What does Street mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
חוּצֽוֹת outside 2
πλατείας a broad way 2
ῥύμην a swing 2
בָֽרְחוֹב֙ broad or open place or plaza. 1
רְח֑וֹב broad or open place or plaza. 1
רְחֽוֹב broad or open place or plaza. 1
רְחֹבָהּ֒ broad or open place or plaza. 1
רְח֣וֹב broad or open place or plaza. 1
מֵרְחֹ֣ב broad or open place or plaza. 1
ἀμφόδου a road around anything 1
חוּצ֑וֹת outside 1
הַח֛וּצָה outside 1
בַּ֭חוּץ outside 1
מִח֣וּץ outside 1
וְכַח֖וּץ outside 1
בַּח֖וּץ outside 1
πλατεῖα a broad way 1
בַּ֭שּׁוּק street. 1

Definitions Related to street

G4113


   1 a broad way, a street.
   

G4505


   1 a swing, rush, force, trail, of a body in motion.
   2 a tract of way in a town shut in by buildings on both sides.
   3 a street, a lane.
   

H2351


   1 outside, outward, street, the outside.
   

H7339


   1 broad or open place or plaza.
   

G296


   1 a road around anything, a street.
   

H7784


   1 street.
   

Frequency of street (original languages)

Frequency of street (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Wall street
A street towards the southern end of the borough of Manhattan, New York City, extending from Broadway to the East River; - so called from the old wall which extended along it when the city belonged to the Dutch. It is the chief financial center of the United States, hence the name is often used for the money market and the financial interests of the country.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - street
STREET . See City.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - street
The streets of a modern Oriental town present a great contrast to those with which we are familiar, being generally narrow, tortuous and gloomy, even in the best towns. Their character is mainly fixed by the climate and the style of architecture, the narrowness being due to the extreme heat, and the gloominess to the circumstance of the windows looking for the most part into the inner court. The street called "Straight," in Damascus, (Acts 9:11 ) was an exception to the rule of narrowness: it was a noble thoroughfare, one hundred feet wide. divided in the Roman age by colonnades into three avenues, the central one for foot passengers, the side passages for vehicles and horsemen going in different directions. The shops and warehouses were probably collected together into bazaars in ancient as in modern times. (Jeremiah 37:21 ) That streets occasionally had names appears from (Jeremiah 37:21 ; Acts 9:11 ) That they were generally unpaved may be inferred from the notices of the pavement laid by Herod the Great at Antioch, and by Herod Agrippa II. at Jerusalem. Hence pavement forms one of the peculiar features of the ideal Jerusalem. Tobit 13:17 ; (Revelation 21:21 ) Each street and bazaar in a modern town is locked up at night; the same custom appears to have prevailed in ancient times. (Song of Solomon 3:3 )
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - street (2)
STREET.—In place of ‘street’ in Mark 6:56 we should read with Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘market-place,’ the open space or square (ἀγορά) where goods are brought for disposal to the merchants from the bazaars, and where people at leisure gather for conversation. πλατεῖα stands for ‘street’ in the ordinary sense. In Luke 14:21 it is apparently distinguished from ῥύμη, as ‘street’ from ‘alley’ or ‘lane.’ But the distinction is ignored elsewhere; and certainly the ‘street’ (ῥύμη) called ‘Straight’ in Damascus (Acts 9:11) is no ‘alley.’ In the East it would be difficult to maintain the distinction. Even the main streets in cities like Jerusalem and Cairo are often narrow and crooked, more like ‘alleys’ than ‘streets’ in our sense. The footway is made narrow, the upper storeys frequently overhanging the road, for protection against the heat of the sun. Seclusion is a main object aimed at in building Eastern houses: the wall to the street is seldom pierced by windows; the door usually leads through a passage into a court, round which the rooms are arranged. All sorts of filth are cast into the streets (Revelation 11:8). In spite of the scavengering of dogs, their condition is often not only loathsome, but a source of danger to health.
W. Ewing.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - street
The only street referred to by name in the apostolic writings is the street in Damascus which is called ‘Straight’ (Acts 9:11). The word employed (ῥύμη, ‘lane’ or ‘alley’) hardly applies to this instance, for it was a broad, straight street on the Greek model, flanked by colonnades, on the further side of which foot-paths extended. The modern equivalent, which still retains the name, and forms the principal thoroughfare of the city, is in reality only the northern foot-way of the ancient street. The proof of this is given by the East Gate, the central and southern archways of which are now closed up; also by fragments of columns, found in houses and courtyards contiguous to the present street.
The same word is found in Acts 12:10, applied to one of the streets or lanes of Jerusalem, probably in the heart of the city, to which it appears to be appropriate (cf. article Gate). The use of πλατεῖα in Acts 5:15 is somewhat surprising; if taken in conjunction with κατὰ followed by acc. plur. it forcibly suggests alleys or lanes in which it was necessary to arrange the sick in lines. But it has to be noted that καὶ εἰς is now read, following אABD, which seems to correspond better with the likely situation. The sick were brought from narrow ways into the ‘broad places.’ A comparison with Mark 6:56 (ἐν ταῖς ἀγοραῖς; D reads πλατείαις) is instructive: applied to villages and country, no less than to cities, this would seem to denote no more than ‘open spaces,’ perhaps as opposed to courtyards. Such open spaces in cities came to be used as business centres, and were put to other uses (see especially Acts 17:17).
If we keep in view the smallness and the extreme irregularity of ancient cities, as revealed by recent excavation in Palestine, it seems best to equate ῥύμη to ‘street,’ and πλατεῖα to ‘square,’ in the modern city. The difference is greater than the similarity, however, for the average Hebrew city could boast of only one ‘broad place,’ and that was at the gate. An exception must be made for the Apostolic Age in favour of recent cities, built according to Graeco-Roman designs (cf. Damascus above). Whether a city was ancient or modern would have an important bearing on its plan.
πλατεῖα alone is used in Rev., notably always in the singular (Revelation 11:8; Revelation 21:21; Revelation 22:1). The Graeco-Roman model seems to be before the writer’s eye. Here πλατεῖα is not a broad place or square, but rather a broad street running from gate to gate. Had the symmetry been detailed there would have been found a corresponding πλατεῖα intersecting the first at right angles. Within the walls the city would thus be divided into four segments which were built over, whose streets and lanes would be dwarfed by the spaciousness of the two πλατεῖαι. This principle is carried further in the description of the Holy City, New Jerusalem, in correspondence with the number of gates (twelve).
H. B. Swete (The Apocalypse of St. John 2, London, 1907, p. 299) takes exception to the division of the verses in Revelation 22:1-2 Revised Version , and follows Authorized Version and Revised Version margin. ‘The picture presented is that of a river flowing through the broad street which intersects the city, a row of trees being on either bank.’ In John 11:8 the corpses cast out into the principal street (now generally understood of the earthly Jerusalem), and left without burial, were a purposed insult to the martyred witnesses, which was speedily avenged (John 11:11-13). Such defilement stands in marked contrast to the later picture of purity and life (water and tree).
W. Cruickshank.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - street
The street called "Straight" at Damascus (Acts 9:11 ) is "a long broad street, running from east to west, about a mile in length, and forming the principal thoroughfare in the city." In Oriental towns streets are usually narrow and irregular and filthy (Psalm 18:42 ; Isaiah 10:6 ). "It is remarkable," says Porter, "that all the important cities of Palestine and Syria Samaria, Caesarea, Gerasa, Bozrah, Damascus, Palmyra, had their 'straight streets' running through the centre of the city, and lined with stately rows of columns. The most perfect now remaining are those of Palmyra and Gerasa, where long ranges of the columns still stand.", Through Samaria, etc.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - street
1: πλατεῖα (Strong's #4113 — Noun Feminine — plateia — plat-i'-ah ) grammatically the feminine of platus, "broad," is used as a noun (hodos, "a way," being understood, i.e., "a broad way"), "a street," Matthew 6:5 ; 12:19 (in some texts, Mark 6:56 ); Luke 10:10 ; 13:26 ; 14:21 ; Acts 5:15 ; Revelation 11:8 ; 21:21 ; 22:2 .
2: ἄμφοδον (Strong's #296 — Noun Neuter — amphodon — am'-fod-on ) properly "a way around" (amphi, "around," hodos, "a way"), occurs in Mark 11:4 , RV, "the open street" (AV, "where two ways met").
Note: For rhume, see LANE. For agora, see MARKET.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Straight street
A street in Damascus where Paul was staying after being struck blind in his experience with the risen Christ (Acts 9:10-12 ). This street still exists today called Darb al-Mustaqim . See Damascus .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Baker's street
Street in Jerusalem known as “baker's street” where most, if not all, the bakeries of the city were located. It was common in ancient cities for trades and crafts to locate near others of the same kind. In all likelihood, the baker's residence was part of the bakery. Zedekiah promised Jeremiah, whom he had imprisoned, that he would have food for as long as bread was available on baker's street (Jeremiah 37:21 ).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - street
rechob . A broad open space, as the courtyard, the space near the gate devoted to public business (Deuteronomy 13:16), or before t he temple (Ezra 10:9; Esther 4:6). Particular trades gathered in certain quarters, as "the bakers' street" (Jeremiah 37:21). Chuts is a "narrow street" (Proverbs 5:16; Jeremiah 5:1) in contrast to the "broad street", rechob . Shuq like chuts is seemingly "the narrow street" distinguished from "the broad way," rechob , in Song of Solomon 3:2. Luke 14:21 plateia and rumee , "the streets and lanes." But shuq etymology means "a place of concourse", and rume is applied to the "straight" street of Damascus (Acts 9:11).
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - street
Revelation 21:21 (c) This type represents the Lord JESUS Himself, who is the way to Heaven, and the way to GOD. Note that the word is in the singular and not plural. The gold represents the beauty of CHRIST, the purity of CHRIST, and the value of CHRIST. That which men almost worship down here, end constantly seek after, and which is not permanent, may well become insignificant in our sight while CHRIST JESUS becomes supreme and paramount.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - street
A. Noun.
Chûts (חֻץ, Strong's #2351), “street.” This word, of uncertain origin, appears in biblical, mishnaic, and modern Hebrew. In the Old Testament the total number of occurrences of the noun and adverb is about 160.
A particular use of chûts denotes the place outside the houses in a city, or the “street.” The “street” was the place for setting up bazaars: “The cities, which my father took from thy father, I will restore; and thou shalt make streets for thee in Damascus, as my father made in Samaria” (1 Kings 20:34). Craftsmen plied their trade on certain “streets” named after the guild—for example, the Bakers’ Street: “Then Zedekiah the king commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the court of the prison, and that they should give him daily a piece of bread out of the bakers’ street, until all the bread in the city were spent” (Jer. 37:21). The absence of justice in the marketplace was an indication of the wickedness of the whole population of Jerusalem. Jeremiah was called to check in the “streets” to find an honest man: “Run ye to and fro through the streets of Jerusalem, and see now, and know, and seek in the broad places thereof, if ye can find a man, if there be any that executeth judgment, that seeketh the truth; and I will pardon it” (5:1).
Other descriptions of the “streets” are given by the prophets. Several mention that the “streets” were muddy: “… And to tread them down like the mire of the streets” (Isa. 10:6; cf. Mic. 7:10; Zech. 10:5). Others make reference to the blood (Ezek. 28:23), the famished (Lam. 2:19), and the dead (Nah. 3:10) which filled the “streets” in times of war.
The area outside a city was also known as the chûts. In this case it is better translated as “open country” or “field”; cf. “That our garners may be full, affording all manner of store, that sheep may bring forth thousands and ten thousands in our streets” (Ps. 144:13, KJV; RSV, “fields”; cf. Job 5:10; Prov. 8:26).
B. Adverb.
Chûts (חֻץ, Strong's #2351), “outside.” The first occurrence of this word is in Gen. 6:14: “Make thee an ark of gopher wood; rooms shalt thou make in the ark, and shalt pitch it within and without [1] with pitch.”
By chûts the general idea of “the outside” is intimated. It is sometimes indeterminate where “outside” is, especially when connected with a verb: “You shall also have a place outside the camp; he may not reenter the camp” (Deut. 23:12, NASB). The area could be “outside” a home, tent, city, or camp—hence the adverbial usage of “outside.” The word is also connected with a preposition with the sense of “in, to, on, toward the outside”: “If he rise again, and walk abroad upon his staff, then shall he that smote him be quit: only he shall pay for the loss of his time, and shall cause him to be thoroughly healed” (Exod. 21:19).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - With Glad And Joyous Strains Now Let Each street r
Hymn for Vespers on the feast of the Most Precious Blood, July 1,. It was written in the 17th century, by an unknown author. It has five translations. The English title given is by T. Potter.

