What does Chief mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἀρχιερεῖς chief priest 48
לַמְנַצֵּ֥חַ to excel 18
לַמְנַצֵּ֗חַ to excel 13
אַלּ֥וּף tame 11
ἀρχιερέων chief priest 10
שַׂ֥ר prince 6
שַׂ֣ר prince 6
ἀρχιερεῦσιν chief priest 6
לַ֭מְנַצֵּחַ to excel 6
אַלּ֣וּף tame 6
לַמְנַצֵּ֬חַ ׀ to excel 6
רֹ֣אשׁ head 5
הָרֹ֔אשׁ head 5
לַמְנַצֵּ֣חַ to excel 5
הַשָּׂ֔ר prince 4
הָרֹ֖אשׁ head 2
הָרֹ֨אשׁ head 2
לַמְנַצֵּ֬חַ to excel 2
לַ֝מְנַצֵּ֗חַ to excel 2
שַֽׂר־ prince 2
לַמְנַצֵּ֤חַ ׀ to excel 2
הָרִאשֹׁנִ֖ים first 2
אַלּ֤וּף tame 2
κεφαλὴν the head 2
הַשָּׂ֖ר prince 2
אַלּ֧וּף tame 2
הָרֹֽאשׁ head 2
וְרַב־ great. / captain 1
רָאשֵׁ֤י head 1
לְרֹאשִׁ֛י head 1
לָרֹ֧אשׁ head 1
וּמֵרָאשֵׁ֤י head 1
וְרָאשֵׁ֥י head 1
שַׂ֤ר prince 1
מִשַּׂ֣ר prince 1
לְרֹ֣אשׁ head 1
שָׂרֵ֣י prince 1
רֵאשִׁ֣ית first 1
הָרֹאשׁ֒ head 1
הָרֹ֜אשׁ head 1
רַ֣ב great. / captain 1
רֹ֗אשׁ head 1
בְּרֹ֣אשׁ head 1
רָאשֵׁ֥י head 1
וְרָאשֵׁ֖י head 1
רָאשֵׁ֛י head 1
רָאשֵׁ֣י head 1
בְּרֹ֥אשׁ head 1
רַבֵּ֥י much 1
רָאשִׁ֑ים head 1
רַ֧ב great. / captain 1
רֹ֥אשׁ head 1
רֹ֛אשׁ head 1
רָאשֵׁ֖י head 1
נָגִ֖יד leader 1
ἀρχιερέων⧽ chief priest 1
ἀρχιποίμενος chief shepherd. 1
ἀρχιτελώνης a chief of tax collectors 1
πρωτοκλισίαν the first reclining place 1
πρώτῳ first in time or place. / first in rank. / first 1
χιλιάρχοις a chiliarch 1
אָ֔ב father of an individual. / of God as father of his people. / head or founder of a household 1
אַבִּ֥יר mighty 1
אַלּֽוּף־ tame 1
בַּ֣עַל owner 1
גִּבֹּרֵ֣י strong 1
דָּג֖וּל to look 1
כֹהֵ֖ן priest 1
כֹּהֲנִ֥ים priest 1
לַמְנַצֵּ֖חַ to excel 1
רָאשִׁ֥ים head 1
רֹ֚אשׁ head 1
רֹ֖אשׁ head 1
הָרֹ֥אשׁ head 1
רֹ֑אשׁ head 1
הָרֹ֛אשׁ head 1
לְרָאשֵׁ֧י head 1
רֹ֤אשׁ head 1
לְרֹֽאשׁ head 1
לַמְנַצֵּ֥ח to excel 1
לְרֹ֖אשׁ head 1
בְרָאשֵׁיהֹֽם chief 1
עַתּ֣וּדֵי ram 1
וּנְשִׂיא֙ one lifted up 1
נְשִׂיאֵ֧י one lifted up 1
נְשִׂיאֵ֨י one lifted up 1
שַׂר־ prince 1

Definitions Related to chief

G749


   1 chief priest, high priest.
   Additional Information: He above all others was honoured with the title of priest, the chief of priests.
   It was lawful for him to perform the common duties of the priesthood; but his chief duty was, once a year on the day of atonement, to enter into the Holy of Holies (from which the other priests were excluded) and offer sacrifices for his own sins and the sins of the people, and to preside over the Sanhedrin, or Supreme Council, when convened for judicial deliberations.
   According to Mosaic law, no one could aspire to the high priesthood unless he were of the tribe of Aaron and descended from a high priestly family; and he on whom the office was conferred held it till death.
   But from the time of Antiochus Epiphanes, when the kings of Seleucideae and afterwards the Herodian princes and the Romans arrogated to themselves the power of appointing the high priests, the office neither remained vested in the pontifical family nor was conferred on any for life; but it became venal, and could be transferred from one to another according to the will of civic or military rulers.
   Hence it came to pass, that during the one hundred and seven years intervening between Herod the Great and the destruction of the holy city, twenty eight persons held the pontifical dignity.
      2) the high priests, these comprise in addition to one holding the high priestly office, both those who had previously discharged it and although disposed, continued to have great power in the State, as well as the members of the families from which high priest were created, provided that they had much influence in public affairs.
      3) Used of Christ because by undergoing a bloody death he offered himself as an expiatory sacrifice to God, and has entered into the heavenly sanctuary where he continually intercedes on our behalf.
      

H441


   1 tame, docile.
   2 friend, intimate.
   3 chief.
   

H5329


   1 to excel, be bright, be preeminent, be perpetual, be overseer, be enduring.
      1a (Niphal) enduring (participle).
      1b (Piel) to act as overseer or superintendent or director or chief.
      

H8269


   1 prince, ruler, leader, chief, chieftain, official, captain.
      1a chieftain, leader.
      1b vassal, noble, official (under king).
      1c captain, general, commander (military).
      1d chief, head, overseer (of other official classes).
      1e heads, princes (of religious office).
      1f elders (of representative leaders of people).
      1g merchant-princes (of rank and dignity).
      1h patron-angel.
      1i Ruler of rulers (of God).
      1j warden.
      

H7218


   1 head, top, summit, upper part, chief, total, sum, height, front, beginning.
      1a head (of man, animals).
      1b top, tip (of mountain).
      1c height (of stars).
      1d chief, head (of man, city, nation, place, family, priest).
      1e head, front, beginning.
      1f chief, choicest, best.
      1g head, division, company, band.
      1h sum.
      

H7223


   1 first, primary, former.
      1a former (of time).
         1a1 ancestors.
         1a2 former things.
      1b foremost (of location).
      1c first (in time).
      1d first, chief (in degree) adv.
   2 first, before, formerly, at first.
   

H7227


   1 much, many, great.
      1a much.
      1b many.
      1c abounding in.
      1d more numerous than.
      1e abundant, enough.
      1f great.
      1g strong.
      1h greater than adv.
      1i much, exceedingly.
   2 captain, chief.
   

H5387


   1 one lifted up, chief, prince, captain, leader.
   2 rising mist, vapour.
   

G2776


   1 the head, both of men and often of animals.
   Since the loss of the head destroys life, this word is used in the phrases relating to capital and extreme punishment.
   2 metaph.
   anything supreme, chief, prominent.
      2a of persons, master lord: of a husband in relation to his wife.
      2b of Christ: the Lord of the husband and of the Church.
      2c of things: the corner stone.
      

H1


   1 father of an individual.
   2 of God as father of his people.
   3 head or founder of a household, group, family, or clan.
   4 ancestor.
      4a grandfather, forefathers—of person.
      4b of people.
   5 originator or patron of a class, profession, or art.
   6 of producer, generator (fig.
   ).
   7 of benevolence and protection (fig.
   ).
   8 term of respect and honour.
   9 ruler or chief (spec.
   ).
   

H1167


   1 owner, husband, lord.
      1a owner.
      1b a husband.
      1c citizens, inhabitants.
      1d rulers, lords.
      1e (noun of relationship used to characterise—ie, master of dreams).
      1f lord (used of foreign gods).
      

H5057


   1 leader, ruler, captain, prince.
      1a ruler, prince.
      1b prince-overseer.
      1c ruler (in other capacities).
      1d princely things.
      

H1713


   1 to look, behold.
      1a (Qal) looked at, conspicuous (participle).
   2 to carry a banner or standard, set up banner or standard.
      2a (Qal) to set up standard (in battle).
      2b (Niphal) supplied with banners, bannered.
      

G4413


   1 first in time or place.
      1a in any succession of things or persons.
   2 first in rank.
      2a influence, honour.
      2b chief.
      2c principal.
   3 first, at the first.
   

G754


   1 a chief of tax collectors, chief publican.
   

G5506


   1 a chiliarch, the commander of a thousand soldiers.
   2 the commander of a Roman cohort (a military tribunal).
   3 any military commander.
   

G4411


   1 the first reclining place, the chief place at table.
   2 the relative rank of the several places at table varied among the Persians, Greeks, and Romans; and what arrangements the Jews had in the time of Christ can not be accurately determined.
   

H7229


   1 great.
      1a great.
      1b great (fig of power) n.
   2 captain, chief.
   

H6260


   1 ram, he-goat, chief one.
   

H1368


   1 strong, mighty.
   2 strong man, brave man, mighty man.
   

H3548


   1 priest, principal officer or chief ruler.
      1a priest-king (Melchizedek, Messiah).
      1b pagan priests.
      1c priests of Jehovah.
      1d Levitical priests.
      1e Zadokite priests.
      1f Aaronic priests.
      1g the high priest.
      

H7225


   1 first, beginning, best, chief.
      1a beginning.
      1b first.
      1c chief.
      1d choice part.
      

H7217


   1 chief, head.
      1a head (of man).
      1b head (as seat of visions).
      1c chief.
      1d sum (essential content).
      

G750


   1 chief shepherd.
      1a of Christ the head of the church.
      

Frequency of chief (original languages)

Frequency of chief (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - chief Priest
Jewish, the equivalent of high priest. It is more frequently used in the plural, especially in the New Testament, to designate the actual and the ex-high priests. According to Flavius Josephus, the sons of high priestly families also bore that title. Finally, the heads of the 24 courses of priests organized by David may have been called chief priests.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Musician, chief
(Heb. menatstseah), the precentor of the Levitical choir or orchestra in the temple, mentioned in the titles of fifty-five psalms, and in Habakkuk 3:19 , Revised Version. The first who held this office was Jeduthun (1 Chronicles 16:41 ), and the office appears to have been hereditary. Heman and Asaph were his two colleagues (2 Chronicles 35:15 ).
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Florentius, a chief Minister of State at Constantinople
Florentius (50) , a chief minister of state at Constantinople under Theodosius II. and Marcian, a man of the highest reputation for soundness of faith, purity of life, and statesmanlike wisdom (Labbe, Concil. iv. 220). He was consul in a.d. 429, patrician in 448, prefect of the praetorian guards, and the high dignity of prefect of the East was bestowed on him a seventh time by Marcian in 450.
In 448, when Flavian had resolved to put Eutyches on his trial for heretical doctrine, Theodosius demanded that Florentius should have a seat at the synod as his representative. Hitherto the ostensible reason for the presence of imperial officers at ecclesiastical synods was the preservation of order. The ground expressly assigned by the emperor for requiring the admission of Florentius, viz. that the matters under discussion concerned the faith, was a startling innovation which Flavian withstood as long as he dared (Acac. Hist. Brevicul. p. 112; Liberat. Breviar. c. xi.; Labbe, Concil. iv. 247). On the opening of the trial Florentius took his seat among the metropolitans, next to Seleucus, bp. of Amasea (Labbe, 238; Liberat. p. 60), and disclaimed all desire to dogmatize, or to forget his position as a layman; but he took a very leading and authoritative part in the discussion, and manifested a strong leaning towards the acquittal of Eutyches. But his efforts to induce Eutyches to acknowledge the two natures in Christ or to adopt language which might satisfy the council were fruitless, and the interests of orthodoxy compelled him to assent to his condemnation (Labbe, 507, 517). As Eutyches left the hall he lodged with Florentius an appeal against his condemnation to the churches of Rome, Alexandria, and Jerusalem. The bishop availed himself of the plea that the trial was closed to exclude the registration of the appeal ( ib. 244). When the council of Chalcedon met, Florentius was present with other high civil dignitaries; but there is no record of the part he took. We have letters to Florentius from Theodoret ( Ep. 89), Isidore of Pelusium ( Ep. lib. i. 486), and Firmus of Caesarea ( Ep. 29).
[1]
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - chief Priest
See Priest.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - chief of Asia
CHIEF OF ASIA . Acts 19:31 ; RV [1] ‘chief officers of Asia’; RVm [2] ‘Asiarchs.’ See Asiarch.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - chief of the Three
A title given to Adino the Eznite, one of David's greatest heroes (2 Samuel 23:8 ); also called Jashobeam (1 Chronicles 11:11 ).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - chief Priests
CHIEF PRIESTS (ἀρχιερεῖς).—In the Gospels ἀρχιερεύς properly denotes the individual who for the time being held the office of Jewish high priest; and when the word occurs in its singular form, ‘high priest’ is the almost invariable rendering it receives throughout the NT, both in Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 (in Luke 3:2 ἐπὶ ἀρχιερέως Ἄννα καὶ Καιάφα is rendered in Authorized Version ‘Annas and Caiaphas being the high priests,’ and in Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘in the high priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas.’ In Acts 19:14 ἀρχιερεύς, as applied to ‘one Sceva, a Jew,’ is rendered ‘chief of the priests’ in Authorized Version, ‘a chief priest’ in Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885). For a general treatment of the office of the ἀρχιερεύς in NT times, and also of the use of the word as a title of Christ by the author of Hebrews, reference must be made to art. High Priest. But in the Gospels and Acts the word occurs very frequently in the plural form (cf. Josephus Vita, 38, BJ iv. iii. 7, 9, 10, and passim), and on all such occasions, both in Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885, it is translated ‘chief priests.’ It is these ἀρχιερεῖς, not the ἀρχιερεύς proper, with whom we are concerned in the present article.
The precise meaning of ἀρχιερεῖς, as we meet it in the Gospels and Josephus, is not easily determined. A common explanation used to be that these ‘chief priests’ were the heads or presidents of the twenty-four courses into which the Jewish priesthood was divided (1 Chronicles 24:4, 2 Chronicles 8:14, Luke 1:5; Luke 1:8; Josephus Ant. vii. xiv. 7), or at least that these heads of the priestly courses were included under the term (see, e.g., the Lexicons of Cremer and Grimm-Thayer, s.v. ἀρχιερεύς; Alford on Matthew 2:4). It is true that some support for this view may be found in the expressions ‘all the chief ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘chiefs’) of the priests’ (2 Chronicles 36:14, Nehemiah 12:7), ‘the chief priests’ ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘the chiefs of the priests,’ Ezra 10:5). But it is noticeable, as Schürer pointed out (‘Die ἀρχιερεῖς im NT’ in SK [1] for 1872), that in the LXX Septuagint the word ἀρχιερεῖς is never used of the heads of the priestly courses, and that the nearest approximations to this term are such phrases as ἄρχοντες τῶν πατριῶν τῶν ἰερέων (1 Chronicles 24:6) ἄρχοντες τῶν ἱερέων (Nehemiah 12:7). And most scholars now take the view that the ἁρχιερεῖς were high priests rather than ‘chief priests,’ not leading representatives from the general body of the priesthood, but members of an exclusive high priestly caste.* [2]
As applied to this high priestly class, the word ἀρχιερεῖς would seem to denote primarily the official high priest together with a group of ex-high priests. For by NT times the high priestly office had sunk far from its former greatness. It was no longer hereditary, and no longer held for life. Both Herod and the Roman legates deposed and set up high priests at their pleasure (Josephus Ant. xx. x. 1), as the Seleucidae appear to have done at an earlier period (2 Maccabees 4:24; Josephus Ant. xii. v. 1). Thus there were usually several ex-high priests alive at the same time, and these men, though deprived of office, still retained the title of ἀρχιερεῖς and still exercised considerable power in the Jewish State (cf. Josephus Vita, 38, BJ ii. xii. 6, iv. iii. 7, 9, 10, iv. iv. 3). In the notable case of Annas, we even have an ex-high priest whose influence was plainly greater than that of the ἀρχιερεύς proper (cf. Luke 3:2, John 18:13; John 18:24, Acts 4:6).
But Schürer further maintains that, in addition to the ex-high priests, the title was applied to the members of those families from which the high priests were usually chosen—the γένος ἀρχιερατικόν of Acts 4:6. It appears from a statement of Josephus that the dignity of the high priesthood was confined to a few select families (BJ iv. iii. 6); and that this was really the case becomes clear upon an examination of the list which Schürer has compiled, from the various references given by the Jewish historian, of the twenty-eight holders of the office during the Romano-Herodian period (HJP [3] ii. i. 196 ff., 204). Above all, in one passage (BJ vi. ii. 2) Josephus, after distinguishing the υἱοὶ τῶν ἀρχιερέων from the ἀρχιερεῖς themselves, apparently combines both classes under the general designation of ἀρχιερεῖς. Schürer accordingly comes to the conclusion, which has been widely adopted, that the ἀρχιερεῖς of the NT and Josephus ‘consist, in the first instance, of the high priests properly so called, i.e. the one actually in office and those who had previously been so, and then of the members of those privileged families from which the high priests were taken’ (op. cit. p. 206). These, then, were in all probability the ‘chief priests’ of the Authorized and Revised Versions. They belonged to the party of the Sadducees (Acts 5:17; Josephus Ant. xx. ix. 1), and were, formally at least, the leading personages in the Sanhedrin.† [4] But in NT times their influence, even in the Sanhedrin, was inferior to that of the scribes and Pharisees, who commanded the popular sympathies as the high priestly party did not (Josephus Ant. xiii. x. 6, xviii. i. 4; cf. Acts 5:34 ff; Acts 23:6 ff.).
Literature.—Schürer, HJP [3] ii. i. pp. 174–184, 195–206, and ‘Die ἀρχιερεῖς im NT’ in SK [1] , 1872, pp. 593–657; Edersheim, Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah, i. p. 322 t.; Ewald, HI [3] vii. p. 479 ff.; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, artt. ‘Priests and Levites’ and ‘Priest in NT’; Hauck-Herzog, PRE [2] 3 [9] , art. ‘Hoher Priester’; Jewish Encyc., art. ‘High Priest.’
J. C. Lambert.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Paul as the chief of Sinners
EVERYBODY knows what the most eminent saints of Holy Scripture think and say of their sinfulness. And here is what some of the most eminent saints who have lived since the days of Holy Scripture have felt and said about their own exceeding sinfulness also. And to begin with one of the very saintliest of them all-Samuel Rutherford. "When I look at my sinfulness," says Rutherford, "my salvation is to me my Saviour's greatest miracle. He has done nothing in heaven or on earth like my salvation." And the title-page of John Bunyan's incomparable autobiography runs thus: "Grace abounding to John Bunyan, the chief of sinners. Come and hear, all ye that fear God, and I will declare what He hath done for my soul." "Is there but one spider in all this room?" asked the Interpreter. Then the water stood in Christiana's eyes, for she was a woman quick of apprehension, and she said, "Yes, Lord, there is more here than one; yea, and spiders whose venom is far more destructive than that which is in her." "My daughters," said Santa Teresa on her deathbed, "do not follow my example; for I have been the most sinful woman in all the world." But what she most dwelt on as she died was that half verse, "Cor contritum-a broken and a contrite heart, O God, Thou wilt not despise." "Do not mistake me," said Jacob Behmen, "for my heart is as full as it can hold of all malice at you and all ill-will. My heart is the very dung-hill of the devil, and it is no easy work to wrestle with him on his own chosen ground. But wrestle with him on that ground of his I must, and that the whole of my life to the end." "Begone! all ye self-ignorant and false flatterers," shouted Philip Neri at them; "I am good for nothing but to do evil." "When a man like me," says Luther, "comes to know the plague of his own heart, he is not miserable only-he is absolute misery itself; he is not sinful only-he is absolute sin itself." "I am made of sin," sobbed Bishop Andrewes, till his private prayer-book was all but unreadable to his heirs because of its author's sweat and tears. "It has often appeared to me," says Jonathan Edwards, "that if God were to mark my heart-iniquity my bed would be in hell." "I sat down on the side of a stank," says Lord Brodie, "and was disgusted at the toads and esks and many other unclean creatures I saw sweltering there. But all the time my own heart was far worse earth to me, and filthier far than the filthy earth I sat upon." "This is a faithful saying," says Paul, "and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am chief." Well may our Saviour stop us and ask us whether or no we have counted the cost of being one of His out-and-out disciples!
I can very well believe that there are some new beginners here who are terribly staggered with all that. They were brought up positively to worship the Apostle Paul, and Luther, and Rutherford, and Bunyan. And how such saints of God can write such bitter things against themselves, you cannot understand. You would like to acquiesce in all that these men say about all such matters as sin and sinfulness; but you do not see how they can honestly and truly say such things as the above about themselves.
Fool! said my muse to me,Look in thy heart and write.Remember these two lines of the true poet. Though they were not written about sin they never come to their fullest truth and their most fruitful application till they are taken home by the sinner who is seeking sanctification. Yes; look well into your own heart and you will find there the true explanation of your perplexity about Paul, and Luther, and Rutherford, and Bunyan, and all the rest. For your own heart holds the secret to you of this whole matter. If you have any real knowledge of your own heart at all, this cannot possibly have escaped you, that there are things in your own heart that are most shocking and prostrating for you to find there. There are thoughts in your heart, and feelings, and wishes, and likes and dislikes; things you have to hide, and things you cannot hide; things that if you have any religion at all you must take on your knees to Jesus Christ every day, and things you cannot take to anything even in Him short of His sin-atoning blood. Well, you have in all that the true key to Paul's heart, and to the hearts of all the rest. So much so that if you advance as you have begun you will soon be staggering new beginners yourself with the Scriptures you read, and with the psalms and hymns you select, and with the petitions you offer ere ever you are aware; and, it may yet be, with the autobiography you will yet write to tell to all that fear God what He hath done for your soul. Just go on in the lessons of that inward school, and you will soon stagger us all by the passion that you, as well as David and Asaph, will put into the most penitential psalm.
"The highest flames are the most tremulous," says Jeremy Taylor. That is to say, the holiest men are the most full of holy fear, holy penitence, holy humility, and holy love. And all that is so because the more true spirituality of mind any man has, the more exquisite will be that man's sensibility to sin and to the exceeding sinfulness of sin. "The saints of God are far too sharp-sighted for their own self-satisfaction," says William Guthrie in his golden little book. So they are. For, by so much the holier men they become in the sight and estimation both of God and man, the more hideous and the more hopeless do they become to themselves. Such is their more and more sharpened insight into their own remaining sinfulness. Even when God is on the point of translating them to Himself because they so please Him, at that very moment they feel that they were never so near being absolute castaways. When all other men are worshipping them for their saintliness, and rightly so, those right saints of God are gnashing their teeth at the devilries that are still rampant in their own heart. They hate themselves the more you love them. They curse themselves the more you bless them. The more you exalt and enthrone them the more they lie with their faces on the earth. When you load them with honours, and banquet them with praises, they make ashes their bread and tears their drink. Their whole head will be waters, and their eyes one fountain of tears just at that moment when God is rising up in compassion, and in recompense, to wipe all tears from their eyes for ever.
And it is the sight of God that does it. It is the sight of Jesus Christ that does it. It is God's holy law of love entering our hearts ever deeper and deeper that does it. It is when I take my own heart, with all its wickedness-working self-love, and with all its self-seeking in everything, and self-serving out of everything and every one: with all its deceitfulness, and disingenuousness, and envy, and jealousy, and grudging, and malevolence, and lay it alongside of the holy heart of my Lord,-it is that that does it. It is then that I sit down at a stank-side with poor Lord Brodie. It is then that my midnight Bible begins to open at unwonted places, and I begin to make bosom friends of unwonted people. It is then that I search the Book of Job, say, not any more for its incomparable dialectic and its noble literature. All these things, as Halyburton has it, have now become comparatively distasteful to me. Or if not distasteful, then without taste and insipid, as Job himself says about the white of an egg. No: my soul turns in its agony of pain and shame and seeks an utterance for itself in such consummating passages as these. "I have heard of Thee by the hearing of the ear: but now mine eye seeth Thee. Wherefore I abhor myself, and repent in dust and ashes. Behold, I am vile: what shall I answer Thee? I will lay my hand upon my mouth." And from that my Bible begins to open at the right places for me in David, and in Asaph, and in Ezra, and in Daniel, and in Peter, and in Paul: and so on to all Paul-like men down to my own day. And thus it comes about that the authors who are classical to me now are not the ephemerids in religion or in literature that I used to waste my time and my money upon when I was a neophyte: my true classics now are those masterly men who look into their own hearts and then write for my heart. It is the sight of God that has made them the writers they are, and it is the same sight that is at last making me the reader that I, too late, am beginning to be. It is the sight of God that does it, till my sinfulness takes such a deep spiritualness, and such a high exclusiveness, and such a hidden secretness, that I can find fit utterance for all that is within me in David, and in David's greatest psalms, alone. As thus:-"Against Thee, Thee only, have I sinned, and done this evil in Thy sight. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, O God, Thou wilt not despise. Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me."
It was their own sin; or to speak much more exactly, it was their own sinfulness, that so humbled Rutherford and Bunyan and Christiana and Teresa, and broke their hearts. Nothing at all humiliates; nothing really touches the hearts of people like them; but the inward sinfulness of their own hearts. We shallow-hearted fools would think and would say that it was some great crime or open scandal that those saintly men and women had fallen into. Oh, no! there were no men nor women in their day of so blameless a name as they. One of themselves used to say that it was not "so humiliating and heart-breaking to be sometimes like a beast, as to be always like a devil. But, to be both!" he cried out in his twofold agony. The things of this world also that so humiliate all other men do not any more bring so much as a momentary blush to men like Rutherford, and women like Teresa. Just go over the things that humiliate and shame you in your earthly life and its circumstances; and then pass over into the ranks of God's saints, and you will there enter on a career of humiliation that wilt quite drink up the things that make you so ashamed now, till you will completely forget their very existence. What I am at this moment contending for is this, that sin alone truly humiliates a saint, even as holiness alone truly exalts him. It was sin, and especially sinfulness, that made those great saints cry out as they did.
A Greek fortune-teller was once reading Socrates's hands and face to discern his true character and to advertise the people of Athens of his real deserts. And as he went on he startled the whole assembly by pronouncing Socrates the most incontinent and libidinous man in all the city; the greatest extortioner and thief; and even worse things than all that. And when the enraged crowd were about to fall upon the soothsayer and tear him to pieces for saying such things about their greatest saint, Socrates himself came forward and restrained their anger and confessed openly and said, "Ye men of Athens, let this truth-speaking man alone, and do him no harm. He has said nothing amiss about me. For there is no man among you all who is by nature more predisposed to all these evil things than I am." And with that he quieted and taught and solemnised the whole city. Now in that again Socrates was God's dispensational apostle and preacher to the Greek people. For he was teaching them that there is, to begin with, no difference. That our hearts by nature are all equally evil. But that, as the Stoics taught, though all vice is equally in us all, it is not equally extant in us all. As also that he who knows his own heart will measure his own worth by his own heart and not by the valuation of the street and the market-place. As also that the noblest and best men in all lands, and in all dispensations, are those who know themselves, and who out of that knowledge keep themselves under, and wait upon God, till they attain in His good time to both a blameless heart, a blameless conscience, and a for ever blameless life.
Yet another use of this solemn subject is for the comfort of the true people of God. It is to let them see that they are not alone, and that no strange thing is befalling them, in all they are passing through. For myself, when I hear Paul saying this that is in the text, and Luther, and Rutherford, and Bunyan, and Andrewes, and Edwards, and Brodie, it is with me as it was with John Bunyan's pilgrim in the valley of the shadow of death. "About the midst of the valley I perceived the mouth of hell to be, and it stood hard by the wayside, and ever and anon the flame and smoke, with sparks and noises, would come out in such abundance that Christian said, What shall I do? One thing I would not that you let slip. Just when he was come over against the mouth of the burning pit, one of the wicked ones got behind him, and stepped up softly to him, and whisperingly, suggested many grievous blasphemies to him, which he verily thought had proceeded from his own mind. This put Christian to it more than anything he had met with before, yet could he have helped it, he would not have done it, but he had not the discretion, neither to stop his ears, nor to know from whence these blasphemies came." And here comes our point. "When Christian had travelled in this disconsolate condition some considerable time, he thought he heard the voice of a man, as going before him, saying, Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear none ill, for Thou art with me. Then was Christian glad, and that for these reasons. First, because he gathered from them that some one who feared God was in the valley as well as himself. Second, for that he perceived God was with them, though in that dark and dismal state; and why not, thought he, with me? though by reason of the impediment that attends this place, I cannot perceive it. Thirdly, for that he hoped to have company by and by. So he went on, and called to him that was before, but that he knew not what to answer, for that he also thought himself to be alone. But by and by the day broke. Then said Christian, He hath turned the shadow of death into the morning."
Webster's Dictionary - chief-Justiceship
(n.) The office of chief justice.
Webster's Dictionary - chief
(1):
(a.) Principal or most eminent in any quality or action; most distinguished; having most influence; taking the lead; most important; as, the chief topic of conversation; the chief interest of man.
(2):
(a.) Highest in office or rank; principal; head.
(3):
(n.) The upper third part of the field. It is supposed to be composed of the dexter, sinister, and middle chiefs.
(4):
(n.) The principal part; the most valuable portion.
(5):
(a.) Very intimate, near, or close.
(6):
(n.) The head or leader of any body of men; a commander, as of an army; a head man, as of a tribe, clan, or family; a person in authority who directs the work of others; the principal actor or agent.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - chief, chiefest, chiefly
A — 1: πρῶτος (Strong's #4413 — Adjective — protos — pro'-tos ) denotes "the first," whether in time or place. It is translated "chief" in Mark 6:21 , RV, of men of Galilee; in Acts 13:50 , of men in a city; in Acts 28:7 , of the "chief" man in the island of Melita; in Acts 17:4 , of "chief" women in a city; in Acts 28:17 , of Jews; in 1 Timothy 1:15,16 , of a sinner. In the following, where the AV has "chief," or "chiefest," the RV renderings are different: Matthew 20:27 ; Mark 10:44 , "first;" Luke 19:47 ; Acts 25:2 , "principal men;" Acts 16:12 , said of Philippi, "the first (city) of the district," RV, for incorrect AV, "the chief city of that part of Macedonia." Amphipolis was the "chief" city of that part. Protos here must mean the first in the direction in which the Apostle came. See BEGINNING , BEFORE , BEST , FIRST , FORMER.
B — 1: κεφάλαιον (Strong's #2774 — Noun Neuter — kephalaion — kef-al'-ah-yon ) akin to the adjective kephalaios, "belonging to the head," and kephale, "the head," denotes the chief point or principal thing in a subject, Hebrews 8:1 , "the chief point is this" (AV, "the sum"); elsewhere in Acts 22:28 (of principal, as to money), "(a great) sum." See SUM.
*Certain compound nouns involving the significance of chief, are as follows:
B — 2: ἀρχιερεύς (Strong's #749 — Noun Masculine — archiereus — ar-khee-er-yuce' ) a chief priest, high priest" (arche, "first," hiereus, "a priest"), is frequent in the Gospels, Acts and Hebrews, but there only in the NT. It is used of Christ e.g. in Hebrews 2:17 ; 3:1 ; of "chief" priests, including ex-high-priests and members of their families, e.g., Matthew 2:4 ; Mark 8:31 .
B — 3: ἀρχιποίμην (Strong's #750 — Noun Masculine — archipoimen — ar-khee-poy'-mane ) "a chief shepherd" (arche, "chief," poimen, "a shepherd"), is said of Christ only, 1 Peter 5:4 . Modern Greeks use it of tribal chiefs.
B — 4: ἀρχιτελώνης (Strong's #754 — Noun Masculine — architelones — ar-khee-tel-o'-nace ) denotes "a chief tax-collector, or publican," Luke 19:2 .
B — 5: ἀκρογωνιαῖος (Strong's #204 — Adjective — akrogoniaios — ak-rog-o-nee-ah'-yos ) denotes "a chief corner-stone" (from akros, "highest, extreme," gonia, "a corner, angle"), Ephesians 2:20 and 1 Peter 2:6 . In the Sept., Isaiah 28:16
B — 6: πρωτοκαθεδρία (Strong's #4410 — Noun Feminine — protokathedria — pro-tok-ath-ed-ree'-ah ) "a sitting in the first or chief seat" (protos, "first," kathedra, "a seat"), is found in Matthew 23:6 ; Mark 12:39 ; Luke 11:43 ; 20:46 .
B — 7: πρωτοκλισία (Strong's #4411 — Noun Feminine — protoklisia — pro-tok-lis-ee'-ah ) "the first reclining place, the chief place at table" (from protos, and klisia, "a company reclining at a meal;" cp. klino, "to incline"), is found in Matthew 23:6 ; Mark 12:39 (as with No. 6); Luke 14:7,8 ; 20:46
B — 8: χιλίαρχος (Strong's #5506 — Noun Masculine — chiliarchos — khil-ee'-ar-khos ) denotes "a chief captain:" SEE CAPTAIN, No 1.
B — 9: Ἀσιάρχης (Strong's #775 — Noun Masculine — asiarches — as-ee-ar'-khace ) "an Asiarch," was one of certain officers elected by various cities in the province of Asia, whose function consisted in celebrating, partly at their own expense, the public games and festivals; in Acts 19:31 , RV, the word is translated "chief officers of Asia" (AV, "chief of Asia").
It seems probable, according to Prof. Ramsay, that they were "the high priests of the temples of the Imperial worship in various cities of Asia;" further, that "the Council of the Asiarchs sat at stated periods in the great cities alternately ... and were probably assembled at Ephesus for such a purpose when they sent advice to St. Paul to consult his saftey." A festival would have brought great crowds to the city.
B — 10: ἄρχων (Strong's #758 — Noun Masculine — archon — ar'-khone ) "a ruler," is rendered "chief" in the AV of Luke 14:1 (RV, "ruler"); "chief rulers," in John 12:42 , RV, "rulers (of the people)," i.e., of members of the Sanhedrin; "chief," in Luke 11:15 (RV, "prince") in reference to Beelzebub, the prince of demons. SEE MAGISTRATE, PRINCE, RULER.
B — 11: ἀρχισυνάγωγος (Strong's #752 — Noun Masculine — archisunagogos — ar-khee-soon-ag'-o-gos ) "a ruler of a synagogue," translated "chief ruler of the synagogue," in Acts 18:8,17 , AV, was the administrative officer supervising the worship.
C — 1: ἡγέομαι (Strong's #2233 — Verb — hegeomai — hayg-eh'-om-ahee ) "to lead the way, to preside, rule, be the chief," is used of the ambition "to be chief" among the disciples of Christ, Luke 22:26 ; of Paul as the "chief" speaker in Gospel testimony at Lystra, Acts 14:12 ; of Judas and Silas, as chief (or rather, "leading") men among the brethren at Jerusalem, Acts 15:22 . See ACCOUNT , COUNT , ESTEEM , GOVERNOR , JUDGE , SUPPOSE , THINK.
D — 1: χόρτος (Strong's #5528 3029 — Noun Masculine — huperlian — khor'-tos ) "chiefest" (huper, "over," lian, "exceedingly, pre-eminently, very much"), is used in 2 Corinthians 11:5 ; 12:11 , of Paul's place among the Apostles.
D — 2: μάλιστα (Strong's #3122 — Adverb — malista — mal'-is-tah ) the superlative of mala, "very, very much," is rendered "chiefly" in 2 Peter 2:10 and in the AV of Philippians 4:22 (RV, "especially"). See ESPECIALLY MOST.
Note: In Romans 3:2 , RV, the adverb proton is translated "first of all" (AV, "chiefly").
People's Dictionary of the Bible - chief Priest
Chief Priest. See Priest.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible
PARABLES IN OLD TESTAMENT
Trees choosing a king. Judges 9:7-15.
Samson's riddle. Judges 14:14.
Nathan and the eve lamb. 2 Samuel 12:1-6.
Woman of Tekoah. 2 Samuel 14:6-11.
Escaped prisoner. 1 Kings 20:35-40.
Thistle and cedar. Luke 21:1-382.
The vine. Psalms 80:8-16.
Vineyard. Isaiah 6:1-7.
Eagle and vine. Ezekiel 17:3-10.
Lion's whelps. Ezekiel 19:2-9.
Boiling pot. Ezekiel 24:3-5.
Cedar in Lebanon. Ezekiel 31:3-18.
MIRACLES IN OLD TESTAMENT
Enoch translated. Genesis 5:24 : Hebrews 11:5.
The flood. Genesis 7:11-24.
Sodom and Gomorrah destroyed. Genesis 19:24.
Lot's wife made a salt pillar. Genesis 19:26.
Burning bush. Exodus 3:2-4.
Aaron's rod. Exodus 7:10-12.
Ten plagues of Egypt, Exodus 7:1 to Luke 15:3-7 :
Waters turned to blood. Exodus 7:19-25.
Frogs. Exodus 8:6-14.
Lice. Exodus 8:17-18.
Flies. Exodus 8:24.
Murrain, (cattle plague). Exodus 9:3-6.
Boils. Exodus 9:8-11.
Thunder, hail, etc. Exodus 9:22-26.
Locusts. Exodus 10:12-19.
Darkness. Exodus 10:21-29.
Death of the firstborn. Exodus 12:29-30.
Crossing of the Red Sea. Exodus 14:21-31.
Marah's waters sweetened. Exodus 15:23-25.
Giving the manna. Exodus 16:14-35.
Water from the rock at Horeb. Exodus 17:5-7.
Nadab and Abihu. Leviticus 10:1-2.
Fart of Israel burned. Numbers 11:1-3.
Korah and his company. Numbers 16:32.
Aaron's rod budding. Matthew 9:27-31 etc.
Water from the rock. Meribah. Numbers 20:7-11.
Brazen serpent. Numbers 21:8-9.
Balaam's ass speaks. Numbers 22:21-35.
River Jordan crossed. Joshua 3:14-17.
Walls of Jericho fall. Joshua 6:6-20.
Jeroboam's hand withered. 1 Kings 13:4; 1 Kings 13:6.
Widow's meal and oil increased. 1 Kings 17:14-16.
Widow's son raised. 1 Kings 17:17-24.
Elijah calls fire from heaven. Daniel 6:16-28.
Ahaziah's captains consumed by fire. 2 Kings 1:10-12.
Jordan divided by Elijah and Elisha. 2 Kings 2:7-8; 2 Kings 4:32-37.
Elijah carried to heaven, Matthew 7:24-277.
Waters of Jericho healed. 2 Kings 2:21-22
The widow's oil multiplied. 2 Kings 4:2-7.
Shunammite's son raised. 2 Kings 2:14.
Naaman and Gehazi. 2 Kings 5:10-27.
The iron axe-head swims. 2 Kings 6:5-7.
Syrian army's blindness. 2 Kings 6:18; 2 Kings 6:20.
Dead man raised. 2 Kings 13:21.
Sennacherib's army destroyed. 2 Kings 19:35.
Sun-dial of Ahaz. 2 Kings 20:9-11.
Uzziah struck with leprosy. 2 Chronicles 26:16-21.
Shadrach, Meshach, Abednego in the furnace. Daniel 3:19-27.
Daniel in the den of lions. 1 Kings 18:28.
Jonah and a great fish. Jonah 2:1-10.
PARABLES IN THE GOSPELS
1. Found in Matthew only (and not found in any other Gospel).—2.
The tares. Matthew 13:1-24.
Hid treasure. Luke 13:11-15.
Pearl of great price. Matthew 13:46.
Dragnet. Matthew 13:47-48.
Unmerciful servant. Matthew 18:23-34.
Laborers in the vineyard. Matthew 20:1-16.
The two sons. Matthew 21:28-32.
Marriage of king's son. Matthew 22:1-14.
Ten virgins. Matthew 25:1-13.
Ten talents. Matthew 25:14-30.
Sheep and goats. Matthew 25:31-46.
2. Found in Mark only.—2.
The seed. Mark 4:26-29.
Householder. Mark 13:34-36.
3. Found in Luke only.—17.
Two debtors. Luke 7:41-43.
Good Samaritan. Luke 10:25-37.
Friend at midnight. Luke 11:5-8.
Rich fool. Luke 12:16-21.
Servants watching. Luke 12:35-40.
The servant on trial. Luke 12:42-48.
Barren fig tree. Luke 13:6-9.
Great supper. Luke 14:16-24.
Tower and warring king. Luke 14:28-33.
The lost silver. Luke 15:8-10.
Prodigal (lost) son. Luke 15:11-32.
The shrewd steward. Luke 16:1-8.
Rich man and Lazarus. Luke 16:19-31.
Unprofitable servants. Luke 17:7-10.
Unjust Judge. Luke 18:1-8.
Pharisee and publican. Luke 18:9-14.
Ten pounds. Luke 19:12-27.
4. In Matthew and Luke only.—3.
House on rock and sand. 1664057491_16; Luke 6:48-49.
The leaven. Matthew 13:33; Luke 13:20.
Lost sheep. Matthew 18:12; Exodus 12:51.
5. In Matthew, Mark and Luke only.—7.
Light under a bushel. Matthew 5:15 : Mark 4:21; Luke 8:16.
Cloth and garment. Matthew 9:16; Mark 2:21; Luke 5:36.
Wine and bottles. Matthew 9:17 : Mark 2:22; Luke 5:37.
The sower. Matthew 13:1-58; Mark 4:1-41; Luke 8:1-56.
Mustard seed. Matthew 13:1-58; Mark 4:1-41; Luke 13:1-35.
Wicked husbandmen. Matthew 21:1-46; Mark 12:1-44; Luke 20:1-47.
The fig tree and the trees. Matthew 24:1-51; Mark 13:1-37; 1664057491_29.
MIRACLES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT
A. In the Gospels.
1. Found in Matthew only (not in any other Gospel).—3.
Two blind men see. Numbers 17:1,.
Dumb demoniac. Matthew 9:32-33.
Money (shekel) in the fish. Matthew 17:24-27.
2. Found in Mark only.—2.
Deaf and dumb cured. Mark 7:31-37.
Blind man made to see. Mark 8:22-26.
3. Found in Luke only.—6.
Draught of fishes. Luke 5:1-11.
Raising widow's son. Luke 7:11-15.
Infirm woman healed. Matthew 13:44.
Dropsy cured. Luke 14:1-6.
Ten lepers cleansed. Luke 17:11-19.
Malchus' ear healed. Luke 22:50-51.
4. Found in John only.—6.
Water made wine at Cana. John 2:1-11.
Nobleman's son healed. John 4:46-54.
Impotent man at Bethesda. John 5:1-9.
Sight to man born blind. John 9:1-7.
Lazarus raised to life. John 11:38-44.
Draught of 153 fishes. John 21:1-14.
5. In Matthew and Mark only.—3.
Syrophœnician's daughter. Matthew 15:1-39; Mark 7:1-37.
Four thousand fed. Matthew 15:1-39; Mark 8:1-38.
Withered fig tree. Matthew 21:1-46; Mark 11:1-33.
6. In Matthew and Luke only.—2.
Centurion's servant.
Holman Bible Dictionary - chief Priest
See Aaron ; Priests; Levites .
Holman Bible Dictionary - chief
The English translation of at least thirteen different Hebrew words designating a leader in political, military, religious, or economic affairs. Abir means the powerful one and is used of the chief of Saul's shepherds ( 1 Samuel 21:7 ). Ayil is one who holds official power ( Exodus 15:15 ; 2 Kings 24:15 ; Ezekiel 17:13 ; Ezekiel 32:21 ). Aluph is the leader of a clan or tribe ( Genesis 36:15-43 ; Zechariah 12:5-6 ). Gibbor is the manly one or hero ( 1 Chronicles 9:26 ). Gadol is the great one or the big one ( Leviticus 21:10 ). Baal is the lord or master (Leviticus 21:4 ). Kohen is literally a priest and then a leader ( 2 Samuel 8:18 ). Nagid is a leader ( 1 Chronicles 23:22 ; 2 Chronicles 11:11 ; Isaiah 55:4 ; Jeremiah 20:1 ; Ezekiel 28:2 ). Nitstsab is the one in charge, the overseer or foreman ( 1 Kings 9:23 ). Menatstseach is the eminent one or supervisor and is used in the titles of many Psalms ( Psalm 4:1 ), apparently referring to the choir director. Nasi' is a sheikh or tribal chief ( Numbers 25:18 ; Joshua 22:14 ). Pinnah is the corner or cornerstone ( Judges 20:2 ; 1 Samuel 14:38 ; Zechariah 10:4 ). Attud is a ram or he-goat and is used metaphorically for a chief or leader ( Isaiah 14:9 ; Zechariah 10:3 ). Qatsin is the last one, the one who has to decide and thus the leader ( Joshua 10:24 ; Judges 11:6 ; Proverbs 6:7 ; Isaiah 1:10 ; Micah 3:1 ). Ro'sh is the head ( Numbers 25:4 ; 2 Samuel 23:8 ; 2 Samuel 25:18 ; Job 29:25 and often in Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah). Ri'shon is number one, the first ( Daniel 10:13 ). Re'shith is the first or beginning one (Daniel 11:41 ). Sar is one with dominion or rule, thus an official or ruler ( Genesis 40:2 ; 1 Samuel 17:18 ; 1 Kings 4:2 ; 1 Kings 5:16 ; 1 Chronicles 24:5 ; Daniel 10:20 ). Rab means numerous or great and is used in several compound words to represent the chief or greatest one ( 2 Kings 18:17 ; Jeremiah 39:13 ; Daniel 5:11 ).
In the New Testament the Greek word arche means beginning or chief and is used in several compound words to represent the chief priest or ruler ( Matthew 2:4 ; Matthew 16:21 ; Luke 11:15 ; Luke 19:2 ; John 12:42 ; Acts 18:8 ; Acts 19:31 ; 1 Peter 5:4 ). Hegeomai means to lead to command with official authority ( Luke 22:26 ; Acts 14:12 ). Protos means first or foremost ( Matthew 20:27 ; Luke 19:47 ; Acts 13:50 ; Acts 16:12 ; Acts 25:2 ; Acts 28:7 ). Chiliarchos is the commander of a military unit supposed to have 1,000 members ( Acts 21:31 ; Acts 25:23 ; Revelation 6:15 ).

