in Israel under the Law, in Hebrews 10:28 ; (b) of the separation of man from God; all who are decended from Adam not only "die" physically, owing to sin, see (a) above, but are naturally in the state of separation from God, 2 Corinthians 5:14 . From this believers are freed both now and eternally, John 6:50 ; 11:26 , through the "death" of Christ, Romans 5:8 , e. Believers have spiritually "died" to the Law as a means of life, Galatians 2:19 ; Colossians 2:20 ; to sin, Romans 6:2 , and in general to all spiritual association with the world and with that which pertained to their unregenerate state, Colossians 3:3 , because of their identification with the "death" of Christ, Romans 6:8 (see No. As life never means mere existence, so "death," the opposite of life, never means nonexistence. ...
3: συναποθνῄσκω (Strong's #4880 — Verb — sunapothnesko — soon-ap-oth-nace'-ko ) "to die with, to die together," is used of association in physical "death," Mark 14:31 ; in 2 Corinthians 7:3 , the Apostle declares that his love to the saints makes separation impossible, whether in life or in "death. " It is used once of association spiritually with Christ in His "death," 2 Timothy 2:11 . ...
4: τελευτάω (Strong's #5053 — Verb — teleutao — tel-yoo-tah'-o ) "to end" (from telos, "an end"), hence, "to end one's life," is used (a) of the "death" of the body, Matthew 2:19 ; 9:18 ; 15:4 , where "die the Death" means "surely die," RV, marg. , "let him end by Death;" Mark 7:10 ; Matthew 22:25 , "deceased;" Luke 7:2 ; John 11:39 , some mss. " Hence it is used metaphorically of "death," Matthew 27:52 , etc
Dyingly - ) In a dying manner; as if at the point of Death
Hanged - Suspended put to Death by being suspended by the neck
Martyr - (Greek: a witness) ...
A person who, for the Christian faith, freely and patiently suffers Death at the hands of a persecutor. A martyr chooses to die rather than deny his faith by word or deed; he suffers patiently, that is, after the example of Christ, he does not resist his persecutors; he suffers Death at the hands of one who, though he may assign some other reason, really acts through hatred of the Christian religion or of some Christian virtue. The early Christians, who bore witness to the truth of those facts upon which Christianity rests, were liable at any time to be given a choice between Death and a denial of their testimony. Many of them, refusing to deny Christ, actually suffered Death. Thus the name martyr, which in the very beginning of the Christian era meant a witness of Christ, was after a while given to those alone who suffered Death for the faith
Blood-Avenger - The sacredness of human life, and the justice of punishing a murderer by Death, are grounded on the fact that man was made in the image of God, Genesis 9:6 . With justice, the passion for revenge often conspired to secure the Death of the criminal. Among the Arabs, the nearest male relative of a murdered person was to pursue the homicide until by force or craft he put him to Death. In the former case, he was at once given up to his pursuer for Death, Exodus 1:14 ; 1 Kings 2:29,34 . In the latter case, he might dwell with safety in the city of refuge; but should he go elsewhere before the Death of the high priest, he was liable to be slain by the avenger of blood, Numbers 35:25-28
Mortuarium - (Latin: mors, Death) ...
a tithe paid by the heirs of a land renter to the landlord, commonly the best head of cattle ...
a portion, received by bishops, from the estate of deceased clergymen ...
bequests made to churches (Decretals, 3) ...
the quota demanded for funerals not performed in one's own parish ...
Death notices ...
a chapel, or hall for the dead, or morgue
Fate - The Old Testament speaks of Death as the common fate of humankind (Psalm 49:12 ; Psalm 81:15 ; Ecclesiastes 2:14 ; Ecclesiastes 3:19 ; Ecclesiastes 9:2-3 ). The Old Testament similarly speaks of violent Death as the destiny of the wicked (Job 15:22 ; Isaiah 65:12 ; Hosea 9:13 )
Lintel - The people of Israel were to sprinkle the blood of the sacrificial lamb on the lintel and the doorposts as a sign to the Death angel. Every household which had blood on the lintel would be spared the Death of the firstborn (Exodus 12:22-23 )
Sting (And Forms) - ...
1 Corinthians 15:55 (b) Death certainly does hurt the hearts of the living, bringing deep wounds, and many sad results. Death is caused by sin, and is the result of sin
Methusaleh - His name carries somewhat of an idea respecting it; one who demands his Death, from Shelah, to demand; and Muth, Death
Baptism, Private - That administered in danger of Death, by anyone. Apart from danger of Death, the bishop is not to permit private Baptism, except for non-Catholic adults conditionally baptized
Testator - ) A man who makes and leaves a will, or testament, at Death
Life, the - Our Lord's own way of naming Himself before raising Lazarus from Death (John 11)
Doomed - * For RV in 1 Corinthians 4:9 , see APPOINT (Note at end), Death , B
Testatrix - ) A woman who makes and leaves a will at Death; a female testator
the Life - Our Lord's own way of naming Himself before raising Lazarus from Death (John 11)
Taste - 1: γεύομαι (Strong's #1089 — Verb — geuo — ghyoo'-om-ahee ) "to make to taste," is used in the Middle Voice, signifying "to taste" (a) naturally, Matthew 27:34 ; Luke 14:24 ; John 2:9 ; Colossians 2:21 ; (b) metaphorically, of Christ's "tasting" Death, implying His personal experience in voluntarily undergoing Death, Hebrews 2:9 ; of believers (negatively) as to "tasting" of Death, Matthew 16:28 ; Mark 9:1 ; Luke 9:27 ; John 8:52 ; of "tasting" the heavenly gift (different from receiving it), Hebrews 6:4 ; "the good word of God, and the powers of the age to come," Hebrews 6:5 ; "that the Lord is gracious," 1 Peter 2:3
Translate - KJV term meaning, “to take up,” used of Enoch's being taken up into God's presence without experiencing Death (Hebrews 11:5 ). See Death ; Future Hope ; Resurrection
Tibni - After Zimri had burned himself to Death half the people followed Tibni, half Omri. The contest lasted four years (1 Kings 16:18; 1 Kings 16:21-22), and issued in the Death of Tibni and in Omri's accession
Banshie - ) A supernatural being supposed to warn a family of the approaching Death of one of its members, by wailing or singing in a mournful voice. ) A supernatural being supposed by the Irish and Scotch peasantry to warn a family of the speedy Death of one of its members, by wailing or singing in a mournful voice under the windows of the house
Asleep - Dead in a state of Death. To Death
Immortality - The quality of never ceasing to live or exist exemption from Death and annihilation life destined to endure without end as the immortality of the human soul. ...
--Jesus Christ, who hath abolished Death, and hath brought life and immortality to light through the gospel
Bastinado - Upwards of a hundred blows were often inflicted, and sometimes the beating was unto Death. Paul, Hebrews 11:25 , says that some of the saints were tortured, τυμπανιζω , suffered the tympanum, that is, were stretched on an instrument of torture, and beaten to Death
Bereavement - , the loss of a relative by Death
Dalphon - The second son of Haman, put to Death by the Jews
Aridai - The ninth of Haman’s sons, put to Death by the Jews
Aridatha - The sixth son of Haman, put to Death by the Jews
Arisai - The eighth son of Haman, put to Death by the Jews
Aspatha - The third son of Haman, put to Death by the Jews
Jeopardy - ) Exposure to Death, loss, or injury; hazard; danger
Widower - ) A man who has lost his wife by Death, and has not married again
Dibri - A Danite, grandfather of the blasphemer who was stoned to Death ( Leviticus 24:11 )
Testator - A man who makes and leaves a will or testament at Death
Deathless - ) Not subject to Death, destruction, or extinction; immortal; undying; imperishable; as, Deathless beings; Deathless fame
Perishable - ) Liable to perish; subject to decay, destruction, or Death; as, perishable goods; our perishable bodies
Hymenaeus - ) charged his adversaries with alleging that even Death itself was to be understood in a spiritual sense, since Death was not the separation of body and soul, but ignorance of God, by reason of which man is dead to God, and is not less buried in error than he would be in the grave. ...
‘Wherefore that also must be held to be the resurrection, when a man is re-animated by access to the truth, and having dispersed the Death of ignorance, and being endowed with new life by God, has burst forth from the sepulchre of the old man, even as the Lord likened the Scribes and Pharisees to “whited sepulchers” (Matthew 23:27). ’...
The ground for this spiritualizing of Death is given in a homily of Valentinus quoted by Clement Alex. 13):...
‘Ye are originally immortal, and children of aeonian life, and ye willed that Death should be your portion, that you might exhaust it and consume it, so that Death might die in you and through you. ’...
According to Clement, Basilides also held that a ‘saved race’ had come down from above in order to remove Death, and that the origin of this Death was to be sought in the Demiurge. And a little later in the same chapter Clement tells us that the followers of Valentinus called the Catholics ‘psychical,’ as did the ‘Phrygians,’ the implication being that the Catholics thought, when Death was mentioned, of the Death of the body, and the Gnostics of the Death of the soul. A further implication is that the moment of regeneration, or of passing through the third gate, overshadowed in the Gnostic mind the incident of physical Death, as not merely giving a change of status, but as being an actual admission into the Divine world, and therefore into a world over which physical Death had no jurisdiction. 24, which declares that he who has come to put his trust in the Son hath passed out of Death into life. )...
The delivering of Hymenaeus and Alexander to Satan is to be understood as an excommunication from the fold of grace and safety, and a consequent transition into the world outside the Church where Satan has his throne-the world of suffering, disease, and Death
Announcements of Death - ANNOUNCEMENTS OF Death. —It is certain that we have words from Jesus concerning His Death; for such ruthless criticism as that of Schmiedel (Encyc. ...
The main point in the announcements of His Death by Jesus rests on the time of their utterance. If He spoke of His Death only as a disappointed man after He saw the manifest hate of the rulers, there would be little ground for claiming Messianic consciousness concerning His Death as an atonement for sin. When did He become conscious of His Death? Why did He expect a violent Death? What did He think was to be accomplished by His Death? Was His Death a voluntary sacrifice, or merely a martyr’s crown? These and similar questions can be answered only by a careful and comprehensive survey of Christ’s own words upon the subject. It is noteworthy that Jesus put the emphasis in His career on His Death rather than on His incarnation. —(a) Jesus first exhibits knowledge of His Death at the time of the Temptation, immediately after the Baptism and the formal entrance upon the Messianic ministry. The word ‘death’ or ‘cross’ is not mentioned between Jesus and Satan, but the point at issue was the easy or the hard road to conquest of the world. The Synoptic Gospels thus give the first account of Christ’s consciousness of His struggle to the Death for the spiritual mastery of men. ]'>[1] occasion for the mention of His Death by our Lord grew out of the failure of Nicodemus to understand the new birth and the spiritual nature of the kingdom of God (John 3:9). If the teacher of Israel could not apprehend these aspects of what took place in the kingdom on earth, now could he lay hold of the purposes of God in heaven (John 3:12) about the work of the kingdom? One of the chief of these ‘heavenly things’ is the necessity of the Death of Christ for the sin of the world. The high religious necessity for His Death, of which Jesus is here conscious, could come to Him by revelation from the Father (Schwartzkopff; l. Even when the multitudes heard Jesus use the word just before His Death, they did not understand it (John 12:34), though the Evangelist gives the correct interpretation in the light of the after history (John 12:33). ...
(c) It is possibly nearly a year before we have the next allusion by the Master to His Death. By itself this reference might allude merely to the Death that would come to Christ as to other men, but the numerous other clear passages of a different nature preclude that idea here. on Mark 2:20) in saying that ‘even as a premonition it is not premature,’ though there is more in it than this, for Jesus understood the significance of His Death. ...
(d) The use of the cross as a metaphor, as in Matthew 10:38 (see also Mark 8:24, Matthew 16:24, Luke 14:27), would not of itself constitute an allusion to the Death of Jesus, since Death on the cross was so common at this time. But in the light of the many allusions by Jesus Himself to His Death, the background of the metaphor would seem to be personal, and so to imply His own actual cross. Meyer, in loco, considers that this verse was transferred from the later period; but this is unnecessary; for it is eminently pertinent that in the directions to the Twelve, who are now sent out on their first mission, they should be urged to self-sacrifice by the figure of His own Death on the crass. In this same address occurs an apocalyptic saying that presupposes the Death of Christ (Matthew 10:23). Weiss) to find self-sacrifice and self-realization in the words of Jesus about losing life and finding it (Matthew 10:39), for Jesus Himself gives the historical background of this image in the sublime justification of His own Death in His resurrection (John 12:24). ...
(e) It is just a year (John 6:4) before the Death of Jesus that He is addressing the Galilaean populace in the synagogue at Capernaum. To-day Jesus tests their enthusiasm by the supreme revelation of His gift of Himself ‘for the life of the world’ (John 6:51), a clear allusion to His atoning Death on the cross. The people and many of the so-called disciples fall back at this saying (John 6:66), and thus justify the wisdom of Jesus in having said no more as yet concerning His Death, and life by His Death. ’ Clearly, then, this was an epoch in the teaching of Jesus concerning His Death. The specific teaching concerning His Death follows, therefore, the searching test of their fidelity to Him as the Messiah. Now Jesus told the details of His Death, the place and the persecutors. He repeats the necessity (δεῖ) of His Death as He had proclaimed it in John 3:14. The disciples could not yet, any more than Nicodemus, grasp the moral necessity of the Death of Jesus. ...
(b) On the Mount of Transfiguration a week later, somewhere on the spurs of Hermon, Peter, James, and John get a fresh word from Jesus about His Death (Mark 9:9). There is a fitness both from the manner of the Deaths of Moses and Elijah, and from their respective positions in law and prophecy, that these two should talk with Jesus about His atoning and predicted sacrificial Death. This exalted scene lifts the curtain a little for us, so that we catch some glimpse of the consciousness of Jesus concerning His Death, as He held high converse with Moses and Elijah. ...
(c) In Galilee Jesus renewed His earnest words about the certainty of His Death (Mark 9:31, Matthew 17:22 f. ...
(d) At the feast of Tabernacles, or a few days afterwards, just six months before the end, in the midst of the hostile atmosphere of Jerusalem, Jesus emphasizes the voluntary character of His Death for His sheep (John 10:15). It was a ‘commandment’ from the Father, but not to the exclusion of the voluntary nature of His Death; just as the necessity of His Death was an inward necessity of love, not an outward compulsion of law. It is in the realm of spirit that we find the true value of the Death of Jesus for our sins (Hebrews 9:14), and the moral grandeur of it is seen in the fact that He made a voluntary offering of His life for those who hated Him (Romans 5:8). ...
(e) As the time draws nearer, Jesus even manifests eagerness to meet His Death (Luke 12:49 f. However we take τί, whether as interrogative or exclamation, we see clearly the mingled eagerness and dread with which Jesus contemplated His Death. It is a baptism of Death that presses as a Divine compulsion upon Him, like the ‘must’ of the earlier time (John 3:14, Mark 8:31). So Jesus had a double point of view about His Death, one of joy and one of shrinking, but He did not go now one way and now the other. He will pursue His way steadily, and as the time draws nigh, His view of His Death will amount to rapture (John 17:1; John 17:24). But Jesus was never more conscious and sane than when He spoke thus about His Death. He thus gave us not only a new view of His own Death, but a new view of Death itself. ...
(f) Jesus even tells His enemies that He expects to be put to Death in Jerusalem (Luke 13:33). ...
(g) It is not till the Death of Lazarus that the disciples realize that Jesus may be put to Death (John 11:8); and then as a dread growing out of the last attempt of the Jews to kill Him at the feast of Dedication (John 10:39). One item in this glorification was the formal decision of the Sanhedrin to put Jesus to Death (John 11:53). —(a) The relation between the Death of Christ and the consummation of the kingdom. ’ Thus Jesus separates His own Death from the final stage of the Messianic work on earth. 202), because it is expressly used by Christ only twice before His Death (see also Matthew 26:2); but the Master particularizes beforehand other details, such as the mocking, scourging, spitting, delivering to the Gentiles (these all now mentioned for the first time, Mark 10:33 f. Besides, now for the first time also Jesus claims that His Death will be in fulfilment of the prophetic writings concerning the Son of Man (Luke 18:31). Jesus is not, however, playing a part just to fulfil the Scripture, but He sees this objective confirmation of the inner witness of His spirit to the Father’s will concerning His Death. Besides, on this occasion Jesus had made a special point of talking about His coming Death, taking the Twelve apart (Matthew 20:17 f. ...
(c) There is strange pathos in the next occasion Jesus had for speaking concerning His Death. James and John and their mother (Matthew 20:20, Mark 10:35) seem hardly able to wait for the Master to cease telling about His Death before they come and ask for the chief positions in the temporal kingdom for which they are still looking. Waiving their ignorance, He asked if they could drink His cup of Death and take His baptism of blood (Matthew 20:22, Mark 10:38). And James was the first of the Twelve to die a martyr’s Death, and John the last; for Jesus had said that they would have His cup and baptism (Mark 10:39). ...
(d) It was on the same occasion, as Jesus proceeded to give the disciples a needed lesson in true greatness and taught the dignity of service, that He set forth in plain speech the purpose of His Death (Matthew 20:28, Mark 10:45). Certainly Jesus had the right to tell the purpose of His voluntary Death. Λύτρον is obviously ‘ransom,’ but it need not be said that this word exhausts all the content in the Death of Christ. This view of the redemptive Death of Christ is further emphasized by the symbol of Baptism and also of the Supper, in both of which the vital aspect of mystic union is expressed. ...
A distinction needs to be made between the atoning Death of Christ as a basis for reconciliation and the consummation of reconciliation in the individual case by the Holy Spirit’s work in the heart. The doctrine of the substitutionary atoning Death of Jesus, with vital and mystic union of the believer with Him, is not a rabbinic and legal refinement of St. ...
(e) The request of the Greeks during the last week brought forth one of the deepest words of Jesus concerning the necessity of His Death (John 12:23-25). He gives, in fact, the philosophy of grace about His Death, which is, in truth, the same as the law of nature. By His Death the middle wall of partition between Jew and Gentile, and between both and God, will be broken down (Ephesians 2:14-18). In facing His Death He shrinks from it, but instantly submits to the Father (John 12:26 f. At every turn during these last days the Death of Jesus is in the back ground of His words and deeds; especially is this true of the great eschatological discourse (Matthew 24 f. ...
(g) It is on Tuesday night (beginning of Jewish Wednesday) that Jesus definitely foretells the time of His Death (Matthew 26:2). And so it would have been but for the treachery of one of Christ’s own disciples, who this very night, after the doleful announcement by Jesus of His near Death, and after a stern rebuke for his covetous stinginess (John 12:6 f. ...
(h) Jesus is fully conscious that the Paschal meal which He is celebrating is His last, is, in fact, taking place on the very day of His Death (John 13:31-33; John 13:38). He knows that now at last His hour has come (John 13:1), and that He will conquer Death (John 13:3). 179) seeks to reconstruct the whole story of Jesus’ attitude towards His Death by the answer of Jesus, ‘It is enough
Ox - Emblem in art associated with ...
Saint Ambrose of Milan
Saint Blandina; it was the means of her martyrdom
Saint Eustachius who was martyred with his family in a bronze bull
Saint Luke, symbolic of sacrifice and thus of Death on the Cross
Saint Saturninus who was martyred by being dragged to Death by a bull
Saint Thomas Aquinas, who was called The Dumb Ox for his early problems at school
Barabbas - , son of Abba or of a father, a notorious robber whom Pilate proposed to condemn to Death instead of Jesus, whom he wished to release, in accordance with the Roman custom (John 18:40 ; Mark 15:7 ; Luke 23:19 ). But the Jews were so bent on the Death of Jesus that they demanded that Barabbas should be pardoned (Matthew 27:16-26 ; Acts 3:14 )
Hanging - Foreboding Death by the halter. Death by the halter as hard words or hanging
Delaroche, Hippolyte - His "Death of Queen Elizabeth" and "Children of Edward IV in the Tower" are in the Louvre, and the "Death of the Duke of Guise" is in the Chantilly Museum. After the Death of his wife, a daughter of Horace Vernet, he produced religious paintings of marked sincerity in feeling
Delaroche, Paul - His "Death of Queen Elizabeth" and "Children of Edward IV in the Tower" are in the Louvre, and the "Death of the Duke of Guise" is in the Chantilly Museum. After the Death of his wife, a daughter of Horace Vernet, he produced religious paintings of marked sincerity in feeling
Adonijah - After the Death of Amnon and Absalom, he aspired to the throne, although it was promised to Solomon, his younger brother. But soon after the Death of David, he applied for the hand of Abishag, thus renewing his pretensions to the throne, for which he was put to Death, 1 Kings 1:1-2:46
Lord's Supper - A memorial celebrated by the early church to signify Jesus' sacrificial Death for humankind's sin. His actual Death the next day fulfilled the prophecy. Church groups celebrate the Lord's Supper regularly as a sign of the new covenant sealed by Christ's Death and resurrection
Hippolyte Delaroche - His "Death of Queen Elizabeth" and "Children of Edward IV in the Tower" are in the Louvre, and the "Death of the Duke of Guise" is in the Chantilly Museum. After the Death of his wife, a daughter of Horace Vernet, he produced religious paintings of marked sincerity in feeling
Manslayer, -
Death by a blow in a sudden quarrel. (Numbers 35:22 ) ...
Death by a stone or missile thrown at random. A thief overtaken at night in the act of stealing might lawfully be put to Death, but if the sun had risen the killing him was to be regarded as murder
Adalia - The fifth of the sons of Haman, put to Death by the Jews
Beatification - In the Romish church, the act whereby the pope declares a person happy after Death
Quietus - ) rest; Death
Eschatology - ) The doctrine of the last or final things, as Death, judgment, and the events therewith connected
Moribund - ) In a dying state; dying; at the point of Death
Myriologue - ) An extemporaneous funeral song, composed and sung by a woman on the Death of a friend
Parmashta - The seventh of the sons of Haman, put to Death by the Jews ( Esther 9:3 )
Parshandatha - The eldest of the sons of Haman, put to Death by the Jews ( Esther 9:7 )
the Last Supper - All four Gospels link this meal with Jesus' sacrificial Death. The first three Gospels picture Christ's Death in the symbols of the broken bread (“This is my body which is given for you” Luke 22:19 ) and the outpoured wine (“This is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins” Matthew 26:28 ). In John, foot washing replaces the “breaking of bread” as the picture of Christ's humble acceptance of His servant role (John 13:4-20 ), anticipating His Death on the cross which made cleansing from sin and fellowship with Him possible (John 13:8 ,John 13:8,13:10 ). ...
The supper not only anticipated Christ's Death but also His victory over Death in the promise of His drinking wine anew in the Father's kingdom (Matthew 26:29 ; Mark 14:25 ; Luke 22:18 ; compare 1 Corinthians 11:26 ). The tension in the timing of Christ's Death should not detract from the united New Testament witness that “Christ our passover is sacrificed for us” (1 Corinthians 5:7 )
c.m. - = Congregation of the Mission; Fathers of the Company of Mary; Vincentians; Lazarists ...
= causa mortis (on occasion of Death) ...
Centesimation - ) The infliction of the Death penalty upon one person in every hundred, as in cases of mutiny
Predecease - ) The Death of one person or thing before another
Elysian - ) Pertaining, or the abode of the blessed after Death; hence, yielding the highest pleasures; exceedingly delightful; beatific
Obiyuary - ) Of or pertaining to the Death of a person or persons; as, an obituary notice; obituary poetry
Testacy - ) The state or circumstance of being testate, or of leaving a valid will, or testament, at Death
Legitim - ) The portion of movable estate to which the children are entitled upon the Death of the father
Kill - to Death," similarly rendered in John 18:31 ; often of Christ's Death; in Revelation 2:13 , RV, "was killed" (AV, "was slain"); Revelation 9:15 , RV, "kill" (AV, "slay"); Revelation 11:13 , RV, "were killed" (AV, "were slain"); so in Revelation 19:21 ; (b) metaphorically, Romans 7:11 , of the power of sin, which is personified, as "finding occasion, through the commandment," and inflicting deception and spiritual Death, i. , separation from God, realized through the presentation of the commandment to conscience, breaking in upon the fancied state of freedom; the argument shows the power of the Law, not to deliver from sin, but to enhance its sinfulness; in 2 Corinthians 3:6 , "the letter killeth," signifies not the literal meaning of Scripture as contrasted with the spiritual, but the power of the Law to bring home the knowledge of guilt and its punishment; in Ephesians 2:16 "having slain the enmity" describes the work of Christ through His Death in annulling the enmity, "the Law" ( Ephesians 2:15 ), between Jew and Gentile, reconciling regenerate Jew and Gentile to God in spiritual unity "in one body. " See Death , C, No. ...
2: ἀναιρέω (Strong's #337 — Verb — anaireo — an-ahee-reh'-o ) denotes (a) "to take up" (ana, "up," haireo, "to take"), said of Pharaoh's daughter, in "taking up" Moses, Acts 7:21 ; (b) "to take away" in the sense of removing, Hebrews 10:9 , of the legal appointment of sacrifices, to bring in the will of God in the sacrificial offering of the Death of Christ; (c) "to kill," used physically only (not metaphorically as in No. " See Death , C, No. ...
3: θύω (Strong's #2380 — Verb — thuo — thoo'-o ) primarily denotes "to offer firstfruits to a god;" then (a) "to sacrifice by slaying a victim," Acts 14:13,18 , to do sacrifice; 1 Corinthians 10:20 , to sacrifice; 1 Corinthians 5:7 , "hath been sacrificed," of the Death of Christ as our Passover; (b) "to slay, kill," Matthew 22:4 ; Mark 14:12 ; Luke 15:23,27,30 ; 22:7 ; John 10:10 ; Acts 10:13 ; 11:7 . ...
5: θανατόω (Strong's #2289 — Verb — thanatoo — than-at-o'-o ) "to put to Death" (from thanatos, "death"), is translated "are killed" in Romans 8:36 ; "killed" in 2 Corinthians 6:9 . See Death , C, No. ...
7: σφάζω (Strong's #4969 — Verb — sphazo | sphatto — sfad'-zo ) "to slay, to slaughter," especially victims for sacrifice, is most frequently translated by the verb "to slay;" so the RV in Revelation 6:4 (AV, "should kill"); in Revelation 13:3 , RV, "smitten unto Death" (AV, "wounded")
Immortality - The quality or state of being exempt from Death. When that happens, the saying concerning victory over Death will have been fulfilled (1 Timothy 6:16 ; see Isaiah 25:8 ; Hosea 13:14 ). As it is, humans in their earthly life are mortal; they are subject to Death. Most of the time, we are given immortality after Death. Those who did escape Death—Enoch (Genesis 5:24 ) and Elijah (2 Kings 2:10-11 )—did so only by the power of God and not by some inherent power they had to live forever
Bernice - After the early Death of her first husband she was married to her uncle Herod, king of Chalcis. After his Death (A
Calvary - A fit place; in Death's stronghold the Lord of life gave Death his Deathblow through Death (Hebrews 2:14)
Abel - For his Death in this way he is regarded as a type of Our Saviour. His Death symbolizes, too, the bloody sacrifice of the Cross and the unbloody one of the altar
Jezreel, Portion of - Here Naboth was stoned to Death (1 Kings 21:13 )
Electrocute - ) To execute or put to Death by electricity
Doomsday - ) A day of sentence or condemnation; day of Death
Omega - ) The last; the end; hence, Death
Ketu'Rah - (incense ), the wife of Abraham after the Death of Sarah
Barbara, Saint - When she professed Christianity, she was cruelly tortured, condemned to Death, and was beheaded by her father. The place of her Death is uncertain. Patroness of artillerymen, architects, prisoners, founders, stonemasons, grave-diggers, fortifications; invoked against thunderstorms, fire, lightning, impenitence, and sudden Death; venerated as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers
Wound - In Revelation 13:3,12 , plege is used with the genitive case of thanatos, "death," lit. , "stroke of Death," RV, "death stroke" (AV, "deadly wound"); the rendering "wound" does not accurately give the meaning; in Revelation 13:14 , with the genitive of machaira, "a sword," AV, "wound" (RV, "stroke")
Bowstringed - ) Put to Death with a bowstring; strangled
Dispatched - Sent with haste or by a courier express sent out of the world put to Death performed finished
Psychopannychism - ) The doctrine that the soul falls asleep at Death, and does not wake until the resurrection of the body
Digamous - ) Pertaining to a second marriage, that is, one after the Death of the first wife or the first husband
Terah - Repented before his Death
Resurrection, the - Our Lord's way of naming Himself before raising Lazarus from Death: "I am the Resurrection and the Life
Piram - The king of Jarmuth, defeated by Joshua at Beth-horon and afterwards put to Death ( Joshua 10:3 ff
Sleep - Sleep is a figure of physical Death (John 11:11-14 ; 1 Corinthians 15:51 ). See Death ; Eternal Life
Lysias - ); after the Death of Epiphanes he championed the cause of Eupator, and finally suffered Death along with the latter at the hands of Demetrius (6:14ff
Soul Sleep - The Bible is not specific on the condition of the person between Death and resurrection. However, there are scriptures that strongly suggest man's continued self-awareness and continued existence after Death (Luke 16:19-31; 2 Corinthians 5:1-10; Philippians 1:21-23)
Abishag - After David's Death Adonijah persuaded Bathsheba, Solomon's mother, to entreat the king to permit him to marry Abishag. Solomon suspected in this request an aspiration to the throne, and therefore caused him to be put to Death (1 Kings 2:17-25 )
Marah - It is typical of the Christian's acceptance of Death (Romans 6:11 ; John 6:53 , etc. It is the love of Christ, expressed in His going into Death to make a way out for us, that sweetens the bitterness
Didymus, Saint - He was put to Death with Saint Theodora whose virtue he had protected
Savingly - ) So as to be finally saved from eternal Death
Christ - —See Atonement, Authority of Christ, Birth of Christ, Dates, Death of Christ, Messiah, Person of Christ, Preaching Christ, etc
Decease - Literally, departure hence, departure from this life Death applied to human beings only
Jejunum - ) The middle division of the small intestine, between the duodenum and ileum; - so called because usually found empty after Death
Sprinkling - This mode of applying blood as a witness of Death was ...
1. " Death had already nullified the power of Death. " Death separated the priestly family from their own associations. Death became the means of God accomplishing His purposes of grace
Slay - ) To put to Death with a weapon, or by violence; hence, to kill; to put an end to; to destroy
Deathbird - ) Tengmalm's or Richardson's owl (Nyctale Tengmalmi); - so called from a superstition of the North American Indians that its note presages Death
Executioner - ) One who puts to Death in conformity to legal warrant, as a hangman
Decease - ) Departure, especially departure from this life; Death
Chabanel, Noel, Saint - From 1643 until Death, he labored among the Huron Indians in Canada. In spite of the difficulty of learning the language, of overcoming his natural repulsion for the savages, and of adjusting himself to the mode of life, he persisted and even bound himself by a sacred vow to remain with them until Death. Little is certain concerning the nature of his Death
Noel Chabanel, Saint - From 1643 until Death, he labored among the Huron Indians in Canada. In spite of the difficulty of learning the language, of overcoming his natural repulsion for the savages, and of adjusting himself to the mode of life, he persisted and even bound himself by a sacred vow to remain with them until Death. Little is certain concerning the nature of his Death
Die - The Death of the body to this world. The Death of the soul to GOD. The Death of the Christian to worldly and wicked desires
Hell - The place or state of punishment for the wicked after Death. The place of the dead, or of souls after Death the lower regions, or the grave called in Hebrew, sheol, and by the Greeks, hades. The pains of hell, temporal Death, or agonies that dying persons feel, or which bring to the brink of the grave
Immortality - Life without Death anytime in the future. All people can die in a physical sense but they continue on after Death
Uriah -
A Hittite, the husband of Bathsheba, whom David first seduced, and then after Uriah's Death married. " The sad story of the curel wrongs inflicted upon him by David and of his mournful Death are simply told in the sacred record (2 Samuel 11:2-12:26 )
Aventure - ) A mischance causing a person's Death without felony, as by drowning, or falling into the fire
Elysium - ) A dwelling place assigned to happy souls after Death; the seat of future happiness; Paradise
Jerusalem - ) The chief city of Palestine, intimately associated with the glory of the Jewish nation, and the life and Death of Jesus Christ
Jeopardy - Exposure to Death, loss or injury hazard danger peril
Seth - The first son of Adam after the Death of Abel, Genesis 4:25,26 ; 5:3,6,8 , and ancestor of the line of godly patriarchs
Abigail - After Nabal's Death, David married Abigail
Sheol - ...