Sentence search

Larrikin - ) A rowdy street loafer; a rowdyish or noisy ill-bred fellow; - variously applied, as to a street blackguard, a street Arab, a youth given to horse-play, etc
Street - Particular trades gathered in certain quarters, as "the bakers' street" (Jeremiah 37:21). Chuts is a "narrow street" (Proverbs 5:16; Jeremiah 5:1) in contrast to the "broad street", rechob . Shuq like chuts is seemingly "the narrow street" distinguished from "the broad way," rechob , in Song of Solomon 3:2. Luke 14:21 plateia and rumee , "the streets and lanes. " But shuq etymology means "a place of concourse", and rume is applied to the "straight" street of Damascus (Acts 9:11)
Reat White Way - Broadway, in New York City, in the neighborhood chiefly occupied by theaters, as from about 30th street about 50th street; - so called from its brilliant illumination at night
Lane - 1: ῥύμη (Strong's #4505 — Noun Feminine — rhume — hroo'-may ) in earlier Greek meant "the force or rush or swing of a moving body;" in later times, "a narrow road, lane or street;" it is translated "lanes" in Luke 14:21 ; "streets" in Matthew 6:2 ; "street" in Acts 9:11 ; 12:10 . See street
Hawker - ) To sell goods by outcry in the street. ) One who sells wares by crying them in the street; hence, a peddler or a packman
Straight Street - A street in Damascus where Paul was staying after being struck blind in his experience with the risen Christ (Acts 9:10-12 ). This street still exists today called Darb al-Mustaqim
Thoroughfare - ) A passage through; a passage from one street or opening to another; an unobstructed way open to the public; a public road; hence, a frequented street
Baker's Street - street in Jerusalem known as “baker's street” where most, if not all, the bakeries of the city were located. Zedekiah promised Jeremiah, whom he had imprisoned, that he would have food for as long as bread was available on baker's street (Jeremiah 37:21 )
Street - street
Lane - —See street
Judas - At whose house, in the street called Straight at Damascus (now the "street of bazaars," reaching long, straight, and wide from the S. The house is still professedly shown a few steps out of the "street of bazaars," in an open space, "the sheikh's place
Street (2) - STREET. —In place of ‘street’ in Mark 6:56 we should read with Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘market-place,’ the open space or square (ἀγορά) where goods are brought for disposal to the merchants from the bazaars, and where people at leisure gather for conversation. πλατεῖα stands for ‘street’ in the ordinary sense. In Luke 14:21 it is apparently distinguished from ῥύμη, as ‘street’ from ‘alley’ or ‘lane. ’ But the distinction is ignored elsewhere; and certainly the ‘street’ (ῥύμη) called ‘Straight’ in Damascus (Acts 9:11) is no ‘alley. Even the main streets in cities like Jerusalem and Cairo are often narrow and crooked, more like ‘alleys’ than ‘streets’ in our sense. Seclusion is a main object aimed at in building Eastern houses: the wall to the street is seldom pierced by windows; the door usually leads through a passage into a court, round which the rooms are arranged. All sorts of filth are cast into the streets (Revelation 11:8)
Minories, the - street in London, named after the order of Minoresses or Poor Clares (Second Order of Saint Francis). It runs southward from Aldgate to George street in, the direction of the Tower and of the Thames. East of the street is the old church of the Holy Trinity (once an appanage of an abbey of Minoresses) which contains the arms (stars and stripes) of the Washington family
Outstreet - ) A street remote from the center of a town
Amin - ) A neglected and untrained city boy; a young street Arab
Patterer - ) One who patters, or talks glibly; specifically, a street peddler
Upstreet - ) Toward the higher part of a street; as, to walk upstreet
Sidewalk - ) A walk for foot passengers at the side of a street or road; a foot pavement
Jewry - Judea also, a district inhabited by Jews, whence the name of a street in London
Water Meter - A contrivance for measuring a supply of water delivered or received for any purpose, as from a street main
Lamp-Post - ) A post (generally a pillar of iron) supporting a lamp or lantern for lighting a street, park, etc
Water Motor - (1):...
A water wheel; especially, a small water wheel driven by water from a street main
Macadamize - ) To cover, as a road, or street, with small, broken stones, so as to form a smooth, hard, convex surface
Lamplighter - , a person who lights street lamps
Abutter - Specifically, the owner of a contiguous estate; as, the abutters on a street or a river
Belgian Block - granite, used as a material for street pavements
Fleet - FLEET, in English names, denotes a flood, a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, or a river as in Fleet-street, North-flete, Fleet-prison
Catch-Basin - ) A cistern or vault at the point where a street gutter discharges into a sewer, to catch bulky matters which would not pass readily through the sewer
Rez-de-Chaussee - ) The ground story of a building, either on a level with the street or raised slightly above it; - said esp
Chaunter - ) A street seller of ballads and other broadsides
Causey - word is literally ‘a raised way,’ and is used of a public road, but never of a street in a city. The word ‘causey’ is still used in Scotland for the raised footpath by the side of a road or street
Street - , "a broad way"), "a street," Matthew 6:5 ; 12:19 (in some texts, Mark 6:56 ); Luke 10:10 ; 13:26 ; 14:21 ; Acts 5:15 ; Revelation 11:8 ; 21:21 ; 22:2 . ...
2: ἄμφοδον (Strong's #296 — Noun Neuter — amphodon — am'-fod-on ) properly "a way around" (amphi, "around," hodos, "a way"), occurs in Mark 11:4 , RV, "the open street" (AV, "where two ways met")
Tower of the Furnaces - It was probably so named from its contiguity to the "bakers' street" (Jeremiah 37:21 )
Bowery - ) Characteristic of the street called the Bowery, in New York city; swaggering; flashy
Bazaar - A section of a street given over to merchants
Padrone - ) A man who imports, and controls the earnings of, Italian laborers, street musicians, etc
Motorcar - ) An automobile, locomobile, or locomotive designed to run and be steered on a street or roadway; esp
Street - The street called "Straight" at Damascus (Acts 9:11 ) is "a long broad street, running from east to west, about a mile in length, and forming the principal thoroughfare in the city. " In Oriental towns streets are usually narrow and irregular and filthy (Psalm 18:42 ; Isaiah 10:6 ). "It is remarkable," says Porter, "that all the important cities of Palestine and Syria Samaria, Caesarea, Gerasa, Bozrah, Damascus, Palmyra, had their 'straight streets' running through the centre of the city, and lined with stately rows of columns
Porch - The porch (puloon or proaulion ), Matthew 26:71, is the passage beneath the housefront from the street to the aule or court inside, open to the sky. This passage or porch was closed next the street by a large folding gate with a small wicket for single persons, kept by a porter (John 18:16-17)
Street - The only street referred to by name in the apostolic writings is the street in Damascus which is called ‘Straight’ (Acts 9:11). The word employed (ῥύμη, ‘lane’ or ‘alley’) hardly applies to this instance, for it was a broad, straight street on the Greek model, flanked by colonnades, on the further side of which foot-paths extended. The modern equivalent, which still retains the name, and forms the principal thoroughfare of the city, is in reality only the northern foot-way of the ancient street. The proof of this is given by the East Gate, the central and southern archways of which are now closed up; also by fragments of columns, found in houses and courtyards contiguous to the present street. ...
The same word is found in Acts 12:10, applied to one of the streets or lanes of Jerusalem, probably in the heart of the city, to which it appears to be appropriate (cf. ...
If we keep in view the smallness and the extreme irregularity of ancient cities, as revealed by recent excavation in Palestine, it seems best to equate ῥύμη to ‘street,’ and πλατεῖα to ‘square,’ in the modern city. Here πλατεῖα is not a broad place or square, but rather a broad street running from gate to gate. Within the walls the city would thus be divided into four segments which were built over, whose streets and lanes would be dwarfed by the spaciousness of the two πλατεῖαι. ‘The picture presented is that of a river flowing through the broad street which intersects the city, a row of trees being on either bank. ’ In John 11:8 the corpses cast out into the principal street (now generally understood of the earthly Jerusalem), and left without burial, were a purposed insult to the martyred witnesses, which was speedily avenged (John 11:11-13)
Uptown - ) Situated in, or belonging to, the upper part of a town or city; as, a uptown street, shop, etc
Oven - There was a street in Jerusalem (Jeremiah 37:21 ) called "bakers' street" (the only case in which the name of a street in Jerusalem is preserved)
Wastrel - ) A neglected child; a street Arab
Troublous - The street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times
Double-Decker - ) A public conveyance, as a street car, with seats on the roof
Streets - The layout of city streets often was established by the shape of the outer city walls. In some cities a wide street encircled the city, following the line of the outer wall. In other towns, streets radiated from a main plaza or thoroughfare. The doors of shops, storehouses, and private homes opened onto the street. Often, household wastes were thrown out into the street. Small, crooked lanes and alleyways led off from main streets, ending at a central courtyard serving several homes or shops. streets were often paved with large, flat stones, although dirt paths were not uncommon. Larger towns constructed drainage canals beneath city streets, some to carry away waste water and others to trap the run off from winter rains which was channeled into cisterns. During the New Testament era, Roman engineers designed cities throughout the empire with wide, straight, and well-constructed streets, usually leading to a central plaza or temple. Sidewalks with raised curbs bordered streets set with large polygonal paving stones. The constant traffic of carts and pedestrians often wore ruts into the streets, necessitating repair
Tag Day - A day on which contributions to some public or private charity or fund are solicited promiscuously on the street, and tags given to contributors to wear as an evidence of their having contributed
Friars, Austin - It is now a Dutch Reformed church and the name of a street
Dunstable, England - Town in Bedfordshire, England, founded on the site of a Romano-British village (Durocobrivre) on Watling street by Henry I who also endowed the Augustinian priory (1131)
Austin Friars - It is now a Dutch Reformed church and the name of a street
Terrace - ) A street, or a row of houses, on a bank or the side of a hill; hence, any street, or row of houses
Life: to be Viewed in Reference to Its End - The way is good, says Chrysostom, if it be to a feast, though through a dark and miry lane; if to an execution not good, though through the fairest street of the city
ju'Das, - (Matthew 1:2,3 ) ...
A man residing at Damascus, in "the street which is called Straight," in whose house Saul of Tarsus lodged after his miraculous conversion
ju'Das, - (Matthew 1:2,3 ) ...
A man residing at Damascus, in "the street which is called Straight," in whose house Saul of Tarsus lodged after his miraculous conversion