Sentence search

Uppermost - * Note: In Luke 11:43 protokathedria, "a chief seat," is translated "uppermost seats," AV (RV, "chief seats"). In Matthew 23:6 ; Mark 12:39 , AV, protoklisia, "a chief place," is translated "uppermost rooms" (RV, "chief place" and "chief places"). See chief , B, Nos
Duke - KJV translation of Hebrew word for “chief. ” See chief
Mayor - ) The chief magistrate of a city or borough; the chief officer of a municipal corporation. In some American cities there is a city court of which the major is chief judge
Foreman - ) The first or chief man...
(2):...
(n. ) The chief man of a jury, who acts as their speaker. ) The chief of a set of hands employed in a shop, or on works of any kind, who superintends the rest; an overseer
Archon - ) One of the chief magistrates in ancient Athens, especially, by preeminence, the first of the nine chief magistrates
Corypheus - ) The conductor, chief, or leader of the dramatic chorus; hence, the chief or leader of a party or interest
Nebushasban - chief of the eunuchs (as Ashpenaz, Daniel 1:3), as Nebuzaradan was Rab-tabbachim, i. chief of the body guard, and Nergal Sharezer was Rabmag, i. chief of the priests (Jeremiah 39:13)
Metropolitan - A bishop of a mother church, or of the chief church in the chief city
Ammihud - Ephraimite chief, father of Elishama. Simeonite chief, father of Shemuel. chief of Naphtali, father of Pedahel
Chief of Asia - chief OF ASIA . ]'>[1] ‘chief officers of Asia’; RVm Paramount - ) The highest or chief. ) Having the highest rank or jurisdiction; superior to all others; chief; supreme; preeminent; as, a paramount duty
Speaker - * Note: In Acts 14:12 the verb hegeomai, "to lead the way, be the chief," is used in the present participle with the article (together equivalent to a noun), followed by the genitive case of logos, "speech," with the article, the phrase being rendered "the chief speaker," lit. " See chief , C
Chef - ) Same as chief. ) A chief of head person
Adnah -
A chief of the tribe of Manasseh who joined David at Ziklag (1Chronicles 12:20). ...
A general under Jehoshaphat, chief over 300,000 men (2Chronicles 17:14)
Sirdar - , a commander in chief, esp. ) A native chief in Hindostan; a headman
Hashabiah - ...
One of the chief Levites (2 Chronicles 35:9 ). ...
One of the chief priests in the time of Ezra (Ezra 8:24 ). ...
A chief of the Levites (Nehemiah 12:24 )
Chief, Chiefest, Chiefly - It is translated "chief" in Mark 6:21 , RV, of men of Galilee; in Acts 13:50 , of men in a city; in Acts 28:7 , of the "chief" man in the island of Melita; in Acts 17:4 , of "chief" women in a city; in Acts 28:17 , of Jews; in 1 Timothy 1:15,16 , of a sinner. In the following, where the AV has "chief," or "chiefest," the RV renderings are different: Matthew 20:27 ; Mark 10:44 , "first;" Luke 19:47 ; Acts 25:2 , "principal men;" Acts 16:12 , said of Philippi, "the first (city) of the district," RV, for incorrect AV, "the chief city of that part of Macedonia. " Amphipolis was the "chief" city of that part. ...
B — 1: κεφάλαιον (Strong's #2774 — Noun Neuter — kephalaion — kef-al'-ah-yon ) akin to the adjective kephalaios, "belonging to the head," and kephale, "the head," denotes the chief point or principal thing in a subject, Hebrews 8:1 , "the chief point is this" (AV, "the sum"); elsewhere in Acts 22:28 (of principal, as to money), "(a great) sum. ...
*Certain compound nouns involving the significance of chief, are as follows: ...
B — 2: ἀρχιερεύς (Strong's #749 — Noun Masculine — archiereus — ar-khee-er-yuce' ) a chief priest, high priest" (arche, "first," hiereus, "a priest"), is frequent in the Gospels, Acts and Hebrews, but there only in the NT. in Hebrews 2:17 ; 3:1 ; of "chief" priests, including ex-high-priests and members of their families, e. ...
B — 3: ἀρχιποίμην (Strong's #750 — Noun Masculine — archipoimen — ar-khee-poy'-mane ) "a chief shepherd" (arche, "chief," poimen, "a shepherd"), is said of Christ only, 1 Peter 5:4 . Modern Greeks use it of tribal chiefs. ...
B — 4: ἀρχιτελώνης (Strong's #754 — Noun Masculine — architelones — ar-khee-tel-o'-nace ) denotes "a chief tax-collector, or publican," Luke 19:2 . ...
B — 5: ἀκρογωνιαῖος (Strong's #204 — Adjective — akrogoniaios — ak-rog-o-nee-ah'-yos ) denotes "a chief corner-stone" (from akros, "highest, extreme," gonia, "a corner, angle"), Ephesians 2:20 and 1 Peter 2:6 . , Isaiah 28:16 ...
B — 6: πρωτοκαθεδρία (Strong's #4410 — Noun Feminine — protokathedria — pro-tok-ath-ed-ree'-ah ) "a sitting in the first or chief seat" (protos, "first," kathedra, "a seat"), is found in Matthew 23:6 ; Mark 12:39 ; Luke 11:43 ; 20:46 . ...
B — 7: πρωτοκλισία (Strong's #4411 — Noun Feminine — protoklisia — pro-tok-lis-ee'-ah ) "the first reclining place, the chief place at table" (from protos, and klisia, "a company reclining at a meal;" cp. 6); Luke 14:7,8 ; 20:46 ...
B — 8: χιλίαρχος (Strong's #5506 — Noun Masculine — chiliarchos — khil-ee'-ar-khos ) denotes "a chief captain:" SEE CAPTAIN, No 1. ...
B — 9: Ἀσιάρχης (Strong's #775 — Noun Masculine — asiarches — as-ee-ar'-khace ) "an Asiarch," was one of certain officers elected by various cities in the province of Asia, whose function consisted in celebrating, partly at their own expense, the public games and festivals; in Acts 19:31 , RV, the word is translated "chief officers of Asia" (AV, "chief of Asia"). ...
B — 10: ἄρχων (Strong's #758 — Noun Masculine — archon — ar'-khone ) "a ruler," is rendered "chief" in the AV of Luke 14:1 (RV, "ruler"); "chief rulers," in John 12:42 , RV, "rulers (of the people)," i. , of members of the Sanhedrin; "chief," in Luke 11:15 (RV, "prince") in reference to Beelzebub, the prince of demons. ...
B — 11: ἀρχισυνάγωγος (Strong's #752 — Noun Masculine — archisunagogos — ar-khee-soon-ag'-o-gos ) "a ruler of a synagogue," translated "chief ruler of the synagogue," in Acts 18:8,17 , AV, was the administrative officer supervising the worship. ...
C — 1: ἡγέομαι (Strong's #2233 — Verb — hegeomai — hayg-eh'-om-ahee ) "to lead the way, to preside, rule, be the chief," is used of the ambition "to be chief" among the disciples of Christ, Luke 22:26 ; of Paul as the "chief" speaker in Gospel testimony at Lystra, Acts 14:12 ; of Judas and Silas, as chief (or rather, "leading") men among the brethren at Jerusalem, Acts 15:22 . ...
D — 1: χόρτος (Strong's #5528 3029 — Noun Masculine — huperlian — khor'-tos ) "chiefest" (huper, "over," lian, "exceedingly, pre-eminently, very much"), is used in 2 Corinthians 11:5 ; 12:11 , of Paul's place among the Apostles. ...
D — 2: μάλιστα (Strong's #3122 — Adverb — malista — mal'-is-tah ) the superlative of mala, "very, very much," is rendered "chiefly" in 2 Peter 2:10 and in the AV of Philippians 4:22 (RV, "especially"). ...
Note: In Romans 3:2 , RV, the adverb proton is translated "first of all" (AV, "chiefly")
Eneralissimo - ) The chief commander of an army; especially, the commander in chief of an army consisting of two or more grand divisions under separate commanders; - a title used in most foreign countries
Dais - ) The high or principal table, at the end of a hall, at which the chief guests were seated; also, the chief seat at the high table. ) A platform slightly raised above the floor of a hall or large room, giving distinction to the table and seats placed upon it for the chief guests
Room - § 5 , and for the now obsolete use of ‘room’ in the sense of place at table, as ‘the chief room’ ( Luke 14:7 ), the ‘highest room’ (v. ]'>[1] in both cases ‘chief seat’), or ‘the uppermost room’ ( Matthew 23:6 , Mark 12:39 , RV [1] ‘chief place’), see Meals, § 6
Tartan - The commander-in-chief, who commanded his armies in his absence (Isaiah 20:1). After the tartan came the rubsaris , "chief eunuch," who had right of near approach to the king's person, and introduced strangers and attended to his comforts; then the rabshakeh , "chief cupbearer," representing his master in embassies
Protonotary - ) A register or chief clerk of a court in certain States of the United States. ) The chief secretary of the patriarch of Constantinople. ) Formerly, a chief clerk in the Court of King's Bench and in the Court of Common Pleas, now superseded by the master. ) A chief notary or clerk
Eliasaph - Son of Deuel, or Reuel: a chief man of the tribe of Gad. Son of Lael: a chief man of the Gershonites
President - ) Occupying the first rank or chief place; having the highest authority; presiding. ) The chief officer of a corporation, company, institution, society, or the like. ) The chief executive officer of the government in certain republics; as, the president of the United States
Ahiezer - "
The chief of the tribe of Dan at the time of the Exodus (Numbers 1:12 ; 2:25 ; 10:25 ). ...
The chief of the Benjamite slingers that repaired to David at Ziklag (1Chronicles 12:3)
Beth-ba'Rah - (house of the ford ), named only in ( Judges 7:24 ) It derived its chief interest in the possibility that its more modern representative may have been Beth-abara, where John baptized. It was probably the chief ford of the district
Ahasuerus - Prince; head; chief
Primo - ) First; chief
Shilshah - Three; chief; captain
Archprimate - ) The chief primate
Archical - ) chief; primary; primordial
Alpheus - A thousand; learned; chief
Rab-Saris - chief of the eunuchs
Chief Priest - chief Priest
Hallerstein, August - His proficiency in astronomy and mathematics recommended him to the Emperor of China, by whom he was made mandarin and chief of the Department of Mathematics; his chief work is a census of China
Allerstein, August - His proficiency in astronomy and mathematics recommended him to the Emperor of China, by whom he was made mandarin and chief of the Department of Mathematics; his chief work is a census of China
Primal - ) First; primary; original; chief
Archtraitor - ) A chief or transcendent traitor
Chiefest - ) First or foremost; chief; principal
Chiefless - ) Without a chief or leader
Heresiarchy - ) A chief or great heresy
Headship - ) Authority or dignity; chief place
Chief-Justiceship - ) The office of chief justice
Megalopolis - ) A chief city; a metropolis
Bel - The chief idol of the Babylonians
General - General, commander, and (chief) captain are used interchangeably for such an officer in English translations. KJV consistently translates “captain” or “chief captain
Archprelate - ) An archbishop or other chief prelate
Maister - ) Principal; chief
Ishi - A Judahite chief ( 1 Chronicles 4:20 ). A chief of East Manasseh ( 1 Chronicles 5:24 )
Phylarch - ) The chief of a phyle, or tribe
Joshah - A Simeonite chief ( 1 Chronicles 4:34 )
Mishmannah - A Gadite chief ( 1 Chronicles 12:10 )
Corregidor - ) The chief magistrate of a Spanish town
Imna - An Asherite chief ( 1 Chronicles 7:35 )
Imrah - An Asherite chief ( 1 Chronicles 7:36 )
Ishmerai - A Benjamite chief ( 1 Chronicles 8:18 )
Ishpan - A Benjamite chief ( 1 Chronicles 8:22 )
Jaareshiah - A Benjamite chief ( 1 Chronicles 8:27 )
Jacan - A Gadite chief ( 1 Chronicles 5:13 )
Jahdiel - A Manassite chief ( 1 Chronicles 5:24 )
Jamlech - A Simeonite chief ( 1 Chronicles 4:34 )
Janai - A Gadite chief ( 1 Chronicles 5:12 )
Jaroah - A Gadite chief ( 1 Chronicles 5:14 )
Joshibiah - A Simeonite chief ( 1 Chronicles 4:35 )
Potestate - ) A chief ruler; a potentate
Adina - A Reubenite chief, 1 Chronicles 11:42
Ataman - ) A hetman, or chief of the Cossacks
Enearch - ) The chief of a family or tribe
Hareph - A Judahite chief ( 1 Chronicles 2:51 )
Jorai - A Gadite chief ( 1 Chronicles 5:13 )
Naik - ) A chief; a leader; a Sepoy corporal
Rabshakeh - An officer—the chief butler or cupbearer—who was sent with Rab-saris, the chief of the eunuchs, and Tartan, messengers of the king of Assyria, to Hezekiah, summoning him, in the most indecent and blasphemous manner, to surrender his capital
Chiliarch - ) The commander or chief of a thousand men
Odomera - A chief, slain by Jonathan ( 1Ma 9:66 )
Cutwal - ) The chief police officer of a large city
Jaziz - A Hagerite, David's chief shepherd
Ashpenaz - The chief of Nebuchadrezzar’s eunuchs ( Daniel 1:3 )
Jeriel - A chief of Issachar ( 1 Chronicles 7:2 )
Ariel - One of Ezra's chief men who directed the caravan which Ezra led from Babylon to Jerusalem. Jerusalem being the chief city of Judah, whose emblem was a lion, Genesis 49:9, the word Ariel is applied to that city
Bevile - ) A chief broken or opening like a carpenter's bevel
Shiza - Father of a Reubenite chief ( 1 Chronicles 11:42 )
Archbutler - ) A chief butler; - an officer of the German empire
High Priest - A chief priest; esp
Prima Donna - ) The first or chief female singer in an opera
Eschevin - ) The alderman or chief officer of an ancient guild
Abdiel - Servant of God, (1 Chronicles 5:15 ), a Gadite chief
Jaanai - Mourner, one of the chief Gadites (1 Chronicles 5:12 )
High Priest - The chief priest of the Jews, whose special duties were to officiate on the Day of Atonement, preside over the court of judgment, and consult the Divine oracle; his office was usually for life. See also: chief priest
Jedaiah - The son of Shimri, a chief Simeonite (1 Chronicles 4:37 ). The chief of one of the courses of the priests (1 Chronicles 24:7 )
Leader - A chief a commander a captain. The chief of a party or faction as the leader of the whigs or of the tories a leader of the Jacobins
Harnepher - A chief of the tribe of Asher (1 Chronicles 7:36 )
Ambrein - ) A fragrant substance which is the chief constituent of ambergris
Eshban - An Edomite chief ( Genesis 36:26 , 1 Chronicles 1:41 )
Shapham - A chief of the tribe of Gad
Zaavan - A Horite chief, son of Ezer, Seir's son (Genesis 36:27)
Doge - ) The chief magistrate in the republics of Venice and Genoa
Elidad - Son of Chislon and a chief of Benjamin
Executioner - In three places persons are pointed out as 'captain of the guard,' who in the margin are called 'chief of the executioners or slaughtermen. In Solomon's day Benaiah the chief of the army was called to fulfil this office, 1 Kings 2:25,34,46 , though doubtless the 'chief ' had others under him that actually carried the king's word into execution, unless the persons were of high rank
Seorim - Barley, the chief of the forth priestly course (1 Chronicles 24:8 )
Archtreasurer - ) A chief treasurer
Czar - ) A king; a chief; the title of the emperor of Russia
Heresiarch - ) A leader in heresy; the chief of a sect of heretics
Pacha - (1):...
The chief admiral of the Turkish fleet
Jaanai - A chief man of the tribe of Gad
Azaz - Father of Bela a chief of the Reubenites
Sharonite - Designation of Shitrai, David's chief herdsman in Sharon
Hadlai - Father of Amasa, a chief of the Ephraimites
Ammizabad - Son of Benaiah, chief captain in David's army
Sachem - ) A chief of a tribe of the American Indians; a sagamore
Coz'bi - (deceitful ), daughter of Zur, a chief of the Midianites
Iram - Citizen, chief of an Edomite tribe in Mount Seir (Genesis 36:43 )
Adlai - Father of Shaphat, one of David's chief shepherds
Room - ...
A — 2: πρωτοκλισία (Strong's #4411 — Noun Feminine — protoklisia — pro-tok-lis-ee'-ah ) "the chief reclining place at table," is rendered "uppermost rooms," in Matthew 23:6 , AV (RV, "chief place"); in Mark 12:39 , "uppermost rooms," AV (RV, "chief places"); in Luke 14:7 , "chief rooms," AV (RV, "chief seats"); in Luke 14:8 , AV, "highest room" (RV, "chief seat"); in Luke 20:46 , AV, "highest seats" (RV, "chief seats"). See chief , B, No
Corps of Engineers - It consisted of assistant and passed assistant engineers, ranking with ensigns and lieutenants, chief engineers, ranking from lieutenant to captain, and engineer in chief, ranking with commodore and having charge of the Bureau of Steam Engineering
Rab'Shakeh - (chief cupbearer ), ( 2 Kings 19:1 ; Isaiah 36:1 ; Isaiah 37:1 ) . ) The English version takes Rabshakeh as the name of a person; but it is more probably the name of the office which he held at the court, that of chief cupbearer
Shephi - A Horlte chief
Archpriest - ) A chief priest; also, a kind of vicar, or a rural dean
Battle - BATTLE See War, also names of places where the chief battles were fought
Matri - The chief of Saul's family, signifying rain
Zaim - ) A Turkish chief who supports a mounted militia bearing the same name
Jog'li - (led into exile ), the father of Bukki, a Danite chief
Jaro'ah - (moon ), a chief man of the tribe of Gad ( 1 Chronicles 5:14 )
Jachan - Mourner, one of the chief Gadite "brothers" in Bashan (1 Chronicles 5:13 )
Meraiah - Resistance, a chief priest, a contemporary of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:12 )
Zophah - Spreading out, a son of Helem (1 Chronicles 7:35 ), a chief of Asher
Shitrai - The Sharonite who was chief herdsman of David at Sharon
Reelection - ) Election a second time, or anew; as, the reelection of a former chief
Amminadab -
The father of Nahshon, who was chief of the tribe of Judah (Numbers 1:7 ; 2:3 ; 7:12,17 ; 10:14 ). ...
...
chief of the 112 descendants of Uzziel the Levite (1 Chronicles 15:10,11 )
Shaphat - A chief of the tribe of Gad. Son of Adlai and one of David's chief herdsmen
Jeshaiah - The chief of the Benç-Elam who returned ( Ezra 8:7 [1]). chief of the Merarites ( Ezra 8:19 [2])
Rabmag - It has been supposed by some to signify 'chief of the Magi,' and by others, 'chief priest
Archangel - Archangel, a chief angel, only twice used in the Bible. In this last passage it is applied to Michael, who, in Daniel 10:13; Daniel 10:21; Daniel 12:1, is described as "one of the chief princes," having a special charge of the Jewish nation, and in Revelation 12:7-9 as the leader of an angelic army
Helkai - Smooth-tongued, one of the chief priests in the time of Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:15 )
Adnah - chief over 300,000, under Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 17:14)
Portgrave - In old English law, the chief magistrate of a port or maritime town
His Holiness - Designation of the pope on account of his office as chief administrator of holy things
Habaziniah - Ancestor of Jaazaniah, chief of the Rechabites in the time of Jeremiah
Mitter's Green - A pigment of a green color, the chief constituent of which is oxide of chromium
ja'Chan - (affliction ), one of seven chief men of the tribe of Gad
ja'Ana-i - (whom Jehovah answers ), a chief man in the tribe of Gad
Berai'ah - (created by Jehovah ), son of Shimhi, a chief man of Benjamin
Iphedeiah - Set free by Jehovah, a chief of the tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:25 )
Zadok - As a result Solomon promoted Zadok to chief priest and sent Abiathar into exile (1 Kings 1:5-8; 1 Kings 1:43-45; 1 Kings 2:26; 1 Kings 2:35). ...
Since Zadok belonged to the line of chief priests that went back through Phinehas and Eleazar to Aaron (Ezra 7:2-5), his appointment to the high priesthood was in keeping with the plan and promise of God (Numbers 25:10-13). His descendants followed him as chief priests till the destruction of Jerusalem in 587 BC (2 Chronicles 31:10). Because they remained faithful to God throughout that period, they were designated the chief priests in the religious system that Ezekiel looked for in the rebuilt nation (Ezekiel 40:46; Ezekiel 44:15). ...
History shows that after the reconstruction of Israel, descendants of Zadok continued to be the chief priests for several centuries
Ambassador - ...
Men of high rank usually; as Sennacherib sent his chief captain, chief cupbearer, and chief eunuch, Tartan, Rabsaris, Rabshakeh, whom Hezekiah's chief men of the kingdom, Eliakim over the household, Shebna the secretary, and Joab the recorder, met (2 Kings 18:17-18; Isaiah 30:4; Isaiah 33:7; compare Isaiah 18:2)
Captain - Literally, a head or chief officer appropriately, the military officer who commands a company, whether of infantry, cavalry, artillery or matrosses. A chief commander. Captain-general, is the commander in chief of an army, or of the militia. chief valiant
Chieftain - ) A captain, leader, or commander; a chief; the head of a troop, army, or clan
Mahazioth - Visions, a Kohathite Levite, chief of the twenty-third course of musicians (1 Chronicles 25:4,30 )
High priest - the “high priest,” or chief of the Kohanim; only he may enter the Holy of Holies ...
Publius - The chief man of the island at Malta when Paul landed there
Simri - Though not the firstborn, his father made him chief
Jogli - The Danite chief who took part in the division of the land ( Numbers 34:22 )
Kohen gadol - the �high priest,� or chief of the Kohanim; only he may enter the Holy of Holies ...
Outport - ) A harbor or port at some distance from the chief town or seat of trade
Vilayet - ) One of the chief administrative divisions or provinces of the Ottoman Empire; - formerly called eyalet
Nebushasban - Officer of Nebuchadnezzar, called Rab-saris, which is thought to mean 'chief chamberlain
Consul - ) One of the two chief magistrates of the republic. ) One of the three chief magistrates of France from 1799 to 1804, who were called, respectively, first, second, and third consul
Publius - "The chief man of the island" of Malta (Acts 28:7 ), who courteously entertained Paul and his shipwrecked companions for three days, till they found a more permanent place of residence; for they remained on the island for three months, till the stormy season had passed. The word here rendered "chief man" (protos) is supposed by some to be properly a Maltese term, the official title of the governor
Sceva - A "chief priest", i. once having been high priest, or else chief of the priests at Ephesus, or of one of the 24 courses
Crownet - ) The ultimate end and result of an undertaking; a chief end
Seo'Rim - (barley ), the chief of the fourth of the twenty-four courses of priests
Agha - ) In Turkey, a commander or chief officer
Palmary - ) Worthy of the palm; palmy; preeminent; superior; principal; chief; as, palmary work
Fibroin - ) A variety of gelatin; the chief ingredient of raw silk, extracted as a white amorphous mass
Adlai - (ad' law i) Personal name of father of one of David's chief shepherds (1 Chronicles 27:29 )
Decurion - ) A head or chief over ten; especially, an officer who commanded a division of ten soldiers
Hasenu'ah - (the hated ), a Benjamite, of one of the chief families in the tribe
Principal - ) Highest in rank, authority, character, importance, or degree; most considerable or important; chief; main; as, the principal officers of a Government; the principal men of a state; the principal productions of a country; the principal arguments in a case. ) A leader, chief, or head; one who takes the lead; one who acts independently, or who has controlling authority or influence; as, the principal of a faction, a school, a firm, etc. ) The chief actor in a crime, or an abettor who is present at it, - as distinguished from an accessory. ) A chief obligor, promisor, or debtor, - as distinguished from a surety. ) A thing of chief or prime importance; something fundamental or especially conspicuous. ) In English organs the chief open metallic stop, an octave above the open diapason
Heresiarch - Of arch heretic, the founder or inventor of an heresy; or a chief of a sect of heretics
Zichri -
A Benjamite chief (1 Chronicles 8:19 )
Naarai - Youthful, a military chief in David's army (1 Chronicles 11:37 ), called also Paarai (2 Samuel 23:35 )
Mahazioth - The Hemanite chief of the 23rd course of singers ( 1 Chronicles 25:4 ; 1 Chronicles 25:30 )
Ziza - A Simeonite chief ( 1 Chronicles 4:37 )
Borsholder - ) The head or chief of a tithing, or borough (see 2d Borough); the headborough; a parish constable
Padishah - ) chief ruler; monarch; sovereign; - a title of the Sultan of Turkey, and of the Shah of Persia
Demarch - ) A chief or ruler of a deme or district in Greece
Jarl - ) A chief; an earl; in English history, one of the leaders in the Danish and Norse invasions
ad'Ina - (slender ), one of David's captains beyond the Jordan, and a chief of the Reubenites
Jaziz - ” chief shepherd under David
za'Avan, - (migratory ), a Horite chief, son of Ezer the son of Seir
Jesim'Iel - (whom God makes ), a Simeonite chief of the family of Shimei
Jam'Lech - (whom God makes king ), one of the chief men of the tribe of Simeon
Ilai - An Ahohite, one of David's chief warriors (1 Chronicles 11:29 ); called also Zalmon (2 Samuel 23:28 )
Tidal - Probably chief of several nomadic tribes who occupied different tracts of Lower Mesopotamia at different times, as the Arabs do there to this day. His name Thurgah (in the Septuagint, Thargal), "the great chief
Rab-Saris - It signifies "the chief of the eunuchs. " Such officers, high in honor and in trust, are found on the mural tablets of Nineveh so wonderfully preserved to this day; and in the Ottoman Porte of our own times the Kislar Aga, or chief of the black eunuchs, is one of the highest dignitaries
Zuriel - Rock of God, chief of the family of the Merarites (Numbers 3:35 ) at the time of the Exodus
Gahar - Lurking-place, one of the chief of the Nethinim, whose descendants returned to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:47 )
Archchancellor - ) A chief chancellor; - an officer in the old German empire, who presided over the secretaries of the court
Regnant - ) Having the chief power; ruling; predominant; prevalent
Eznite - Designation of Adino, the Tachmonite, chief of David's mighty men
Jahaziah - Son of Tikvah: a chief who supported Ezra in the matter of separating from foreign wives
European Concert - An agreement or understanding between the chief European powers to take only joint action in the (European) Eastern Question
Gamul - A chief of the Levites, and head of the 22nd course of priests ( 1 Chronicles 24:17 )
Householder - The master or chief of a family one who keeps house with his family
Zuar - Father of Nethaneel a chief of Issachar
Tincal - It was once the chief source of boric compounds
Nodab - Probably the name is derived from Nadab, prince or chief
Undersecretary - ) A secretary who is subordinate to the chief secretary; an assistant secretary; as, an undersecretary of the Treasury
Hallo'Hesh - (enchanter ), one of the chief of the people who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah
Naham'Aai - (merciful ), a chief man among those who returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel and Jeshua
Jeshoha'Iah - (whom Jehovah casts down ), a chief of the Simeonites, descended from Shimei
Nebuzar-a'Dan - (chief whom Nebo favors ), the Rab-tabbachim i. chief of the slaughterers (Authorized Version "captain of the guard"), a high officer in the court of Nebuchadnezzar. ( Jeremiah 39:11 ) He seems to have quitted Judea when he took down the chief people of Jerusalem to his master at Riblah
Shaashgaz - Servant of the beautiful, a chief eunuch in the second house of the harem of king Ahasuerus (Esther 2:14 )
Ulla - Of Asher (1 Chronicles 7:39-40): head of a house and a mighty man of valor, a chief prince
Haurient - ) In pale, with the head in chief; - said of the figure of a fish, as if rising for air
Elzabad - A Gadite chief who joined David ( 1 Chronicles 12:12 )
Quindecemvir - ) One of a sacerdotal college of fifteen men whose chief duty was to take care of the Sibylline books
Tycoon - ) The title by which the shogun, or former commander in chief of the Japanese army, was known to foreigners
Shedeur - Father of Elizur, a chief of the Reubenites
Foremost - ) First in time or place; most advanced; chief in rank or dignity; as, the foremost troops of an army
Hierarch - ) One who has high and controlling authority in sacred things; the chief of a sacred order; as, princely hierarchs
Agee - ” Father of one of David's three chief commanders (2 Samuel 23:11 )
Zeus - ) The chief deity of the Greeks, and ruler of the upper world (cf
Jove - ) The chief divinity of the ancient Romans; Jupiter
Ahi'ra - unlucky ), chief of the tribe of Naphtali
ja'Irite - The IRA THE JAIRITE was a priest (Authorized Version "chief ruler") to David (2 Samuel 20:26 )
je'Uel, - a chief man of Judah, one of the Bene-Zerah
Satan - ) The grand adversary of man; the Devil, or Prince of darkness; the chief of the fallen angels; the archfiend
Elie'na-i - (my eyes are toward God ) a descendant of Benjamin, and a chief man in the tribe
Aph'Ses - (the dispersion ), chief of the 15th of the 24 courses in the service of the temple
Admiral - The chief gradations in rank are admiral, vice admiral, and rear admiral. The admiral is the commander in chief of a fleet or of fleets
Colonel - ) The chief officer of a regiment; an officer ranking next above a lieutenant colonel and next below a brigadier general
Ibneiah - A chief man in Benjamin at their first settlement in Jerusalem
Phichol - Chief captain of Abimelech, king of the Philistines, in the times of Abraham and Isaac
Pinon - (pi' nahn) Edomite clan chief (Genesis 36:41 ; 1 Chronicles 1:52 ), whose descendants perhaps settled Punon (Numbers 33:42-43 )
Seraskier - ) A general or commander of land forces in the Turkish empire; especially, the commander-in-chief of minister of war
Decuman - ) Large; chief; - applied to an extraordinary billow, supposed by some to be every tenth in order
Chenani'ah - (established by the Lord ), chief of the Levites when David carried the ark to Jerusalem
Landtrost - ...
(2):...
A chief magistrate in rural districts
Lacedaemonian - ) Of or pertaining to Lacedaemon or Sparta, the chief city of Laconia in the Peloponnesus
Hashab'Nah - (whom Jehovah regards ), one of the chief of the "people" who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah
Hak'Katan - Johanan son ,of Hakkatan, was the chief of the Bene-Azgad who returned from Babylon with Ezra
Pileha - One of the chief priests in the days of Nehemiah, (See Nehemiah 10:24) The name is probably from Palach, to divide
Ocran - Father of Pagiel, a chief of the tribe of Asher
Simri - "Though he was not the firstborn, yet his father made him the chief
a'Der - (flock ), a Benjamites, son of Beriah, chief of the inhabitants of Aijalon
Landamman - ) A chief magistrate in some of the Swiss cantons
Pagiel - chief of the tribe of Asher ( Numbers 1:13 ; Numbers 2:27 ; Numbers 7:72 ; Numbers 7:77 ; Numbers 10:26 )
Satan - The grand adversary of man the devil or prince of darkness the chief of the fallen angels
o'Bil - (chief of the camels ), a keeper of the herds of camels in the reign of David
zu'ri-el - (my rock is God ) son of Abihail, and chief of the Merarite Levites at the time of the exodus
Praetor - In origin this word means ‘the man who goes before (the army),’ prae-itor, ‘the general,’ and was applied to the chief magistrates of Rome, when the kingdom gave place to the republic. ) of two extra officials to look after the legal business of the Roman State, the name praetor was given to them, and a new name consul was given to the chief magistrates. are the chief magistrates of Philippi, a Roman colonia
Rabshakeh - Chief of the princes, the name given to the chief cup-bearer or the vizier of the Assyrian court; one of Sennacherib's messengers to Hezekiah
ab'Ana - " ( 2 Kings 5:12 ) The Barada and the Awaj are now the chief streams of Damascus, the former representing the Abana and the latter the Pharpar of the text. The Barada (Abana) rises in the Antilibanus, at about 23 miles from the city, after flowing through which it runs across the plain, of whose fertility it is the chief source, till it loses itself in the lake or marsh Bahret-el-Kibliyeh
Headstone - ) The principal stone in a foundation; the chief or corner stone
Ahira - Brother of evil = unlucky, or my brother is friend, chief of the tribe of Naphtali at the Exodus (Numbers 1:15 ; 2:29 )
Jaalam - A duke or tribal chief of Edom
Archchamberlain - ) A chief chamberlain; - an officer of the old German empire, whose office was similar to that of the great chamberlain in England
Captainship - ) The condition, rank, post, or authority of a captain or chief commander
Pumpernickel - ) A sort of bread, made of unbolted rye, which forms the chief food of the Westphalian peasants
Mattaniah - A man's name, chief of the family of the Levites, 1 Chronicles 25:16
Zephi - tribe chief, of Edom
Sheshan - A chief of Judah, whose family was sustained in the tribe by his daughter's marriage to his Egyptian servant
Pagiel - Son of Ocran and a chief of the tribe of Asher
Eneva - ) The chief city of Switzerland
Headstone - The principal stone in a foundation the chief or corner stone
Jerusalem - ) The chief city of Palestine, intimately associated with the glory of the Jewish nation, and the life and death of Jesus Christ
Pelet - A Benjamite chief who joined David at Ziklag ( 1 Chronicles 12:3 )
Ammizabad - People of the giver, the son of Benaiah, who was the third and chief captain of the host under David (1 Chronicles 27:6 )
Oholiab - The chief assistant of Bezalel ( Exodus 31:8 ; Exodus 35:34 ; Exodus 36:1-2 ; Exodus 38:23 )
Chenaniah - chief Levite skilful in song (but see the margin ) 1 Chronicles 15:22,27
Optimate - ) A nobleman or aristocrat; a chief man in a state or city
Topsman - ) The chief drover of those who drive a herd of cattle
Major-Domo - ) A man who has authority to act, within certain limits, as master of the house; a steward; also, a chief minister or officer
Bil'Han -
A Horite chief dwelling in Mount Seir
Jakim -
chief of the twelfth priestly order (1 Chronicles 24:12 )
Commander - A chief one who has supreme authority a leader the chief officer of an army, or of any division of it
Jeiel - A Reubenite chief. ...
...
One of the chief Levites, who made an offering for the restoration of the Passover by Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:9 )
Michael - Who is like God?
The title given to one of the chief angels (Daniel 10:13,21 ; 12:1 ). ...
...
1 Chronicles 7:3 , a chief of the tribe of Issachar. ...
...
A chief Gadite in Bashan (1 Chronicles 5:13 )
Prince, Princess - nasi , 'one raised up'; this is translated also 'ruler, governor, captain, and chief. sar , 'to bear rule,' hence applied to the head men in the tribes, 'chief of the fathers'; and to the satraps in the Persian empire. In Daniel these same are called achashdarpenayya , 'chief governors
Donjon - ) The chief tower, also called the keep; a massive tower in ancient castles, forming the strongest part of the fortifications
Main Altar - (altar, main) The chief altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary
Crispus - Curled, the chief of the synagogue at Corinth (Acts 18:8 )
Tartan - An Assyrian word, meaning "the commander-in-chief
Chenaiah - "Chief of the Levites," probably a Kohathite (1 Chronicles 15:22 ), and therefore not the same as mentioned in 26:29
Scottish - ) Of or pertaining to the inhabitants of Scotland, their country, or their language; as, Scottish industry or economy; a Scottish chief; a Scottish dialect
Pendragon - ) A chief leader or a king; a head; a dictator; - a title assumed by the ancient British chiefs when called to lead other chiefs
Prurigo - ) A papular disease of the skin, of which intense itching is the chief symptom, the eruption scarcely differing from the healthy cuticle in color
Postmaster-General - ) The chief officer of the post-office department of a government
Altar, High - (altar, main) The chief altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary
Altar, Main - (altar, main) The chief altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary
Hezir - A chief of the people who sealed the covenant
Publius - The chief man, or governor, of Melita (Malta) when Paul was shipwrecked
Forewoman - ) A woman who is chief; a woman who has charge of the work or workers in a shop or other place; a head woman
High Altar - (altar, main) The chief altar in a church, mounted by steps, and in the center of the sanctuary
Archiereus - (Greek: archos, chief; hieros, holy) ...
Greek word for bishop, used in Greek prayer-books in services corresponding to the pontifical services of the Roman rite
Pil'Eha - (worship ), the name of one of the chief of the people, probably a family, who signed the covenant with Nehemiah
Pash'ur -
One of the families of priests of the chief house of Malchijah. (1 Chronicles 9:12 ; 24:9 ; Nehemiah 11:12 ; Jeremiah 21:1 ; 38:1 ) In the time of Nehemiah this family appears to have become a chief house, and its head the head of a course. (Ezra 2:38 ; Nehemiah 7:41 ; 10:3 ) The individual from whom the family was named was probably Pushur the son of Malchiah, who in the reign of Zedekiah was one of the chief princes of the court. Again somewhat later Pashur joined with several other chief men in petitioning the king that Jeremiah might be put to death as a traitor. (Jeremiah 38:4 ) ...
Another person of this name, also a priest, and "chief governor of the house of the Lord," is mentioned in (Jeremiah 20:1 ) He is described as "the son of Immer
Fu - ) A department in China comprising several hsein; also, the chief city of a department; - often forming the last part of a name; as, Paoting-fu
Fremin, Jacques - His chief work was among the Cayuga, Mohawk, and Huron Indians, 10,000 of whom he converted
Jacques Fremin - His chief work was among the Cayuga, Mohawk, and Huron Indians, 10,000 of whom he converted
Police, Policemen - NAS, NRSV used police and policemen to refer to those Roman officials who attended the chief magistrates (Acts 16:35 ,Acts 16:35,16:38 )
Archiepiscopacy - ) That form of episcopacy in which the chief power is in the hands of archbishops
Mizzah - ” Edomite clan chief (Genesis 36:13 ,Genesis 36:13,36:17 ; 1 Chronicles 1:37 )
Omar - of Jordan, also to amar "to speak," and emir "a chief
Primate - ) The chief ecclesiastic in a national church; one who presides over other bishops in a province; an archbishop
Paris - ) The chief city of France
Gin'Netho - (gardner ), one of the chief of the priests and Levites who returned to Judea with Zerubbabel
Potiphar - , chief, probably, of the state police, who, while they formed part of the Egyptian army, were also largely employed in civil duties (37:36; marg. , "chief of the executioners")
Ashtaroth, Ashtoreth - Ashtaroth was the chief female goddess and Baal the chief male god, and they are often named together
Zurishaddai - Rock of the Almighty, the father of Shelumiel, who was chief of the tribe of Simeon when Israel was encamped at Sinai (Numbers 1:6 ; 2:12 )
Rabsaris - Chief of the Heads, one of the three officers whom Sennacherib sent from Lachish with a threatening message to Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17 ; Jeremiah 39:3,13 )
Archiater - ) chief physician; - a term applied, on the continent of Europe, to the first or body physician of princes and to the first physician of some cities
Archangel - ) A chief angel; one high in the celestial hierarchy
Kallai - ” A chief priest who returned from Exile during the time of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:20 )
Sheading - ) A tithing, or division, in the Isle of Man, in which there is a coroner, or chief constable
Rabmag - (Jeremiah 39:3) The word is compounded of Rab and Magi—the chief of the magi, or wise men
Ziha - chief of the Nethinim in Ophel (Nehemiah 11:21)
Phichol - chief captain of Abimelech king of Gerar (Genesis 21:22; Genesis 26:26)
Purpure - ) Purple, - represented in engraving by diagonal lines declining from the right top to the left base of the escutcheon (or from sinister chief to dexter base)
Metropolis - ) The mother city; the chief city of a kingdom, state, or country
Abi'Dan - (father of the judge ), chief of the tribe of Benjamin at the time of the Exodus
Sceva - a Jew, and chief of the priests, Acts 19:14-16
Bezalel - Chosen by G-d to be chief architect and builder of the Tabernacle together with Oholiab the son of Ahisamach
Gerar - Chief city of the Philistines in Abraham's and Isaac's time; now Khirbet el Gerar. ) The people were pastoral in the times of Abraham, but warlike, with a regular "chief captain of the army," Phichol (the "mouth of all," implying a commanding voice as commander-in-chief
Joel - A Gadite chief ( 1 Chronicles 5:12 ). A chief man of Issachar ( 1 Chronicles 7:3 ). A Manassite chief ( 1 Chronicles 27:20 )
King - ) The chief piece in the game of chess. ) One who, or that which, holds a supreme position or rank; a chief among competitors; as, a railroad king; a money king; the king of the lobby; the king of beasts. ) A chief ruler; a sovereign; one invested with supreme authority over a nation, country, or tribe, usually by hereditary succession; a monarch; a prince
Mallothi - My fulness, a Kohathite Levite, one of the sons of Heman the Levite (1 Chronicles 25:4 ), and chief of the nineteenth division of the temple musicians (26)
Jozabad - ...
...
A chief of the tribe of Manasseh (1 Chronicles 12:20 )
Enmanche - ) Resembling, or covered with, a sleeve; - said of the chief when lines are drawn from the middle point of the upper edge upper edge to the sides
Podesta - ) One of the chief magistrates of the Italian republics in the Middle Ages
Jashobeam - A Hachmonite, chief of David's captains
Tidal - He was probably chief over several clans here called 'nations
Voluptuary - ) A voluptuous person; one who makes his physical enjoyment his chief care; one addicted to luxury, and the gratification of sensual appetites
Mastership - ) chief work; masterpiece
ze'Bul - (habitation ), chief man (Authorized Version "ruler") of the city of Shechem at the time of the contest between Abimelech and the native Canaanites
Concert of the Powers - An agreement or understanding between the chief European powers, the United States, and Japan in 1900 to take only joint action in the Chinese aspect of the Eastern Question
Phanar - ) A quarter of Constantinople which, after the Turkish conquest of the city, became the chief Greek quarter; hence, the Greek officials of Turkey, or phanariots, as a class
League of the Cross - Its chief centers are London and Liverpool; it has branches in Great Britain, Ireland, Australia, and Canada
sa'Rid - (survivor ), a chief landmark of the territory of Zebulun
Cadilesker - ) A chief judge in the Turkish empire, so named originally because his jurisdiction extended to the cases of soldiers, who are now tried only by their own officers
Melons - Melons of all kinds have ever been largely cultivated in Egypt, and in summer often form the chief food and drink of the lower classes
Headborrow - ) The chief of a frankpledge, tithing, or decennary, consisting of ten families; - called also borsholder, boroughhead, boroughholder, and sometimes tithingman
Pinic - ) Of or pertaining to the pine; obtained from the pine; formerly, designating an acid which is the chief constituent of common resin, - now called abietic, or sylvic, acid
Zaccheus - chief of the publicans; that is, farmer general of the revenues, Luke 19:1 , &c
Chow - ) A prefecture or district of the second rank in China, or the chief city of such a district; - often part of the name of a city, as in Foochow
Mitylene - The chief town and capital of the isle of Lesbos
Shed'Eur - (darter of light ), the father of Elizur, chief of the tribe of Reuben at the time of the exodus
Anthracene - Its chief use is in the artificial production of alizarin
Ithran - An Asherite chief ( 1 Chronicles 7:37 ), probably identical with Jether of the following verse
Sea King - One of the leaders among the Norsemen who passed their lives in roving the seas in search of plunder and adventures; a Norse pirate chief
Shaphat - A chief herdsmen of David in Bashan, 1 Chronicles 27:29
pa'gi-el - (God allots ) the son of Ocran and chief of the tribe of Asher at the time of the exodus
Phi'Chol - (strong ), chief captain of the army of Abimelech, king of the Philistines of Gerar in the days of both Abraham, ( Genesis 21:22,32 ) and Isaac
Uzzi - ...
...
A Benjamite, a chief in the tribe (1 Chronicles 9:8 ). ...
...
The head of the house of Jedaiah, one of "the chief of the priests" (Nehemiah 12:19 )
Timna - Sister of the Horite clan chief Lotan (Genesis 36:22 ; 1 Chronicles 1:39 ), concubine of Esau's son Eliphaz, and mother of Amalek (Genesis 36:12 ). Son of Eliphaz (1 Chronicles 1:36 ; Genesis 36:16 , Teman) and Edomite clan chief (Genesis 36:40 ; 1 Chronicles 1:51 )
Jeiel - A chief of the tribe of Reuben. A chief of the Levites in the time of Josiah
Jozabad - A chief of the Levites in the days of Josiah. A chief of the Levites who returned from exile
Provinces - The chief or presiding Bishop of theProvince is generally the Bishop of the metropolis or chief cityand therefore he is styled Metropolitan, and also Archbishop
Elidad - Whom God has loved, son of Chislon, and chief of the tribe of Benjamin; one of those who were appointed to divide the Promised Land among the tribes (Numbers 34:21 )
Attorney-General - ) The chief law officer of the state, empowered to act in all litigation in which the law-executing power is a party, and to advise this supreme executive whenever required
Sheriff - ) The chief officer of a shire or county, to whom is intrusted the execution of the laws, the serving of judicial writs and processes, and the preservation of the peace
Headless - ) Destitute of a chief or leader
Hariph - A chief of the people who sealed the covenant
i'Ram - the chief of a family or tribe
Aaronites - Eleazar, Aaron's son, was their chief Numbers 4:16
Shaphat - ...
...
One of David's chief herdsmen (1 Chronicles 27:29 )
Canto - ) One of the chief divisions of a long poem; a book
Amharic - ) The Amharic language (now the chief language of Abyssinia)
Polemarch - ) In Athens, originally, the military commanderin-chief; but, afterward, a civil magistrate who had jurisdiction in respect of strangers and sojourners
Drum Major - ...
(3):...
The chief or first drummer of a regiment; an instructor of drummers
Hodijah - A chief of the people who sealed the covenant
Guni - Father of Abdiel, a chief man of Gad
Forehand - ) The chief or most important part
Warder - ) A truncheon or staff carried by a king or a commander in chief, and used in signaling his will
Salmon - Or SALMAH 1 Chronicles 2:11 , a chief man of the tribe of Judah, husband of Rahab, and father of Boaz, Ruth 4:20 Matthew 1:4,5 Luke 3:32
ar'ba - (city of the four ), the progenitor of the Anakim, or sons of Anak, from whom their chief city, HEBRON , received its name of Kirjath-Arba
Ner'Gal - (hero ), one of the chief Assyrian and Babylonian deities, seems to have corresponded closely to the classical Mars
Pub'Lius, - the chief man --probably the governor-of Melita, who received and lodged St
Musician - We meet with an address, or dedication, at the opening of very many of the psalms: "To the chief Musician. We do not know that there was such an office over the choir as chief musician; certain it is, that neither the Chaldee paraphrase, nor any of the other versions, say any thing about this chief musician. Besides, if it be supposed that David had such a character in his band as chief musician, what authority is there to suppose that the prophet Habakkuk knew of any such a character; and yet he also addresseth his hymn to the chief sinner. (See Habakkuk 3:19) I find an author of no small authority observe, that the word which (1 Samuel 15:29) is rendered strength, and is a well known title of Christ, is not dissimilar to the word in the Psalms rendered chief musician. And what end, but the end of Christ's triumphs by virtue of his sacrifice? And as Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth," may not those numberless sweet Psalms which so plainly refer to him, be supposed to be addressed to him as the end? So we find the title of Psalms 6:1-10 and Psalms 12:1-8 to be addressed to the chief musician upon Sheminith. And every one cannot but know that these Psalms are both of them spoken prophetically of the person of Christ, the God-man-Mediator; and therefore, as such, surely it is doing no violence to the word Sheminith, joined with Lamenetz, to suppose that it forms an address to Christ, as the strength of Israel in his Sheminith or abundant riches, suited to his high character as the chief end of salvation to his people
Rabbabbi - The word RAB in Hebrew signifies chief; thus Nebuzaradan is the chief or captain of the guard, 2 Kings 25:8 , in Hebrew rabtabbachim; so Ashpenaz is the rab, chief or master of the eunuchs, and Daniel of the mag, Daniel 1:3 5:11
Melzar - , chief butler; the title of an officer at the Babylonian court (Daniel 1:11,16 ) who had charge of the diet of the Hebrew youths
Abida - Or Abi'dah, father of knowledge; knowing, one of the five sons of Midian, who was the son of Abraham by Keturah (1 Chronicles 1:33 ), and apparently the chief of an Arab tribe
Tartan - The name is supposed to signify 'commander in chief
Jemidar - ) The chief or leader of a hand or body of persons; esp
Ismaiah - A Gibeonite chief of the men who left Saul, the head of their tribe, to join David at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12:1-4); "a mighty man among the 30 and over the 30
Chanter - ) The chief singer of the chantry
Mibzar - ” Edomite clan chief and his tribe (Genesis 36:42 ; 1 Chronicles 1:53 )
Archimandrite - ) A chief of a monastery, corresponding to abbot in the Roman Catholic church
Demesne - ) A lord's chief manor place, with that part of the lands belonging thereto which has not been granted out in tenancy; a house, and the land adjoining, kept for the proprietor's own use
Sheik - ) The head of an Arab family, or of a clan or a tribe; also, the chief magistrate of an Arab village
Fathers - to the patriarchs and chief men of Israel
Jeriah - The chief of one of the Levitical courses ( 1 Chronicles 23:19 ; 1 Chronicles 24:23 ; 1 Chronicles 26:31 Tai - ) Designating, or pertaining to, the chief linguistic stock of Indo-China, including the peoples of Siamese and Shan speech
Khan - ) A king; a prince; a chief; a governor; - so called among the Tartars, Turks, and Persians, and in countries now or formerly governed by them
Mission, Sarayacu - chief Franciscan mission of the Ucayali river country in northeastern Peru, established in 1791 by Father Narciso Girbal, his first colonists being some Setebos who were joined later by other tribes. Withdrawal of government support and establishment of other missions led to its abandonment in 1863, but the town continued as the chief port of the Ucayali with a mixed Spanish and Indian population, using the Quichua language as the medium
Best - , chief, principal, first in rank or quality. See BEFORE , BEGINNING , chief , FIRST , FORMER
Sarayacu Mission - chief Franciscan mission of the Ucayali river country in northeastern Peru, established in 1791 by Father Narciso Girbal, his first colonists being some Setebos who were joined later by other tribes. Withdrawal of government support and establishment of other missions led to its abandonment in 1863, but the town continued as the chief port of the Ucayali with a mixed Spanish and Indian population, using the Quichua language as the medium
Nergal - The great dog; that is, lion, one of the chief gods of the Assyrians and Babylonians (2 Kings 17:30 ), the god of war and hunting
Aner -
A Canaanitish chief who joined his forces with those of Abraham in pursuit of Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:13,24 )
Pika - See chief hare
Premiere - ) First; chief; as, a premiere danseuse
Preterist - ) One whose chief interest is in the past; one who regards the past with most pleasure or favor
Shemuel - Son of Tola and a chief of Issachar
Shubael - Son of Heman and a chief in the service of song
Sheshan - Descended from Jerahmeel, Hezron's son, representing a chief family of Judah
Voir Dire - An oath administered to a witness, usually before being sworn in chief, requiring him to speak the truth, or make true answers in reference to matters inquired of, to ascertain his competency to give evidence