First, the word means the state of Death: “For in Death there is no remembrance of thee: in the grave who shall give thee thanks?” (
Second, “Sheol” is used of a place of conscious existence after Death. All men go to “Sheol”—a place and state of consciousness after Death (Luke 16:19-31 seems to reflect accurately the Old Testament concept of she'ôl; it is a place of conscious existence after Death, one side of which is occupied by the suffering, unrighteous dead separated by a great chasm from the other side peopled by the righteous dead enjoying their reward
Zur -
One of the five Midianite kings whom the Israelites defeated and put to Death (Numbers 31:8 )
Pale - 1: χλωρός (Strong's #5515 — Adjective — chloros — khlo-ros' ) "pale green," is translated "pale" (of a horse) in Revelation 6:8 , symbolizing Death
Trental - ) An office and mass for the dead on the thirtieth day after Death or burial
Revivor - ) Revival of a suit which is abated by the Death or marriage of any of the parties, - done by a bill of revivor
Abner - Commander of Saul's army and for a time enemy of David, afterwards reconciled, but treacherously slain by David's commander Joab, David bewailed his Death
Landfall - ) A sudden transference of property in land by the Death of its owner
Passion Tide - The name given to the last two weeks of Lentbeginning with the Fifth Sunday in Lent, during which our Lord'sPassion and Death are commemorated
National Spiritualist Association - The Spiritualists believe in Infinite Intelligence, expressed in the physical and spiritual phenomena of Nature; religion, the correct understanding of these phenomena and living in accordance with them; existence after Death; communication with the dead; punishment for wrong-doing even after Death until sufficient atonement has been made; Theism "in the broadest possible sense, as the foundation of their philosophy
Jabin - He and his allies were utterly defeated in a battle with Joshua at Merom, the city of Hazor was taken, and Jabin put to Death. His army was defeated by Deborah and Barak, and Sisera, Ms principal general, put to Death
Zadok - At the Death of Ahimelech, or Abiathar, he came to the pontificate, A. After the Death of David, 1 Kings 2:35 , Solomon excluded Abiathar from the high priesthood, because he espoused the party of Adonijah, and made Zadok high priest alone
Paschasius, Deacon of Rome - " He was a firm supporter of the antipope Laurentius to his Death, and his adhesion was a great source of strength to the opponents of Symmachus (cf. " The date of his Death was c
Curse - No one on pain of Death shall curse father or mother (Exodus 21:17 ), nor the prince of his people (22:28), nor the deaf (Leviticus 19:14 ). Cursing God or blaspheming was punishable by Death (Leviticus 24:10-16 ). Perhaps they simply mean that as nothing but Death was expected, God would by this cursing at once interpose and destroy Job, and so put an end to his sufferings
Discharged - 2 the meaning is that the Death of a woman's first husband makes void her status as a wife in the eyes of the Law; she is therefore "discharged" from the prohibition against remarrying; the prohibition is rendered ineffective in her case. It is not the Law that has died (AV), but the believer (see the RV), who has been "discharged," through being put to Death, as to the old nature, in identification with the Death of Christ, that he might have life in Christ
Jordan - The river probably refers to the time of Death. If, in the company of believers here, with their anemic and emaciated type of Christianity they are disgusted, what would these people do when brought face to face with Death, and the realities that must be faced after Death
Piram - Like a wild ass, a king of Jarmuth, a royal city of the Canaanites, who was conquered and put to Death by (Joshua 10:3,23,26 )
Asphyxy - ) Apparent Death, or suspended animation; the condition which results from interruption of respiration, as in suffocation or drowning, or the inhalation of irrespirable gases
Articulo Mortis - (Latin: at the point of Death) ...
Phrase used in such expressions as: an indulgence granted to a person in articulo mortis, i
Tibni - An unsuccessful competitor with Omri the general, for the throne of Israel, during three years after the Death of Elah, 1 Kings 16:18 - 23
Elasa - The scene of the defeat and Death of Judas Maccabæus
Batsheba - Married King David after Uriah's Death
Heir - The man who succeeds, or is to succeed another in the possession of lands, tenements and hereditaments, by descent the man on whom the law casts an estate of inheritance by the Death of the ancestor or former possessor or the man in whom the title to an estate of inheritance is vested by the operation of law, on the Death of a former owner. We give the title to a person who is to inherit after the Death of an ancestor, and during his life, as well as to the person who has actually come into possession. , by virtue of the Death of Christ, or of God's gracious promises. To inherit to take possession of an estate of inheritance, after the Death of the ancestor
Miserably - ...
The fifth was miserably stabbed to Death
Deuterogamy - ) A second marriage, after the Death of the first husband of wife; - in distinction from bigamy, as defined in the old canon law
Ephesdammim - Place in Judah, the scene of the Death of Goliath in the valley of Elah
Gittaim - Place to which the Beerothites fled on the Death of Abner
Transmigration - ) The passing of the soul at Death into another mortal body; metempsychosis
Lodebar - Town on the east of Jordan, to which Mephibosheth retired after the Death of his father
Lynch - ) To inflict punishment upon, especially Death, without the forms of law, as when a mob captures and hangs a suspected person
Lethe - ) Death
Death - Death may be considered as the effect of sin, Romans 5:12 . Satan is said to have the power of Death, Hebrews 2:14 ; not that he can at his pleasure inflict Death on mankind, but as he was the instrument of first bringing Death into the world, John 8:44 ; and as he may be the executioner of God's wrath on impenitent sinners, when God permits him. Death is but once, Hebrews 9:27 . The fear of Death is a source of uneasiness to the generality, and to a guilty conscience it may indeed be terrible; but to a good man it should be obviated by the consideration that Death is the termination of every trouble; that it puts him beyond the reach of sin and temptation: that God has promised to be with the righteous, even to the end, Hebrews 13:5 . Preparation for Death. Bates's four last Things; Hopkins, Drelincourt, Sherlock, and Fellowes, on Death; Bp. Porteus's Poem on Death; Grove's admirable Sermon on the fear of Death; Watts's World to Come. Spiritual Death is that awful state of ignorance, insensibility, and disobedience, which mankind are in by nature, and which exclude them from the favour and enjoyment of God, Luke 1:79 . Brothers of Death, a denomination usually given to the religious of the order of St. They are called brothers of Death, on account of the figure of a Death's head which they were always to have with them, in order to keep perpetually before them the thoughts of Death. Death of Christ. The circumstances attendant on the Death of Christ are so well known, that they need not be inserted here. "The hour of Christ's Death, " says Blair (vol. " ...
See ATONEMENT; Person and Barrow on the Creed; Owen's Death of Death in the Death of Christ; Charnock's Works, vol. of the Death of Christ
Mortification - (Latin: mortificare, to cause Death) ...
A practise of Christian asceticism the purpose of which is twofold: negatively, to cause Death to sin, to overcome the desires of the flesh, to conquer evil habits; positively, through penances, hardships, austerities and continued good actions, so to strengthen the will that a man may pursue a desired object despite difficulties
Banner - A symbol of victory, belonging to military saints and to missionaries, and associated in Christian art with ...
Our Saviour after His Resurrection indicative of his victory over Death
Saint Ansano
Saint Felix of Valois
Saint George
Saint Hubert
Saint Joan of Arc
Saint Julian
Saint Maurice and Companions
Michael the Archangel
Saint Reparata
Saint Ursula
It is the emblem and symbol of temporal victory, and of spiritual victory over sin, Death, and idolatry
Dance of Death - Originally a spectacular play which has been traced to the 14th century when the Black Death and other epidemics had impressed the popular imagination. These plays were given in the churchyard; they were opened by a sermon on Death, then a series of figures resembling skeletons would appear
Death, Dance of - Originally a spectacular play which has been traced to the 14th century when the Black Death and other epidemics had impressed the popular imagination. These plays were given in the churchyard; they were opened by a sermon on Death, then a series of figures resembling skeletons would appear
Dancing - However pleasing the polkas of Herodias might be to Herod, they were Death to John the Baptist. The caperings and wantonings of the ball-room are Death to the solemn influences of our ministry, and many an ill-ended life first received its bent for evil amid the flippancies of gay assemblies met to trip away the hours
Awake - ) To rouse from a state resembling sleep, as from Death, stupidity. ) To cease to sleep; to come out of a state of natural sleep; and, figuratively, out of a state resembling sleep, as inaction or Death
Abraham's Bosom - Unique phrase found in a parable of Jesus describing the place where Lazarus went after Death (Luke 16:19-31 ). Together these passages support the conviction that a believer enjoys immediate bliss at the moment of physical Death
Abaddon - ” Abaddon appears in parallel with Sheol and Death. It represents the dark side of existence beyond Death
Purgatory - ) A state or place of purification after Death; according to the Roman Catholic creed, a place, or a state believed to exist after Death, in which the souls of persons are purified by expiating such offenses committed in this life as do not merit eternal damnation, or in which they fully satisfy the justice of God for sins that have been forgiven
Death - The general appointment for sinful man — the Death of the body by the separation of the soul from it. Death personified as a power of Satan: the last enemy to be destroyed. THE SECOND Death:eternal punishment
Pelethites - They remained with him until his Death, fighting for him during the rebellions against his throne. Following his Death, they helped Solomon purge the kingdom of David's enemies
Minstrel - These musicians were hired to assist in mourning the child's Death
Minos - After Death he was made a judge in the Lower Regions
Jabesh - ...
...
The father of Shallum (2 Kings 15:10,13,14 ), who usurped the throne of Israel on the Death of Zachariah
Ehud - After the Death of Othniel the people again fell into idolatry, and Eglon, the king of Moab, uniting his bands with those of the Ammonites and the Amalekites, crossed the Jordan and took the city of Jericho, and for eighteen years held that whole district in subjection, exacting from it an annual tribute. At length Ehud, by a stratagem, put Eglon to Death with a two-edged dagger a cubit long, and routed the Moabites at the fords of the Jordan, putting 10,000 of them to Death
Sleep - Apart from having its common meaning of physical rest, ‘sleep’ is used in the Bible as another word for physical Death (1 Kings 2:10; Job 14:12; Jeremiah 51:39; Matthew 27:52; John 11:11-14; 1 Corinthians 11:30; 1 Corinthians 15:20; 1 Corinthians 15:51). This is because Death is not permanent. One day all people will rise from Death to meet the great judge of the universe and receive either his blessing or his punishment (Daniel 12:2; John 5:28-29)
Death (2) - The hour of Death may be fitly likened to that celebrated picture in the National Gallery, of Perseus holding up the head of Medusa. Such is Death. What I am when Death is held before me, that I must be for ever
Captives - Taken in war, seem anciently to have been looked upon as justly liable to Death, and hence to any treatment less dreadful than Death. The Romans in some cases bound a living captive to a dead body, and left them to perish together; a practice which may be applied to illustrate the apostle's cry, "O wretched man that I am! Who shall deliver me from the body of this Death?" Romans 7:24
Hades - ...
With Christ’s conquest of Death, there was no need to fear the world of the dead any longer. Hades spoke therefore of more than Death in general; it spoke of the separation from God that followed Death in the afterlife (Matthew 11:23; Matthew 16:18; Revelation 20:13-14)
Caiaphas - , met after the resurrection of Lazarus, to plot the Death of the Savior, lest all the people should believe on him. On one of these occasions, John 11:47-54 , he counseled the Death of Christ for the political salvation of the nation; and his words were, unconsciously to him, an inspired prediction of the salvation of a lost world. Not content with procuring the Death of the Savior, Caiaphas and his friends violently persecuted his followers, Acts 4:1-6 5:17,33 . Like Balaam of the Old Testament, he is a melancholy instance of light resisted, privilege, station, and opportunity abused, and prophetic words concerning Christ joined with a life of infidelity and crime and a fearful Death
Abaddon, or Apollyon - He is called the angel of Death, or the destroying angel
Mibzar - Duke or tribe prince of Edom of Esau (Genesis 36:42) at Hadar's Death, ("fortress")
Eschatology - That department of Theology devoted to inquiryconcerning the "last things,"—the Advent of Christ, Death and theState of the Departed, the judgment to come and the final award
Mara - (may' ruh) Personal name meaning “bitter,” chosen by Naomi to reflect God's bitter dealings with her in the Death of her husband and sons (Ruth 1:20-21 )
Race Suicide - The voluntary failure of the members of a race or people to have a number of children sufficient to keep the birth rate equal to the Death rate
Fatally - ) In a manner issuing in Death or ruin; mortally; destructively; as, fatally deceived or wounded
Empalement - ) A putting to Death by thrusting a sharpened stake through the body
Mourner - ) One who mourns or is grieved at any misfortune, as the Death of a friend
Passion - Acts 1:3 , suffering; the last sufferings and Death of Christ
Lazarus - " This public and stupendous miracle drew so many to Christ, that his enemies sought to put both him and Lazarus to Death, John 11:1-57 12:1-11 . The narrative displays Christ as a tender and compassionate friend, weeping for and with those he loved, and at the same time as the Prince of life, beginning his triumph over Death and the grave. Happy are they who, in view of their own Death, or that of friends, can know that they are safe in Him who says, "I am the resurrection and the life;" and, "because I live, ye shall live also. Their state in this life was greatly in contrast with their real character before God, which was revealed in the amazing changes of their condition at Death, Luke 16:19-31 . Our Savior plainly teaches us, in this parable, that both the friends and the foes of God know and begin to experience their doom immediately after Death, and that it is in both cases unchangeable and eternal
Ransom - " Some interpreters have regarded the "ransom" price as being paid to Satan; others, to an impersonal power such as Death, or evil, or "that ultimate necessity which has made the whole course of things what it has been. What the Lord states in the two passages mentioned involves this essential character of His Death. In these passages the preposition is anti, which has a vicarious significance, indicating that the "ransom" holds good for those who, accepting it as such, no longer remain in Death since Christ suffered Death in their stead. " The giving of His life was the giving of His entire person, and while His Death under Divine judgment was alone expiatory, it cannot be dissociated from the character of His life which, being sinless, gave virtue to His Death and was a testimony to the fact that His Death must be of a vicarious nature
Abner - He was with Saul when David took away the spear and cruse of water while they slept: for which David reproached him, saying he was worthy of Death because he had not more faithfully guarded his master. After the Death of Saul (apparently about 5 years after) Abner made Ish-bosheth king over Israel; but this did not include Judah over which David was king. This act of self-defence was afterwards made the plea for Abner's Death. He sent messengers for Abner's return, and then, under the pretence of privately communing with him, smote him, professedly to avenge the Death of his brother Asahel. " ...
David further said that in Abner's Death a prince and a great man hadfallen, and that Jehovah would avenge his Death. Yet doubtless the holy government of God was fulfilled in the Death of Abner
Redemption - (Latin: redimo, buy back) ...
Just as sin consists of a twofold element, namely, guilt (reatus culpaI) and a penalty (reatu8 PamaJ), so too Christ's Death involves a moral and a penal phase. The moral element is Christ's obedience and love, the penal element, His Passion and Death. Christ's redeeming and loving obedience took the form of, and expressed itself in, sufferings and Death. The Resurrection is an essential complement of the redeeming Death. Baptism, the initial sacrament by which we appropriate subjectively the graces of the Cross, is viewed by Saint Paul as a mystic Death and resurrection with Christ: ...
"Know you not that all we, who are baptized in Christ Jesus, are baptized in his Death? For we are buried together with Him by baptism into Death; that as Christ is risen from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we also may walk in newness of life
Sin Unto Death - The expression "sin unto Death" (1 John 5:16-17 ) appears in a context concerning confident, effective prayer (cf. Verses 16-17 speak specifically about the confidence that God will answer intercession for believers who are committing a sin not unto Death and give life to them. But no such confidence is available when the sins is unto Death. While all unrighteousness is sin, not all sin is unto Death. Thus, the comment about sin unto Death is something of an afterthought. In another approach, Death is understood as physical, but in 1John Death and life are spiritual (1:1-2; 2:25; 3:14-15; 4:9; 5:11-13). Yet another theory sees the sin unto Death as apostasy (cf
Segub - His Death is recorded in 1 Kings 16:34 (Compare Joshua 6:26 )
Bigamy - In criminal law, formally contracting a marriage while a former one remains undissolved; in ecclesiastical law, the contracting of a valid marriage after the Death of a first spouse
Merodach - Merodach (me-rô'dak, or mĕr'o-dak), Death, Jeremiah 50:2, identical with the Babylonian Bel or Belus the term being probably at first a mere epithet of the god
Depopulate - ) To deprive of inhabitants, whether by Death or by expulsion; to reduce greatly the populousness of; to dispeople; to unpeople
Open Verdict - A verdict on a preliminary investigation, finding the fact of a crime but not stating the criminal, or finding the fact of a violent Death without disclosing the cause
Testate - ) One who leaves a valid will at Death; a testate person
Life And Death - In this employment of it, ζωή is very frequently characterized as ‘eternal (αἰώνιος) life’; but the epithet does not impart any real addition to the connotation of the word as elsewhere used without the adjective, much less restrict its reference to the life after Death; it only expresses more explicitly the conception of that life as something so full and positive that from its very nature it is unconquerable by Death, and consequently everlasting. Paul also conceives of life as a present reality when he proclaims that Christ is out life (Colossians 3:4), and that our life is hid with Christ in God (Colossians 3:3), when he makes our baptism into Christ’s Death, and resurrection in His likeness, determinative of our present walk in newness of life (Romans 6:4), and declares that to be spiritually-minded is life and peace (Romans 8:6). 2 Timothy 1:10), and places it in direct antithesis with Death (Romans 6:23) and corruption (Galatians 6:8). Peter’s language, it was not possible that Christ should be holden of Death (Acts 2:24), so it is impossible that those whose very life Christ is (Colossians 3:4) should not be sharers in His victory over Death’s pains and powers. It is the frailty and imperfection of the earthly body, its domination by the law of sin and Death, that hinder the full enjoyment of eternal life in the present world (2 Corinthians 5:2; 2 Corinthians 5:4). To the natural body will succeed a spiritual body (1 Corinthians 15:44), to the body of Death (Romans 7:24) a body instinct with the Lord’s own life, to the house that must be dissolved a house not made with hands, eternal, in the heavens (2 Corinthians 5:1). Death (θἀνατος, to which in its various senses correspond the vb. -Death is frequently used in the apostolic literature in its ordinary, everyday meaning of the end of man’s earthly course (βίος) or the extinction of his animal life (ψυχή) through the separation of the soul from the body (Acts 2:24, 1 Corinthians 3:22, Philippians 2:27). Paul, Death has a punitive significance as the judicial sentence pronounced by God upon sin. Paul writes, ‘The wages of sin is Death’ (Romans 6:23), or ‘Through one man sin entered into the world, and Death through sin; and so Death passed unto all men, for that all sinned’ (Romans 5:12); or when the author of Hebrews links together the facts of Death and the judgment and relates them to the Death and redeeming Sacrifice of Christ (Hebrews 9:26-28); or when St. James says, ‘He which converteth a sinner from the error of his way shall save a soul from Death and shall cover a multitude of sins’ (James 5:20), Death is used to denote the punitive consequences of sin and the state in which man lies as condemned on account of it. Among these penal consequences certainly physical Death is included, as passages like Romans 5:12; Romans 5:14 and 1 Corinthians 15:21 f. More than this, the Death of the body is treated as ‘the point of the punitive sentence, about which all the other elements in that sentence are grouped’ (H. Death is the wages of sin (Romans 6:23), it is the recompense received by the servants of sin (Romans 6:16). Sin reigns in Death (Romans 5:21); it is the sting of Death (1 Corinthians 15:56). The saving significance of the Death of Christ is due to this same punitive relation between Death and sin. And it is through the Death of His Son that we are reconciled to God (Romans 5:10). In including physical Death among the penalties of sin, however, the apostolic writers are not to be held as meaning either that man was naturally immortal or that until he fell there was no natural law of Death in the physical world. In neither the OT nor the NT is the assertion ever made that Death entered into the natural world in consequence of the sin of man (the ‘world’ in Romans 5:12 is the moral world, as the context shows). And when man became liable to Death because of sin (Romans 5:12; Romans 5:14; cf. But it does imply that, mortal as he was, he differed from the rest of the animal world in a potentiality of exemption from the law of decay and Death, owing to the fact that he was a spiritual being made in God’s image; and that by his transgression he lost God’s proffered gift of physical immortality (Romans 5:14, 1 Corinthians 15:21 f. ...
But, while physical Death is the point of the punitive sentence, the sentence of Death stretches far beyond it. Sometimes it plainly refers to a Death that is not an earthly experience but a future state of misery which awaits the wicked in the world to come (Romans 1:32, 1 John 3:14; 1 John 5:16). In Revelation 2:11; Revelation 20:6; Revelation 14; Revelation 21:8 this future condition of woe is called ‘the second Death,’ in contrast, viz. , with the first Death by which the life on earth is ended (see Punishment). ...
(2) At the other extreme from this punitive sense of Death is the use of the word with a redemptive meaning. Paul declares in Romans that we died to sin (Revelation 6:2), that we were buried through baptism into Death (Revelation 6:4), that he that hath died is justified from sin (Revelation 6:11); or when in Galatians he says of himself, ‘For I through the law died unto the law’ (Revelation 2:19), the Death he speaks of, as the last passage shows, is a legal or judicial Death which carries with it a deliverance from the state of condemnation into which the sinner has been brought by his sin (Romans 6:7). And when he speaks of this Death as a dying with Christ (Romans 6:8), and explains more fully that all died because one died for all (2 Corinthians 5:14), he reminds us that this redemptive Death is possible for Christians only because a punitive Death was endured by Christ on their behalf. ...
(3) Side by side with this redemptive Death in Christ-a Death to the penalty of sin-St. The Christian’s union with Christ in His redeeming Death is not only the ground of his justification but the secret source and spring of his sanctification. He passes at a bound, and as it were unconsciously, from the legal aspect of the Christian’s Death in Christ to its mystical aspect, from a Death in the eyes of the law against sin to a Death to the principle of sin itself (2 Corinthians 5:14 f. Baptism into Jesus Christ is the symbol and seal of a baptism into His Death, which means not only a dying to the retribution of the of offended law but a crucifixion of the old man, a destruction of ‘the body of sin,’ so that we should no longer be in bondage to sin’s power (1618882878_82; cf. But in any case Death to the law meant life unto God, because crucifixion with Christ meant the Death of the former self and the substitution for it of a life of faith in the son of God (Galatians 2:19 f. And in this case, at least, it is plain that the Death of which he thinks is not the judicial but the mystical dying, the dying which is at the same time the birth to a new life (cf. ) that carries with it a putting to Death of all that is earthly and evil in the natures of those whom Christ has redeemed (Colossians 3:5). ...
(4) Once more, Death is used to denote the spiritual atrophy and moral inability of fallen man in his unregenerate condition. Colossians 2:13), in the summons to the spiritual sleeper to awake and arise from the dead (Ephesians 5:14), in the description of true believers as those that are alive from the dead (Romans 6:13) and of false professors as having a name that they are living when they are really dead (Revelation 3:1), in the statements that the mind of the flesh is Death (Romans 8:6) and that the woman who lives in pleasure is dead while she liveth (1 Timothy 5:6). This, especially on the side of moral inability, is the Death which St. Death
Manius Glabrio - Roman consul in 91, banished by Domitian and put to Death for the Faith in 95; the crypt at Rome in which his remains were placed was discovered in 1888
Crossbones - ) A representation of two of the leg bones or arm bones of a skeleton, laid crosswise, often surmounted with a skull, and serving as a symbol of Death
Plotinist - ) A disciple of Plotinus, a celebrated Platonic philosopher of the third century, who taught that the human soul emanates from the divine Being, to whom it reunited at Death
Glabrio, Manius Acilius - Roman consul in 91, banished by Domitian and put to Death for the Faith in 95; the crypt at Rome in which his remains were placed was discovered in 1888
Abator - ) A person who, without right, enters into a freehold on the Death of the last possessor, before the heir or devisee
Unprepared - Not prepared by holiness of life for the event of Death and a happy immortality
Matthias, Saint - (Hebrew: Mattithiah, gift of Jahveh) ...
Disciple selected with Barsabas, after the Ascension, from those followers of Christ who were deemed qualified for appointment to the Apostleship vacant through the betrayal and Death of Judas. Details of his life and Death vary; according to one legend he was crucified in Ethiopia; another maintains that he was stoned and beheaded by the Jews, in Jerusalem
Dan Name - ...
(3) The Death and the Ploughman city mentioned above, Death and the Married near the modern Banias
Lys'Ias - After the Death of Antiochus Epiphanes, B. 164 he, together with his ward, fell into the hands of Demetrius Soter, who put them both to Death
Zachariah - On the Death of his father there was an interregnum of ten years, at the end of which he succeeded to the throne, which he occupied only six months, having been put to Death by Shallum, who usurped the throne
Hanging - ) Death by suspension; execution by a halter. ) Requiring, deserving, or foreboding Death by the halter
Happy Death Confraternity, the - (Happy Death) Founded, 1648, in the church of the Gesti, Rome, by Reverend Vincent Caraffa, seventh General of the Society of Jesus. Its object is the preparation of members for a happy Death by a well regulated life, and particularly through devotion to the Passion of Christ and the sorrows of Mary
Abaddon - It occurs six times in the Old Testament, in three of which it is associated with hell (sheol): Job 26:6 ; Proverbs 15:11 ; Proverbs 27:20 ; once with Death: 'Destruction and Death say,' etc
Claudius Caesar - He endowed Agrippa with royal authority over Judea, which on the Death of Agrippa again became a province of Rome, A. His Death was caused by poison, from the hand of his wife and niece Agrippina
End - , Death
Muth-Labben - (muhth lab' behn) Hebrew phrase in the title of Psalm 9:1 which means, “death of the son
Mortally - Irrecoverably in a manner that must cause Death as mortally wounded
Beelphegor - Many Israelites were punished by Death for taking part in this worship (Numbers 25)
Zechariah, king of israel - 607 BCE) Ascended to the throne after the Death of his father, King Jeroboam II
Abaddon - 1) Hebrew word meaning ruin, place of destruction, realm of the dead (Job 31) ...
2) A prince of Hell, evil angel of Death and disaster (Apocalypse 9); same as Apollyon, Destroyer
Eternity - ) Condition which begins at Death; immortality
Andrew of Rinn, Blessed - At the age of three, he was cruelly put to Death by Jews, through hatred of the Faith
Decembrist - ) One of those who conspired for constitutional government against the Emperor Nicholas on his accession to the throne at the Death of Alexander I
Ahi'Moth - (brother of Death ), a Levite apparently in the time of David
Mero'Dach - (death ), ( Jeremiah 50:2 ) identical with the famous Babylonian Bel or Belus, the word being probably at first a mere epithet of the god, which by degrees superseded his proper appellation
Obsequy - ) The last duty or service to a person, rendered after his Death; hence, a rite or ceremony pertaining to burial; - now used only in the plural
Dibri - The son cursed God's name and was stoned to Death (Leviticus 24:10-23 )
Perdition - , the utter loss of the soul, or of final happiness in a future state; future misery or eternal Death
Regicide - to Death
Translation - ’ The NT passage adds an interpretation of the ‘translation,’ namely, ‘that he should not see Death,’ whereas the passages in Gen. need not necessarily mean anything but a holy Death; but it was undoubtedly the common belief that Enoch did not die. The similar word μεθίστημι is used of king Saul’s Death in Acts 13:22, and metaphorically in Colossians 1:13 of our translation into the Kingdom of the Son
Martyr - " Thus martyrs are distinguished from "confessors," properly so called, who underwent great afflictions for their confession of the truth, but without suffering Death. Since the time of Stephen, Acts 7:59 22:20 , myriads of martyrs have sealed the truth of Christianity by a painful Death; which they willingly endured through faith, rather than to deny Christ, and which they often eagerly desired as a special privilege. It is doubtless possible to be put to Death as a Christian, without real love for Christ, 1 Corinthians 13:3 ; but in general "the noble army of the martyrs" have borne a true and overwhelming testimony to the power and preciousness of faith in Christ; and their blood witnesses before God against their foes, especially against that apostate church which is "drunken with the blood of the martyrs of Jesus," Revelation 17:6
Faith of Our Fathers! Living Still - The last two lines of each verse read: ...
Faith of our Fathers! Holy Faith!...
We will be true to thee till Death
Davy, John, Blessed - Refusing to take the oath of supremacy, he was imprisoned at Newgate, where he starved to Death
John Davy, Blessed - Refusing to take the oath of supremacy, he was imprisoned at Newgate, where he starved to Death
Baal-Berith - Worshipped at Shechem by Israel after Gideon's Death (Judges 8:33; Judges 9:4) "Baal in covenant", namely, with his worshippers; or perhaps a compromise, to combine Baal with the "covenant" of Jehovah
Gabbatha - (Hebrew: raised) ...
Aramaic name of a place in Jerusalem where Pilate had his judgment seat, and whither he caused Jesus to be brought forth, that he might condemn Him to Death (John 19)
Eleazar - His history commences from the Death of his father Aaron
Thirdings - ) The third part of the corn or grain growing on the ground at the tenant's Death, due to the lord for a heriot, as within the manor of Turfat in Herefordshire
Mytilotoxine - It either causes paralysis of the muscles, or gives rise to convulsions, including Death by an accumulation of carbonic acid in the blood
Nain - A city of Palestine, rendered memorable from the Lord Jesus raising the widow's son from Death at the gate of this city
Gabbatha - a place in Pilate's palace, from whence he pronounced sentence of Death upon Jesus Christ, John 19:13
Mount Hor - This place was rendered memorable by the Death of Aaron
Salt, Robert, Blessed - Imprisoned for refusing the Oath of Supremacy, and starved to Death along with Thomas Johnson and the other Carthusians
Robert Salt, Blessed - Imprisoned for refusing the Oath of Supremacy, and starved to Death along with Thomas Johnson and the other Carthusians
Untimely - Happening before the natural time premature as untimely Death untimely fate
Testator - " The rendering "the Death of the testator" would make Christ a Testator, which He was not. Here He who is "the Mediator of a new covenant" ( Hebrews 9:15 ) is Himself the Victim whose Death was necessary. We may render somewhat literally thus: "For where a covenant (is), a Death (is) necessary to be brought in of the one covenanting; for a covenant over dead ones (victims) is sure, since never has it force when the one covenanting lives' [1]. "To adduce the fact that in the case of wills the Death of the testator is the condition of validity, is, of course, no proof at all that a Death is necessary to make a covenant valid. To support his argument, proving the necessity of Christ's Death, the writer adduces the general law that he who makes a covenant does so at the expense of life" (Marcus Dods)
Naomi - She had migrated to Moab in a time of famine, and returned to Bethlehem after her husband's Death
Deliver me - The first words, recited aloud or intoned, of the Absolution, the prayer, after a Mass of Requiem, over the remains of the departed: "Deliver me, O Lord, from eternal Death on that awful day
Libera me - The first words, recited aloud or intoned, of the Absolution, the prayer, after a Mass of Requiem, over the remains of the departed: "Deliver me, O Lord, from eternal Death on that awful day
Noemi - She had migrated to Moab in a time of famine, and returned to Bethlehem after her husband's Death
Adipose - It solidifies after Death
Murder - The designed and malevolent taking of human life, was by the original appointment of God, a crime to be punished by Death. The ground for the Death penalty for murder is the eminent dignity and sacredness of man as a child of God, Genesis 9:5-6 . The Mosaic code reenacted it, Leviticus 24:17 ; and while providing for the unintentional homicide a safe retreat, declares that deliberate murder must be punished by Death, from which neither the city of refuge nor the altar of God could shield the criminal, Exodus 21:12-14 Numbers 35:9-34 Deuteronomy 19:1-13 1 Kings 2:5-6,28-34 . Death was usually inflicted by stoning, upon the testimony of at least two witnesses, Numbers 35:30 . Of all murders, that of the soul is incomparably the most awful, John 8:44 , and many plunge not only themselves but also others into the second Death
Herald - 1 Timothy 2:5-7 outlines Paul's message as the uniqueness of God, Christ's unique role as mediator between God and humanity, and Christ's Death as ransom. 2 Timothy 1:9-11 outlines Paul's gospel as the good news that God has given grace by sending Christ who abolished Death and brought life
Linus - Irenaeus implies that Linus was made bishop by Paul and Peter before Peter's Death; but the Scripture evidence is against Peter's having been at Rome at all, and certainly before Paul's Death
Mahanaim - Mahanaim was the seat of the kingdom of Ishbosheth, after the Death of Saul, 2 Samuel 2:9 ; 2 Samuel 2:12 . It was also to this place that David retired during the usurpation of Absalom, 2 Samuel 17:24 ; and this rebellious son was subdued, and suffered Death, not far from this city
Rachel - Matthew made application of it to what happened at Bethlehem, when Herod put to Death the children of two years old and under. Then Rachel, who was buried there, might be said to make her lamentations for the Death of so many innocent children sacrificed to the jealousy of a wicked monarch
Adoniram - He was stoned to Death by the people of Israel (1 Kings 4:6 ; 5:14 )
Bellasis, Edward - From that time to his Death he was one of the most devoted Catholic laymen in England, and was prominently associated with all Catholic activities
Hoham - HOHAM , king of Hebron, formed an alliance with other four kings against Gibeon, but was defeated by Joshua at Beth-horon, and put to Death along with his allies at Makkedah ( Joshua 10:3 ff
Cachalot - It has in the top of its head a large cavity, containing an oily fluid, which, after Death, concretes into a whitish crystalline substance called spermaceti
Humbly - ...