Market-Place - Any place of public resort, and hence a public place or broad street (Matthew 11:16 ; 20:3 ), as well as a forum or market-place proper, where goods were exposed for sale, and where public assemblies and trials were held (Acts 16:19 ; 17:17 ). In large towns the sale of particular articles seems to have been confined to certain streets, as we may infer from such expressions as "the bakers' street" (Jeremiah 37:21 ), and from the circumstance that in the time of Josephus the valley between Mounts Zion and Moriah was called the Tyropoeon or the "valley of the cheesemakers
Chare - ) A narrow street
Furnaces, Tower of - The “Baker's street” (Jeremiah 37:21 ) may have passed by this tower
Pall-Mall - The name was also given to the mallet used, to the place where the game was played, and to the street, in London, still called Pall Mall
Wich - ) A street; a village; a castle; a dwelling; a place of work, or exercise of authority; - now obsolete except in composition; as, bailiwick, Warwick, Greenwick
Inconsistency - Mark Antony once yoked two lions together, and drove them through the streets of Rome, but no human skill can ever yoke together the Lion of the Tribe of Judah and the Lion of the Pit. I did see a man once trying to walk on both sides of the street at one time, but he was undoubtedly drunk; and when we see a man labouring day by day to walk on both sides of the street, morally: in the shady side of sin and the sunny side of holiness, or reeling in the evening, at one time towards the bright lights of virtue, and anon staggering back to sin in dark places, where no lamp is shining: we say of him, 'He is morally intoxicated,' and wisdom adds, 'He is mad, and if the Great Physician heal him not, his madness will bring him to destruction
Cul-de-Sac - ) A passage with only one outlet, as a street closed at one end; a blind alley; hence, a trap
Persecution: Not to be Feared - When a blind man comes against you in the street you are not angry at him, you say, He is blind, poor man, or he would not have hurt me
Pitching - ) The rough paving of a street to a grade with blocks of stone
Peddler - One who sells goods, usually on the street or door-to-door
Streets - They were named, like our own streets, Acts 9:11 , and often resembled the bazaars of modern eastern cities, the shops of the same kind being in the same street and giving it its name, as the bakers' street, Nehemiah 3:31,32 ; Jeremiah 37:21 , and the valley of the cheesemongers
Trailer - of such cars on street railroads
Slum - ) A foul back street of a city, especially one filled with a poor, dirty, degraded, and often vicious population; any low neighborhood or dark retreat; - usually in the plural; as, Westminster slums are haunts for theives
Wall Street - A street towards the southern end of the borough of Manhattan, New York City, extending from Broadway to the East River; - so called from the old wall which extended along it when the city belonged to the Dutch
Rathskeller - , in Germany, the cellar or basement of the city hall, usually rented for use as a restaurant where beer is sold; hence, a beer saloon of the German type below the street level, where, usually, drinks are served only at tables and simple food may also be had; - sometimes loosely used, in English, of what are essentially basement restaurants where liquors are served
Laura - (Greek: a passage, alley, avenue, or street; later a set of shops along a street, hence a bazaar) ...
In the ecclesiastical sense, a series of streets of hermitages clustered around a monastery and the type of life lived by the monks in a laura
Avenue - ) A broad street; as, the Fifth Avenue in New York
Tramway - ) A railway laid in the streets of a town or city, on which cars for passengers or for freight are drawn by horses; a horse railroad. ) A street railway or interurban railway for local traffic, on which cable cars, or trolley cars, etc
Vaudeville - ) A kind of song of a lively character, frequently embodying a satire on some person or event, sung to a familiar air in couplets with a refrain; a street song; a topical song
Street - ...
Chûts (חֻץ, Strong's #2351), “street. ...
A particular use of chûts denotes the place outside the houses in a city, or the “street. ” The “street” was the place for setting up bazaars: “The cities, which my father took from thy father, I will restore; and thou shalt make streets for thee in Damascus, as my father made in Samaria” (1 Kings 20:34). Craftsmen plied their trade on certain “streets” named after the guild—for example, the Bakers’ street: “Then Zedekiah the king commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the court of the prison, and that they should give him daily a piece of bread out of the bakers’ street, until all the bread in the city were spent” ( streets of Jerusalem, and see now, and know, and seek in the broad places thereof, if ye can find a man, if there be any that executeth judgment, that seeketh the truth; and I will pardon it” (5:1). ...
Other descriptions of the “streets” are given by the prophets. Several mention that the “streets” were muddy: “… And to tread them down like the mire of the streets” (
streets” ( Bethlehemites - Several authors have mentioned this order, but none of them have told us their origin, nor where their convents were situated; if we except Matthew Paris, who says that, in 1257, they obtained a settlement in England, which was at Cambridge, in Trumpington-street
Scraping - ) Something scraped off; that which is separated from a substance, or is collected by scraping; as, the scraping of the street
Crossing - ) A place where anything (as a stream) is crossed; a paved walk across a street
Cassock - (Italian: casacca, great-coat) A gown or soutane, usually black, the ordinary outer garb of clerics and priests, worn in Catholic countries on the street as well as indoors
Door-Keeper - Persons were appointed to keep the street door leading into the interior of the house ( John 18:16,17 ; Acts 12:13 )
Kennel - ) The water course of a street; a little canal or channel; a gutter; also, a puddle
Fifth Monarchy Men - Their leader was Thomas Venner, a wine cooper, who, in his little conventicle in Coleman-street, warmed his admirers with passionate expectations of a fifth universal monarchy, under the personal reign of King Jesus upon earth, and that the saints were to take the kingdom to themselves. On Wednesday morning they returned and dispersed a party of the king's soldiers in Thread-needle-street. In Wood-street they repelled the trained bands, and some of the horse guards; but Venner himself was knocked down, and some of his company slain; from hence the remainder retreated to Cripplegate, and took possession of a house, which they threatened to defend with a desperate resolution; but nobody appearing to countenance their frenzy, they surrendered after they had lost about half their number. Venner, and one of his officers, were hanged before their meeting house door in Colemanstreet, Jan
Rhode Island - Bishop Benedict Fenwick of Boston appointed Reverend Robert Woodley their pastor, and services were held in 1828 at Newport, in a former schoolhouse on Barney street purchased for the purpose. In 1830 a church was erected on Mount Vernon street by Reverend John Corry
Busy - ) Crowded with business or activities; - said of places and times; as, a busy street
Pave - ) To lay or cover with stone, brick, or other material, so as to make a firm, level, or convenient surface for horses, carriages, or persons on foot, to travel on; to floor with brick, stone, or other solid material; as, to pave a street; to pave a court
Obstruct - ) To block up; to stop up or close, as a way or passage; to place an obstacle in, or fill with obstacles or impediments that prevent or hinder passing; as, to obstruct a street; to obstruct the channels of the body
Rehob - Street; broad place
Scripture: Versus System - The one is the horse standing in the street in harness, feeding indeed, but on the contents of a bag tossed up and down; the other, the same animal in a large, fine meadow, where he lies down in green pastures, and feeds beside the still waters
Automobile - , a self-propelled vehicle suitable for use on a street or roadway
Alley - ) A narrow passage or way in a city, as distinct from a public street
Conductor - ) One in charge of a public conveyance, as of a railroad train or a street car
Orderly - ) A street sweeper
Porch - The porch, (Matthew 26:71 ) may have been the passage from the street into the first court of the house, in which, in eastern houses, is the mastabah or stone bench, for the porter or persons waiting, and where also the master of the house often receives visitors and transacts business
Alley - ) A narrow passage or way in a city, as distinct from a public street
Street - The streets of a modern Oriental town present a great contrast to those with which we are familiar, being generally narrow, tortuous and gloomy, even in the best towns. The street called "Straight," in Damascus, (Acts 9:11 ) was an exception to the rule of narrowness: it was a noble thoroughfare, one hundred feet wide. (Jeremiah 37:21 ) That streets occasionally had names appears from (Jeremiah 37:21 ; Acts 9:11 ) That they were generally unpaved may be inferred from the notices of the pavement laid by Herod the Great at Antioch, and by Herod Agrippa II. Tobit 13:17 ; (Revelation 21:21 ) Each street and bazaar in a modern town is locked up at night; the same custom appears to have prevailed in ancient times
Olaf Haraldson, Saint - His cult spread rapidly over northern Europe, and in Hart street in London there is a church of Saint Olave
Window - The windows generally look into the inner court of the house, but in every house one or more look into the street
Haraldson, Olaf, Saint - His cult spread rapidly over northern Europe, and in Hart street in London there is a church of Saint Olave
Throng - ) To crowd into; to fill closely by crowding or pressing into, as a hall or a street
Stille Omgang - While Catholics could not formally process, there was no law against a group simply walking together in the street, and no one could stop them from silently praying as they walked
Damascus - The street called "Straight," in which Judas lived, in whose house Saul was found by Ananias, is known by the name Sultany, or "Queen's street. " It is the principal street of the city
Enlarge - platos, "breadth," and plateia, "a street
Chamber - "On the wall," which the Shunammite prepared for the prophet Elisha (2 Kings 4:10 ), was an upper chamber over the porch through the hall toward the street
Jam - ) A mass of people or objects crowded together; also, the pressure from a crowd; a crush; as, a jam in a street; a jam of logs in a river
Broad - It is opposed to narrow as a broad street a broad table
Massachusetts - The same fall a congregation of about 100 was gathered together in Boston and the building of a brick church, under the patronage of the Holy Cross, was undertaken on the site of a former Huguenot church on School street, by Reverend Claude de la Poterie, who had come from France. His reception was most gratifying in the city where, as he said: ...
"Many here, even of the principal people, have acknowledged to me that they would have crossed to the opposite side of the street rather than meet a Roman Catholic some time ago
Lethargy of Soul - No blaze was ever visible, nor could any remarkable sign of fire be seen from the street, yet they died as readily as if they had been burned to ashes by raging flames