Urea - ) A very soluble crystalline body which is the chief constituent of the urine in mammals and some other animals
Eli'ah -
A Benjamite, a chief man of the tribe
Jeri'ah, - a Kohathite Levite, chief of the great house of Hebron when David organized the service
Jarrow - It became one of the chief intellectual centers of England
Uzal - A wanderer, a descendant of Joktan (Genesis 10:27 ; 1 Chronicles 1:21 ), the founder apparently of one of the Arab tribes; the name also probably of the province they occupied and of their chief city
Nebushasban - Adorer of Nebo, or Nebo saves me, the "Rabsaris," or chief chamberlain, of the court of Babylon
Duke - " This word is used to denote the phylarch or chief of a tribe (Genesis 36:15-43 ; Exodus 15:15 ; 1 Chronicles 1:51-54 )
Tartan - (tahr' tan) Title of the highest ranking Assyrian officer under the king; commander in chief; supreme commander (2 Kings 18:17 ; Isaiah 20:1 )
on (1) - Son of Peleth, chief of Reuben; took part with Korah, Dathan, etc
Premier - ) First; chief; principal; as, the premier place; premier minister
Aleph - This word signifies, prince, chief, or thousand, expressing, as it were, a leading number
Hur - A chief man among the Hebrews in the desert, associated with Aaron in upholding the hands of Moses at Rephidim, and in supplying his place while on the summit of Sinai, Exodus 17:10 ; 24:14
Chenaniah - chief of the Levites at the removal of the ark from the house of Obed-edom ( 1 Chronicles 15:22 ; 1 Chronicles 15:27 ), named among the officers and judges over Israel ( 1 Chronicles 26:29 )
Re - The chief Egyptian god, worshiped at his Temple in Thebes, credited with creating the universe and believed to have been the first pharaoh
Archbishop - ) A chief bishop; a church dignitary of the first class (often called a metropolitan or primate) who superintends the conduct of the suffragan bishops in his province, and also exercises episcopal authority in his own diocese
Archimandrite - (Greek: archos, chief; mandra, monastery) ...
Superior of a monastery in several of the Oriental Churches, including the Melchite or Uniat Greeks; also an honorary title of certain officials attached to the chanceries of the great Oriental patriarchates
Shebuel - 1 Chronicles 25:4, SHUBAEL in 1 Chronicles 25:20; chief of the 13th order or band in the temple choir
Hachmonite - ' Supposed to be the same as the TACHMONITE in 2 Samuel 23:8 (see margin ) the chief of David's valiant men
zi'za -
Son of Shiphi, a chief of the Simeonites in the reign of Hezekiah
Talitha-Cumi - the words that Jesus Christ made use of when he raised up the daughter of Jairus, chief of the synagogue of Capernaum
Zab'di-el -
Father of Jashobeam, a chief of David's guard
President - a "head"), a high officer in the Persian court, a chief, a president, used of the three highest ministers
Tar'Tan, - which occurs only in (2 Kings 18:17 ) and Isai 20:1 Has been generally regarded as a proper name; like Rabsaris and Rabshakeh, it is more probably an official designation, and indicates the Assyrian commander-in-chief
Seir - Mount Seir was the chief mountain of the land of Edom
Sosthenes - chief ruler of the synagogue at Corinth, who was beaten by the rabble
Hashub, Hasshub - A chief of the people who sealed the covenant
Damascus - The chief city of Syria; so called from Damashech, a place of blood, from Damah, blood
Know-Nothing - ) A member of a secret political organization in the United States, the chief objects of which were the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws, and the exclusive choice of native Americans for office
Adnah - The chief of the captains of thousands in the reign of Jehoshaphat
Nebuzaradan - " "Captain of the guard," literally, "chief of the slaughterers"; next to the royal person (2 Kings 25:8-18; Jeremiah 39:9-13). Assumed the chief command on arriving after the siege of Jerusalem. ) Took the chief Jews for judgment to Nebuchadnezzar at Riblah
Publican - ...
Note: For architelones, "a chief publican," see chief , B, No
Hashabiah - 1 Chronicles 26:30, one of the Hebronites (a chief Levite family sprung from Hebron, Kohath's son). Nehemiah 10:11; the "chief" (Nehemiah 12:24; Nehemiah 12:26)
Rector - ) The chief elective officer of some universities, as in France and Scotland; sometimes, the head of a college; as, the Rector of Exeter College, or of Lincoln College, at Oxford. ) The superior officer or chief of a convent or religious house; and among the Jesuits the superior of a house that is a seminary or college
Archelaus - Archelaus (är-ke-lâ'us), chief, or prince of the people. Herod bequeathed to him his kingdom, but Augustus confirmed him in the possession of only half of it—Idumea, Judea, and Samaria, with the title of ethnarch, or chief of the nation
Scriptural Patriarchs - In 1Paralipomenon 8:28, called "Chief fathers and heads of their families who dwelt in Jerusalem. " They are therefore founders and chief men of a clan
Miamin - ...
...
A chief priest who returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:5 ), called Mijamin (10:7) and Miniamin (12:17)
Engraver - The chief business of the engraver was cutting names or devices on rings and seals and signets (Exodus 28:11,21,36 ; Genesis 38:18 )
Cardinal - ) Of fundamental importance; preeminent; superior; chief; principal
Burgomaster - ) A chief magistrate of a municipal town in Holland, Flanders, and Germany, corresponding to mayor in England and the United States; a burghmaster
Perez - ) An important family of Judah, of whom one was "chief of all the captains of the host for the first month" (1 Chronicles 27:3); 468 returned from Babylon; some settled in Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:4-6)
zi'ha - ) ...
Chief of the Nethinim in Ophel
Rab-Mag - He was, as his name signifies, a chief of the magi; a dignitary who had accompanied the king of Babylon in his campaign
Obedient - ...
The chief his orders gives the obedient band, with due observance, wait the chief's command
Dalphon - ” One of ten sons of Haman, chief enemy of Mordecai and Esther
Marchi, Giuseppe - His chief works are: "Musei Kircherniani inscriptiones" and "Monumenti delle arti cristiane primitive
so'Rek - ( Judges 16:4 ) It was possibly nearer Gaza than any other of the chief Philistine cities, since thither Samson was taken after his capture at Delilah's house
Mercurius - The inhabitants of Lystra took Paul for this god because he was the "chief speaker
Ammishaddai - People of the Almighty, the father of Ahiezer, who was chief of the Danites at the time of the Exodus (Numbers 1:12 ; 2:25 )
Cony - ) The chief hare
Phichol - ” The chief captain of the Philistine army under King Abimelech (Genesis 21:22 )
Antechamber - ) A chamber or apartment before the chief apartment and leading into it, in which persons wait for audience; an outer chamber
Bilhan - A Horite chief, the son of Ezer ( Genesis 36:27 = 1 Chronicles 1:42 )
Giuseppe Marchi - His chief works are: "Musei Kircherniani inscriptiones" and "Monumenti delle arti cristiane primitive
Vitellin - ) An albuminous body, belonging to the class of globulins, obtained from yolk of egg, of which it is the chief proteid constituent, and from the seeds of many plants
a'hi -
A Gadite, chief of a family who lived in Gilead in Bashan, (1 Chronicles 5:15 ) in the days of Jotham and of Judah
Ahi-e'Zer -
Son of Ammishaddai, hereditary chieftain of the tribe of Dan. ...
The Benjamite chief of a body of archers in the time of David
Rabshakeh - a chief butler, or cupbearer
Phichol - ” The chief captain of the Philistine army under King Abimelech (Genesis 21:22 )
Hak'Koz - (thorn ), a priest, the chief of the seventh course in the service of the sanctuary, as appointed by David
Eliz'Aphan -
A Levite, son of Uzziel, chief of the house of the Kohathites at the time of the census in the wilderness of Sinai
Shemuel - Clan chief in tribe of Issachar (1 Chronicles 7:2 )
Fisherman, the - Our Lord said He would make them fishers of men (Luke 5); this term designates especially their chief, Peter, and his successors
Amalek - Dweller in a valley, the son of Eliphaz and grandson of Esau (Genesis 36:12 ; 1 Chronicles 1:36 ); the chief of an Idumean tribe (Genesis 36:16 )
Doeg - Fearful, an Edomite, the chief overseer of Saul's flocks (1 Samuel 21:7 )
Cardinal - One of the chief governors of the Romish church, by whom the pope is elected out of their own number, which contains six bishops, fifty priests, and fourteen deacons: these constitute the sacred college, and are chosen by the pope
Geshem - Or Gashmu, firmness, probably chief of the Arabs south of Palestine, one of the enemies of the Jews after the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 2:19 ; 6:1,2 )
Zophar - ]'>[1] as ‘king of the Minæans’ ( Job 2:11 ); probably the chief of a tribe on the borders of Idumæa
Dissenters - They are divided into several parties; the chief of which are the Presbyterians, Independents, Baptists, Quakers, and Methodists
Selfish - ) Believing or teaching that the chief motives of human action are derived from love of self
Mitylene - ” chief city of the Aegean island of Lesbos southeast of Asia Minor
Hodaviah - A chief of Manasseh on the east of the Jordan
Epher - A chief of Manasseh, east of the Jordan
Headquarters - ) The quarters or place of residence of any chief officer, as the general in command of an army, or the head of a police force; the place from which orders or instructions are issued; hence, the center of authority or order
Pontiff - ) The chief priest
Demiurge - ) The chief magistrate in some of the Greek states
Accessary - , uniting in, or contributing to, a crime, but not as chief actor
Ahiezer - Benjamite, chief of the armed men that flocked to David at Ziklag 1 Chronicles 12:3
Nebuzar-Adan - a general of Nebuchadnezzar's army, and the chief officer of his household
Eli'Asaph - ) ...
A levite, and "chief of the Gershonites" at the same time
Nahshon or Naasson - One of our Lord's ancestors, Matthew 1:4 Luke 3:32 ; chief of the tribe of Judah in the desert, Numbers 1:7 2:3 7:12 ; and brother-in-law of Aaron, Exodus 6:23 Ruth 4:20 1 Chronicles 2:10
Nain - Where Christ performed one of his chief miracles, in raising to life a widow's only son, Luke 7:11-17 , was a small village in Galilee, three miles south by west of Mount Tabor: It is now a petty hamlet, called Nein
Mij'Amin -
The chief of the sixth of the twenty-four courses of priests established by David
Bithyn'ia - Mentioned only in (Acts 16:7 ) and in 1 Peter 1:1 The chief town of Bithynia was Nicaea, celebrated for the general Council of the Church held there in A
Engraver - His chief business was cutting names or devices on rings and seals; the only notices of engraving are in connection with the high priest's dress --the two onyx stones, the twelve jewels and the mitre-plate having inscriptions on them
Nehiloth - The title of (Psalm 5:1 ) in the Authorized Version is rendered "To the chief musician upon Nehiloth
Metz, Arnulf of, Saint - A chief minister of Theodebert II, King of Austrasia, he married, and had two sons. After being chief adviser of the young King Dagobert, he resigned all his offices and ended his life in monastic solitude
Meshullam -
One of the chief Gadites in Bashan in the time of Jotham (1 Chronicles 5:13 ). ...
...
A chief priest (Nehemiah 12:16 )
Nethaneel -
The son of Zuar, chief of the tribe of Issachar at the Exodus (Numbers 1:8 ; 2:5 ). ...
...
A chief Levite in the time of Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:9 )
Chief - ) Principal or most eminent in any quality or action; most distinguished; having most influence; taking the lead; most important; as, the chief topic of conversation; the chief interest of man. It is supposed to be composed of the dexter, sinister, and middle chiefs
Arnulf of Metz, Saint - A chief minister of Theodebert II, King of Austrasia, he married, and had two sons. After being chief adviser of the young King Dagobert, he resigned all his offices and ended his life in monastic solitude
Potiphar - Potiphar seems to be entitled ‘chief cook’ (EV Adino - "The Tachmonite that sat in the seat, chief among the captains; the same was Adino the Eznite. In 1 Chronicles 11:11 the chief of the captains is Jashobeam an Hachmonite, or son of Hachmoni, margin. ' Jashobeam may therefore have died and Adino become chief in his place
Phicol - Great, the chief captain of the army of Abimelech, the Philistine king of Gerar
Kabzeel - Gathering of God, a city in the extreme south of Judah, near to Idumaea (Joshua 15:21 ), the birthplace of Benaiah, one of David's chief warriors (2 Samuel 23:20 ; 1 Chronicles 11:22 )
Collodion - It is strongly adhesive, and is used by surgeons as a coating for wounds; but its chief application is as a vehicle for the sensitive film in photography
Conaniah - A chief of the Levites in Josiah’s reign ( 2 Chronicles 35:9 ); called in Esther 1:9 Esther 1:9 Jeconias
Pensionary - ) One of the chief magistrates of towns in Holland
Hakkoz - The chief of the seventh course of priests
Onfalonier - ) The chief magistrate of any one of several republics in mediaeveal Italy
Monarchy - ) A system of government in which the chief ruler is a monarch
Ar - The chief city of Moab, on the east of the Salt Sea; called also Aroer, Deuteronomy 2:36; sometimes used for the whole land of Moab, Deuteronomy 2:29; burned by Sihon
Carchemish - A chief city of northern Syria, on the Euphrates, where a great and decisive battle was fought, in which Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh-necho
Chu'Shan-Rishatha'im - (chief of two governments ), the king of Mesopotamia who oppressed Israel during eight years in the generation immediately following Joshua
Pharez - "The chief of all the captains of the host" was of the children of Perez (1 Chronicles 27:3 ; Matthew 1:3 )
Pethahiah -
The chief of one of the priestly courses (the nineteenth) in the time of David (1 Chronicles 24:16 )
Shinar - Its chief towns were Babel, Erech and Accad, and its most famous warrior was Nimrod (Genesis 10:9-10; Genesis 11:1-9; Genesis 14:1; Isaiah 11:11; Daniel 1:2)
Rosh - (rohssh) Personal name meaning, “head” or “chief
Seljukian - ) Of or pertaining to Seljuk, a Tartar chief who embraced Mohammedanism, and began the subjection of Western Asia to that faith and rule; of or pertaining to the dynasty founded by him, or the empire maintained by his descendants from the 10th to the 13th century
Cid - ) chief or commander; in Spanish literature, a title of Ruy Diaz, Count of Bivar, a champion of Christianity and of the old Spanish royalty, in the 11th century
Figurehead - ) A person who allows his name to be used to give standing to enterprises in which he has no responsible interest or duties; a nominal, but not real, head or chief
Futurist - ) One whose chief interests are in what is to come; one who anxiously, eagerly, or confidently looks forward to the future; an expectant
Dine - ) To give a dinner to; to furnish with the chief meal; to feed; as, to dine a hundred men
Archiparaphonista - A chief officer of the man Schola Oantorum (school of singers)
Hessians - They were converted by Saints Lubentius and Goar, but their chief missionary was Saint Boniface
Aaronites - Eleazar (Numbers 3:32 ), and at a later period Zadok (1 Chronicles 27:17 ), was their chief
Overman - ) One in authority over others; a chief; usually, an overseer or boss
a'Mon, or a'Men - ( Nahum 3:8 ) Amen was one of the eight gods of the first order and chief of the triad of Thebes
Heman - A Kohathite Levite, to whom as a chief musicians of the temple of the eighty-eighty Psalm is inscribed, 1 Chronicles 6:33 ; 16:41,42
Jasho'be-am - (to whom the people turn ), named first among the chief of the mighty men of David
Forest - Although Palestine has never been in historical times a woodland country, yet there can be no doubt that there was much more wood formerly than there is a t present, and that the destruction of the forests was one of the chief causes of the present desolation
Centurion - However, the chief centurion of a legion. known as the ‘centurion of the first (chief) pike,’ was sometimes promoted to the equestrian order
Damascene, John, Saint - His father, though a Christian, was esteemed by his Saracen countrymen, and was chief financial officer for the caliph. John was educated by the monk Cosmas; after his father's death he was made chief councilor of Damascus
John Damascene, Saint - His father, though a Christian, was esteemed by his Saracen countrymen, and was chief financial officer for the caliph. John was educated by the monk Cosmas; after his father's death he was made chief councilor of Damascus
Primary - ) First in dignity or importance; chief; principal; as, primary planets; a matter of primary importance. ) That which stands first in order, rank, or importance; a chief matter
Gaza - The chief of the five cities of the Philistines, 60 miles southwest of Jerusalem, 3 miles from the Mediterranean, now called Ghŭzzeh. Gaza was peopled by the descendants of Ham, Genesis 10:19; by the Anakim, Joshua 11:22; given to Judah, Judges 16:1-3148; the scene of Samson's exploits, 1664057491_1; under Solomon's rule and called Azzah, 1 Kings 4:24; smitten by Egypt, Jeremiah 47:1; Jeremiah 47:5; prophesied against, Amos 1:6-7; Zephaniah 2:4; Zechariah 9:5; noticed in New Testament only in Acts 8:26; a chief stronghold of paganism and the worship of the god Dagon
Cos - (cahss) Island and its chief city between Miletus and Rhodes where Paul landed briefly on his return voyage after his third missionary journey (Acts 21:1 )
Denzinger, Heinrich Joseph Dominicus - His best-known work is his "Enchiridion," or handbook of the chief conciliar decrees, with a list of condemned propositions
Maestro di Camera Del Papa - Title of one of the four palace prelates, actual chief chamberlain of the Vatican
Castro Palao, Fernando - His chief work is "Opus Morale
Raish lakish - He possessed extraordinary physical strength and was originally the chief of a gang of robbers
Metheg-Ammah - Bridle of the mother, a figurative name for a chief city, as in 2 Samuel 8:1 , "David took Metheg-ammah out of the hand of the Philistines" (RSV, "took the bridle of the mother-city"); i
Shaalabbin - It was one of the chief towns from which Solomon drew his supplies (1 Kings 4:9 )
Eliel -
A chief of Manasseh, on the east of Jordan (1 Chronicles 5:24 )
Ahihud - chief of the tribe of Asher; one of those appointed by Moses to superintend the division of Canaan among the tribe (Numbers 34:27 )
Uriel - chief of the Levites assisting in David's transport of the ark to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 6:24 ; 1Chronicles 15:5,1 Chronicles 15:11 ); 2
Ashpenaz - (assh' peh naz) chief eunuch guarding the family of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon (605-562 B
Amyl Alcohol - Any of eight isomeric liquid compounds, C5H11OH; ordinarily, a mixture of two of these forming a colorless liquid with a peculiar cough-exciting odor and burning taste, the chief constituent of fusel oil
Hellenism - ) The type of character of the ancient Greeks, who aimed at culture, grace, and amenity, as the chief elements in human well-being and perfection
Emerald - Avery precious gem of a pure green color, to which it owes its chief value, as the deepest colors are the most esteemed
Lictor - His duty was to attend the chief magistrates when they appeared in public, to clear the way, and cause due respect to be paid to them, also to apprehend and punish criminals
Duke - In Genesis 36:15-43 , is a long list of "dukes" of Edom; but the word duke, from the Latin dux, merely signifies a leader, and not an order of nobility; and the word chief or sheikh would have been preferable in our translation, 1 Chronicles 1:51
Heinrich Denzinger - His best-known work is his "Enchiridion," or handbook of the chief conciliar decrees, with a list of condemned propositions
Asiar'Chae - (chief of Asia ) (Authorized Version; ( Acts 19:31 ) ), officers chosen annually by the cities of that part of the province of Asia of which Ephesus was, under Roman government, the metropolis
Capital - ) First in importance; chief; principal. ) chief, in a political sense, as being the seat of the general government of a state or nation; as, Washington and Paris are capital cities. ) The seat of government; the chief city or town in a country; a metropolis
Captain - the Lord is called 'Captain' of our salvation, ἀρχηγός, 'chief leader. ...
THE chief CAPTAIN or HIGH CAPTAIN is χιλίαρχος, lit. 'Captain of a thousand,' applied to the chief of the soldiers in Jerusalem
Potiphar - "An officer (chamberlain) of Pharaoh, chief of the executioners," i. The prison in which he confined Joseph was an apartment arched, vaulted, and rounded (ha-sohar ) for strength (called a "dungeon," Genesis 40:15), in the house of the chief of the executioners (Genesis 40:3). There seems little ground for thinking that Potiphar was succeeded by another "chief of the executioners," "the keeper of the prison" was entrusted by Potiphar with Joseph
Chief - Abir means the powerful one and is used of the chief of Saul's shepherds ( 1 Samuel 21:7 ). Nasi' is a sheikh or tribal chief ( Numbers 25:18 ; Joshua 22:14 ). Attud is a ram or he-goat and is used metaphorically for a chief or leader ( Isaiah 14:9 ; Zechariah 10:3 ). Rab means numerous or great and is used in several compound words to represent the chief or greatest one ( 2 Kings 18:17 ; Jeremiah 39:13 ; Daniel 5:11 ). ...
In the New Testament the Greek word arche means beginning or chief and is used in several compound words to represent the chief priest or ruler ( Matthew 2:4 ; Matthew 16:21 ; Luke 11:15 ; Luke 19:2 ; John 12:42 ; Acts 18:8 ; Acts 19:31 ; 1 Peter 5:4 )
Hermes - Paul's role as chief speaker made the Lystrans think of Hermes
Amasai - chief of the captains of those who resorted to David at Ziklag
Uriel - ...
...
The chief of the Kohathites at the time when the ark was brought up to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:5,11 )
Myra - One of the chief towns of Lycia, in Asia Minor, about 2 1/2 miles from the coast (Acts 27:5 )
Crispus - The chief ruler of the Jewish synagogue at Corinth ( Acts 18:8 )
Andrada, Antonio de - For four years he was the chief Jesuit missionary in the Indies
Samlah - From separate cities being assigned to most of the Edomite kings it is supposed Edom was a confederacy of tribes, and the chief city of the reigning tribe was capital of the whole
Ater - A chief of the people who sealed the covenant
Hashum - A chief of the people who sealed the covenant
Rosh - The same Hebrew word occurs in Ezekiel 38:2 and Ezekiel 39:1 , which, though frequently translated 'chief,' is now treated in these passages as a proper name reading 'prince of Rosh,' as in the R
Sherebiah - A Levite who with his sons and brethren returned from exile: he assisted Ezra, sealed the covenant, and was a chief of the choir
Archdeacon - (Greek: archos, chief; diakonos, servant) ...
Formerly an important official who, in virtue of jurisdiction delegated by his bishop, administered part of a diocese; today his duties are performed by the vicar-general and vicars-forane (rural deans)
Zur - Midianite tribal chief (Numbers 25:15 NIV) whose daughter, Cozbi, was killed along with an Israelite man by Phinehas
Para Rubber - It is usually exported in flat round cakes, and is a chief variety of commercial India rubber
Volute - ) A spiral scroll which forms the chief feature of the Ionic capital, and which, on a much smaller scale, is a feature in the Corinthian and Composite capitals
Mamre - An Amorite chieftain, who, with his brothers Aner and Eshcol, was confederate with Abram. Place connected with Machpelah and Hebron, the name of which is derived from the above chief
Rabsaris - This, like Rab-mag, is a title, its meaning being 'chief eunuch
Shekel - It was also the name of the chief silver coin of the Hebrews, and is mentioned in the Bible (Genesis 24; Exodus 30 ; 2 Kings 14)
Makkedah - A chief city of the Canaanites, near which five confederate kings were defeated, taken in the cave to which they had fled, and executed
Rab-Shakeh - chief butler or cup-bearer, an officer sent from Lachish by Sennacherib king of Assyria, to summon Hezekiah to surrender; which message he delivered in a most audacious and insolent manner
Lys'Ias Clau'Dius, - a chief captain of the band, that is, tribune of the Roman cohort who rescued St
Maaseiah - sar, rendered elsewhere in the Authorized Version "prince," "chief captain," chief ruler") of Jerusalem
Publican - Zacchaeus is called a “chief among the publicans” (Luke 19:2 ), probably indicating one who contracted with the government to collect taxes, and who in turn hired others to do the actual work. In New Testament times people bid for the job of chief tax collector and then exacted the tax plus a profit from the citizens
Henry de Bracton - It is uncertain whether he was ever chief justice, though he often pleaded before Henry III. His chief work, "On the Laws and Customs of England," written sometime before 1259, is the greatest medieval treatise on English law and was often quoted by Coke
Henry de Bratton - It is uncertain whether he was ever chief justice, though he often pleaded before Henry III. His chief work, "On the Laws and Customs of England," written sometime before 1259, is the greatest medieval treatise on English law and was often quoted by Coke
Rabshakeh - This is a title, signifying 'chief cup-bearer,' borne by an officer who was sent by Sennacherib with the Tartan (general) and a Rab-saris to Jerusalem. He was the chief spokesman; and from the fact of his being able to speak in the Jews' language, he is supposed to have been either a proselyte or an apostate Jew
Sympathy: Fruit of Experience - Hone in his 'Year Book,' has the following anecdote of Charles Pratt, Earl Camden, when chief Justice of the Common Pleas. The chief Justice sat down upon them, and after awhile, having a mind to know what the punishment was, he asked his companion to open them and put him in. In the meantime, the chief Justice being tired of the stocks, tried in vain to release himself. The chief Justice rose, and, leaning over the bench, said, in a half-whisper, 'Brother, have you ever been in the stocks?' 'Really, my lord, never
Capital - Figuratively, as the head is the highest part of a man, chief principal first in importance as a capital city or town the capital articles of religion. Great, important, though perhaps not chief as, a town possesses capital advantages for trade. ...
A capital city or town is the metropolis or chief city of an empire, kingdom, state or province. The chief city or town in a kingdom or state a metropolis
Zebul - ...
Chief man of Shechem; Abimelech's officer, acting for his interests against the native Canaanites and (See GAAL
Bureaucracy - ) A system of carrying on the business of government by means of departments or bureaus, each under the control of a chief, in contradiction to a system in which the officers of government have an associated authority and responsibility; also, government conducted on this system
Hadad - Hadad was also the name of the chief deity of the Ugaritic pantheon
Rephaiah - A Simeonite chief ( 1 Chronicles 4:42 )
Cellarer - Medieval name for the chief purveyor of foodstuffs and drinks for the use of a monastic community
Sup - 1: δειπνέω (Strong's #1172 — Verb — deipneo — dipe-neh'-o ) "to sup" (said of taking the chief meal of the day), occurs in Luke 17:8 ; 22:20 (in the best texts), lit
ti'Dal - ) He is called "king of nations," from which we may conclude that he was a chief over various nomadic tribes who inhabited different portions of Mesopotamia at different seasons of the year, as do the Arabs at the present day
Jarib - Sent unto Iddo the chief at Casiphia, and to his brethren the Nethinims, to procure ministers for the house of God
Primacy - ) The office, rank, or character of a primate; the chief ecclesiastical station or dignity in a national church; the office or dignity of an archbishop; as, the primacy of England
Preside - ; to direct, control, and regulate, as chief officer; as, to preside at a public meeting; to preside over the senate
Ira - A Jairite, one of David's chief officers
Albumin - ) A thick, viscous nitrogenous substance, which is the chief and characteristic constituent of white of eggs and of the serum of blood, and is found in other animal substances, both fluid and solid, also in many plants
Jehozabad - A Benjamite chief ( 2 Chronicles 17:18 )
Amasa - A kinsman of David, and chief captain in Absalom's rebel army
Pamphylia - " The chief city of Pamphylia was Perga, where Paul and Barnabas preached, Acts 13:13 ; 14:24
Seraiah - The last is termed "a quiet prince" or "chief chamberlain
Muth-Labben - "To the chief musician upon Muth-labben" is the title of (Psalm 9:1 ) which has given rise to infinite conjecture
Jehon'Adab - (whom Jehovah impels ) and Jon'adab, the son of Rechab, founder of the Rechabites, an Arab chief
ge'Shem - ) We may conclude that he was an inhabitant of Arabia Petraea or of the Arabian desert, and probably the chief of a tribe
Cassiterite - It is the chief source of metallic tin
Ariel -
One of the chief men sent by Ezra to procure Levites for the sanctuary (Ezra 8:16 )
Jerah - The moon was the chief god in South Arabia
Cupbearer - Rabshakek was "chief cupbearer" in Sennacherib's court (Isaiah 36:2), as his name implies
Dishan - ...
A Horite chief and son of Seir (Genesis 36:21 ,Genesis 36:21,36:28 ,Genesis 36:28,36:30 )
Rabmag - Εmga means "priest," so Rabmag is "chief priest
Mordecai - Between them, Mordecai and Esther saved the Jewish people from threatened destruction, and Mordecai later became the Emperor’s chief minister (Esther 10:3)
Kushaiah - His son Ethan was appointed as a chief assistant of Heman (1 Chronicles 15:17 )
Almodad - His name is preserved in El-Mudad, famous in Arab history, reputed father of Ishmael's Arab wife, Mir-at-ez-Zeman, and chief of Jarhum, a Joktanite tribe that passed from Yemen to the vicinity of Mekkeh
Abased - ...
In heraldry, it is used of the wings of eagles, when the tops are turned downwards towards the point of the shield or when the wings are shut, the natural way of bearing them being spread, with the top pointing to the chief of the angle
Alpha - It was formerly used also to denote chief as, Plato was the Alpha of the wits
Crater - ) The basinlike opening or mouth of a volcano, through which the chief eruption comes; similarly, the mouth of a geyser, about which a cone of silica is often built up
Erosion - The chief agent of erosion is running water; minor agents are glaciers, the wind, and waves breaking against the coast
Guni - A Gadite chief ( 1 Chronicles 5:15 )
Abilene - A plain, a district lying on the east slope of the Anti-Lebanon range; so called from its chief town, Abila (Luke 3:1 ), which stood in the Suk Wady Barada, between Heliopolis (Baalbec) and Damascus, 38 miles from the former and 18 from the latter
Aldhelm, Saint - His chief prose work was a treatise in praise of virginity
ar - A chief city in the Moabite territory
a'bi-el -
Father of Kish, and consequently grandfather of Saul, (1 Samuel 9:1 ) as well as of Abner, Saul's commander-in-chief
Legion, - the chief subdivision of the Roman army, containing about 6000 infantry, with a contingent of cavalry
Hor'Mah - (a place laid waste ), or ZEPHATH , (Judges 1:17 ) was the chief town of a king of a Canaanitish tribe on the south of Palestine, which was reduced by Joshua, and became a city of the territory of Judah, (Joshua 15:30 ; 1 Samuel 30:30 ) but apparently belonged to Simeon
Rab-Mag, - [1] (it probably means chief of the magi ; at all events it was "an office of great power and dignity at the Babylonian court, and probably gave its possessor special facilities for gaining the throne
Penny, Pennyworth - ( Matthew 20:2 ; 22:10 ; Mark 6:37 ; 12:15 ; Luke 20:24 ; John 6:7 ; Revelation 6:6 ) The denarius was the chief Roman silver coin, and was worth about 15 to 17 cents
Acolyte - His chief duties are to arrange the elements on the Credence, tolight the candles, receive the offerings and present them, andalso the Bread, Wine and water, to the Priest at the proper timein the Celebration
Eunuch - The chief of Pharaoh's cupbearers, and the chief of his cooks, were eunuchs; Potiphar was an "eunuch" (so Hebrew of "officer") of Pharaoh's (Genesis 37:36; Genesis 37:41). So the Assyrian Rabsaris, or chief eunuch (2 Kings 18:17)
Eneral - ) The chief of an order of monks, or of all the houses or congregations under the same rule. ) The whole; the total; that which comprehends or relates to all, or the chief part; - opposed to particular. ) One of the chief military officers of a government or country; the commander of an army, of a body of men not less than a brigade
Rosh - "Chief" (Ezekiel 38:2-3; Ezekiel 39:1). Hengstenberg supports KJV: "Magog was Gog's original kingdom, though he acquired also Meshech and Tubal, so as to be called their 'chief prince
a'Riel -
One of the "chief men" who under Ezra directed the caravan which he led back from Babylon to Jerusalem. (Isaiah 29:1,2,7 ) We must understand by it either "lion of God," as the chief city, or "hearth of God," a synonym for the altar of burnt offering
Eli'el - (1 Chronicles 6:34 ) ...
A chief man in the tribe of Benjamin. (1 Chronicles 8:20 ) ...
Also a Benjamite chief
cy'Prus, - Its two chief cities were Salamis, at the east end of the island, and Paphos, at the west end. It was one of the chief seats of the worship of Venus, hence called Cypria
Jaddua - One of the chief of the people who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah
Majordomo - (Latin: major, elder; domus, house) ...
The chief governor of the papal household, formerly Prefect of the Apostolic Palace, whose principal office is to supervise religious functions at which the pope and his court assist, to draw up nominations to court offices or posts of honor in the Vatican, and to act as Governor of the Conclave during a vacancy
Ethiopian Eunuch - The chief officer or prime minister of state of Candace (q
Kirjath-Sannah - ), a Canaanitish royal city included in Judah (Joshua 10:38 ; 15:49 ), and probably the chief seat of learning among the Hittites
Cos - The chief town was on the N
Neginoth - The "chief musician on Neginoth" is the leader of that part of the temple choir which played on stringed instruments
Chromium - Its chief commercial importance is for its compounds, as potassium chromate, lead chromate, etc
Mass Priest - From the 16th century, a contemptuous designation for priests among Reformers in England, when the Mass was the chief object of their hatred
Beelzebub - In Luke 11, he is called chief of the demons
Nahath - Edomite clan chief (Genesis 36:13 ,Genesis 36:13,36:17 ; 1 Chronicles 1:37 )
Acephalous - ) Without a leader or chief
Provost - ) A person who is appointed to superintend, or preside over, something; the chief magistrate in some cities and towns; as, the provost of Edinburgh or of Glasgow, answering to the mayor of other cities; the provost of a college, answering to president; the provost or head of certain collegiate churches
Penny, - It was the chief Roman silver coin
Duke - ) A leader; a chief; a prince
Duenna - ) The chief lady in waiting on the queen of Spain
Arba - see), where was a chief seat of the Anakim
Tithingman - ) The chief man of a tithing; a headborough; one elected to preside over the tithing
Allon - chief of a family descended from Simeon
Melita - Paul cured the father of the chief man and many others
Mimicry - ) Protective resemblance; the resemblance which certain animals and plants exhibit to other animals and plants or to the natural objects among which they live, - a characteristic which serves as their chief means of protection against enemies; imitation; mimesis; mimetism
me'Theg-am'Mah - of Gath, the chief town of the Philistines
Jaddu'a - ) ...
One of the chief of the people who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah
Amasai - A chief of the captains who joined David in the desert
Baal - (Hebrew: lord, owner; plural: Baale or Baalim) The chief divinity, the sun god, of the Chanaanites and the Arameans; also the name of the principal deity worshiped by certain nations or communities
Baale - (Hebrew: lord, owner; plural: Baale or Baalim) The chief divinity, the sun god, of the Chanaanites and the Arameans; also the name of the principal deity worshiped by certain nations or communities
Baalim - (Hebrew: lord, owner; plural: Baale or Baalim) The chief divinity, the sun god, of the Chanaanites and the Arameans; also the name of the principal deity worshiped by certain nations or communities
Baaloth - (Hebrew: lord, owner; plural: Baale or Baalim) The chief divinity, the sun god, of the Chanaanites and the Arameans; also the name of the principal deity worshiped by certain nations or communities
Parosh - This Parosh was likely the chief member of the family above
Persepolis - The chief capital of the ancient kings of Persia, chosen as such by Darius Hystaspis (b
Ar - (a city ), or Ar of Moab, one of the chief places of Moab
Neginah - "The chief musician on Neginoth " was therefore the conductor of that portion of the temple-choir who played upon the stringed instruments, and who are mentioned in ( Psalm 68:25 )
Ituraea - The present Jedur comprehends the chief part of Ituraea
Jehoiada - The only one concerning whom it speaks in any detail is the chief priest in Jerusalem who was the main influence for good in the life of the Judean king Jehoash (or Joash) (2 Chronicles 22:10-12; 2 Chronicles 23; 2 Chronicles 24:1-25; for details see JEHOASH)
Herdsman - David's herd-masters were among his chief officers of state. The daughters also of wealthy chiefs were wont to tend the flocks of the family (Genesis 29:9 ; Exodus 2:16 ). The "chief of the herdsmen" was in the time of the monarchy an officer of high rank (1 Samuel 21:7 ; Compare 1 Chronicles 27:29 )
Mesech - Gog's chief vassal, ideal representative of the pagan barbarian world. Magog was Gog's original kingdom; he acquired also Mesech and Tubal, becoming their "chief prince" ("rest"; the Scythian Τauri and the Araxes were called Rhos , from whence Russia)
Hall - ) The chief room in a castle or manor house, and in early times the only public room, serving as the place of gathering for the lord's family with the retainers and servants, also for cooking and eating. ) A name given to many manor houses because the magistrate's court was held in the hall of his mansion; a chief mansion house
Captain - ) A head, or chief officer...
(4):...
(n. ) chief; superior
Corner Stone - In 1 Corinthians 3:11 we are told "other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ;" and in Ephesians 2:20 we read "Jesus Christ himself being the chief corner stone. " Thus the Lord Jesus is the chief corner stone that binds all together, and is the foundation upon which all rests
Jehiel - One of David’s chief musicians ( 1 Chronicles 15:18 ; 1 Chronicles 15:20 ; 1 Chronicles 16:5 ). A chief of the Levites ( 1 Chronicles 23:8 ; 1 Chronicles 29:8 )
Abishai - He was the chief of the second rank of the three "mighties" (2 Samuel 23:18,19 ; 1 Chronicles 11:20,21 ); and on one occasion withstood 300 men, and slew them with his own spear (2 Samuel 23:18 ). Abishai is the name of the Semitic chief who offers gifts to the lord of Beni-Hassan
Pahath Moab - ) Head of a chief house of Judah. Their chief signed second among the lay princes (Nehemiah 10:14)
Parthians - Selencia was a chief city, also Hecatompylon. Horsemen and bowmen were their chief force, expert in terribly injuring any enemy who durst follow them in flight
Main - ) Principal; chief; first in size, rank, importance, etc. ) The chief or principal part; the main or most important thing
Archangel - 1: ἀρχάγγελος (Strong's #743 — Noun Masculine — archangelos — ar-khang'-el-os ) "is not found in the OT, and in the NT only in 1 Thessalonians 4:16 and Jude 1:9 , where it is used of Michael, who in Daniel is called 'one of the chief princes,' and 'the great prince' (Sept. Whether there are other beings of this exalted rank in the heavenly hosts, Scripture does not say, though the description 'one of the chief princes' suggests that this may be the case; cp
Libya - The part adjoining Egypt was sometimes called Libya Marmarica; and that around Cyrene, Cyrenaica, from its chief city; or Pentapolitana, from its chief city; or Pentapolitana, from its five cities, Cyrene, Apollonia, Berenice, Arsinoe, and Ptolemais
Eli - At the time when Eli was chief priest and chief administrator in Israel, the tabernacle was at Shiloh, in central Israel
Captain - , a "captain" or "chief captain," Mark 6:21 ; Revelation 6:15 ; 19:18 . ...
2: στρατηγός (Strong's #4755 — Noun Masculine — strategos — strat-ay-gos' ) originally the commander of an army (from stratos, "an army," and ago, "to lead"), came to denote "a civil commander, a governor" (Latin, duumvir), the highest magistrate, or any civil officer in chief command, Acts 16:20,22,35,36,38 ; also the "chief captain" of the Temple, himself a Levite, having command of the Levites who kept guard in and around the Temple, Luke 22:4,52 ; Acts 4:1 ; 5:24,26
Batanists - Their head and chief seems to have been Hassan Sabah, who made fanatical slaves of his subjects. They believed the Holy Ghost resided in their chief; that the orders proceeded from God himself, and were real declaration of his will. This chief, from his exalted residence on Mount Lebanon, was called the old man of the mountain; who, like a vindictive deity, with the thunderbolt in his hand, sent inevitable death to all quarters, so that even kings trembled at his sanguinary power. At the command of their chief, they made no difficulty of stabbing any prince, even on his throne; and for that purpose conformed to the dress and religion of the country that they might be less suspected
Saltpetre - It is a strong oxidizer, is the chief constituent of gunpowder, and is also used as an antiseptic in curing meat, and in medicine as a diuretic, diaphoretic, and refrigerant
Larrey, Baron Dominique Jean - Surgeon-in-chief of the Napoleonic armies and favorite of the Emperor by whom he was ennobled on the field of Wagram, 1809
Chief Priest - Finally, the heads of the 24 courses of priests organized by David may have been called chief priests
Julius Garesche - During the Civil War as chief of staff to General Rosecrans he fell at the battle of Stone River
Mitylene - The chief city of the island of Lesbos, on its east coast, in the AEgean Sea
Chapter - The chief or head of the chapter is the dean; the body consists of canons or prebendaries
Rabmag - Assyrian Rab-mugi, "chief physician," "who was attached to the king (Jeremiah 39:3,13 ), the title of one of Sennacherib's officers sent with messages to Hezekiah and the people of Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17-19:13 ;; Isaiah 36:12-37:13 )) demanding the surrender of the city
Zaccur - ...
...
A son of Asaph, and chief of one of the courses of singers as arranged by David (1 Chronicles 25:2,10 )
Nimrod - He established an empire in Shinar, the classical Babylonia, the chief towns being Babel, Erech, Accad, and Calneh: and extended this empire northward along the course of the Tigris over Assyria, where he founded a second group of capitals, Nineveh, Rehoboth, Calah, and Resen
Rab-Mag - The first element (rab ) means, “chief
Thebes - Thebes (called No in KJV) was the center of worship for the god Amon, a chief deity in Egyptian religion
Rabsaris - ("chief eunuch"), often a minister of state or a commander in expeditions (margin, 2 Kings 25:19)
Puisne - ) Younger or inferior in rank; junior; associate; as, a chief justice and three puisne justices of the Court of Common Pleas; the puisne barons of the Court of Exchequer
Disapprove - ) To refuse official approbation to; to disallow; to decline to sanction; as, the sentence of the court-martial was disapproved by the commander in chief
Altruism - (Latin: alter, other) Unselfish interest in another; a theory of conduct propounded by the French philosopher, Auguste Comte (1798- 1857), according to which only actions having for their object the happiness of others possess a moral value; the theory that the chief good and the supreme end of conduct are to be found only in disinterested devotion to the welfare of others
Ahiezer - The chief of the Benjamite archers who joined David at Ziklag ( 1 Chronicles 12:1-3 )
Await - Betwixt the rocky pillars, Gabriel sat, ...
chief of the Angelic guards, awaiting night
Garesche, Julius Peter - During the Civil War as chief of staff to General Rosecrans he fell at the battle of Stone River
Barony - ) In Ireland, a territorial division, corresponding nearly to the English hundred, and supposed to have been originally the district of a native chief
Adino - ” chief of David's captains who slew 800 men at one time (2 Samuel 23:8 )
Yuman - The Yuma, Maricopa, Mohave, Walapi, and Yavapai are among the chief tribes, all of fine physique
Lem'Uel - Others regard him as king or chief of an Arab tribe dwelling on the borders of Palestine, and elder brother of Agur, whose name stands at the head of (Proverbs 30:1 )
Landscape - ) A picture representing a scene by land or sea, actual or fancied, the chief subject being the general aspect of nature, as fields, hills, forests, water
Chenaniah - chief of the Levites under David who instructed people in singing and played a leading role in bringing the ark back to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:22 , 1 Chronicles 15:27 )
Satan - (Hebrew: an adversary, enemy) ...
Name for the chief demon or devil (1Par 5), frequently used as a common noun in the Old Testament (3Kings 5)
Sosthenes - The chief of the synagogue at Corinth, who was beaten by the Gentiles when the Jews carried Paul before Gallio the proconsul, Acts 18:17
Amasa'i, - (burdensome )
A Kohathite, father of Mahath and ancestor of Samuel (1 Chronicles 6:25,35 ) ...
Chief of the captains of Judah and Benjamin, who deserted to David while an outlaw at Ziklag
Rab'Saris - (chief of the eunuchs )
Cupbearer, - (Nehemiah 1:11 ) The chief cupbearer, or butler, to the king of Egypt was the means of raising Joseph to his high position
Jahaziel - ...
...
A Benjamite chief who joined David at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12:4 )
Caphar, - To us its chief interest arises from its forming a part of the name of Capernaum, i
Wall Street - It is the chief financial center of the United States, hence the name is often used for the money market and the financial interests of the country
Francesco Guicciardini - His chief work is a history of Italy from 1492 to 1534
Perez - "The chief of all the captains of the host for the first month" in the reign of David was taken from his family (1 Chronicles 27:3 )
Beth-Barah - It was probably the chief ford of the Jordan in that district, and may have been that by which Jacob crossed when he returned from Mesopotamia, near the Jabbok (Genesis 32:22 ), and at which Jephthah slew the Ephraimites (Judges 12:4 )
Principal - See chief , A
Ammiel - chief man of the tribe of Dan sent to search the land
Ammihud - "
The father of the Ephraimite chief Elishama, at the time of the Exodus (Numbers 1:10 ; 2:18 ; 7:48,53 )
Rogereens - So called from John Rogers their chief leader
Bailiff - ) Originally, a person put in charge of something especially, a chief officer, magistrate, or keeper, as of a county, town, hundred, or castle; one to whom power/ of custody or care are intrusted
Superintendent - He is the chief pastor, and has the direction of all the inferior pastors within his district or diocess
Banner - ) A kind of flag attached to a spear or pike by a crosspiece, and used by a chief as his standard in battle
Zanoah - The Rabbis interpret "Jekuthiel was chief of Zanoach," referring to No
Ruling - ) Predominant; chief; reigning; controlling; as, a ruling passion; a ruling sovereign
Guicciardini, Francesco - His chief work is a history of Italy from 1492 to 1534
Chemosh - One of the chief gods of the Moabites and the Ammonites, the worship of which was introduced at Jerusalem by Solomon, and abolished by Josiah
Jeduthun - Son of Berechiah, a Levite, and one of David's chief musicians; he is also called the king's seer
Jeremoth - A chief man among the Benjamites
Ambrosius of Greece - Ambrosius (2) , "a chief man of Greece," and a "senator," "who became a Christian," and, according to the title of the Syriac translation, wrote the "Address to the Greeks" (Λόγος πρὸς Ἕλληνας ), which is published with the works of Justin Martyr (Cureton, Spicil
Esperanto - The vocabulary is very largely based upon words common to the chief European languages, and sounds peculiar to any one language are eliminated
Executive - ) An impersonal title of the chief magistrate or officer who administers the government, whether king, president, or governor; the governing person or body
Amminadab - A chief of a Levitical house ( 1 Chronicles 15:10 f
Jeush - A Benjamite chief ( 1 Chronicles 7:10 )
Marcites - This doctrine they borrowed from Simon Magus, who however was not their chief; for they were called Marcites from one Marcus, who conferred the priesthood, and the administration of the sacraments, on women
Theatine - Their chief employment is preaching and giving religious instruction
Abihil - Father of Zuriel, chief of the Levitical family of Merari
Milk Sickness - Its chief symptoms in man are uncontrollable vomiting, obstinate constipation, pain, and muscular tremors
Cos - A small island in the Ægean sea off the coast of Caria, the birthplace of Hippocrates, with a chief town of the same name, in which was a famous temple of Æsculapius
Doeg - chief of Saul's herdsmen, an Edomite, who informed Saul of David's being aided by Ahimelech, and who afterwards slew the latter and his house — 85 priests
King's Bench - It consisted of a chief justice and four puisne, or junior, justices
Meat - ) Specifically, dinner; the chief meal
Bildad - His chief topics are the suddenness, swiftness, and terribleness of God's wrath upon hypocrites and oppressors
do'eg - (fearful ), an Idumean, chief of Saul's herdmen
Jashobeam - Dweller among the people; or to whom the people turn, the Hachmonite (1 Chronicles 11:11 ), one of David's chief heroes who joined him at Ziklag (12:6)
Jaaz-Aniah -
The son of Jeremiah, and one of the chief Rechabites (Jeremiah 35:3 )
Priest - His chief duties are to offer theHoly Sacrifice in the Eucharist, to administer Baptism, to giveabsolution, to give the Priestly Blessing at Marriages, Churchings,and at other services of the Church: in fact, to exercise everysacred function which is not properly or exclusively Episcopal,that is, belonging to the Bishop
So - Assyrian annals, however, inform us that in 722, shortly after the fall of Samaria, a certain Sib’i , ‘tartan’ (commander-in-chief) of Musri, was sent by Pir’u, king of Musri ( i. This Sib’i may be our So (or Seve), not king, but commander-in-chief
Nergal-Sharezer - " Two are mentioned (Jeremiah 39:3; Jeremiah 39:13) as accompanying Nebuchadnezzar at the capture of Jerusalem, and as releasing Jeremiah: one has the title (for it is not a distinct person) Rubmag, "chief priest. The bricks state he was "son of Belzikkariskun, king of Babylon," possibly the "chief Chaldaean" (Berosus) who kept the throne for Nebuchadnezzar at Nabopolassar's death, until his arrival at Babylon
Jashobeam - Also he is here called "chief of the captains" or "the three" (shallishiy ), in Chronicles "chief of the thirty" (Hebrew shalishim ): 2 Samuel 23:11; 2 Samuel 23:15; 2 Samuel 23:42; 1 Chronicles 12:4