Hope humbly the, with trembling pinions soar, ...
Wait the great teacher, Death, and God adore
Metempsychosis - ) The passage of the soul, as an immortal essence, at the Death of the animal body it had inhabited, into another living body, whether of a brute or a human being; transmigration of souls
Dead - A — 1: νεκρός (Strong's #3498 — Adjective — nekros — nek-ros' ) is used of (a) the Death of the body, cp. ]'>[1] ...
B — 1: νεκρόω (Strong's #3499 — Verb — nekroo — nek-ro'-o ) "to put to Death," is used in the Active Voice in the sense of destroying the strength of, depriving of power, with reference to the evil desires which work in the body, Colossians 3:5 . ...
B — 2: θανατόω (Strong's #2289 — Verb — thanatoo — than-at-o'-o ) "to put to Death:" see Death , C, No
Chimham - 1 Kings 2:7 ) of Barzillai the Gileadite, who returned with David from beyond Jordan to Jerusalem after the Death of Absalom ( 2 Samuel 19:31 f
Pang - ) A paroxysm of extreme pain or anguish; a sudden and transitory agony; a throe; as, the pangs of Death
Ending - ) Termination; concluding part; result; conclusion; destruction; Death
Jehoadah - ” Descendant of Saul in tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:36 ), the list showing a continued interest in lineage of Saul long after his Death
Adam - " At the time of his Death, Lamech, the father of Noah, was fifty-six years of age; and being in the line of those who "walked with God," had probably heard the early history of the race from the lips of the penitent Adam. ...
The curse pronounced on man includes not only physical labor and toil on a barren and thorny earth, and the physical dissolution of the body, but also the exposure of the soul, the nobler part, to "everlasting Death. " In that very day he should lose the moral image of his Maker, and become subject not only to physical Death, but also to God's eternal wrath and curse, which is Death in the highest sense of the word, and is the doom which has fallen upon all his race. Such is the view of the apostle Paul; who everywhere contrasts the Death introduced into the world through Adam, with the life which is procured for our race through Jesus Christ, Romans 5:1-21 . This life is spiritual; and the Death, in its highest sense, is also spiritual. So far as the penalty is temporal and physical, no man is or can be exempt from it; but to remove the spiritual and eternal punishment, Christ has died; and he who comes to him in penitence and faith will avoid the threatened Death, and enter into life eternal, both of the body and the soul. ...
The Redeemer is called "the second Adam," 1 Corinthians 15:45 , as being the head of his spiritual seed, and the source of righteousness and life to all believers, as the first Adam was the sorrow of sin and Death to all his seed
Dead - The friend whom he is to take care of in Death is physically dead. This aspect of "death" is found also in Revelation 3:1. ...
Revelation 20:14 (a) When the soul is forever cast out of GOD's presence after the final judgment of the Great White Throne, this is characterized as "the second Death. "...
The first Death is the physical Death when the soul is separated from the body, and can no longer go to church services, nor hear songs, nor see the flowers, nor mingle among Christians. ...
The second Death takes place when that disembodied soul which has been in hell since its first Death, is taken out of hell, is reunited with his body in the second resurrection, is judged at the Great White Throne in his body, and then both body and soul are cast into the lake of fire, to be punished forever in conscious torment. "...
The "grave," called in this passage Death, gives up the body and hell gives up the soul
Abolish - ...
The barren tree was cumbering the ground, making it useless for the purpose of its existence, Luke 13:7 ; the unbelief of the Jews could not "make of none effect" the faithfulness of God, Romans 3:3 ; the preaching of the Gospel could not "make of none effect" the moral enactments of the Law, Romans 3:31 ; the Law could not make the promise of "none effect," Romans 4:14 ; Galatians 3:17 ; the effect of the identification of the believer with Christ in His Death is to render inactive his body in regard to sin, Romans 6:6 ; the Death of a woman's first husband discharges her from the law of the husband, that is, it makes void her status as his wife in the eyes of the law, Romans 7:2 ; in that sense the believer has been discharged from the Law, Romans 7:6 ; God has chosen things that are not "to bring to nought things that are," i. , their wisdom becomes ineffective, 1 Corinthians 2:6 ; the use for which the human stomach exists ceases with man's Death, 1 Corinthians 6:13 ; knowledge, prophesyings, and that which was in part were to be "done away," 1 Corinthians 13:8,10 , i. , He is going to render them inactive, 1 Corinthians 15:24 ; the last enemy that shall be abolished, or reduced to inactivity, is Death, 1 Corinthians 15:26 ; the glory shining in the face of Moses, "was passing away," 2 Corinthians 3:7 , the transitoriness of its character being of a special significance; so in 2 Corinthians 3:11,13 ; the veil upon the heart of Israel is "done away" in Christ, 2 Corinthians 3:14 ; those who seek justification by the Law are "severed" from Christ, they are rendered inactive in relation to Him, Galatians 5:4 ; the essential effect of the preaching of the Cross would become inoperative by the preaching of circumcision, Galatians 5:11 ; by the Death of Christ the barrier between Jew and Gentile is rendered inoperative as such, Ephesians 2:15 ; the Man of Sin is to be reduced to inactivity by the manifestation of the Lord's Parousia with His people, 2 Thessalonians 2:8 ; Christ has rendered Death inactive for the believer, 2 Timothy 1:10 , Death becoming the means of a more glorious life, with Christ; the Devil is to be reduced to inactivity through the Death of Christ, Hebrews 2:14
Manslayer - One who was guilty of accidental homicide, and was entitled to flee to a city of refuge (Numbers 35:6,12,22,23 ), his compulsory residence in which terminated with the Death of the high priest
Untimely - ) Not timely; done or happening at an unnatural, unusual, or improper time; unseasonable; premature; inopportune; as, untimely frosts; untimely remarks; an untimely Death
Cushi - Joab's messenger to David on the Death of Absalom
Benjamin - With his brother Joseph’s sale and presumed Death, he assumed the status of Jacobs’s favored son
pe'Rez-uz'za - (breaking of Uzzah ), ( 1 Chronicles 13:11 ) and PEREZ-UZZAH (2 Samuel 6:8 ) the title which David conferred on the threshing-floor of Nachon or Cidon, in commemoration of the sudden Death of Uzzah
Ebedmelech - He aided Jeremiah and God sent word to him that he should be delivered from Death at the taking of Jerusalem
Blood - The special significance of blood in the Bible is that it commonly signifies Death; not Death through natural causes, but Death through killing or violence. In the language of the Bible, anyone responsible for the Death of another has upon him the blood of the dead person, and the one who executes the guilty avenges the blood of the dead person (Numbers 35:19; 1 Kings 2:32-33; 1 Kings 2:37; Matthew 27:4; Matthew 27:24-25; Acts 5:28; Revelation 6:10; Revelation 17:6). Since blood in the body represents life, shed blood represents life poured out; that is, Death. Their sin made them guilty before God, and the penalty was Death. People received forgiveness through the animal’s blood; that is, through the animal’s Death on their behalf (Leviticus 17:11; see ATONEMENT; SACRIFICE). The firstborn was saved through the Death of an innocent substitute (Exodus 12:13). All humankind was, because of sin, under the penalty of Death; but when Jesus Christ died on the cross in the sinner’s place, he made salvation possible. ...
In the New Testament the expressions ‘blood of the cross’, ‘blood of Christ’ and ‘death of Christ’ are often used interchangeably (Romans 5:7-9; Ephesians 2:13; Ephesians 2:16; Colossians 1:20; Colossians 1:22). To have life through Christ’s blood means to have life through his Death. Those who ‘share in Christ’s blood’ share in the benefits of his Death through receiving forgiveness of sins and eternal life (John 6:54-58; 1 Corinthians 10:16). This does not mean that they are washed in blood in the sense that clothes are washed in water, but that they are cleansed from sin through Christ’s atoning Death (Revelation 7:14; cf. He entered by means of his Death. They claim for themselves the benefits of his Death (Hebrews 10:19)
Megiddo - A city of Manasseh, rendered remarkable for the Death of Josiah, (2 Kings 23:29) It seems derived from Magad, rich fruit
Orpah - On the Death of her husband she accompanied Naomi, her mother-in-law, part of the way to Bethlehem, and then returned to Moab
Post-Obit Bond - A bond in which the obligor, in consideration of having received a certain sum of money, binds himself to pay a larger sum, on unusual interest, on the Death of some specified individual from whom he has expectations
Cosinage - ) A writ to recover possession of an estate in lands, when a stranger has entered, after the Death of the grandfather's grandfather, or other distant collateral relation
Qualm - ) Sickness; disease; pestilence; Death
Aphthartodocites - A denomination in the sixth century; so called from the Greek incorruptible, and to judge; because they held that the body of Jesus Christ was incorruptible, and not subject to Death
Tenebrae - ) The matins and lauds for the last three days of Holy Week, commemorating the sufferings and Death of Christ, - usually sung on the afternoon or evening of Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, instead of on the following days
Eighth Crusade - (1267-1270) Caused by the merciless destruction of the Sultan Bibars and having Saint Louis and Charles of Anjou as commanders, it terminated in the Death of the former and the fall of the last Christian towns, 1291
Sufferings of Christ - To form an idea of Christ's sufferings, we should consider the poverty of his birth; the reproach of his character; the pains of his body; the power of his enemies; the desertion of his friends; the weight of his people's sins; the slow, ignominious, and painful nature of his Death; and the hidings of his Father's face. If the annals of time; if the writings of the apostles; if the Death of his martyrs; if the confession of Gentiles; if the scoffs of the Jews, be testimonies, Jesus suffered. For the end of Christ's sufferings, see Death OF CHRIST
Stephen - Saul held the clothes of those who stoned Stephen to Death; he saw him die a victorious Death. The believers had to flee Jerusalem after Stephen's Death while the apostles alone remained there (Acts 8:1 )
Wickedness - 20:13, where the sons of belı̂ya‛al are perpetrators of wickedness (they raped and murdered a man’s concubine): “Now therefore deliver us the men, the children of Belial [1] which are in Gibeah, that we may put them to Death, and put away evil from Israel. The psalmist uses belı̂ya‛al as a synonym of Death: “The cords of Death encompassed me, and the torrents of ungodliness [3] terrified me” ( Ophrah - After Gideon's Death his family resided here till they were put to Death by Abimelech (Judges 9:5 )
Azmaveth - (az may' beth) Personal and place name meaning, “strong as Death” or “death is strong
Punish - ) To impose a penalty upon; to afflict with pain, loss, or suffering for a crime or fault, either with or without a view to the offender's amendment; to cause to suffer in retribution; to chasten; as, to punish traitors with Death; a father punishes his child for willful disobedience. , with pain or loss; as, to punish murder or treason with Death
Bathsheba - David's lusting after her became the occasion of his sin in accomplishing the Death of her husband. She asked this of Solomon, but it led to Adonijah's Death
Atonement - Reconciliation of sinners with God through the Incarnation, sufferings, and Death of Christ. It is also held, in accordance with Abelard, that a full equivalent satisfaction such as was made by Christ's Death was not absolutely necessary; therefore the Incarnation was an act of love, though not exclusively so
Deadness - 1: νέκρωσις (Strong's #3500 — Noun Feminine — nekrosis — nek'-ro-sis ) "a putting to Death" (cp
Gamaliel - He counseled the Sanhedrin to put Saint Peter and the Apostles to Death
Kapitel - �excision�); the cutting of the soul, causing premature Death on the earthly plane and a severing of the soul�s connection with G-d on the spiritual plane...
Cessationism - ) ceased with the closing of the Canon of scripture and/or the Death of the last apostle
Abdas, Saint - During the reign of Yezdegerd, he destroyed a Zoroastrian fire-temple; in retaliation a general destruction of all churches was ordered, followed by persecution, and Abdas was clubbed to Death
Edward Coleman - Accused of complicity in the Titus Oates Plot, he was condemned to Death, though innocent
Caiaphas - 4037, which was the year of Jesus Christ's Death. When the priests deliberated on the seizure and Death of Jesus Christ, Caiaphas declared, that there was no room for debate on that matter, "because it was expedient that one man should die for the people, that the whole nation should not perish,"...
John 11:49-50 . This sentiment was a prophecy, which God suffered to proceed from the mouth of the high priest on this occasion, importing, that the Death of Jesus would be for the salvation of the world. The depositions of certain false witnesses being insufficient to justify a sentence of Death against him, and Jesus continuing silent, Caiaphas, as high priest, said to him, "I adjure thee by the living God, that thou tell us whether thou art the Christ, the Son of God!" To this adjuration, so solemnly made by the superior judge, Jesus answered, "Thou hast said; nevertheless I say unto you, Hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven. What think ye?" They answered, "He is worthy of Death. " And as the power of life and Death was not at this time in their hands, but was reserved by the Romans, they conducted him to Pilate, that he might confirm their sentence, and order his execution
Gallio - He was put to Death, in one of the persecutions of Nero
John Payne, Blessed - In 1581 he was arrested in Warwickshire, tortured, and put to Death
Og - Killed in battle by the Israelites shortly before Moses� Death
Ammah - A hill facing Giah by way of the wilderness of Gibeon, where Joab ceased pursuing Abner after Asahel's Death (2 Samuel 2:24)
Eucharist - ) The sacrament of the Lord's Supper; the solemn act of ceremony of commemorating the Death of Christ, in the use of bread and wine, as the appointed emblems; the communion
Hateful - And, worse than Death, to view with hateful eyes ...
His rival's conquest
Persecution - ) The act or practice of persecuting; especially, the infliction of loss, pain, or Death for adherence to a particular creed or mode of worship
Decumbiture - ) Aspect of the heavens at the time of taking to one's sick bed, by which the prognostics of recovery or Death were made
Resuscitate - ) To revivify; to revive; especially, to recover or restore from apparent Death; as, to resuscitate a drowned person; to resuscitate withered plants
Henoch - The name of (1) a son of Cain; (2) a nephew of Abraham; (3) a son of Ruben; (4) a patriarch, son of Jared and father of Mathusala, who according to Saint Paul "was translated that he should not see Death
Thankful - The Lord's supper is to be celebrated with a thankful remembrance of his sufferings and Death
Passion Sunday - The Fifth Sunday in Lent is so called because onthis day our Lord began to make open prediction of His sufferings,and in her round of worship the Church begins the solemn commemorationof His Passion and Death
Descent Into Hell (Hades) - The heroes or the gods descend into Hades to perform a rescue, to triumph over Death, or as part of the recurring seasons of the agricultural year. ...
Yet a descent into Sheol and return to the land of the living was the way in which the Old Testament described a near Death experience (Psalm 107:18 ; Isaiah 38:10 ). Only God was able to rescue them from Death (Psalm 9:13 ; 30:3 ; 86:13 ; Isaiah 38:17 ), since he is the one who "kills and makes alive" (Deuteronomy 32:39 ; 1 Samuel 2:6 ; 2 Kings 5:7 ; cf. This corresponds with the uniqueness of his vicarious Death and of his resurrection as an eschatological triumph. ...
Jesus himself used Jonah 2:6 to describe his Death as three days and three nights in the heart ( en te kardia ) of the earth. This corresponded with contemporary Jewish representations of Sheol as the belly of the fish, when speaking of Death and the world of the dead. ...
So also the apostles understood the Death and resurrection of Jesus "according to the scriptures, " even as he instructed them (Luke 24:46 ; cf. Peter quoted Psalm 16:8-11 when he declared that God had released Jesus from the pangs of Death by resurrecting him. Paul used Deuteronomy 30:12-13 and Psalm 71:20 in Romans 10:6-7 to explain the Death of Christ as a descent into the abyss ( tis katabesetai eis abusson ) and the resurrection as a going up from (among) the dead (ek nekron anagagein ). And the author of Hebrews (2:14-16) declared that just as Jesus shared fully in the humanity of Abraham's seed, so also he shared the entire experience of Death, by which he destroyed the power of Satan. The descent into Hades is rather a part of Christ's full identification with us, as well as the means by which he conquered Death (Matthew 16:18 ; Revelation 1:18 ), and became the firstborn from among the dead (Colossians 1:18 ; Revelation 1:5 )
Herod the Great - On the Death of Julius Caesar the country was in anarchy; but eventually Herod contrived to ingratiate himself with Antony and Octavian, and was appointed KING OF JUDAEA. 37) with blood: there were a few left of the Asmonaean house, descendants of the Maccabees; these were put to Death and their adherents, and the whole of the Sanhedrim except two. He left orders with his uncle Joseph that if he were put to Death, Mariamne was to be killed. He was however reconciled with his wife, but Joseph was put to Death and Alexandra imprisoned. Herod's domestic life was however greatly embittered by his renewed suspicions against his wife (who had again discovered that during his absence orders had been given to put her to Death if he lost his life). Her mother also was put to Death. He feared they would avenge their mother's Death, therefore after trivial charges they were both strangled. This was followed by Antipater, another son, being put to Death, who was proved to be guilty of plotting to have his father poisoned. He ordered that the heads of the chief families in Judaea should be shut up in the Hippodrome at Jericho, to be put to Death as soon as he expired, that there might be mourning at his Death! This cruel order was not carried out
Mortify - ]'>[1] metaphorically ‘to put to Death
Montepulciano, Agnes of, Saint - She entered a monastery at nine, became prioress at fifteen, and founded a Dominican convent at Montepulciano, which she governed until her Death
Hazar-Maveth - Court of Death, the third son of Joktan, and a region in Arabia-Felix settled by him (Genesis 10:26 ; 1 Chronicles 1:20 )
Merodach - Death; slaughter, the name of a Babylonian god, probably the planet Mars (Jeremiah 50:2 ), or it may be another name of Bel, the guardian divinity of Babylon
Caius - He held a disputation at Rome with Proclus, a Montanist leader, in the course of which he gives valuable evidence of the Death of Saint Peter and Saint Paul at Rome and the public veneration of their remains
Gazares - They held almost the same opinions with the Albigenses; but their distinguishing tenet was, that no human power had a right to sentence men to Death for any crime whatever
Wizard - Such an one was forbidden on pain of Death to practise his deceptions (Leviticus 19:31 ; 20:6,27 ; 1 Samuel 28:3 ; Isaiah 8:19 ; 19:3 )
Megiddon, Valley of - The passage perhaps alludes to the Death of Josiah on this plain (2 Chronicles 35:22 )
Bestiality - Sexual intercourse between a human and an animal, punishable by Death in Old Testament legal codes
Artifact - ) A structure or appearance in protoplasm due to Death or the use of reagents and not present during life
Murrain - The earliest Greek translation used the term Death
Agnes of Montepulciano, Saint - She entered a monastery at nine, became prioress at fifteen, and founded a Dominican convent at Montepulciano, which she governed until her Death
Capital Punishment - The Death penalty
Magic - This was strictly forbidden by the law of God, on pain of Death, Leviticus 19:31
Theta - ) A letter of the Greek alphabet corresponding to th in English; - sometimes called the unlucky letter, from being used by the judges on their ballots in passing condemnation on a prisoner, it being the first letter of the Greek qa`natos, Death
Wail - ) To lament; to bewail; to grieve over; as, to wail one's Death
Manahem - He revenged the Death of his master Zachariah, by killing Shallum, son of Jabesh, who had usurped the crown of Israel, A
Hananiah - A false prophet of Gibeon, who for his impious hardihood was overtaken with speedy Death, according to the word of God, Jeremiah 28:15-17
Tola - Of the tribe of Issachar, judge of Israel, at Shamir in Mount Ephraim, for twenty-three years after the Death of Abimelech, Judges 10:1,2
Hiel - The fulfillment of the curse by the Death of his children, proves the truth which his name signified, 1 Kings 16:34
Mica'Iah - Micahiah, the son of Imlah, was a prophet of Samaria, who in the last year of the reign of Ahab king of Israel predicted his defeat and Death, B
Jehozabad - ...
...
The son of Shomer, one of the two conspirators who put king Jehoash to Death in Millo in Jerusalem (2 Kings 12:21 )
Bilhah - After Rachel’s Death, she became embroiled in Reuben’s Sin
Shephathiah - Son of Mattan; urged Zedekiah to put Jeremiah to Death, as weakening the hands of the men of war, by foretelling life to those who would go forth to the Chaldaeans and Death to those who should remain in the city (Jeremiah 38:1)
Sadducee - They held rigidly to the old Testament law and a denying the life after Death, reward and punishment after Death, the resurrection, and the existence of angels and demons
Guilty - In Scripture, to be guilty of Death, is to have committed a crime which deserves Death
Shoe - It must be linked with the Death of CHRIST, for shoes, whether of wood or leather, can only be such after the Death of that from which they are made
Ahaziah - He reigned two years, alone and with his father, who associated him in the kingdom the year before his Death, B. Elijah the prophet foretold his speedy Death-first to the messengers, and again to Ahaziah himself, after two companies of fifty had been consumed by fire from heaven. He met his Death at the hand of Jehu, while in company with Joram, son of Ahab
Second Death - Philo uses the term to refer to all miseries arising from sin causing physical Death followed by hopelessness in the afterlife (Rewards and Punishments 2. Death is the loss of the only kind of life worthy of the name. ...
The second Death is to be cast into the lake of fire (Revelation 20:14 )
Chronology of the New Testament - ...
4 (April)...
Death of Herod. ...
Death of Stephen. ...
98-100...
Death of John
Zacharias - A person mentioned in Matthew 23:35 Luke 11:51 , and most probably designating the son of the high-priest Jehoida, or Barachias, who was stoned to Death by order of king Joash for publicly rebuking the king, his court and the people for their growing corruption, 2 Chronicles 24:20-22 . Some suppose the prophet Zechariah to be intended; but history gives no account of his Death. Others refer it to a Zacharias the son of Baruch, who was put to Death just before the destruction of Jerusalem; but it seems unnatural and unnecessary to suppose that Christ here spoke prophetically
Jotham - After Gideon’s Death, another son, Abimelech, killed his brothers and, with the help of some worthless men from Shechem, established himself ‘king’. His forecast of doom came true when Abimelech’s ambition brought about his own Death and the destruction of his supporters (Judges 9:57). After his father’s Death (739 BC), Jotham maintained the policies of national development his father had introduced
Hades - The New Testament Hades does not differ essentially from the Hebrew Sheol, but Christ has broken the power of Death, dispelled the darkness of Hades, and revealed to believers the idea of heaven as the state and abode of bliss in immediate prospect after a holy life. reads "death," and thus obliterates the important distinction between the realm of the dead or spirit world and the place of torment. Since Christ's descent into Hades, or the unseen, the spirit world, believers need not fear to enter this realm through Death. Christ declares, "I am alive for evermore, Amen; and have the keys of Death and of Hades
Masse, Enemond - He was one of the first Jesuits sent to New France, established a mission at Bar Harbor, Maine, made three journeys to America, and labored among the Indians at Sillery from 1632 until his Death
Donatus, Saint - He suffered torments and was put to Death
Bere, Richard, Blessed - With the other Charterhouse monks he was arrested, imprisoned at Newgate, and starved to Death
Zabdiel - An Arabian who put Alexander Balas to Death and sent his head to Ptolemy ( 1Ma 11:17 )
Martyrs of Uganda - Thirteen were burnt alive, the other nine put to Death in various horrible ways
Chidon - Dart, the name of the threshing-floor at which the Death of Uzzah took place (1 Chronicles 13:9 )
Uzza, the Garden of - By some placed at the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite; the scene of Uzzah's Death was a threshing floor (2 Samuel 6:6)
Lucre - ...
The lust of lucre, and the dread of Death
Manslayer - One guilty of involuntary manslaughter; one who accidentally causes another's Death (Numbers 35:9-15 ,Numbers 35:9-15,35:22-28 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-10 )
Viaticum - ) The communion, or eucharist, when given to persons in danger of Death
Wraith - ) An apparition of a person in his exact likeness, seen before Death, or a little after; hence, an apparition; a specter; a vision; an unreal image
Obstruction - ) The condition of having the natural powers obstructed in their usual course; the arrest of the vital functions; Death
Abishag - After David’s Death, Abishag was asked in marriage by Adonijah; the request cost him his life ( 1 Kings 2:13-25 )
Enemond Masse - He was one of the first Jesuits sent to New France, established a mission at Bar Harbor, Maine, made three journeys to America, and labored among the Indians at Sillery from 1632 until his Death
Genesis - It includes a period of near two thousand four hundred years, from the beginning of the world to the Death of Joseph
Ahikam - A person who rescued Jeremiah, when It was proposed to give him into the hands of the people, to be put to Death
Benaiah - One of David's distinguished officers, who succeeded, after Joab's Death, to the command of the Hebrew army
Richard Bere, Blessed - With the other Charterhouse monks he was arrested, imprisoned at Newgate, and starved to Death
Richard Creagh - Arrested on account of his faith, he was imprisoned in the Tower of London from 1567 till his Death
Uganda, Martyrs of - Thirteen were burnt alive, the other nine put to Death in various horrible ways
Remission - ' The forgiveness or remission of sins is through faith in the Lord Jesus Christ and on the ground of His sacrificial Death
Sacrifice (2) - —The saving significance of the Death of Jesus Christ is of necessity the most important part of any article on the NT idea of sacrifice; for it is in the light of the sacrifice of Christ that all Christian sacrifice must be viewed. The statements of our Lord as to the significance of His Death are far from numerous, and in no case can they be looked at wholly by themselves. To any one carefully reading the Synoptic Gospels it becomes plain that it is only towards the end of His life on earth that the meaning of His Death begins to occupy anything like a prominent place in the consciousness of Christ. But it is already a Father of infinite tenderness and love, a Father only waiting to be gracious, whom He reveals, not a God full of wrath against sinful man, who must be propitiated and reconciled by the Death of His Son before He can pardon. The world-spirit which dominates the bulk of His countrymen demands His Death; and even His most faithful followers are still enslaved by the world’s toils—bound to earth by that material glory which, according to their selfish hopes, His Messiahship is to procure for them. ’ The perception of these dangers, then—of that which from the outside threatened His life, of that which from within threatened the purity of His disciples’ faith—became to Him a further revelation of the Father’s will,—a revelation that His Death was decreed, and that by it He should accomplish that for which His whole life had been but the preparation. Manifestly the baptism was the baptism of Death (cf. In Matthew 20:28 the reason for the necessity of His Death is made plain—‘to give his life a ransom for many. ‘From Death, from the guilt of sin and its punishment,’ says the old theology, or, as it is sometimes expressed, ‘from the wrath of God. ’ But there is not a single word upon the lips of Christ to justify this interpretation; and, as we shall see later, wherever in the NT the Death of Christ is called a deliverance or a ransom, it is always a being purchased for God, a being delivered from the bondage of sin to serve God, that is thought of (Romans 6:1-11, 1 Corinthians 6:20; 1 Corinthians 7:23, 1 Peter 1:18 ff. There is no thought of Death or even of guilt; but there is a thought of sin—of the sin of self-seeking, bound up as it was with the expectation of material glory in an earthly kingdom, which had just prompted the request of James and John, and of the selfish indignation of the other disciples who resented that request as an attempt to obtain an unfair advantage over them. That Christ should think of His coming Death as certain to break for ever the cords of their worldliness, so that their love for Him might draw them away from the world unto righteousness and God, is perfectly conceivable. ...
But let us proceed to the institution of the Lord’s Supper, whence the most definite teaching as to the saving import of His Death is to be drawn (Matthew 26:26-28, Mark 14:22-24, Luke 22:19-20). Now the Passover signified exemption from the Death of the firstborn which overtook the Egyptians. By the Death of the lamb, which the Israelites appropriated to themselves by eating it, forgiveness and life were granted to them. It brought them freedom not only from Death, but also from bondage. Our Lord, then, in the institution of the bread expressed the thought that His life given up to Death is to be appropriated by His followers, that it may become their life, that it may set them free from the bondage of sin, and make them free servants and sons of God. This, too, must be noted, that it is not the fact of His Death in itself that is significant. Had He thought of abiding in Death, the whole meaning of the institution would have been taken away. Thus Christ called His blood about to be shed the blood of the New Covenant, in the sense that His Death of love would inspire His followers with new life, would be to them in the first place a means of breaking the power of sin in their lives, of recreating them in the love of holiness, and only in consequence of that an assurance of pardon. The saving significance of the Death of Christ, then, as it is set forth in the Lord’s Supper, is this—to create in the believer a new power of spiritual life which should make sin hateful and so destroy its bondage, and to assure him of pardon by the guarantee of God’s perfect love as revealed in the life and Death of His Son. Christ’s Death is a sacrifice in that it removes for ever all doubt of God’s forgiving love, and makes man’s willing, loving obedience possible; in that it proves the absolute victory of good over evil; and, lifting His life beyond the limits of time and space, makes it a spiritual force communicable to all who accept Him as their Saviour. John presents it, the thought of His Death as setting free a spiritual life-giving principle emerges with much greater distinctness. He is the Bread of Life, the Living Water, that giveth life to men (John 6:1-71; John 7:37-38; John 3:10-15); He is the Resurrection and the Life (John 11:25); but that this πνεῦμα ζωοποιοῦν may act with completed power, it must pass through Death to larger life. But the Death itself has a value apart from the resurrection, for in it is revealed the triumph of holy love over the power of evil: it is the means whereby the Father glorifies the Son (John 12:27-28, John 13:31-32). All men are subject to this power save Jesus only; and the power of evil is broken through His meek submission to that Death which the evil world forces upon Him (John 12:31). The spirit of selfishness no longer rules the earth when its utmost wickedness is outdone by the obedience of perfect love even unto Death. The cleansing power of His Death, which in the Synoptics is symbolized by the institution of the Supper, here finds its place in the washing of the disciples’ feet (John 13:2-17). They were already clean by the word which He had spoken unto them (John 15:3): the Death was but the completion, the final cleansing. Proceeding now to the Acts of the Apostles and to the Epistle of James, we are met by this remarkable fact, that in neither is there a single reference to the saving significance of the Death of Christ. The accusation of having put the Holy One to Death is brought home most forcibly in the speeches of Peter and Stephen (Acts 2:23; Acts 3:13-15; Acts 7:52); but the Cross is not once spoken of as necessary to salvation. ) Philip overhears the Ethiopian reading the fifty-third chapter of Isaiah and interprets it for him, though this chapter above all others seems to speak of Messiah’s vicarious suffering and Death, the all-important passage—‘He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities,’ etc. The natural conclusion is that the sacrificial significance of Christ’s Death, so far from having been a cardinal doctrine of the Church from the outset, had not yet dawned upon the disciples’ minds. The Death, except in so far as it was the passage to this larger life, was still obscure. The Apostle explains the Death of the Lord as an example, as a power of redemption, and as a deliverance from the sense of guilt. Forgiveness is never thought of by itself as a consequence of the Death of the Saviour, but always in connexion with sanctification, its end and aim. Christ’s Death is only for those who let it act upon them. That Christ ‘suffered once for sin, the just for the unjust’ (1 Peter 3:18), means simply that human sin brought Him to Death, a Death which love and righteousness compelled Him to bear for our sakes, and that the spectacle of that Divine transcendent love becomes to all believers a power of regeneration. ’ What can this mean but that the love of the Father manifested in the Death of His Son is to be to believers a means of breaking down the barrier which the sense of guilt had erected between them and God? It shows the Father ready to forgive and draw men unto Him (1 Peter 3:18). To get rid of sin and to be assured of pardon are the two essentials to salvation, which by His Death Christ has procured, but He has procured them only for those who make Christ their example by suffering Him to write God’s law upon their hearts—who appropriate God’s life unto themselves. Yet the emphasis be lays on it is never one-sided; for the Death of Christ is but the consummation of His holy life of Divine love, and at the same time the prelude to the fuller life of glory beyond; both of which are essential to the meaning and value of the sacrifice. ...