Patter - ) The language or oratory of a street peddler, conjurer, or the like, hence, glib talk; a voluble harangue; mere talk; chatter; also, specif
Market, Market-Place - In the larger towns the single shop of a kind became a street, row, or enclosed square devoted to the manufacture and sale of particular articles, each being thus known as the fruit-market, the shoe-makers’ street, or the khan of the silver-smiths (Jeremiah 37:21, John 5:2). Such was the agora of Ephesus (Acts 16:19; Acts 17:17), leading in a direct line, with branching side streets of the ordinary kind, from the canal quay to the amphitheatre at the other end. The street called ‘Straight’ (Acts 9:11) in Damascus was thus laid out
Asses - The street of Tombs (each formed of one granite block) leading to the great gate is a striking feature
Lecture, Merchants - This lecture is kept up to the present day, and is, we believe, now held at Broad-street Meeting every Tuesday morning
Window - In the houses of the East, which still differ but little from those of ancient times, windows do not usually look out upon the street, but balconies project from the upper stories over the street, with windows in which the lattice-work is often of a highly ornamental kind
Court - A space inclosed by houses, broader than a street or a space forming a kind of recess from a public street
Meet - , to come in contact, or into proximity, by approach from opposite directions; to join; to come face to face; to come in close relationship; as, we met in the street; two lines meet so as to form an angle. ) To come into the presence of without contact; to come close to; to intercept; to come within the perception, influence, or recognition of; as, to meet a train at a junction; to meet carriages or persons in the street; to meet friends at a party; sweet sounds met the ear
Roofs - They are built round a paved court, into which the entrance from the street is through a gateway or passage room furnished with benches, and sufficiently large to be used for receiving visits or transacting business. The stairs which lead to the roof are never placed on the outside of the house in the street, but usually in the gateway, or passage room to the court, sometimes at the entrance within the court. " The windows of the eastern houses being chiefly within, facing the court, in order to see what was going on without in the streets of the city, the only way was to run up to the flat roof
Bedlam - (contraction of Bethlehem) Famous asylum, London, originally on the site of the present Liverpool street railway station; founded, 1247, by Simon FitzMary, sheriff of London, for the Order of Saint Mary of Bethlehem, as a general hospital for the poor, with the special duty of entertaining the bishops and canons of Saint Mary of Bethlehem, as often as they might come to England
Salutation - I have often listened to these prolonged salutations in the house, the street, and the highway, and not unfrequently I have experienced their tedious monotony, and I have bitterly lamented useless waste of time" (Porter, Through Samaria, etc
Straight - A — 1: εὐθύς (Strong's #2117 — Adjective — euthus — yoo-thoos' ) "direct, straight, right," is translated "straight," figuratively, of the paths of the Lord, Matthew 3:3 ; Mark 1:3 ; Luke 3:4 ; in Luke 3:5 of the rectification of the crooked, with reference to moral transformation; in Acts 9:11 , the name of a street in Damascus, still one of the principal thoroughfares
Baker - In Jerusalem there was apparently a part devoted to the bakers, for Jeremiah was to have a piece of bread out of the Bakers' street (or Bazaar, as it would now be expressed in the East) as long as the bread lasted
Windows - All the windows open into private courts, if we except sometimes a latticed window or balcony toward the street
Damas'Cus, - Queen's street, which runs straight through the city from east to west, may be the street called Straight
Damascus - In the midst of this plain lies at your feet the vast lake or island of deep verdure, walnuts and apricots waving above, corn and grass below; and in the midst of this mass of foliage rises, striking out its wide arms of streets hither and thither, and its white minarets above the trees which embosom them, the city of Damascus. The principal street, known as Sultany, or Queen's street, runs in nearly a straight line from east to west, and is supposed to be the same as the street called "Straight" in Acts 9:11
Porch - ...
3: προαύλιον (Strong's #4259 — Noun Neuter — proaulion — pro-ow'-lee-on ) "the exterior court" or "vestibule," between the door and the street, in the houses of well-to-do folk, Mark 14:68 , "porch" (RV marg
Broad - ) Wide; extend in breadth, or from side to side; - opposed to narrow; as, a broad street, a broad table; an inch broad
Extend - ) To stretch out; to prolong in space; to carry forward or continue in length; as, to extend a line in surveying; to extend a cord across the street
Glasgow University - The university occupied a site on High street, 1460-1870, to which Mary Queen of Scots contributed 13 acres; it was almost completely destroyed at the Reformation
Hawk - To cry to offer for sale by outcry in the street, or to sell by outcry as, to hawk goods or pamphlets
Path - A way beaten or trodden by the feet of man or beast, or made hard by wheels that part of a highway on which animals or carriages ordinarily pass applied to the ground only, and never to a paved street in a city
University, Glasgow - The university occupied a site on High street, 1460-1870, to which Mary Queen of Scots contributed 13 acres; it was almost completely destroyed at the Reformation
Salt of the Earth - Once corrupted it is fit only to be thrown out in the street or on the refuse piles within or at the edge of Eastern villages
Judas - The street called "Straight" in which it was situated is identified with the modern "street of bazaars," where is still pointed out the so-called "house of Judas
Chamber - An apartment built upon and projecting from the walls of the main house, and communicating by a private door with the house, and by a private stairway with the street
Market, Market-Place - The AV sometimes changes the rendering to "markets" and translates it "streets" in Mark 6:56 . See street
Corner, Cornerstone - , "coign"), signifies (a) "an external angle," as of the "corner" of a street, Matthew 6:5 ; or of a building, 21:42; Mark 12:10 ; Luke 20:17 ; Acts 4:11 ; 1 Peter 2:7 , "the corner stone or head-stone of the corner" (see below); or the four extreme limits of the earth, Revelation 7:1 ; 20:8 ; (b) "an internal corner," a secret place, Acts 26:26
Faber, Frederick William - Newman sent him, 1849, to London to found the Oratory at King William street, which was removed to South Kensington in 1854
Frederick William Faber - Newman sent him, 1849, to London to found the Oratory at King William street, which was removed to South Kensington in 1854
Jezreel - Robert street...
...
Absence From Week-Night Services - I saw her next morning, going down street to get her old bonnet 'done up
By - ) Out of the common path; aside; - used in composition, giving the meaning of something aside, secondary, or incidental, or collateral matter, a thing private or avoiding notice; as, by-line, by-place, by-play, by-street
Narrow - Of little breadth not wide or broad having little distance from side to side as a narrow board a narrow street a narrow sea a narrow hem or border
Justice - 2: Berry street Lect
Lantern - ; - sometimes portable, as a closed vessel or case of horn, perforated tin, glass, oiled paper, or other material, having a lamp or candle within; sometimes fixed, as the glazed inclosure of a street light, or of a lighthouse light
Lattice - For the most part, the windows open into their own courts, except a latticed window, or balcony, that for conveniency is formed to look into the street. But the latticed window, or balcony, formed the only opening for communication (except the entrance) with the public street, It was at this lattice-work window, most probably, that Jezebel looked out at the time that Jehu entered into Jezreel
Children And Dogs - Only later is salvation to be offered to the Gentiles who by their idolatrous worship and low standard of morals had made themselves like to the despised, half-wild dogs of the East that prowl about the streets and feed on carrion. Great is the power of faith: for lack of it, the Jews who once boasted of being the chosen sons of God are cast off as the dogs of the street; for being strong in it the Gentiles, once treated as dogs, become through the good offices of Holy Mother Church sons of God and heirs of heaven
Sin: Mans Readiness to Invent Excuse For - ' ...
Commonly enough are we told by evildoers in excuse for their sins that no man could do otherwise were he in their position, that there is no living at their trade honestly, that in such a street shops must be open on a Sunday, that their health required an excursion to Brighton on the Sabbath because their labours were so severe, that nobody could be religious in the house in which they were engaged, and so on, all to the same effect, and about as truthful as the soliloquy of the drunkard of Venezuela
Way - ) That by, upon, or along, which one passes or processes; opportunity or room to pass; place of passing; passage; road, street, track, or path of any kind; as, they built a way to the mine
Remain - … And they said, Nay; but we will abide in the street all night
House - Of modern eastern houses it may be said the backs of the houses are in the street. A house may be watched all day, and not a soul be seen, unless some one comes to the door, though all going on in the street may be seen from the lattices
Jezebel - She tried to adorn herself and entice him, but her servants obeyed Jehu's call to throw her from the window to the street, where horses trod her in the ground (2 Kings 9:30-37 )
Hawk - ) To offer for sale by outcry in the street; to carry (merchandise) about from place to place for sale; to peddle; as, to hawk goods or pamphlets
Fleet - ) A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; - obsolete, except as a place name, - as Fleet street in London
Gerasa - The chief remains are those of the town walls, the street of columns, several temples, a triumphal arch, a hippodrome, a theatre, etc
Alexandria - From the gate of the sea ran one magnificent street, 2,000 feet broad, through the entire length of the city, to the gate of Canopus, affording a view of the shipping in the port, whether north in the Mediterranean, or south in the noble basin of the Mareotic lake. Another street of equal width intersected this at right angles, in a square half a league in circumference. The streets are so narrow, that the inhabitants can lay mats of reeds from one roof to the opposite, to protect them from the scorching sun
Thessalonica - Octavius Augustus rewarded its adhesion to his cause in the second civil war by making it "a free city" with a popular assembly ("the people") and "rulers of the city" (politarchs: Acts 17:1; Acts 17:5; Acts 17:8); this political term is to be read still on an arch spanning the main street, from it we learn there were seven politarchs. The main street still standing is the old Via Ignatia, running E
Gate - This shows that the portal or gateway was closed by means of a door placed at the end fronting the street. Bezae, seven steps led down from this gate to the level of the street