Arch - ) chief; eminent; greatest; principal. ) A chief
Magi - Wise men, "rabmag," Jeremiah 39:3, which is used as a proper name, and properly signifies the prince Magus, or chief of the Magi. Daniel describes them as men of wisdom, Daniel 1:20; he intercedes for them with Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 2:24; and accepts a position as their chief or master
Bezalel - The chief architect of the Tabernacle. Among the gifts thus bestowed upon him, not the least was the gift of teaching the arts of which he was himself a master, to his subordinates ( Exodus 35:34 ), the chief of whom was Oholiab ( Exodus 31:6 ; Exodus 35:34 etc
Arch - ) chief; eminent; greatest; principal. ) A chief
ha'Nan -
One of the chief people of the tribe of Benjamin. ) ...
Another of the chief laymen on the same occasion
jo'el - ...
A Simeonite chief. ) ...
Chief of the Gadites, who dwelt in the land of Bashan. ...
The chief of the Gershomites in the reign of David. ) ...
The son of Pedaiah, and a chief of the half-tribe of Manasseh west of Jordan, in the reign of David
Oakley, Frederick - His chief works include: Aristotelean and Platonic Ethics; The Subject of Tract XC examined; Life of Saint Augustine; Historical Notes on the Tractarian Movement
Frederick Oakeley - His chief works include: Aristotelean and Platonic Ethics; The Subject of Tract XC examined; Life of Saint Augustine; Historical Notes on the Tractarian Movement
Lycaonia - It was a Roman province, and its chief towns were Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe
Mattaniah -
A Levite, son of Heman, the chief of the ninth class of temple singers (1 Chronicles 25:4,16 )
Amasa - ...
...
A son of Hadlai, and chief of Ephraim (2 Chronicles 28:12 ) in the reign of Ahaz
Kenaz - He became the chief of an Edomitish tribe (Genesis 36:11,15,42 )
Metheg-Ammah - NAS translated the phrase as “the chief city
Merodach - (mihr oh' dak) Hebrew form of Marduk, the chief god of Babylon, also called Bel, corresponding to the Semitic Baal or “Lord” (Jeremiah 50:2 )
Magor-Missabib - A nickname given ( Jeremiah 20:8 ) by Jeremiah to Pashhur, chief officer in the Temple, who had caused Jeremiah to be beaten and put in the stocks as a false prophet
She'ba - (on oath ), the son of Bichri, a Benjamite, ( 2 Samuel 20:1-22 ) the last chief of the Absalom insurrection
Shel'Omith - ) ...
Chief of the Izharites
Zadokites - (zay' dahk ihtess) Descendants of Zadok, a chief priest with David and Solomon
Berechiah - Father of Meshullam, one of Nehemiah’s chiefs ( Nehemiah 3:4 ; Nehemiah 3:30 ; Nehemiah 6:19 ). An Ephraimite chief ( 2 Chronicles 28:12 )
Jarib - One of the ‘chief men’ who were sent by Ezra to Casiphia in search of Levites ( Ezra 8:16 ); called in 1Es 8:44 Joribus
Barsabas - He and Silas are called 'chief men among the brethren,' and 'prophets,' who exhorted the brethren and confirmed them
Silas - A 'chief man' among the brethren and a prophet
Shipping Note - In the case of free goods the shipping notes are the receiving note, addressed by the shipper to the chief officer of the vessel, requesting him to receive on board specified goods, and a receipt for the mate to sign, on receiving whose signature it is called the mate's receipt, and is surrendered by the shipper for the bills of lading
Antonio da Sangallo, the Elder - He later erected the church of Madonna di San Biagio at Montepulciano, one of the handsomest in Italy, as well as many splendid palaces, and became chief engineer of the fortifications of Florence
Administration of the Sacraments - As the chief means of sanctification, they are to be administered to the faithful frequently, while the faithful on their part are to receive them with reverence and holy dispositions
Monarch - ) A sole or supreme ruler; a sovereign; the highest ruler; an emperor, king, queen, prince, or chief
She'ba - (on oath ), the son of Bichri, a Benjamite, ( 2 Samuel 20:1-22 ) the last chief of the Absalom insurrection
Ashdod - One of the five confederate cities of the Philistines, allotted to Judah, Joshua 15:46-47 : the chief seat of Dagon-worship, 1 Samuel 5:1-12
Barsabas - The surname of Judas, a Christian teacher, and one of the "chief men among the brethren
Sampson, Richard - He gained Wolsey's favor, held many preferments, and became one of the chief agents in the divorce proceedings of Henry VIII
Richard Sampson - He gained Wolsey's favor, held many preferments, and became one of the chief agents in the divorce proceedings of Henry VIII
Sangalo, Antonio da, the Elder - He later erected the church of Madonna di San Biagio at Montepulciano, one of the handsomest in Italy, as well as many splendid palaces, and became chief engineer of the fortifications of Florence
Sacraments, Administration of the - As the chief means of sanctification, they are to be administered to the faithful frequently, while the faithful on their part are to receive them with reverence and holy dispositions
Hazarma'Veth - The capital is Satham, a very ancient city, and its chief ports are Mirbat, Zafari and Kisheem, from whence a great trade was carried on in ancient times with India and Africa
She'ba - (on oath ), the son of Bichri, a Benjamite, ( 2 Samuel 20:1-22 ) the last chief of the Absalom insurrection
ko're -
A Korahite, ancestor of Shallum and Meshelemiah, chief porters in the reign of David
ha'Shum - ) The chief man of the family was among these who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah
Riblah - City in the land of Hamath, where Pharaoh-nechoh imprisoned Jehoahaz, and whence the king of Babylon carried Zedekiah, when he slew his sons and the priests and chief men of Judah
Prince - " It is used as follows ("p" denoting "prince," or "princes;" "r," "ruler" or "rulers"): (a) of Christ, as "the Ruler (AV, Prince) of the kings of the earth," Revelation 1:5 ; (b) of rulers of nations, Matthew 20:25 , RV, "r," AV, "p;" Acts 4:26 , "r;" Acts 7:27 , "r;" Acts 7:35 , "r" (twice); (c) of judges and magistrates, Acts 16:19 , "r;" Romans 13:3 , "r;" (d) of members of the Sanhedrin, Luke 14:1 , RV, "r" (AV, "chief"); Luke 23:13,35 , "r;" so Luke 24:20 ; John 3:1 ; 7:26,48 ; 12:42 , RV, "r" (AV, "chief r. See chief , B, No
Christ: His Eye Our Stimulus - There is a touching fact related in a history of a Highland chief, of the noble house of M'Gregor, who fell wounded by two balls, at the battle of Prestonpans. Seeing their chief fall, the clan wavered, and gave the enemy an advantage. The old chieftain, beholding the effect of his disaster, raised himself up on his elbow, while the blood gushed in streams from his wounds, and cried aloud, 'I am not dead, my children; I am looking at you to see you do your duty. There was a charm in the fact that they still fought under the eye of their chief
Cornerstone - The placing of the chief cornerstone was always a satisfying achievement, because this was the stone that guaranteed the perfection of the whole building. On one occasion when an Israelite king was on the edge of a humiliating defeat, he was likened to a useless stone that the builders had thrown away; but when he triumphed, he was likened to a stone that they had brought back and made the chief cornerstone (Psalms 118:21-24). God then took the rejected stone (Jesus) and made him the chief cornerstone in the new house of God, the church
Font, Baptismal - Since such administration is the chief right of a pastor, one of the external signs of a parish church is the baptismal font
Merodach-Baladan - Merodach has given a son, (Isaiah 39:1 ), "the hereditary chief of the Chaldeans, a small tribe at that time settled in the marshes at the mouth of the Euphrates, but in consequence of his conquest of Babylon afterwards, they became the dominant caste in Babylonia itself
Lime - " Limestone is the chief constituent of the mountains of Syria
Bureau - ) Hence: A department of public business requiring a force of clerks; the body of officials in a department who labor under the direction of a chief
Binding - ) The transoms, knees, beams, keelson, and other chief timbers used for connecting and strengthening the parts of a vessel
Zeus - (zeyooss) The Greek god of the sky and chief of the pantheon; ruler over all the gods
Alphonsus Salmeron - His chief writings are scriptural commentaries
Gildas the Wise, Saint - He is the earliest British historian; "De excidio Britannire liber querulus" is his chief work
Engineer Corps - In the United States army, the Corps of Engineers, a corps of officers and enlisted men consisting of one band and three battalions of engineers commanded by a brigadier general, whose title is chief of Engineers
Baptismal Font - Since such administration is the chief right of a pastor, one of the external signs of a parish church is the baptismal font
Jeroham - A Danite chief ( 1 Chronicles 27:22 )
Abbey, Stanbrook - Between Malvern and Worcester, England; founded by nine English ladies, Helen More being the chief foundress
Lycaonia - Its chief towns were Iconium, Derbe, and Lystra
Adoni'Ram - (lord of heights ), ( 1 Kings 4:6 ) by an unusual contraction ADORAM , (2 Samuel 20:24 ) and 1 Kings 12:18 Also HADORAM , (2 Chronicles 10:18 ) chief receiver of the tribute during the reigns of David, (2 Samuel 20:24 ) Solomon, (1 Kings 4:6 ) and Rehoboam
Amphipolis - A chief city of the southern portion of Macedonia under the Romans
Beth-Shean - Saul's body was fastened to its walls, 1 Samuel 31:10; 1 Samuel 31:12; after the captivity it was called Scythopolis, and was a chief city of Decapolis; now Beisan, having ruins of temples, colonnades, hippodrome, theatre, and city walls
Sargon - The exhumed ruins of the Khorsabad palace show him to have been a great warrior with able generals, the chief of whom was Tartan
Wise, Gildas the, Saint - He is the earliest British historian; "De excidio Britannire liber querulus" is his chief work
Stanbrook Abbey - Between Malvern and Worcester, England; founded by nine English ladies, Helen More being the chief foundress
Salmeron, Alphonsus - His chief writings are scriptural commentaries
Tobiah - During Nehemiah's absence, Tobiah was unlawfully established by some of the chief men of Judah, his relatives, in a fine apartment of the new temple; but was ignominiously expelled on the governor's return, Nehemiah 6:17-19 ; 13:1-9
pa'Hath-mo'ab - (governor of Moab ), head of one of the chief houses of the tribe of Judah
ha'Man - (magnificent ), the chief minister or vizier of King Ahasuerus
Charles Herbermann - Educator and author, editor-in-chief of The Catholic Encyclopedia; born Saerbeck, Germany, 1840; died New York, New York, 1916. In 1905 he became editor-in-chief of The Catholic Encyclopedia, and, by the aid of accomplished sons and daughters completed his part of the work despite the handicap of partial and finally complete blindness
Silver - (Acts 19:24 ) But its chief use was as a medium of exchange, and throughout the Old Testament we find "silver" used for money, like the French argent . Spain appears to have been the chief source whence silver was obtained by the ancients
Augustus Caesar - ...
Saluted emperor (imperator, military commander in chief originally), and surnamed Augustus Caesar, "majestic. " Leaving the names and rights of the chief republican officers unchanged, he united them all, one by one, in himself
Herbermann, Charles George - Educator and author, editor-in-chief of The Catholic Encyclopedia; born Saerbeck, Germany, 1840; died New York, New York, 1916. In 1905 he became editor-in-chief of The Catholic Encyclopedia, and, by the aid of accomplished sons and daughters completed his part of the work despite the handicap of partial and finally complete blindness
Elie'Zar -
Abraham's chief servant, called by him "Eliezer of Damascus. ) ...
A chief Israelite whom Ezra sent with others from Ahava to Cesiphia, to induce some Levites and Nethinim to accompany him to Jerusalem
mi'Chael - (1 Chronicles 12:20 ) ...
The father or ancestor of Omri, chief of the tribe of Issachar in the reign of David. (Ezra 8:8 ) ...
"One," or "the first, of the chief princes" or archangels, (Daniel 10:21 ) as the "prince" of Israel, and in ch
Corner, Cornerstone - 1), "a chief corner stone," see chief
Ezer - A Gadite chief who joined David ( 1 Chronicles 12:9 )
Machabees - The most notable martyrs of the persecution propagated by Antiochus in his effort to hellenize Jerusalem, were Eleazar, an old man, chief of the scribes, seven brothers, and their mother Samona
Cantor - chief singer of an ecclesiastical choir, who selects the music and leads the singing
Cantoris - chief singer of an ecclesiastical choir, who selects the music and leads the singing
Bricks - The making of, formed the chief labour of the Israelites in Egypt (Exodus 1:13,14 )
Farnovians - This sect did not last long; for having lost their chief, who died in 1615, it was scattered, and reduced to nothing
Rabshakeh - (rab sshuh rihss) Assyrian title, literally, “chief cupbearer
Eznite - Designation of Adino, one of David's chief captains (2 Samuel 23:8)
Magdala - In the chief manuscripts and versions the name is given as "Magadan
Elioenai - A Simeonite chief ( 1 Chronicles 4:36 )
Adoniram - Stoned by the people of Israel when sent by Rehoboam to collect the tribute which had been their chief ground of complaint against the king (1 Kings 12:18; 2 Chronicles 10:18)
Progressive Party - The political party formed, chiefly out of the Republican party, by the adherents of Theodore Roosevelt in the presidential campaign of 1912. Among the chief articles in the platform are those demanding direct primaries, preferential primaries for presidential nominations, direct election of United States senators, women's suffrage, and recall of judicial decisions in certain cases
Procurator - The Roman title given to the chief ruler of a district
Calliope - ) The Muse that presides over eloquence and heroic poetry; mother of Orpheus, and chief of the nine Muses
Duke - A chief a prince as the dukes of Edom
Elizaphan - Son ofUzziel, and a 'chief' of the Kohathites
Overnor - ) One who governs; especially, one who is invested with the supreme executive authority in a State; a chief ruler or magistrate; as, the governor of Pennsylvania
Adoram - By an unusual contraction from Adoniram, 2 Samuel 20:24, and 1 Kings 4:6, and also Hadoram, 2 Chronicles 10:18, chief receiver of the tribute during the reigns of David, 2 Samuel 20:24; Solomon, 1 Kings 4:6, and Rehoboam, 1 Kings 12:18
Rabbah - The chief city and capital of the Ammonites
Succentor - chief singer of an ecclesiastical choir, who selects the music and leads the singing
Savor - The chief savor of the apostles' teaching was welcome by some to their eternal life, and rejected by others to their aggravated condemnation, 2 Corinthians 2:15,16
Rephaiah - Son of Ishi and a chief in the tribe of Simeon
Gadara - The Gadarenes were known also as Gerasenes after the chief town of the district (Matthew 8:28; Mark 5:1; Mark 5:11-14)
Governor - nagid, a prominent, conspicuous person, whatever his capacity: as, chief of the royal palace (2 Chronicles 28:7 ; Compare 1 Kings 4:6 ), chief of the temple (1 Chronicles 9:11 ; Jeremiah 20:1 ), the leader of the Aaronites (1 Chronicles 12:27 ), keeper of the sacred treasury (26:24), captain of the army (13:1), the king (1 Samuel 9:16 ), the Messiah (Daniel 9:25 ). Used to denote the chiefs of families (Numbers 3:24,30,32,35 ); also of tribes (2:3; 7:2; 3:32). Used of the "dukes" of Edom (Genesis 36 ), and of the Jewish chiefs (Zechariah 9:7 ). sar, a ruler or chief; a word of very general use. It is used of the chief baker of Pharaoh (Genesis 40:16 ); of the chief butler (40:2, etc. The corresponding Hebrew word Segan Is used of provincial rulers ( Jeremiah 51:23,28,57 ); also of chiefs and rulers of the people of Jerusalem (Ezra 9:2 ; Nehemiah 2:16 ; 4:14,19 ; 5:7,17 ; 7:5 ; 12:40 )
Sanhedrin - Because of the predominance of the chief priests in the Sanhedrin, at times the words chief priests seem to refer to the action of the Sanhedrin, even though the name itself is not used. The chief priests conspired with Judas to betray Jesus (Matthew 26:14-16 ). The healing of the man at the Temple and Peter's sermon attracted the attention of the chief priests. The chief priests and elders were part of a plot to have Paul assassinated as he was led to another hearing before the council (Acts 23:13-15 ,Acts 23:13-15,23:20 )
Zadok - His descendants continued in the high priesthood (compare 2 Chronicles 31:10, "Azariah of the house of Zadok chief priest") until the time of Antiochus Eupator. The double high priesthood of Zadok and Abiathar answers to that of the chief priest and second priest (2 Kings 25:18; Luke 3:2 "Annas and Caiaphas being high priest);" compare 2 Chronicles 31:10, "Azariah the chief priest of the house of Zadok. Abiathar bad charge of the ark in Jerusalem; so formerly Eleazar and Ithamar, Hophni and Phinehas, were joint chief priests. Son of Baana, repaired the wall (Nehemiah 3:4), signed the covenant (Nehemiah 10:21); a chief of the people, of the tribe of Judah (for Baana was a Netophathite of Judah, 2 Samuel 23:29)
General - ...
The word general thus annexed to a name of office, denotes chief or superior as a commissary general, quarter-master general. The whole the total that which comprehends all or the chief part opposed to particular. The chief commander of an army. But to distinguish this officer from other generals, he is often called general in chief. The chief of an order of monks, or of all the houses or congregations established under the same rule
Nebaioth - Petra was their chief city
Moabite Stone - Discovered in 1868 at Dhiban (Dibon) in the Land of Moab, it is about 3 feet 8 inches by 2 feet 3 inches, and 14 inches thick, bearing 34 lines of writing, in which Mesa gives the chief events of his reign; of great historical and geographical importance, and one of the oldest inscriptions in the North Semitic alphabet
de Vere, Aubrey Thomas Hunt - His chief works are: "The Waldenses" (a lyrical sketch); "Search after Proserpine" (recollections of Greece); "Poetical Works"; and "Essays
Tartan - ]'>[1] tartânu or turtânu , the title borne by the commander-in-chief of the army
Ariel - The lion of God, one of Ezra's chief men, Ezra 8:16
Tiphsah - The classical Thapsacus , the chief crossing-place on the middle Euphrates for caravans and armies, after the decline of Carchemish in the Persian period
Catholic Reading Guild - It was founded in London under the presidency of Cardinal Manning in 1899, the late Ambrose Willis being its chief inspirer
Aristocracy - ) The nobles or chief persons in a state; a privileged class or patrician order; (in a popular use) those who are regarded as superior to the rest of the community, as in rank, fortune, or intellect
Nicholas Sanders - His chief work is De schismate Anglicano
Jedaiah - A Simeonite chief ( 1 Chronicles 4:37 )
Abrech - Canon Cook (Speaker's Commentary) makes it imperative, from the Egyptian," Rejoice thou;" but Harkevy understands it as Αp-Rach , "Chief of the Rech", or "men of learning
Sceva - A Jew at Ephesus, a chief of the priests, whose seven sons sought by the name of Jesus to cast out a demon
Syene - " The shepherd kings had Syene for their chief city, from whence they are called Sebennyte Ρharaohs
Ahiezer - The chief warrior who joined David at Ziklag
Aubrey Thomas Hunt de Vere - His chief works are: "The Waldenses" (a lyrical sketch); "Search after Proserpine" (recollections of Greece); "Poetical Works"; and "Essays
Pharpar - One of the chief rivers of Syria, eight miles from Damascus 2 Kings 5:12); the Awaj, as the Abana is the Baruda
Nebuzaradan - Captain of the guard, or commander in chief of Nebuchadnezzar's army at the capture of Jerusalem, and afterwards at its destruction
Agave - ) A genus of plants (order Amaryllidaceae) of which the chief species is the maguey or century plant (A
Pashur - The son of Immer, a priest and a chief officer in the temple; he violently opposed the prophet Jeremiah, and persecuted him even with blows and confinement in the stocks; but all recoiled on his own head, Jeremiah 20:1-6
Stone, Moabite - Discovered in 1868 at Dhiban (Dibon) in the Land of Moab, it is about 3 feet 8 inches by 2 feet 3 inches, and 14 inches thick, bearing 34 lines of writing, in which Mesa gives the chief events of his reign; of great historical and geographical importance, and one of the oldest inscriptions in the North Semitic alphabet
Sanders, Nicholas - His chief work is De schismate Anglicano
Sobieski, John - As commander-in-chief, he beat the Turks at Chocim and Lemberg
am'Mihud -
An Ephraimite father of Elishama, the chief of the tribe at the time of the Exodus
Nim'Rod - , from which we learn (1) that he was a Cushite; (2) that he established an empire in Shinar (the classical Babylonia) the chief towns being Babel, Erech, Accad and Calneh; and (3) that he extended this empire northward along the course of the Tigris over Assyria, where he founded a second group of capitals, Nineveh, Rehoboth, Calah and Resen
Council - The chief priest and all the council sought false witness. ...
The word is applicable to any body of men, appointed or convened for consultation and advice, in important affairs as, a council of divines or clergymen, with their lay delegates a council of war, consisting of the principal officers, to advise the commander in chief or admiral a council of physicians, to consult and advise in difficult cases of disease. A body of men specially designated to advise a chief magistrate in the administration of the government, as in Great Britain
Hoshea - Son of Azaziah and a chief of the tribe of Ephraim. A chief of the people who sealed the covenant
Govern - This is the chief point by which he is to govern all his counsels and actions. The chief magistrate should govern with impartiality
Pharez - His sons Hezron and Hamul became heads of two new chief houses. ...
Under David "the chief of all the captains of the host for the first month was of the children of Pharez" (1 Chronicles 27:2-3), famed for valor (1 Chronicles 11:11
Meshullam - A chief of the people who sealed the covenant. A chief among the Levites
School - The chief studies were their own language and literature; the chief school-book the Holy Scriptures
Potiphar - Potiphar, with whom the history of Joseph is connected, is described as "an officer of Pharaoh, chief of the executioners, an Egyptian
Tach'Monite, the - "The Tachmonite that sat in the seat," chief among David's captains, (2 Samuel 23:8 ) Isa in 1 Chronicles 11:11 Called "Jashobeam an Hachmonite," or, as the margin gives it, "son of Hachmoni
pi-Beseth - It was the seat of one of the chief annual festivals of the Egyptians
Rosh - (Ezekiel 38:2,3 ; 39:1 ) is rendered "chief" in the Authorized Version
Chios - The chief city was also named Chios
Noon - I has been supposed that the ninth hour, among the Romans, was the time of eating the chief meal this hour was three o'clock, P
Sosthenes - He apparently assumed the post after Crispus, the former chief ruler, became a Christian under Paul's preaching (Acts 18:8 )
American Catholic Quarterly Review - The first issue appeared in January with Father Corcoran as editor-in-chief
Gaels - They were organized in tribal communities, each clan being governed by a chief, who was always a member of the ruling family, or by a king
Harim - A chief of the people who sealed the covenant
Publius - Chief ("first," Greek) man of Melita; "lodged courteously for three days" Paul when shipwrecked (Acts 28:7)
Acolyte - The chief duties of this office are: to light the candles on the altar and to carry them in procession and during the solemn singing of the Gospel; to prepare wine and water for the Sacrifice of the Mass; to assist the ministers at Mass and other public services of the Church
Doeg - An Edomite, the chief of Saul's herdsmen, "detained before the Lord," probably by a vow, or because it was the sabbath, when David fled to Nob
Joab - He performed great services for David, to whose interests he was always firm, and was commander-in-chief of his troops, when David was king of Judah only
Sosthenes - He apparently assumed the post after Crispus, the former chief ruler, became a Christian under Paul's preaching (Acts 18:8 )
Salamis - The chief city of the isle of Cyprus, visited by Paul and Barnabas, A
Ash'Dod, - Its chief importance arose from its position on the high road from Palestine to Egypt
Ammin'Adab - ...
The chief of the 112 sons of Uzziel, a Junior Levitical house of the family of the Kohathites
Lamb And Flag - The lamb is the chief emblem of ourSaviour who was called by St
Chief Priests - CHIEF PRIESTS (ἀρχιερεῖς). ’ In Acts 19:14 ἀρχιερεύς, as applied to ‘one Sceva, a Jew,’ is rendered ‘chief of the priests’ in Authorized Version, ‘a chief priest’ in Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885). 7, 9, 10, and passim), and on all such occasions, both in Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885, it is translated ‘chief priests. A common explanation used to be that these ‘chief priests’ were the heads or presidents of the twenty-four courses into which the Jewish priesthood was divided (1 Chronicles 24:4, 2 Chronicles 8:14, Luke 1:5; Luke 1:8; Josephus Ant. It is true that some support for this view may be found in the expressions ‘all the chief ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘chiefs’) of the priests’ (2 Chronicles 36:14, Nehemiah 12:7), ‘the chief priests’ ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘the chiefs of the priests,’ Ezra 10:5). And most scholars now take the view that the ἁρχιερεῖς were high priests rather than ‘chief priests,’ not leading representatives from the general body of the priesthood, but members of an exclusive high priestly caste. These, then, were in all probability the ‘chief priests’ of the Authorized and Revised Versions
Obedience - With poverty and chastity it is one of the chief counsels of Christ
Living Stone - The Church is compared to a building in Ephesians 2 where Christ is called the "chief corner stone
Ashdod - One of the five chief cities of the Philistines, assigned to the tribe of Judah, but never conquered by them, Joshua 13:3 ; 15:47 ; 1 Samuel 5:1 ; 6:17 ; Nehemiah 4:7
Christian Workers For Fellowship - The "chief" or "bishop" is the presiding officer, the ministry including evangelists, pastors, and local preachers
John Mullanphy - Settled in Saint Louis, 1804, where he proved himself thereafter the chief benefactor of every Catholic institution
Mangan, James Clarence - The chief editions of his poems (O'Donoghue ascribes between 800,900 to him) are Louise Guiney's (1897) and the Centenary edition (Dublin and London, 1903)
Jean Champollion - His chief glory consists in having discovered through the Rosetta Stone a key for deciphering hieroglyphics
Bible, Study of the - chief occupation of the authorities of the Catholic Church, of its early Fathers and Doctors, of scriptural specialists, and theologians
James Mangan - The chief editions of his poems (O'Donoghue ascribes between 800,900 to him) are Louise Guiney's (1897) and the Centenary edition (Dublin and London, 1903)
Eliab - ...
...
A son of Helon, and chief of the tribe of Zebulun at the time of the census in the wilderness (Numbers 1:9 ; 2:7 )
Ephraim (2) - Our Lord, when the chief priests plotted to kill Him, retired to "a city called Ephraim
Dinah - She was seduced by Shechem, the son of Hamor, the Hivite chief, when Jacob's camp was in the neighbourhood of Shechem
Sycamine Tree - The rearing of them is one of the chief industries of the peasantry of Lebanon and of other parts of the land
Smyrna - It is now the chief city of Anatolia, having a mixed population of about 200,000, of whom about one-third are professed Christians
Diblath - Here it was that Nebuchadnezzar had sat in judgment on the last Jewish king, Zedekiah, and killed his sons before his eyes, and then blinded him and slain the chief men of Jerusalem
Sosthenes - Safe in strength, the chief ruler of the synagogue at Corinth, who was seized and beaten by the mob in the presence of Gallio, the Roman governor, when he refused to proceed against Paul at the instigation of the Jews (Acts 18:12-17 )
Tarsus - The chief city of Cilicia
Zaphnath-Paaneah - , of Goshen, the chief city of which was Pithom, "the place of life
Urijah - chief priest who complied with Ahab's order to build an Assyrian-style altar for the Jerusalem Temple (2 Kings 16:10-16 )
Mullanphy, John - Settled in Saint Louis, 1804, where he proved himself thereafter the chief benefactor of every Catholic institution
Jehizkiah - Son of Shallun, a chief of Ephraim, in Ahaz's time
Melita - Its chief officer (under the Roman governor of Sicily) appears from inscriptions to have had the precise title which Luke uses
Cushan-Rishathaim - ]'>[1] ’ is a mistake for Edom , ‘Rishathaim’ for Resh-hat-temani , ‘chief of the Temanites
Devil - In the Christian theology, an evil spirit or being a fallen angel, expelled from heaven for rebellion against God the chief of the apostate angels the implacable enemy and tempter of the human race
Dine - To eat the chief meal of the day
Captain of the Temple - Pashhur (“chief governor in the house of the Lord,” Jeremiah 20:1 ) and Seraiah (“ruler of the house of God,” Nehemiah 11:11 ) held this office in the Old Testament times
Presbyterians English - Their chief difference from the Independents is, that they are less attached to Calvinism
Blandina, Martyr - Blandina , martyr, a female slave, reckoned as the chief among the martyrs of Lyons, in that, although weakest in body, she suffered longest and most bravely the most various and prolonged torture
Zamzummims - Then "Ham" would be the chief city of the Zuzim and the root derivation of Ammon's capital, Rubbath Ammon
Baumgartner, Gallus Jacob - As chief magistrate of Saint Gall he labored to reorganize the Swiss confederation somewhat on the lines of the United States
Ariel - One of Ezra’s chief men ( Ezra 8:16 )
Hadoram - chief officer over the tribute in the days of Solomon
Troas - It is now called Eski-Stamboul: there are many ruins of the ancient city (called Alexandria Troas), which was the chief port of the traffic from Macedonia
Od - ) A person or thing deified and honored as the chief good; an object of supreme regard
Ephraim - (See Jeremiah 31:20; Hosea 7:1; Hos 12:1; Hos 13:1) I do not presume to say the cause was, because the ten tribes had the chief city in Ephraim; but I think it probable
Od - ) A person or thing deified and honored as the chief good; an object of supreme regard
ja'Rib - ...
One of the "chief men" who accompanied Ezra on his journey from Babylon to Jerusalem
Jedi'a-el -
A chief patriarch of the tribe of Benjamin. ) ...
One of the chiefs of the thousands of Manasseh who joined David on his march to Ziklag
Jaha'zi-el - ) ...
The "son of Jahaziel" was the chief of the Bene-Shecaniah who returned from Babylon with Ezra
Air - "The prince of the power of the air" is the head and chief of the evil spirits, with which both Jews and Heathens thought the air was filled
Baasha - the son of Ahijah, commander-in-chief of the armies belonging to Nadab, the son of Jeroboam, king of Israel
Study of the Bible - chief occupation of the authorities of the Catholic Church, of its early Fathers and Doctors, of scriptural specialists, and theologians
Patriarch - a family, father, and a chief
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Carondelet - The chief power of administration is in the hands of a superior-general, residing at Saint Louis
Stone, Living - The Church is compared to a building in Ephesians 2 where Christ is called the "chief corner stone
Doeg - An Edomite, and chief of the herdmen [1] of king Saul
am'Asa - 1023, was appointed commander-in-chief and suffered defeat by Joab
re'Zin - He attacked Jotham during the latter part of his reign, (2 Kings 15:37 ) but his chief war was with Ahaz, whose territories he invaded, in conjunction with Pekah about B
Jer'Emoth -
A Benjamite chief, a son of the house of Beriah of Elpaal
Pot'Iphar, - with whom the history of Joseph is connected is described as an officer of Pharaoh chief of the executioners, an Egyptian
Og - His rule extended over sixty cities, of which the two chief were Ashtaroth and Edrei ( Joshua 12:4 ). The conquest of this powerful giant king lingered long in the imagination of the Israelites as one of the chief exploits of the conquest ( Psalms 135:11 ; Psalms 136:20 )
Tritheists - A sect of the sixth century, whose chief was John Ascunage, a Syrian philosopher, and at the same time a Monophysite. This sect was divided into two parties, the Philoponists and the Cononites; the latter of whom were so called from Conon, bishop of Tarsus, their chief
Captain - There were various ranks, from the captains of 50 to the captain of the host (or commander-in-chief). ("chiefs" in the R. The captain of the temple, Luke 22:4; Acts 4:1; Acts 5:24, was not a military man, but the chief of the priests and Levites that watched in the temple at night
King - The chief or sovereign of a nation a man invested with supreme authority over a nation, tribe or country a monarch. The chief piece in the game of chess
Joha'Nan - (2 Chronicles 28:12 ) ...
The son of Hakkatan, and chief of the Bene-Azgad who returned with Ezra. (Ezra 8:12 ) ...
The son of Eliashib, one of the chief Levites
Joel - A chief man among the Gadites. A chief of the sons of Gershom
Prince - ...
Nâśı̂y' (נָשִׁא, Strong's #5387), “prince; chief; leader. Noth proposed the idea that the nâśı̂y' was originally a tribal representative or a “deputy, chief. ...
The Septuagint translation is arxon (“ruler; lord; prince; authority; official”), and the KJV has these translations: “prince; captain; chief; ruler
Palestine - Mandate of the British Empire, Asia, comprising the districts of Jerusalem, Jaffa, Gaza, Beersheba, Samaria, Phenicia, and Galilee, administered by a High Commissioner and Commander-in-Chief, assisted by an Executive Council
Rab-Mag - Tentatively adopting the oldest and most obvious account, that it means ‘chief magus,’ we note here that the name magus may very well have been applied to a sacred caste employed in Babylon long before it became associated with Zoroastrianism, to which the silence of the Avesta shows it was originally foreign
Innocent Viii, Pope - As pope his chief concern was the promotion of peace among Christian princes
Marcian - The chief religious event following his coronation was the Council of Chalcedon, which he assembled with the cooperation of Leo I to deal with Monophysitism
Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius - Son of the Emperor Maximianus Herculius and son-in-law of the chief emperor Galerius
Synzygus - It is more probably a way of describing the chief minister of the church at Philippi
ta'Anach - (Joshua 21:25 ) Taanach is almost always named in company with Megiddo, and they were evidently the chief towns of that fine rich district which forms the western portion of the great plain of Esdraelon
Asiarchs - "CHIEF OF ASIA" (Acts 19:31)
Lycia - Its two chief towns Patara and Myra Paul visited, during the period when Lycia and Pamphylia in Claudius' reign were combined under one proconsul (Acts 21:1; Acts 27:5)
Rector - The same name is also given to the chief elective officer in several foreign universities, and also to the head master of large schools
Tarsus - Chief city of the province of Cilicia, Tarsus was a large and important city in the days of the Roman Empire (Acts 21:39; for map see ACTS, BOOK OF)
Punon - The site was perhaps home to descendants of the clan chief Pinon (Genesis 36:41 )
Shalmaneser - ]'>[1]3 is chief’)
Praetorium - It denotes (1) the general's tent or headquarters; (2) the governor's residence, as in Acts 23:35 (RSV, "palace"); and (3) the praetorian guard (See PALACE), or the camp or quarters of the praetorian cohorts ( Acts 28:16 ), the imperial guards in immediate attendance on the emperor, who was "praetor" or commander-in-chief
Prince - The title generally applied to the chief men of the state
Uriel - chief of the Kohathites under David (1 Chronicles 15:5; 1 Chronicles 15:11), with 120 brethren brought up the ark from Obed Edom's house (1 Chronicles 15:12)
Caster And Pollux - The Dioscuri or two mythical sons of the chief idol of Rome and Greece, Jupiter
Commodore - ) A title given by courtesy to the senior captain of a line of merchant vessels, and also to the chief officer of a yachting or rowing club
Ford - Of the numerous ‘fords’ or passages of the Jordan, two in ancient times were of chief importance: that opposite Jericho near Gilgal ( Joshua 2:7 , Judges 3:28 ), and that at Bethabara (mod
Behaviorism - Its chief concern is the study of inherited instincts and acquired habits
Zacchaeus - A chief of the tax-collectors, who, in his anxiety to see Jesus, climbed a tree; he was agreeably surprised to hear that Jesus wished to abide at his house
Prelude - ), a strain introducing the theme or chief subject; a movement introductory to a fugue, yet independent; - with recent composers often synonymous with overture
Archbishop - (Greek: archos, chief; episkopos, bishop) ...
The bishop of an archdiocese who presides over one or more dioceses, forming an ecclesiastical province
Lamentations - And in after-ages how tenderly the Lord Jesus wept over the same city, (Matthew 23:37-39) But besides this, there is much of Christ discoverable in it, indeed, though in the first face of the book it refers to history, yet the chief beauty of it is as prophetical of Christ and his church
Samaria - The chief city in the kingdom, of the ten tribes
Abner - ” The chief military officer for King Saul and Saul's uncle (1 Samuel 14:50 )
Hofbauer, Clement Mary, Saint - He was the chief supporter of religion in Austria, and contributed greatly to the extinction of Josephinism
Consultation - The chief priests held a consultation with the elders and scribes
Castle - The "castle" into which the chief captain commanded Paul to be brought was the quarters of the Roman soldiers in the fortress of Antonia (so called by Herod after his patron Mark Antony), which was close to the north-west corner of the temple (Acts 21:34 ), which it commanded
Trophy - Sometimes trophies were erected in the chief city of the conquered people
Abilene - Abila was its chief city
Collyridians - 79) assails certain women who had brought from Thrace into Arabia the practice of performing on certain days rites in honour of the Blessed Virgin the chief being the offering of a cake (κολλυρίς) and the partaking of it by the worshippers
Zar'Ephath - One group of foundations is on a headland called Ain el-Kanatarah ; but the chief remains are south of this, and extend for a mile or more, with many fragments of columns, slabs and other architectural features
Sceptre - a word derived from the Greek, properly signifies, a rod of command, a staff of authority, which is supposed to be in the hands of kings, governors of a province, or of the chief of a people, Genesis 49:10 ; Numbers 24:17 ; Isaiah 14:5
Beelzebub - , the chief abomination, was used as an appellation of the prince of devils
Silas - Silas (sî'las), Acts 15:40, contracted from Silvanus (sil-vâ'nus), woody, 2 Corinthians 1:19, is called one of the chief of the brethren, Acts 15:22, and a faithful brother
Ziklag - Its chief interest is in connection with the life of David
Sikhism - The reigious system, a revolt from polytheism, ceremonialism, and caste-exclusiveness, took for its chief doctrines the oneness of God, salvation by faith and good works, and the equality and brotherhood of man
Remigius, Saint - He studied literature at Rheims, and while still a layman was elected Bishop of Rheims in 459, and made his chief aim the propagation of Christianity among the Franks
Duke - ]'>[2] dux ) ‘duke’ meant any leader or chief. ]'>[1] to the chiefs of Edom, with the exception of Joshua 13:21 ‘dukes of Sihon,’ and 1Ma 10:65 (applied to Jonathan Maccabæus)
el'Iphaz - (Genesis 36:4 ; 1 Chronicles 1:35,36 ) ...
The chief of the "three friends" of Job
Mor'Deca-i - (little man , or worshipper or Mars ), the deliverer, under divine Providence, of the Jews from the destruction plotted against them by Haman the chief minister of Xerxes; the institutor of the feast of Purim
re'Hum - ) ...
One of the chief of the people, who signed the covenant with Nehemiah
Pha'Rez - Pharez occupied the rank of Judah's second son, and from two of his sons sprang two new chief houses, those of the Hezronites and Hamulites
Eli'hu - (1 Samuel 1:1 ) ...
In (1 Chronicles 27:18 ) Elihu "of the brethren of David" is mentioned as the chief of the tribe of Judah
Publius - The epithet ὁ πρῶτος, ‘the chief man,’ seems to have been an official title peculiar to Malta (cf
Elah - Son of Uzzi and a chief of the tribe of Benjamin
Seraiah - ‘ or prince of Menucha or chief chamberlain’; RV [2] ‘chief chamberlain,’ mg
Cassinese Congregation - This reform gradually spread to all the chief Benedictine monasteries in Italy, including Monte Cassino, Subiaco, Saint Paul's in Rome, Saint George's at Venice, La Cava, and Farfa. This federation was called after its chief house, the "Province of Subiaco
Sun - As the sun is chief in nature, so CHRIST is chief in all humanity and in all human affairs
Obadiah -
An Israelite who was chief in the household of King Ahab (1 Kings 18:3 ). " ...
...
A chief of the tribe of Issachar (1 Chronicles 7:3 )
Neginah - " As Habakkuk 3:19 "to the chief singer on my stringed instruments"; also Amos 6:5, "invent instruments of music like David. " In Habakkuk 3:19 the direction is the prophet's to the precentor or "chief singer," how the ode was to be performed in the temple liturgy
Jupiter - He was conceived as having usurped the authority of his father Kronos and become the chief and ruler of all the other gods. The case of Acts 14:12-13 is further complicated, because there it is not even the Greek Zeus who is referred to, but the native supreme god of the Lycaonians, who was recognized by the author of Acts to correspond, as their chief god, to the Greek Zeus
Abishai - In the same war probably he, as chief of the three "mighties," chivalrously broke through the Philistine host to procure water for David from the well of his native Bethlehem (2 Samuel 23:14-17). Probably the commander in chief was David, but the victory actually gained by Abishai
Seraiah - A chief man who returned from exile. In verse 59, instead of 'a quiet prince,' it is better translated 'chief chamberlain,' as in the margin
Pashur - A priest, Immer's son, of the 16th order (1 Chronicles 9:12), "chief governor in the house of the Lord. ) The house was a chief one in Nehemiah's time (Nehemiah 7:41; Nehemiah 10:3; Nehemiah 12:2)
Abbot - The chief ruler of a monastery or abbey. At present, in the Roman Catholic countries, the chief distinctions are those of regular and commendatory
Essenes - The chief sources of their history are: Philo (Quod omnia probus liber, II); Pliny the Elder (Historia Naturalis, V); and Flavius Josephus (Jewish War, II, V; Antiquities, XIII, XV, XVII, XVIII). Agriculture was their chief occupation
Justice - A person commissioned to hold courts, or to try and decide controversies and administer justice to individuals as the chief Justice of the king's bench, or of the common pleas, in England the chief Justice of the supreme court in the United States, &c
Perga - It was the chief native city of Pamphylia, and never seems to have come much under Greek influence, but it had a coinage of its own from the 2nd cent. ‘Artemis of Perga’ was the chief object of worship, and she resembled ‘Diana of the Ephesians’ in her rites and images, being sometimes represented like the Greek Artemis as goddess of the chase, but more often by a pillar of stone, the top of which was rounded or roughly carved to represent a head
Travelling - First went the sheep and goat herds, each with their flocks in divisions, according as the chief of each family directed; then followed the camels and asses, loaded with the tents, furniture, and kitchen utensils; these were followed by the old men, women, boys, and girls, on foot. The procession is closed by the chief of the tribe, whom they call emir and father, (emir means prince,) mounted on the very best horse, and surrounded by the heads of each family, all on horses, with many servants on foot. At set times a chapter in the Koran is read by the chief of each family, either in or near each tent, the whole family being gathered round, and very attentive
Collateral - ) Related to, but not strictly a part of, the main thing or matter under consideration; hence, subordinate; not chief or principal; as, collateral interest; collateral issues
Duns Scotus, John - His chief followers were among the Franciscans
John Duns Scotus - His chief followers were among the Franciscans
Amasai - The chief of David's captains, who received prophetic inspiration from the Spirit (1 Chronicles 12:18 )
Donato Bramante - His chief work was the plan for Saint Peter's, which he did not live to execute
Molina, Luis de - Molina's chief work is the "Concordia," concerned with the problem of reconciling grace and free will
Hananiah -
A chief of the tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:24 )
Karl Huysmans - His chief works are: "En route," "La Cathedrale," "L'Oblat," "Les Foules de Lourdes," an answer to Zola, and "Sainte Lydwine de Schiedam
Laodicea - At a very early period it became one of the chief seats of Christianity (Colossians 2:1 ; 4:15 ; Revelation 1:11 , etc
Powerful, Powerfully - ...
B — 1: εὐτόνως (Strong's #2159 — Adverb — eutonos — yoo-ton'-oce ) signifies "vigorously, vehemently" (eu, "well," teino, "to stretch"), Luke 23:10 , "vehemently," of the accusation of the chief priests and scribes against Christ; Acts 18:28 , RV, "powerfully" (AV, "mightily"), of Apollos in confuting Jews
Executioner - The execution of Jesus is the chief example of such an abuse of power
Chair - ) An official seat, as of a chief magistrate or a judge, but esp
Huldah - ‘The prophetess, wife of Shallum, keeper of the wardrobe,’ living in a part of Jerusalem called the Mishneh (‘second quarter’), whose advice Josiah sought, by a deputation of his chief ministers, on the alarming discovery of ‘the book of the law’ in the Temple, in 621 b
Nebo (1) - The chief centre of his worship was the temple of E-Zida in Borsippa, between which and the temple of Marduk in Babylon took place the great annual processions of which we find a reminiscence in Isaiah 46:1 f
Huysmans, Karl - His chief works are: "En route," "La Cathedrale," "L'Oblat," "Les Foules de Lourdes," an answer to Zola, and "Sainte Lydwine de Schiedam
o'Callaghan, Edmund Bailey - About 80 historical works have appeared under his name, chief among them "Documentary History of New York," "Documents relating to the Colonial History of New York
Luis de Molina - Molina's chief work is the "Concordia," concerned with the problem of reconciling grace and free will
Tribute - The chief biblical facts connected with the payment of tribute have been already given under TAXES
Devil - Calumniator, or slanderer; a fallen angel, especially the chief of them
Taanath Shiloh - 16, section 5, named with Neapolis as the two chief towns of Samaria; now Tana, Ain Tana, ruins S
Malchus - (mal' kuhss) Personal name meaning “king,” common among the Idumaeans and Palmyrenes, especially for their kings or tribal chiefs. Perhaps the slave was chief of the Temple guard
Eliel - A chief of eastern Manasseh ( 1 Chronicles 5:24 ). Two Benjamite chiefs ( 1 Chronicles 8:20 ; 1 Chronicles 8:22 ), 8
Elnathan - The son of Achbor, the chief of those sent to Egypt to fetch Uriah, who had offended Jehoiakim by his prophecy ( Jeremiah 26:22 ff
Mercury - Hence, when Paul and Barnabas healed the cripple at Lystra, the former was hailed as Hermes, ‘because he was the chief speaker
Message - An official written communication of facts or opinions sent by a chief magistrate to the two houses of a legislature or other deliberative body
Supper - In the East this is the chief meal of the day; it is enjoyed in the evening when the labours of the day are over and the partakers have only rest before them
First - ) Most eminent or exalted; most excellent; chief; highest; as, Demosthenes was the first orator of Greece
Dean - ) The chief or senior of a company on occasion of ceremony; as, the dean of the diplomatic corps; - so called by courtesy
Jehoiachin - In his brief reign Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem and carried the king and royal family, the chief men of the nation, and great treasures, unto Babylon
Ammen, Daniel - He served with Dupont's fleet during the Civil War, was chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, 1869-71, and of the Bureau of Navigation, 1871-78
Galilee - Joseph and Mary belonged to Nazareth, the chief city in the south, and there Jesus lived the greater part of His life
Gal, Saint - The chief, event of his episcopate was the Council of Clermont, 535, which drew up 17 canons, 16 of which have become laws of the Universal Church
Shephatiah - Son of Maachah and a chief of the Simeonites
Abiasaph - The descendants of Abiasaph, of whom Shallum was chief, were "keepers of the gates of the tabernacle" (1 Chronicles 9:19; 1 Chronicles 9:31), and "had the set office over the things made in the pans," in David's time
Header - ) One who heads a movement, a party, or a mob; head; chief; leader
Bartolommeo Gavantus - His chief work, dedicated to Pope Urban VIII (1623-1644), who appointed him perpetual consultor to the Congregation of Rites in recognition of his great services, is entitled, "Thesaurus sacrorum rituum
Haman - as the enemy of the Jews, and the chief minister of Ahasuerus
Only - ) Hence, figuratively: Alone, by reason of superiority; preeminent; chief
Ecclesiastical Hat - A red, broad-brimmed hat is chief among the cardinal's insignia; it was granted to secular cardinals by Pope Innocent IV, 1245, and to cardinals belonging to religious orders by Gregory XIV, 1591
Edmund o'Callaghan - About 80 historical works have appeared under his name, chief among them "Documentary History of New York," "Documents relating to the Colonial History of New York
Midian - The chief city of the Midianites
Gavantus, Bartolommeo - His chief work, dedicated to Pope Urban VIII (1623-1644), who appointed him perpetual consultor to the Congregation of Rites in recognition of his great services, is entitled, "Thesaurus sacrorum rituum
Seth - Seth was the chief of "the children of God," as the Scripture calls them, Genesis 6:2 that is, those who before the flood preserved true religion and piety in the world, while the descendants of Cain gave themselves up to wickedness
a'Mos, Book of - The chief peculiarity of the style consists in the number of allusions to natural objects and agricultural occupations, as might be expected from the early life of the author
Sloyd - The sloyd system derives its name from the fact that it was adopted or largely developed from a similar Swedish system, in which wood carving was a chief feature
Perizzites - In several places of Scripture, the Canaanites and Perizzites are mentioned as the chief people of the country; as in the time of Abraham and Lot, Genesis 13:7
Pamphylia - One of the chief cities was Perga, where John Mark left Paul and Barnabas during the first missionary journey (Acts 13:13 )
Hazor - A chief city of northern Canaan, whose king Jabin, at the head of an allied host, was defeated by Joshua, Joshua 11:1-13
Hat, Ecclesiastical - A red, broad-brimmed hat is chief among the cardinal's insignia; it was granted to secular cardinals by Pope Innocent IV, 1245, and to cardinals belonging to religious orders by Gregory XIV, 1591