It certainly cannot be denied that in many passages the Apostle speaks of the Death of Jesus as a means of deliverance from guilt, or of justification (Romans 3:25-26, 2 Corinthians 5:21, Galatians 3:13, Colossians 2:14 etc. The whole sixth chapter of Romans is on this theme—death to sin in Christ; and the seventh expresses the same thing in reference to the Law. The Death of Christ is in his view, then, the direct cause of our Death to sin, the breaking of sin’s bondage, the putting off the sensuous selfish nature, the subjugation of its desires and appetites (Colossians 2:11, Romans 3:24; Romans 6:3-4; Romans 7:4); and this is the first step to the energizing of the life-giving Spirit of the glorified Lord within us. Here we are told that it is the love of Christ that constraineth—that makes the Death of the One a means of Death to sin in all. It is not, however, the love of Christ only that is manifested by His Death, but also that of the Father. It is this, then, that God seeks to remove by the Death of His Son. He must accept God’s offer; he must allow God’s love to enter his heart; and that means Death to sin, and makes him a new creature (2 Corinthians 5:17). Paul, too, we find that aspect of Christ’s Death as a conquest of evil, an objective breaking of the power of sin, of which we have already spoken. By this he means that Christ’s Death was the completion of a life of righteousness, and the final act of triumph over evil. He submitted to the shameful Death of the Cross, because to that the path of Divine righteousness led Him. In Him they spiritually delight in the law of God; by their love to Him and life in Him they, too, condemn sin; and ‘the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made them free from the law of sin and Death’ (Romans 8:2). It is in the same manner that the Apostle represents the Death of Christ as a ‘propitiation through faith in his blood’ (Romans 3:25). It is not even the Death of Christ, but only the risen Saviour that justifies (Romans 4:25)
Immortality - A state or condition free from both Death and decay. In Proverbs 12:28 (NASB)—"In the way of righteousness is life, and in its pathway there is no Death"—immortality (as the word is translated in the NIV) is, literally, the Hebrew phrase "no-death" ( al-mawet ). The hope is for deliverance from it after Death (Psalm 49:15 ; 86:13 ). Job 10:20-22 anticipates only a sheol-like state after Death, but 19:25-26 seems to look for something more. Immortality is a corollary to references to existence after Death or to the resurrection in general. ...
Jesus assumes a continuing existence after Death throughout his teachings. Indeed, Paul assumes that immortality as a permanent, incorruptible, never-ending state and life not only await the Christian after Death but is actually the present possession of the believer. Traditional Christianity has held a dualist or tripartite view of persons (soul-spirit and body or soul, spirit, and body) and that between Death and the resurrection there is some sort of an intermediate state in which the immaterial part of the individual continues a conscious existence apart from the physical. Some who emphasize a holistic view of persons assume that at Death there is an immediate resurrection of a new spiritual body and union with God. Others with a similar anthropology propound a form of re-creationism, a temporary extinction at Death that ends at the resurrection in a new creation. ...
In summary, the Bible clearly teaches a continuing existence after Death for all. For believers this will be Deathless and imperishable, marked by that glory and honor that come from union with Christ. This fact, along with the bodily resurrection, Paul sees as assured because of the Spirit's guarantee, the defeat of Death, and the ultimate victory of God through Jesus Christ (1 Corinthians 15:54-57 ). ...
See also Death, Mortality ; Eternal Life, Eternality, Everlasting Life ; Resurrection ...
Bibliography . Moreland, Immortality: The Other Side of Death ; M
Misericordia - ) A thin-bladed dagger; so called, in the Middle Ages, because used to give the Death wound or "mercy" stroke to a fallen adversary
Fire, Liturgical Use of - (1) As a symbol of the Death and Resurrection of Christ, fire (candles and lamps) is extinguished on Good Friday, and rekindled from a flint on Easter Eve
Liturgical Use of Fire - (1) As a symbol of the Death and Resurrection of Christ, fire (candles and lamps) is extinguished on Good Friday, and rekindled from a flint on Easter Eve
Horam - ” King of Gezer whose attempt to deliver Lachish from Joshua resulted in his Death and the annihilation of his army (Joshua 10:33 ), though his city remained a Canaanite stronghold (Joshua 16:10 ; compare 1 Kings 9:16 )
Malagrida, Gabriel - After laboring nearly thirty years on the Brazilian mission, he was called to the Portuguese Court; later he incurred the animosity of Pombal, who had him falsely accuied of conspiracy and strangled to Death at an auto-da-fe
Besayle - ) A kind of writ which formerly lay where a great-grandfather died seized of lands in fee simple, and on the day of his Death a stranger abated or entered and kept the heir out
Bane - ) Destruction; Death
Aillon, Joseph de la Roche d' - He landed at Quebec, 1625; was among the Hurons, 1626; passed to the Neutral Nation, remaining with them three months, barely escaping Death; returned to the Hurons; and published an account of his sojourn amongst the Neutrals, describing their country and customs
Afraid - It is followed by of before the object of fear as, to be afraid of Death
Gabriel Malagrida - After laboring nearly thirty years on the Brazilian mission, he was called to the Portuguese Court; later he incurred the animosity of Pombal, who had him falsely accuied of conspiracy and strangled to Death at an auto-da-fe
Chimham - 1 Kings 2:7 ), who commended him to David on his return to Jerusalem, after the Death of Absalom
Crucify - ) To fasten to a cross; to put to Death by nailing the hands and feet to a cross or gibbet
Salvation - ) The redemption of man from the bondage of sin and liability to eternal Death, and the conferring on him of everlasting happiness
Abraham's Bosom - Expression used by Luke to indicate the abode of the righteous dead before their admission to the Beatific Vision after the Death of the Saviour; the Fathers of the Church often use it to mean heaven
Allion, Joseph de la Roche d' - He landed at Quebec, 1625; was among the Hurons, 1626; passed to the Neutral Nation, remaining with them three months, barely escaping Death; returned to the Hurons; and published an account of his sojourn amongst the Neutrals, describing their country and customs
Gatianus, Saint - At his Death the Church of Tours was securely established
Seven Holy Brothers - Januarius, Felix, and Philip were scourged to Death; Silvanus was thrown over a precipice; Alexander, Vitalis, and Martialis were beheaded
e'Vil-Mero'Dach - He reigned but a short time, having ascended the throne on the Death of Nebuchadnezzar in B
Ethio'Pian Woman - The wife of Moses is to described in (Numbers 12:1 ) She is elsewhere said to have been the daughter of a Midianite, and in consequence of this some have supposed that the allusion is to another wife whom Moses married after the Death of Zipporah
Jonathan -
Eldest son of Saul and friend of David, noted for his bravery against the Philistines (1 Kings 13; 14), his loyalty to David, and his glorious Death on Mount Gelboe (1 Kings 31; 2 Kings 19). He took an important part in the Machabean revolt, and was chosen leader after Judas's Death
Judgment, Particular - That Divine judgment, immediately following Death, in whlch the eternal lot of each separate soul is justly determined. The existence of the Particular Judgment may be inferred from the parable of Lazarus and Dives (Luke 16), from the promise of Christ to the penitent thief (Luke 23), and from other passages in Holy Scripture where it is clearly indicated that the soul's eternal lot will be determined immediately after Death
Sacrament - ...
Baptism is an outward expression of faith in Christ and what he has done for believers through his Death and resurrection (Acts 2:38; Romans 6:3-4; see BAPTISM). The Lord’s Supper is an outward expression of fellowship with the risen Christ and his people, through recalling his sacrificial Death and proclaiming its eternal blessings (Matthew 26:26-29; 1 Corinthians 10:16-17; 1 Corinthians 11:26; see LORD’S SUPPER)
Eli - Eli's Death was precipitated by the news of the Death of his sons and the capture of the ark of God by the Philistines (1 Samuel 4:18 )
Martyr - Martyrs are those who stand firm in the midst of persecution and willingly suffers Death rather than deny their faith (Acts 7:54-60; Acts 12:1-2; Acts 22:20; Revelation 2:13). The basis of this assured victory is the Death and resurrection of Christ, who is himself the faithful and true witness (2 Timothy 4:6-8; 2 Timothy 4:18Revelation 12:10-11...
Nergal-Sharezer - He was a son-in-law of Nebuchadnezzar who usurped the Babylonian throne following the Death of Evil-merodach. Nergal-sharezer quite possibly had something to do with the rebellion and the king's Death
Preachers: to be Acquainted With Human Nature - Michael Angelo, when painting an altar-piece in the conventual church, in Florence, in order that the figures might be as Death-like as possible, obtained permission of the prior to have the coffins of the newly-buried opened and placed beside him during the night;: an appalling expedient, but successful in enabling him to reproduce with terrible effect, not the mortal pallor only, but the very anatomy of Death
Doom - ) To pronounce sentence or judgment on; to condemn; to consign by a decree or sentence; to sentence; as, a criminal doomed to chains or Death. ) Ruin; Death
Blasphemy - Blaspheming the name of the Lord was under the Jewish economy punishable by Death: the son of Shelomith who had married an Egyptian, was stoned to Death for this sin
End - ...
Psalm 37:37 (a) This end is Death or the manner of Death
Reconcile, Reconciliation - we were reconciled to God through the Death of His Son. Because of the Death of Jesus, the Christian's relationship with God is changed for the better
Sheol - In fact, the writers often used ‘sheol’ simply as another word for ‘death’ (Genesis 42:38; Psalms 18:5; Psalms 86:13; Psalms 116:3; cf. But by speaking of sheol, they made it clear that Death does not end human existence. ...
People saw Death as an enemy (Psalms 6:5; Psalms 56:13; Ecclesiastes 8:8; cf. ...
During the latter part of the Old Testament era, believers became more firmly convinced that beyond Death lay the resurrection (Daniel 12:1-2). This confidence grew into bold assurance through the Death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Once Christ had conquered Death and hades (sheol), people had no need to fear them any longer. ...
Since believers now shared Christ’s conquest, they naturally looked upon those who were not believers as still under the power of Death
Hades - As the strength of a walled city depended on the strength of its gates, ‘the gates of Hades’ is metaphor for the power of Death, and promise amounts to an assurance of the indestructibility of the Church. The moral lesson that the recompense of character is sure and that it begins immediately after Death is very clear; but it is going beyond our Lord’s didactic intention in a parable to find here a detailed doctrine as to the circumstances and conditions of the intermediate state. In the same general and ordinary sense the word is used in Revelation 1:18 : ‘I have the keys of Death and of Hades’; cf. the close association in the OT of Death with Sheol (Psalms 116:3, Proverbs 5:5). ...
In Revelation 6:8 Hades is personified as a follower of Death upon his pale horse. ) the sea and Death and Hades give up the dead which are in them (Revelation 20:13), and finally Death and Hades are themselves cast into the lake of fire (Revelation 20:14)
Dead - ) Resembling Death in appearance or quality; without show of life; Deathlike; as, a dead sleep. ) Still as Death; motionless; inactive; useless; as, dead calm; a dead load or weight. ) Sure as Death; unerring; fixed; complete; as, a dead shot; a dead certainty. ) Bringing Death; deadly. ) To a degree resembling Death; to the last degree; completely; wholly. ) The most quiet or Deathlike time; the period of profoundest repose, inertness, or gloom; as, the dead of winter
Execution - Israelite law laid down the Death penalty for certain offences, some of them religious, others civil (Leviticus 20:2; Leviticus 20:10; Leviticus 20:27; Leviticus 24:16-17; Numbers 15:32-36; Deuteronomy 13:6-10; Deuteronomy 22:20-24; Deuteronomy 24:7). Even under the Roman system of law that operated in New Testament times, Paul accepted that the government had the right to carry out the Death sentence in certain cases (Acts 25:11; cf. However, the law that laid down the Death penalty for murderers was based on a command that God gave long before the nation Israel existed. Jews could pass the Death sentence upon their own people for offences relating to Jewish law, but they could not carry it out. Yet when the Jews illegally stoned Stephen to Death, the Roman authorities took no action against them
Ahitub - Grandson of Eli, and son of Phinehas, in whose place he succeeded to the high priesthood on the Death of Eli, Phinehas having perished in battle, B
Middlemore, Humphrey, Blessed - Refusing to recognize the validity of Henry VIII's marriage with Anne Boleyn, he was arrested, imprisoned, and put to Death
Achor - Trouble, a valley north of Jericho; so called, perhaps, from the troubles occasioned by the sin of Achan, who was here put to Death, Joshua 7:26
Murrain - It was some distemper that resulted in the sudden and widespread Death of the cattle
Deuteronomy - The book concludes with Moses� Death
Catharine of Braganza - The wife of Charles II of England, of the royal house of Portugal; was unpopular in the country as a Catholic and neglected by her husband, on whose Death, however, she returned to Portugal, and did the duties ably of regent for her brother Don Pedro (1638-1705)
Azmaveth - Strong as Death
Attainder - ) The act of attainting, or the state of being attainted; the extinction of the civil rights and capacities of a person, consequent upon sentence of Death or outlawry; as, an act of attainder
Bell, Passing - In England when it was Catholic, and in other countries as well, there was a pious custom of ringing the church bell slowly when a Death was imminent in the parish, that the faithful might be reminded to pray for the dying person
Humphrey Middlemore, Blessed - Refusing to recognize the validity of Henry VIII's marriage with Anne Boleyn, he was arrested, imprisoned, and put to Death
the'Bez - (conspicuous ), a place memorable for the Death of the brave Abimelech, ( Judges 9:50 ) was known to Eusebius and Jerome, in whose time it was situated "in the district of Neapolis," 13Roman miles therefrom, on the road to Scythopolis
Imalcue - After the Death of Alexander, in b
Philipists - He had strenuously opposed the Ubiquists, who arose in his time; and, the dispute growing still hotter after his Death, the university of Wittemburg, who espoused Meiancthon's opinion, were called by the Flaccians, who attacked it, Philipists
Dangerous - ) In a condition of danger, as from illness; threatened with Death
Danger - ...
It is easy to boast of despising Death, when there is no danger
Executioner - One who executes one who carries into effect a judgment of Death one who inflicts a capital punishment in pursuance of a legal warrant
Hadad-Rimmon - It was in the valley of Megiddo, Zechariah 12:11, and the scene of a great lamentation over the Death of Josiah
Absalom - Of his open revolt, his conduct in Jerusalem, his pursuit of the king his father, his defeat and Death, see 2 Samuel 16-18, at large
Hell in the Apostles' Creed - Occurs in the phrase "He descended into Hell," and refers not to the abode of the damned, but to the abode of the just who had died before Christ's Death, limbo, as it is called, a place where they were awaiting Him so as to enter Heaven with Him
Christs, False - One of them named Coziba lived within followers, and occasioned the Death of more than half a million of Jews
Baca, Valley of - ’ Most probably it is no more an actual locality than is the ‘Valley of the Shadow of Death’ in Psalms 23:4
Unripe - Too early as the unripe Death of Dorilaus
Sacrifice - A solemn offering made to God according to His ordinance,for His honor and for the benefit of sinners, as in the HolyCommunion which is called "our sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving,"and in which the merits and Death of Christ are pleaded for theremission of our sins
Jules Mazarin - Cardinal, and prime minister of France after Richelieu's Death; born July 14, 1602 in Piscina, Italy; died May 9, 1661 in Vincennes, France. His real power began after the Death of Louis XIII, and during the minority of his son. Anne of Austria, who favored him greatly, appointed him prime minister, and in spite of fierce opposition he remained in power until Death
Mazarin, Jules - Cardinal, and prime minister of France after Richelieu's Death; born July 14, 1602 in Piscina, Italy; died May 9, 1661 in Vincennes, France. His real power began after the Death of Louis XIII, and during the minority of his son. Anne of Austria, who favored him greatly, appointed him prime minister, and in spite of fierce opposition he remained in power until Death
Children, Communion of - In ancient times in the Eastern Church infants received Communion immediately after Baptism; in the West it was common to communicate them in the hour of Death. Yet in danger of Death they may receive, if they are able to distinguish the Holy Eucharist from ordinary bread and reverently adore it. Outside the case of the danger of Death, it is necessary that they have a deeper knowledge of Christian doctrine, and that they approach Holy Communion with due reverence
Armageddon - The plain of Esdraelon, the great Old Testament battle field between Israel and the various enemies of Jehovah's people: the scene of Barak's victory over Canaan, and Gideon's over Midian (Judges 4; 5; 7), the scene also of Saul's Death and Israel's defeat before the Philistines (1 Samuel 31), and of Josiah's Death in battle with Pharaoh Necho (2 Kings 23:29-30). ...
The mourning at Josiah's Death in the valley of Megiddo became proverbial for the most poignant grief
Corruption - At Death the soul went to Sheol, and the body decayed. The term ‘corruption’ came, therefore, to stand for the physical aspects of that state which followed Death and preceded the resurrection. The resurrection as a part of salvation is thus placed in sharpest contrast with the condition of the personality following physical Death, since, as St
Spirits in Prison - The argument is, Be not afraid (1 Peter 3:14; 1 Peter 3:17) of suffering for well doing even unto Death, for Death in the flesh leads to life in the spirit as in Christ's case, who was put to Death in the flesh but quickened in spirit (i
Accursed - See Numbers 21:2 ); “put everyone to Death” (Deuteronomy 2:34 ); “completely destroy” (Deuteronomy 20:17 ); “killed” (Joshua 6:21 ; Joshua 8:26 ); “become the Lord's permanent property” (Leviticus 27:21 ); “put a curse on destroyed” (Judges 1:17 ). REB uses “dedicated” (Leviticus 27:21 ); “devoted” (Leviticus 27:28-29 ); “utterly destroy” (Numbers 21:2 ); “put to Death under solemn ban” (Deuteronomy 2:34 ); “exterminate” (Deuteronomy 7:2 ); “destroyed” (Joshua 2:10 ); “put to Death” (Judges 21:11 )
Perdition - Describes the eternal state of Death, destruction, annihilation, or ruin. Set into the context of eternity, the Gospel writers used it to mean an everlasting state of Death and judgment. See Death ; Devil ; Eternal Life ; Everlasting Punishment ; Hell ; Sheol
Intermediate State - Death is a separation of the soul and body; thebody becoming lifeless and eventually decomposing into dust, thesoul continuing to live as truly as ever. What becomes of the livingsoul when thus separated from the body by Death? ...
"Our Lord," says the Rev. The separateexistence of the soul between Death and the Judgment Day is,therefore, called the Intermediate State!" (See HADES, also DESCENTINTO HELL
Resurrection - They experienced a normal human existence again, and in due course died a normal human Death (1 Kings 17:22; 2 Kings 4:32-35; Luke 7:12-15; Luke 8:49-55; John 11:39-44; Acts 9:37-41). The present article, however, is concerned with a kind of resurrection that is an entirely new order of existence, where Death has no more power (Romans 6:9; 1 Corinthians 15:54; 2 Corinthians 5:4). ...
Death and the afterlife...
Old Testament believers did not have a clear understanding of eternal life, though they did at times express the hope of a resurrection through which they would have deliverance from the power of Death. By Christ’s Death God broke the power of Death and revealed the nature of resurrection life (2 Timothy 1:10; Hebrews 2:14-15). ...
Death is a consequence of sin, and therefore salvation from sin must include victory over Death if that salvation is to be complete. Because Jesus’ Death and resurrection conquered sin and Death, the believer in Jesus can look forward to salvation from sin and Death (Romans 4:24-25; Romans 6:8-10; Romans 8:11; 1 Corinthians 15:26; 1 Corinthians 15:54-57). The human being’s destiny, whether for salvation or damnation, is connected not with Death but with the resurrection of the body, after which the person faces final judgment (Romans 6:3-4; John 5:29; Acts 24:15; see Death). Throughout his ministry Jesus pointed out that he was not only to die but was also to rise from Death (Mark 8:31; Mark 9:9; Mark 9:31; John 2:19-21). By his resurrection he had conquered Death and made salvation sure, and they were witnesses of these things (Luke 24:46-48; Acts 2:24; Acts 2:32; 1618882878_62; Acts 10:39-43). Through their union with him, they can look forward to an entirely new order of existence where sin and Death have no more power (1 Corinthians 15:20-26; 1618882878_17; 1 Peter 1:3-4)
Sorrow - He was sorrowful also because of what it had done to human relationships by bringing Death and its consequent grief (John 11:33-36). But by his Death and resurrection he conquered Death and gave sorrowing believers hope (Romans 6:5-10; Romans 6:23; Romans 8:31-37). ...
Like Jesus, Christians sorrow because of the Death of those they love; but they do not sorrow as unbelievers, who have nothing to look forward to beyond Death (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18; 1 Thessalonians 5:9-11). ...
Besides Death, there are many troubles and sufferings in life that are likely to produce sorrow
Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse - At the opening of four of these, four horses appear (Apocalypse 6), white, red, black, and pale (piebald); they signify conquest, slaughter, famine, and Death
Four Horses of the Apocalypse - At the opening of four of these, four horses appear (Apocalypse 6), white, red, black, and pale (piebald); they signify conquest, slaughter, famine, and Death
Ethbaal - Murdered Pheles, 50 years after Hiram's Death, and usurped the throne of Tyre for 32 years, 940-908 B
Amanita - phalloides is the Death cup
Nourry, Agathangelus, Blessed - With Blessed Cassianus he was imprisoned and stoned to Death
Gangrene - The Greek gangraina ( 2 Timothy 2:17 ) can refer either to gangrene, a Death of soft tissue resulting from problems with blood flow (NAS, NRSV, REB) or to an ulcer (canker, KJV; open sore, TEV)
Propitiation - ) That which propitiates; atonement or atoning sacrifice; specifically, the influence or effects of the Death of Christ in appeasing the divine justice, and conciliating the divine favor
Atad - ” Owner of threshing floor east of the Jordan River where Joseph stopped to mourn the Death of his father before carrying Jacob's embalmed body across the Jordan to Machpelah for burial
Agathangelus Nourry, Blessed - With Blessed Cassianus he was imprisoned and stoned to Death
Echinococcus - ) A parasite of man and of many domestic and wild animals, forming compound cysts or tumors (called hydatid cysts) in various organs, but especially in the liver and lungs, which often cause Death
Heriot - ) Formerly, a payment or tribute of arms or military accouterments, or the best beast, or chattel, due to the lord on the Death of a tenant; in modern use, a customary tribute of goods or chattels to the lord of the fee, paid on the decease of a tenant
Destructive - ) Causing destruction; tending to bring about ruin, Death, or devastation; ruinous; fatal; productive of serious evil; mischievous; pernicious; - often with of or to; as, intemperance is destructive of health; evil examples are destructive to the morals of youth
Achor - ” The valley in which Achan and his household were stoned to Death (Joshua 7:24-26 )
Concision - Hence, In scripture, the Jews or those who adhered to circumcision, which, after our Saviors Death, was no longer a seal of the covenant, but a mere cutting of the flesh
Consummation - Death the end of life
Evangelist - A writer of the history, or doctrines, precepts, actions, life and Death of our blessed Savior, Jesus Christ as the four evangelists, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
Herod Antipas - Tetrarch of Galilee, put John the Baptist to Death after the latter had censured his adulterous union with Herodias, wife of his own half-brother
Antipas, Herod - Tetrarch of Galilee, put John the Baptist to Death after the latter had censured his adulterous union with Herodias, wife of his own half-brother
Apocalypse, Four Horsemen of the - At the opening of four of these, four horses appear (Apocalypse 6), white, red, black, and pale (piebald); they signify conquest, slaughter, famine, and Death
Apocalypse, Four Horses of the - At the opening of four of these, four horses appear (Apocalypse 6), white, red, black, and pale (piebald); they signify conquest, slaughter, famine, and Death
Apelleans - They affirmed that Christ, when he came down from heaven, received a body not from the substance of his mother, but from the four elements, which at his Death he rendered back to the world, and so ascended into heaven without a body
Alexander the Charcoal Burner, Saint - He was burned to Death in the persecution of Decius
Nadab - His awful Death is related to us, Leviticus 10:1-2, with the cause of it
Sala, George Augustus Henry - Before Death he was received into the Church
George Sala - Before Death he was received into the Church
Sunday, Passion - It is a time for special reflection on the Passion and Death of Christ
Asaliah - After Ahaziah's Death, she killed his potential heirs and ruled for six years, using her influence to suppress the true prophets and to support Baal worship
Athaliah - After Ahaziah's Death, she killed his potential heirs and ruled for six years, using her influence to suppress the true prophets and to support Baal worship
Hel'Kath-Haz'Zurim - (field of rock ), a smooth piece of ground, apparently close to the pool of Gibeon, where the combat took place between the two parties of Joab's men and Abner's men which ended in the Death of the whole of the combatants, and brought on a general battle
ha'Dad-Rim'Mon - is, according to the ordinary interpretation of (12:11) a place in the valley of Megiddo (a part of the plain of Esdraelon, six miles from Mount Carmel and eleven from Nazareth), where a national lamentation was held for the Death of King Josiah
Athaliah - After their premature Death, she usurped the throne, and sought to secure herself in it by the murder of all the seed royal. Six years afterwards he was brought from his place of refuge, and crowned by the bold and faithful high priest Jehoiada, who at the same time caused the blood-stained Athaliah to be put to Death, 2 Kings 11:1-21 2 Chronicles 23:1-21
Ichabod - Born at the time of Israel's defeat by the Philistines, and his father Phinehas' Death; named accordingly by his dying mother. " As in the case of her pious and patriotic father-in-law, Eli, the overwhelming sorrow that caused her Death was "because the ark of God was taken," hence this is thrice repeated
Sarah - Her story is from her marriage identified with that of the patriarch till the time of her Death. Her Death, at the age of one hundred and twenty-seven years (the only instance in Scripture where the age of a woman is recorded), was the occasion of Abraham's purchasing the cave of Machpelah as a family burying-place
Destruction - Death murder slaughter massacre. Eternal Death
Oak - Genesis 35:8 (c) Deborah, the nurse, was buried under an oak tree, and from this we notice that usually the oak tree is a type of the bitterness of sorrow because of Death. In Zechariah 11:2 the oaks are said to howl because of Death
Access - Under the law, the high priest alone had access into the holiest of all; but when the veil of the temple was rent in twain, at the Death of Christ, it was declared that a new and living way of access was laid open through the veil, that is to say, his flesh. By his Death, also, the middle wall of partition was broken down, and Jew and Gentile had both free access to God; whereas, before, the Gentiles had no nearer access in the temple worship than to the gate of the court of Israel
Deborah - Rebekah's nurse: she accompanied her mistress when she left Padan-aram and remained with her till her Death; she was buried under the 'oak of weeping. This led to the defeat of their enemies, the Death of Sisera by the hand of Jael, and the destruction of Jabin
Death - ...
Revelation 20:14 (a) The first Death is the Death of the body because of which the person cannot longer enjoy the earthly blessings of life. This second Death is called by that name because the body and the soul have at the Great White Throne been brought before GOD for a final judgment. ...
Here are some references to Death as used in the Scriptures:...
Dead to sin - Romans 6:2...
Dead with CHRIST - Romans 6:8
Crucifixion - It is clear from scripture, by His crying with a loud voice just before His Death, that as stated in John's gospel (John 10:18 ) He gave up His life. The Lord referred to the manner of His Death as being lifted up out of the earth, so that Death by stoning would not have answered to this. Thus did the blessed Lord in saving rebellious man go down to the very lowest form of Death
Ish bosheth - Following his father's Death, he ruled for two years, fighting with David for the right to the throne
Sin, Original - Death passed upon all men because of Adam's sin, but all have sinned
Beth-Azmaveth - (behth-az may' vehth) Place name meaning, “house of the strength of Death
Night - ...
(2) Death, the time when life's day is over (John 9:4)
Segub - Second son of Hiel, whose Death during rebuilding of Jericho showed power of God's prophecy through the centuries (1 Kings 16:34 )
Bereave - Genesis 42 ...
It is sometimes used without of, and is particularly applied to express the loss of friends by Death
Emerentiana, Saint - According to the acts of Saint Agnes she was a foster-sister to that saint; while praying at Saint Agnes's grave she was stoned to Death by the pagan mob, thus receiving the baptism of blood
Zelophehad - A descendant of Joseph, whose Death in the wilderness, leaving five daughters and no sons, led to the establishment of a law that in such cases daughters should inherit the patrimony of their father; but they were not to marry out of their tribe, Numbers 26:33 27:1-11 Joshua 17:3,4
Obed-Edom - A Levite, whose special prosperity while keeper of the ark after the dreadful Death of Uzziah encouraged David to carry it up to Jerusalem
Silvia of Rome, Saint - She gave her sons an excellent education, and after the Death of her husband devoted herself to religion
Sylvia of Rome, Saint - She gave her sons an excellent education, and after the Death of her husband devoted herself to religion
Rome, Silvia of, Saint - She gave her sons an excellent education, and after the Death of her husband devoted herself to religion
Scorner - They are great scorners of Death
Terrestrial - Death puts and end to all terrestrial scenes
Muth-Labben - It may be either upon the Death ( muth ) of the fool ( labben ), as an anagram on Nabal or as Gesenius, "to be chanted by boys with virgins' voices," i
Agunah - anchored woman�); a woman whose husband has disappeared and it is not known with certainty whether he is dead or alive; she is thus forbidden to marry unless a) the husband is located and grants her a legal divorce, or b) careful investigation by rabbinical authorities uncovers admissible evidence of his Death ...
Away - The verb airo, "to seize, to lift up, take away," is translated "away with," in Luke 23:18 ; John 19:15 ; Acts 21:36 ; 22:22 , implying a forcible removal for the purpose of putting to Death
Last Things, the Four - These are Death, Judgment, Heaven, Hell
Horseman - This association of horsemen with armed forces perhaps sparked the use of the four riders of Revelation 6:2-8 as symbols of military conquest, war, economic injustice, and Death and Hades
Lamberville, Jacques de - He labored in the Iroquois missions from 1675 until his Death, baptizing Catherine Tekakwitha, and assisting his brother Jean to pacify the Iroquois, who were aroused by Governor de la Barre's campaign
Ahimaaz - During the reign of David, he revealed to him the counsels of Absalom and his advisers in rebellion, 2 Samuel 17:15-21 ; and conveyed to him also the tidings of Absalom's defeat and Death, 2 Samuel 18:1-33
Devarim - The book concludes with Moses' Death
Jacques de Lamberville - He labored in the Iroquois missions from 1675 until his Death, baptizing Catherine Tekakwitha, and assisting his brother Jean to pacify the Iroquois, who were aroused by Governor de la Barre's campaign
Bardesanists - ...