Upper Room - The room is both higher and also larger than those below; it has two projecting windows; and the whole floor is so much extended in front beyond the lower part of the building, that the projecting windows considerably overhang the street. Eutychus, thus sitting, would be on a level with the open window; and, being overcome with sleep, he would easily fall out from the third loft of the house into the street, and be almost certain, from such a height, to lose his life
John Mccloskey - Named second Archbishop of New York in 1864, he was installed in Saint Patrick's Cathedral on Mott street
Mccloskey, John - Named second Archbishop of New York in 1864, he was installed in Saint Patrick's Cathedral on Mott street
Church Missions House - The corner-stone was laid on the southeast cornerof Fourth Avenue and Twenty-Second street in New York City onOctober 3, 1892
Court - ) An inclosed space; a courtyard; an uncovered area shut in by the walls of a building, or by different building; also, a space opening from a street and nearly surrounded by houses; a blind alley
John Hughes - Named coadjutor to Bishop Dubois of New York in 1837, he was consecrated in old Saint Patrick's Cathedral on Mott street
Corner - The angle of a house (Job 1:19 ) or a street (Proverbs 7:8 ). The "corners of the streets" mentioned in Matthew 6:5 means the angles where streets meet so as to form a square or place of public resort
Bethshean - ...
The men of Jabesh Gilead stole the bones of Saul and Jonathan and Saul's other two sons from the wall in "the street" or open space before the gate of Bethshean (2 Samuel 21:12
Eden - ...
Robert Anderson street...
...
Hughes, John - Named coadjutor to Bishop Dubois of New York in 1837, he was consecrated in old Saint Patrick's Cathedral on Mott street
Money-Making: Nothing But Play - So all that great foul city of London there: rattling, growling, smoking, stinking: a ghastly heap of fermenting brickwork, pouring out poison at every pore: you fancy it is a city of work? Not a street of it! It is a great city of play; very nasty play, and very hard play,
Assos - Ida, then through the rich Valley of the Tuzla, and finally reaching the Via Sacra, or street of Tombs, which still extends a great distance to the N
Lodge - , to sleep at night; as, to lodge in York street
South Carolina - Two years later a priest named Ryan, (or O'Reilly) was sent by Bishop Carroll to Charleston, and during a stay of two years he assembled about 200 Catholics and used a former Methodist church on Hasell street for their meeting-place
Court - ...
2: αὐλή (Strong's #833 — Noun Feminine — aule — ow-lay' ) primarily, "an uncovered space around a house, enclosed by a wall, where the stables were," hence was used to describe (a) "the courtyard of a house;" in the OT it is used of the "courts" of the tabernacle and Temple; in this sense it is found in the NT in Revelation 11:2 ; (b) "the courts in the dwellings of well-to-do folk," which usually had two, one exterior, between the door and the street (called the proaulion, or "porch," Mark 14:68 ), the other, interior, surrounded by the buildings of the dwellings, as in Matthew 26:69 (in contrast to the room where the judges were sitting); Mark 14:66 ; Luke 22:55 ; AV, "hall;" RV "court" gives the proper significance, Matthew 26:3,58 ; Mark 14:54 ; 15:16 (RV, "Praetorium"); Luke 11:21 ; John 18:15
House (2) - Accordingly we find artisans and merchants plying their trades in the street, or in open shops looking out on the street. From the roof one could easily see what was going on in the street, or on a neighbouring housetop (cf. 1 Samuel 9:25); indeed, could even step from roof to roof, and thus walk the whole length of a street, as the present writer once did in Damascus (cf
Tad'Mor - Among the most remarkable are the Tombs, the Temple of the Sun and the street of Columns
Life: Power of the Inner - Some of these huts were empty, or the lonely inhabitant cowered over a scanty fire; whilst the peopled hearth and the high- blazing fagots of the rest created such an inward warmth that grim winter melted and relaxed his gripe; and the loosened mass folded off and tumbled over on the trampled street
Zone - ) Any circular or ring-shaped area within which the street-car companies make no differences of fare
Porch - ’ In both cases the covered gateway leading from the street to the court is probably meant
Place - (5) For amphodon, rendered "a place where two ways met," Mark 11:4 (RV, "the open street"), see street
River - It is found in Revelation 22:1-2, ‘And he shewed me a river of water of life, bright as crystal, proceeding out of the throne of God and of the Lamb, in the midst of the street thereof. The river and the street run side by side through the city, as the Barada and the street upon its left bank do to-day in the city of Damascus
Jeru'Salem - streets, houses, etc. The "east street," ( 2 Chronicles 29:4 ) the "street of the city," i. the city of David, (2 Chronicles 32:6 ) the "street facing the water gate," (Nehemiah 8:1,3 ) or, according to the parallel account in Ezra 10:9 ) the "street of the gate of Ephraim," (Nehemiah 8:16 ) and the "open place of the first gate toward the east," must have been not "streets," in our sense of the word, so much as the open spaces found in easter towns round the inside of the gates. streets, properly so called, there were, (Jeremiah 5:1 ; 11:13 ) etc. ; but the name of only one, "the bakers' street," (Jeremiah 37:21 ) is preserved to us. The Via Dolorosa, or street of sorrows, is a part of the street thorough which Christ is supposed to have been led on his way to his crucifixion. To the houses we have even less clue; but there is no reason to suppose that in either houses or streets the ancient Jerusalem differed very materially from the modern. The streets within are narrow, ungraded, crooked, and often filthy. There are few windows toward the street
Lambe, Alphonsus - ...
Born Friday June 24, 1932 in Tullamore, Ireland ...
Died January 21, 1959 at Buenos Aires, Argentina of stomach cancer; buried in the Irish Christian Brothers vault, Recoleta Cemetery, Buenos Aires ...
Venerated; pending; his Cause for Canonization was introduced by the Archdiocese of Buenos Aires in 1978; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Alphonsus Lambe, contact...
Concilium Legionis Mariae...
Morning Star Avenue...
Brunswick street...
Dublin 7, IRELAND ...
Prayers O God, who by your infinite mercy inflamed the heart of your servant, Alphonsus Lambe with an ardent love for you and for Mary, our Mother; a love which revealed itself in a life of intense labour, prayer and sacrifice for the salvation of souls, grant, if it be your will, that we may obtain, by his intercession, what we cannot obtain by our own merits
Ohio - It was named Christ Church and was a rude plank structure erected at Vine and Liberty streets, outside the limits of the city. After the consecration of Bishop Fenwick in 1822, the little church was moved by oxen into the city to a site on Sycamore street, above Sixth
Resurrection - ...
See Hody on the Resurrection; Pearson on the Creed; Lame street Lect
City - The streets of eastern cities are generally narrow, seldom allowing more than two loaded camels to pass one another. Those of one trade generally lived on the same street (Jeremiah 37:21)
Alfie Lambe - ...
Born Friday June 24, 1932 in Tullamore, Ireland ...
Died January 21, 1959 at Buenos Aires, Argentina of stomach cancer; buried in the Irish Christian Brothers vault, Recoleta Cemetery, Buenos Aires ...
Venerated; pending; his Cause for Canonization was introduced by the Archdiocese of Buenos Aires in 1978; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Alphonsus Lambe, contact...
Concilium Legionis Mariae...
Morning Star Avenue...
Brunswick street...
Dublin 7, IRELAND ...
Prayers O God, who by your infinite mercy inflamed the heart of your servant, Alphonsus Lambe with an ardent love for you and for Mary, our Mother; a love which revealed itself in a life of intense labour, prayer and sacrifice for the salvation of souls, grant, if it be your will, that we may obtain, by his intercession, what we cannot obtain by our own merits
Veil - The other veil, to be worn in the street, is a large mantle or sheet, of black silk, linen, or some coarse material, so ample as to envelope the whole person and dress, leaving but one of the eyes exposed, Song of Song of Solomon 4:9
Set - ...
The town of Berne has handsome fountains planted and set distances from one end of the street to the other
Gib'e-ah - (Judges 19:20 ) It was then a "city," with the usual open street or square, (Judges 19:15,17,20 ) and containing 700 "chosen men," ch
Place - ) A broad way in a city; an open space; an area; a court or short part of a street open only at one end
Front - ) To face toward; to have the front toward; to confront; as, the house fronts the street
Sheep - street considers this precept to have had respect to the health of the Israelites; observing that "bilious disorders are very frequent in hot countries; the eating of fat meat is a great encouragement and excitement to them; and though the fat of the tail is now considered as a delicacy, it is really unwholesome
Damascus - There is a long street of more than a mile in length that may well have been called 'Straight,' but is now a street of Bazaars
Dwelling - ...
A modern eastern house of the better class presents a dead wall to the street, with an interior court. A passage from the outer door, which is attended to by the porter, John 18:16-17; Acts 12:13-14, leads into the first or outer court, but is so contrived that the entrance to the court is not exactly opposite to the external door; so that no view of the court is obtained from the street, nor any of the street from the court. This towards the street is a wall, towards the interior court usually a balustrade. Our Lord was perhaps in the veranda; while the people crowded the court and impeded the passage from the street
Judas - After his experience on the road to Damascus Paul went to the house of a man named Judas who lived on Straight street
Redemption - ...
See articles PROPITIATION, RECONCILIATION, SATISFACTION; and Edwards's History of Redemption; Cole on the Sovereignty of God; Lime street Lect
Thessalonica - However, a Roman arch at the western end of ancient Vardar street contained an inscription from before A
Antioch - Antiochus Epiphanes formed a great colonnaded street intersecting it from one end to the other
Tree - And it is not the least of the beauty of this similitude, that this tree of life is said to be in the midst of the street, and on either side of the river
an'Tioch - One feature, which seems to have been characteristic of the great Syrian cities,--a vast street with colonnades, intersecting the whole from end to end,--was added by Antiochus Epiphanes
Rellyanists - " Many of his followers are removed to the world of spirits, but a branch still survives, and meets at the chapel in Windmill-street, Moorfields, London; where there are different brethren who speak
High Place - ...
The term 'high places' has another application under the Hebrew word ramah, which also signifies 'exalted;' for Israel is charged with making a high place in every street, and at every head of the way, which doubtless refers to some shrine or symbol of idolatry connected with abominable practices
Gadara - The ruins of Um Keis attest the greatness of Gadara anciently; from the gate a straight street, with a colonnade on each side, passed through the city; the pavement is almost perfect, marked here and there by chariot wheels; the columns are prostrate