Carts - The roads are generally impassable by any wheeled vehicle; and the chief use of the cart was on a limited scale for agricultural purposes, such as forcing the ripe grain out of the ear, bruising the straw, removing the produce of the fields, etc
Og - Ashtaroth-carnaim and Edrei were his chief cities; but there were many other walled towns, and the land was rich in flocks and herds
pa'Phos - The harbor and the chief town were at "New Paphos," ten miles to the northwest
ma'ry, Mother of Mark, - She gave up her house to be used as one of the chief places of meeting
Pamphyl'ia - ( Acts 13:13 ) The two missionaries finally left Pamphylia by its chief seaport Attalia
Asai'ah - ) ...
A Levite in the reign of David, chief of the family of Merari
Hazor - Before Israel’s conquest of Canaan, Hazor was the chief city of the far northern region of Canaan
Lycaonia - Although the local people spoke Greek, the chief language of the Roman Empire, they continued to use their own Lycaonian language (Acts 14:11)
Rimmon (1) - ’ He is mentioned, however (in 2 Kings 5:18 ), not as a Palestinian or Babylonian, but as a Syrian, deity, who was honoured as the chief god of Damascus. Elsewhere there are many Indications that the chief Aramæan divinity was called by that people not Rimmon or Rammân, but Hadad (wh
Seraiah - ...
...
A Netophathite (Jeremiah 40:8 ), a chief priest of the time of Zedekiah. Jeremiah 51:59 is rendered in the Revised Version, "Now Seraiah was chief chamberlain," instead of "was a quiet prince," as in the Authorized Version
Point, Points - " ...
A — 1: κεφάλαιον (Strong's #2774 — Noun Neuter — kephalaion — kef-al'-ah-yon ) the neuter of the adjective kephalaios, "of the head," is used as a noun, signifying (a) "a sum, amount, of money," Acts 22:28 ; (b) "a chief point," Hebrews 8:1 , not the summing up of the subject, as the AV suggests, for the subject was far from being finished in the Epistle; on the contrary, in all that was being set forth by the writer "the chief point" consisted in the fact that believers have "a High Priest" of the character already described
Abel-Mizraim - ) The threshingfloor of Atad; so called by the Canaanites, because it was the chief scene of the funeral laments of Joseph and his Egyptian retinue for Jacob (Genesis 50:4-11). " The phrase, "Joseph spake unto the house of Pharaoh" implies that Pharaoh and his estates in council decreed a state funeral for Jacob, in which the princes, nobles, and chief men of Egypt, with their pomp of chariots and equipages, took part
Judah - The dying benediction of Jacob foretells the superior power and prosperity of the family of Judah, and their continuance as chief of the Jewish race until the time of Christ, Genesis 49:8-12 . Though not the firstborn, Judah soon came to be considered as the chief of Jacob's children, and his tribe was the most powerful and numerous
Master - A director, head, or chief manager as the master of a feast. A chief a principal as the master root of a plant. The chief of a society as the Grand Master of Malta, of free-masons, &c. ...
The word master has numerous applications, in all of which it has the sense of director, chief or superintendent
Metz, Amalarius of - The chief merit of his works is that they have preserved much accurate and valuable information on the state of the liturgy at the beginning of the ninth century and are therefore useful sources for the history of Latin rites
Hagarite - David's chief shepherd was a Hagarite (1 Chronicles 27:31 )
Cupbearer - The “chief butler” of the Joseph story (Genesis 40:2 ) was a cupbearer who was overseer of a staff of his own
Abiezer - An Anathothite, one of David’s thirty-seven chief heroes, who had command of the army during the ninth month ( 2 Samuel 23:27 , 1 Chronicles 27:12 )
Areopagus - By a law of Solon, no person could be a member of this tribunal, until he had been archon or chief magistrate
Sepharva'im - Berosus celled Sippara "a city of the sun;" and in the inscriptions it bears the same title, being called Tsipar sha Shamas , or "Sippara of the Sun" --the sun being the chief object of worship there
Bigvai - A chief of Zerubbabel's expedition, who subsequently signed the covenant (Ezra 2:2; Nehemiah 7:7)
Seat - ...
A — 2: πρωτοκαθεδρία (Strong's #4410 — Noun Feminine — protokathedria — pro-tok-ath-ed-ree'-ah ) "the first seat," Matthew 23:6 ; Mark 12:39 ; Luke 11:43 ; 20:46 ; see chief , No
Amariah - ...
...
A "chief priest" who took an active part in the reformation under Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 19:11 ); probably the same as mentioned in 1 Chronicles 6:9
Eunice - The Scriptures were her chief teaching to Timothy from childhood (2 Timothy 3:15)
Notaries - As soon as a bureau for ecclesiastical documents was established, we find evidence of notaries, and in the time of Pope Julius I (4th century) the notaries formed a kind of college presided over by a "primicerius" or chief
Shoshan'Nim - "To the chief musician upon Shoshannim" is a musical direction to the leader of the temple choir which occurs in ( Psalm 45:1 ; 69:1 ) and most probably indicates the melody "after" or "in the manner of" (Authorized Version upon") which the psalms were to be sung
Cabinet - ) The advisory council of the chief executive officer of a nation; a cabinet council
Marduk - (mahr' dyook) chief god of Babylon, sometimes called Merodach or Bel, the Babylonian equivalent of Baal meaning lord
Barley - It is the chief food of horses ( 1 Kings 4:28 ), mules, and donkeys, oats being practically unknown
Amalarius of Metz - The chief merit of his works is that they have preserved much accurate and valuable information on the state of the liturgy at the beginning of the ninth century and are therefore useful sources for the history of Latin rites
Malchiah - There was a Malchiah chief of a family in Israel
Iddo - chief at Casiphia, to whom Ezra sent for Levites
Heman - Son of Joel, a Kohathite: he was both a seer and chief of the musicians in the sanctuary under David
Ether - It is powerful solvent of fats, resins, and pyroxylin, but finds its chief use as an anaesthetic
Amphipolis - The Romans raised it to the rank of a free town and the chief town of the first district of the province Macedonia; through it the Via Egnatia passed
Arvad - In the ethnological list of Genesis 10:18 ( 1 Chronicles 1:16 ) it is mentioned among the chief settlements of the Canaanites or Phœnicians
Elishama - Son of Ammihud and grandfather of Joshua: he was a chief of Ephraim
Anti-Sabbatarians - Their chief arguments are, ...
1
Magister Disciplinae - For this purpose they were taken into the bishop's family, and educated under him by some grave and discreet person whom the bishop deputed for that purpose, and set over them, by the name of Presbyter or Magister Disciplinae, whose chief business it was to inspect their behaviour, and instruct them in the rules and discipline of the church
Anah - In Genesis 36:29 Anah is a Horite chief living in Seir
Alexandria, Cyril of, Saint - Cyril's chief fame arises from his defense of Catholic teaching against Nestorius
Caesarea - The chief Roman city of Palestine in New Testament times
Zebulun - He had three sons, founders of the chief families of the tribe
Symphosius of Metz - The chief merit of his works is that they have preserved much accurate and valuable information on the state of the liturgy at the beginning of the ninth century and are therefore useful sources for the history of Latin rites
Rohrbacher, Rene Francois - His chief work is his monumental Histoire Universelle de l'EgliseCatholique in 29 volumes, continued by Chantrel and Guillaume
Rene Rohrbacher - His chief work is his monumental Histoire Universelle de l'EgliseCatholique in 29 volumes, continued by Chantrel and Guillaume
Gods - Among the first objects to be deified were the sun, the moon, and the chief powers of nature
Kir of Moab - (fortress of Moab ), one of the two chief strongholds of Moab, the other being Ar of Moab
Ithamar - He had earlier supervised the building of the tabernacle (Exodus 38:21), and now he was the chief overseer of its maintenance (Numbers 4:24-33)
Serjeants Lictors - This power during the Republic was held by generals commanding-in-chief in the field, but the insignia had to be dropped before they passed within the city gates, unless they had been awarded the dignity of a triumph. Just as Rome had praetores and lictores, so had the coloniae, even where the chief magistrates did not bear that name. Philippi was a colonia, and the two chief magistrates there had their lictores
Prevail - ; some have kataxioo, "to count worthy;" see AV), of "prevailing" to escape judgments at the close of this age; in Luke 23:23 , of the voices of the chief priests, rulers and people against Pilate regarding the crucifixion of Christ. ...
3: ὠφελέω (Strong's #5623 — Verb — opheleo — o-fel-eh'-o ) "to benefit, do good, profit," is translated "prevailed" in Matthew 27:24 , RV (AV, "could prevail"), of the conclusion formed by Pilate concerning the determination of the chief priests, elders and people
Tubal - Gog is their chief prince. In Sargon's time, according to inscriptions, Ambris, son of Khuliya, was their hereditary chief, and by alliance with the kings of Musak and Vararat (Mesech and Ararat) who were revolting from Assyria
Meshullam - One of the ‘chief men’ whose services were enlisted by Ezra to procure Levites ( Ezra 8:16 ); called in 1Es 8:44 Mosollamus. A priest and a chief of the people who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:7 ; Nehemiah 10:20 )
ab'Ner - ) Abner, therefore, was Saul's first cousin, and was made by him commander-in-chief of his army. (2 Samuel 3:33,34 ) ...
The father of Jaasiel, chief of the Benjamites in David's reign, (1 Chronicles 27:21 ) probably the same as the preceding
Bena'Iah -
The son of Jehoiada the chief priest, (1 Chronicles 27:5 ) of the tribe of Levi, though a native of Kabzeel, (2 Samuel 23:20 ) set by David, (1 Chronicles 11:25 ) over his body-guard. (1 Chronicles 27:5 ) Benaiah remained faithful to Solomon during Adonijah's attempt on the crown, (1 Kings 1:8,10,32,38,44 ) and was raised unto the place of Joab as commander-in-chief of the whole army
Nathan - One of the chief men who returned to Jerusalem with Ezra
Judge, Ecclesastical - While the bishop may act as judge in matters subject to him, he is recommended to allow the officialis or chief justice to try cases together with the associate justices
John o'Donovan - He was the mainstay of the chief Irish archaeological reviews of his day
Teman - Its inhabitants were renowned for wisdom ( Jeremiah 49:7 ), and the chief of Job’s counsellors was Eliphaz ‘the Temanite ’ ( Job 2:11 )
Mamre -
An Amoritish chief in alliance with Abraham (Genesis 14:13,24 )
Pergamos - The chief city of Mysia, in Asia Minor
Kish - The Levitical house under its chief, rather than an individual, is meant here by Kish
Ramoth-Gilead - )...
Ramoth-gilead’s chief importance was as a defence outpost on the nation’s eastern frontier
Torches - On the night of his betrayal, when our Lord was in the garden of Gethsemane, Judas, "having received a band of men and officers from the chief priests and Pharisees, cometh thither with lanterns and torches and weapons" (John 18:1-3 )
o'Donovan, John - He was the mainstay of the chief Irish archaeological reviews of his day
Shecaniah - chief of the tenth course of priests ( 1 Chronicles 24:11 )
Shephati'ah - ) ...
Chief of the Simeonites in the reign of David
Aufklarung - Its chief center was in France, where it gave rise to the skepticism of Voltaire , the naturalism of Rousseau, the sensationalism of Condillac, and the publication of the "Encyclopedia" by D'Alembert and Diderot
Holocaust - The chief purpose of the holocaust was ...
to recall vividly to the Hebrews of old the supreme dominion of God over His creatures;
a means of atonement for sin; and
to foreshadow the sacrifice which Jesus Christ, the true Lamb of God, was to offer in fulfilment of all the bloody sacrifices of the first covenant (Hebrews 9)
Kiriath-Arba - It was the chief city in the hill country of Judah (Joshua 15:54 ) and was both a Levitical city (Joshua 21:11 ) and a city of refuge (Joshua 20:7 )
Mitylene - MITYLENE was the chief town of Lesbos on its E
Cilicia - Tarsus, the birth-place of Paul, was one of its chief towns, and the seat of a celebrated school of philosophy
Divan - ) A chief officer of state
Congress - of a republic, constituting the chief legislative body of the nation
Asaiah - He is apparently the same as the chief of the sons of Merari, who led 220 of his clan in helping bring the ark of the covenant from the house of Obed-edom to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:1 )
Agnosticism - Its chief use is to deny that human reason can arrive at a knowledge of God and some truths of religion
Abbey - Principal parts of an abbey are: ...
almonry
calefactory
cellars for stores
cells
chapter-house
choir
cloister
conference-room
dormitory
guest-house
infirmary
kitchen
novitate
oratory
parlor or locutorium
refectory
workshops
The chief abbey buildings are constructed around a quadrangle; in the more usual English plan the church is on the northern side
Barabbas - Yet the Jews, led by the chief priests and elders, requested the release of this man rather than the release of the Lord Jesus
Accho - The chief seaport in Syria, 30 miles S
Geshem - 715 this would explain his close connexion with the Samaritans; or he may have been the chief of an Arab tribe dwelling in the S
God - Any person or thing exalted too much in estimation, or deified and honored as the chief good
Angelo Secchi - In astronomy the sun was the chief object of his study
Lecturers - They are chosen by the vestry, or chief inhabitants of the parish, supported by voluntary subscriptions and legacies, and are usually the afternoon preachers, and sometimes officiate on some stated day in the week
Rand - ) Of large size or extent; great; extensive; hence, relatively great; greatest; chief; principal; as, a grand mountain; a grand army; a grand mistake
Ecclesiastical Judge - While the bishop may act as judge in matters subject to him, he is recommended to allow the officialis or chief justice to try cases together with the associate justices
Ross - ) The main body; the chief part, bulk, or mass
Rand - ) Of large size or extent; great; extensive; hence, relatively great; greatest; chief; principal; as, a grand mountain; a grand army; a grand mistake
ja'Besh - In its widest sense Gilead included the half tribe of Manasseh, (1 Chronicles 27:21 ) as well as the tribes of Gad and Reuben, (Numbers 32:1-42 ) east of the Jordan; and of the cities of Gilead, Jabesh was the chief
id'do - (Zechariah 1:1,7 ) ...
The chief of those who assembled at Casiphia at the time of the second caravan from Babylon
Maschil - Thus Psalms 32 is inscribed, "A Psalm of David, Maschil;" and Psalms 42, "To the chief musician, Maschil, for the sons of Korah
Ross - ) The main body; the chief part, bulk, or mass
Amminadab - The chief in David's time of the sons of Uzziel, a Levite, son of Kohath
Secchi, Angelo - In astronomy the sun was the chief object of his study
Esau - We have an account of his ill-advised marriages, Genesis 26:34 ; of his loss of his father's chief blessing, and his consequent anger against Jacob, Genesis 27:1-46 ; of their subsequent reconciliation, Genesis 32:1-33:20 ; and of his posterity, Genesis 36:1-43
an'Akim - Though the war-like appearance of the Anakim had struck the Israelites with terror in the time of Moses, (Numbers 13:28 ; 9:2) they were nevertheless dispossessed by Joshua, (Joshua 11:21,22 ) and their chief city, Hebron, became the possession of Caleb
Adoniram - chief over the tribute in the days of Solomon
Cilicia - His home town of Tarsus was the chief city of Cilicia (Acts 21:39)
Rabshakeh - "chief cupbearer" (2 Kings 18-19; Isaiah 36-37). Sent by Sennacherib with Tartan who probably had chief command (first in 2 Kings 18:17; Isaiah 20:1) of an army to induce Jerusalem by threats and promises to surrender
Eliezer - Abraham’s chief servant, a Damascene ( Genesis 15:2 AV Rib - ) The chief nerve, or one of the chief nerves, of a leaf
Music, Musicians, Musical Instruments - "...
In the headings of fifty-five of the Psalms the words occur, "To the chief musician;" the word is natsach, and simply means 'to the chief or the leader,' and may therefore apply as much to the singers as to the musicians
England, John - A pioneer in intellectual activities as well as in religion, he organized in 1823 a Book Society, designed to have branches in each congregation, founded the same year the "United States Catholic Miscellany," the first Catholic newspaper in the United States, and established a seminary and College called "The Philosophical and Classical Seminary of Charleston," of which he was president and chief teacher. He was the chief factor in bringing about the first Provincial Council of Baltimore, 1829
Abner - ) Abner, therefore, was Saul's first cousin, and was made by him commander-in-chief of his army. The father of Jaasiel, chief of the Benjamites in David's reign, 1 Chronicles 27:21; probably the same as the preceding
e'Lam - ) ...
A chief man of the tribe of Benjamin. ) Elam occurs amongst the names of the chief of the people who signed the covenant with Nehemiah
Euphra'Tes - It rises from two chief sources in the Armenian mountains, and flows into the Persian Gulf. The great hydraulic works ascribed to Nebuchadnezzar had for their chief object to control the inundation
Absalom - But one of David’s chief advisers stayed behind as a spy in Absalom’s court. By appealing to Absalom’s vanity, he was able to persuade Absalom to ignore the wise words of Absalom’s chief adviser (2 Samuel 15:32-37; 2 Samuel 17:1-14)
Demetrius -
A silversmith at Ephesus, whose chief occupation was to make "silver shrines for Diana" (q
Rab-Saris - ]'>[2] title rabû (or rubû ) -sha-rçshu , borne by a high court-official, who may perhaps have been the ‘chief eunuch,’ though his office cannot be determined with absolute certainty
Oblates of Mary Immaculate - It was formed to repair the havoc caused by the French Revolution and its principal aim is the instruction and conversion of the poor; missions, retreats, and catechism courses, especially in rural parishes; the direction of seminaries, and the training of priests are its chief duties
Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate - It was formed to repair the havoc caused by the French Revolution and its principal aim is the instruction and conversion of the poor; missions, retreats, and catechism courses, especially in rural parishes; the direction of seminaries, and the training of priests are its chief duties
Tar'Sus, - the chief town of Cilicia, "no mean city" in other respects, but illustrious to all time as the birthplace and early residence of the apostle Paul
Machir - Son of Ammiel of Lodebar, a Gileadite chief; sheltered Mephibosheth, Jonathan's lame son; afterward, influenced probably by David's kindness to the same youth, supplied David with necessaries when fleeing from Absalom (2 Samuel 9:4; 2 Samuel 17:27-29)
Sceva - An implement, a Jew, chief of the priests at Ephesus (Acts 19:13-16 ); i
Canton - ) A division of a shield occupying one third part of the chief, usually on the dexter side, formed by a perpendicular line from the top of the shield, meeting a horizontal line from the side
Rimmon - chief god of Syria, also called Hadad
Nethanel - A chief of the Levites under Josiah ( 2 Chronicles 35:9 [1])
Michael - A chief angel, who is represented as the patron of the Hebrews before God
Calah - ’ It was the capital, or at least the chief royal residence, under several of the greatest Assyrian kings, whose palaces have been excavated by modern explorers
Ephraem, Saint - In 363, when Nisibis was retroceded to Persia, Ephraem fled with the Christian population to escape persecution, and settled at Edessa, where he was probably one of the chief founders of the "School of the Persians
Gioacchino Rossini - His first triumph, Il Tancredi in 1813; Il Barbiere di Siviglia, his chief work of Opera Buffa in 1816; Otello, a reform of Opera Seria in 1816; and Guillaume Tell in 1829, his masterpiece, represent his best work
Heshbon - chief city of Sihon king of the Amorites
Craft - The chief priests and scribes sought how they might take him by craft, and put him to death
Hanani - A chief musician mentioned in connexion with the dedication of the walls of Jerus
Leucopetrians - The founder of this sect is said to have been a person called Leucopetrus, and his chief disciple Tychicus, who corrupted by fanatical interpretations several books of Scripture, and particularly St
Amariah - chief priest in the time of Jehoshaphat king of Judah
Juggernaut - ...
(2):...
A particular form of Vishnu, or of Krishna, whose chief idol and worship are at Puri, in Orissa
je'Ther - (1 Chronicles 2:32 ) ...
The chief of a family of warriors of the line of Asher, and father of Jephunneh
Lentil - Shaw says, beans, lentils, kidney beans, and garvancos are the chief of their pulse kind
Gadara - Now Um-keis, a fortified chief city of Decapolis, of considerable importance in the time of Christ, and having many Greek inhabitants
Rossini, Gioacchino Antonio - His first triumph, Il Tancredi in 1813; Il Barbiere di Siviglia, his chief work of Opera Buffa in 1816; Otello, a reform of Opera Seria in 1816; and Guillaume Tell in 1829, his masterpiece, represent his best work
Paphos - The Phœnician origin of the former need not be doubted; the latter was by tradition a Greek settlement, but in both the chief object of worship was the ‘Papbian goddess,’ undoubtedly of Syrian origin, and worshipped under the form of a conical stone, though identified by the Greeks with Aphrodite
Interpretation - ...
For the right interpretation of the word of God, the chief requisites are, a renewed heart, supremely desirous to learn and do the will of God; the aid of the Holy Spirit, sought and gained; a firm conviction that the word of God should rule the erring season and heart of man; a diligent comparison of its different parts, for the light they throw upon each other; all reliable information as to the history and geography, the customs, laws, and languages, the public, domestic, and inner life of Bible times
Patmos - The chief remaining interest of the island is the monastery of St
Warn - Juturna warns the Daunian chief of Lausus danger-- being warned of God in a dream, that they should not return to Herod, they departed into their own country another way
Dan'Iel, Apocryphal Additions to - The first of these is supposed to be the triumphal song of the three confessors in the furnace, ( Daniel 3:23 ) praising God for their deliverance, of which a chief part (35-66) has been used as a hymn in the Christian Church since the fourth century
Imposed - 1: ἐπίκειμαι (Strong's #1945 — Verb — epikeimai — ep-ik'-i-mahee ) denotes "to be placed on, to lie on," (a) literally, as of the stone on the sepulchre of Lazarus, John 11:38 ; of the fish on the fire of coals, John 21:9 ; (b) figuratively, of a tempest (to press upon), Acts 27:20 ; of a necessity laid upon the Apostle Paul, 1 Corinthians 9:16 ; of the pressure of the multitude upon Christ to hear Him, Luke 5:1 , "pressed upon;" of the insistence of the chief priests, rulers and people that Christ should be crucified, Luke 23:23 , "were instant;" of carnal ordinances "imposed" under the Law until a time of reformation, brought in through the High Priesthood of Christ, Hebrews 9:10
Great - chief principal as the great seal of England. chief of vast power and excellence supreme illustrious as the great God the great Creator. chief principal much traveled as a great road
Genealogy - Let it only be remembered that these records have respect to political and territorial divisions as much as to strictly genealogical descent, and it will at once be seen how erroneous a conclusion it may be that all who are called "sons" of such or such a patriarch or chief father must necessarily be his very children. Of any one family or house became extinct, some other would succeed to its place, called after its own chief father. The same principle must be borne in mind in interpreting any particular genealogy Again, when a pedigree was abbreviated, it would naturally specify such generations as would indicates from what chief houses the person descended
Jehoshaphat - He set up courts and appointed judges in all the chief cities of Judah, with the chief court in Jerusalem. Others dealt solely with civil matters, and these were under the control of the chief governor (2 Chronicles 19:4-11)
Amasa - A chief of Ephraim, who opposed retaining as bondsmen the men of Judah taken captive in a war with Pekah king of Israel, 2 Chronicles 28:12
Magus, Simon - Another version makes him the chief antagonist of Saint Peter
Zacchaeus - A ‘chief publican’ of Jericho who entertained our Lord ( Luke 19:1-10 )
Ashdod - It was one of the chief seats of the worship of Dagon (1 Samuel 5:5 )
Merchant - After the Hebrews became settled in Palestine they began to engage in commercial pursuits, which gradually expanded (49:13; Deuteronomy 33:18 ; Judges 5:17 ), till in the time of Solomon they are found in the chief marts of the world (1 Kings 9:26 ; 10:11,26,28 ; 22:48 ; 2 Chronicles 1:16 ; 9:10,21 )
Cathedral - The chief church of a diocese; a church wherein is a bishop's see
Nehiloth - Title of Psalm 5, Gesenius explains, "upon the flutes," from chalil a "perforated instrument", chaalal ("to bore"); a direction "to the chief musician" that it was to be sung to wind instruments in the temple service; compare Psalms 87:7, "players on instruments," i
Uzzi - A priest, chief of the fathers' house of Jedaiah, in the high priesthood of Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:19)
Bethuel - His relationship to Rebekah's brother Laban (Genesis 24:29 ) is not clear, since Laban takes the chief role protecting Rebekah (Genesis 24:55 ; Genesis 27:43 ), and Nahor is Laban's father (Genesis 29:5 )
Projection - ) The representation of something; delineation; plan; especially, the representation of any object on a perspective plane, or such a delineation as would result were the chief points of the object thrown forward upon the plane, each in the direction of a line drawn through it from a given point of sight, or central point; as, the projection of a sphere
Administration - ) The executive part of government; the persons collectively who are intrusted with the execution of laws and the superintendence of public affairs; the chief magistrate and his cabinet or council; or the council, or ministry, alone, as in Great Britain
Amsterdam - The chief church is called the "Holy Room
Anglin, Timothy Warren - He became a member of the editorial staff of the "Toronto Globe," 1883, and editor-in-chief of the "Toronto Tribune," a Catholic weekly, 1874-1885
Eliphaz - chief of Job's three friends, a 'Temanite,' or descendant of Teman
Perizzite - Bezek was their stronghold, and Adoni-bezek their chief (Judges 1:4-5), in the S
Eloi, Saint - A master goldsmith, he was placed in charge of the mint under King Clotaire, whose son and successor Dagobert made him his chief councilor
Montessori Method - " Most of the chief features of the method are borrowed from current methods used in many institutions for training feeble-minded children, and dating back especially to the work of the French-American physician Edouard O
Mer'Ari, Mer'Arites - (1 Chronicles 6:19,47 ) Their chief at that time was Zuriel
Aceldama - A field said to have been intended for the burial of strangers, which the chief priests bought with the money returned by Judas, as the price of the Saviour's blood
Cistern - The chief dependence of a large portion of the population was upon the water which fell in the rainy season and which they gathered in cisterns
Eligius, Saint - A master goldsmith, he was placed in charge of the mint under King Clotaire, whose son and successor Dagobert made him his chief councilor
Esther, the Book of - The chief value of the book is to illustrate the wonder- working providence of God, his control of human passions, his righteous judgment of sinners, and his care for his covenant people- whom, even when captives in a strange land, he can exalt above all their foes
Simonans - Another version makes him the chief antagonist of Saint Peter
Simon Magus - Another version makes him the chief antagonist of Saint Peter
Moon - This beautiful and stately ruler of the night, Genesis 1:16 , is one of the chief witnesses to mankind of the goodness, wisdom, and power of the Creator, Psalm 8:3 ; and as receiving all its light from the sun, and reflecting it on all around, it is a striking image of the church of Christ
Darkness - The absence of natural light, Genesis 1:2 , and hence figuratively a state of misery and adversity, Job 18:6 Psalm 107:10 Isaiah 8:22 9:1 ; also the absence of the sun and stars, and hence the fall of chief men and national convulsions, Isaiah 13:10 Acts 2:20
Joz'Abad - ) ...
A chief Levite in the reign of Josiah
na'Hash - (2 Samuel 10:2 ) ...
A person mentioned once only-- (2 Samuel 17:25 ) --in stating the parentage of Amasa, the commander-in-chief of Absalom's army
Gold - (Genesis 2:11 ) It was at first used chiefly for ornaments, etc. (1 Kings 6:22 ) 10 passim ; ( Esther 1:6 ; Song of Solomon 3:9,10 ; Jeremiah 10:9 ) The chief countries mentioned as producing gold are Arabia, Sheba and Ophir
Jehoiada -
The father of Benaiah, who was one of David's chief warriors (2 Samuel 8:18 ; 20:23 )
Also - 1: καί (Strong's #2532 — Conjunction — kai — kahee ) has three chief meanings, "and," "also," "even
Joab - His chief military achievements were, (1) against the allied forces of Syria and Ammon; (2) against Edom (1 Kings 11:15,16 ); and (3) against the Ammonites (2 Samuel 10:7-19 ; 11:1,11 ). Benaiah succeeded him as commander-in-chief of the army
Estate, State - , "first," is rendered "chief estates," AV, RV, "the chief men," i
Sanhedrim - This "council" is referred to simply as the "chief priests and elders of the people" (Matthew 26:3,47,57,59 ; 27:1,3,12,20 , etc. They were of three classes (1) the chief priests, or heads of the twenty-four priestly courses (1 Chronicles 24 ), (2) the scribes, and (3) the elders
Schools - The chief studies were their own language and literature the chief school-book the Holy Scriptures; and there were special efforts to impress lessons of morality and chastity
Minister - Properly, a chief servant hence, an agent appointed to transact or manage business under the authority of another in which sense, it is a word of very extensive application. In modern governments, the secretaries or heads of the several departments or branches of government are the ministers of the chief magistrate
Baal, Baalim - The chief male god of the Phoenicians and the Canaanites, as ASHTORETH was the chief female goddess
Band - One such cohort formed the garrison of Jerusalem, stationed in the fortress of Antonia, adjoining the Temple, under a chiliarch or tribune (‘the chief captain of the band,’ Acts 21:31). This Roman force was probably granted by Pilate to effect our Lord’s arrest (John 18:3; John 18:12, where ‘the band’ under its ‘chief captain’ [1] seems distinguished from ‘the officers of the Jews,’ i
ga'za - (the fortified; the strong ) (properly Azzah ), one of the five chief cities of the Philistines. There are a few palm trees in the town, and its fruit orchards are very productive; but the chief feature of the neighborhood is the wide-spread olive grove to the north and northeast
Band - One such cohort formed the garrison of Jerusalem, stationed in the fortress of Antonia, adjoining the Temple, under a chiliarch or tribune (‘the chief captain of the band,’ Acts 21:31). This Roman force was probably granted by Pilate to effect our Lord’s arrest (John 18:3; John 18:12, where ‘the band’ under its ‘chief captain’ [1] seems distinguished from ‘the officers of the Jews,’ i
Prince - ‘chieftain,’ ‘ruler,’ ‘king,’ ‘governor,’ ‘noble,’ ‘deputy. ), of leaders in war ( 1 Samuel 22:2 ), of tribal chieftains ( e. Philistines, 1 Samuel 18:30 ), of the chief butler and baker ( Genesis 40:2 ; Genesis 40:16 ), of the keeper of prison ( Genesis 39:21 ), of the taskmaster ( Exodus 1:11 ), of the prince of the eunuchs ( Daniel 1:7 ). ’ It is applied to the governor of the palace ( 2 Chronicles 28:7 ), the keeper of the treasury ( 1 Chronicles 26:24 ), the chief of the Temple ( 1 Chronicles 9:11 , 2 Chronicles 31:13 ); also to the chief of a tribe ( 2 Chronicles 19:11 ), the son of a king ( 2 Chronicles 11:22 ), the king himself ( 1 Samuel 25:30 ), the high priest ( Daniel 9:25 ), and is occasionally in AV [2] are Persian satraps, while in the names Rabshakeh , Rabsaris the prefix rab signifies ‘chief,’ as also the proper name Rezon ( 1 Kings 11:23 ), which occurs as a common noun ( râzôn ) in Proverbs 14:28
Druidism - Their chief duties were to teach youths by means of a system of oral education, and to preside over the traditional religious ceremonies
Lapparent, Auguste de - One of his chief treatises is "Providence Creatrice
Cause - Efficient causality is of chief concern
Father - ); and (2) as a title of respect to a chief, ruler, or elder, etc
Eshcol -
A young Amoritish chief who joined Abraham in the recovery of Lot from the hands of Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:13,24 )
Charles Russell Lawyer - In 1894 he was made lord of appeals, and raised to the peerage for life; he was also appointed lord chief justice
Tirza - It remained the chief residence of the kings of Israel till Omri took Samaria (1 Kings 14:17 ; 15:21 ; 16:6,8 , etc
Dream - Other significant dreams are also recorded, such as those of Abimelech (Genesis 20:3-7 ), Pharaoh's chief butler and baker (40:5), Pharaoh (41:1-8), the Midianites (Judges 7:13 ), Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 2:1 ; 4:10,18 ), the wise men from the east (Matthew 2:12 ), and Pilate's wife (27:19)
Deputy - , chief of the commissariat appointed by Solomon (1 Kings 4:5 , etc
Secretary - ) An officer of state whose business is to superintend and manage the affairs of a particular department of government, and who is usually a member of the cabinet or advisory council of the chief executive; as, the secretary of state, who conducts the correspondence and attends to the relations of a government with foreign courts; the secretary of the treasury, who manages the department of finance; the secretary of war, etc
Iconostasis - (Greek: a picture screen) ...
The chief and most distinctive feature in most Eastern churches, consisting of a solid screen which divides the sanctuary from the body of the church, shutting off the altar from the worshippers
Eliel - A chief Levite in the time of David (1Chronicles 15:9,1 Chronicles 15:11 )
o'Reilly, Edmund - His chief work was The Relations of the Church to Society
Malcham - The chief god of the Ammonites (Zephaniah 1:5 , KJV; Malcam, RSV and NAS margins)
Fir - It was a tree of large growth ( 2 Kings 19:23 , Ezekiel 31:8 ); evergreen ( Hosea 14:8 ); a chief element in the glory of Lebanon ( Isaiah 60:13 ); associated with cedars ( Psalms 104:16-17 , Isaiah 14:8 , Zechariah 11:2 )
Chamberlain - The Rab-saris of 2 Kings 18:17 is literally, “chief of eunuchs” but more likely signifies the office held by a high military and administrative official
Prince - ) The chief of any body of men; one at the head of a class or profession; one who is preeminent; as, a merchant prince; a prince of players
Grace, Controversies on - The chief theological systems involved are: Augustinianism, Thomism, Molinism, Congruism, and Syncretism
Zichri - Father of Eliezer, the chief of Reuben under David (1 Chronicles 27:16)
Pashur - Son of Immer, 'chief governor in the house of the Lord
Auguste de Lapparent - One of his chief treatises is "Providence Creatrice
Johanan - 2 Kings 25:23 , Jeremiah 40:8 to Jeremiah 43:5 , the son of Kareah, chief of ‘the captains of the forces,’ who after the fall of Jerusalem joined Gedaliah at Mizpah
Eliel - chief of the sons of Hebron, a Levite: he assisted in bringing up the ark
Edmund o'Reilly - His chief work was The Relations of the Church to Society
Kirharaseth - The prophet Isaiah saith, that his bowels "sounded like an harp for Moab, and his inward parts for Kei-haresh," which was the chief city of Moab
Philippi - It was the chief city, not of all Macedonia, but of that part of it
Silas - Luke, Acts 15:22 , one of the "chief men among the brethren," which makes it probable, that he was of the number of the seventy disciples
Centurion - There were several at Jerusalem under the chief captain mentioned in Acts 21:31
Mistress - ) A woman having power, authority, or ownership; a woman who exercises authority, is chief, etc
Shamanism - The Shaman is regarded as a healer, hence the name "medicine man," as an educator, a civilmagistrate, and a war-chief, because he cures diseases, preserves the art of writing and divination, is able to foretell the future, make rain, and discover game
Semites - In historic times all western Asia, with the exception of Asia Minor, was Semitic, and philologically the race is divided into four chief groups: Babylonian-Assyrian, Chanaanite, Aramaic, and Arabian
Russell, Charles - In 1894 he was made lord of appeals, and raised to the peerage for life; he was also appointed lord chief justice
Heshbon - It was a chief city of Moab, till lost to the Amorites
High Priest - A number of terms are used to refer to the high priest: the priest ( Exodus 31:10 ); the anointed priest (Leviticus 4:3 ); the priest who is chief among his brethren (Leviticus 21:10 ); chief priest (2 Chronicles 26:20 ); and high priest (2 Kings 12:10 ). Neither Eli, Ahimelech, Abiathar, nor Zadok are called high or chief priest, though all four headed priestly families and are mentioned in connection with items usually associated with the high priest (the ark, the ephod, the Urim and Thummim: 1 Samuel 3:3 ; 1 Samuel 4:4-11 ; 1 Samuel 21:6 , Ezra 6:9-15 ; 2 Samuel 15:24-29 ). As chief priest Eleazar assisted Moses with the census (Numbers 26:1 ). One indication of the significance of Eleazar is that the Book of Joshua concludes with the death of this chief priest (Joshua 24:33 ). Nor is Eli included among this list, though he functioned as the chief priest of the Shiloh sanctuary. When David moved the ark to Jerusalem, Abiathar and Zadok apparently officiated jointly as chief priests (2Samuel 8:17;2Samuel 15:24-29,2 Samuel 15:35 ; 2 Samuel 19:11 ), though Zadok already appears as the dominant figure in 2Samuel. ...
High Priest and chief Priests The ordination rite for the high priest included the consecration of his sons as well (Exodus 29:8-9 ,Exodus 29:8-9,29:20-21 ). A number of terms refer to leading priests other than the high priest: anointed priests (2 Maccabees 1:10 ); chief priests (Ezra 8:29 ; Ezra 10:5 ; Nehemiah 12:7 ); senior priests (2 Kings 19:2 ; Isaiah 37:2 ; Jeremiah 19:1 ). Pashur was the “chief officer in the house of the Lord” (Jeremiah 20:1 )
Apocrypha - The Old Testament Apocrypha consists of fourteen books, the chief of which are the Books of the Maccabees (q
Ferdinand Brunetiere - His critical ability, wide learning and trenchant style won early recognition and he became editor-in-chief of the "Revue des Deux Mondes
Maximus of Constantinople, Saint - He was one of the chief doctors of the theology of the Incarnation, and was called Homogoletes (Confessor), from his orthodox zeal in the Monothelite controversy
Peter, First Epistle of - ...
It was written from Babylon, on the Euphrates, which was at this time one of the chief seats of Jewish learning, and a fitting centre for labour among the Jews
Misrule, Lord of - One of the chief characters in the celebration of the Feast of Fools, a custom of the later medieval period, which came to be marked with much license and buffoonery, and was eventually suppressed
Dante Alighieri - Elected to the chief magistracy of the republic of Venice by the White or constitutional party, he was permanently exiled in 1302 when the Blacks were restored to power
Christian Union Church of God - " The chief ruler is the pastor of the local church
Christ, Resurrection of - This fact was predicted by Christ Himself, and offered by Him as the chief sign or proof of His Divine mission and Divinity
Macedonia - ), a "seller of purple," residing in Philippi, the chief city of the eastern division of Macedonia
Timnath-Serah - A single cavity with a niche for a lamp has been thought to be the resting-place of the warrior-chief of Israel
Ashtoreth - The moon goddess of the Phoenicians, representing the passive principle in nature, their principal female deity; frequently associated with the name of Baal, the sun-god, their chief male deity (Judges 10:6 ; 1 Samuel 7:4 ; 12:10 )
Jephthah - Considered as one of Yahweh's “chief” deliverers of his people (1 Samuel 12:11 ), Jephthah is hailed by the author of Hebrews as a hero of faith (Hebrews 11:32 )
Eloquence - "The chief characteristics of the eloquence suited to the pulpit are these two gravity and warmth
Gilead, Balm of - The word "balm" is a contracted form of "balsam," a word derived from the Greek Balsamon , Which was adopted as the representative of the Hebrew words Baal shemen , meaning "lord" or "chief of oils
Cathedral - As such, it is the chief church inthe Diocese and the centre of the Bishop's work. Of the Cathedral as an institution a recent writer hassaid: "It must be granted that a Cathedral in its origin wasnothing more than a missionary creation, where the Bishop of apartly unevangelized country placed his seat with his council ofclergy grouped around him, whose duty was to go forth into thesurrounding districts with the message of the Gospel, to plantsmaller churches which should be subordinate or parochial centres,and to return again periodically to the Diocesan church asheadquarters, for the counsel, direction and inspiration of theirchief
Tekoa - ...
One of David's chief fighting men was Ira, the son of Ikkesh from Tekoa (2 Samuel 23:26 )
Lord of Misrule - One of the chief characters in the celebration of the Feast of Fools, a custom of the later medieval period, which came to be marked with much license and buffoonery, and was eventually suppressed
Elah - Uzzi's son, a chief of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 9:8)
Lime - In Amos 2:1 the prophet denounces Moab because they ‘burned the bones of the king of Edom into lime’ phosphate of lime being the chief ingredient of the ash of well-burned bones
Merodach - The name of the city-god of Babylon, worshipped, after the establishment of Babylon as capital of the Babylonian Empire, as chief god of Babylonia
Holiness Church Church of God - " The chief ruler is the pastor of the local church
Penitentiary - Its chief is a cardinal, called the Grand Penitentiary, appointed by the pope
Alighieri, Dante - Elected to the chief magistracy of the republic of Venice by the White or constitutional party, he was permanently exiled in 1302 when the Blacks were restored to power
Baker - In Egypt the king had a man-servant who is called his 'chief baker,' Genesis 40:1-22 ; Genesis 41:10 ; but in Israel the baking was done by the women of each house, as Abraham called to Sarah to prepare cakes upon the hearth, Genesis 18:6 ; and Samuel said that if the Israelites had a king he would take their daughters to be bakers
Escutcheon - The surface of the escutcheon is called the field, the upper part is called the chief, and the lower part the base (see Chiff, and Field
Jair - A chief warrior under Moses, descended from the most powerful family of Judah and Manasseh
Exalt - To elevate in power, wealth, rank or dignity as, to exalt one to a throne, to the chief magistracy, to a bishopric
Hanan - A Benjamite chief ( 1 Chronicles 8:23 ). Two of ‘the chiefs of the people’ who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:22 ; Nehemiah 10:26 )
Jehoiada - The chief priest of the Temple at the time of Ahaziah’s death ( 2 Kings 11:4 etc
Veto - ) A power or right possessed by one department of government to forbid or prohibit the carrying out of projects attempted by another department; especially, in a constitutional government, a power vested in the chief executive to prevent the enactment of measures passed by the legislature
Gad (2) - Its chief cities were Ramoth-gilead, Mahanaim, Heshbon, and Aroer
Aceldama - In that sense he bought the field, Acts 1:18,19 ; whereas it was really purchased by the chief priests, Matthew 27:6-8 ; cf
is'Sachar - 1753-45) At the descent into Egypt four sons are ascribed to him, who founded the four chief families of the tribes
Naboth - She wrote letters in Ahab's name, and sealed them with the king's seal, and sent them to the elders of Jezreel, directing them to publish a fast, to place Naboth among the chief of the people, suborn against him two sons of Belial, or two false witnesses, who might depose, that Naboth had blasphemed God and the king
Commune - ...
3: συλλαλέω (Strong's #4814 — Verb — sullaleo — sool-lal-eh'-o ) "to talk together," is translated "communed" in Luke 22:4 , of the conspiracy of Judas with the chief priests
Amon - Amen was one of the eight gods of the first order, and chief of the triad of Thebes
Obadiah - The chief officer of king Ahab's household, who preserved the lives of one hundred prophets from the persecuting Jezebel, by concealing them in two caves and furnishing them with food, 1 Kings 18:4
Molech, Moloch, or Milcom - According to some of these passages, Moloch would seem to be another name for Baal; and we find that the Phoenicians, whose chief god was Baal, and the Carthaginians their colonists, worshipped his image with similar horrid sacrifices, as the Romans did their god Saturn
Horn - The married women among the Druses of mount Lebanon still wear on their heads silver horns, as in the accompanying cut; the other head is that of an Abyssinian chief
Sacred Penitentiaria - The Cardinal chief Penitentiary (pamitentiarius maior) generally exercises the complete jurisdiction of the tribunal
Sect - Christianity was originally considered as a new sect of Judaism; hence Tertullus, accusing Paul before Felix, says that he was chief of the seditious sect of the Nazarenes, Acts 24:5 ; and the Jews of Rome said to the apostle, when he arrived in this city, "As concerning this sect, we know that everywhere it is spoken against," Acts 28:22
Resurrection of Christ - This fact was predicted by Christ Himself, and offered by Him as the chief sign or proof of His Divine mission and Divinity
Saba - They were very prosperous, agriculture flourished, gold, silver, and precious stones abounded, but their chief source of wealth was the trade route from India to Egypt and Northern Syria
Sabeans - They were very prosperous, agriculture flourished, gold, silver, and precious stones abounded, but their chief source of wealth was the trade route from India to Egypt and Northern Syria
Tenant - ...
Tenant in capite, or tenant in chief, by the laws of England, is one who holds immediately of the king
Mag'Dala - The chief MSS
Philis'Tia - the use of war-chariots, which were the chief arm of offence, the occasional elevations which rise out of it offered secure sites for towns and strongholds
Ner'Gal-Share'Zer - One of these is not marked by any additional title; but the other has the honorable distinction of Rab-mag, probably meaning chief of the Magi [1], and it is to him alone that any particular interest attaches
Zacchae'us - " The term which designates his office -"the chief among the publicans" -is unusual, but describes him, no doubt, as the superintendent of customs or tribute in the district of Jericho, where he lived
Abiathar - Upon becoming king, Solomon promoted Zadok to chief priest, but sent Abiathar into exile (1 Kings 1:5-8; 1 Kings 1:43-45; 1 Kings 2:26; 1 Kings 2:35)
Rehoboam, - In the history of Rehoboam the chief point is his indiscreet treatment of the tribes at his accession treatment which resulted in the revolt of the best part of the nation and the establishment of a rival kingdom ( 1 Kings 12:1-33 ). Here the hereditary chiefs demanded that he should lighten the yoke. The chief event in the secular history of the time was the invasion of the country by Shishak, king of Egypt. The author of our Books of Kings is chiefly concerned at the Egyptian’s plundering the Temple (1 Kings 14:26 ), while the Chronicler ( 2 Chronicles 12:1-16 ) as usual is ready to make an edifying story out of the incident
Lachish - This letter is from the chief of Atim (=Etam, 1 Chronicles 4:32 ) to the chief of Lachish, in which the writer expresses great alarm at the approach of marauders from the Hebron hills
Jonathan - The chief of these are,
A Levite descended from Gershom (Judges 18:30 ). ...
...
Son of Shammah, and David's nephew, and also one of his chief warriors (2 Samuel 21:21 )
Eleazar - On the death of Nadab and Abihu without children (Leviticus 10:1; Numbers 3:4) Eleazar had the oversight of the chief Levites, who kept the charge of the sanctuary (Numbers 3:32). Dodo the Ahohite's son, one of the three chief strongmen of David; perhaps descended from Ahoah of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:4; 2 Samuel 23:9; 1 Chronicles 11:12)
King - The officers of his court were, (1) the recorder or remembrancer (2 Samuel 8:16 ; 1 Kings 4:3 ); (2) the scribe (2 Samuel 8:17 ; 20:25 ); (3) the officer over the house, the chief steward (Isaiah 22:15 ); (4) the "king's friend," a confidential companion (1 Kings 4:5 ); (5) the keeper of the wardrobe (2 Kings 22:14 ); (6) captain of the bodyguard (2 Samuel 20:23 ); (7) officers over the king's treasures, etc. (1 Chronicles 27:25-31 ); (8) commander-in-chief of the army (1 Chronicles 27:34 ); (9) the royal counsellor (1 Chronicles 27:32 ; 2 Samuel 16:20-23 )
Ammonite - They are known as the Beni-ammi (Genesis 19:38 ), Ammi or Ammon being worshipped as their chief god. David also defeated them and their allies the Syrians (2 Samuel 10:6-14 ), and took their chief city, Rabbah, with much spoil (2 Samuel 10:14 ; 12:26-31 )
Korah - A son of Esau (Genesis 36:5 ,Genesis 36:5,36:14 ; 1 Chronicles 1:35 ) who became chief of a clan of Edom (Genesis 36:18 ). A grandson of Esau, son of Eliphaz, and chief of a clan of Edom (Genesis 36:16 ; 1 Chronicles 1:36 )
Michael - A Manassite chief who joined David at Ziklag ( 1 Chronicles 12:20 ). In the OT he is alluded to several times in the Book of Daniel ( Daniel 10:13 ; Daniel 10:21 ; Daniel 12:1 ) as ‘one of the chief princes,’ ‘the prince,’ and ‘the prince which standeth for the people,’ and he is opposed to the prince-angels of Persia and of Greece
Abiathar - Having escaped with the ephod, Abiathar became the high priest and chief counselor for David (1 Samuel 23:6 ). See Priests ; Levites ; chief Priest
Command - ...
COMMAND, To have or to exercise supreme authority to possess the chief power to govern as, the general commands with dignity and humanity. The right or power of governing with chief or exclusive authority supreme power control as, an officer has a brigade under his command he takes command of the army in France an appropriate military term
Alexan'Dria, - Its importance as one of the chief corn-ports of Rome secured for it the general favor of the first emperors. " After Rome became the chief city of the world, Alexandria ranked second to Rome in wealth and importance, and second to Athens only in literature and science
Obadi'ah - ) ...