They denied the resurrection of the body, and the incarnation and Death of our Saviour
Tree of the Knowledge of Good And Evil - But they disobeyed the divine injunction, and so sin and Death by sin entered our world and became the heritage of Adam's posterity
Bottomless Pit - It represented the home of evil, Death, and destruction stored up until the sovereign God allowed them temporary power on earth
Ascribe - ) To attribute, impute, or refer, as to a cause; as, his Death was ascribed to a poison; to ascribe an effect to the right cause; to ascribe such a book to such an author
Anna Maria Taigi, Blessed - Soon after her Death her name was venerated at Rome and she was beatified, May 30, 1920
Baptismal Grace - Baptismal innocence is the state of the soul as the result of Baptism, a state which many saints are believed to have preserved until Death
Hades - In Revelation 1:18, it says that Christ holds the keys to Death and Hades
Urijah - Son of Shemaiah: he prophesied against Jerusalem and the land, and then fled into Egypt, but was sent for by Jehoiakim and put to Death
Utterance - ) The last extremity; the end; Death; outrance
Proscription - ) The act of proscribing; a dooming to Death or exile; outlawry; specifically, among the ancient Romans, the public offer of a reward for the head of a political enemy; as, under the triumvirate, many of the best Roman citizens fell by proscription
Persecute - ) To pursue in a manner to injure, grieve, or afflict; to beset with cruelty or malignity; to harass; especially, to afflict, harass, punish, or put to Death, for adherence to a particular religious creed or mode of worship
Stephen - Acts 6:5; After a noble defence, he was dragged without the city, where, while praying, he was stoned to Death
Hanun - Upon the Death of Nahash, David sent an embassage to condole with his son
Death of Christ - In the records of Jesus that the Gospels give us, it is clear that a place of supreme significance is given to the Death—and the resurrectionof Christ. ...
In each of the Synoptic Gospels Jesus specifically predicts his suffering and Death three times (Matthew 16:21 ; 17:22-23 ; 20:17-19 ; Mark 8:31 ; 9:31 ; 10:32-34 ; Luke 9:21-22 ; 9:44 ; 18:31-33 ). Intimations of his Death are also given in his words about his anointing in Bethany being a preparation for his burial (Matthew 26:12 ; Mark 14:8 ; John 12:7 ), in the parable of the wicked tenants (Matthew 21:33-39 ; Mark 12:1-12 ; Luke 20:9-17 ), at the transfiguration when Moses and Elijah spoke with him "about his departure, which he was about to bring to fulfillment at Jerusalem" (Luke 9:31 ), in the words about the bridegroom being taken away (Matthew 9:15 ; Mark 2:20 ; Luke 5:35 ), and right back in the words of Simeon to Mary about the anguish that would come to her (Luke 2:35 ). When we consider the Gospels as written for the early church and related to its life and mission we can appreciate three supremely important reasons for this emphasis on the Death of Christ: ...
The centrality of the crossand resurrectionin the preaching of the good news of Jesus.
The centrality of the Deathand resurrectionin the worship of the church, especially in relation to its ordinances of baptism and the Lord's Supper.
The centrality of the suffering and Death of Christ for the meaning of Christian discipleship. The New Testament very clearly indicates that the Death of Christ had central significance in Christian preaching. ...
In the records that the Acts of the Apostles gives us of the preaching of apostles Peter and Paul, we find that the Death of Christ always has a place of central importance (2:23; 3:13-15,17-18; 4:10; 5:30; 7:52; 8:32-35; 10:39; 13:27-29; 17:2-3). In this preaching the human responsibility for the Death of Christ is laid at the door of the Jews who handed him over to be crucified and of Pilate who condemned him to Death, but it is also made clear that it was in fulfillment of the purpose of God expressed in the Scriptures (3:18). When we turn back to the Gospels we find it made abundantly clear that the Death of Jesus was, from the human standpoint, the culmination of opposition to him. As in the preaching in the Acts of the Apostles, so much more in the Gospels, it is made clear that the reason for the Death of Jesus was not just the opposition of his enemies. (For the emphasis in Acts of the Death of Christ being the fulfillment of Scripture, see 3:18; 8:32-35; 13:27; 17:2-3; 26:22-23). ...
The Death of Christ and the Forgiveness of Sins . When we follow what is said in the New Testament about the meaning and purpose of the Death of Christ we find, in a number of different ways, that it is specifically related to the forgiveness of sins. " The Death of Christ is the supreme expression of the love of God and the love of Jesus himself (John 15:13 ; Romans 5:8 ; Ephesians 5:2,25 ; 1 John 3:16 ; 4:10 ). He died in our place ( Matthew 20:28 ; Mark 10:45 ), meaning that he died a sin-bearing Death so that we might not have to. ...
Jesus' Death as sin-bearing is explicitly referred to in Hebrews 9:28 : "Christ was sacrificed once to take away the sins of many people. ...
The benefits of the Death of Christ for those who believe are thus spoken of in a number of ways. More briefly Colossians 1:22 puts it, "now he has reconciled you by Christ's physical body through Death. " In an essentially similar way the work of Christ's Death is described in Hebrews 10:19-22 : "we have confidence to enter the Most Holy Place by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way opened for us. All of these have a place in the New Testament in the explanation given of the meaning of the Death of Christ. Hebrews develops this theme in detail, showing the Death of Christ to be the fulfillment and the replacement of the sacrifices of Old Testament times. When in the different strands of New Testament testimony we have reference to the "blood" of Christ, that word speaks of his sacrificial Death (e. Paul penetrates more deeply into the meaning of that sacrificial Death as he speaks of it "as a sacrifice of atonement" ("as a propitiation" KJV), since, because Christ bore our sins, there was no longer the "passing over of sins, " but in what Christ did on the cross, God is shown to be "just and the one who justifies" those who have faith in Jesus. It is abundantly clear, however, that the fulfillment of the Passover was prominent in the thought of Jesus himself as he approached his Death (in all the Gospel records of the crucifixion this is evident: see Matthew 26:1-2,17-19 ; Mark 14:1-2,12-16 ; Luke 22:1-2,7-16 ; John 11:55 ; 12:1 ; 13:1 ; 19:14 ), and so the early Christian understanding was expressed in these terms: "Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed" (1 Corinthians 5:7 ). "Redemption through his blood, " Ephesians 1:7 puts it, and that "redemption" ( Romans 3:24 ; Galatians 3:14 ) means freedom from sin and evil and from the power of Death (Galatians 1:4 ; Titus 2:14 ; Hebrews 2:14-15 ; Revelation 1:5 ). For the Death of Christ is a triumph over evil and over all the forces of evil (Colossians 2:15 ). Alluding to his imminent Death Jesus says in John 12:31 , "Now is the time for judgment on this world; now the prince of this world will be driven out. ...
The Death of Christ and Discipleship . In all the many ways listed, and more, the Death of Christ is spoken of as the way of salvation, of our acceptance with God, of pardon and peace. "I have been crucified with Christ" says Paul (Galatians 2:20 ); the things of the old life are put to Death (Colossians 3:5-8 ; cf. It is also a Death to self: "he died for all, that those who live should no longer live for themselves but for him who died for them and was raised again" (2 Corinthians 5:15 ); and it is a Death to the world, as the apostle says, "May I never boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world" (Galatians 6:14 ). ...
In these ways the Death of Christ is an example for the Christian. Yet in no place in the New Testament is the example of Christ's suffering and Death presented without the emphasis also being on what was done in his Death "for us. " Thus the sacraments of the gospel indicate the lifestyle to which Christians are called, but also indicate and recall (requiring the response of repentance and faith) what Jesus Christ did once and for all for us by his Death and resurrection. The Lord's Supper is nothing less than the constant proclaiming of the Lord's Death until he comes (1 Corinthians 11:26 ). Baptism is an identifying with Christ in his Death and resurrection, speaking of the whole lifestyle of the Christian as (in Christ's name) a dying to self and living for him who has loved us and given himself for us (Galatians 2:20 ). Denney, The Death of Christ ; M. Wallace, The Atoning Death of Christ
End - ) Termination of being; Death; destruction; extermination; also, cause of Death or destruction. ) To destroy; to put to Death
Vest - ) To clothe with authority, power, or the like; to put in possession; to invest; to furnish; to endow; - followed by with before the thing conferred; as, to vest a court with power to try cases of life and Death. ) To place or give into the possession or discretion of some person or authority; to commit to another; - with in before the possessor; as, the power of life and Death is vested in the king, or in the courts. ) To come or descend; to be fixed; to take effect, as a title or right; - followed by in; as, upon the Death of the ancestor, the estate, or the right to the estate, vests in the heir at law
Eusebius (126), Eunuch Under Constantius ii - 2, 16) relates that, after the Death of Constantine in 337, Eusebius of Nicomedia and Theognis of Nicaea, bestirring themselves on behalf of the Arians, made use of a certain presbyter in high favour with Constantius, who had before been instrumental in recalling Arius from exile. On the Death of Constantius in 361 Eusebius tried to curry favour with Julian by assuring him of the loyalty of the East (Amm. One of the first acts of Julian was to condemn him to Death ( ib
End - ) Termination of being; Death; destruction; extermination; also, cause of Death or destruction. ) To destroy; to put to Death
Elea'Zar - After the Death of Nadab and Abihu without children, (Leviticus 10:6 ; Numbers 3:4 ) Eleazar was appointed chief over the principal Levites. (Numbers 3:32 ) With his brother Ithamar he ministered as a priest during their father's lifetime, and immediately before his Death was invested on Mount Hor with the sacred garments, as the successor of Aaron in the office of high priest. (Joshua 14:1 ) The time of his Death is not mentioned in Scripture
Uzza - Uzza’s sudden Death at a place called, in commemoration of this untoward incident, Perez-uzzah (‘breach of Uzzah’), led to the temporary abandonment of David’s project of transporting the ark to Jerusalem. Uzza’s Death was attributed by the popular mind to anger on the part of Jahweh at his having presumed to handle the sacred emhlem too familiarly
Tamar - After her husband's Death, she was married to Onan, his brother (8), and on his Death, Judah promised to her that his third son, Shelah, would become her husband
Hearing: Carelessly - Alas! it may be sport to them, but it is Death to us, because we know it will ere long be Death to them
Horse-Leech - The horse-leech ( Hœmopis sanguisuga ) and the medicinal leech ( Hirudo medicinalis ) are very common in Palestine and are the cause of much trouble, even sickness and Death, to man and beast. They cause frequent hæmorrhages, and, if not removed, lead to progressive anæmia and Death
Sentence - In the NT this word is used only three times: (1) as indicating a judicial sentence (ἐπικρίνω, Luke 23:24; see Trial-at-law); (2) as giving a decision or judgment on a matter submitted for settlement (κρίνω): ‘My sentence (Revised Version ‘judgement’) is, that we trouble not them, which from among the Gentiles are turned to God’ (Acts 15:19); (3) as a conclusion come to, or an answer given to a question put in certain circumstances (ἀπόκριμα): ‘But we had the sentence of Death in ourselves’ (2 Corinthians 1:9 Authorized Version ; Revised Version , ‘Yea, we ourselves have had the answer [1] of Death within ourselves’)
Abishag - After his Death, Adonijah requested her in marriage, for which he lost his life; Solomon perceiving in this a design upon the crown also. Adonijah was his elder brother, an intriguing man, and had aspired to be king before the Death of David, and had had his life spared only upon the condition of his peaceable conduct
Ahijah - The same prophet declared to Jeroboam, that he would usurp the kingdom, 1 Kings 11:29 , &c; and, about the end of Jeroboam's reign, he also predicted the Death of Abijah, the only pious son of that prince, as is recorded 1 Kings 14:2 , &c. Ahijah, in all probability, did not long survive the delivery of this last prophecy; but we are not informed of the time and manner of his Death
Jeho-i'Achin - , till the Death of Nebuchadnezzar, when Evilmerodach, succeeding to the throne of Babylon, brought him out of prison, and made him sit at this own table. The time of his Death is uncertain
Jerubbaal - " They took up Joash's words: "he that will fight for Baal (seeking to put to Death the destroyer of his altar) shall be put to Death (himself; let us wait) TILL morning (to see, will Baal avenge his own wrong); let Baal fight for himself
Saints' Days - ) The daycommemorated is generally that of the Saint's Death, because likehis Master, he passed through Death to the portals of EverlastingLife
Adam, the Second - He was "made like his brothers in every way" so that "by his Death he might destroy him who holds the power of Death" and free those held in slavery by fear of Death (Hebrews 2:14,17 ). The first Adam lost his crown and gained Death. The second Adam was crowned because he tasted Death for every man (2:8-9). Sin and Death upon all men entered the world through one man. The last enemy placed under the feet of the second Adam is Death (Psalm 110:1 ; 1Col 15:26)
Huldah - She prophesied judgment for the nation but a peaceful Death for Josiah the king
Franco, Boniface - He was banished by Otto, 974, but returned, 983, after the emperor's Death, imprisoned John XIV, and reinstated himself
John Xiv, Pope - After the Death of Otto, the pope was incarcerated by the antipope, Boniface VII, in the Castle of Sant' Angelo where he died, possibly by violence
Jezabel - She met her Death by being thrown from a window at the command of Jehu, and the dogs ate her flesh, thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elias
Jezebel - She met her Death by being thrown from a window at the command of Jehu, and the dogs ate her flesh, thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elias
si'Rah - (the turning ) , The well of, from which Abner was recalled by Joab to his Death at Hebron
Ebed-Melech - He interceded with the king in Jeremiah's behalf, and was the means of saving him from Death by famine (Jeremiah 38:7-13 : comp 39:15-18)
Campanora, Peter - After the Death of Otto, the pope was incarcerated by the antipope, Boniface VII, in the Castle of Sant' Angelo where he died, possibly by violence
Festus - He held it until his Death in A
Jehosheba - ” Sister of King Ahaziah who, after his Death, took young Joash and protected him from Queen Athaliah so Athaliah could not have him killed as she did the other royal children (2 Kings 11:2 )
Amnon - Absalom caused him to be put to Death for his great crime in the matter of Tamar (2 Samuel 13:28,29 )
Keturah - Incense, the wife of Abraham, whom he married probably after Sarah's Death (Genesis 25:1-6 ), by whom he had six sons, whom he sent away into the east country
Mary Guise - The widow of Louis II d'Orleans, she married James V of Scotland, and on his Death was made regent for her daughter, Mary, Queen of Scots
Hanging - Criminals were usually put to Death before hanging, for ignominy (Joshua 10:26)
Beccus, John - After the Death of Emperor Michael Palaeologus, 1282, the enemies of reunion forced his resignation as patriarch and exiled him to Prusa, Bithynia
Caleb Ephratah - The RSV (not NRSV) follows a slight change of Hebrew text to make Ephrathah the wife of Hezron whom Caleb took after his father's Death
Phinehas - Anointed high priest after his father’s Death
Deodand - ) A personal chattel which had caused the Death of a person, and for that reason was given to God, that is, forfeited to the crown, to be applied to pious uses, and distributed in alms by the high almoner
Great, Herod the - He was barbarous, a slave to his passions, jealous, and ambitious; he put several of his own children to Death and was responsible for the massacre of the Holy Innocents
Adoniram, Adoram - He was stoned to Death by the rebellious Israelites when sent to them by Rehoboam ( 1 Kings 12:18 )
Gardiner, German, Blessed - His courage was aroused by the example of the martyrs, especially Blessed Thomas More, and he suffered the Death of a traitor
Guise, Mary - The widow of Louis II d'Orleans, she married James V of Scotland, and on his Death was made regent for her daughter, Mary, Queen of Scots
Diffusion - Unlike absorption, diffusion may go on after Death, that is, after the blood ceases to circulate
Herod the Great - He was barbarous, a slave to his passions, jealous, and ambitious; he put several of his own children to Death and was responsible for the massacre of the Holy Innocents
Apostolic, College - After the Death of Judas to show that Christ wished them to be a religious society, they immediately elected Matthias "to take the place of this ministry and 'Apostleship" (Acts 1) ...
Arphaxad - Nebuchadrezzar, king of Assyria, made war upon him, defeated him, and put him to Death
Jehosheba - On the Death of her half-brother Ahaziah, she was instrumental in preserving the Davidic stock, by concealing the infant Jehoash in a lumber-room of the palace (RVm Reprisal - ) The act of retorting on an enemy by inflicting suffering or Death on a prisoner taken from him, in retaliation for an act of inhumanity
Decimate - ) To select by lot and punish with Death every tenth man of; as, to decimate a regiment as a punishment for mutiny
Narcotic - ) A drug which, in medicinal doses, generally allays morbid susceptibility, relieves pain, and produces sleep; but which, in poisonous doses, produces stupor, coma, or convulsions, and, when given in sufficient quantity, causes Death
Askelon - The tribe of Judah, after the Death of Joshua, took the city of Askelon, Judges 1:18 , being one of the five governments belonging to the Philistines
Ophrah - A town of Manesseh where Gideon resided; and where after his Death his ephod was superstitiously adored, Judges 6:11-24 ; 8:27
Rulers of the World of This Darkness - As a consequence of original sin the world had been given over to the "world-rulers of this darkness," but by the redeeming Death of Christ it was bought back to the kingdom of God and of light
Necromancer - One who pretended to discover unknown and future events by summoning and interrogating the dead, Deuteronomy 18:10,11 , a crime punishable by stoning to Death, Leviticus 20:27
German Gardiner, Blessed - His courage was aroused by the example of the martyrs, especially Blessed Thomas More, and he suffered the Death of a traitor
Venerable - Saint Bede was called Venerable soon after his Death, the first instance of the title
Keturah - The wife of Abraham, after the Death of Sarah, Genesis 25:1-6
Gabbatha - (elevated; a platform ) the Hebrew or Chaldee appellation of a place, also called "Pavement," where the judgment-seat or bema was planted, from his place on which Pilate delivered our Lord to Death
Didache - It may be divided into three parts: ...
first, the "Two Ways," the Way of Life and the Way of Death;
second, a rituale dealing with Baptism, fasting, and Holy Communion;
third, a treatise on the ministry. The Way of Life is the love of God and of our neighbor; the Way of Death is a mere list of vices to be avoided
Doctrine of the Twelve Apostles - It may be divided into three parts: ...
first, the "Two Ways," the Way of Life and the Way of Death;
second, a rituale dealing with Baptism, fasting, and Holy Communion;
third, a treatise on the ministry. The Way of Life is the love of God and of our neighbor; the Way of Death is a mere list of vices to be avoided
Artaxerxes - It is given in Ezra 4:7-24 , to Smerdis the Magian, who usurped the throne after the Death of Cambyses, B. 522, pretending to be Smerdis, the son of Cyrus, whom Cambyses had put to Death
Atonement - The satisfaction offered to divine justice for the sins of mankind by the Death of Jesus Christ; by virtue of which all true penitents believing in Christ are reconciled to God, are freed from the penalty of their sins, and entitled to eternal life. This is actually effected by the Death of Christ; while the ceremonial offerings of the Jewish church only secured from impending temporal judgments, and typified the blood of Jesus Christ which "cleanseth us from all sin
Adonijah - After the Death of his elder brothers, Amnon and Absalom, he became heir-apparent to the throne. He afterwards made a second attempt to gain the throne, but was seized and put to Death (1Kings 2:13-25)
Cedar - ...
Psalm 92:12 (a) Here is a picture of the believer who in the midst of drought, Death, dearth and desolation fixes his faith and trust down deep in the living promises of GOD and flourishes for Him, in company with other believers. This passage was read at Spurgeon's funeral to teach that the lesser preachers mourned over the Death of this great preacher (the cedar)
Execution - ) A putting to Death as a legal penalty; Death lawfully inflicted; as, the execution of a murderer
Stoning - Was a punishment much in use among the Hebrews, and the rabbins reckon all crimes as being subject to it, which the law condemns to Death without expressing the particular mode. They say that when a man was condemned to Death, he was led out of the city to the place of execution, and there exhorted to acknowledge and confess his fault
Enemy - ...
The Bible speaks of enemies other than one’s fellow human beings; for example, Satan, Death and evil spiritual forces. But Christ has conquered all these through his Death and resurrection, and in the day of his final victory he will destroy them for ever (Matthew 13:39; Luke 10:18; 1 Corinthians 15:25-28; Colossians 2:15; Hebrews 10:12-13)
Evil - Three senses of the term have been distinguished by Leibniz: metaphysical-the necessary imperfection of the creature as compared with the Creator; physical-pain, suffering, sorrow, Death; and moral-sin. Of all evils Death is regarded as the greatest, and in Paul we find a painful shrinking from it (2 Corinthians 5:1-8); accordingly, it is evident how precious a comfort was the Christian hope of immortality and resurrection (Romans 8:23-25). Since Death is regarded as the penalty of sin (Romans 5:12-21; Romans 6:21-23, 1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:56), the salvation in Christ includes deliverance from Death for the believer, and finally the abolition of Death (1 Corinthians 15:24-28, 2 Timothy 1:10) and all other evils (Revelation 21:4). Behind Death, sin, and all evil, the Apostolic Church saw the devil and other powers of wickedness (Ephesians 4:27, 1 Thessalonians 3:5, Hebrews 2:14, James 4:7, 1 Peter 5:8, 1 John 5:19, Revelation 12:9), and accordingly Christ’s work, especially His Death (Colossians 2:15), was regarded as a victory over all evil powers (1 John 3:8). There are two speculative elements in it which modern Christian faith cannot unquestioningly accept-the connexion of Death with sin as its penalty, and the existence of the devil and other evil powers. ‘It is generally admitted that Death is a natural necessity for animal organisms such as man’s, and that before man was in the world Death prevailed. It seems vain to justify Paul by speculations such as these: that God anticipating sin introduced Death into the natural order as a. What he was concerned with was man’s sense of the mystery and dread of the desolation of Death, man’s looking for judgment after Death. In such totality, including what man thinks of, and feels about, Death, surely Paul’s view of the connexion between sin and Death is not altogether false. It is man’s sense of guilt that invests Death with its terror (1 Corinthians 15:56). If there he indeed a moral order in the world, an antagonism of God to sin, and if, as there is reason to believe, there is a moral continuity between this life and the next, such a change as Death is may he conceived as fraught with moral significance, as introducing the soul into such conditions as have been determined by the judgment of God on the moral character of this life’ (Studies of Paul and his Gospel, 1911, pp
Professors (Mere): Have no Changes - Life has its changes; 'tis Death that abideth the same. Life has muscle, sinew, brain, spirit, and these vary in physical condition; but the petrified limbs of Death lie still until the worm has devoured the carcase. Life weeps as well as smiles, but the ghastly grin of Death relaxes not with anxiety or fear
Access - The Persian court which Esther faced set the Death penalty for anyone who sought access to the king without royal permission (Esther 4:11 ). The New Testament teaches that every person can now have access to God because Jesus' Death on the cross has opened the way. Both Gentiles and Jews have an open door to the Father through Christ's Death on the cross and through the work of the Holy Spirit present in the believer's life (Ephesians 2:10-18 )
Bertha, Wife of Ethelbert, King of Kent - The date of her marriage is unknown, but it was probably after the Death of her mother, although Bede speaks of the king receiving her "a parentibus. The date of her Death is unknown. Ethelbert seems to have married again after her Death. She was the mother of Eadbald, who succeeded to the throne on Ethelbert's Death, and of Ethelburga, who, in 625, was married to Edwin, King of Northumbria
Deuteronomy - --which means "the repetition of the law" --consists chiefly of three discourses delivered by Moses shortly before his Death. Subjoined to these discourses are the Song of Moses the Blessing of Moses, and the story of his Death. (33:5) The book closes, Deuteronomy 34 , with an account of the Death of Moses, which is first announced to him ch. (Matthew 19:7,8 ; Mark 10:3 ; Acts 3:22 ; 7:37 ) The last chapter, containing an account of the Death of Moses, was of course added by a later hand, and probably formed originally the beginning of the book of Joshua
Nabal - He treated David very churlishly, and was saved from the disastrous consequence by his wife Abigail, whom David married after Nabal's Death
Cushite - An unnamed Cushite served as Joab's messenger to bring the news of Absalom's Death to David (2 Samuel 18:21-32 )
Moloch - His worship consisted of offering human sacrifices, especially children, causing them to "pass through the fire" after they had been put to Death (4Kings 16,17)
Ichabod - His birth seems to have been precipitated by the news of the Death of his father and the capture of the ark of the covenant in battle against the Philistines
Lay Confession - A custom prevalent in the Middle Ages of confessing one's sins to a lay person, when danger of Death was imminent and no priest could be obtained
Adonizedek - The five kings were utterly routed, and hid themselves in a cave at Makkedah; but were taken by Joshua, and put to Death, Joshua 10:1-43
Merida, Eulalia of, Saint - At her Death a white dove is said to have issued from her mouth and over her ashes, cast into a field, fell a pall of snow
Cassian, Saint - Refusing to sacrifice to the gods, he was condemned to the mercy of his pupils who tortured him to Death with their iron styles or pencils
Jacques Echard - On the Death of Jacques Quetif, who had planned and gathered nearly one-fourth of the material for a literary history or the Dominican Order, Echard was commissioned to complete the work, which was published in 1721
Caswall, Edward - After the Death of his wife he became an Oratorian
Cainites - They had in particular great veneration for Judas, under the pretence that the Death of Christ had saved mankind
Ahitub - On the Death of his grandfather Eli he succeeded to the office of high priest, and was himself succeeded by his son Ahijah (1Samuel 14:3; 22:9,11,12,20)
Kir-Haraseth - After the Death of Ahab, Mesha, king of Moab (see 2 Kings 3:20-27 )
Salathiel - The probable explanation of the apparent discrepancy is that he was the son of Neri, the descendant of Nathan, and thus heir to the throne of David on the Death of Jeconiah (Compare Jeremiah 22:30 )
Jairus - Jesus raised her to life immediately after Death (Matthew 9:18; Mark 5:22; Luke 8:41)
Hazarmaveth - ("the court of Death") Third of Joktan's sons (Genesis 10:26)
Samurai - They possessed power of life and Death over the commoners, and wore two swords as their distinguishing mark
Noon - Noon is frequently associated with Death and destruction (2 Samuel 4:5 ; 1 Kings 20:16 ; 2 Kings 4:20 ; Psalm 91:6 ; Jeremiah 6:4 ; Jeremiah 15:8 ; Jeremiah 20:16 ; Zephaniah 2:4 )
Alvarez de Paz - He was renowned for his sanctity, is said to have had the gift of prophecy, and it is reported that his body remained incorrupt after Death
Arioch - He confided in Daniel, who was able to interpret the king's forgotten dream and prevent the Death of the wise counselors of Babylon
Alexius, Saint - According to legend he secretly left his wife on the night of their wedding, and after seventeen years at Edessa returned to Rome, living hidden in his father's house until his Death
Bury - It is a testimony of identification with CHRIST in His Death, burial and resurrection
Atonement - Specifically, in theology: The expiation of sin made by the obedience, personal suffering, and Death of Christ
Pelagian - ) A follower of Pelagius, a British monk, born in the later part of the 4th century, who denied the doctrines of hereditary sin, of the connection between sin and Death, and of conversion through grace
Echard, Jacques - On the Death of Jacques Quetif, who had planned and gathered nearly one-fourth of the material for a literary history or the Dominican Order, Echard was commissioned to complete the work, which was published in 1721
Eulalia of Merida, Saint - At her Death a white dove is said to have issued from her mouth and over her ashes, cast into a field, fell a pall of snow
Ahim'Elech - He gave David the shew bread to eat, and the sword of Goliath; and for so doing was put to Death, with his whole house, by Saul's order
Artemas - We know nothing particular of the life or Death of Artemas; but the employment to which he was appointed by the Apostle is a proof of his great merit
Shibboleth - If they could not pronounce it, and said "sibboleth" instead, they were put to Death (Judges 12); in modern times, a password, a slogan, a peculiarity of pronunciation or accent which indicates a person's origin
Scibboleth - If they could not pronounce it, and said "sibboleth" instead, they were put to Death (Judges 12); in modern times, a password, a slogan, a peculiarity of pronunciation or accent which indicates a person's origin
Sadoc - To foil Adonias' plans, he anointed Solomon king before David's Death (3Kings 1), and as a reward was appointed sole high priest (id
Barabbas - A noted robber in Christ's time, who was imprisoned and awaiting Death for the crimes of sedition and murder
Giffard, Bonaventure - A few months later during the Revolution he was thrown into prison, but was released in 1690, and continued his perilous missionary work till his Death
Edward Caswall - After the Death of his wife he became an Oratorian
Pascal - Paul used the sacrifice of the pascal lamb as a picture of the Death of Christ (1 Corinthians 5:7 NRSV)
Magic - It was also forbidden to consult magicians on pain of Death, Leviticus 19:31 20:6
Wages - Eternal Death is the wages or just recompense of sin; while eternal life is not a recompense earned by obedience, but a sovereign gift of God, Romans 6:22-23
Peaceable - Not violent, bloody or unnatural as, to die a peaceable Death
Pelatiah - It is difficult to decide whether Pelatiah’s Death is to be understood as actual or merely symbolical
Gal'Lio - Winer thinks he was put to Death by Nero
Passion - We find mention made of our Lord's passion in the Acts of the Apostles: (Acts 1:3) and indeed the whole tendency of the Scriptures is to bring the church acquainted with this one great event, in the sufferings and Death of Jesus
Archelaus - But at Herod's Death the kingdom, by a change in the will, was divided between his three sons, Antipus, Archelaus, and Philip. " For the short time only between his father's Death and his going to Rome, to seek confirmation of the kingship from Augustus, had he the title. When Joseph, at Herod's Death, was about to return with the child Jesus from Egypt to the Holy Land, "he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea;" and "he was afraid to go thither" (Matthew 2:22). One of Herod's last deeds was the putting Judas and Matthias to Death for instigating young men to pull down a golden eagle set up contrary to Moses' law over the temple gate by Herod; at the Passover which succeeded Herod's Death, before Archelaus had as yet the emperor's ratification of his accession, Archelaus, finding several commiserating the martyrs, caused his cavalry to inclose at the temple and slay 3,000 men
Adonis - But he was sometimes called by the name of Ammuz, or Tammuz, the concealed, probably to denote his Death or burial. At this good news they exhibited marks of the most extravagant joy, and were guilty of a thousand lewd practices, to convince Venus how much they congratulated her on the return and revival of her favourite, as they had before condoled with her on his Death. Venus lamented the Death of Adonis in an inconsolable manner. After his Death, Venus went to the shades, and obtained from Proserpine, that Adonis might be with her six months in the year, and continue the other six in the infernal regions. Upon this were founded those public rejoicings, which succeeded the lamentations of his Death
Inheritance - A legal transmission of property after Death. ” The Greek word in the New Testament does refer to the disposition of property after Death, but its use in the New Testament often reflects the Old Testament background more than normal Greek usage. ...