Range - Which way thy forests range - ...
We say, the front of a house ranges with the line of the street
Rate - ...
An old lord of the council rated me the other day in the street about you, sir
Close - ) A narrow passage leading from a street to a court, and the houses within
Blow - ) To be carried or moved by the wind; as, the dust blows in from the street
Smyrna - In addition to its picturesque situation it was commended by its handsome and excellently paved streets, which were fringed by the groves in the suburbs. ) There was one street known as the street of Gold
the Angel of the Church of the Laodiceans - " But in the next street there was a lamp still burning, and a voice from within answered, "Come in, Thou Blessed of the Lord. Think to yourself that He is actually in the street, and is actually, and in the body, standing at your door. And it will be a sacramental action to go and actually open your room door or your street door late and alone tonight. And even if you should again and again be deceived and disappointed: even if again and again you should mistake some other sound in the street for His footstep, do not despair of His coming
Houses - For the accommodation of the guests, the pavement is covered with mats or carpets; and as it is secured against all interruption from the street, is well adapted to public entertainments. The windows which look into the street are very high and narrow, and defended by lattice work; as they are only intended to allow the cloistered inmate a peep of what is passing without, while he remains concealed behind the casement. Irwin describes the windows in Upper Egypt as having the same form and dimensions; and says expressly, that one of the windows of the house in which they lodged, and through which they looked into the street, more resembled a pigeon hole than any thing else. It is surrounded by a wall breast-high, which forms the partition with the contiguous houses, and prevents one from falling into the street on the one side, or into the court on the other. Rahab concealed the spies on the roof, with the stalks of flax which she had laid in order to dry, Joshua 2:6 ; the king of Israel, according to the custom of his country, rose from his bed, and walked upon the roof of his house, to enjoy the refreshing breezes of the evening, 2 Samuel 11:2 ; upon the top of the house the prophet conversed with Saul, about the gracious designs of God, respecting him and his family, 1 Samuel 9:25 ; to the same place Peter retired to offer up his devotions, Acts 10:9 ; and in the feast of tabernacles, under the government of Nehemiah, booths were erected, as well upon the terraces of their houses, as in their courts, and in the streets of the city, Nehemiah 8:16
House - Into this court all the windows open, there being usually no windows towards the street. ...
In the middle of the front of each house is usually an arched passage, leading into the court-not directly, lest the court should be exposed to view from the street, but by turning to one side. The jealously likewise of these people is less apt to be alarmed, while all the windows open into their respective courts, if we except a latticed window or balcony which sometimes looks into the streets", 2 Kings 9:30 . ...
"The streets of eastern cities, the better to shade them from the sun, are usually narrow, with sometimes a range of shops on each side. It is usually surrounded by two walls; the outermost whereof is partly built over the street, partly makes the partition with the contiguous houses, being frequently so low that one may easily climb over it. When one of these cities is built upon level ground, we can pass from one end of it to the other, along the tops of the houses, without coming down into the street
Baptists - Their general assembly is held annually in Worship street, London, of the Tuesday in the Whitsun week
Regeneration - Owen on the Spirit; Lime street Lectures, ser
Mouth - Every coffee house has some statesman belonging to it, who is the mouth of the street where he lives
Beth-Shean - This city formed the foundation of a significant Hellenistic and Roman occupation that included temples, theater, amphitheater, colonnaded street, hippodrome, tombs, and many public buildings, which had spread to the northern, eastern, and southern quadrants around the earlier “tell
Damascus - He "made himself streets" in Samaria (1 Kings 20:34), so completely was he Israel's master. The street called "Straight" is still there, leading from one gate to the pasha's palace, i. a mile long; it was originally divided by Corinthian colonnades into three avenues, of which the remains are still traced (Acts 9:11); called by the natives "the street of bazaars
City - ...
The streets are now seen to have been exceedingly narrow and to have been laid out on no definite plan, ‘a maze of narrow crooked causeways and blind alleys,’ as at Gezer. Only at the intersection of the more important streets, and especially near the city gates, were broad places ( Jeremiah 5:1 , Nehemiah 8:1 ; Nehemiah 8:3 ; Nehemiah 8:16 RV [6] , as often, has ‘streets’) the markets ( Matthew 11:16 , Luke 11:43 ) and market-places ( Matthew 20:3 , Luke 7:32 ) of NT where the citizens met to discuss public affairs, the children to play, and the elders to dispense justice. A feature of an Eastern city in ancient as in modern times was the aggregation in a particular street or streets of representatives of the same craft or occupation, from which the name of the street or quarter was derived (see Arts and Crafts, § 10 ). ...
The houses were absurdly small to Western ideas (see House), for the city folk lived their life in the courts and streets, retiring to their houses mainly to eat and sleep
Judas - His house was in the Straight street, and Saul of Tarsus lodged there after his conversion
Intercession of Christ - 348; Berry street Lec
Cyriac, Patriarch of Constantinople - He built a church dedicated to the Θεοτόκος in a street of Constantinople called Diaconissa (Theoph
Live - He lives in a large house on Second street
Jehu - On entering the city, Jehu commanded the eunchs of the royal palace to cast down Jezebel into the street, where her mangled body was trodden under foot by the horses
Jerusalem - Of the various so-called streets, as the "east street," R. , "the broad place on the east," 2 Chronicles 29:4; the "street of the city," i. , "broad place at the gate of the city," 2 Chronicles 32:6; the "street," R. , "broad place facing the water gate," Nehemiah 8:1; Nehemiah 8:3, or, according to the parallel account in 1 Esdras 9:38, the "broad place of the temple towards the east;" the "street of the house of God," Ezra 10:9, R. , "broad place;" the "street," R. , "broad place of the gate of Ephraim," Nehemiah 8:16; and the "open place of the first gate toward the east" could not have been "streets," in our sense of the word, but rather open spaces found in eastern towns near the inside of the gates. streets, properly so called, there were, however, Jeremiah 5:1; Jeremiah 11:13, etc. ; but the name of only one, "the bakers' street," Jeremiah 37:21, is preserved to us
Babylon - The streets of the magnificent city layout were roughly parallel to the river, meeting others at right angles and terminating in great bronze gates. Ancient Babylon's most famous street was the Processional Way, Aibur-shabu (“the enemy shall never pass”) along which the images of the gods were transported from the Euphrates into Babylon during the New Year Festival. From the Euphrates along this street the distance was about 2000 feet to the northern side of the rectangular wall system. Over 6,000 figures were uncovered, and ten street altars were found from the period from Esarhaddon to Nabonidus (681-539 B
Toleration, Tolerance - The ascetic Baptist (Matthew 11:18), who drew men into the wilderness (Matthew 11:7-9), received the highest commendation (Luke 7:26-28) from Him whose scene of ministry was the street and the synagogue, and who honoured with His presence bridal and other feasts (Matthew 9:10-12, John 2:1-11; John 12:2)
Cut - ) To refuse to recognize; to ignore; as, to cut a person in the street; to cut one's acquaintance
Torch - 459), assemble at sunset on the occasion of a marriage, and move with dance and song through the street to the house of the marriage festival bearing torches in their hands
Damascus - A street is still found here called "Straight," probably the same referred to in Acts 9:11
Way - (7) For "two ways" in Mark 11:4 , AV see street
New York, City of - The few remaining were ministered to by Father Ferdinand Steinmayer (or "Father Farmer") who celebrated Mass in such places as a loft in Water street. On June 10, 1785, largely through the instrumentality of the Spanish minister, Don Diego de Gardoqui, an act of incorporation was secured for the "Trustees of the Roman Catholic church of the City of New York," and November 4, 1786, Saint Peter's Church at Barclay and Church streets, the first permanent structure for a Catholic Church erected in New York, was opened. The increasingly large number of Catholics necessitated the building of another church and, May 4, 1815, Saint Patrick's Cathedral, on Mott street, was formally dedicated by Bishop Cheverus of Boston. The present Saint Patrick's Cathedral, occupying the block between Fifth and Madison avenues, Fiftieth and Fifty-first streets, was dedicated May 25, 1879
Cry - The notices of hawkers of wares to be sold int he street are called cries as the cries of London
Bread - Besides there were public bakers (Hosea 7:4), and in Jerusalem a street tenanted by bakers (Jeremiah 37:21); Nehemiah mentions "the tower of the furnaces," or ovens (Nehemiah 3:11; Nehemiah 12:38)
Thebes - Upon the western bank there was almost a continuous line of temples and public edifices for a distance of two miles,from Qoonah to Medeenet Haboo; and Wilkinson conjectures that from a point near the latter, perhaps in the line of the colossi, the "Royal street" ran down to the river, which was crossed by a ferry terminating at Luxor, on the eastern side
Gibeah - It was then a "city" with the usual open "street" or square, having its "700 chosen men," probably the same as the "left handed men who could sling stones at an hair breadth and not miss" (Judges 20:15-16)
Judas - The one whose house in Straight street, Damascus, sheltered Paul during his blindness
Line - Every new building must be set in a line with other on the same street
Walk - To pass through or upon as, to walk the streets. This is elliptical for to walk in or through the street
Zedekiah - " Zedekiah showed his sense of Jeremiah's faithfulness by ordering bread to be given him out of the bakers' street until all the bread in the city was spent (Proverbs 28:23; Psalms 37:19). sides of the Tyropoeon valley, by a street issuing at the gate above the royal gardens and the fountain of Siloam
Blood - So here “blood” means responsibility for one’s dead: “And it shall be, that whosoever shall go out of the doors of thy house into the street, his blood shall be upon his head, and we will be guiltless: and whosoever shall be with thee in the house, his blood shall be on our head, if any hand be upon him” ( Door - Ezekiel 40:11 [1]) is best understood as a door abutting on the street or lane, which gave the entry to a covered passage communicating with the court of the house, in which the living rooms were situated (see Gate)
Roll - ) To move on wheels; as, the carriage rolls along the street