A descendant of Issachar and a chief man of his tribe. ) ...
The father of Ishmaiah who was chief of the tribe of Zebulun in David's reign
Head - ) The most prominent or important member of any organized body; the chief; the leader; as, the head of a college, a school, a church, a state, and the like. ) Principal; chief; leading; first; as, the head master of a school; the head man of a tribe; a head chorister; a head cook. ) The anterior or superior part of an animal, containing the brain, or chief ganglia of the nervous system, the mouth, and in the higher animals, the chief sensory organs; poll; cephalon
Ninian, British Missionary Bsp - Columba, yet touches therein the chief points embodied in the later Life—his converting the southern Picts a long time before St. The chief Life is Vita Niniani Pictorum Australium apostoli, auctore Ailredo Reivallensi , first printed by Pinkerton (Vit. The chief field of his missionary labours was in the central district of the E. )...
His monastic school, known variously as Magnum Monasterium, Monasterium Rosnatense, Alba, and Candida Casa, was famous through Cumbria and Ireland, and was one of the chief seats of early Christian learning to which Welsh and Irish saints resorted, till both school and see were destroyed by the irruptions of the Britons and Saxons
High Priest (2) - —The terms ‘high priest’ and ‘chief priest’ in the NT represent the same original (ἀρχιερεύς), varied in translation to correspond with the uses of the term as explained below. The numerous references in the Gospels are ordinarily to this high priestly class, and when the Greek is so used it is translated ‘chief priests’ (see art. chief Priests). ...
As far as concerns the high priest proper, he occupied the position of chief political authority among the Jews, as head of the Sanhedrin. Other high priests after the end of their term of service are stated to have held high positions at home and abroad, and it is possible that some of the Gospel references to high or chief priests are to this group of ex-high priests together with the officiating priest. But although historically this was his chief claim to authority, his religious influence in the time of Christ was far less than his political power
Devil - (Greek: diabolos, slanderer, accuser, or traducer) ...
The word is used as a name for a fallen angel or evil spirit, especially for the chief of the rebellious angels, Lucifer or Satan (Matthew 25)
Amos - But the ten tribes of Israel were the chief subjects of his prophecies
Ammonites - They were gross idolaters; their chief idol being Moloch, supposed to be the same with Saturn, 1 Kings 11:5-7 2 Kings 23:13
Censures - The right to inflict censure follows from the nature of the Church as a perfect society; while the chief purpose of censure is corrective or medicinal as indicated by its main divisions: ...
(1) particular, excommunication, interdict, suspension; ...
(2) general, censure ab homine (by man) when penalty is inflicted by way of special precept or particular judgment, and a jure (by law) when a specified penalty is fixed by the common or particular law of the Church; ...
(3) latre sententire (of sentence passed) if penalty is incurred by the very commission of an act; ferendae sententiae (of sentence to be passed) if penalty is to be inflicted after admonition and judgment of a superior
Eliezer - ...
...
Son of Zichri, and chief of the Reubenites under David (1 Chronicles 27:16 )
Nethinim - They were under the control of a chief from among themselves (2:43; Nehemiah 7:46 )
Habakkuk, Prophecies of - " The third chapter is a sublime song dedicated "to the chief musician," and therefore intended apparently to be used in the worship of God
Eshcol - An Amorite chief, Mamre's brother, ally to Abram in his expedition against Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:13; Genesis 14:24). The Amorite chief's name originated the designation of the valley Eshcol, which Israel afterward interpreted in the suitable sense cluster
Meshullam - A chief sent by Ezra (Ezra 8:16-21, etc
Benaiah - Son of Jehoiada, and officer in David's and Solomon's army, perhaps chief of their body-guard
Eustathians - Whether this Eustathius were the same with the bishop of Sabastia, and chief of the Semi-arians, is not easy to determine
Zacchaeus - Pure, a superintendant of customs; a chief tax-gather (publicanus) at Jericho (Luke 19:1-10 )
Gamaliel -
A chief of the tribe of Manasseh at the census at Sinai (Numbers 1:10 ; 2:20 ; 7:54,59 )
Prince - ) KJV used prince as a title for Israel's king ( 1 Samuel 13:14 ), a leading priest (1 Chronicles 12:27 ), a Midianite tribal chief (Numbers 25:18 ), the leading men of a city or province (Genesis 34:2 ; 1 Kings 20:15 ; Jeremiah 34:19 ), and for rulers in general (Matthew 20:25 ; 1Corinthians 2:6,1 Corinthians 2:8 )
Hermon - The modern name is Jebet esh-Sheikh , ‘the Mountain of the chief
Iddo - Loddeus ) the chief at Casiphia, who provided Ezra with Levites and Nethinim
Lucifer - It could scarcely have been a morning-star, whose chief point would be its brightness
Shaphan - Shaphan appears to have been the chief lay leader in the execution of Josiah’s reforms
uz'zi - (Nehemiah 11:22 ) ...
A priest, chief of the father's house of Jedaiah, in the time of Joiakim the high priest
Tin - ) There call be little doubt that the mines of Britain were the chief source of supply to the ancient world, [1] ("Tin ore has lately been found in Midian
Ithamar - Eleazar's family and chief men were more numerous than those of Ithamar
Nazarenes - Christians converted from Judaism, whose chief error consisted in defending the necessity or expediency of the works of the law, and who obstinately adhered to the practice of the Jewish ceremonies
Rabbi - ‘chief or ‘master
Naphtali - During Solomon's reign the territory was designated a separate economic district (1Kings 4:7,1 Kings 4:15 ) and produced Hiram, the king's chief brass worker (1 Kings 7:13-14 )
Master - Luke often uses epistates (manager, chief) where Matthew and Mark have teacher (didaskalos), rabbi, or Lord (for example, Luke 5:5 ; Luke 8:24 ,Luke 8:24,8:45 ; Luke 9:33 ,Luke 9:33,9:49 ; Luke 17:13 )
Clean - ...
The chief design of these regulations seems to have been to establish a system of regimen which would distinguish the Jews from all other nations
Midian - Its chief was Jethro (or Reuel), whose daughter Moses married (v
Allegory - In pure allegory the chief object aimed at is never directly expressed
Administration - The persons collectively, who are entrusted with the execution of laws, and the superintendence of public affairs the chief magistrate and his council or the council alone, as in Great Britain
Zebadiah - Zebadiah probably acted for the king, Amariah the high priest for the priesthood and ecclesiastical interests in the court consisting of priests, Levites, and chief men, over which they jointly presided, and which decided all causes civil and ecclesiastical
Assumptionists - At the time of its suppression this congregation had 20 Apostolic schools, with hospitals, orphanages, and branches in 80 dioceses; and La Bonne Presse which issued periodicals, pamphlets, and books in great numbers, the chief publication being La Croix
Augustinians of the Assumption - At the time of its suppression this congregation had 20 Apostolic schools, with hospitals, orphanages, and branches in 80 dioceses; and La Bonne Presse which issued periodicals, pamphlets, and books in great numbers, the chief publication being La Croix
Hashabiah - A chief of the Levites in the time of Josiah ( 2 Chronicles 35:9 ); called in 1E Esther 1:9 Sabias
Heude, Pierre - He was one of the chief contributors to the Jesuit review of oriental natural history, and specialized in the systematic and geographical propagation of east Asiatic mammals, and comparative morphology of classes and groups according to tooth formation and skeleton
Procurator - In smaller provinces as Judaea, attached to larger as Syria, the procurator had the judicial junctions as "president," subordinate to the chief president over Syria
Pamphylia - Then they "went down (sea being lower than land) to Attalia," the chief seaport of Pamphylia
Menandrians - The most ancient branch of Gnostics; thus called from Menander their chief, said by some, without sufficient foundation, to have been a disciple of Simon Magus, and himself a reputed magician
Anathoth - A chief that is a family or clan leader, who along with 84 other priests, Levites, and leaders signed a covenant that the Israelites would obey the law of God given through Moses (Nehemiah 10:19 )
Michael the Archangel - In Daniel he is called 'one of the chief princes,' 'your prince,' 'the great prince which standeth for the children of thy people
Zich'ri - ) ...
The father of Eliezer, the chief of the Reubenites in the reign of David
Armenia - Its chief modern towns are Erzeroum, Erivan, and Van
Scribes - The chief meaning of the term, however, is a man of letters whose office it was to explain the law of Moses
Capernaum - A chief city of Galilee in the time of Christ, not mentioned before the captivity in Babylon
Mother - It is put for a chief city, 2 Samuel 20:19 ; for a benefactress, Judges 5:7 ; for a nation, as in the expressive English phrase, "the mother country," Isaiah 3:12 49:23
Preaching - Under the gospel dispensation, the preaching of Christ crucified, by those whom he calls to be his ambassadors, is an established ordinance of prime importance-God's chief instrumentality for the conversion of the world, Mark 16:15 1 Corinthians 1:21 2 Timothy 2:2 4:2
Cilicia - This country was the province of Cicero when proconsul; and its chief town, Tarsus, was the birthplace of the apostle Paul, Acts 6:9
za'Bad - The chief interest connected with him is in his genealogy, which is of considerable importance in a chronological point of view
Lycao'Nia - "Cappadocia is on the east, Galatia on the north, Phrygia on the west and Cilicia on the south "Among its chief cities are Derbe, Lystra and Iconium
Magistrate - See chief , PRINCE , RULER
Edrei - One of the chief towns of Bashan, where Og was defeated by the Israelites
Jesse - Obed's son, father of David; sprung from the Moabitess Ruth and the Canaanite Rahab of Jericho; and from Nahshon, at the Exodus chief of Judah, and so from the great house of Pharez, through Hezron
Cornerstone - Architectural term used twice in the New Testament (Ephesians 2:20 ; 1 Peter 2:6 ) to speak of the exalted Jesus as the chief foundation stone of the church, the cornerstone on which all the building depends. Paul builds on this concept in Ephesians 2:20 by saying that Jesus Christ is the chief cornerstone, the apostles and prophets are foundation stones, and the whole building (the church) is a holy temple in the Lord
Benaiah - ) Son of Jehoiada, the chief priest (1 Chronicles 27:5), so of the tribe of Levi, though of Kabzeel in S. Having remained faithful in Adonijah's rebellion (1 Kings 1:8; 1 Kings 1:10; 1 Kings 1:32-38; 1 Kings 1:44), and having by Solomon's command slain him and Joab, he was promoted to the latter's post as commander in chief (1 Kings 2:25; 1 Kings 2:34-35; 1 Kings 4:4)
Captain - Rendered "chief," Genesis 40:2 ; 41:9 ; rendered also "prince," Daniel 1:7 ; "ruler," Judges 9:30 ; "governor,' 1 Kings 22:26 . ), the "captain of the body-guard" (Genesis 37:36 ; 39:1 ; 41:10 ; Jeremiah 40:1 ), or, as the word may be rendered, "chief of the executioners" (marg
Bend - To incline to be determined that is, to stretch towards, or cause to tend as, to be bent on mischief. They have the beams,knees, and foot hooks bolted to them, and are the chief strength of the ship's sides. It is made by two lines drawn across from the dexter chief, to the sinister base point
Reign - To hold such a position was to function as the commander-in-chief of the army, the chief executive of the group, and to be an important, if not central, religious figure
Diana of the Ephesians - The rude idol preserved in her chief temple at Ephesus was said to have fallen from heaven (this is the real meaning of Acts 19:35 ), a not uncommon idea in ancient times, which suggests that such images were sometimes meteoric stones. The chief priest, who bore a Persian title, had under him a large company of priestesses
Governor -
The chief of a tribe or family. It is applied to a king as the military and civil chief of his people, ( 2 Samuel 5:2 ; 6:21 ; 1 Chronicles 29:22 ) to the general of an army, (2 Chronicles 32:21 ) and to the head of a tribe. (2 Chronicles 28:7 ) It is applied in (1 Kings 10:15 ) to the petty chieftains who were tributary to Solomon, (2 Chronicles 9:14 ) to the military commander of the Syrians, (1 Kings 20:24 ) the Assyrians, (2 Kings 18:24 ; 23:8 ) the Chaldeans, (Jeremiah 51:23 ) and the Medes
Leontius, Priest And Martyr of Armenia - He acted a conspicuous part in the stand of the Armenian church against the court of Persia, as related chiefly in the History of Varian by Elisha Vartabed and in the historical work of Lazarus of Barb. Leontius, who is everywhere mentioned with Joseph, and is usually the orator, as he is the chief inspirer, of the whole movement, delivered a fervent address before the battle (given fully by Langlois), dwelling on the examples of Phineas, Elijah, Gideon, and other famous believers in O. The most severely dealt with was Leontius, he being regarded as the chief instigator of the Armenian resistance
Head - Literally, the uppermost part of the body considered to be the seat of life, but not the intellect and figuratively for first, top, or chief. It can mean leader, chief, or prince (Isaiah 9:15 ), and it can have the idea of first in a series (1 Chronicles 12:9 ). Israel was the “head” (translated “chief”) nation, God's firstborn (Jeremiah 31:7 ). Injury to it was a chief form of defeating an enemy (Psalm 68:21 )
Chlodowech - His conversion helped to weld the peoples of his kingdom into that nation which was to be for ages the chief defender of western civilization and Catholicism
Chlodwig - His conversion helped to weld the peoples of his kingdom into that nation which was to be for ages the chief defender of western civilization and Catholicism
Leo the Great, Pope Saint - Elected when the Western Empire was disintegrating and heresy rife, his chief aim was to sustain church unity
Leo i, Pope Saint - Elected when the Western Empire was disintegrating and heresy rife, his chief aim was to sustain church unity
Shallum - A chief priest (1 Chronicles 6:13 ; Ezra 7:2 )
Diocesan Court - It consists of: ...
a vicar-general with general vicarious power in spiritual and temporal matters, who is one tribunal with his bishop and can be removed from office at will;
an official, who corresponds to a chief justice in the civilcourts, having ordinary power;
a chancellor, to keep the records a promoter of justice, like a district attorney;
a defender of the bond of Marriage and Sacred Orders, whose duty it is to defend the existence of a true marriage or valid Orders when either is attacked;
synodal judges, who may be called associate justices and who are generally named in the diocesan synod;
examiners, who preside at examinations of the clergy and intervene in certain cases of removal of parish priests;
parish priest consultors, who also are called in sometimes in the removal of irremovable pastors or in the transfer of ordinary pastors; auditors, who assist the judges in ecclesiastical trials by citing witnesses, etc
Judgment - " Judgment is the chief act toward which all thought converges, since it alone is true or false
Damascus, Syria - , Damascus was the chief commercial emporium for the nomad Arabs
Nehemias - Sanaballat, his chief opponent, was unsuccessful in trying to prevent the work which had been so divided among the Jews that each family agreed to build a section of the wall as a monument to its zeal
Nehemiah - Sanaballat, his chief opponent, was unsuccessful in trying to prevent the work which had been so divided among the Jews that each family agreed to build a section of the wall as a monument to its zeal
Jashobeam - He is listed first among the “chief of the mighty men whom David had” (1 Chronicles 11:11 )
Miletus - On the Maeander, anciently capital and chief seaport of Caria and Ionia, subdued by Croesus, then by Persia
Adoni-Zedec - , Hebrews) is graphically described: "Behold, I say that the land of the king my lord is ruined", "The wars are mighty against me", "The Hebrew chiefs plunder all the king's lands", "Behold, I the chief of the Amorites am breaking to pieces
Phinehas - God rewarded Phinehas’ zeal by promising that his descendants would become the chief priestly family in Israel (Numbers 25:10-13; cf
Rechabites - Wolff (1839) found in Arabia, near Mecca, a tribe claiming to be descendants of Jehonadab; and recently a Bedouin tribe has been found near the Dead Sea who also profess to be descendants of the same Kenite chief
Spinosism - The chief articles in his system are such as these: that there is but one substance in nature, and that this only substance is endued with an infinite variety of attributes, among which are extension and cogitation; that all the bodies in the universe are modifications of this substance, considered as extended: and that all the souls of men are modifications of the same substance, considered as cogitative: that God is a necessary and infinitely perfect Being, and is the cause of all things that exist, but not a different Being from them: that there is but one Being, and one nature; and that this nature produces within itself, by an immanent act, al those which we call creatures; and that this Being is, at the same time, both agent and patient, efficient cause and subject, but that he produces nothing but modifications of himself
Death: Its Revealing Power - High carnival is being held, and men wear their masks and dominoes, and strut about, and we think that man a king, and this a mighty Oriental prince, and this a haughty Indian chief
Lourdes, France - The chief pilgrimage, called the national, is in August
Red Sea - But the chief reference is in 1 Corinthians 10:1-2, where St
Magistrate - In the case of Philippi, strategoi serves as the Greek equivalent of the Latin duumviri , the two magistrates who served as the chief judicial officials of a Roman city or colony
Gadara - It was a town of the Decapolis, probably Greek in origin, and was the chief city of Peræa
Gamaliel - The advice given by him to the chief priests ( Acts 5:34-40 ) in reference to their dealing with the Apostles shows similar tolerance and wisdom
Secondary - ) One who occupies a subordinate, inferior, or auxiliary place; a delegate deputy; one who is second or next to the chief officer; as, the secondary, or undersheriff of the city of London
Joab - The son of Zeruiah, and nephew of David, and commander-in-chief of his army
Asahel - Asahel, along with ten others, assisted the chief officers in charge of contributions, tithes, and dedicated objects
Gregory of Neocaesarea, Saint - " He is also well known as a writer and some of his chief works are: "Oratio Panegyrica," in honor of Origen; "Tractatus ad Theopompum," on the passibility and impassibility of God; "Epistola Canonica," an explanation of the organization of the churches of Pontus under Gregory; and "Exposition of the Faith," showing Gregory's idea of the Trinity
Gregory Thaumaturgus, Saint - " He is also well known as a writer and some of his chief works are: "Oratio Panegyrica," in honor of Origen; "Tractatus ad Theopompum," on the passibility and impassibility of God; "Epistola Canonica," an explanation of the organization of the churches of Pontus under Gregory; and "Exposition of the Faith," showing Gregory's idea of the Trinity
Apply - To betake to give the chief part of time and attention as, to apply one's self to the study of botany
Andorra - The country is included in the Spanish Diocese of Urgel, founded in the 4th century, of which Seo de Urgel, in Spain, is the cathedral city; the chief town of the republic is Andorra La Vieja
Sadducees - These were a sect among the Jews, but possessing nothing of the principles of Abraham, but rather a class of Epicureans: They were rigid to a degree for the law, because, denying any future state of reward or punishment, angel or spirit, they made the chief good to consist in an attention to the observance of order in this life
Jeshua, Jeshuah - Son of Kadmiel, and a chief of the Levites
Sanhedrin or Sanhedrim - we find it consisted of the chief priests, or heads of the twenty-four courses, the elders, lawyers, and the scribes
Anselm, Saint - He influenced deeply Catholic philosophy and theology, his chief achievement in philosophy being the ontological argument for the existence of God, viz
Gospel in Liturgy - From the earliest times the Gospels were read and explained during Divine services; gradually certain portions, appropriate to the chief feasts and seasons of the year, were chosen and became a fixed part of the Mass
Shelomith - Laadan and Shimei are not named in 1 Chronicles 23:7 as being sons of Gershon, but as founders of the two chief lilies of the Gershonites
Archibishop - The chief or metropolitan bishop, who has several suffragans under him
Abner - Saul’s cousin ( 1 Samuel 9:1 ; 1 Samuel 14:51 ) and commander-in-chief ( 1 Samuel 17:55 ; 1 Samuel 26:5 )
Eusebius, Saint Martyr - After the synod at Alexandria, 362, Eusebius went to Antioch to reconcile the Eustathians and the Meletians, visited other churches of the Orient in the interest of the orthodox faith, and arriving at Vercelli, 363, became one of the chief opponents of Arianism
Cyprus - Venus was its chief goddess—hence her name Cypria
Hauran - The chief of these are Bozra, Ezra, Medjel, Shoba, Shakka, Souerda, Kanouat, Hebran, Zarle, Oerman, and Aatyl; with Messema, Berak, and Om Ezzeitoun, in the Ledja
Silas - Acts 23:3 , and 2 Corinthians 1:19 , the former name being a contraction of the latter; one of the chief men among the first disciples at Jerusalem, Acts 15:22 , and supposed by some to have been of the number of the seventy
Thaumaturgus, Gregory, Saint - " He is also well known as a writer and some of his chief works are: "Oratio Panegyrica," in honor of Origen; "Tractatus ad Theopompum," on the passibility and impassibility of God; "Epistola Canonica," an explanation of the organization of the churches of Pontus under Gregory; and "Exposition of the Faith," showing Gregory's idea of the Trinity
Learn - The chief art of learning is to attempt but little at a time
Birthright - Besides the father's chief blessing, Genesis 27:1-46 , and various minor advantages, the firstborn son was, first, specially consecrated to the Lord, ...
Exodus 13:11-16 22:29 ; and the firstborn son of a priest succeeded his father in the priestly office
Patara - 440, and the chief Lycian god was identified with Apollo, whose celebrated oracle at Patara gave him the title Patareus (Hor
Kir'Jath-je'Arim - These requirements are exactly fulfilled in the small modern village of Kuriet-el-Enab --now usually known as Abu Gosh , from the robber chief whose headquarters it was --on the road from Jaffa and Jerusalem
Education - The wisdom therefore and instruction, of which so much is said in the book of Proverbs, are to be understood chiefly of moral and religious discipline, imparted, according to the direction of the law, by the teaching and under the example of parents. ) Previous to the captivity, the chief depositaries of learning were the schools or colleges, from which in most cases proceeded that succession of public teachers who at various times endeavored to reform the moral and religious conduct of both rulers and people
Jebusites - They lived in the central highlands, where their chief centre was Jerusalem, earlier known as Jebus (Genesis 10:15-16; Genesis 15:18-21; Exodus 3:8; Numbers 13:29; Joshua 11:3; Joshua 15:63; Joshua 18:28)
Government - As such, he was the chief official of family and government. One individual might be designated as chief or head of each clan. A tribe might have a chief or even a prince as its leader. Certainly the judge seems to have been the chief official of the confederacy of tribes in that period prior to the monarchy. The judge was just an extension of the tribal chief or leader carried to a somewhat larger realm of a leader for several combined tribes. Not only did the king stand as a single ruler for all the people, as a sort of chief raised to a national level; but the king was also surrounded by a new structure. Surrounding the royal court were such officials as “the one who is over the house” a sort of Secretary of State or Prime Minister; the recorder who was a herald, press secretary, and chief of protocol combined; the chief scribe; counselors; priests; and prophets ( 1 Kings 4:1 ). The chief ruler became a local governor appointed by the foreign power as was Nehemiah, or even a foreigner as were the Roman procurators
Armour - The bow was, however, the chief weapon of offence. ...
...
Of the defensive armour a chief place is assigned to the shield or buckler
Innocents - Herod the Great, hearing from the Magi about the birth of a king of the Jews, foreshadowed by the star in the East which they had followed, inquired of the chief priests and scribes where this promised prince should be born. The chief ground is the silence of Josephus on the subject
Justinus - The principal part is played by the third paternal angel, Baruch, the chief minister of good, and the third maternal, Naas, or the serpent, the chief author of evil
Archangel - The English term archangel is based on a Greek term archangelos which means “chief, or first angel. Hierarchies emerge in the literature that stressed particular groupings headed by archangels [1] who were counted among number designations such as seven (Tobit 12:15 ; 4 Ezra 5:20 ), four (Enoch 4; 87:2-3; 88:1), three (Enoch 90:31). In particular, Michael (Daniel 10:13 ,Daniel 10:13,10:21 ; Daniel 12:1 ; Jude 1:9 ; Assumption of Moses 12:7-9), Gabriel (gabriel , “hero of God”; Daniel 8:16 ; Daniel 9:21 ; Luke 1:19 ,Luke 1:19,1:26 ), and Raphael (rapael “God has healed”; a chief figure in the book of Tobit, see Tobit 3:16-17 ) were cast as important interpreters, advocates, and intercessors
Tell - ...
Nâgı̂yd (נַגִד, Strong's #5057), “chief leader. 9:16 the word is used as a “chief leader” that is equivalent to a king: “Tomorrow about this time I will send thee a man out of the land of Benjamin, and thou shalt anoint him to be captain over my people Israel. 9:11 to refer to a “chief leader” (ruler) of a smaller region
Circoncelliones - But the chief objects of their cruelty were the Catholics, and especially those who had renounced Donatism. Their chief took the name of chief of the saints
Asiarch - In Acts 19:31 Revised Version margin reads ‘Asiarchs’ for Revised Version ‘chief officers of Asia’ and Authorized Version ‘chief of Asia. Another (civil) office could be held concurrently with the Asiarchate, but not with the chief priesthood of Asia
Porphyrius, Patriarch of Antioch - Porphyry then managed to get into his hands Cyriacus, Diophantus, and other presbyters of the orthodox party who were likely to be troublesome, and seized the opportunity of the Olympian festival at Antioch, when the population had poured forth to the spectacles of Daphne, to lock himself and his three consecrators, Acacius, Antiochus, and Severianus, whom he had kept hiding at his own house, with a few of the clergy, into the chief church, and to receive consecration at their hands. Porphyry was completely deserted by the chief clergy and all the ladies of rank of Antioch, who refused to approach his church and held their meetings clandestinely ( ib. It is a misfortune that the chief and almost only source for the character of Porphyry is the violent pamphlet of Palladius, whose warm partisanship for Chrysostom unduly blackens all his opponents, and refuses them a single redeeming virtue
Jubilee - The chief ceremony is the opening at the beginning, and the closing at the end; of the "holy doors" in each of the basilicas the pilgrims visit in Rome, two of them being Saint Peter's and Saint John Lateran
Zephani'ah - The chief characteristics of this book are the unity and harmony of the composition, the grace, energy and dignity of its style, and the rapid and effective alternations of threats and promises
Thessalonica - On his second missionary journey, Paul preached in the synagogue here, the chief synagogue of the Jews in that part of Macedonia, and laid the foundations of a church (Acts 17:1-4 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:9 )
James Hope-Scott - His funeral sermon was preached by Cardinal Newman, and he was buried in Saint Margaret's Convent, Edinburgh, of which he was the chief benefactor
Courses - Each course was under a head or chief, and ministered for a week, the order being determined by lot
Barzillai - ) A Gileadite chief
Ariel - A brave "chief," who directed under Ezra (Ezra 8:16) the caravan from Babylon to Jerusalem
Search - , "search," RV text, "ye search," either is possible grammatically; (f) of Nicodemus as commanded similarly by the chief priests and Pharisees, John 7:52
Iddo - chief of those who met at Casiphia to join in the second caravan returning under Ezra (Ezra 8:17; Ezra 8:20) in the reign of Artaxerxes Longimanus, 458 B
Ease, Eased - Its chief significance is that of taking, or causing to take, rest; it is used in the Middle Voice in Luke 12:19 , "take (thine) ease," indicative of unnecessary, self-indulgent relaxation
Goliath - He came into public notice now as the deliverer of Israel and the chief among Saul's men of war (18:5), and the devoted friend of Jonathan
Innocents, Slaughter of the - ...
Flavius Josephus, our chief ancient source on Herod, is surprisingly silent on this episode
Jehoiarib - The Talmud view is not favored by Nehemiah 10:2-8, which enumerates 21 courses, of Nehemiah's time: Nehemiah 12:1-7; Nehemiah 12:19, also enumerates 22 courses of Zerubbabel's time, among them Jehoiarib, of whose course Mattenai was chief in Jehoiakim's days
Tirzah (2) - " Its mention is no ground for assigning the Song to a date later than Solomon, as it was in his time the chief city of northern Israel as Jerusalem of southern Israel
Mortification - The means to be used in this work are, not emacerating the body, seclusion from society, our own resolutions: but the Holy Spirit is the chief agent, Romans 8:13
Town Clerk - An officer originally appointed to record the laws and decrees of the state, mid to read them in public; but in Asia Minor, under the Roman empire, authorized to preside over popular assemblies and submit questions to their vote, as inscriptions on marbles testify; in short, governors of single cities and districts, and named as such on the coins; sometimes also entitled "chief priests"; a kind of state secretary
Seal - ]'>[1] where we read that the chief priests and Pharisees, after consultation with Pilate, in order to guard against the removal of our Lord’s body by the disciples, secured the sepulchre to the best of their power by setting their seal upon the entrance stone (cf
Chemosh - Jerome states that Dibon was his chief seat of worship
Cob - ) A leader or chief; a conspicuous person, esp
Seraiah - chief priest taken into Babylonian Exile in 587 B
Hope-Scott, James Robert - His funeral sermon was preached by Cardinal Newman, and he was buried in Saint Margaret's Convent, Edinburgh, of which he was the chief benefactor
Benaiah - He played an important role in the young king’s coronation ( 1 Kings 1:38 ; 1 Kings 1:44 ), and was subsequently ordered to dispatch Joab, whose place as commander-in-chief he then filled ( 1 Kings 2:28-35 )
Eli - Thus in his interviews with Hannah, in the first one it is she in whom the chief interest centres ( 1 Samuel 1:12 ff
Fish - The chief edible fish are members of the Chromides and of the Cyprinidæ (carps)
Goshen - There seems to be no Egyptian origin for the name, unless it represented Kesem , the Egyptian equivalent of Phacussa (the chief town of the nome of Arabia according to Ptolemy)
Amminadab - chief of Uzziel's 112 sons, whom David sent for to bring the ark to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:10-12)
Jehoiada - This Jehoiada was the chief priest, 1 Chronicles 27:5, and therefore he was the leader of the priests who came to David at Hebron
Athaliah - The persons active in this were Jehosheba, sister of Ahaziah, and her husband Jehoiada, the chief priest
Builder - Under another similitude Christ is the chief corner stone, or head of the corner, which 'the builders,' the heads of the Jewish nation, refused, but which God exalted
Head - Besides the common use of this as 'chief,' referring to the heads of families and heads of tribes, the word was used symbolically of government and power, as when God declared that the Seed of the woman should bruise the serpent's 'head
Morsel - Moth - ...
Isaiah 14:12 (b) The word is used in this place to describe the bright glories in the pre-earth days, when Satan was one of GOD's chief angels, clothed in the glory of Heaven, and living gorgeously in the light of GOD
Athens - The chief city of Attica, and the seat of Grecian learning and art
Jehoiada - In 1 Chronicles 27:5 he is called 'a chief priest,' which makes it possible that he is the same person as No
Caleb - Joshua 15:13 does not mean that Caleb did not belong to the tribe of Judah, as some have supposed; but that though he was not a chief of the tribe, a special portion was given to him
Felicissimus, Deacon of Carthage - He was the chief agent ( signifer seditionis , Ep
Greek Language - The chief captain at Jerusalem, though a Roman, asked Paul if he could speak Greek, supposing him to be an Egyptian
Publicans - Zacchaeus would appear to have been a just and liberal man; he speaks of restoring money taken 'by false accusation': being 'the chief among the publicans,' he remedied such things as were under his control
Ziklag - Amasai, chief of the captains, said "Thine are we, David, and on thy side, thou son of Jesse: peace, peace be unto thee, and peace be to thine helpers; for thy God helpeth thee
Reat - ) Holding a chief position; elevated: lofty: eminent; distingushed; foremost; principal; as, great men; the great seal; the great marshal, etc
Amariah - The chief priest and highest judge of matters involving religious law under King Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 19:11 )
Gibeon - GIBEON, GIBEONITES...
Gibeon was the chief city; so called from Gabah, an hill
Marshal - ) The chief officer of arms, whose duty it was, in ancient times, to regulate combats in the lists
Jesh'ua - ...
A branch of the family of Pahath-moab, one of the chief families, probably, of the tribe of Judah
Assideanis - " They were a kind of religious society among the Jews, whose chief and distinguishing character was, to maintain the honour of the temple, and observe punctually the traditions of the elders
Rosh - It deserves notice, that the LXX render the passage in Ezekiel, Γωγ , αοχοντα ‘Ρως , Μεσοχ , και Θοβελ , Gog the chief of Ros, Mesoch, and Thobel; and Jerom, not absolutely to reject this name, inserts both renderings: Gog, terram Magog, principem capitis ( sive Ros) Mosoch, et Thubal
Lord - ) A title bestowed on the persons above named; and also, for honor, on certain official persons; as, lord advocate, lord chamberlain, lord chancellor, lord chief justice, etc
Care - The different degrees of anxiety expressed by this word constitute the chief differences in its signification or applications
Edward vi - Under Edward, brought up a Protestant, dominated by his uncle, the Protector Somerset, and by Archbishop Cranmer, great doctrinal and liturgical changes came about, chief among them the introduction of the first and second Books of Common Prayer (indubitably by Cranmer, 1549; 1552)
Zerubbabel or Zorobabel - He is always named first, as being chief of the Jews that returned to their own country, Ezra 2:2 3:8 5:2 Haggai 1:1 2:1-9,21-23
Top - The highest person the chief
Omri - ...
Tirzah had previously been the chief residence of the kings of Israel; but when Omri purchased the hill of Shomeron, 1 Kings 16:24 , he built there a new city, which he called Samaria, from the name of the previous possessor, Shemer or Shomer, and here fixed his royal seat
Jesh'ua - ...
A branch of the family of Pahath-moab, one of the chief families, probably, of the tribe of Judah
Patriarch - ) ("After the destruction of Jerusalem, patriarch was the title of the chief religious rulers of the Jews in Asia and in early Christian times it became the designation of the bishops of Rome, Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem
Nethan'e-el - ) ...
A chief of the Levites in the reign of Josiah
Hup'Pim - The Jewish tradition is that he was the husband of Miriam, and that he was identical with ...
The grandfather of Bezaleel, the chief artificer of the tabernacle
Jabin -
A king of Hazor, at the time of the entrance of Israel into Canaan (Joshua 11:1-14 ), whose overthrow and that of the northern chief with whom he had entered into a confederacy against Joshua was the crowning act in the conquest of the land (11:21-23; comp 14:6-15)
Maximianus i., m. Aurelius Valerius - (For the chief events in his history see DIOCLETIAN, CONSTANTINE, and MAXENTIUS in D
Seal - ]'>[1] where we read that the chief priests and Pharisees, after consultation with Pilate, in order to guard against the removal of our Lord’s body by the disciples, secured the sepulchre to the best of their power by setting their seal upon the entrance stone (cf
Theodorus Askidas, Archbaptist of Caesarea - of Caesarea in Cappadocia, the chief supporter of Origen's views in the first half of cent
Vitellius - He took over the office of chief pontiff on 18th July, and, after arranging the elections for ten years, he appointed himself perpetual consul. It is reported that the pleasures of the table were Vitellius’ chief concern, and certain dishes were named after him
Head - It signifies a chief or capital city: "The head of Syria is Damascus," Isaiah 7:8 . It denotes a chief or principal member in society: "The Lord will cut off from Israel head and tail
Simon Peter - Because of his faith, fidelity, enthusiasm, and love, although he was somewhat irresolute of character, Jesus showered him with many favors; He gave him the name Peter, cured his mother-in-law, appointed him chief of the Apostolic band, made him head of the Church, chose him as one of the witnesses of the raising of Jairus's daughter from the dead, and of the Transfiguration, and of the Agony in the Garden; and after the Resurrection, lest Peter's denial make him lose prestige, Our Lord renewed his commission as chief pastor of the flock
Chancellor - Ordinally, a chief notary or scribe, under the Roman Emperors but in England, in later times, an officer invested with judicial powers, and particularly with the superintendence of all charters, letters and other official writings of the crown, that required to be solemnly authenticated. He is the chief magistrate in the government of the university
Lead - To conduct, as a chief or commander, implying authority to direct and govern as, a general leads his troops to battle and to victory. To conduct, as a chief or commander
Esther - ...
Some time later a proud and ambitious man named Haman became chief minister in the Persian government. ...
Mordecai then became chief minister instead of Haman
Head - Hence the head is the chief or more important part, and is used for the whole person, in the phrase, let the evil fall on my head. A chief a principal person a leader a commander one who has the first rank or place,and to whom others are subordinate as the head of an army the head of a sect or party. Topic of discourse chief point or subject a summary as the heads of a discourse or treatise. or in composition, chief principal as a head workman
Anakim - Their chief city Hebron became Caleb's possession for his faith, shown in having no fear of their giant stature since the Lord was on Israel's side (Joshua 15:14; Judges 1:20; compare Numbers 13:22; Numbers 13:28; Numbers 13:30-33; Numbers 14:24)
Francis Gasquet - He is the chief Catholic historian of the English Reformation, of English monastic life, and of the ecclesiastical history of the Middle Ages in England
Cecil, William, Baron Burghley - From custos brevium on the court of common pleas, Historic Caughnawaga and secretary for the Lord Protector Somerset, William Cecil rose to the position of chief secretary of state under Queen Elizabeth, in which position he practically dictated England's policy for 40 years
Semi-Pelagians - Cassian, who had been a deacon of Constantinople, who was afterwards a priest at Marceilles, was the chief of these Semi-Pelagians, whose leading principles were, ...
1
Hemerobaptists - John, because they yet retain some knowledge of the Gospel, is probably of Jewish origin, and seems to have been derived from the ancient Hemerobaptists; at least it is certain that John, whom they consider as the founder of their sect, bears no sort of similitude to John the Baptist, but rather resembles the person of that name whom the ancient writers represent as the chief of the Jewish Hemerobaptists
Midwives - Aben Ezra makes these two "chiefs over all the midwives, who were more than 500. " Pharaoh probably only desired to kill the males of the chief Hebrew, who alone would call in midwives
Nebo (2) - Babylon from early ages held Nebo among the chief gods
Humanism - From Italy the movement spread throughout Europe; into Germany under Reuchlin (1455-1522) and Erasmus (1466-1536), who both exemplified its Christian spirit; into England where Sir Thomas More (1478-1535) was its chief exponent; into the French universities
Shammah - Son of Reuel, son of Esau, a tribal chief ( Genesis 36:13 )
Ulai - In Daniel 8:16 Daniel says, "I heard a man's voice between the banks of Ulai," referring either to the bifurcation or to the river and one of its chief channels, for Eulaeus by artificial canals surrounded the Shushan citadel
Fillet - ) An ordinary equaling in breadth one fourth of the chief, to the lowest portion of which it corresponds in position
Scribes - ...
In the New Testament the word is used in the sense in which it is applied to Ezra, and scribes are classed with the chief priests and the elders
Harvest - It especially refers to the time of collecting corn or grain, which is the chief food of men, as wheat and rye
Transfiguration - Moses the lawgiver and Elijah tie chief of the prophets both appear talking with Christ the source of the gospel, to show that they are all one and agree in one
Gasquet, Francis Aidan - He is the chief Catholic historian of the English Reformation, of English monastic life, and of the ecclesiastical history of the Middle Ages in England
Meshech - That passage in Ezekiel , 38, also, which in our Bibles is rendered "the chief prince of Meshech and Tubal," is, in the Septuagint, "the prince of Rosh, Meshech, and Tubal
William Cecil, Baron Burghley - From custos brevium on the court of common pleas, Historic Caughnawaga and secretary for the Lord Protector Somerset, William Cecil rose to the position of chief secretary of state under Queen Elizabeth, in which position he practically dictated England's policy for 40 years
Regesta, Papal - The regesta generally are of first historical importance, and have been published in three great collections, chief among which is that of Jaffe, Leipzig, 1888 (2nd edition)
Shishak - In the palace-temple of Karnak in Egypt, the walls of which are yet standing, Sesonchis is represented in a large basrelief, dragging captive kings in triumph before the three chief Theban gods
Love - Love is a chief attribute of Jehovah, the length and breadth and height and depth of which are beyond comprehension, for they are infinite, Ephesians 3:18,19
Bashan - In the time of Joshua, Argob, one of its chief districts, contained sixty walled towns, Deuteronomy 4:43 Joshua 20:8 21:27
Malachi - He seems to allude to the covenant that Nehemiah renewed with the lord, together with the priests and chief of the nation
no-a'Mon - (temple of Amon ) ( Nahum 3:8 ) No, (Jeremiah 46:25 ; Ezekiel 30:14,16 ) a city of Egypt, better known under the name of Thebes or Diospolis Magna, the ancient and splendid metropolis of upper Egypt The second part of the first form as the name of Amen , the chief divinity of Thebes, mentioned or alluded to in connection with this place in Jeremiah
Eleazar - He succeeded as chief of the Levites on the death of Nadab and Abihu, and on the death of his father became high priest
Justinus i - He was a man of no education, and the affairs of the state were managed chiefly by his prudent minister Proclus the quaestor and afterwards by his nephew and eventual successor Justinian. 527 Justin caused Justinian, who had long taken the chief part in government, to be proclaimed emperor and crowned, and on Aug
Victorinus - Jerome (our chief authority concerning him) mentions him several times, and with respect even where his criticisms are adverse
Basilidians - A denomination, in the second century, from Basilides, chief of the Egyptian Gnostics. ...
Hence, the Supreme God, beholding with compassion the miserable state of rational beings, who groaned under the contest of these jarring powers, sent from heaven his son Nus, or Christ, the chief of the aions, that, joined in a substantial union with the man Jesus, he might restore the knowledge of the Supreme God, destroy the empire of those angelic natures which presided over the world, and particularly that of the arrogant leader of the Jewish people
Ethnarch - This comparatively rare term is derived from ἔθνος, ‘a race,’ and ἄρχειν, ‘to rule’; perhaps the nearest English equivalent is ‘chief. 616) from a village, El-Mâlikîje in the Hauran, mentions by the names ‘ethnarch’ and ‘general (or praetor) of nomads’ a chief of nomad Arabs of the time of Hadrian or Antoninus Pius who must have submitted to the Emperor
Felix - Claudius Lysias, the chief captain, sent Paul for judgment to Felix at Caesarea. After the first hearing, Felix deferred the Jews until Lysias the chief captain should come
Commander - Śar (שַׂר, Strong's #8269), “official; leader; commander; captain; chief; prince; ruler. …” In other contexts śar represents “men who clearly have responsibility over others”; they are “rulers or chieftains. In such usage, “chief” means “head official” (cf. ...
The “leaders” or “chiefs” of the Levites ( Midst - In many contexts the word means “among,” not necessarily in the middle: “… And he [3] lifted up the head of the chief butler and of the chief baker among [2] his servants” ( Edom - Bozrah and Sela, or Selah, were its chief cities. When the king of the north in a future day invades Palestine and overthrows countries as far as Egypt, "Edom, and Moab, and the chief of the children of Ammon" will escape, being reserved to be subdued by Israel
King - Gilboa, it was not long till David the outlaw chief of Judah was invited to fill his place. ’ ( c ) Further, according to the usual Semitic conception, the king was also the chief person from a religious point of view. This idea has been lost sight of by later Jewish writers, but there is little doubt that in early times the king regarded himself as the supreme religious director, the chief priest. ), so also David ( 2 Samuel 6:13 ; 2 Samuel 6:17 ; 2 Samuel 24:25 ); while both David and Solomon seem to appoint and dismiss the chief priest at pleasure (cf. The king’s power was limited by the fact that, to begin with, the royal house differed little from other chief houses of the nation. These included ( a ) the commander-in-chief, ‘the captain of the host,’ who in the absence of the king commanded the army ( e. ’ His functions are nowhere defined, but he seems to have held an influential position, and was probably the chief minister, the Grand Vizier of modern times (cf
Honey - Milk and honey were among the chief dainties in the earlier ages, as they are now among the Bedawin; and butter and honey are also mentioned among articles of food (Isaiah 7:15 )
Naaman - Naaman was commander-in-chief of the army of Syria, and was nearest to the person of the king, Ben-hadad II
Dagon - When the Philistines conquered the coastal region of Canaan, they adopted Dagon as their chief deity
Lydia (1) - The chief interest of Lydia for us is that it contained several very ancient and important great cities (of the Ionian branch), Smyrna, Ephesus, Sardis, Colophon, etc
Edrei -
One of the chief towns of the kingdom of Bashan (Joshua 12:4,5 )
Kirjath Jearim - Now Kuryet el Enab, "the city of grapes," on the right bank of a long wady, with a fine old church, stone houses grouped round two or three castle-like houses, the hereditary residences of the family of Abu Ghaush, a marauding chief, amidst olive groves and terraced slopes
Thomas - According to tradition, his chief contribution to this task was to take the gospel to India
Myra - In Greek times Patara surpassed it, but in Roman times Myra became the chief seaport of Lycia, and was recognized by Theodoslus as the capital
Shal'Lum - (1 Chronicles 7:13 ) ...
The chief of a family of porters or gate-keepers of the east gate of the temple
Holy Childhood, Association of the - Its chief ends are: to draw young children near to the Infant Jesus that they may practise Christian charity and contribute to the salvation of pagan children; to procure baptism for these infidels, and educate them to spread Christianity among their countrymen
Ben-Hadad - 854 he had Ahab of Israel as one of his chief allies
Judges - Their chief work was that of deliverers and captains in war
Girl Scouts - " Mrs Nicholas F Brady, the treasurer of the National Council and one of the chief patronesses of the organization, is also the chairman of the Girl Scout Bureau of the International Federation of Catholic Alumnae
Asterius, a Bishop of Arabia - One of the chief subjects that came before this synod was the unhappy schism at Antioch between the Eustathians and the Meletians
Ashdod - One of the five chief cities of the Philistines
Singing - In Habakkuk 3:19 , at the end of the prophet's poetical 'prayer,' it says, "To the chief singer on my stringed instruments
Father - ) One of the chief esslesiastical authorities of the first centuries after Christ; - often spoken of collectively as the Fathers; as, the Latin, Greek, or apostolic Fathers
Association of the Holy Childhood - Its chief ends are: to draw young children near to the Infant Jesus that they may practise Christian charity and contribute to the salvation of pagan children; to procure baptism for these infidels, and educate them to spread Christianity among their countrymen
Ashdod - It was captured by Sargon’s commander-in-chief ( Isaiah 20:1 )
Ordinary - The bend, chevron, chief, cross, fesse, pale, and saltire are uniformly admitted as ordinaries
Camp And Encamp - Three tribes lay to the east, Judah the chief, and Issachar and Zebulun
Zeb'Ulun - The list of Genesis46 ascribes to him three sons, founders of the chief families of the tribe (comp
Latitudinarians - The chief leaders of this party were the great Chillingworth and John Hales; to whom may be added More, Cudworth, Gale, Tillotson, and Whitchcot
Indignation - ...