Because the Hebrew words did not necessarily presuppose a Death, they could be used in reference to God's granting of the land to Israel (Joshua 1:15 ; Numbers 36:2-4 ). Only Hebrews makes explicit use of the idea of “inheritance” as requiring the Death of the testator, Christ. A “will” requires a Death to come into effect, so the Death of Christ brings the new “covenant”/”will” into effect (Hebrews 9:16-17 )
Propitiation (2) - ‘Sacrifice’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible , where the conclusion is reached that ‘the expiation of guilt is the leading purpose of Levitical sacrifices,’ and that the expiation is accomplished through the sacrifice taking the place of the offender, and its Death being accepted in place of his. 68), ‘Everything pressed towards the assumption that the offering of a life substituted for sinners according to God’s appointment, cancelled the Death penalty which had been incurred, and that consequently the offered blood of the sacrificial victim expiated sin as the surrogate for the life of the guilty. Now, the Evangelists believed much relating to His birth, lifework, and Death to be the fulfilment of OT prophecy (Matthew 1:23; Matthew 2:6; Matthew 2:18; Matthew 3:3; Matthew 4:15-16; Matthew 12:18-21; Romans 3:25,; Matthew 21:5 etc. He saw His life and Death related to Moses (the Law) and all the Prophets. ...
In view of this general conception, we must interpret our Lord’s references to His Death. The place His Death had in His thought, apart from the more direct teaching as to its purpose and import, makes it plain that it was deemed of paramount importance in His mission work. Interpreting His words at His baptism (Matthew 3:15 ‘Thus it becometh us to fulfil all righteousness’) in the light of Matthew 20:22-23, but especially of His words in Luke 12:50 (‘I have a baptism to be baptized with, and how am I straitened till it be accomplished’), it would seem that His Death was before Him from the first as an essential part of His mission. He foretold that His resurrection would follow His Death (Matthew 12:40 || Luke 11:29). He dwelt upon the details of His betrayal and Death (Matthew 16:21, cf. Mark 8:34-35 and Luke 9:23-24, see also John 8:28), referring, doubtless, to the manner of His Death. Mark 8:30), and Luke 9:31 declares that Moses and Elijah talked with Jesus of His Death as of supreme moment. As the end drew near, He dwelt more upon His Death and resurrection (Matthew 17:22-23; Matthew 20:18-19; Matthew 21:33-40, cf. The great space given to the circumstances connected with our Lord’s Death seems to show that the Evangelists saw in it the culmination of His redemptive work. The words of the Baptist: ‘Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world’ (John 1:29), probably also are in terms of Isaiah 53:5, as the Servant of Jehovah, ‘bruised for our iniquities,’ like the sacrificial lamb, endured Death silently. ...
From all these lines of evidence it is impossible to escape the conclusion that our Lord and the Evangelists considered His Death to be of paramount importance in His mission, and gave it this value because it stood to the sins of the world in a similar relation to that which the Levitical sacrifices held to the sins of the Jews. ...
If the conclusion be accepted that these sacrifices were expiatory and vicarious, we have a clear idea of the purpose our Lord supposed His Death served. Neither need we wonder that He taught so little about the purport of His Death. Consequently He had ‘many things to say’ to them which they could not bear before His Death shattered their false ideas (John 16:1-13). Immediately after His resurrection He began to instruct His disciples as to the meaning of His mission and Death as they stood related to the Law and the Prophets (Luke 24:26-27). They were not the men to invent an interpretation of His Death, or to go back to Levitical explanations without His sanction. From them we can get the clearest light on our Lord’s own conception of the purpose served by His life and Death. Paul’s conception, Christ is a propitiation in (ἐν) His blood or Death, and because He manifests or demonstrates the righteousness of God. Paul regard our Lord as a propitiation? How could He in His blood or Death demonstrate God’s righteousness, which demanded that sins be punished and not passed over, and that the ungodly be condemned and not justified when the reverse of this took place? Could it be in any other way than that, in the Death of Christ, the righteousness of God which made these demands received a satisfaction for the sins of men of the same kind as would have been paid if God had let His punitive wrath (Romans 1:18) fall upon the transgressor? In His Death Christ endured the just desert of sin (Romans 6:23), as ‘him who knew no sin he (God) made to be sin on our behalf’ (2 Corinthians 5:21). He could in consequence pass over sins in forbearance, and justify the believer though ungodly (Romans 4:5), and His righteousness would not be tarnished but demonstrated, because Christ stood for sinners, and all died in His Death (2 Corinthians 5:14). John had just referred to our Lord’s blood as cleansing from all sin (1 John 1:7), it is plain that he thought of Christ in His blood or Death as the propitiation. Neither is He the propitiation for sins because of any cleansing or other work wrought in men as a consequence of His work and Death; for He is the propitiation for the whole world, many of whom will never be purified or subjectively changed by or through it. By His sacrificial Death He ‘made purification of sins’ (Hebrews 1:3), ‘obtained eternal redemption’ (Hebrews 9:12), ‘put away sin’ (Hebrews 9:26), ‘perfected for ever them who are sanctified’ (Hebrews 10:14). All this is regarded as already accomplished for us in Christ’s sacrificial Death, and not as still to be wrought in us through its influence. 2) is significant, and the statement that He tasted Death for every man (Hebrews 2:9) and bore the sins of many (Hebrews 9:28), taken in connexion with His antitypical relation to the sacrificial system, can scarcely mean less than that He represented men in some way, so that He could bear their sins for them and die on their behalf. The propitiatory value is in His blood, as He tastes Death for every man so as to bear the sins of all, in a way analogous to that in which the sacrificial victim bore those of the offerer. How the sin is removed by His Death is not explicitly stated, but the whole sweep of thought is favourable to the view that it was as a satisfaction to that in God which sin offends—call it holiness or righteousness as one will—and is in substantial agreement with St. They were interpreting His Death in the fuller light of His own teachings after His resurrection and with the Spirit’s help. We are justified in interpreting His own allusions to what was done by His Death in view of both. Beneath the superficial variations due to the aspects of truth treated and the special aim of each of the NT writers, there is an underlying unity of thought as to what was effected by the Death of Christ, and how it had efficacy to this end. Atonement, Death of Christ, Ransom, Reconciliation, Redemption, Sacrifice, Vicarious Sacrifice [3]. 286; Denney, The Death of Christ; Gess, ‘Zur Lehre von Versöhnung’ in Jahrbucher fur Deutsche Theol
Goel - If, therefore, an individual should unfortunately happen to lay violent hands upon another person and kill him, the next of kin is bound to avenge the Death of the latter, and to pursue the murderer with unceasing vigilance until he have caught and killed him, either by force or by fraud. She could not be afraid of the magistrate for punishing the murderer, for the patriarchs were subject to no superior in Palestine; and Isaac was much too partial to Esau for her to entertain any expectation that he would condemn him to Death for it. In most ages and countries, certain reputed sacred places enjoyed the privileges of being asylums; Moses, therefore, taking it for granted that the murderer would flee to the altar, commanded that when the crime was deliberate and intentional, he should be torn even from the altar, and put to Death, Exodus 21:14 . If the goel overtook the fugitive before he reached an asylum, and put him to Death, he was not considered as guilty of blood; but if the man-slayer had reached a place of refuge, he was immediately protected, and an inquiry was instituted whether he had a right to such protection and asylum, that is, whether he had caused his neighbour's Death undesignedly, or was a deliberate murderer. In the latter case he was judicially delivered to the goel, who might put him to Death in whatever way he chose; but in the former case the homicide continued in the place of refuge until the high priest's Death, when he might return home in perfect security. It would seem that if no avenger of blood appeared, or if he were dilatory in the pursuit of the murderer, it became the duty of the magistrate himself to inflict the sentence of the law; and thus we find that David deemed this to be his duty in the case of Joab, and that Solomon, in obedience to his father's dying entreaty, actually discharged it by putting that murderer to Death, ...
1 Kings 2:5 ; 1 Kings 6:28-34 . ...
The following extracts will prove how tenaciously the eastern people adhere to the principle of revenging the Death of their relations and friends—"Among the Circassians," says Pallas, "all the relatives of the murderers are considered as guilty. It is alike legal for him to forgive him, to accept a sum of money as the price of blood, or to put him to Death. They led their victims bound to the burial ground, where they put them to Death; but the part of the execution that appeared of the most importance, was to make the infant children of the deceased stab the murderers with knives, and imbrue their little hands in the blood of those who had slain their father
Felony - ) A heinous crime; especially, a crime punishable by Death or imprisonment
Cuth - Cuthah was the center of worship of Nergal, god of Death in Mesopotamia
Evil-Merodach, - Berosus describes him as reigning lawlessly and without restraint, and he was put to Death by his brother-in-law Neriglissar, who succeeded him
Abelshittim - It was one of the last encampments of Israel before the Death of Moses, Numbers 33:49 ; called also Shittim, Joshua 2:1
Lazarus - This miracle so excited the wrath of the Jews that they sought to put both Jesus and Lazarus to Death
Tabitha - We find an honourable widow called by it in the Acts of the apostles, whose Death gave occasion for the Holy Ghost by the ministry of the apostle Peter, to manifest his almighty power in raising her again
Iri - The Death of Hananiah Iri's grandfather, for false prophecy, was foretold by Jeremiah; the grandson now takes his revenge (Jeremiah 28:16)
Eleven, Eleventh - , undecim), is used only of the eleven Apostles remaining after the Death of Judas Iscariot, Matthew 28:16 ; Mark 16:14 ; Luke 24:9,33 ; Acts 1:26 ; 2:14
Meraioth - 4:1) thought that he was next before Eli, and that at his Death the high priesthood passed from Eleazar's to Ithamar's line
Hadad-Rimmon - ) The scene of the national lamentation for Josiah's Death in the battle fought here with Pharaoh Necho (2 Kings 23:29; 2 Chronicles 35:23)
Talmai - ...
...
A king of Geshur, to whom Absalom fled after he had put Amnon to Death (2 Samuel 3:3 ; 13:37 )
Baal-Berith - Covenant lord, the name of the god worshipped in Shechem after the Death of Gideon (Judges 8:33 ; 9:4 )
Barzillai - David on his Death-bed, remembering his kindness, commended Barzillai's children to the care of Solomon (1 Kings 2:7 )
Death: Peace in - Young of Jedburgh, was once visiting the Death-bed of an aged member of his congregation, who was hourly looking for his last change
Christ Jesus: the Marrow of Theology - On his Death-bed, he was heard to say to a friend, 'Ah, my theology is reduced to this narrow compass: Jesus Christ came into the world to save
Howard, Thomas 15th Century - Accused of treason in 1544, his life was saved by Henry VIII's timely Death, but he remained in prison till Mary's accession
le Moyne, Simon - While on an embassy to the Cayuga Iroquois, he was seized and tortured, barely escaping Death to which he had been sentenced
Ignaz Philipp Semmelweiss - After his Death he was recognized as the pioneer of antiseptic treatment
Benedict ii, Saint, Pope - To shorten the time of vacancy at the Death of a pope he obtained from the Emperor Constantine IV a decree abolishing the imperial confirmation of the pope-elect before consecration
Jehovah Shalom - ) Gideon so-called his altar of thanksgiving (not sacrifice) in Ophrah, to commemorate the angel of Jehovah's salutation, "Peace be unto thee"; where rather judgment for national backslidings was to have been expected, and when he himself had feared Death, as having seen the angel of Jehovah
Beatrice - Dante's love for her was purely spiritual and mystical, and after her Death his idealized love for her was expressed in the Vita Nuova, a collection of sonnets
Bezek - A place attacked by Judah after Joshua’s Death, probably Bezkah , a ruin W
Callisthenes - At a festival in celebration of the victory, the Jews burnt Callisthenes to Death, because he had set fire to the portals of the Temple (cf
Martyr - The transliteration was used for these persons and the translation “witness” came to be used for those who testified of Christ but were not put to Death
Agar - The unfortunate woman determined to abandon the boy to Death in the wilderness but hearkened to the angel who foretold his people as the progenitor of a great people, the Ismaelites
Rehoboam - We have his history at large from 1 Kings 11:43, where it begins, to the rebellion against him by Jeroboam, where it ends in his Death, 1 Kings 14:31
Exit - ) Any departure; the act of quitting the stage of action or of life; Death; as, to make one's exit
Dower - ) That portion of the real estate of a man which his widow enjoys during her life, or to which a woman is entitled after the Death of her husband
Onan - Following the Death of his older brother, Er, Onan was to have married the widow and produced a son who would carry on Er's name
Antipas - According to these, he was roasted to Death in a brazen bowl in the days of Domitian
Apollonia, Saint - A pile of faggots was prepared to burn her and the other martyrs, but, threatened with Death, Apollonia chose to embrace it voluntarily and sprang into the fire
Skull - It may be that the palms of the hands remind us that the work which she did in persecuting the believers remained after she was unable to serve because of Death
Sepulchre - Matthew 23:27 (b) This is a description of the Death and decay which the Lord saw in the hearts, minds and lives of these hypocritical, religious leaders
Barak - Barak (Βαράκ) was the ally of Deborah in the life-and-death struggle of Israel with the Canaanites
Reprieve - ) A temporary suspension of the execution of a sentence, especially of a sentence of Death
Winter - ) The period of decay, old age, Death, or the like
Absalom - David was inconsolable when he heard of his Death
Dayspring, - Christ is here compared to the spring of day from on high, as the true heavenly light, "to give light to them that sit in darkness and in the shadow of Death, to guide our feet into the way of peace
Thomas Burke - Returning to Ireland he preached continually, despite his impaired health, until Death
Thomas Howard 15th Century - Accused of treason in 1544, his life was saved by Henry VIII's timely Death, but he remained in prison till Mary's accession
Semmelweiss, Ignaz Philipp - After his Death he was recognized as the pioneer of antiseptic treatment
Berni'ce, - She was first married to her uncle Herod, king of Chaleis, and after his Death (A
o'Nan - (Genesis 38:9 ) His Death took place before the family of Jacob went down into Egypt
Ahijah the shilonite - After Solomon's Death, he prophesied that the northern ten tribes would secede from the Davidic dynasty ruled by the Kings of Judah and crown Jeroboam as their king
Holy Innocents' Day - A Festival of the Church observed on the thirdday after Christmas, December 28th, in memory of the children ofBethlehem, whose Death Herod caused, and who have always beenregarded as the Infant Martyrs of the Christian Church, for that"not in speaking, but in dying, have they confessed Christ
Jeshishai - A part of the transjordanic tribes came temporarily under his dominion in the period of disorder in Israel after the Death of Jeroboam II This caused his registration of the Gadites
Paulinus, Disciple of Ephraem Syrus - After his master's Death he "separated from the church, and wrote much against the faith," being of an ambitious temperament and eager for renown
Potimiaena, a Martyr at Alexandria - 5) relates how she was cruelly tortured, and Death finally inflicted by burning pitch poured slowly about her from feet to head
Atonement - (uh tohne' mehnt), meaning reconciliation, was associated with sacrificial offerings to remove the effects of sin and in the New Testament,] refers specifically to the reconciliation between God and humanity effected by the Death, burial, and resurrection of Christ. ...
Atonement and the Cross The focal point of God's atoning work is Christ's Death on the cross. Paul wrote that “when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the Death of his Son” (Romans 5:10 ). He explained His Death in terms of the “blood of the new testament, which is shed for many” (Mark 14:24 ). ...
Though atonement is focused in the cross, the New Testament makes clear that Christ's Death is the climax of His perfect obedience. He “became obedient unto Death, even the Death of the cross” (Philippians 2:8 ). ...
The Origin of Atonement The atonement for sin provided by Christ's Death had its origin in divine love. Sin and Death came into the world through him. He experienced as substitute the suffering and Death each person deserved. Christ came so “that through Death he might destroy him that had the power of Death, that is, the devil; And deliver them who through fear of Death were all their lifetime subject to bondage” (Hebrews 2:14-15 ). Not surprisingly, the atoning power of Christ's Death is often expressed in terms drawn from Old Testament sacrificial practices. Thus, Christ's Death is called a “sacrifice for sins” (Hebrews 10:12 ) and a “sacrifice to God” (Ephesians 5:2 ). Furthermore, sacrifice witnesses to the effectiveness of Christ's Death. This glorification climaxes in Jesus' Death on the cross (John 12:23-24 ; John 13:31-32 ). ' This he said, signifying what Death he should die. The meaning is not that Jesus was glorified as a reward for His Death. Rather it means that divine glory was revealed in the Death He died for sins
Strangling - This is suggested as a mode of Death, Job 7:15 . The cognate verb describes the manner of Ahithophel’s self-inflicted Death ( 2 Samuel 17:23 , EV Widow - ...
The word represents a woman who, because of the Death of her husband, has lost her social and economic position. Even if children had been born before her husband’s Death, a widow’s lot was not a happy one ( Death, living in widowhood” ( Adoni'Jah - ) After the Death of his three brothers, Amnon, Chileab and Absalom, he became eldest son; and when his father's strength was visibly declining, put forward his pretensions to the crown. " (1 Kings 1:52 ) The Death of David quickly followed on these events; and Adonijah begged Bath-sheba to procure Solomon's consent to his marriage with Abishag, who had been the wife of David in his old age. (1 Kings 1:3 ) This was regarded as equivalent to a fresh attempt on the throne [4]; and therefore Solomon ordered him to be put to Death by Benaiah
Cross - Although the New Testament writers refer to the cruelty and injustice of Jesus’ crucifixion (Acts 2:23; see CRUCIFIXION), their main concern is not with the physical horror of his Death but with its theological meaning (1 Corinthians 1:18; 1 Peter 2:24). Because the Jews had a wrong understanding of the curse Jesus bore in his Death, his crucifixion was to them a stumbling block. They could not trust in Jesus’ Death on the cross as a way of salvation, and therefore they could not be saved (1 Corinthians 1:23; see CURSE; STUMBLING BLOCK). ...
God’s way of salvation...
To the writers of the New Testament, Jesus’ Death on the cross was the central point in the whole saving activity of God (1 Corinthians 1:23; 1 Corinthians 2:2; 1 Corinthians 15:3-4; see JUSTIFICATION; PROPITIATION). To the early Christians, the expression ‘cross of Christ’, like the expression ‘blood of Christ’, meant the same as ‘death of Christ’ (Romans 5:9-10; Colossians 1:20; Colossians 1:22; see BLOOD). ...
The cross symbolized Death not only for Christ, but also for believers. ...
But Death on a cross also meant humiliation
Hour - An appointed time for meeting or for religious festival, a brief moment of time, one twelfth of the day or of the night, and in the Gospel of John the significant period of Jesus' saving mission on earth from His triumphal entry until His Death and resurrection. ...
Jesus' hour is a central theme in John's Gospel, creating an emotional uncertainty and expectancy and a theological understanding of the central importance of Jesus' Death and resurrection. In John's Gospel, “hour” usually refers to the period from the triumphant entry (John 12:23 ) until the climactic Death and resurrection. Jesus clearly associated His ability to give life with His own Death (John 6:51-58 ). This is the first time the reader has been asked to understand Jesus' “hour” in terms of Death. The reader has by now developed strong suspicions that Jesus' “hour” somehow forebodes His Death. He then interpreted this “hour” as the time of his being “lifted up” in Death (John 12:32-34 ; compare John 3:14-15 ). In the references to Jesus' hour that follow, the association with His Death is explicit (John 13:1-3 ; John 17:1 ). As the reader encounters this motif repeatedly, a perspective on Jesus' Death develops that is quite different from that gained in the other Gospels. Without trivializing the reality of Jesus' suffering and Death, the Gospel of John presents that event as the “hour” of Jesus' “glory,” the time of His “exaltation/lifting up. ” Jesus' Death is the means by which eternal life is provided for the world (John 3:14-15 ; John 6:51-53 ). The glory of Jesus' Death is found both in what it enabled him to offer the world (John 12:28 ; John 7:37-39 ) and in its being the means by which He returned to the Father (John 13:1 )
Curtain - The curtain separating the holy of holies and the holy place was torn from top to bottom at the time of Jesus' Death signifying the access that all people had to God from that time forward (Matthew 27:51 ). Jesus also opened this curtain to his followers by his Death (Hebrews 10:20 )
Francis Jaccard, Blessed - Sentenced to Death, he was pardoned because of his skill as translator, but was again seized, tortured, and strangled to Death, September 21, 1838
Enoch - After the birth of Methuselah, Enoch "walked with God three hundred years" (Genesis 5:22-24 ), when he was translated without tasting Death. When he was translated, only Adam, so far as recorded, had as yet died a natural Death, and Noah was not yet born
Jaccard, Francis, Blessed - Sentenced to Death, he was pardoned because of his skill as translator, but was again seized, tortured, and strangled to Death, September 21, 1838
Josh'ua, Book of - Some events, such as the capture of Hebron, of Debir, (Joshua 15:13-19 ) and Judges 1:10-15 Of Leshem, ( Joshua 19:47 ) and Judges 18:7 And the joint occupation of Jerusalem, ( Joshua 15:63 ) and Judges 1:21 Probably did not occur till after Joshua's Death. (It was written probably during Joshua's life, or soon after his Death (B
Jabin - Leader of northern coalition of kings who attacked Joshua at the water of Merom and met their Death (compare Joshua 12:19-24 ). Jabin, king of Hazor, controlled the Israelites when they turned away from God at Ehud's Death (Judges 4:1-2 )
Non-Jurors - After the Death of James II, some of them rejoined the Anglican Church, while others held out until the Death of Charles Edward in 1788
Muth-Labben - Saul slain by the Philistines by whom he had sought to slay David, and receiving the last thrust from one of the Amalekites whom he ought to have destroyed, and Nabal ("fool") dying after his selfish surfeit when churlishly he had refused aught to David's men who had guarded him and his, are instances of the Death of such world-wise "fools" (1 Samuel 25:26; 1 Samuel 25:38; 2 Samuel 3:33; Psalms 14:1). ) The Septuagint and Vulgate versions read concerning the mysteries of the Son," namely, the divine Son's Death, the earnest of His final victory over the last "enemy" (Psalms 9:6)
Beatification - (Latin: beatus, blessed; facere, to make) The declaration by the pope as head of the Church that one of its members deserves for saintly life as confessor or heroic Death as martyr, to be entitled Blessed, that is, regarded as dwelling in the happiness of heaven. The second process, known as the Apostolic process, is instituted by the Holy See in case the first inquiry shows that there is a likelihood of proving that the Servant of God practised virtue to an heroic degree, or died by the heroic Death of martyrdom
Menelaus - Having secured the Death of Onias III. After this attempt of Jason, which ended in failure, Menelaus is lost to sight for some years, but finally suffered Death at the hands of Antiochus Eupator ( c Gondi, Jean Francois Paul - From 1638 to 1641 he took part in the plots of the Count de Soissons against Richelieu, but after the Death of the former, devoted himself to an ecclesiastical career, and in 1644 was consecrated at Notre Dame, receiving the title of Archbishop of Corinth. When made cardinal in 1651, he promised fidelity to the royal family, but his opposition to Mazarin ended only with the latter's Death
Herod Antipas - ' He heard John the Baptist 'gladly,' yet put him to Death. This led to the Death of John the Baptist by her desire, as recorded in scripture; and also to his being attacked and defeated with great loss by Aretas
Execute - ) To infect capital punishment on; to put to Death in conformity to a legal sentence; as, to execute a traitor. ) Too put to Death illegally; to kill
Pestilence - In Ugaritic, dbr probably signifies “death. ...
The Septuagint gives the following translation: thanatos (“death”)
Samuel - However, in these chapters there are some small additions, which seem to have been inserted after his Death. Samuel began the order of the prophets, which was never discontinued till the Death of Zechariah and Malachi, Acts 3:24
Gamaliel - The Talmundists say that he was the son of Rabbi Simeon, and grandson of Hillel, the celebrated teacher of the law, and that upon his Death the glory of the law departed. His noble intervention before the Sanhedrin saved the apostles from an ignominious Death, and shows that he was gifted with great wisdom and tolerance, if not strongly inclined towards the gospel, Acts 5:33-40
Pisgah - Its principal distinction, however, is its being the scene of Moses’ vision of the Promised Land ( Deuteronomy 3:27 ; Deuteronomy 34:1 ) and of his Death. see), referred to in Deuteronomy 32:49 as the scene of the Death of Moses
Translate - To remove or convey to heaven, as a human being, without Death. By faith Enoch was translated, that he should not see Death
Devil, Devlish - Death having been brought into the world by sin, the "Devil" had the power of Death, but Christ through His own Death, has triumphed over him, and will bring him to nought, Hebrews 2:14 ; his power over Death is intimated in his struggle with Michael over the body of Moses
Atonement - The word does not occur in most versions of the New Testament, but it is used broadly in the language of theology in relation to the sacrificial Death of Christ. They are guilty, the penalty is Death, and they cannot, by their own efforts, escape this penalty. )...
The sacrifices of the Old Testament pointed to the one great sacrifice that is the only basis on which God can forgive a person’s sins, the Death of Christ. Through that Death God is able justly to forgive the sins of all who turn to him in faith, no matter what era they might have lived in (Matthew 26:28; Romans 3:25-26; Romans 4:25; Hebrews 9:15; 1 Peter 2:24)
Christian Science - A system of healing disease of mind and body which teaches that all cause and effect is mental, and that sin, sickness, and Death will be destroyed by a full understanding of the Divine Principle of Jesus' teaching and healing
Ireland, Clement of, Saint - So great was his fame that Charlemagne invited him to his court and made him regent of the school of Paris from 775 until his Death
Falling Asleep of Mary - 4thcentury, falsely attributed to Saint John the Evangelist, and describing the Death of the Blessed Virgin
Flight Into Egypt - After the departure of the wise men, the angel of the Lord told Joseph to fiy into Egypt with the Infant Jesus and His mother, as Herod had evil designs against them; there they remained until the Death of Herod (Matthew 2)
Joel Harris - Although his wife was a Catholic and he had long admired the Catholic religion, he did not embrace it until a few weeks before his Death
Kunigunde, Saint - After Henry's Death, 1025, she retired to the convent of Kaufungen which she had founded
Julitta, Saint - She sought refuge in Tarsus, but she and the child were put to Death there
Quiricus, Saint - She sought refuge in Tarsus, but she and the child were put to Death there
Shelomith - The mother of the man who was stoned to Death for having blasphemed ‘the Name’ ( Leviticus 24:11 )
Thebez - A fortified city, in the reduction of which Abimelech met his Death ( Judges 9:50 , 2 Samuel 11:21 )
Good Thief - He is patron of persons condemned to Death
Dismas, Saint - He is patron of persons condemned to Death
James Northcote - " After his wife's Death he entered the priesthood and for 17 years was president of Oscott College
Cellites - Congregation under patronage of Saint Alexius of Edessa, founded by Tobias at Mechlin, Brabant, in the 15th century, to nurse the sick and bury the dead during the Black Death
Shephatiah - ...
...
One of the princes who urged the putting of Jeremiah to Death (Jeremiah 38:1-4 )
Cushi - Joab's retainer, a foreigner, probably from his name a Cushite, and so unrecognized by the watchman, and ignorant of David's devoted affection for Absalom, as appears from the abrupt inconsiderateness with which he announced Absalom's Death
Novitiate - It is esteemed the bed of the civil Death of a novice, who expires to the world by profession
Amasa - He was appointed by David to command the army in room of his cousin Joab (2 Samuel 19:13 ), who afterwards treacherously put him to Death as a dangerous rival (2 Samuel 20:4-12 )
Pentateuch - ' The many references to and quotations from them in other parts of the scripture, and allusions to them by Christ under the name of Moses, show plainly that Moses was the inspired writer of them, except of course the small portion that records his Death and burial
Babe - In Isaiah 3:4 the word "babes" refers to a succession of weak and wicked princes who reigned over Judah from the Death of Josiah downward to the destruction of Jerusalem
Inscription - The Gospel writers saw in Pilate's mockery the truth about Jesus who in His suffering and Death fulfilled His messianic role
Avoidance - ) The act of becoming vacant, or the state of being vacant; - specifically used for the state of a benefice becoming void by the Death, deprivation, or resignation of the incumbent
Northcote, James Spencer - " After his wife's Death he entered the priesthood and for 17 years was president of Oscott College
Luigi Galvani - 1762,and held that post till a few months before his Death, when he resigned rather than take the civiloath demanded by the Cisalpine Republic
Cherethim - This name is by some interpreted as meaning "Cretans," and by others "executioners," who were ready to execute the king's sentence of Death (Genesis 37:36 , marg
Mahlon - The reason for Mahlon's Death is not given
Nebuchadnezzar - He was the son of Nabopolassar and inherited the throne upon the Death of his father
Canker - In 2 Timothy 2:17 the reference is to gangrene which is the local Death of soft tissues due to loss of blood supply—a condition that can spread from infected to uninfected tissue
Agony - ) The last struggle of life; Death struggle
Alimentation - (Latin: alimentum, nourishment) Support or maintenance; whatever is necessary for life, as food and drink, a home, clothing, care in sickness and Death
Galvani, Luigi - 1762,and held that post till a few months before his Death, when he resigned rather than take the civiloath demanded by the Cisalpine Republic
Crisis - ) That change in a disease which indicates whether the result is to be recovery or Death; sometimes, also, a striking change of symptoms attended by an outward manifestation, as by an eruption or sweat
Hippolytus, Saint - Racked and scourged, he was finally tied to the tail of a horse and dragged to Death
Adultery - It is a diriment impediment to marriage between two who, during the time of a legitimate marriage, commit the crime pledging themselves to marriage later; or, who commit it during the time of a legitimate marriage and one or the other brings about the Death of one of the married parties
Night - Death, a time "when no man can work
ab'Arim - Its most elevated spot was "the Mount Nebo, 'head' of 'the' Pisgah," from which Moses viewed the Promised Land before his Death
Nahor - Neither the year of his birth nor of his Death is exactly known
Blasphemy - The law sentenced blasphemers to Death, Leviticus 24:12-16
Harris, Joel Chandler - Although his wife was a Catholic and he had long admired the Catholic religion, he did not embrace it until a few weeks before his Death
Paradise - Heaven, the blissful seat of sanctified souls after Death
Trachonitis - Herod the Great subdued the robbers that infested it; and after his Death it was governed by Philip his son, and then by Herod Agrippa
Egypt, Flight Into - After the departure of the wise men, the angel of the Lord told Joseph to fiy into Egypt with the Infant Jesus and His mother, as Herod had evil designs against them; there they remained until the Death of Herod (Matthew 2)
Tammuz - The fabled Death and restoration of Adonis, supposed to symbolize the departure and return of the sun, were celebrated at the summer solstice first with lamentation, and then with rejoicing and obscene revels
Thief, Good - He is patron of persons condemned to Death
Thief, Penitent - He is patron of persons condemned to Death
Hazarma'Veth - (court of Death ), the third in order of the sons of Joktan ( Genesis 10:26 ) The name is preserved in the Arabic Hadramawt and Hadrumawl , the appellation of a province and an ancient people of southern Arabia
Elim'Elech - ) In consequence of a great Death in the land he went with his wife, Naomi, and his two sons, Mahlon and Chilion, to dwell in Moab, where he and his sons died without posterity
Sebastianus, Martyr at Rome - He confessed Christ, and was shot (apparently) to Death with arrows in the camp
Original Sin - Other consequences of Adam's sin are Death, and concupiscence, or the rebellion of our lower appetites against reason and will. All this is based on Holy Scripture, particularly on Saint Paul's Epistle to the Romans 5: "Wherefore as by one man sin entered into this world, and by sin Death; and so Death passed upon all men, in whom all have sinned
Worm - The expression ‘ eaten of worms ,’ used ( Acts 12:23 ) in describing the Death of Herod Agrippa i. , would seem to refer to a Death accompanied by violent abdominal pains, such symptoms being commonly ascribed in the Holy Land to-day to abdominal worms ( Lumbricoides ) a belief often revived by the evacuation of such worms near the time of Death (cf
Mary, Sister of Lazarus And Martha - The heart of Mary was riven at the Death of Lazarus. Jesus wept, and Mary thus learned His sympathy, and had a fresh taste of the good part which Death could not take from her. To Martha Jesus said that she should have her brother back, and should see the power of Death broken by the One who was "the resurrection and the life;" but Mary had Himself
Murder - Among the Hebrews murder was always punished with Death; but involuntary homicide, only by banishment. Cities of refuge were appointed for involuntary manslaughter, whither the slayer might retire and continue in safety till the Death of the high priest, Numbers 35:28 . A murderer was put to Death without remission, and the kinsman of the murdered person might kill him with impunity
Abner - After Saul's Death, he made Ishbosheth king; and for seven years supported the family of Saul, in opposition to David; but in most of his skirmishes came off with loss. On his own authority he sent a messenger to invite him back, to have some farther communication with the king; and when Abner was come into Joab's presence, the latter, partly from jealousy lest Abner might become his superior, and partly to revenge his brother Asahel's Death, mortally stabbed him in the act of salutation. David, to show how heartily he detested the act, honoured Abner with a splendid funeral, and composed an elegy on his Death, 2 Samuel 3
Sin, Original - Other consequences of Adam's sin are Death, and concupiscence, or the rebellion of our lower appetites against reason and will. All this is based on Holy Scripture, particularly on Saint Paul's Epistle to the Romans 5: "Wherefore as by one man sin entered into this world, and by sin Death; and so Death passed upon all men, in whom all have sinned
Baxterians - This denomination own, with Calvin, that the merits of Christ's Death are to be applied to believers only; but they also assert that all men are in a state capable of salvation. In order to prove that the Death of Christ has put all in a state capable of salvation, the following arguments are alleged by this learned author. Baxter allows, certain fruits of Christ's Death which are proper to the elect only: ...