Calvary - Buckingham describes the present mount as a rock, the summit of which is ascended by a steep flight of eighteen or twenty steps from the common level of the church, which is equal with that of the street without; and beside this, there is a descent of thirty steps, from the level of the church, into the chapel of St
Door - Ezekiel 40:11 [1]) is best understood as a door abutting on the street or lane, which gave the entry to a covered passage communicating with the court of the house, in which the living rooms were situated (see Gate)
Paul as a Man of Prayer - You are so beset with men whom you cannot meet in the street, or hear or see their very names, but you must surely, on the spot, flee to Christ to forgive, and heal, and hide you. On the midday street tomorrow you would stop to make those sad marks in your book, at your meals you would make them, at business, at calls, and in conversation with your wisest, and best, and least sin-provoking, friends. Speaking of Paul's physician, I shall close with a few lines on this subject, out of the private papers of Sir Thomas Browne, a man of prayer, not unworthy to be named with the Apostle himself: "To pray in all places where quietness inviteth; in any house, highway, or street; and to know no street in this city that may not witness that I have not forgotten God and my Saviour in it: and that no parish or town where I have been may not say the like
Bethlehem - Bethlehem is now a village with one chief street, and population (wholly Christian) of 3,000
Lot (1) - The angels' declining his invitation at first, "we will abide in the street (the broad open space) all night," answers to Jesus' mode of eliciting the faith of the two Emmaus disciples (Luke 24:28)
Fall of Man - of the Bible; Fletcher's Appeal to Matters of Fact; Berry street Lectures, Babylon - side ran the sacred procession street, decorated with enamelled tiles representing the dragon and the re’çm , to the Istar-gate at the S
Greetings - In a crowded street it is, of course, impossible to greet everyone
Bread - Such no doubt were the ovens of the professional bakers in the street named after them in Jerusalem ( Jeremiah 37:21 )
Marcellinus, Bishop of Rome - The holy bodies lay for 26 days in the street by order of Diocletian; when the presbyter Marcellus collected by night the bodies of the saints, and buried them on the Salarian Way in the cemetery of Priscilla in a cell (cubiculum ) which is to be seen to the present day, because the penitent [1] himself had so ordered while he was being dragged to execution, in a crypt near the body of St
Tabernacles, Feast of - ...
In Jerusalem the booths were built on the roofs, in house courts, in the temple court, and in the street of the water gate and of the Ephraim gate
Seventy Weeks of Daniel - The first period of seven weeks refers to the building of the street and the wall, or moat, in troublous times, of which times an account is found in the book of Nehemiah
Jerusalem - A street runs nearly north from Zion gate to Damascus gate; and a street from the Jaffa gate runs eastward to the Mosque enclosure These two streets divide the city into four quarters of unequal size. ...
The Christian population gave names to the streets, and point out traditional sites of many events recorded in scripture, but of course without the slightest authority. "Thus saith the Lord of hosts: There shall yet old men and old women dwell in the streets of Jerusalem, and every man with his staff in his hand for very age. And the streets of the city shall be full of boys and girls playing in the streets thereof
the Man Who Went Out to Borrow Three Loaves at Midnight - The well-supped churl is folded up in his warm bed and is just falling asleep, when a knock comes to his door so loud that it wakens the very dogs in the street. " Think shame, man! the passers-by exclaimed as they heard him making that so disgraceful noise in the midnight street
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - " Now that elder had long ago had a miserable quarrel with a man in the same profession as his own, and whose office was in the same street as his own. And on the Monday before the communion, as if it were tomorrow, he left his own office-door and crossed the street and rang his enemy's bell
Smyrna - It was noted for its carefully-planned streets-one of them called ‘Golden street’-and splendid public buildings
the Samaritan Who Shewed Mercy - What do you think would be the thoughts of the half-dead Jew as he saw his own temple-kinsmen passing by on the other side, and then saw this dog of a Samaritan leaping off his mule? What would he think and say all night as he saw this excommunicated Samaritan lighting the candle to pour oil and wine into his wounds and watching all night at his bedside? That Samaritan mule hobbling down the Jericho-pass with that half-dead burden on its back always reminds me of Samuel Johnson hobbling along to Bolt Court with the half-dead streetwalker on his back and laying her down on old Mrs. But that immortal picture of that midnight street in London, and that immortal picture of that bloody pass of Adummim, will be sister portraits for ever among the arttreasures of the new Jerusalem. It is not only in the bloody pass of Adummim and on the midnight street of London that your neighbours are to be come on wounded and half-dead: they are to be found everywhere
Manaen (2) - —When Herod was yet a schoolboy, he was one day greeted in the street by this Manaen, who patted him on the back, and saluted him as future king of the Jews
Set - ) A stone, commonly of granite, shaped like a short brick and usually somewhat larger than one, used for street paving
Water - Some of these houses make a very handsome appearance; and the persons appointed to wait on the passengers are required to have some vessels of copper, curiously tinned and filled with water, always ready on the window next the street
Paul Apprehended of Christ Jesus - A man of business will be on his way to his office on a Monday morning, and he could let you see to this day the very shop window, passing which, in Princes street, he was apprehended. 'Go to the street called Straight,' said the Lord, 'and if thou dost not find him in prayer, then it is a trap as thou fearest it is
Canon of the Old Testament - Their keenness to return to the law appears in Nehemiah 8:1-8; Ezra the priest read to "all the people gathered as one man into the street before the water gate
Gather - A special application of this nuance is to “receive hospitality”: “… When he went in he sat him down in a street of the city: for there was no man that took them into his house to lodging” ( Thessalonica - The term πολιτάρχαι is not found in any classical author, though the forms πολιάρχοι and πολιτάρχοι occur; but the inscription on a marble archway, probably erected in the time of Vespasian and still spanning a street of modern Thessalonica, begins with the word ΠΟΛΙΤΑΡΧΟΤΝΤΩΝ, which is followed by the names of seven magistrates
Shechem (1) - The main street runs from E. The houses are of stone, the streets narrow and dark
Mediator - First he speaks of him, and calls upon the church to behold him: "Behold my servant whom I uphold, mine elect in whom my soul delighteth: I have put my Spirit upon him; he shall bring forth judgment to the Gentiles; he shall not cry, nor lift up, nor cause his voice to be heard in the street
Bread - An Oriental seeing a scrap of bread on the road will usually lift it up and throw it to a street dog, or place it in a crevice of the wall or on a tree branch where the birds may find it
Rome - The streets of the city were for the most part narrow, and no vehicles were allowed inside the city walls except the wagons necessary for building purposes. There was no proper lighting of the streets at night. 1]'>[1] by the requirements of his metre said uia sacra, but to the ordinary Roman it would have been as absurd to say Via Sacra as to say ‘Street Oxford’ or ‘Street Princes’ to-day). This Sacred Way was one of the oldest streets in Rome. ...
Crossing the Vicus Tuscus or Etrurian street, which went at right angles to the Sacra Via, we come to the great Temple of Castor or the Castors
Bethlehem - There is just one main street or thoroughfare, extending about half a mile, and largely occupied by workshops, which are little better than arches open to the street
Alexandria - The city was laid out in shape like the outspread cloak of a Macedonian soldier; in circumference about 15 miles: and it was divided into quarters by a magnificent street nearly 5 miles long, and 100 feet wide, running from E
Commerce - He also mentions the bakers' street as the principal area of production and supply of bread in Jerusalem (Jeremiah 37:21 )
Animals - A camel-caravan would be one of the sights of our Lord’s boyhood, and the awkwardness of meeting a camel in the narrow street, which modern travellers experience, was not unknown nineteen hundred years ago. A Christian is not required to wear his heart on his sleeve! In the parable of Dives and Lazarus it is said that these street-dogs came and licked the beggar’s sores (Luke 16:21)
House - The passage into it is so contrived that the court cannot be seen from the street outside. Amusement, business, conversation (1 Samuel 9:25), and worship (Acts 10:9) are carried on here, especially in the evening, as a pleasant and cool retreat (2 Samuel 11:2) from the narrow filthy streets of an eastern town
Nehemiah, Theology of - ...
Upon discovering Tobiah had commandeered a storeroom in the temple for his personal use, Nehemiah personally threw his household goods out into the street (13:4-9)
Dominicans - James's street, ) whence the denomination of Jacobins. In the year 1276, the mayor and aldermen of the city of London gave them two whole streets, by the river Thames, where they erected a very commodious convent; whence that place is still called Blackfriars, from the name be which the Dominicans were canned in England
Illustrations - It is amazing how the common life of His day passes in procession through His words! The sower in the fields, the merchant on his travels, the fisherman on the beach looking over his catch, the labourers waiting to be hired in the market-place, the beggar at the rich man’s gate and the dogs licking his sores, the clamorous woman with her wrongs at the unjust judge’s door, the poor woman turning her house upside down for her lost coin, the play of the little children in the streets; and even the faults and follies of men, the Pharisee with his broad phylacteries and wide fringes praying ostentatiously at the street corners, the craft of the dishonest steward, the son who says ‘I go, sir,’ and goes not, the anxious host begging for a loaf at midnight, and the grumbling friend in bed with his children—all speak of the interest with which Jesus looked on life
Proverbs, Theology of - Rather, in a fine piece of literary fiction, "Wisdom calls aloud in the street, she raises her voice in the public squares" (1:20)
the Widow With the Two Mites - All the time the poor widow was coming up the street singing to her own heart the sixty-third Psalm, our Lord was sitting in the treasury singing to His Father the fortieth Psalm
New Jerusalem - And the streets of Jerusalem shall be paved with beryl and carbuncle and stones of Ophir. And the twelve gates were twelve pearls; each one of the several gates was of one pearl: and the street of the city was pure gold, as it were transparent glass’ (cf. : ‘And he shewed me a river of water of life, bright as crystal, proceeding out of the throne of God and of the Lamb, in the midst of the street thereof