B — 1: ἀγανακτέω (Strong's #23 — Verb — aganakteo — ag-an-ak-teh'-o ) "to be indignant, to be moved with indignation" (from agan, "much," achomai, "to grieve"), is translated "were moved with indignation" of the ten disciples against James and John, Matthew 20:24 ; in Mark 10:41 , RV (AV, "they began to be much displeased"); in Matthew 21:15 , of the chief priests and scribes, against Christ and the children, RV, "they were moved with indignation" (AV, "they were sore displeased"); in Matthew 26:8 , of the disciples against the woman who anointed Christ's feet, "they had indignation;" so Mark 14:4 ; in Mark 10:14 , of Christ, against the disciples, for rebuking the children, "He was moved with indignation," RV (AV, "he was much displeased"); in Luke 13:14 , of the ruler of the synagogue against Christ for healing on the Sabbath, "being moved with indignation," RV, AV, "(answered) with indignation
Leader - ) One having authority to direct; a chief; a commander
Kadesh - The people rebelled, and were condemned to 40 years sojourn in the wilderness, Numbers 13:14, during which time Kadesh seems to have been their chief centre
Zoan - When Isaiah wrote, it would appear to have been one of the chief cities in Egypt, as he speaks of "the princes of Zoan
Two Sons, Parable of the - They responded in favor of the first son: whereupon Jesus said that publicans and harlots shall go into the Kingdom of God before the chief-priests, Scribes, and Pharisees, thus giving the meaning of the parable and convicting the members of the august Sanhedrin out of their own mouths
Cisterns - The same causes led to the erection, near all the chief cities, of large open reservoirs for public use
Ephraim - Although the youngest, he yet had the chief blessing of his grandfather Jacob, and the tribe was always more distinguished than that of Manasseh, Genesis 48:8-20 Numbers 2:18-21
Worship - chiefly and eminently, the act of paying divine honors to the Supreme Being or the reverence and homage paid to him in religious exercises, consisting in adoration, confession, prayer, thanksgiving and the like. ...
Prayer is a chief part of religious worship
Her'Mon - At the present day it is called Jebel esh-Sheikh , "the chief mountain," and Jebel eth-Thelj , "snowy mountain
am'Orite, the am'Orites - (dwellers on the summits, mountaineers ), one of the chief nations who possessed the land of Canaan before its conquest by the Israelites
Elea'Zar - After the death of Nadab and Abihu without children, (Leviticus 10:6 ; Numbers 3:4 ) Eleazar was appointed chief over the principal Levites
om'ri - (1 Chronicles 7:8 ) ...
A descendant of Pharez the son of Judah, (1 Chronicles 9:4 ) ...
Son of Michael, and chief of the tribe of Issachar in the reign of David
Jethro - Father-in-law of Moses, by whose counsel Moses chose chief men from the tribes to be rulers of thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens, and to judge minor causes, reserving the weightier ones to himself (Exodus 18)
Hellenist - They preached the gospel wherever they went, to non-Jews as well as to Jews, and were the chief cause of the church’s early expansion
Abner - When Saul, the first king of Israel, established his administration, he appointed his cousin Abner as commander-in-chief of his army (1 Samuel 14:50-51)
Pastor - Sometimes he represents him as the Great Shepherd, (Hebrews 13:20) —and sometimes he calls him the Good Shepherd, which giveth his life for the sheep, (John 10:11) —and by his servant the prophet Zechariah, he calls him JEHOVAH'S Shepherd, (Zechariah 13:7) —and by Peter, the chief Shepherd, holding him forth to the under pastors of his flock as a glorious pattern for them to follow, assuring them that when the chief Shepherd shall appear "they shall receive a crown of glory that fadeth not away
Iconium - the chief city of Lycaonia, in Asia Minor. It is the place of chief strength and importance in the central parts of Asiatic Turkey, being surrounded by a strong wall of four miles in circumference; but, as is the case with most eastern cities, much of the enclosed space is waste
Father - Huram is called father of the king of Tyre, 2 Chronicles 2:13 ; and, 2 Chronicles 4:16 , even of Solomon, because he was the principal workman, and chief director of their undertakings. The father of Sichem, the father of Tekoah, the father of Bethlehem, &c, signify the chief persons who inhabited these cities; he who built or rebuilt them
Mordecai - was the son of Jair, of the race of Saul, and a chief of the tribe of Benjamin. Beside, if nothing but civil respect had been intended to Haman, the king need not have enjoined it on his servants after he had made him his first minister and chief favourite, Esther 3:1-2 ; they would have been ready enough to show it on all occasions
King, - "a chief ruler, one invested with supreme authority over a nation, tribe or country. Many persons are called kings whom we should rather call chiefs or leaders. Besides being commander-in-chief of the army, supreme judge, and absolute master, as it were, of the lives of his subjects, the king exercised the power of imposing taxes on them, and of exacting from them personal service and labor
Synagogue - Near this was the place of honour, or the 'chief seats,' which some sought after, Matthew 23:6 , and James 2:2,3 (where the word translated 'assembly' is 'synagogue'). Of others we read that many of the chief rulers believed on the Lord, but feared to confess Him lest they should be cast out, "for they loved the praise of men more than the praise of God. has 'chief ruler,' but the Greek is the same. the sheliach, a delegate of the congregation, who acted as chief reader: he is not mentioned in the New Testament
Jesuits - Founded at Montmartre, Paris, France in 1534 by Saint Ignatius Loyola, it was the chief instrument of the Catholic Reformation. The ministry of the Society consists chiefly in preaching; teaching catechism; administering the sacraments; conducting missions in parishes; taking care of parishes; organizing pious confraternities; teaching in schools of every grade; writing books, pamphlets, periodical articles; going on foreign missions, and special missions when ordered by the pope. Hungary was included in the province of Austria; the chief patron of the order was Cardinal Peter Pazmany. Missionary labor was the chief occupation of the Irish Jesuits
Jesus, Company of - Founded at Montmartre, Paris, France in 1534 by Saint Ignatius Loyola, it was the chief instrument of the Catholic Reformation. The ministry of the Society consists chiefly in preaching; teaching catechism; administering the sacraments; conducting missions in parishes; taking care of parishes; organizing pious confraternities; teaching in schools of every grade; writing books, pamphlets, periodical articles; going on foreign missions, and special missions when ordered by the pope. Hungary was included in the province of Austria; the chief patron of the order was Cardinal Peter Pazmany. Missionary labor was the chief occupation of the Irish Jesuits
Jesus, Society of - Founded at Montmartre, Paris, France in 1534 by Saint Ignatius Loyola, it was the chief instrument of the Catholic Reformation. The ministry of the Society consists chiefly in preaching; teaching catechism; administering the sacraments; conducting missions in parishes; taking care of parishes; organizing pious confraternities; teaching in schools of every grade; writing books, pamphlets, periodical articles; going on foreign missions, and special missions when ordered by the pope. Hungary was included in the province of Austria; the chief patron of the order was Cardinal Peter Pazmany. Missionary labor was the chief occupation of the Irish Jesuits
Society of Jesus - Founded at Montmartre, Paris, France in 1534 by Saint Ignatius Loyola, it was the chief instrument of the Catholic Reformation. The ministry of the Society consists chiefly in preaching; teaching catechism; administering the sacraments; conducting missions in parishes; taking care of parishes; organizing pious confraternities; teaching in schools of every grade; writing books, pamphlets, periodical articles; going on foreign missions, and special missions when ordered by the pope. Hungary was included in the province of Austria; the chief patron of the order was Cardinal Peter Pazmany. Missionary labor was the chief occupation of the Irish Jesuits
Nile - The Blue Nile rises in the mountains of Abyssinia and is the chief source of the deposit which the Nile brings to Egypt. ) The great difference between the Nile of Egypt in the present day and in ancient times is caused by the failure of some of its branches and the ceasing of some of its chief vegetable products; and the chief change in the aspect of the cultivable land, as dependent on the Nile, is the result of the ruin of the fish-pools and their conduits and the consequent decline of the fisheries
Philistia - Their chief god was Dagon, Judges 16:23; 1 Samuel 5:1-5, who, as well as the goddess Derketo, had the form, of a fish
Indifference - A sufficient argument against it is that it had its origin and chief propagating force in rationalism
Indifferentism - A sufficient argument against it is that it had its origin and chief propagating force in rationalism
Hermon - Its modern name is Jebel-esh-Sheikh, "the chief mountain
Stones - (Genesis 49:24 ) The members of the Church are called "living stones," as contributing to rear that living temple in which Christ, himself "a living stone," is the chief or head of the corner
Phinehas - Phinehas was afterwards the chief adviser in the war with the Benjamites
Pashur -
The son of Immer (probably the same as Amariah, Nehemiah 10:3 ; 12:2 ), the head of one of the priestly courses, was "chief governor Nathan - A chief man in Israel, whose family will mourn apart
Gaza - Called also Azzah, which is its Hebrew name (Deuteronomy 2:23 ; 1 Kings 4:24 ; Jeremiah 25:20 ), strong, a city on the Mediterranean shore, remarkable for its early importance as the chief centre of a great commercial traffic with Egypt
Baal - The sun-god, under the general title of Baal, or "lord," was the chief object of worship of the Canaanites
Nahash - ...
...
The father of Amasa, who was commander-in-chief of Abasolom's army (2 Samuel 17:25 )
Moth - The minute wasting of garments, stored up as they are in the East as wealth, by the larva which forms its own case out of the cloth material on which it feeds, is the chief point of similitude (Matthew 6:19-20; James 5:2); Hosea 5:12, "I will be unto Ephraim as a moth," gradually, silently, and surely consuming the nation's substance (Isaiah 50:9; Isaiah 51:8)
Taanach - ) Taanach and Megiddo (1 Kings 4:12) were the chief towns of the fertile tract which forms the western part of the great Esdraelon valley
Trachonitis - Jerome places Trachonitis rightly between Damascus and Bostra; having Kenath among its chief towns
Mercury - Paul, however, was dubbed ‘Hermes,’ ‘because he was the chief speaker,’ which reminds us that this deity was thought of as the god of eloquence
Gregory Vii, Pope Saint - Refusing the papacy on Pope Leo IX's death, he was chief counselor to the four succeeding popes
High Priest - Aaron was constantly called 'the priest;' but as his sons were also called priests, he was necessarily the 'chief' and would correspond to what is called high priest in the N
Athanasius, Saint 2 May - (Greek: immortality) ...
Confessor, Doctor of the Church (296-373), Bishop of Alexandria, called Father of Orthodoxy, as the chief champion of belief in the Divinity of Christ, born and died Alexandria
Condemn - The son of man shall be betrayed to the chief priests, and to the scribes, and they shall condemn him to death
Estate - Herod made a supper for his chief estates
Gerasa - The chief remains are those of the town walls, the street of columns, several temples, a triumphal arch, a hippodrome, a theatre, etc
Hildebrand - Refusing the papacy on Pope Leo IX's death, he was chief counselor to the four succeeding popes
Paradise - But the coming city shall combine all that was excellent of the first Eden, with the perfect polity that rests on Christ the chief corner stone, in which symmetry, grace, power, and the beauty of holiness shall shine for ever
Armenians - They seem to place the chief part of their religion in fastings and abstinences; and, among the clergy, the higher the degree, the lower they must live; insomuch that it is said the archbishops live on nothing but pulse
Gabbatha - And while with that contempt which marked Pilate's character, we hear him say, "Shall I crucify your king?"the chief priests, unconscious of what they said, answered,"We have no king but Caesar;"thereby fulfilling the dying patriarch Jacob's prophecy (that "the sceptre should not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet, until Shiloh come;" Genesis 49:10 and thus proving from their own testimony, that the Shiloh was come
Goliath - But in reading the history of this battle we stop short of the chief glory of it, if we do not eye the Lord Jesus Christ, the almighty David of his Israel, conquering hell, death, and the grave, in all his Goliahs which come forth to defy the army of the living God
City - They all speak the same language, all wear the same garment, Christ's righteousness, all love the same Lord, and his Zion, and prefer her interests above their chief joy
Philippi - one of the chief cities of Macedonia, lying on the north-west of Neapolis, and formerly called Datum or Datos, but afterward taking its name from Philip, the celebrated king of Macedon, by whom it was repaired and beautified
Zerubbabel - He is always named first as being the chief of the Jews that returned to their own country, Ezra 2:2 ; Ezra 3:8 ; Ezra 5:2 ; he laid the foundations of the temple, Ezra 3:8-9 ; Zechariah 4:9 , &c; and restored the worship of the Lord, and the usual sacrifices
Satan - signifies an adversary or enemy, and is commonly applied in the Scriptures to the devil, or the chief of the fallen angels
Libya - It was called Pentapolitana Regio by Pliny, from its five chief cities, Berenice, Arsinoe, Ptolemais, Apollonia, and Cyrene; and Lybia Cyrenaica by Ptolemy, from Cyrene its capital
Eleazar - A son of Dodo, and one of David's chief warriors
Praetorium - Originally the Cohors Prætoria was a company attached to the commander-in-chief in the field
Pastor - It is used of Christ as ‘the great shepherd of the sheep’ (Hebrews 13:20 from LXX_ of Isaiah 63:11), as ‘the Shepherd and Bishop of your souls’ (1 Peter 2:25), and as ‘the chief Shepherd’ (1 Peter 5:4)-expressions suggested by Himself (John 10:11; John 10:14)
Maurus, Saint, Founder of Glanfeuil Monastery - He introduced the Benedictine rule, and was the chief means of its acceptance in France, but the details of his work are not given
Shemaiah - A chief of the Levites ( 2 Chronicles 35:9 ), called Samaias in LXX Human Free Will - The chief influence upon the will for the Christian should be Christlike love (2 Corinthians 5:14 ). The chief use of the free will of mankind should be to seek to know and follow the will of God (Matthew 12:50 ; John 7:17 ; Ephesians 6:6 ; James 4:15 )
Hittites - They inhabited the whole region between the Euphrates and Damascus, their chief cities being Carchemish on the Euphrates, and Kadesh, now Tell Neby Mendeh, in the Orontes valley, about six miles south of the Lake of Homs. Mention is made of "Ahimelech the Hittite" (1 Samuel 26:6 ), and of "Uriah the Hittite," one of David's chief officers (2 Samuel 23:39 ; 1 Chronicles 11:41 )
Absalom - Ahithophel, who had been David's chief counsellor, deserted him and joined Absalom, whose chief counsellor he now became
Annas (2) - In like manner in Acts 4:6 Annas appears at the head of the chiefs of the Sanhedrin in its action against the Apostles, though the actual president was the high priest. See chief Priests. The ex-highpriest had probably been the chief instigator of the plot against Jesus, and before him He was brought not for trial, but only for an informal and private examination (so Schürer, l
je'hu - The chief sacrifice was offered, as if in the excess of his zeal, by Jehu himself. ...
Jehu son of Hanani; a prophet of Judah, but whose ministrations were chiefly directed to Israel. (1 Chronicles 4:35 ) ...
Jehu the Antothite was one of the chief of the heroes of Benjamin who joined David at Ziklag
Joab - In response to David’s declaration that he wanted to take Jerusalem from its Canaanite inhabitants, Joab led a victorious assault on the city and was rewarded by being appointed commander-in-chief of the Israelite army (1 Chronicles 11:6; 1 Chronicles 18:15). ...
Upon resuming his rule in Jerusalem, David appointed Absalom’s general, Amasa, chief of the army in place of Joab
Nard - —The chief ingredient in the costly unguents used in the East, and from thence imported to Rome. But our chief authority is Pliny the Elder (Nat
Sarbelius, a Edessan Martyr - According to them, Sarbelius was chief priest of the idol-worship of Edessa. A great multitude, including some chief men of the city, were converted with him
Head - Military leaders are also called “heads”: “These be the names of the mighty men whom David had: The Tachmonite that sat in the seat, chief among the captains …” (2 Kings 25:18—the chief priest). It is the stone by which all the other stones are measured; it is the chief cornerstone ( chief [5] of the children of Ammon” (Ezra 9:2, ri'shôn is used both of precedence in time and of leadership: “… The holy seed have mingled themselves with the people of those lands: yea, the hand of the princes and rulers hath been chief in this trespass
Affliction: Effects of in Different People - ' A sweet smile of hope and love follows every tear; and tribulation itself is turned into the chief of blessings
Pharisees - " The chief sects among the Jews during Christ's ministry were the Pharisees, the Sadducees, and the Essenes
Lazarus - He became a target for murder by the chief priests because of his celebrity
Pharaoh - ...
An ancient pharaoh was an absolute monarch, supreme commander of the armies, chief justice of the royal court, and high priest of all religion
Order of Friars Preachers - Preaching and teaching constitute the chief occupation of its members
Order of Preachers - Preaching and teaching constitute the chief occupation of its members
Dominicans - Preaching and teaching constitute the chief occupation of its members
Joppa - It was and still is the chief sea-port of Judea
Hand - A position at the right hand was regarded as the chief place of honour and power (Psalm 45:9 ; 80:17 ; 110:1 ; Matthew 26:64 )
Shallum - ...
...
An Ephraimite chief (2 Chronicles 28:12 )
Horn - Horns are emblems of power, dominion, glory, and fierceness, as they are the chief means of attack and defence with the animals endowed with them (Daniel 8:5,9 ; 1 Samuel 2:1 ; 16:1,13 ; 1 Kings 1:39 ; 22:11 ; Joshua 6:4,5 ; Psalm 75:5,10 ; 132:17 ; Luke 1:69 , etc
Engedi - The four kings of whom Chedorlaomer was chief attacked the Amorites here, and were in turn attacked by the five kings of Canaan in the adjoining vale of Siddim
Rabbah -
"Rabbath of the children of Ammon," the chief city of the Ammonites, among the eastern hills, some 20 miles east of the Jordan, on the southern of the two streams which united with the Jabbok
Goodness of God - He is the chief good; the sum and substance of all felicity, Psalms 144:12 ; Psalms 144:15 ; Psalms 73:25 ; Psalms 4:6-7
Emblems - ...
THE LAMB—Agnus Dei—is the chief emblem of our Blessed Lord
Ar - The "chief city" (as the name means) of Moab (Deuteronomy 2:9; Numbers 21:15; Numbers 21:28)
Engedi - It was a chief source of balsam, an important plant used for perfumes, and a major source of income for the area
Mennonite Bodies - "A Declaration of the chief Articles of our Common Christian Faith," was made in Dort, Holland, in 1632
Nineveh - Its chief remains are buried beneath the mounds of Kouyunjik and Nebi Yunus, but the outline of the old walls can be traced
Tree of Life - chief among the radical changes was that they no longer had access to the tree of life (Genesis 3:22-24 )
se'ir - The Horites appear to have been the chief of the aboriginal inhabitants, (Genesis 36:20 ) but it was ever afterward the possession of the Edomites, the descendants of Esau
Throne - The Hebrew word so translated applies to any elevated seat occupied by a person in authority, whether a high priest, (1 Samuel 1:9 ) a judge, (Psalm 122:5 ) or a military chief (Jeremiah 1:16 ) The use of a chair in a country where the usual postures were squatting and reclining was at all times regarded as a symbol of dignity
Mosque - Before the chief gate there is a square court paved with white marble, and low galleries round it, whose roof is supported by marble pillars
Monastic - This made the first congregation of several houses under one chief immediately subject to the pope, so as to constitute one body, or as they now call it, one religious order
Cock - ) A chief man; a leader or master
Bend - It crosses the field diagonally from the dexter chief to the sinister base
Captain - In Ezekiel it is often used for the secular head of the Messianic kingdom: ‘prince’ will there and often elsewhere do as a rendering; ‘officer’ and ‘chief’ will suit other passages
Bathing - The chief use of the word has to do with ritual acts of purification (Exodus 30:19-21 )
Inheritance - The chief difference between the ordinary ancient and the ordinary modern conception of inheritance is this: We have more regard to the mere change in the ownership of certain property which takes place: the ancient civilized races looked rather to the position of the heir as executor and administrator of the deceased’s property, and as the person who, being clothed, so to speak, with the personality of the deceased, took upon himself all the obligations of the testator, as well as the continuance of his race and the perpetuation of his family religion
Jezreel - Ahab chose it for his chief residence
Zimri - Son of Salu, a chief of Simeon
Shepherd - ...
In the church there are those who by reason of gift are called pastors, to feed and shepherd the sheep; but Christ is the chief Shepherd, who is over all, whose own the sheep are, and who has given His word that they shall never perish
Barsumas, Nestorian Bishop of Nisibis - Banished from Edessa by Rabulas, after his desertion of his former friends, Barsumas proved the chief strength and wisdom of the fugitive church
Sodom - Chief of the group Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zeboim, and Bela or Zoar (Genesis 10:19; Genesis 13:3; Genesis 13:10-13; Genesis 13:19; Luke 17:29; 2 Peter 2:6; Judges 1:4-7; Mark 6:11; Matthew 10:15; Deuteronomy 29:23)
Idumaeans - Petra, called "Selah" or "Joktheel," their stronghold in Amaziah's day, 2 Kings 14:7, and chief city, was literally cut in the rocks, and the southern part of the country abounds in cave-dwellings
Consult - The chief priests consulted that they might put Lazarus to death
Gershom - In 1 Chronicles 23:16 ; 1 Chronicles 26:24 the sons of Gershom are mentioned, Shebuel or Shubael being their chief
Academics - This sect, with that of the Epicureans, were the two chief that were in vogue at the time of Christ's appearance, and were embraced and supported by persons of high rank and wealth
Haman - The chief minister of Ahasuerus in the time of Esther
Hor - The chief interest of Mount Hor consists in the prospect from its summit, the last view of Aaron—that view which was to him what Pisgah was to Moses
Foundation - " (1 Corinthians 3:11) And blessed is the corresponding experience and testimony of true believers in the heart, when built upon the foundations of apostles and prophets, "Jesus Christ being the chief corner-stone; they are in all the building fitly framed, and growing together unto an holy temple in the Lord
Comgall - Hither multitudes flocked from all quarters, and for it and kindred institutions he drew up a Rule which was considered one of the chief ones of Ireland
Cattle - But whether from a word originally signifying a beast, for in early ages beasts constituted the chief part of a mans property, or from a root signifying to get or possess
zo'ba, - We first hear of Zobah in the time of Saul, when we find it mentioned as a separate country, governed apparently by a number of kings who owned no common head or chief
Baal Peor - Peor is supposed to have been a part of Mount Abarim; and Baal was the great idol or chief god of the Phoenicians, and was known and worshipped under a similar name, with tumultuous and obscene rites, all over Asia
Gallio - Sosthenes, the chief ruler of the synagogue, was beaten by the Greeks before Gallio's seat of justice; but this governor did not concern himself about it
Edward the Confessor, Saint - There he received a pious education, his chief interests being ecclesiastical
Jeremiah - One of the chief prophets of the Old Testament, prophesied under Josiah, Jehoiakim, and Zedekiah, and also after the captivity of the latter
Herd - The herd yielded the most esteemed sacrifice, ( Numbers 7:3 ; Psalm 69:31 ; Isaiah 66:3 ) also flesh meat, and milk, chiefly converted probably, into butter and cheese. " David's herd-masters were among his chief officers of state
Law - The word is properly used, in Scripture as elsewhere, to express a definite commandment laid down by any recognized authority; but when the word is used with the article, and without any words of limitation, it refers to the expressed will to God, and in nine cases out of ten to the Mosaic law, or to the Pentateuch of which it forms the chief portion
Elam - chief of the people who sealed the covenant
Salvina - Salvina ( Silvina ), daughter of the Moorish chief Gildo, count of Africa
Shepherds - But in the reign of David, the important office of chief herdsman was abolished, and the vast flocks and herds of that monarch were entrusted to a number of superintendents; animals of the same species forming a separate flock, under its proper overseer, 1 Chronicles 27:29 . The office of chief shepherd is frequently mentioned by the classic authors of antiquity. The office of chief shepherd was also known among the Latins; for, in the seventh AEneid, Tyrrheus is named as governor of the royal flocks:...
Tyrrheusque pater, cui regia parent ...
Armenta, et late custodia credita camp. ...
"Their father, Tyrrheus, did his fodder bring Tyrrheus, chief ranger to the Latian king. The office of chief shepherd, therefore, being in pastoral countries one of great trust, of high responsibility, and of distinguished honour, is with great propriety applied to our Lord by the Apostle Peter:...
"And when the chief shepherd shall appear, ye shall receive a crown of glory which fadeth not away," 1 Peter 5:4
Hall - A large, usually imposing building, often used for governmental functions; the chief room in such a structure
Apostle - ...
The apostles of Jesus Christ were his chief disciples, whom he invested with authority, filled with his Spirit, entrusted particularly with his doctrines and services, and chose to raise the edifice of his church
Haran - It was the chief seat of the worship of Sin, the moon-god, and the frequent references to the city in the Assyrian inscriptions have to do mainly with the worship of this deity and the restoration of his temple
Original Sin - Now the loss or privation of Divine grace, the chief consequence of sin, means the privation of the supernatural goodness to which God destined us, and therefore it is called our original stain or sin
Sceva - Among them were seven sons of one Sceva, a Jewish ‘chief priest’ (probably one of the high-priestly family)
Capstone - ...
So the Zechariah 4:7 passage is clearly "capstone" but the remainder are probably best taken as "cornerstone, " with the point being that Jesus was rejected by the ones who ought to have known him (builders = Jewish leadership), but God has exalted him to be the chief stone above all, the very head of the corner, on which all else depends
Corner - He is also styled "the chief corner stone" (Ephesians 2:20 ; 1 Peter 2:6-8 )
Mark - At a later period he was with Peter in Babylon (1 Peter 5:13 ), then, and for some centuries afterwards, one of the chief seats of Jewish learning; and he was with Timothy in Ephesus when Paul wrote him during his second imprisonment (2 Timothy 4:11 )
Merari - Thus, the "sons of Ethan" are distinct from "sons of Jeduthun," and the difficulty is explained how in David's time there could be sons of "sons of Jeduthun" above 30 years of age for they filled offices (1 Chronicles 26:10; 1 Chronicles 16:38), at the same time that Jeduthun is said to be" chief of the singers
Envy - The chief grounds of envy may be reduced to three: accomplishments of mind; advantages of birth, rank, and fortune; and superior success in worldly pursuits. To subdue this odious disposition, let us consider its sinful and criminal nature; the mischiefs it occasions to the world; the unhappiness it produces to him who possesses it; the evil causes that nourish it, such as pride and indolence: let us, moreover, bring often into view those religious considerations which regard us as Christians: how unworthy we are in the sight of God, how much the blessings we enjoy are above what we deserve
Troas - It was the chief port between Macedonia and Asia Minor
Confirmation - " Its chief grace is the seven-fold gift of the Holy Ghostby means of which we are sealed, made firm or strong, and equipped"manfully to fight under Christ's banner against sin, the worldand the devil
Araunah - 9) says Araunah was one of David's chief friends, and spared by him when he took the citadel (v
Euchites - This sect is said to have been founded by a person called Lucopetrus, whose chief disciple was named Tychicus
Hashabiah - Ancestor of chief Levite in Jerusalem in Nehemiah's day (Nehemiah 11:22 )
Doxology - ...
Biblical doxologies are found in many contexts, but one of their chief functions seems to have been as a conclusion to songs (Exodus 15:18 ), psalms (Psalm 146:10 ), and prayers (Matthew 6:13 ), where they possibly served as group responses to solo singing or recitation
Shallum - Father of Jehizkiah, an Ephraimite chief ( 2 Chronicles 28:12 )
Shu'Shan, - ( Daniel 8:2 ) The conquest of Babylon by Cyrus transferred Susa to the Persian dominion; and it was not long before the Achaemenian princes determined to make it the capital of their whole empire and the chief place of their own residence
Jabesh (1) - chief of Gilead's cities
Elder - ...
They retained their position under the judges (Judges 2:7), the kings (2 Samuel 17:4), in the captivity (Jeremiah 29:1), and on the return (Ezra 5:5); and in New Testament times as one of the classes from which the Sanhedrin members were chosen, and are associated with the chief priests and scribes (Matthew 16:21; Matthew 21:23; Matthew 26:59; Luke 22:66), "the presbytery of the people" (Greek)
Herd - Saul himself had herded cattle, and Doeg his chief herdsman was high in his favor (1 Samuel 11:5; 1 Samuel 21:7)
Taste: Spiritual Needful For Earthly Joys - ' What cared he for holy memories? What were meditation and contemplation to him? Is it not the chief end of man to grow potatoes and eat them? Such, on a larger scale, would be an unconverted man's estimate of joys so elevated and refined as those of heaven, could he by any possibility be permitted to gaze upon them
Maaseiah - chief of the people who signed Ezra's covenant (Nehemiah 10:25 ), possibly identical with 14 and/or 18
Euphrates - The Hittite city of Carchemish stood at the point where the Euphrates touched Northern Syria, and commanded one of the chief fords over the river; south of it came the Belikh and Khabur, the last affluents of the Euphrates
Marshal - The chief officer of arms, whose duty it is to regulate combats in the lists
Alpha - (ΑLΡΗΑ ( Α - α ), Greek): (ΑLΕΡΗ ( א ), "chief," "guide," Hebrew
Goat - The atuwd , "he goat", the leader of the flock; hence the chief ones of the earth, leaders in mighty wickedness; the ram represents headstrong wantonness and offensive lust (Isaiah 14:9; Zechariah 10:3; compare Matthew 25:32-33; Ezekiel 34:17)
World - When we omit no opportunity of enjoying the good things of this life; when our great and chief business is to divert ourselves till we contract an indifference for rational and manly occupations, deceiving ourselves, and fancying that we are not in a bad condition because others are worse than we
Heart - ) The nearest the middle or center; the part most hidden and within; the inmost or most essential part of any body or system; the source of life and motion in any organization; the chief or vital portion; the center of activity, or of energetic or efficient action; as, the heart of a country, of a tree, etc
Fill - ) To possess and perform the duties of; to officiate in, as an incumbent; to occupy; to hold; as, a king fills a throne; the president fills the office of chief magistrate; the speaker of the House fills the chair
Above - chief in rank or power. Above all is elliptical above all considerations chiefly in preference to other things
Zion - ...
tsinor , "gutter," as the subterranean aqueduct was called, should be commander in chief
Abana - The chief river of Damascus, the modern Barada, called by the Greeks "the golden stream," flowing through the heart of the city and supplying it with water
Jehoash - After being kept in concealment until he was seven years old, he was crowned by the bodyguard under the active leadership of Jehoiada, the chief priest
Assos - ), the panels of which-now mostly in the Louvre-are among the most important remains of ancient Greek article The modern town, Behram Kalessi, is still the chief shipping-place of the southern Troad
Latitudinarian - The chief leaders of these Latitudinarians were Hales and Chillingworth; but More, Cudworth, Gale, Witchcot, and Tillotson, were also among the number
Implicit Faith - This has been one of the chief sources of ignorance and error in the church of Rome
Gadarenes - " The explanation is, Gadara, a chief city, is named, as better known than Gerasa or Khersa
Dativus, Celebrated Senator - Dativus, refusing to say who was the chief of their company, was tortured
On - The chief object of worship at Heliopolis was the sun, whose temple, described by Strabo, is now only represented by the single beautiful obelisk, of red granite so feet 2 inches high above the pedestal which has stood for more than 4000 years, having been erected by Usirtesen, the second king of the twelfth dynasty
Phenicia - ...
The chief cities of Phenicia were Sidon, Tyre, Ptolemais, Ecdippe, Sarepta, Berythe, Biblos, Tripoli, Orthosia, Simira, Aradus
Kenites - Of these Kenites were the Rechabites, the Tirathites, the Shimeathites, and the Suchathites, mentioned in 1 Chronicles 2:55 , whose chief office was that of scribes
Neighbor - This may be seen from the chief characteristics of the privileges and duties of neighborhood as set forth in Scripture, (a) its helpfulness, e
Philippi - It was constituted a Roman "colony" by Augustus, and as such possessed certain peculiar privileges, which made it a "chief city of that part of Macedonia
Sin, Original - Now the loss or privation of Divine grace, the chief consequence of sin, means the privation of the supernatural goodness to which God destined us, and therefore it is called our original stain or sin
Bahamas - Colony of the British Empire, in the British West Indies, administered by a governor and commander-in-chief, assisted by an executive council, a legislative council, and a representative assembly; area, 4,404 square miles
On - The chief object of worship at Heliopolis was the sun, whose temple, described by Strabo, is now only represented by the single beautiful obelisk, of red granite so feet 2 inches high above the pedestal which has stood for more than 4000 years, having been erected by Usirtesen, the second king of the twelfth dynasty
Rab'Bah -
A very strong place on the east of the Jordan, and the chief city of the Ammonites
Hor - The chief interest of Mount Hor consists in the prospect from its summit, the last view of Aaron --that view which was to him what Pisgah was to his brother
Mines, Mining - There seems to be reference to the latter in (Psalm 12:6 ; Jeremiah 6:28-30 ; Ezekiel 22:18-22 ) The chief supply of silver in the ancient world appears to have been brought from Spain
ma'ry Magdalene - With all the chief motive was that of gratitude for their deliverance from "evil spirits and infirmities
Hebron - ...
The town fell within the tribal allotment of Judah and soon became the chief town of the tribe
Pelagia, Surnamed Margarita - Nonnus had been an ascetic of the severe order of Pachomius of Tabenna, and he addressed Pelagia with such plainness and sternness touching her sins and the future judgments of God, that she at once repented, and with many tears desired baptism, which, after some delay, was granted, the chief deaconess of Antioch, Romana, acting as sponsor for her
Laetare Medal - " Following is a partial list of the recipients of the award: ...
1883 - John Gilmary Shea, historian
1884 - Patrick J Keeley, architect
1885 - Eliza Allen Starr, artist
1886 - General John Newton, army engineer
1887 - Edward Preuss, journalist
1888 - Patrick V Hickey, founder "Catholic Review"
1889 - Anna Hanson Dorsey, novelist
1890 - William T Onahan, organizer Catholic Congress
1891 - Daniel Dougherty, orator
1892 - Henry F Brownson, philosopher
1893 - Patrick Donahoe, founder "Boston Pilot"
1894 - Augustin Daly, theatrical manager
1895 - Mrs James Sadlier, writer
1896 - General William S Rosecrans, leader Army of Cumberland
1897 - Thomas Addis Emmett, surgeon
1898 - Timothy E Howard, jurist
1899 - Mary Gwendolin Caldwell, benefactor Catholic University
1900 - John Creighton, founder Creighton University
1901 - William Bourke Cockran, orator
1902 - John B Murphy, surgeon
1903 - Charles J Bonaparte, attorney-general
1904 - Richard C Kerens, philanthropist
1905 - Thomas B Fitzpatrick, business man
1906 - Francis Quinlan, medical specialist
1907 - Katherine E Conway, author
1908 - James C Monaghan, lecturer
1909 - Frances Tiernan, (Christian Reid), litterateur
1910 - Maurice Francis Egan, writer
1911 - Agnes Repplier, essayist
1912 - Thomas M Mulry, charity worker
1913 - Charles G Herbermann, editor-in-chief "Catholic Encyclopedia"
1914 - Edward Douglas White, chief justice of the United States
1915 - Mary V Merrick, founder, Christ Child Society
1916 - James J Walsh, physician and author
1917 - William Shepherd Benson, admiral
1918 - Joseph Scott, lawyer
1919 - George Duval, philanthropist
1920 - Lawrence F Flick, physician
1921 - Elizabeth Nourse, artist
1922 - Charles P Neil, economist
1923 - Walter George Smith, lawyer
1924 - Charles D Maginnis, architect
1925 - Albert Francis Zahm, scientist
1926 - Edward N Hurley, business man
1927 - Margaret Anglin, actress
1928 - Jack J Spalding, lawyer
1929 - Alfred Emmanuel Smith, statesman
1930 - Frederick P Kenkel, director of Central Bureau of the Central Verein
1931 - James J Phelan, philanthropist
1932 - Stephen J Maher, tuberculosis expert
1933 - John McCormack, vocalist
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1935 - Frank H Spearman, author
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1942 - Helen Constance White, teacher and author
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1984 - John T Noonan, jurist
1985 - Guido Calabresi, jurist
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1992 - Daniel Patrick Moynihan, US senator
1993 - L John Durney, teacher and journalist
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1996 - Sister Helen Prejean, anti-death penalty activist
1997 - Father Virgilio Elizondo, theologian and writer
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2000 - Andrew J McKenna, businessman
2001 - Monsignor George G Higgins, labour activist priest
2002 - Father John Smyth, educator
2003 - Peter and Peggy Steinfels, writers
2004 - Father Bryan Hehir, theologian
2005 - Joseph E Murray, organ transplant pioneer
Athens - The city of Minerva, the chief city of Attica in Greece, situated on the Saronic Gulf, forty-six miles east of Corinth, and about five miles from the coast. At the foot of the Acropolis, on one side was the Odeum, or music hall, and the theatre of Bacchus: on the other side was the Prytaneum, where the chief magistrates and most meritorious citizens were entertained at a table furnished at the public expense
Druids - The chief settlement of the Druids in Britain as in the isle of Anglesey, the ancient Mona, which they might choose for this purpose, as it is well stored with precious groves of their favourite oak. They had one chief, or arch-druid, in every nation, who acted as high priest, or pontifex maximus
Festus - , withstanding ‘the chief men of Jerusalem’ (Ant. Thereupon ‘the chief men of Jerusalem’ erected a wall to obstruct the view from the palace
Aceldama - It was very properly called so, because it was purchased with the thirty pieces of silver, which the traitor Judas received of the chief priests for Christ's blood. Now as the Lord Jesus, being considered by the law as a criminal, (John 18:30) was thus liable to have been cast out with the common dead; what an overruling power must it have been, to prompt the minds of the honourable counsellor, Joseph of Arimathea, and Nicodemus a ruler of the Jews, to have begged the forfeited body from Pilate!...
And there was another providence, directing all this to the accomplishment of the purpose intended; in that the request was so well timed before the chief priests could influence Pilate's mind to refuse; and Pilate's mind so guided by the Lord, to grant the request before that he had power to deliberate
War - The whole army had its commander-in-chief or captain, who was over the host, and its scribe or keeper of the muster-roll. In Isaiah 33:18 the words translated "he that counted the towers" probably indicate what we should call a chief engineer
ma'gi - The office which Daniel accepted (Daniel 5:11 ) was probably rab-mag --chief of the Magi. Isai 9,11; Dani 7 (4) Daniel himself was a prince and chief among this very class of wise men
Paulus, Bishop of Emesa - On the festival the chief church of the city was crowded and Paul having commenced with the "Gloria in excelsis Deo," passed on to Is 7:14 and concluded his exordium with words decisive of the whole controversy "Mary the mother of God brings forth Emmanuel. The happy reunion of the long-divided parties was published by Cyril in the chief church of Alexandria Apr
Army - David had 600 before his accession (1 Samuel 23:13); after it he added the Cherethites and Pelethites and Gittites (2 Samuel 8:18; 2 Samuel 15:18), and veteran guards (shalishim , "captains," 1 Chronicles 12:18; Ezekiel 23:15; Ezekiel 23:23, "princes," "great lords") whose "chief" was about David's person as adjutant. ...
A "captain of the host," or commander in chief, led the army in time of war; as Abner under Saul, Joab under David. The Roman army was divided into legions, each under six tribunes ("chief captains," chiliarchs, Acts 21:31), who commanded in turn
Zechariah - A chief, summoned by Ezra to the consultation at the river Ahava, before the second caravan returned (Ezra 8:16); at Ezra's left, in expounding the law (Nehemiah 8:4). A Reubenite chief in Tiglath Pileser's time, at Israel's captivity (1 Chronicles 5:7). A Manassite, father of Iddo, chief in Gilead under David (1 Chronicles 27:21)
Judas Iscariot - He might naturally have grown impatient under the delay, and dissatisfied also with Jesus for openly discouraging all ambitious views among his disciples; and, therefore, he might have devised the scheme of delivering him up to the sanhedrim, or great council of the nation, (composed of the chief priests, scribes, and elders,) in order to compel him to avow himself openly as the Messiah before them; and to work such miracles, or to give them the sign which they so often required, as would convince and induce them to elect him in due form, and by that means enable him to reward his followers. But when Judas, who attended the whole trial, saw that it turned out quite contrary to his expectations, that Jesus was capitally convicted by the council, as a false Christ and false prophet, notwithstanding he had openly avowed himself; and that he wrought no miracle, either for their conviction or for his own deliverance, as Judas well knew he could, even from the circumstance of healing Malchus, after he was apprehended; when he farther reflected, like Peter, on his Master's merciful forewarnings of his treachery, and mild and gentle rebuke at the commission of it; he was seized with remorse, and offered to return the paltry bribe of thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders instantly on the spot, saying, ‘I sinned in delivering up innocent blood;' and expected that on this they would have desisted from the prosecution. In such a mind there could be no true faith, and no love; what wonder, then, when avarice was in him a ruling and unrestrained passion, that he should betray his Lord? Still it may be admitted that the knowledge which Judas had of our Lord's miraculous power, might lead him the more readily to put him into the hands of the chief priests
Tiberias - Nevertheless the town grew with great rapidity, and, before the downfall of Jerusalem had become one of the chief cities of Palestine. The city was fortified by Josephus when commander-in-chief of Galilee (c. 70), Tiberias became the chief seat of the Jews and of Jewish learning
Captain - This word is the Authorized Version rendering of two Greek terms in the Gospels:—(1) χιλίαρχος, properly ‘leader of a thousand’ (John 18:12, Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘chief captain,’ (Revised Version margin) ‘military tribune’; see also Mark 6:21, Acts 21:31-33; Acts 21:37; Acts 22:24; Acts 22:26-29; Acts 23:10; Acts 23:15; Acts 23:17-19; Acts 23:22; Acts 24:7; Acts 24:22-23, Revelation 6:15; Revelation 19:18). The chief constable of this priestly corps of Temple police was naturally himself a Levite. ...
In accordance with its derivation (ἀρχή and ἡγέομαι), ἁρχηγός originally meant a leader, and so naturally came to be applied to a prince or chief
Ath'Ens - (city of Athene ), the capital of Attica, and the chief seat of Grecian learning and civilization during the golden period of the history of Greece. The chief building was the Parthenon (i. But the chief wonder of the Parthenon was the colossal statue of the virgin goddess executed by Phidias himself: The Acropolis was adorned with another colossal figure of Athena, in bronze, also the work of Phidias
Judges - ), he appointed captains, rulers of thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens, namely, the recognized heads of tribes or of chief houses in them, to judge at all seasons small matters, reserving the great ones for himself to decide, upon the principles which he should learn from God. ...
The custody, in the sanctuary, of the standard weights and measures made an appeal to the priesthood in disputes a necessity; and in final appeals the high priest, as chief legal authority, decided difficult cases before the time of the kings (Deuteronomy 17:8; Deuteronomy 17:12). The Hebrew shophetim , "judges", correspond to the suffetes, the chief magistrates of Phoenician colonies
Joseph - The Arab chief to this day wears an aba or garment of different colored stripes as emblem of office. ...
In his simplicity, possibly with some degree of elation, but certainly with the divine approval (for the revelation was given to be made known, Matthew 10:27), he told the dreams to his brethren, which only aggravated their hatred: the first, their sheaves bowing to his sheaf (pointing to his coming office of lord of the Egyptian granaries); the second, the sun, moon, and 11 stars bowing to him (these heavenly bodies symbolizing authorities subject to his chief rule; compare the coming eclipse of the natural luminaries and earthly potentates before the Antitype, Matthew 24:29-30; Acts 3:12-18). His chief inquiries long afterward were about his father (Genesis 43:7; Genesis 45:13; Genesis 45:28; Genesis 41:51), and the remembrance of "his father" was with him the strongest plea after Jacob's death, that the brothers thought they could urge for their being forgiven (Genesis 50:16-17). court attendant, of Pharaoh, chief of the executioners (Hebrew, or "commander of the body guard"), the superintendence of executions belonging to the chiefs of the military caste. On "against God," the feature of sin which constitutes its chief heinousness, see Psalms 51:4; 2 Samuel 12:13. After a time the chief of Pharaoh's cupbearers (Hebrew), and the chief of his bakers or confectioners, were cast into prison by the king; the captain of the guard committed them as men of rank to Joseph's custody. His interpretation of their dreams, the vine with three branches and the pressing the grape juice into Pharaoh's cup, and the three baskets of white bread (the Egyptians being noted for their fancy bread and pastry) out the uppermost of which the birds ate, came to pass; Pharaoh restored the chief cupbearer, and decapitated the chief baker. The chief cupbearer forgot his promise and his benefactor Joseph (Amos 6:6); compare the Antitype, Psalms 31:12, He "remembered" the companion of His suffering (Luke 23:42). wind, called Joseph to the chief cupbearer's remembrance. ...
Joseph recommended the king to appoint a chief officer and subordinates to take up by taxation a fifth of the produce in the plenteous years against the famine years
Magna Carta - Its chief purpose was to protect the feudal rights of the baronage, especially in the matter of dues, service, and the administration of justice, though clauses in favor of the Church, merchants, and villeins were included
Morality - The chief conditions necessary for the growth and development of morality in the individual and the community are a right education of the young in the home and the school, where religion and virtue are impressed upon the child, a healthy public opinion, and sound legislation
Order of the Most Holy Trinity - Their chief house is the Basilica of Saint John Chrysogonus at Rome, which was given to them by Pope Pius IX, 1856
Sargon - Samaria was captured early in his reign, and Sargon carried away 27,200 of the chief inhabitants, the city being placed under Assyrian governors Sargon’s advent to the throne marked a change of dynasty, and he had to subdue Insurrection right and left
Michelangelo Buonarroti - Having been made chief architect, painter, and sculptor of the Vatican by Pope Paul III, in 1534, he was appointed in 1547 to take charge of the reconstruction of Saint Peter's, carrying out the plans of Bramante, and designing the great dome, of which the drum was completed before his death
Carta, Magna - Its chief purpose was to protect the feudal rights of the baronage, especially in the matter of dues, service, and the administration of justice, though clauses in favor of the Church, merchants, and villeins were included
Abner - He was commander-in-chief of Saul's army (1Samuel 14:50; 17:55; 20:25)
Scribe - 1: γραμματεύς (Strong's #1122 — Noun Masculine — grammateus — gram-mat-yooce' ) from gramma, "a writing," denotes "a scribe, a man of letters, a teacher of the law;" the "scribes" are mentioned frequently in the Synoptists, especially in connection with the Pharisees, with whom they virtually formed one party (see Luke 5:21 ), sometimes with the chief priests, e
Zidon - " In this inscription Baal is mentioned as the chief god of the Sidonians
Seal - The tomb was sealed by the Pharisees and chief priests for the purpose of making sure that the disciples would not come and steal the body away (ver
Naboth - Jehu and Bidcar were with Ahab at this time, and so deeply were the words of Elijah imprinted on Jehu's memory that many years afterwards he refers to them (2 Kings 9:26 ), and he was the chief instrument in inflicting this sentence on Ahab and Jezebel and all their house (9:30-37)