1. Resurrection unto life, and justification in judgment; glorification of the soul at Death, and of the body at the resurrection, Philippians 3:20-21 . Hence he infers, that though Christ never absolutely intended or decreed that his Death should eventually put all men in possession of those benefits, yet he did intend and decree that all men should have a conditional gift of them by his Death
Crucifixion - It was unanimously considered the most horrible form of Death. A Death by crucifixion seems to include all that pain and Death can have of the horrible and ghastly, --dizziness, cramp, thirst, starvation, sleeplessness, traumatic fever, tetanus, publicity of shame, long continuance of torment, horror of anticipation, mortification of untended wounds, all intensified just up to the point at which they can be endured at all, but all stopping just short of the point which would give to the sufferer the relief of unconsciousness. Such was the Death to which Christ was doomed. This was necessary from the lingering character of the Death, which sometimes did not supervene even for three days, and was at last the result of gradual benumbing and starvation. Fracture of the legs was especially adopted by the Jews to hasten Death
Life - Because of sin, the lives of all people are affected by the power of Death. The result is that physically they are doomed to Death and spiritually they are dead already (Romans 5:12; Romans 6:23; Ephesians 2:1; Ephesians 4:18; see Death). ...
Even though physical Death is the common experience of all, believers will never be separated from God (John 8:51; Romans 8:38-39). Their physical Death is viewed as a temporary ‘sleep’. At Christ’s return, God will raise them to resurrection life, where sin and Death will have no more power (John 11:11; John 11:25-26; 1 Corinthians 15:20-26; 1 Corinthians 15:51-57). ...
Being part of a world affected by sin and Death, believers may have to pass through physical Death, but they will never die in the sense that really matters (John 11:25-26). When Jesus Christ returns, they will be raised from Death to enjoy the resurrection life of glory, perfection, power and immortality (Matthew 25:46; John 5:28-29; John 6:40; Romans 2:7; Romans 6:22; 1 Corinthians 15:42-44; 2 Corinthians 5:4; 2 Timothy 1:10; see RESURRECTION)
Maurice Bourdin - After Paschal's Death Henry had him proclaimed pope, 1118
Johann Schall Von Bell - In 1664Father Schall was thrown into prison and narrowly escaped Death
Epaphroditus - " When with Paul at Rome he became very ill, 'nigh unto Death
Jehovah - It is the very name considered by the Jews as great, glorious, terrible, hidden, mysterious, to blaspheme which merited Death (Leviticus 24)
Tabitha - Peter, who was sent for from Lydda on the occasion of her Death, prayed over the dead body, and said, "Tabitha, arise
Jedidiah - Despite David's sin with Bathsheba and the Death of the child of their sinful relationship, God showed His love to their child Solomon, thus underlining God's forgiving nature and His continued commitment to David and his royal house
Good Friday - A fast of the Christian church, in memory of the sufferings and Death of Jesus Christ
Bible - The expositor who nullifies the historical groundwork of Scripture for the sake of finding only spiritual truths everywhere, brings Death on all correct interpretation
Commonwealth - ) Specifically, the form of government established on the Death of Charles I
Procurator - The procurator could issue Death warrants (a privilege often withheld from subject peoples) and have coins struck in his name
Shu'Lamite, the, - [1] If, then, Shulamite and Shunammite are equivalent, we may conjecture that the Shunammite who was the object of Solomon's passion was Abishag, the most lovely girl of her day, and at the time of David's Death the most prominent person at Jerusalem
Baal-Berith - (bay' uhl-beerihth) In Judges 8:33 , a Canaanite deity whom the Israelites began to worship following the Death of Gideon
Gallows - It is very doubtful if Death by strangulation is intended ‘tree’ in all probability having here its frequent sense of ‘pole,’ on which, as was customary in Persia, the criminal was impaled (see Crimes and Punishments, § 10 )
Silence - The Bible uses silence in several ways: as reverence to God (Habakkuk 2:20 ), as a symbol of Death (Psalm 94:17 ), as a symbol of Sheol (Psalm 115:17 ), and as an expression of despair (Lamentations 2:10 )
Deathwatch - ) A small wingless insect, of the family Psocidae, which makes a similar but fainter sound; - called also Deathtick. By forcibly striking its head against woodwork it makes a ticking sound, which is a call of the sexes to each other, but has been imagined by superstitious people to presage Death
Ananias - With his wife he was miraculously punished by Peter with sudden Death, for hypocrisy and falsehood (Acts 5)
Arius - Later he demanded that Alexander of Constantinople give him communion by the emperor's orders, but his sudden Death prevented the sacrilege
Gregory Viii - Anti-Pope - After Paschal's Death Henry had him proclaimed pope, 1118
Incorruption, - When this takes place, and the mortal shall have put on immortality, Death will be swallowed up in victory! 1 Corinthians 15:42-54
Earthly - Not heavenly vile mean, This earthly load ...
Of Death called life
Laugh - There is no mercy after Death
Malignant - ) Tending to produce Death; threatening a fatal issue; virulent; as, malignant diphtheria
Threaten - ) To exhibit the appearance of (something evil or unpleasant) as approaching; to indicate as impending; to announce the conditional infliction of; as, to threaten war; to threaten Death
Adoni'Ram - (1 Kings 12:18 ) This last monarch sent him to collect the tribute from the rebellious Israelites, by whom he was stoned to Death, (B
Acel'Dama - (the field of blood ) ( Akeldama in the Revised Version), the name given by the Jews of Jerusalem to a field near Jerusalem purchased by Judas with the money which he received for the betrayal of Christ, and so called from his violent Death therein
Righteousness - The righteousness of Christ denotes, not only his absolute perfection, but, is taken for his perfect obedience unto Death, and his suffering the penalty of the law in our stead
Asahel - To revenge his Death, his brother Joab, some years after, treacherously killed Abner, who had come to wait on David at Hebron, in order to procure him to be acknowledged king by all Israel, 2 Samuel 3:26-27
Bernice - , Acts 25:13; Acts 23:26-30, married first to her uncle Herod, king of Chalcis, after whose Death she lived under suspicious circumstances with her brother
Uriah - His Death was purposely brought about by an understanding between Joab and David, in order that David's guilt in the case of Bathsheba might be concealed, and that he might obtain her for his wife
Schall Von Bell, Johann Adam - In 1664Father Schall was thrown into prison and narrowly escaped Death
Widow - A woman who has lost her husband by Death
Jar'Muth - to punish Gibeon for having made alliance with Israel, (Joshua 10:3,5 ) and who were routed at Beth-horon and put to Death by Joshua at Makkedah
Eschatology - ...
In its broader aspects, eschatology is concerned with all matters relating to Death and the afterlife (Psalms 16:11; Daniel 12:2; Luke 16:22-23; Hebrews 9:27-28; see Death; HADES; PARADISE; SHEOL). At his first coming Jesus brought God’s plan of salvation to its fulfilment through his life and work, and particularly through his Death and resurrection. His victory will include the healing of the physical world, the destruction of Death and the punishment of Satan (1 Corinthians 15:25-26; Revelation 20:10; see NATURE; Death; SATAN)
Pilate - Under his rule John the Baptist commenced his ministry, Luke 3:1, and our Lord was put to Death. He held it about ten years, till a short time before that emperor's Death
Mortal Sin - (Latin: mors, Death) ...
A grievous offense against the law of God. This sin is called mortal because it deprives us of supernatural life and brings damnation and Death of the soul
Avenger of Blood - This arrangement applied only to cases where the Death was not premeditated. If the offence was merely manslaughter, then the fugitive must remain within the city till the Death of the high priest (Numbers 35:25 )
Antiochus - " In a spirit of revenge he organized an expedition against Jerusalem, which he destroyed, putting vast multitudes of its inhabitants to Death in the most cruel manner. Enraged at this, Antiochus marched against them in person, threatening utterly to exterminate the nation; but on the way he was suddenly arrested by the hand of Death (B
Joab - When Absalom rebelled Joab adhered to David; and contrary to express orders he put Absalom to Death. After the Death of David, Joab was slain at the altar, whither he had fled for protection; and was buried in his own domain in the wilderness
Augustus - he first gained power with Antony and Lepidus at Julius Caesar's Death in 44 B. At his Death the Senate declared him a god
Mourning - For Asa and Zedekiah there was 'great burning' of odours at their Death, which was most probably copied from the heathen. At a Death professional mourners were hired, mostly women. Musicians also attended at Deaths, who played mournful strains
Predestine, Predestination - For example, the crucifixion was brought about by sinful men who unjustly put Jesus to Death (Acts 4:27); yet, in that Death, we are reconciled to God (Romans 5:10)
Caiaphas - He was of the sect of the Sadducees (Acts 5:17 ), and was a member of the council when he gave his opinion that Jesus should be put to Death "for the people, and that the whole nation perish not" (John 11:50 ). " Caiaphas had no power to inflict the punishment of Death, and therefore Jesus was sent to Pilate, the Roman governor, that he might duly pronounce the sentence against him (Matthew 27:2 ; John 18:28 )
Act - ...
2: δικαίωμα (Strong's #1345 — Noun Neuter — dikaioma — dik-ah'-yo-mah ) signifies "an act of righteousness, a concrete expression of righteousness," as in the RV of Romans 5:18 , in reference to the Death of Christ; the AV wrongly renders it "the righteousness of One. " The contrast is between the one trespass by Adam and the one act of Christ in His atoning Death
Sin, Mortal - (Latin: mors, Death) ...
A grievous offense against the law of God. This sin is called mortal because it deprives us of supernatural life and brings damnation and Death of the soul
Enoch - Death is one of the evil consequences of human sin, and the genealogical record of the generations from Adam to Noah is characterized by repetition of the word ‘death’ (Genesis 5:5; Genesis 5:8; Genesis 5:11; Genesis 5:14; Genesis 5:17; Genesis 5:20). In this way God gave hope to the righteous that Death’s apparent conquest is not permanent
Matthias, Feast of Saint - James who had been put to Death by Herod, and ofsome other Apostle whose Death is not recorded
Sacrifice - In the generality of sacrifices offered to God under the law the consciousness is supposed in the offerer that Death, as God's judgement, was on him; hence the sacrifice had to be killed that it might be accepted of God at his hand. ...
The first sacrifice we read of was that offered by Abel, though there is an indication of the Death of victims in the fact that Adam and Eve were clothed by God with coats of skins. Doubtless in some way God had instructed man that, the penalty of the fall and of his own sin being that his life was forfeited, he could only appropriately approach God by the Death of a substitute not chargeable with his offence; for it was by faith that Abel offered unto God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain. Without faith in the sacrificial Death of Christ there is no salvation, as is taught in Romans 3:25 ; Romans 4:24,25 ; 1 Corinthians 15:1-4
Mac'Cabees - After the Death of Judas, Jonathan his brother succeeded to the command, and later assumed the high-priestly office. On the Death of Simon, Johannes Hyrcanus, one of his sons, at once assumed the government, B. 135, and met with a peaceful Death B. engaged in a civil war On the Death of their mother, Alexandra, B
Adoniram - He was stoned to Death by the revolted ten tribes, having been sent to them by Rehoboam, either to induce them to return, or to test by gathering the taxes
John Regis, Saint - On the site of his Death the Institute of the Sisters of Saint Regis of the Cenacle was founded in 1888
Faith, Saint - At a later date Sapientia (Greek: Wisdom) and her three companions, Spes, Fides, and Caritas (Latin: Faith, Hope, and Charity), were put to Death and were buried in the cemetery of Saint Callistus on the Appian Way
Marina de Escobar, Venerable - Her revelations, written down by her and arranged by her confessor, were published after her Death
Margaret Haughery - After her husband's Death at New Orleans, 1836, she consecrated her life to succoring the orphans and the poor, and died mourned as "the mother of the orphans
Machabees - They are known as the Machabees because they suffered Death during the era of the Machabee heroes
Christina, Saint - She suffered torments and a cruel Death under Diocletian, and has been venerated since the 4th century
Dympna, Saint - The latter, however, discovered their whereabouts and put them to Death
Dimpna, Saint - The latter, however, discovered their whereabouts and put them to Death
Charity, Saint - At a later date Sapientia (Greek: Wisdom) and her three companions, Spes, Fides, and Caritas (Latin: Faith, Hope, and Charity), were put to Death and were buried in the cemetery of Saint Callistus on the Appian Way
Baptism of the Dead - The practice seems to be grounded on a vain idea, that, when men had neglected to receive baptism in their life-time, some compensation might be made for this default by receiving it after Death
Statute Bloody - which denounced Death against all those who should deny the doctrine of transubstantiation; or maintain the necessity of receiving the sacrament in both kinds, or affirm that it was lawful for priests to marry, that vows of celibacy might be broken, that private masses were of no avail, and that auricular confession to a priest was not necessary to salvation
Poison - A chemical agent causing ill health or Death when in contact with or ingested by an organism
Martyrs of Cuncolim - Five religious of the Society of Jesus, accompanied by some Christians, who were surrounded by pagan villagers of Cuncolim, India, and put to Death, July 25, 1583
Perishable - Term some translations (KJV, REB, NRSV) use to describe the present, mortal body (1Corinthians 15:42,1Corinthians 15:50,1 Corinthians 15:53-54 ), which is subject to Death and decay
Shoftim - "judges"); (a) Succession of Torah authorities and leaders who ruled Israel from the year 2533 from creation (1228 BCE, 17 years after the Death of Joshua) to the anointing of Saul as king in 2882 (879 BCE)
Mortality - Subjection to Death
Assure - ) To insure; to covenant to indemnify for loss, or to pay a specified sum at Death
Hope, Saint - At a later date Sapientia (Greek: Wisdom) and her three companions, Spes, Fides, and Caritas (Latin: Faith, Hope, and Charity), were put to Death and were buried in the cemetery of Saint Callistus on the Appian Way
Tontine - Thus, an annuity is shared among a number, on the principle that the share of each, at his Death, is enjoyed by the survivors, until at last the whole goes to the last survivor, or to the last two or three, according to the terms on which the money is advanced
Goldwell, Thomas - Nine years later he joined the Theatines, and under Queen Mary returned as Bishop of Saint Asaph; Mary's Death frustrated his transfer to Oxford, and he went into exile again
Gabriel Possenti, Saint - Of a modest and retiring nature, his life was without any miraculous event and his great sanctity was not fully appreciated until after his Death, when many miracles occurred at his tomb at Isola di Gran Sasso
Galla Placidia - After his Death she became the wife of Constantius and the mother of Valentinian III, for whom she acted as regent
Hail Mary - Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our Death
Corruption - ...
Romans 8:21 (b) The bondage of living in this world of sin and Death is compared to vile, rotten, evil things
Country - ...
Hebrews 11:14 (b) Probably this refers to the eternal state where we shall live together in happy fellowship with no debts, no Death, no despair, but only the peace of GOD and His presence
Procurator - Judaea was governed by a procurator, ἡγεμών,who held his authority directly from the emperor, and was invested with powers of life and Death
Bearded, George the - He was trained for the Church, but after the Death of his elder brother he succeeded to the title, 1500
Apollinaris, Saint - Banished from Ravenna with the other Christians, by a decree of Vespasian, he was discovered while passing through the gates, tortured, and put to Death
Didache - and is supposed to be what the twelve apostles taught to the Gentiles concerning life and Death, church order, fasting, baptism, prayer, etc
Philetus - Coupled with Hymenaeus as "erring" (missing the aim: estocheesan ), and holding that "the resurrection is past already" (2 Timothy 2:17), as if it were merely the spiritual raising of souls from the Death of sin: perverting Romans 6:4; Ephesians 2:6; Colossians 2:12; compare 1 Corinthians 15:12, etc
Application - Is used for the act whereby our Saviour transfers or makes over to us what he had earned or purchased by his holy life and Death
Testament - ) A solemn, authentic instrument in writing, by which a person declares his will as to disposal of his estate and effects after his Death
Erasmus, Saint - Tradition holds that he was transported by an angel from Mount Lebanon whence he had fled from the persecution, to Lake Lucrino in Italy, but was seized there and taken to Campania, where he was tortured and put to Death
Ahikam - He also served under Jehoiakim and shielded Jeremiah from Death when he prophesied against the nation
Letter, the - " Whether of the law or of the gospel, the mere intellectual reception of the words only leads to formality and Death; it is only what is 'of the Spirit' that can result in life
Rechab - Son of Rimmon: he and his brother Baanah assassinated Ish-bosheth, son of Saul, for which they were put to Death by David
Jehoiakim - When Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar, this prince was also taken and put to Death, and his body thrown into the common sewer, according to the prediction of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 22:18-19
Leg - 1: σκέλος (Strong's #4628 — Noun Neuter — skelos — skel'-os ) "the leg from the hip downwards," is used only of the breaking of the "legs" of the crucified malefactors, to hasten their Death, John 19:31-33 (a customary act, not carried out in the case of Christ, in fullfillment of Exodus 12:46 ; Numbers 9:12 )
Adoram - This last monarch sent him to collect the tribute from the rebellious Israelites, by whom he was stoned to Death
Theft - A night-robber might lawfully be slain in the act; and a man-stealer was to be punished by Death, Exodus 21:16 22:2
Simeon, Saint - After the Death of Saint James in 62, Simeon succeeded him as Bishop of Jerusalem, which see he occupied for about 40 years
Sabina, Saint - Sabina at first escaped because of her position, but was so zealous in the practise of her religion that she too was put to Death; her relics were brought to the Aventine in 430, and there a basilica bears her name
Zin - It formed part of the great wilderness of Paran, Numbers 13:26 ; and in its north-east corner was Kadesh-barnea, memorable for the Death of Miriam, the mission of the twelve spies into Canaan, the murmuring of the Israelites, the rock flowing with water, and the unholy passion of Moses, Numbers 13:21 20:1-13 27:14
Regis, John Francis, Saint - On the site of his Death the Institute of the Sisters of Saint Regis of the Cenacle was founded in 1888
Thomas Goldwell - Nine years later he joined the Theatines, and under Queen Mary returned as Bishop of Saint Asaph; Mary's Death frustrated his transfer to Oxford, and he went into exile again
Theudas - The period following the Death of Herod the Great was full of revolts
George the Bearded - He was trained for the Church, but after the Death of his elder brother he succeeded to the title, 1500
Haughery, Margaret - After her husband's Death at New Orleans, 1836, she consecrated her life to succoring the orphans and the poor, and died mourned as "the mother of the orphans
Venerable - The places where saints have suffered for the testimony of Christ - rendered venerable by their Death
Yesterday - All our yesterdays have lighted fools the way to dusty Death
Captive - They were kept for slaves, and often sold; but this was a modification of the ancient cruelty, and a substitute for putting them to Death Although the treatment of captives by the Jews seems sometimes to be cruel, it was very much milder than that of the heathen, and was mitigated, as far as possible in the circumstances, by their civil code
Regeneration - Hence every son and daughter of Adam is born, as to spiritual faculties, in a state of spiritual Death, and is as incapable, until an act of regeneration hath passed in quickening to a new and spiritual life, of any act of spiritual apprehension, as a dead body is to any act of animal life. ...
Scripture describes the different degrees of Death in a clear and distinct manner. The Death of the body is the separation of soul and body, so that the soul, which is the life of the body, if fled, leaves the body lifeless, and without any longer principle of consciousness. " (James 2:26)...
Spiritual Death is the Death of sin, by reason of the want of the quickening Spirit of God in the soul; so that as Christ is the life of the soul, every Christ-less soul is a dead soul. Eternal Death is the separation both of soul and body from God for ever: and this is the state of the unreclaimed and unregenerate wicked. And in the third, if living and dying without the blessed influence of regeneration, that soul and body must remain in a state of eternal Death, and separation from God for ever. ...
Now, from this Scriptural statement of spiritual Death, it will be easy to gather what is meant and implied by the doctrine of regeneration
Catastrophe - ) The final event in a romance or a dramatic piece; a denouement, as a Death in a tragedy, or a marriage in a comedy
Obed-Edom - A Gittite who lived in David's time, 1 Chronicles 13:13, and at whose house the ark was left, after the dreadful Death of Uzzah
John Storey, Blessed - He fled to Antwerp, was arrested there, brought to England, and put to Death in the Tower, for his faith
John Story, Blessed - He fled to Antwerp, was arrested there, brought to England, and put to Death in the Tower, for his faith
Faringdon, Hugh, Blessed - Refusing to surrender his abbey, he was accused of high treason and put to Death with the priests, John Rugg and John Eynon
Flavius Claudius Jovianus - He was captain in the imperial bodyguard of the army, which was warring against Persia, and was proclaimed emperor at the Death of Julian the Apostate, 363
Jovianus, Flavius Claudius - He was captain in the imperial bodyguard of the army, which was warring against Persia, and was proclaimed emperor at the Death of Julian the Apostate, 363
Lance, Holy - That with which Our Lord's sacred Side was opened after His Death (John 19), according to a tradition found by Saint Helena at Jerusalem
Asahel - When fighting against Ish-bosheth at Gibeon, in the army of his brother Joab, he was put to Death by Abner, whom he pursued from the field of battle (2 Samuel 2:18,19 )
Methuselah - It is suggestive that Death enters into the name of the longest liver
Adriel - The five sons that sprang from this union were put to Death by the Gibeonites (2 Samuel 21:8,9
Church Catholic, the - THE CHURCH EXPECTANT where the soul abides after Death in astate of expectancy of the final Resurrection; called, also, theINTERMEDIATE STATE (which see)
Phinehas - When his pregnant wife heard of his Death, she immediately delivered, naming the child Ichabod (“the glory has departed”)
Hugh Cook, Blessed - Refusing to surrender his abbey, he was accused of high treason and put to Death with the priests, John Rugg and John Eynon
Hugh Faringdon, Blessed - Refusing to surrender his abbey, he was accused of high treason and put to Death with the priests, John Rugg and John Eynon
Shaaraim - Shaaraim is perhaps mentioned again in the pursuit of the Philistines after the Death of Goliath ( 1 Samuel 17:52 , RVm Sin: How to Overcome - If a man wished to quench fire, he might fight it with his hands till he was burnt to Death; the only way is to apply an opposite element
Hatchment - It is used in England as a means of giving public notification of the Death of the deceased, his or her rank, whether married, widower, widow, etc
Beer-Lahai-Roi - A well between Kadesh and Bered, where the fleeing Hagar was turned back ( Genesis 16:14 ), where Isaac met his bride ( Genesis 24:62 ), and where he dwelt after Abraham’s Death ( Genesis 25:11 )
Dower - That portion of the lands or tenements of a man which his widow enjoys during her life, after the Death of her husband
Holy Lance - That with which Our Lord's sacred Side was opened after His Death (John 19), according to a tradition found by Saint Helena at Jerusalem
Expiration - ) The last emission of breath; Death
Abolish - (Isaiah 2) To abolish Death (2 Timothy 1) This sense is not common
Incense - Exodus 30:1 (c) A figure of the sweet, fragrant life of the Lord JESUS offered up to GOD during His life of suffering and Death of agony wherein and wherewith GOD was well pleased
Abihu - On his Death by fire from heaven, in punishment for offering strange fire, (See AARON above
Hanun - Upon the Death of the latter, David sent a message of condolence to Hanun, who, however, resented this action, and grossly insulted the messengers
Incorruptibles - so that he ate without occasion before his Death, as well as after his resurrection
Confront - They may also be hostile: “The sorrows of hell compassed me about; the snares of Death confronted (KJV, “prevented”) me” ( Achan, Achar - Son of Carmi, of the tribe of Judah, who on the fall of Jericho kept some of its spoil, against the express command of Jehovah, hence called 'the accursed thing,' and was stoned to Death with his family, and with his possessions burned with fire
Tiberius - Our Saviour was put to Death in the reign of Tiberius
az'Maveth - (strong unto Death )
a'Chan - For this sin he was stoned to Death with his whole family by the people, in a valley situated between Ai and Jericho, and their remains, together with his property, were burnt
Jonathan - The Death of Jonathan was lamented by David, in one of the noblest and most pathetic odes ever uttered by genius consecrated by pious friendship
Abaddon - He is the same as the "angel of the abyss," that is, the angel of Death, or the destroying angel
Surety - Hence his obedience unto Death, Isaiah 53:5,12
Storey, John, Blessed - He fled to Antwerp, was arrested there, brought to England, and put to Death in the Tower, for his faith
Story, John, Blessed - He fled to Antwerp, was arrested there, brought to England, and put to Death in the Tower, for his faith
Communion - Paul used the Greek term koinonia to express the basic meaning of the Christian faith, a sharing in the life and Death of Christ which radically creates a relationship of Christ and the believer and of the believers with one another in a partnership or unity
az'Maveth - (strong unto Death )
Abimelech - After his father's Death in 1027 BCE, he convinced the Shechemites to appoint him as his father's successor, and killed all but one of his 70 brothers to eliminate competition
Samson - " Her Death he terribly avenged (15:7-19). After this we have an account of his exploits at Gaza (16:1-3), and of his infatuation for Delilah, and her treachery (16:4-20), and then of his melancholy Death (16:21-31). "So the dead which he slew at his Death were more [1] than they which he slew in his life
Destruction (2) - Still the ‘destruction, spoken of by our Lord in Matthew 7:13 has been held by expositors with practical unanimity from the first to mean a continued life, whether endless or not, of misery after Death. ’ There appears, on the whole, to be general agreement that whether ‘destruction’ means a terminable or interminable life of misery after Death, it does, at any rate, mean a prolongation of existence: it is exclusion from salvation, whether final or not. Whether or not there is a term to the duration of misery hereafter—presuming that there is a continuance of life after Death for those who go in the way of destruction—does not enter into the scope of this note (See Eternal Punishment), but it may be remarked as significant that the ‘lost sheep’ are spoken of by our Lord as being found again, and that the word for ‘lost’ is the participle of ἀπόλλυμι
Christmas - In the early centuries, Christians were much more likely to celebrate the day of a person's Death than the person's birthday. Very early in its history the church had an annual observance of the Death of Christ and also honored many of the early martyrs on the day of their Death
Stephen - His enraged hearers hurried him to Death, a judicial tribunal becoming a riotous mob for the occasion. ...
The results of Stephen's Death illustrates the saying of Tertrullian, "the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church," Acts 8:1,4 11:19-21 . Paul, himself a Cilician, Acts 6:9 22:3 , had undoubtedly felt the force of his arguments in the discussions which preceded his arrest; and long afterwards alluded to his own presence at the martyr's Death, Acts 22:19,20 that triumph of Christian faith and love which has taught so many martyrs and Christians how to die
Caiaphas - In his view, one man’s Death would save the nation. The words of Caiaphas had a prophetic meaning that he did not realize; for Jesus’ Death would indeed be a means of salvation, not just for Jewish people, but for people of all nations (John 11:49-52). Although the meeting’s conduct and verdict were illegal according to Jewish law, the Sanhedrin had no hesitation in condemning Jesus to Death (Matthew 26:59-66; Mark 14:61-64; see SANHEDRIN)
Self- Denial - He has first to wrench himself from the glad associations of home, and then to take his post of hardship, danger, and perhaps Death in the ranks and on the field of battle. Acts 9:16), the fellowship of Christ’s sufferings and conformity to His Death. The Apostle speaks of what he calls his own Death, his own crucifixion, and Christ now living in him. ...
(a) The idea was primarily used in the martyr sense of willingness to suffer Death or persecution for Jesus’ sake. Death and persecution in themselves have no spiritual value (1 Corinthians 13:3, 1 Peter 4:15), but to deny the ‘name’ or the ‘faith’ (Revelation 2:13; Revelation 3:8) in order to escape them is to renounce Christ. The Apocalypse is a warning against ‘cowardice’ (Revelation 21:8), and an encouragement to be faithful unto Death (Revelation 2:10). The Christian was in constant danger of a violent Death for Christ’s sake (Romans 8:36, 2 Corinthians 4:10, Philippians 3:10, Colossians 1:24, 1 Corinthians 15:31, 2 Timothy 2:11-13). Some explain 2 Timothy 2:11 of the Christian’s Death with Christ in conversion (J. 425); but both passages can be as well explained as referring to the danger of violent Death and persecution for Christ’s sake. The Death of Christ is the objective condition of this initial act of self-denial. By faith the Christian is united with Christ in His Death and so guilt is removed. Death cancels all claims (Romans 6:7-14), and the result is a new man (νέος, καινὸς ἄνθρωπος, Colossians 3:10, Ephesians 4:24, Galatians 6:15). ‘Paul never presents Christ’s Death as a substitution for ours in the sense that we need not die as well’ (Green, iii. It is equally true-and this is what Green does not sufficiently emphasize-that he never thinks of our dying as possible apart from the prior substitutionary Death of Christ for us. Paul connects the example of Jesus often with this self-denial, and this example is not simply a human example but that of One who, though He was rich, for our sakes became poor; of One who, though He was Divine, yet became obedient unto Death, the Death of the Cross
Burial - Partly because of the warm climate of Palestine and partly because the corpse was considered ritually impure, the Hebrews buried their dead as soon as possible and usually within twenty-four hours of Death (Deuteronomy 21:23 ). Joseph closed his father's eyelids soon after Jacob's Death (Genesis 46:4 ). Women captured in war were allowed to mourn the Deaths of their parents one month before having to marry their captors (Genesis 23:19 ). ...
The Deaths of the famous prompted poetic laments. David mourned for the Deaths of Saul and Jonathan (Genesis 50:13 ), and Jeremiah lamented the Death of Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:25 ). It is interesting to note that Jesus' own response to Lazarus' Death was comparatively simple; He wept quietly at the tomb ( John 11:35-36 ). ...
Israel's mourning rites reflect in part the belief that Death is something evil. All contact with Death—whether it happened by touching a corpse, the bones of a corpse, a grave, or a house which contained a dead body—made the Israelite unclean and in need of purification
Intermediate State - Their trust was in God who would ultimately redeem them, and if the specifics of what would transpire after Death were not clear, their faith in God was and from this arose an assurance that God would not abandon them in the darkness. ...
The apostle Paul looks forward to being with Christ upon Death (Philippians 1:20-24 ) and believed that Christ would bring with him those who had previously died (1 Thessalonians 4:14 ). ...