Poet - ’ In the same way Jesus utilizes the sudden contrast between the flashing lamps of the banquet-room, reflected from the vessels and from the white garments of the guests, with the ‘outer darkness’ of the unlit street (Matthew 25:30). To realize the full brilliance of this contrast we must remember that the rooms had windows only into the courtyard, and the street walls were of blank unpierced masonry
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - For why do you neglect as you do those whose priest and bishop you already are? You hire a coachman to carry you to church, and to sit in the street with his horses whilst you are attending divine service
Paul in Arabia - For, all that he took with him was his parchments, and some purchases he had made in the street called Straight
the Much Forgiven Debtor And His Much Love - We must accustom ourselves to return to those early days when our Lord was still half a carpenter of Nazareth, and half a preacher at the street corner
the Importunate Widow - And are you not good at driving? Then say like the English clown: I have driven into the ditch, O Jesus Christ, take Thou the reins! When on the street you see a prisoner in the hands of his jailor, say There goes John Newton, but for the grace of God
James the Lord's Brother - And, then, think of the last week of all; the arrest, the trial, the crucifixion, the resurrection of Mary's first-born Son-whose imagination is sufficient to picture to itself Joseph and Mary and James and the other brothers and sisters of Jesus all that week! Where did they make ready to eat the passover? What were they doing at the hour when He was in Gethsemane? Were they standing with the crowd in the street when He was led about all night in His bonds? And where were they while He was being crucified? For, by that time, no one believed on Him but the thief on the cross alone
Presence - Paul would have the Corinthian Christians worship in such a fashion that if the man in the street chanced to drop in to one of their services he should be ‘reproved by all … judged by all,’ so that the secrets of his heart should be made manifest, ‘and so he will fall down on his face and worship God, declaring that God is among [2] you indeed’ (1 Corinthians 14:24 f
Paul as a Believing Man - I would sicken, I would swoon, I would fall down on the street, I would die. " For the shame, the spitting, the scourging, the staggering through the hooting streets, the bitter nails, the heart-gashing spear, the darkness of death and hell, all crowned by His Father forsaking Him,-Yes, that is the desert of my sin
House - It is possible sometimes to walk from one end of the village to the other without descending the ladders or staircases to the courtyards and streets. Hence in time of persecution the fugitive would do well to flee along the roofs rather than fall a prey to the enemy in the streets (Matthew 24:17, Mark 13:15, Luke 17:31). -In the East these now usually look into the courtyard, not into the street, as privacy is of the greatest importance. The same is probably true of κλίνη in Mark 7:30, Luke 17:34, Revelation 2:22, where either sense is possible; and of the κλινἀρια καὶ κράββατα in Acts 5:15 (inferior Manuscripts substitute κλίναι for the former word), where the sick are laid in the streets
Call, Calling - Several things are noticeable here; the loud call—Divine Wisdom as a street preacher (Proverbs 8:1; cf
Paul as the Chief of Sinners - As also that he who knows his own heart will measure his own worth by his own heart and not by the valuation of the street and the market-place
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - And then when I came home, in every house and on every street I was met with salutations of joy over Dr
Entry Into Jerusalem - ), was tied ‘at the door without in the open street’ (ἐπὶ τοῦ ἁμφόδου [2], Just
Mephibosheth - When a government goes out of power, when a church is under a cloud, when religion has lost her silver slippers, and when she walks in the shadow of the street, and when any friend of ours has lost his silver slippers-then we discover Mephibosheth in ourselves, and hate both him and ourselves like hell
Prayer - Ostentatious praying at street corners is discouraged by Christ ( Matthew 6:5 )
Hypocrisy - Not only is no trumpet to be sounded before us in the street; our praise is not even to find an echo in our own heart
Paul as a Pastor - Paul, you may depend upon it, was quite content some days just to have waved his hand in at that window, and to have saluted this and that man in the street, and to have been saluted in return by this and that gentlemanly little school-boy with his satchel on his back
Achan - ' Yes, it is as certain as God's truth and righteousness are certain, that the mortified man who goes about with his eyes out; the man who steals along the street seeing neither smile nor frown; he who keeps his eyes down wherever men and women congregate,-in the church, in the market-place, at a railway-station, on a ship's deck, at an inn table,-where you will; that man escapes multitudes of temptations that more open and more full-eyed men and women continually fall before
Ahithophel - Every time we meet them on the street, every time we hear their name spoken, every time we call them in any way to mind, something says within us-You did it
Nebuchadnezzar - And if Nebuchadnezzar had not built every single street of it, this, at any rate, he could say, that he had found Babylon a city of brick and had made it a city of marble
Preaching - Many of the discourses were preached in camps and courts, in streets, schools, cities, villages; sometimes, with great composure and coolness; at other times, with vehement action and rapturous energy; sometimes, in a plain, blunt style; at other times, in all the magnificent pomp of eastern allegory. Upward of fifty thousand people assembled in a street, or large square, near the water gate. When Narni taught the people in lent, from the pulpits of Rome, half the city went from his sermons crying along the streets, "Lord, have mercy upon us;" so that in only one passion week, two thousand crowns' worth of ropes were sold to make scourges with; and when he preached before the pope to the cardinals and bishops, and painted the sin of non-residence in its own colours, he frightened thirty or forty bishops, who heard him, home to their diocesses
Hypocrisy - Not only is no trumpet to be sounded before us in the street; our praise is not even to find an echo in our own heart
Temple of Jerusalem - An inscription: “To the place of trumpeting” was found below the southwest corner where there was a monumental staircase ascending into the Temple from the main street below
Leprosy - Although a leper in the street is no danger to the passer-by, he must in his home be a danger to his family, and no other disease reduces a human being for so many years to such a hideous wreck
Trade And Commerce - Horrea were long buildings bounded by a street on each of the longer sides, and divided by a wall longitudinally into two rows of store-rooms, placed back to back
Food - The bakers, for example, who gave their name to a street in Jerusalem ( Jeremiah 37:21 ), not only fired the dough prepared in private houses, as at the present day, but, doubtless, baked and sold bread to the public, as did their successors in the first and second centuries (see Mishna, passim ). In the early morning especially, the streets near the city gates on the north and west, which led to the country, were doubtless then, as now, transformed into market-places, lined with men and women offering for sale the produce of their farms and gardens
Thecla - The lover thus repulsed hurried into the street and watched the house where the stranger was preaching whose eloquence had cast this deplorable spell over Thecla
Holiness - A similar saying is quoted from Aristotle: ‘Do not fling wisdom into the street’ (μήτε ῥίψαι σοφίαν εἰς τοὑς τριόδους, ap
Preaching - Many of the discourses were preached in camps and courts, in streets, schools, cities, and villages, sometimes with great composure and coolness, at other times with vehement action and rapturous energy; sometimes in a plain blunt style, at other times in all the magnificent pomp of Eastern allegory. We have a short but beautiful description of the manner of Ezra's first preaching, Nehemiah 8:1-18 : Upwards of fifty thousand people assembled in a street, or large square, near the Water-gate. When Narni taught the populace in Lent, from the pulpits of Rome, half the city went from his sermons, crying along the streets, Lord have mercy upon us; Christ have mercy upon us; so that in only one passion week, two thousand crowns worth of ropes were sold to make scourges with; and when he preached before the pope to cardinals and bishops, and painted the crime of non-residence in its own colours, he frightened thirty or forty bishops who heard him, instantly home to their dioceses
Esther - You hire a cabman to drive you to church, and he sits in the wet street waiting for you, and you never ask him how he manages to live with no Sabbath
Roman Empire - The presence of certain Etrurian customs as well as the ancient ‘Etrurian street’ (Vicus Tuscus) in Rome proves their influence on the young city
Slave, Slavery - Some had only to act as torch-bearers, or as street-attendants: there were instances in which slaves had merely ‘to serve as clocks and announce the hours’ (Roman Life and Manners under the Early Empire, ii
Apocalypse - A prophet might be arrested in the street, a living author might be traced to his desk
Trade And Commerce - Horrea were long buildings bounded by a street on each of the longer sides, and divided by a wall longitudinally into two rows of store-rooms, placed back to back
Roads And Travel - The streets were narrow, and any one who wished to be carried in the city had to be conveyed in a sedan-chair (lectica). The streets of Rome itself were under the charge of another department. , and corresponds in its Roman part to the modern Corso Umberto Primo, the Bond street of Rome
Socialism - This Union has also produced several volumes of Sermons, Lombard street in Lent, The Church and New Century Problems, Preachers from the Pew (lay sermons on social questions), etc
Jerusalem - Of these structures nothing remains, so far as is known, of the palace or the theatre, or the Hippicus tower: the base of Phasaelus, commonly called David’s tower, is incorporated with the citadel; large fragments of the tower Antonia remain incorporated in the barracks and other buildings of the so-called Via Dolorosa, the street which leads through the city from the St
Jews - of his Legation; Sermons preached to the Jews at Berry-street, by Dr
Augustus (2) - At crossways and street corners three hundred small shrines were set up, whose altars were adorned twice a year with flowers
Jerusalem (2) - It is to-day largely filled up, but its direction is preserved by David street
Character of Christ - From the village street He passes to the temple courts, to find Himself there at home, and to occupy Himself with His Father’s concerns
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - His own charities were immense, a large portion of the population of Rome being dependent on them: every day, before his own meal, a portion was sent to the poor at his door; the sick and infirm in every street were sought out; and a large volume was kept containing the names, ages, and dwellings of the objects of his bounty
Belief (2) - ...
Yet the man in the street has something in common with the greatest and the highest