When reflecting on what it will be like to be in that interim state between Death and resurrection, Paul likens it to being unclothed. On the one hand, he does not look forward to being bodiless— Greeks thought positively about leaving the body behind at Death, but Jews did not. Cotterell, What the Bible Teaches about Death ; K. Le—n-Dufour, Life and Death in the New Testament ; H
Deliverer - Paul in 2 Corinthians 1:10 uses it of his rescue from Death in Ephesus (ἐρύσατο ἡμᾶς καὶ ῥύσεται-καὶ ἕτι ῥύσεται). The word is ἐξαιρέομαι, ‘to take out from,’ while in Hebrews 2:15 the word for deliverance from the fear of Death is ἀπαλλάσσω, ‘to set free from. : ‘Death is swallowed up in victory. O Death, where is thy victory? O Death, where is thy sting? The sting of Death is sin; and the power of sin is the law; but thanks be to God, who giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ,’ This deliverance applies to the whole man (soul and body) and to the whole creation (Romans 8:18-25)
Atonement - Although found only once in the NT (Romans 5:11) and there in the Authorized Version alone, this word has become the elect symbol in theological thought to indicate the doctrine in the Apostolic Church which placed the Death of Christ in some form of causative connexion with the forgiveness of sins and with the restoration of men to favour and fellowship with God. Theologically it has been chiefly used in this latter sense, to indicate ‘the expiation made by the obedience and suffering Death of Christ to mark the relation of God to sin in the processes of human redemption. ...
The literature preserved in the NT witnesses to the undoubted fact that the Apostolic Church had very early established a close connexion between the Death of Jesus the Messiah and the redemption of men from their sins. Within seven years of His Death-or probably considerably less-a ‘doctrine of the cross’ was freely and authoritatively preached in the Christian community; it appears to have been distinctly Pauline in general character; it held a primary place in the apostolic preaching; it was declared to be the fulfilment of the OT Scripture; it was set forth as the essence of the gospel, and was definitely referred to the teaching of Jesus for its ultimate authority. To what extent can we find the more elaborate Pauline doctrine, which we shall find elsewhere in his writings, presented in such fragments of the teaching of the first Christians as we possess? How far is the apostolic interpretation of Christ’s Death sustained by appeal to the experience and teaching of Jesus Himself? By what means had the swift transition been made by the apostolic teachers themselves from the state of mind concerning the Death of Jesus which is presented in the Synoptic Gospels to the beliefs exhibited in their preaching in the Acts? How was the unconcealed dismay of a bewildering disappointment changed into a glorying? It is clear from the contents of the Synoptic Gospels that, whatever the confusion and distress in the minds of His disciples which immediately followed the Death of Christ, they were already in possession of memories of His teaching which lay comparatively dormant until they were awakened into vigorous activity by subsequent events and experiences; these, together with the facts of their Lord’s life and the incidents of His Death, may be spoken of as the sources of the apostolic doctrine of the atonement, as to its substance. *
(3) All the Synoptics assure us that, when Jesus received the first full recognition of Messiahship from His disciples, He instantly met it by the open confession that His suffering and Death were a necessity. Henceforth His constant subject of instruction was concerning His Death, which, when ‘the Son of Man was risen from the dead, His disciples were to interpret. The necessity associated with His Death was not merely the inevitable sequence of His loyalty to His ideal of righteousness in face of the opposition of His enemies. In the career of one such as Jesus the violent and unjust Death to which He was moving could not be separated in thought from the Father’s will to which He was so exquisitely sensitive, and which He came perfectly to fulfil. ...
(4) Jesus described His Death as for others and as voluntarily endured. which the meaning more than the fact of the Death is set forth. Here the purpose or ground of the Death of Jesus is set forth. ’‡
(6) The awful isolation of the cry of Jesus on the cross, ‘My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?’ (Mark 15:34) cannot easily be separated in the experience of the sinless Son of Cod from some mysterious connexion with the sin He clearly came to deal with by His Death. ...
To complete the material provided for the apostolic doctrine in the Synoptics there should be added to the points already mentioned the minuteness and wealth of detail-quite without parallel in the presentation of other important features of His life-with which the Death of Jesus is recorded, and also the extent to which the writers insist upon the event as a fulfilment of the OT Scriptures We have, therefore, in the Synoptics, whatever view may be taken of the position largely held, that they were the issue of ‘the productive activity’ of the early Church under the stimulating influence of redemptive experiences attributed to the Death of Christ, at least the starting-point of the ethical and juridical views of the atonement subsequently developed in the primitive community; they lack doctrinal definiteness, and distinctly favour the ethical more than the legal view of the process of redemption; they are also accompanied by evidences that the disciples listened unintelligently or with reluctant acquiescence to the words of Jesus concerning His Death. In this way also we shall provide a statement of the transition from the desolation wrought by the Death of Jesus in the hopes of His followers to the triumphant temper and abounding joy of the primitive faith and preaching. It was also the revealing light that brought meaning into the mystery of His Death. Now and for always these two-death and resurrection-stood together. When the apostles stated the one, they implied the other; the Resurrection was the great theme of the apostolic preaching because it interpreted the significance of the Death. The redeeming virtue issues from the Death and Resurrection as from a common source, though the cross ultimately became its chosen symbol. Beginning to search the Scriptures to discover whether Death had a place in the prophetic presentation of the Messiah, the disciples were surprised into the apprehension of the meaning of the words of Jesus spoken whilst He was yet with them; they thus came to see that the Death was only the shadow side of an experience by which He passed to the exaltation and authority of His redeeming work; the catastrophe was seen to have a place in the moral order of God, and the scandal of the cross was transfigured into the glory of the Divine purpose of redemption. The meaning of the words of Jesus is understood through the works of His Spirit; the significance of His Death can be apprehended only in the light of the experience it creates. In this account the sufferings and Death of Jesus the Messiah have a fundamental place. Although the great feature of the apostolic preaching is not the explanation of the Death of Christ in relation to the remission of sins, but its power in spiritual renewal, it contains much which enables us to perceive how the primitive community was taught to regard it. Summarized, this is-(1) The Death of Christ was a Divine necessity, appointed by God’s counsel and foreknowledge It was a crime whose issue God thwarted for His redeeming purpose (Acts 2:23; Acts 3:18). -(5) Christ’s Death is not distinctly represented as the ground of forgiveness, by setting forth the Messiah’s Death as a satisfaction for sin or as a substitute for sin’s penalty. It is certain, however, that the early Apostolic Church attached a saving significance to the Death of Christ. Peter’s contribution may be epitomized thus: (1) Whilst the suffering Death of Christ holds, as elsewhere in apostolic writings, the central place, its strongest appeal is made in regard to the moral quality of the sufferings. Paul we find for the first time a philosophy of the Death of Christ in relation to the forgiveness of sins, which is ultimately based upon an analysis of the Divine attributes and their place in the interpretation of the doctrine of the cross. Paul’s doctrine rested upon the common apostolic data given in (1) the words of Jesus respecting the necessity of His Death on man’s behalf; (2) the very early Christian idea that it was included in the Divine purpose; (3) the conception of the vicarious sufferings of the righteous and their merit founded on Is 53 which had been elaborated in later Jewish thought. Paul’s method of setting out his interpretation of the Death of Christ in his discourses; how he was accustomed to place it in relation to forgiveness of sin in his earliest preaching does not definitely appear. Paul construes his doctrine in the Galatian I Epistle, which deals more exclusively than any other NT document with the significance of the Death of Christ
Judges, Book of - It is thus called because it relates the deeds of those temporary leaders who, under the name of "Judges" (practically they were dictators), ruled over a part at least of the Tribes of Israel, between the Death of Josue and the days of Samuel. The book may be divided as follows: ...
Introduction describing the political and religious conditions of the Jews after Josue's Death (1-3)
Josue, Book of - Before his Death Josue addressed the assembled people urging them to remain faithful to their God. A later writer is responsible for the account of Josue's Death, for additional explanatory glosses, and, in general, for the editing of the book
Joshua, Book of - Before his Death Josue addressed the assembled people urging them to remain faithful to their God. A later writer is responsible for the account of Josue's Death, for additional explanatory glosses, and, in general, for the editing of the book
Birgitta, Saint - After her husband's Death, Bridget devoted herself entirely to religion and asceticism; the heavenly visions she had had from early childhood became more frequent. In 1349 she journeyed to Rome and remained there until her Death, except while absent on pilgrimages, the most important of which was to the Holy Land
Innocents, Slaughter of the - For example, when lying near Death Herod ordered that all the Jewish leaders be captured and slaughtered upon his Death, thus assuring grief at his passing
the Lord's Supper - A celebration by which the church recalls Christ's sacrificial Death and anticipates His coming again (1 Corinthians 11:26 ). “Eucharist” (from the blessing pronounced over the bread and wine) underlines Christ's sacrificial Death as a cause for thanksgiving to God
Wailing - Jeremiah 9:10; Jeremiah 9:17); in the Gospels only two instances are detailed, one at the Death of Jairus’ daughter, and the other at Christ’s Death
Jezebel - When Elijah caused 450 prophets of Baal to be put to Death this wicked woman threatened to slay Elijah, but he escaped. For even after Ahab's Death she maintained the ascendency over her son Joram
Jehoiada - He preserved the life of Joash, the infant son of Ahaziah, and succeeded, with wisdom and energy, in placing him on the throne, and then caused the Death of Athaliah. It is recorded that Joash did that which was right in the sight of the Lord all the days of Jehoiada; but on the Death of the priest, the king forgot his kindness and slew Zechariah his son
So - Tirhakah or Tehrak, the third and last of the dynasty, is thought to have put So to Death. Smith's deciphering) married the sister of Tirhakah who helped Hezekiah against Sennacherib; at Sabaku's Death Tirhakah succeeded, Sabaku's son being set aside
Jehoahaz - A turn for the better seems to have come before his Death, because the forces of Assyria pressing on the north of Damascus turned the attention of that country away from Israel ( 2 Kings 13:3-5 ). Jehoahaz of Judah (in 1Es 1:34 Joachaz or Jeconias ; in 1Es 1:38 Zarakes ) was the popular choice for the throne after the Death of Josiah ( 2 Kings 23:30 )
Adultery - (Leviticus 19:20-22 ) At a later time, and when owing, to Gentile example, the marriage tie became a looser bond of union, public feeling in regard to adultery changed, and the penalty of Death was seldom or never inflicted. For the water which the accused drank was perfectly harmless, and only by a miracle could it produce a bad effect; while in most ordeals the accused must suffer what naturally produces Death, and be proved innocent only by a miracle
Jonathan - A Levite, son of Gershom, and grandson of Moses, who after the Death of Joshua impiously served as a priest, first to Micah, and then to the Danites in Laish or Dan, where his posterity succeeded him until the captivity, Judges 17:1-18:31 . The narrative of his brilliant exploit in Michmash, 1 Samuel 13:1-14:52 , illustrates his pious faith, his bravery, (see also 1 Samuel 13:3 ) and the favor borne him by the people, who would not suffer him to be put to Death in consequence of Saul's foolish vow
Sweden, Bridget of, Saint - After her husband's Death, Bridget devoted herself entirely to religion and asceticism; the heavenly visions she had had from early childhood became more frequent. In 1349 she journeyed to Rome and remained there until her Death, except while absent on pilgrimages, the most important of which was to the Holy Land
Augus'Tus - After Herod's Death, in A. 14, in his 76th year; but long before his Death he had associated Tiberius with him in the empire
Immortal, Immortality - , "deathlessness" (a, negative, thanatos, "death"), is rendered "immortality" in 1 Corinthians 15:53,54 , of the glorified body of the believer; 1 Timothy 6:16 , of the nature of God. ) show that in early times the word had the wide connotation of freedom from Death; they also quote Ramsay (Luke the Physician, p. " In the NT, however, athanasia expresses more than Deathlessness, it suggests the quality of the life enjoyed, as is clear from 2 Corinthians 5:4 ; for the believer what is mortal is to be "swallowed up of life
Tithe - ...
Note: Hebrews 7:4-9 shows the superiority of the Melchizedek priesthood to the Levitical, in that (1) Abraham, the ancestor of the Levites, paid "tithes" to Melchizedek ( Genesis 14:20 ); (2) Melchizedek, whose genealogy is outside that of the Levites, took "tithes" of Abraham, the recipient himself of the Divine promises; (3) whereas Death is the natural lot of those who receive "tithes," the Death of Melchizedek is not recorded; (4) the Levites who received "tithes" virtually paid them through Abraham to Melchizedek
Paulinus, Biographer of Ambrose - He seems to call himself the bishop's secretary (notarius ) and he was certainly with him at his Death (cc. After the Death of St
Perverting - The charge was utterly false, but it revealed the bitter malice of the Jews and their determination to bring about the Death of Jesus. The power of life and Death was not possessed by the Sanhedrin: no merely religious offence could be visited with capital punishment (John 18:31), and therefore the object which they clamoured for could be accomplished only through the instrumentality of the civil power
Theodoricus i., King of the Visigoths - ( Theodericus ), chosen king of the Visigoths on the Death of Valia, A. In the great battle of the Mauriac plains Theodoric, who was advanced in life, fell from his horse and was trampled to Death by his own troops (A
Eternal Punishment - , the flood and the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah) shows that the Old Testament focuses on premature Death when dealing with the fate of the ungodly, not on life after Death. ...
If the predominant evangelical view is correct, in the Old Testament sheol sometimes refers to a netherworld to which the wicked go at Death. Sheol therefore, takes us beyond the primary judgment passages and speaks of life after Death, although in vague terms. Pictures of Death and destruction speak of the ruin of all that is worthwhile in human existence (Matthew 10:28 ). Hick, Evil and the God of Love ; idem, Death and Eternal Life ; R. Morey, Death and the Afterlife ; C
Murder - But after the flood God delegated thenceforth the murderer's punishment, which is Death, to man; life must go for life, blood for blood. Even a slave's life sacrificed under the rod entailed Death, or some heavy punishment as the judges should decide on the master, unless the slave survived the beating a day or two, when it was presumed the master did not intend to kill him and the loss of his slave was deemed enough punishment (Exodus 21:12; Exodus 21:20-21). Striking a pregnant woman so as to cause Death brought capital punishment. Two witnesses were required before anyone could be put to Death for murder, a check on private revenge (Numbers 35:19-30; Deuteronomy 17:6-12; Deuteronomy 19:12; Deuteronomy 19:17)
Rending of Garments - There were four occasions on which rending of garments was enjoined by the Jewish Law: (1) Death; (2) the apostasy of a member of the family; (3) the destruction, during persecution, of a copy of the Law; (4) blasphemy. In the case of a member of the family becoming apostate the clothes were rent as for his Death, and the mourners sat for one hour on the ground and ate bread and ashes. No rending of garments was obligatory unless news of the Death were received within thirty days, except in the case of the Death of parents
Azariah - The first part of his reign was prosperous and happy; but afterwards, presuming to offer incense in the temple, he was smitten with leprosy, and continued a leper till his Death, 2 Chronicles 26:16 - 23
John Mincius - He was elected in opposition to Pope Nicholas II by a faction of the Roman nobility after the Death of Stephen (IX) X, who had commanded before he died that no election should take place until Hildebrand returned from Germany
Mincius, John - He was elected in opposition to Pope Nicholas II by a faction of the Roman nobility after the Death of Stephen (IX) X, who had commanded before he died that no election should take place until Hildebrand returned from Germany
Fallopio, Gabriello - He was professor of anatomy first at Ferrara and then at Pisa, and despite his early Death left his mark on anatomy for all time
Kingdom of Juda - Formed after the Death of Solomon c
Juda, Kingdom of - Formed after the Death of Solomon c
Frederick Husenbeth - From 1823 till his Death, he wrote numerous works on historical, liturgical, or doctrinal matters, e
Daria, Saint - Condemned to Death they were led to a sandpit on the Salarian Way, and stoned
Imperishable - Imperishable (KJV, incorruption) describes the spiritual resurrection body which unlike the physical body is not subject to the decay associated with Death (1 Corinthians 15:42-54 )
Matilda, Saint - After her husband's Death she made an unsuccessful attempt to secure the throne for her favorite son Henry, but his elder brother was elected and crowned in 936
Fabian, Pope, Saint - At his Death the government of the Church was well organized and the power of the papacy considerably strengthened
Damnation, Eternal - Eternal, because the sentence of God is irrevocable, for it is specifically pronounced to be eternal in its consequences (Matthew 25), and the condemned are no longer in a state of probation, which with man comes to an end at Death, but are in a fixed state which admits of no change (Luke 16)
Nobleman - This officer came to Jesus at Cana and besought him to go down to Capernaum and heal his son, who lay there at the point of Death
Berenice - Suspected after his Death of intimacy with her own brother, Agrippa II, with whom she visited Festus, on his appointment as procurator of Judaea, and heard Paul's defense (Acts 25:13; Acts 25:23; Acts 26:30)
Evil - Natural evil is whatever destroys or any way disturbs the perfection of natural beings; such as blindness, diseases, Death, &c
Canonical Hours - Each of the Seven Hours issaid to commemorate some point in the Passion of our Lord, as setforth in the old rhyme,...
  "At mattins bound, at prime reviled,    Condemned to Death at tierce,   Nailed to the Cross at sexts, at nones    His blessed side they pierced
Tammuz - The wilting of the vegetation at that time of year is seen as a sign of his Death
Benedict x Anti-Pope - He was elected in opposition to Pope Nicholas II by a faction of the Roman nobility after the Death of Stephen (IX) X, who had commanded before he died that no election should take place until Hildebrand returned from Germany
Husenbeth, Frederick Charles - From 1823 till his Death, he wrote numerous works on historical, liturgical, or doctrinal matters, e
Nanaea - In 2Ma 1:10-17 we have a legendary account of the Death of Antiochus Epiphanes, who is said to have attempted to plunder a temple of Nanæa in Persia, and to have been treacherously killed in the temple by the priests
Passover - A solemn festival of the Jews, instituted in commemoration of their coming out of Egypt; because, the night before their departure, the destroying angel, who put to Death the first-born of the Egyptians, passed over the houses of the Hebrews, without entering therein; because they were marked with the blood of the lamb, which was killed the evening before, and which for this reason was called the paschal lamb
Jotham - We know nothing of him except that he rebuilt or ornamented one of the gates of the Temple ( 2 Kings 15:35 ), and that the hostilities which later culminated in the invasion of Judah began before his Death ( 2 Kings 15:37-38 )
Hornet - Travellers relate that when a nest of such insects has been disturbed, the animals and people have fled in terror, the stings being very painful, and occasionally causing Death
Antipas - A martyr faithful unto Death at Pergamos (Revelation 2:13)
Pretence - ) The act of holding out, or offering, to others something false or feigned; presentation of what is deceptive or hypocritical; deception by showing what is unreal and concealing what is real; false show; simulation; as, pretense of illness; under pretense of patriotism; on pretense of revenging Caesar's Death
Ashhur - ” Son of Hazron, born after his father's Death (1 Chronicles 2:24 )
Agony - Extreme pain of body or mind anguish appropriately, the pangs of Death, and the sufferings of our Savior in the garden of Gethsemane
Gabriello Fallopio - He was professor of anatomy first at Ferrara and then at Pisa, and despite his early Death left his mark on anatomy for all time
Achan - Achan was discovered to be the guilty party, and he and his family were stoned to Death (Joshua 7:25 )
Genesis - The first book of the sacred scriptures of the Old Testament, containing the history of the creation, of the apostasy of man, of the deluge, and of the first patriarchs, to the Death of Joseph
Titus - Upon returning to Rome, a gnat entered his nose and pecked at his brain for years, until Titus' Death
Tamar - Daughter of David and Maachah, violated by Amnon, and avenged by Absalom in the Death of Amnon
Intrepidity - Intrepidity encounters the greatest points with the utmost coolness, and dares even present Death
Abatement - ) The entry of a stranger, without right, into a freehold after the Death of the last possessor, before the heir or devisee
Eternal Damnation - Eternal, because the sentence of God is irrevocable, for it is specifically pronounced to be eternal in its consequences (Matthew 25), and the condemned are no longer in a state of probation, which with man comes to an end at Death, but are in a fixed state which admits of no change (Luke 16)
Rizpah - A concubine of Saul, taken after his Death by the ambitious Abner
Gervasius, Saint - The Roman general, Astasius, came to Milan, and ordered the Death of all Christians
Ithamar - He was consecrated to the priesthood along with his brothers (Exodus 6:23 ); and after the Death of Nadab and Abihu, he and Eleazar alone discharged the functions of that office (Leviticus 10:6,12 ; Numbers 3:4 )
Supper - He took the bread which was then on the table, and the wine, of which some had been used in sending round the cup of thanksgiving; and by saying, "This is my body, this is my blood, do this in remembrance of me," he declared to his Apostles that this was the representation of his Death by which he wished them to commemorate that event. "As often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do show the Lord's Death till he come. ...
There is a striking correspondence between this view of the Lord's Supper, as a rite by which it was intended that all Christians should commemorate the Death of Christ, and the circumstances attending the institution of the feast of the passover. Like the Jews, we have the original sacrifice: "Christ our passover is sacrificed for us," and by his substitution our souls are delivered from Death. ...
The Lord's Supper exhibits, by a significant action, the characteristical doctrine of the Christian faith, that the Death of its author, which seemed to be the completion of the rage of his enemies, was a voluntary sacrifice, so efficacious as to supersede the necessity of every other; and that his blood was shed for the remission of sins. By partaking of this rite, his disciples publish an event most interesting to all the kindreds of the earth; they declare that, far from being ashamed of the suffering of their Master, they glory in his cross; and, while they thus perform the office implied in that expression of the Apostle, "Ye do show forth the Lord's Death," they at the same time cherish the sentiments by which their religion ministers to their own consolation and improvement. They cannot remember the Death of Christ, the circumstances which rendered that event necessary, the disinterested love and the exalted virtues of their deliverer, without feeling their obligations to him. Unless the vilest hypocrisy accompany an action, which, by its very nature, professes to flow from warm affection, the love of Christ will constrain them to fulfil the purposes of his Death, by "living unto him who died for them;" and we have reason to hope, that, in the places where he causes his name to be remembered, he will come and bless his people
Punishments - That Death was regarded as the fitting punishment for murder appears plain from the remark of Lamech. The murderer was to be put to Death, even if he should have taken refuge at God's altar or in a refuge city, and the same principle was to be carried out even in the case of an animal. Offences punished with Death. The following offences also are mentioned in the law as liable to the punishment of Death:
Striking, or even reviling, a parent. We may perhaps conclude that the primary meaning of "cutting off" is a sentence of Death to be executed in some cases without remission, but in others voidable -- (1) by immediate atonement on the offender's part; (2) by direct interposition of the Almighty i. , a sentence of Death always "regarded," but not always executed. ( Genesis 38:24 ) Under the law it was ordered in the case of a priest's daughter (Leviticus 21:9 ) ...
Death by the sword or spear is named in the law, ( Exodus 19:13 ; 32:27 ; Numbers 25:7 ) and it occurs frequently in regal and post-Babylonian times. ( 2 Samuel 12:31 ) and perhaps (Proverbs 20:26 ; Hebrews 11:37 ) ...
Pounding in a mortar , or beating to Death, is alluded to in ( Proverbs 27:22 ) but not as a legal punishment, and cases are described
Redeem, Redemption - Money was sometimes paid to deliver a person from Death (Exodus 21:30 ; Numbers 3:46-51 ; 18:16 ; cf. Deliverance of humankind from its state of alienation from God has been accomplished through the Death and resurrection of Christ (Romans 4:25 ; 2 Corinthians 5:18-19 ). Humankind is held in the captivity of sin from which only the atoning Death of Jesus Christ can liberate. Redemption language is merged with substitutionary language in these verses and applied to Jesus' Death. He applied to himself the things said in the Old Testament of the Servant of the Lord concerning his rejection, humiliation, Death, and resurrection (Mark 8:31 ; 9:31 ; 10:33-34 ). Thus, Christ's Death is portrayed as the payment price for the deliverance of those held captive by Satan (the ransom metaphor must be understood in the light of Jesus' offering of himself in obedience to the Father, however, and not interpreted as a payment to Satan). As the means of redemption, the Death of Jesus provides a deliverance that involves not only forgiveness of sin (Ephesians 1:7 ; Colossians 1:14 ), but also newness of life (Romans 6:4 ). The New Testament makes clear that divine redemption includes God's identification with humanity in its plight, and the securing of liberation of humankind through the obedience, suffering, Death, and resurrection of the incarnate Son. David Rightmire...
See also Death of Christ ; Revelation, Idea of ; Salvation ...
Bibliography
Punishment - Molech worship, involving infant sacrifice, was specifically forbidden, also requiring Death by stoning (Leviticus 20:1-5 ). Death is indicted for a sorceress (Exodus 22:18 ); stoning is designated for a medium (Leviticus 20:27 ). According to the case law, Death was the punishment for the one who struck (Exodus 21:15 ) or even cursed a parent (Exodus 21:17 ; Leviticus 20:9 ). However, if two men were fighting and one of them accidentally hit a pregnant woman so that she both miscarried and died, he would suffer Death also (Exodus 21:22-25 ). If the owner of a dangerous ox did not keep it fenced in and the ox gored someone to Death, both the ox and the owner were to be put to Death (Exodus 21:28-32 ). If someone caused bodily harm to another rather than Death, lex talionis, or the law of retaliation was invoked: "an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth" (Exodus 21:23 ; Leviticus 24:19 ; Deuteronomy 19:21 ; Matthew 5:38 ). Incest was proscribed (Leviticus 20:11,12 , 14,17 , 19-21 ; Deuteronomy 27:20,22-23 ) for which the penalty in certain cases was Death by burning (Leviticus 20:11,14 ). Sexual relations between two men or between humans and animals were punishable by Death (Exodus 22:19 ; Leviticus 18:22-23 ; 20:13,15-16 ). Kidnappers, who stole humans, were to be put to Death (Exodus 21:16 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 ). The hope is that after being handed over to Satan, he will repent and return to the fold, or at the very least, that his spirit will go to heaven in spite of his body's Death. While the worst punishment that earthly courts can inflict is Death, Jesus taught his disciples not to fear those who can kill the body, but rather God, who can also cast people into hell (Luke 12:4-5 )
Naboth - So Jezebel, the wife of Ahab, made a wicked plan to have Naboth condemned to Death on a fake charge of blasphemy, and thus allow the king to seize upon the vineyard
Frontenac, Louis de Buade, Count of - At Death he left Canada in peace, enlarged and respected
Moor, Benedict the, Saint - After the dissolution of this society by Pope Pius IV, Benedict joined the reformed Recollects of the Franciscan Order, and was elected guardian of the house at Palermo, which he reformed and ruled until his Death
Keturah - She was Abraham's second wife, apparently taken after Sarah's Death
Ligamen - It endures until the Death of the wife or husband has been legally attested or is morally certain
Laborer, Isidore the, Saint - Many miracles followed after his Death
Isidore the Laborer, Saint - Many miracles followed after his Death
Dissolution of a Marriage - If a valid Christian marriage has taken place and has been followed with marital intercourse, the union is lifelong; it cannot be dissolved except by Death
Ladislaus, Saint - His father was Bela I and upon the Death of his brother, Geisa I, the nobles chose Ladislaus to succeed him rather than Solomon, the son of Andrew I
Newdigate, Sebastian, Blessed - After the Death of his wife in 1534 he became a monk in the London Charterhouse
Margaret of Scotland, Saint - After her father's Death she and her mother fled from England; they were received by Malcolm III, of Scotland, who later, c
John the Almsgiver, Saint - The son of the governor of Cyprus, he entered the religious life at the Death of his wife
Joannes Eleemosynasius, Saint - The son of the governor of Cyprus, he entered the religious life at the Death of his wife
Joannes Misebicors, Saint - The son of the governor of Cyprus, he entered the religious life at the Death of his wife
Misebicors, Joannes, Saint - The son of the governor of Cyprus, he entered the religious life at the Death of his wife
Kidnapping - Kidnapping freeborn Israelites either to treat them as slaves or to sell them into slavery was punishable by Death (Exodus 21:16 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 )
Casartelli, Louis Charles - Shortly before his Death he had accepted the Katrak lectureship in Iranian subjects at Oxford
Sis'Era - The particulars of the rout of Megiddo and of Sisera's flight and Death are drawn out under the heads of BARAK , DEBORAH , JAEL , KISHON
Archelaus - Till a few days before his Death Herod had named Antipas as his successor, but in his last moments he named Archelaus
Beer-la-Hai-Roi - Here Isaac lived before and after his father's Death (Genesis 24:62; Genesis 25:11)
Bands - (1) Of love (Hosea 11:4 ); (2) of Christ (Psalm 2:3 ); (3) uniting together Christ's body the church (Colossians 2:19 ; 3:14 ; Ephesians 4:3 ); (4) the emblem of the captivity of Israel (Ezekiel 34:27 ; Isaiah 28:22 ; 52:2 ); (5) of brotherhood (Ezekiel 37:15-28 ); (6) no bands to the wicked in their Death (Psalm 73:4 ; Job 21:7 ; Psalm 10:6 )
Corruptions: Hard to Die - Often and often have I vowed Death to some evil propensity, and have fondly dreamed that the sentence was fulfilled, but alas! in weaker moments I have had sad cause to know that the sinful tendency still survived
Lodebar - Here at the house of Machir, son of Ammiel, Mephibosheth found a home after Saul's Death (2 Samuel 9:4-5) Perhaps the Debir of Joshua 13:26, where Lidebir is the Hebrew (the "l" is part of the word, not as KJV "of")
Dinah - This led to the terrible revenge of Simeon and Levi in putting the Shechemites to Death (Genesis 34 )
Augustus - Before his Death (A
Luciferians - He apparently was not reconciled with the Church before his Death
Luciferites - He apparently was not reconciled with the Church before his Death
Louis de Buade, Count of Frontenac - At Death he left Canada in peace, enlarged and respected
Louis Casartelli - Shortly before his Death he had accepted the Katrak lectureship in Iranian subjects at Oxford
Benedict of San Philadelphio, Saint - After the dissolution of this society by Pope Pius IV, Benedict joined the reformed Recollects of the Franciscan Order, and was elected guardian of the house at Palermo, which he reformed and ruled until his Death
Benedict the Moor, Saint - After the dissolution of this society by Pope Pius IV, Benedict joined the reformed Recollects of the Franciscan Order, and was elected guardian of the house at Palermo, which he reformed and ruled until his Death
Micaiah - Son of Imlah and prophet of Yahweh who predicted the Death of Ahab and the scattering of Israel's forces at Ramoth-Gilead (1 Kings 22:7-28 )
Marriage, Dissolution of a - If a valid Christian marriage has taken place and has been followed with marital intercourse, the union is lifelong; it cannot be dissolved except by Death
Marriage Without a Priest - In danger of Death, this may also be done even when there is no such expected delay in the coming of the priest
Strip - have enduo, "to clothe"), and Luke 10:30 ; to take off, Matthew 27:31 ; Mark 15:20 ; figuratively, 2 Corinthians 5:4 , "unclothed" (Middle Voice), of putting off the body at Death (the believer's state of being unclothed does not refer to the body in the grave but to the spirit, which awaits the "body of glory" at the resurrection)
Petrojoannites - His doctrine was not known till after his Death, when his body was taken out of his grave, and burnt
Shunem - Abishag from Shunem warmed David on his Death bed (1 Kings 1:3 )
Body - In NT, though the body may be the seat of sin and Death ( Romans 6:6 ; Romans 7:24 ), it is never treated with contempt ( Romans 12:1 , 1 Corinthians 6:13 ; 1 Corinthians 6:19 ); Philippians 3:21 is a well-known mistranslation
Obedience - Even if Death were in the way it is: 'Not ours to reason why: Ours, but to dare and die;' and, at our Master's bidding, advance through flood or flame
Ahikam - In Jehoiakim's subsequent reign Ahikam successfully pleaded for Jeremiah before the princes and elders, that he should not be given to the people to be put to Death for his fearless warnings (Jeremiah 26:16-24)
Aristarchus - Later church tradition said Nero put Aristarchus to Death in Rome
Gunpowder Plot - It was discovered by the arrest of Guy Fawkes, 1605, and the conspirators were put to Death
Achor - see), with his family, was stoned to Death
Adonis - ]'>[2] ‘plantings of Adonis’ ( Isaiah 17:10 ), alludes to the miniature gardens whose rapid decline symbolized the Death of this god, or rather the spring verdure of which he is a personification
Instant - Impending Death is thine and instant doom
Almsgiver, John the Saint - The son of the governor of Cyprus, he e