Camel - A ruminant animal, the chief means of communication between places separated by sandy deserts in Asia, owing to its amazing powers of endurance
Mamertus, Saint, Bishop of Vienne - Already in 470 or 474 Sidonius had established these services at Clermont, and looked to them as his chief hope in the threatened invasion of the Goths
Works, Good - If the most moral of men are saved in the same way as the very chief of sinners, then good works are of no moment
Cap - ) The top, or uppermost part; the chief
Meditation - ” Thus meditation is the repetitious going over of a matter in one's mind because it is the chief concern of life
Pools of Solomon - These pools derive their chief supply of water from a spring called "the sealed fountain," about 200 yards to the north-west of the upper pool, to which it is conveyed by a large subterranean passage
Topheth - One of the chief groves in Hinnom; forming part of the king's gardens, and watered by Siloam; Hinnom is placed by old writers E
Doeg - An Idumean, chief of Saul's herdsmen. He was but the accomplice and ready tool; Saul, the "mighty man" (Psalms 52:1) who "trusted in the abundance of his riches" (Psalms 52:7) as means of destroying David, was the real" boaster in mischief," for this was the very appeal that Saul made, and that induced Doeg to inform (1 Samuel 22:7): "Hear now, ye Benjamites, will the son of Jesse (as I can) give every one of you fields and vineyards?" (compare 1 Samuel 8:14
Foundation - ]'>[2] , where the word is used of the chief men of the State)
Mitylene - (Μιτυλήνη)...
Mitylene, or-according to the usual spelling in classical writings and on coins-Mytilene, was the chief town in the island of Lesbos, lying on the S
Stones - Christians are "living stones" built up as a spiritual temple on Christ "the chief corner stone" (Ephesians 2:20-22; 1 Peter 2:4-8)
Beauty - A beautiful person, In scripture, the chief dignity or ornament
Joppa - It is also one of the chief centres of the fruit-growing industry in Palestine, and its orange gardens are world-famed
Benefactor - It is evidently this latter, complimentary or official, title to which our Lord chiefly allndes in Luke 22:55, and so Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 rightly spells with a capital, ‘Benefactors. But in this new society which Jesus is instituting, the greatest is to be as the least, and he that is chief as he that doth serve
Absolution - The chief passage on which they ground their power of absolution is that in Joh_20:23 : "Whosesoever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them, and whosesoever sins ye retain, they are retained
Pitch - At the shallow southern end of the sea are the chief deposits of salt and bitumen
Medes - The prophet resumes the subject of Babylon's destruction at Isaiah 21:1-17; but the chief prophecy concerning the final ruin of Babylon, is in Isaiah 45:1-25 and following chapters, where Cyrus the Persian, as the destroyer of Babylon, is called by his name, although this was near two hundred years before the events there predicted were intended to be fulfilled
Former - Ri'shôn (רִאשֹׁן, Strong's #7223), “former; chief; first
Mel'Ita - Its chief officer (under the governor of Sicily) appears from inscriptions to have had the title of protos Melitaion , or Primus Melitensium and this is the very phrase which Luke uses
Melchiz'Edek - The way in which he is mentioned in Genesis would rather lead to the inference that Melchizedek was of one blood with the children of Ham, among whom he lived, chief (like the king od Sodom) of a settled Canaanitish tribe
Jannes - Jerom translates their names Johannes and Mambres; and there is a tradition, they say, in the Talmud, that Juhanni and Mamre, chief of Pharaoh's physicians, said to Moses, "Thou bringest straw into Egypt, where abundance of corn grew;" that is, to bring your magical arts hither is to as much purpose as to bring water to the Nile
Athens - The chief town of Attica (now Greece); was visited by Paul on his second missionary journey, after he had been Bent away, for safety, from Berea
Chald a - The chief features of the country were the rivers, for on all sides it is a dead level, broken now only by solitary mounds, old ruins, marshes, and streams
Dan - Dan, city of, the chief city of the northern district held by this tribe
Synagogue - " In the later periods of Jewish history synagogues were not only found in all the chief cities and lesser towns in Syria, but in the principal cities of the Roman empire
Trinitarians - Their chief house is the Basilica of Saint John Chrysogonus at Rome, which was given to them by Pope Pius IX, 1856
Lord - An honorary title bestowed on certain official characters as lord advocate, lord chamberlain, lord chancellor, lord chief justice, &c
Scribe - ...
Their influence was of course great; many of them were members of the Sanhedrin, and we often find them mentioned in connection with the elders and chief priests, Matthew 5:20 7:29 12:38 20:18 21:15
Kingdom of Heaven - Hence the contests among his disciples, ere they had fully learned Christ, about precedency in his kingdom; and hence probably the sons of Zebedee desired the two chief places in it, or those nearest to their endeared Master and Lord
God - ...
The Bible assumes and asserts the existence of God, "In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth;" and is itself the most illustrious proof of his existence, as well as our chief instructor as to his nature and will
Restoration - The question of chief interest is, how far these predictions of a coming ‘ restitution ( apokatastasis ) of all things’ point forward to a future universal salvation
Phinehas - He succeeded Eleazar as chief priest ( Exodus 6:25 , 1 Chronicles 6:4 ; 1 Chronicles 6:50 , Ezra 7:5 , 1E Esther 8:2 , 2E Esther 1:2 ), and was the superintendent of the Korahite Levites ( 1 Chronicles 9:20 )
pe'Kah - Its chief result was the Jewish port of Elath on the Red Sea; but the unnatural alliance of Damascus and Samaria was punished through the complete overthrow of the ferocious confederates by Tiglath-pileser
Hospitality - Hospitality was regarded by most nations of the ancient world as one of the chief virtues
Hair - (Daniel 7:9 ; Revelation 1:14 ) The chief beauty of the hair consisted in curls, whether of a natural or an artificial character
Jonathan - He knew that David would be the next king, and he would be happy to serve under him as chief minister (1 Samuel 23:16-18)
Paulus of Asia - The persecution fell chiefly on the numerous Monophysite monasteries, of both sexes, which had sprung up in and around Constantinople while the empress Theodora lived. The chief difficulty was with the bishops, and Paul of Aphrodisias was singled out for the first example (p
Burial - With the money paid to Judas the chief priests purchased a field to use as a burial place for foreigners (Matthew 27:5-7 ). In addition to all four Gospel writers recording the tomb being found empty (Matthew 28:1-7 ; Mark 16:1-7 ; Luke 24:1-12 ; John 20:1-12 ), Matthew notes the care to which the chief priests and the Pharisees went to make Jesus' tomb secure (27:6-66) and the subsequent rumor they spread when their efforts failed (28:11-15)
Elder (2) - This view is sustained by the connexion and association of the term,—usually with ‘scribes’ and ‘chief priests,’—and by Luke 22:66, where the Sanhedrin is called ‘the presbytery,’ or assembly of ‘elders’ (πρεσβυτέριον, cf. There are various forms of expression: sometimes ‘elders’ simply, and sometimes ‘elders of the people,’ commonly associated with ‘chief priests and scribes
Abner - Made commander in chief by his cousin Saul. But Joab, by a message, brought him back from the well of Sirah, and, taking him aside to speak peaceably, murdered him, Abishai also being an accomplice, for the blood of Asahel (Numbers 35:19; 2 Samuel 3:30; 2 Samuel 3:39), and on Joab's part also, as appears likely from Amasa's case, from fear of Abner's becoming a rival in the chief command (2 Samuel 20:4-10)
Greece - Alexander was the chief agent in the spread of the Greek civilization, manners, language, and culture over these countries. The Jews were amongst the chief spreaders of the language
Shishak - ...
The tablet of Harpsen from the Serapeium (Lepsius) makes Shishak son of a chief named Namuret, whose ancestors are untitled and bear foreign names. An inscription in the Silsilis quarries mentions the cutting of stone for the chief temple of Thebes in Shishak's 22nd year
Paradise - This was not the chief blessing spoken of by the Lord Jesus; but the felicity of which paradise was made up, and which formed the sum and substance of all joy, was Christ. (Isaiah 14:9-10) In the person of the impious king of Babylon, the sacred writer thus addresseth him: "Hell from beneath is moved for thee to meet thee at thy coming; it stirreth up the dead for thee, even all the chief ones of the earth; it hath raised up from their thrones all the kings of the nations
Zerubbabel - To him Cyrus, by the hand of Mithredath the treasurer, had committed the precious vessels of the temple to bring to Jerusalem; at the same time he, Zerubbabel, with the chief of the fathers, the priests, and the Levites whose spirit God had raised, led back from Babylon the first caravan, consisting of 42,360 besides servants, etc. The chief of the fathers also, when they came to the house of God at Jerusalem, offered freely for it after their ability (Ezra 2:68-69). They had wished to join in building the temple, as sacrificing unto the same God as the Jews; but Zerubbabel, Jeshua, and the chief fathers said, "ye have nothing to do with us to build an house unto our God, but we ourselves together will build," etc
King - The king was commander in chief, supreme judge, and imposer of taxes (Menahem, 2 Kings 15:19-20; Jehoiakim, 2 Kings 23:35) and levies of men (1 Kings 5:13-15). His chief officers were the recorder, who wrote annals of his reign (2 Samuel 8:16); the scribe or secretary wrote dispatches and conducted his correspondence (2 Samuel 8:17); the officer over the house, arrayed in a distinctive robe of office and girdle (Isaiah 22:15, etc. , Isaiah 36:3); the king's friend or companion (1 Kings 4:5); the captain of the body guard (2 Samuel 20:23; 1 Kings 2:25; 1 Kings 2:34; 1 Kings 2:46), who was also chief executioner; the commander in chief under the king (2 Samuel 3:30-39; 2 Samuel 20:23); his counselor (2 Samuel 216:20-23; 1 Samuel 10:24; 1 Chronicles 27:32)
Shemai'ah - (1 Chronicles 9:16 ) ...
Son of Elizaphan, and chief of his house in the reign of David
Tiberias - 70), Tiberias became one of the chief residences of the Jews in Palestine
Media - They consisted for three or four centuries of a number of tribes, each ruled by its own chief, who at length were brought under the Assyrian yoke (2 Kings 17:6 )
Moabite - ...
After the Return, it was Sanballat, a Moabite, who took chief part in seeking to prevent the rebuilding of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:19 ; 4:1 ; 6:1 )
Bashan-Havoth-Jair - " Bashan or Argob was divided between two chief families of Machir the Manassite, namely, that of Nobah who conquered Kenath and her dependencies, and Jair who conquered and named the Havoth Jair
Chaplain - the persons vested with a power of retaining chaplains, together with the number each is allowed to qualify, are as follow: an archbishop eight; a duke or bishop six; marquis or earl five; viscount four; baron, knight of the garter, or lord chancellor, three: a duchess, marchioness, countess, baroness, the treasurer or comptroller of the king's house, clerk of the closet, the king's secretary, dean of the chapel, almoner, and master of the rolls, each of them two; chief justice of the king's bench, and ward of the cinque ports, each one
Florentius, a Chief Minister of State at Constantinople - Florentius (50) , a chief minister of state at Constantinople under Theodosius II
Sinai - )...
In the biblical record the Sinai region’s chief importance is as the location of the mountain in the south known as Horeb, or Mount Sinai
Lutheran - The chief doctrines of Lutheranism, which are summarized in six "Confessions" are: ...
acceptance of the Apostles', Nicene, and Athanasian Creeds
the authority of the Scriptures as the rule of faith
justification by faith alone
"consubstantiation" or the real, corporeal presence of Christ in and with the substance of the bread and wine at the time of the celebration of the Lord's Supper
Following Luther's teaching on private judgment, their formularies are variously interpreted, and wide divergence is found, ranging from strict orthodoxy to the extremes of rationalism
Lutheranism - The chief doctrines of Lutheranism, which are summarized in six "Confessions" are: ...
acceptance of the Apostles', Nicene, and Athanasian Creeds
the authority of the Scriptures as the rule of faith
justification by faith alone
"consubstantiation" or the real, corporeal presence of Christ in and with the substance of the bread and wine at the time of the celebration of the Lord's Supper
Following Luther's teaching on private judgment, their formularies are variously interpreted, and wide divergence is found, ranging from strict orthodoxy to the extremes of rationalism
Eliakim - As Joseph over Pharaoh's palace, Azrikam "governor of Ahaz' house" (2 Chronicles 28:7); chamberlain, treasurer, prefect of the palace (Genesis 41:40), chief minister. "...
Type of Messiah: "the key of the house of David will I lay upon his shoulder (the key hung from the kerchief on the shoulder as emblem of his office, or figuratively for sustaining the government on his shoulder); so he shall open and none shall shut:, and he shall shut and none shall open;" i
Conventicle - know of such proceedings, and do not inform a justice of peace or chief magistrate, he shall forfeit 5l
Watch - This word, which is said to have been the technical term for a company of 60 men, is used here to describe either the Roman soldiers, whom the chief priests and Pharisees obtained from Pilate, or the Temple guard, which he reminded them they already had and could employ to protect the sepulchre from being rifled. ...
As to the general attitude or frame of mind in which the Church is bidden by her Lord to look for His coming, the burden of His teaching is that ours must be the steadfast, active readiness of dutiful, trusty servants, who are not afraid of being caught idle or in mischief, when the Master appears and reveals His welcome, though awful presence
Corner, Corner-Stone - Hence the figurative use of the word for the chief men of the State, as its ‘corners,’ i
Stone - Christ himself became the chief cornerstone (Ephesians 2:20-22 ; 1 Peter 2:4-8 )
Guard (2) - custodia), Matthew 27:65-66; Matthew 28:11, Authorized Version ‘watch’; obtained by the chief priests and Pharisees from Pilate to guard the sepulchre. Speculatores were originally spies or scouts (from specula, ‘a look-out’); but we find them chiefly employed (a) as messengers or couriers, carrying official despatches; (b) as military executioners
Artemis - Artemis was the chief deity of Ephesus, and her temple was one of the seven wonders of the ancient world
Shimei - chief of the tenth course in the service of song
Gog And Magog - GOG is a symbolical name for the powerful and proud chief of the vast hordes of Scythia and Tartary
Hesychius (27) Illustris, a Writer - His chief work was a Universal History in six books and in a synoptical form through a period of 1920 years, reaching from Belus, the reputed founder of the Assyrian empire, to the death of Anastasius I
Fuller - " The fuller's chief work was cleansing and whitening garments for festive and religious occasions
Baptism - The chief effects of this sacrament are: ...
the impression of a character or seal by which we are incorporated with Christ (Galatians 3; 1 Corinthians 6); ...
regeneration and remission of original sin (and actual if necessary), as well as punishment due to sin, and infusion of sanctifying grace (with its gifts)
Cock - A leader a chief man
Gross - The main body the chief part the bulk the mass as the gross of the people
Jeroboam - This was perhaps because he was hereditary chief in Ephraim, but we must also suppose that he attracted the attention of Solomon by his ability and energy
Apocalypse - Satan, too, the great dragon, appears as the Church's chief enemy, but is finally conquered, bound, and cast into a pool of fire
Gate - It was, at least at times, the king's chief place of audience
Inghamites - He contends very strongly for salvation by the imputation of Christ's righteousness; and as to doctrine, the chief point wherein the Inghamites differ from the Independents, is respecting the Trinity
Doctor (2) - ...
The chief English Versions translate the word διδάσκαλος in Luke 2:46 as follows: Wyclif, doctours; Tindale, doctours; Cranmer, doctours; Geneva, doctours; Rheims, doctors; Authorized Version, doctors; Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885, doctors; Noyes, teachers; Bible Union Revision, teachers; American Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885, teachers; Twentieth Century NT, Teachers
Keep, Oversee - Other versions render it “choir director” (NASB); “chief musician” (KJV); and “leader” (NAB)
Coelestius, Heretic of Hibernian Scots - His chief opponents were St
Dionysius, Saint, Apostle of France - Saturninus, her first and chief
Master - (d) A sovereign, prince, or feudal noble; a chief, or one exercising similar authority
Army - The number in a legion varied from 3000 to 6000, each under "chief captains," Acts 21:31, who commanded by turns
Gaza or Azzah - Judah seems to have held possession of it for a while; but in the time of the judges it was independent, and one of the five chief cities of the Philistines, Judges 1:18 3:3 13:1 16:1-31
Sanhedrin - The Nasi, or president, who was generally the high-priest, sat on a throne at the end of the hall; the vice-president, or chief counselor, called Ab-bethdin, at his right hand; and the sub-deputy, or Hakam, at his left; the other senators being ranged in order on each side
Publican - ...
There were many publicans in Judea in the time of our Savior; Zaccheus, probably, was one of the principal receivers, since he is called "chief among the publicans," Luke 19:2 ; but Matthew was only an inferior publican, Luke 5:27
Deuteronomy - --which means "the repetition of the law" --consists chiefly of three discourses delivered by Moses shortly before his death. (1:1; 4:40) After a brief historical introduction the speaker recapitulates the chief events of the last forty years in the wilderness
na'Aman - " (Luke 4:27 ) Naaman was commander-in-chief of the army of Syria, and was nearest to the person of the king, Ben-hadad II
jo'ab - [1] There was now no rival left in the way of Joab's advancement, and at the siege of Jebus he was appointed for his prowess commander-in-chief --"captain of the host
Publican - The position of Zacchaeus as a "chief among the publicans," (Luke 19:2 ) implies a gradation of some kind among the persons thus employed
Teilo, Bishop of Llandaff - ...
The chief authority for his Life is Vita S
Zoaras - Mennas and his synod repeated the condemnation, and Justinian banished Zoaras from Constantinople and its vicinity, and from all the chief cities of the empire, charging him to live in solitude
Phenicia - ) ...
The Phoenicians were the most enterprising merchants of the old world, establishing colonies at various places, of which Carthage was the chief. Among the chief Phoenician cities were Tyre and Sidon, Gebal north of Beirut, Arvad or Arados and Zemar
Pharisees - Their chief concern was not with following tradition, but with using the religious and social structures of Jewish society to gain controlling power for themselves. Although the Sadducees had the chief positions in the Sanhedrin (the Jewish Council that condemned Jesus), many Pharisees were Sanhedrin members
Shepherd - ) The nomadic state is one of the earliest stages of society, and was regarded as honourable even to a chief (Genesis 4:2; Genesis 4:20; Genesis 30:29 ff; Genesis 37); chiefs' daughters did not disdain to tend flocks (Genesis 29:6, etc. There were chief and under shepherds (Genesis 47:6; 1 Peter 5:4), and hirelings not of the family (John 10:11-13; 1 Samuel 21:7)
Aichmalotarch - ‘Αιχμαλοταρχης , signifies the prince of the captivity, or chief of the captives. These chiefs of the learned men then delivered an address, exhorting the new monarch not to abuse his power; and reminded him that he was called to slavery rather than to sovereignty, for he was prince of a captive people. The prince returned to his palace, where he gave a splendid banquet to the chief persons of the community
Order - I have received an order from the commander in chief. ...
General orders, the commands or notices which a military commander in chief issues to the troops under his command
Pelagius i., Bishop of Rome - Vigilius being summoned by the emperor to Constantinople in the matter of the Three Chapters, Pelagius remained as the archdeacon and chief ecclesiastic at Rome; and occupied this position when the Gothic king Totila (Dec. A great part of the western church still, and for many years afterwards, resolutely rejected these decisions, and the chief recorded action of Pelagius as pope is his unavailing attempt to heal the consequent schism
Edom - chief among Edom’s mountains was Mt Seir, after which the land was sometimes called (Genesis 14:6; Genesis 32:3; Genesis 36:21; Deuteronomy 2:1; Deuteronomy 2:4; Judges 11:15-243; Joshua 15:1; 1 Kings 9:26). ...
Chief of Edom’s mountain towns were Sela, Bozrah and Teman (2 Kings 14:7; Isaiah 34:6; Isaiah 63:1; Jeremiah 49:20; Jeremiah 49:22; Amos 1:11-12)
Synagogue - Here were the "chief seats," for which Pharisees and scribes strove so eagerly, (Matthew 23:6 ) and to which the wealthy and honored worshipper was invited. Where a fuller organization was possible, there was a college of elders, ( Luke 7:3 ) presided over by one who was "the chief of the synagogue. " (Luke 8:41,49 ; 13:14 ; Acts 18:8,17 ) The most prominent functionary in a large synagogue was known as the sheliach (= legatus ), the officiating minister who acted as the delegate of the congregation and was therefore the chief reader of prayers, etc
Nero - The folly of this king and the cowardice and incompetence of the Roman general Pætus threatened to undo all that Corbulo had achieved; but Corbulo, as supreme commander-in-chief for the whole Eastern frontier, retrieved the loss in the year 63 and following on this successful campaign Tiridates received the crown as the gift of Rome. Of these charges, hostility to civilized society was the chief. A conspiracy against the Emperor’s life, in which some of the chief men in the State were implicated, failed of its purpose through treachery in 65; the effect on the Emperor’s mind issued in a reign of terror, and a number of the noblest persons, particularly Stoics, were put to death
Ammonites - Ammon, the kingdom of the Ammonites, was hardly more than a city-state, consisting of the capital city itself, Rabbah or Rabbath-Ammon (“chief city,” or “chief city of the Ammonites”) and its immediately surrounding territory. The Ammonites made war on the Israelites of Gilead, leading the Israelites to appeal to Jephthah, chief of a local band of renegade raiders, to organize and lead their resistance
Columba (1) Columcille - His chief instructor was bp. 544 we have probably to place the many ecclesiastical and monastic foundations attributed to him in Ireland, his chief favourites being Durrow and Derry. Hy was henceforth his chief abode, but he frequently left it for Scotland, where he founded many churches, penetrating N
Mithraism - The highest, that of father, included those who ruled the cult, and the chief among them resided at Rome
Norway - The early dioceses were suffragan to the Archdiocese of Lund until 1152, and then to the Archdiocese of Trondhjem (Nidaros); they became numerous and; prosperous, and church buildings and furnishings are the chief representatives of the early development of Norwegian art
Catholic Truth Society of Ireland - A certain proportion of the society's publications must needs be exposures of the fictions propagated in England by Protestants, as well as considerations of the Anglican claims, but the publication for Catholics of devotional and educational works, at nominal prices, is the chief object
Catholic Truth Societies - A certain proportion of the society's publications must needs be exposures of the fictions propagated in England by Protestants, as well as considerations of the Anglican claims, but the publication for Catholics of devotional and educational works, at nominal prices, is the chief object
Benjamin - Its chief towns are named in Joshua 18:21-28
Judas - He was a "prophet" and a "chief man among the brethren
Ham - Egypt being the first civilized was singled out as the chief country of Hamite settlements
Argob (2) - of Jordan, in Bashan, in Og's kingdom, containing 60 great and fortified cities "with walls and brazen bars"; allotted to Manasseh, and taken by Jair a chief of that tribe (Numbers 32:41)
Etam - Conder identifying Etam with Beit 'Atab says that Etam, meaning in Hebrew "cleft," answers to the singular rock tunnel, roughly hewn in the stone, and running from the midst of the village eastward to the chief spring
Zedekiah - The chief priests and the people also transgressed greatly
Dagon - Under this hall the Philistine chief men celebrated a sacrificial meal, while the people assembled above upon the balustraded roof
Hamath - The chief city of upper Syria, in the valley of the Orontes, commanding the whole valley, from the low hills which form the watershed between the Orontes and the Liturgy, to the defile of Daphne below Antioch; this was "the kingdom of Hamath
Episcopacy - The name given to that form of Church government inwhich Bishops are the chief Pastors with Priests and Deacons underthem
London, England, City of - The chief events concerning London Catholics after the erection of the Vicariate Apostolic, 1688, were: ...
the petty persecutions conducted by common informers, 1767-1778
the first Catholic Relief Acts 1778, and the consequent Gordon Riots, 1780
the second Catholic Relief Acts 1791
the Catholic Emancipation Acts 1829
the Oxford Movement, 1833-1845
the reestablishment of the hierarchy, 1850
the erection of Westminster Cathedral, 1895-1903
the Eucharistic Congress, 1908
the steady growth of Catholic strength in all phases of activity in the city
Mesha - The designation of Mesha as a sheep breeder (2 Kings 3:4 NRSV) is perhaps an honorary title for chief
Head - Psalms 140:7 ), ‘swearing by the head’ ( Matthew 5:36 ), and the metaphorical use, common to all languages, as equivalent to ‘chief
Mamre - Genesis 23:19 , Genesis 35:27 ); in Genesis 14:13 it is the name of a local sheik or chief (cf
No - Nahum seems to imagine Thebes as resembling the cities of the less remote Delta surrounded by canals, which were their chief protection; in reality it lay on both banks of the Nile, with desert bounding it on either side, and water probably played little part in its defence
Sharon - The chief town of Sharon was in ancient days Dor ( Joshua 11:2 ; Joshua 12:23 , 1 Kings 4:11 ), in NT times Cæsarea, and in later Crusading times (1218 1291) the fortified port of Athlît
Sennach'Erib, - 700, Sennacherib turned his arms toward the west, chastised Sidon, and, having probably concluded a convention with his chief enemy finally marched against Hezekiah, king of Judah
Mufti - The chief of the ecclesiastical order, or primate of the Mussulman religion
Barnabas - ...
At Lystra (Acts 14:12 ), as doubtless at other places, Paul was the chief speaker; he was also the more prominent figure at the Jerusalem conference ( Acts 15:2 ff
Esther - The combined wisdom of Mordecai and courage of Esther became the means of doing a great service to the very large number of Jews living under Persian rule; for, owing to the craft and hatred of Haman , the chief court favourite, the Jews were in danger of being massacred en bloc ; but Esther, instigated by Mordecai, revealed her Jewish nationality to the king, who realized thereby that she was in danger of losing her life, owing to the royal decree, obtained by Haman, to the effect that all those of Jewish nationality in the king’s dominions were to be put to death
Bull - In the Canaanite religion, the chief of the assembly was called “father bull El
Prime - ) The first of the chief guards. ) To prepare; to make ready; to instruct beforehand; to post; to coach; as, to prime a witness; the boys are primed for mischief
Shechem - Son of Hamor the chief of the city of Shechem — from whom the city appears to have derived its name — killed with his father and household by Simeon and Levi because he had dishonoured their sister Dinah
Grain - Grain, without a definitive, signifies corn in general, or the fruit of certain plants which constitutes the chief food of man and beast, as wheat, rye, barley, oats and maiz
Australian Catholic Truth Society - A certain proportion of the society's publications must needs be exposures of the fictions propagated in England by Protestants, as well as considerations of the Anglican claims, but the publication for Catholics of devotional and educational works, at nominal prices, is the chief object
Jezreel - But the chief interest of the town’s history centres in the time of the reign of Ahab, who established here a royal residence, to which he retired when the three years’ drought came to an end ( 1 Kings 21:1 ; 1 Kings 18:45 ), and whence he saw and coveted the vineyard of Naboth (21)
Zechariah - A chief man among the Reubenites
Alexander, Bishop of Jerusalem - His chief claim to celebrity rests on the library he formed at Jerusalem, and on the boldness with which he supported Origen against his bishop, Demetrius of Alexandria
Chamber - ...
And it should seem, that this is the chief sense of the word, because it was the custom among Jews, to unfold the secrets of their religion in this way
a'Hab - See (1 Kings 18:19 ) One of Ahab's chief tastes was for splendid architecture which he showed by building an ivory house and several cities
Banner - The original רגל , is rendered by lexicographers and translators under this word, as a noun, in which form it often occurs, a standard, banner; as a verb, once, to set up a banner; Psalms 20:5 ; as a participle pahul, vexillatus, one distinguished by a banner, the chief; as a participle niphal, bannered, or with banners
Baal Zebub - In Scripture Beelzebub is called "the prince of devils," Matthew 12:24 ; Luke 11:15 ; merely, it would seem, through the application of the name of the chief idol of the Heathen world to the prince of evil spirits
Deacon - Our Lord makes use of both terms in Matthew 20:26-27 , though they are not distinctly marked in our translation: "Whosoever will be great among you, let him be your deacon; and whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant
Birthright - The first-born was consecrated to the Lord, Exodus 22:29 ; had a double portion of the estate allotted him, Deuteronomy 21:17 ; had a dignity and authority over his brethren, Genesis 49:3 ; succeeded in the government of the family or kingdom, 2 Chronicles 21:3 ; and, as some with good reason suppose, in ancient times to the priesthood or chief government in matters, ecclesiastical
Zeal - Charity, or love, is not only one ingredient, but the chief ingredient, in its composition
Zebulun - When the tribe of Zebulun left Egypt, it had for its chief Eliab the son of Elon, and comprehended fifty-seven thousand four hundred men able to bear arms, Numbers 1:9-30
Potter - —‘The Potter’s Field’ was the name of the property in the purchase of which the chief priests spent the thirty pieces of silver returned by Judas, and which they proposed to use as a burial-place for strangers (Matthew 27:7)
Mesha - The designation of Mesha as a sheep breeder (2 Kings 3:4 NRSV) is perhaps an honorary title for chief
Hell - The chief punishment is of course loss of God
Hanani'ah -
One of the fourteen sons of Heman, and chief of the sixteenth course of singers
za'Dok -
Son of Ahitub and one of the two chief priests in the time of David, Abiathar being the other
Ishmael - He became a great desert chief, but of his history little is recorded
Artaxerxes - His religious reforms included the removal of the queen mother (one of the chief supporters of the Canaanite religions), the destruction of idols, and the banning of religious prostitutes (1 Kings 15:9-15; Ezra 4:21)
Joshua the Son of Jehozadak - chief among those who returned were the governor Zerubbabel and the high priest Joshua (or Jeshua) the son of Jehozadak (or Jozadak) (Ezra 2:1-2)
Potter - —‘The Potter’s Field’ was the name of the property in the purchase of which the chief priests spent the thirty pieces of silver returned by Judas, and which they proposed to use as a burial-place for strangers (Matthew 27:7)
Bethany - The anointing by Mary, introduced by Mark, after mention of the chief priests' plot "two days" before the Passover, is not in chronological order, for it was six days before the Passover (John 12), but stands here parenthetically, to account for Judas' spite against Jesus. Judas "promised and sought opportunity to betray Him unto them in the absence of the multitude " (Luke 22:6); Matthew (Matthew 26:5) similarly represents the chief priests, in compassing His death, as saying," Not on the feast day, lest there be an uproar among the people
Philippi - farthest from Rome and first which Paul met in entering Macedon) city of the district" called Macedonia Prima, as lying farthest eastward, not as KJV "the chief city. "...
Thessalonica was chief city of the province, and Amphipolis of the district "Macedonia Prima
Ara'Bia - The latter name is probably derived from that of its chief city, not from its stony character. The principal Joktanite kingdom, and the chief state of ancient Arabia, was that of the Yemen. They appear to have settled chiefly north of the peninsula in Desert Arabia, from Palestine to the Persian Gulf. It flourished chiefly in the Yemen, where many churches were built
Joshua the Son of Nun - He became Moses’ chief assistant on the journey from Egypt to Canaan and, when Moses died, became Israel’s new leader and led the people into Canaan. ...
As Moses’ chief assistant, Joshua kept watch when Moses entered God’s presence on Mt Sinai (Joshua 19:49-502) and when Moses spoke face to face with God in his tent (Exodus 33:11)
Good - ...
Although the following article is dealing with the Christian moral ideal as ‘goodness,’ this brief statement in introducing the subject of ‘the good’ as man’s ‘chief end’ has been made for two reasons. (a) In the Christian view, God Himself is man’s chief good, for in His fellowship alone is man’s perfection, glory, and blessedness, and it is God’s goodness that man enjoys for ever; and (b) it is because of this goodness-this self-giving of God’s perfection as love-that the chief good is given to man. ...
We must note, however, that the chief good is presented to us in three distinctive phrases in the different types of teaching in the NT. ...
The idea of the good combines character and condition; it includes Tightness and happiness, holiness and blessedness, or, as the Shorter Catechism puts it: ‘man’s chief end is to glorify God and to enjoy Him for ever
Sadducees (2) - ), whose posterity officiated in the Temple down to the time of the Exile, and even formed the chief element of the post-exilic priesthood; but Kuenen says this conjecture is burdened with insurmountable difficulties’ (Religion of Israel, iii. The chief authorities for its use are the NT, Josephus, and portions of the Mishna. —The chief outstanding feature of the Sadducees was probably their conservatism. They were characterized chiefly by their denial of certain doctrines, and had no positive religious or theological system of their own. —The Sadducees are not often mentioned by name in the Gospels, but it has to be remembered that, when mention is made of the chief priests, practically the same persons are referred to
Joab - Joab, at Abner's appeal to his generosity, the Benjamites having rallied round the fleeing chief, forbore to press the vanquished to extremities. Joab speedily attained the command in chief by his being first gallantly to scale the Jebusite stronghold and drive out the enemy. The victory over Edom is variously attributed to David as king, to Joab as commander in chief, who slew 12,000, and to Abishai, who slew 6,000, under Joab (1 Chronicles 18:12). Then he removed the body out of the highway, and cast a cloth over it; so the people moved on, and Joab resumed the chief command, with the blood of the treacherously murdered victim still upon his girdle and sandals (1 Kings 2:5), David felt himself powerless to punish him (2 Samuel 23:6-7)
Intention - The intention is the chief among the determinants of the concrete morality of a human act
Shepherd - Shepherding was the chief occupation of the Israelites in the early days of the patriarchs: Abraham (Genesis 12:16 ); Rachel (Genesis 29:9 ); Jacob (Genesis 30:31-40 ); Moses (Exodus 3:1 )
Copper - ...
Cyprus was the chief source of copper in the Mediterranean world, but Egypt probably secured some from the Sinai peninsula
Oregon - After three years of apostolic labor among Indians and settlers, he received into the Church in 1842, Dr John Mcltoughlin, the chief factor of the Hudson Bay Company at Fort Vancouver, a pioneer whose influence and ability earned him the title of the "Father of Oregon," and who for his loyalty to the Church was made a Knight of Saint Gregory in 1846
Aaron - ...
Aaron's chief distinction consisted in the choice of him and his male posterity for the priesthood
Sim'Eon - (Genesis 42:19,24,36 ; 43:23 ) The chief families of the tribe of Simeon are mentioned int he lists of (Genesis 46:10 ) At the census of Sinai Simeon numbered 59,300 fighting men
Philip - " As he travelled along this road he was overtaken by a chariot in which sat a man of Ethiopia, the eunuch or chief officer of Queen Candace, who was at that moment reading, probably from the Septuagint version, a portion of the prophecies of (Isaiah 53:6,7 )
Azariah - chief priest of the house of Zadok, in Hezekiah's reign, who appointed chambers in the house of the Lord for storing the tithes and offerings, on which were dependent the attendance of the priests at the temple services (Nehemiah 10:35-39; Nehemiah 12:27-80; Nehemiah 12:44-47; 2 Chronicles 31:10-13)
Cush (2) - ) in Africa, its chief representative, but the Cush of Asia, watered by the Gihon river of paradise (Genesis 2:13)
Satan - Is a Hebrew word, and signifies an adversary, or enemy, and is commonly applied in Scripture to the devil, or the chief of the fallen angels
Ashtoreth - The chief goddess of the Phoenicians, as Baal was the male
Moses - Having slain an Egyptian, however, he fled into the land of Midian, where he was a shepherd chief
Honey - Sir 11:3 ‘the bee is little, but her fruit is the chief of sweet things’), and as an accompaniment to other food (Matthew 3:4 , Mark 1:6 ‘locusts and wild honey,’ Luke 24:42 , AV Medes, Media - Their chief city was Ecbatana, the Achmetha of Ezra 6:2 and the modern Hamadân
Cherub - Some have regarded them as symbolical of the chief ruling power by which God carries on his operations in providence (Psalm 18:10 )
Thessaloni'ca -
This was the chief station on the great Roman road called the Via Egnatia , which connected Rome with the whole region to the north of the AEgean Sea
Timnah - As Beit Atab, into which Samson went down for refuge (now called Hasuta), answers to the rock Elam ("eagle's nest"), so seven miles off is a low hill, and close by is a chapel sacred to sheikh Nedhir, "the Nazarite chief," and higher up is the ruin "Ism-Allah," i
Monophysites - The laborious efforts of Jacob were seconded in Egypt and the adjacent countries by Theodosius, bishop of Alexandria; and he became so famous, that all the Monophysites of the East considered him as their second parent and founder, and are to this day called Jacobites, in honour of their new chief
Samos - Its chief city, also called Samos, was a libera civitas in St
Nazareth - The chief importance of Nazareth is that it was the place where Jesus lived most of his life
Nippur - The chief deity was En-lil, also occasionally called Bel (“the lord”)
Judges - But at an early period the functions of the ‘judges,’ at any rate the more important of them, were exercised by a chief, chosen from among the elders probably on account of superior skill in warfare, an hereditary succession would, however, naturally tend to arise who was to all intents and purposes a king
Jupiter - The miracle of healing at once causes the barbarians to suppose that the gods had come to pay them a visit, and the impassive Barnabas is regarded as the chief
Gibeon - Chief of the four Hivite (in 2 Samuel 21 called by the general name "Amorite") cities which obtained a league from Joshua by guile (Joshua 9)
Gentiles - In Genesis 14:1, Tidal "king of nations" was probably chief of several nomadic wandering tribes of western Asia
Hedge - The tragedy of Jesus and the hedges was that He wanted them rooted up, while the chief priests hated the idea of their removal (Matthew 21:45)
Kiss (2) - ...
With regard to the salutation of Judas Iscariot (Luke 22:47-48), to have kissed the hand of Christ after the interval of absence caused by his conference with the chief priests would have been but an ordinary tribute of respect, and as such would have escaped the notice of the disciples, while giving the required information to those who had come with him
Seasons - In June, figs, cherries, and plums begin to ripen, but August is the chief month for fruit
Habakkuk - 'Upon Shigionoth ,' reads in the margin "according to variable songs or tunes," which signification seems confirmed by the subscription, "To the chief singer on stringed instruments
Ass - ...
But I will beg to detain the reader with another thought upon the subject, which hath not, as far as I have ever read or heard, been noticed; and yet may be after all, for aught I know, the chief circumstance for which the prophet predicted, and Jesus fulfilled, the prophecy
Messenger - "Whosoever will be great among you, (saith that humble Lord) let him be your minister; and whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant; even as the Son of man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom for many
Concise Chronological Table of Bible History - There are two chief systems of chronology: one based upon the Hebrew text of the Old Testament, and the other upon the Septuagint, or Greek text, and called the "short" and the "long" chronology
Aaron - (Exodus 29:9 ) From this time the history of Aaron is almost entirely that of the priesthood, and its chief feature is the great rebellion of Korah and the Levites
Ammon - ...
Ammon is by others derived from Ham, the son of Noah, who first peopled Egypt and Lybia, after the flood; and, when idolatry began to gain ground soon after this period, became the chief deity of those two countries, in which his descendants continued
Honey - Milk and honey were the chief dainties of the earlier ages, and continue to be so of the Bedoween Arabs now
Redemption - It is in virtue of this solidarity between the race and Christ, its chief, that His redeeming acts have a value for all His mystic members
Rousseau, Jean Jacques - His chief works are: The Discourse on the Arts and Sciences, in which he, assails reason and science; the Discourse on the origin of inequality among men, in which he develops his favorite theory that man is by nature good and virtuous but is depraved by society; the Social Contract, which became the gospel of the Revolution; Emile, in which he develops his theories on education, and which contains, alongside of some excellent ideas, many utopian views and very grave errors; the New Heloise, a novel in which he preaches a return to the natural state; and the famous Confessions, in which imagination plays such a part that they are unreliable as an autobiography
na'Bal - His wealth, as might be expected from his abode, consisted chiefly of sheep and goats. (1 Samuel 25:2,4 ; 36 ) It was on one of these occasions that ten youths from the chief of the freebooters approached Nabal, enumerated the services of their master, and ended by claiming, with a mixture of courtesy and defiance characteristic of the East, "whatsoever cometh into thy hand for thy servants and for thy son David
an'Tioch - The chief interest of Antioch, however, is connected with the progress of Christianity among the heathen, Here the first Gentile church was founded, ( Acts 11:20,21 ) here the disciples of Jesus Christ were first called Christians (Acts 11:26 ) It was from Antioch that St
Army - --The Roman army was divided into legions, the number of which varied considerably (from 3000 to 6000), each under six tribuni ("chief captains,") (Acts 21:31 ) who commanded by turns
Author - it is used of the chief of a tribe or family, Numbers 13:2 (RV, prince); of the "heads" of the children of Israel, Numbers 13:3 ; a captain of the whole people, Numbers 14:4 ; in Micah 1:13 , of Lachish as the leader of the sin of the daughter of Sion: there, as in Hebrews 2:10 , the word suggest a combination of the meaning of leader with that of the source from whence a thing proceeds
Joab - He was a bold and successful warrior, and was made David's commander-in-chief; but he is not mentioned as associated with David until he was established at Hebron, and he is not classed among David's valiant men
Maximinus i., Roman Emperor - The persecution was limited in its range, and probably was effectual chiefly in removing the restraints which the leanings of Alexander had imposed on the antagonism of the populations and governors of the provinces. A party of praetorian guards rose, and he, with his son and the chief ministers of his tyranny, were slain in his tent
Habakkuk - ...
Background to the book...
With its conquest of Assyria in 612 BC, Babylon had become the chief power in the region
Symbol - Examples of these are the Second Adam, the Firstborn, the chief Shepherd, the chief Corner-stone
Titus, Epistle to - We are not surprised, then, to find the Apostle in this Epistle laying the chief emphasis on the importance of personal holiness of character, and insisting that right belief must issue in useful, fruitful life ( Titus 1:15-16 ; Titus 1:2 passim Titus 3:8 ; Titus 3:14 ). The chief errorists mentioned by him are unruly men, vain talkers, and deceivers, especially those of the circumcision, who led men astray for filthy lucre’s sake ( Titus 1:10-11 ), men who professed that they knew God but denied Him in their lives ( Titus 1:16 ), and men who were ‘heretical’ (RVm Baal (1) - The chief male deity, as Ashtoreth is the chief goddess, of the Canaanites and Phoenicians
Thieves - The chief butler when raised again forgot Joseph; Jesus, when glorified, then especially remembered the penitent companion of His sufferings (Genesis 40:14; Genesis 40:23; Mark 15:7). ) cf6 "With ME" is the chief blessedness of the intermediate state (Philippians 1:23; 2 Corinthians 5:8), as it shall be of the final; to him alone of all His hearers did Jesus speak of paradise
Issue of Blood - ...
The chief feature of the miracle was the fact that the healing was gained surreptitiously, apart from the will and initiative of Jesus. The Divine power utilized and made more efficacious these already powerful sympathies and expectations; but while this is to be freely recognized, the chief emphasis is to be laid on the holy will of the unseen Father, with whom our Lord was morally and essentially one
Eleusius, Bishop of Cyzicus - In 381 Eleusius was the chief of 36 bishops of Macedonian tenets summoned by Theodosius to the oecumenical council of Constantinople in the hope of bringing them back to Catholic doctrine. Similarly at the conference of bishops of all parties in 383, to which Eleusius was also invited as chief of the Macedonians, the differences proved irreconcilable, and the emperor manifested his disappointment by severe edicts directed against the Macedonians, Eunomians, Arians, and other heretics (Tillem
Assyr'ia, as'Shur, - It derived its name apparently from Asshur, the son of Shem, (Genesis 10:22 ) who in later times was worshipped by the Assyrians as their chief god. -- The boundaries of Assyria differed greatly at different periods, Probably in the earliest times it was confined to a small tract of low country lying chiefly on the left bank of the Tigris. Her religion was a gross and complex polytheism, comprising the worship of thirteen principal and numerous minor divinities, at the head of all of whom stood the chief god, Asshur, who seems to be the deified patriarch of the nation
Scribes - It is said, "Out of Zebulon come they that handle the pen of the writer," Judges 5:14 ; and the rabbins state, that the scribes were chiefly of the tribe of Simeon; but it is thought that only those of the tribe of Levi were allowed to transcribe the Holy Scriptures. In the reign of David, Seraiah, 2 Samuel 8:17 , in the reign of Hezekiah, Shebna, 2 Kings 18:18 , and in the reign of Josiah, Shaphan, 2 Kings 22:3 , are called scribes, and are ranked with the chief officers of the kingdom; and Elishama the scribe, Jeremiah 36:12 , in the reign of Jehoiakim, is mentioned among the princes. Ezra had examined the various traditions concerning the ancient and approved usages of the Jewish church, which had been in practice before the captivity, and were remembered by the chief and most aged of the elders of the people; and he had given to some of these traditionary customs and opinions the sanction of his authority. And our Saviour speaks of them as sitting in Moses's seat, Matthew 23:2 , which implies that they taught the law; and he foretold that he should be betrayed unto the chief priests and unto the scribes, Matthew 16:21 , and that they should put him to death, which shows that they were men of great power and authority among the Jews
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - ...
Asherah was one of the three chief consort-goddesses within the Canaanite pantheon, along with Astarte (or Ashtaroth) and Anath. In the Ugaritic myths she clearly emerges as the consort of El, the chief high god of the west Semitic pantheon. Marduk was the chief deity of Babylon. Enlil was the original chief god until the Code of Hammurabi and the Creation Epic focused on Marduk instead. Milcom, called the "abomination" of the Ammonites, was apparently the chief deity of the Ammonites or Moabites
Treasure, Treasury, Treasurer - In Matthew 27:6 ‘treasury’ represents korbanâs (the depository of the ‘corban,’ see Sacrifice and Offering, § 1 ( a )), the sacred treasury into which the chief priests would not put Judas’ 30 pieces of silver
Cush - Nimrod was a great Cushite chief
Faith (2) - 'Much obliged to you, captain,' said the chief by this one word making the soldier a captain
Reject - A — 1: ἀποδοκιμάζω (Strong's #593 — Verb — apodokimazo — ap-od-ok-ee-mad'-zo ) "to reject" as the result of examination and disapproval (apo, "away from," dokimazo, "to approve"), is used (a) of the "rejection" of Christ by the elders and chief priests of the Jews, Matthew 21:42 ; Mark 8:31 ; 12:10 ; Luke 9:22 ; 20:17 ; 1 Peter 2:4,7 (AV, "disallowed"); by the Jewish people, Luke 17:25 ; (b) of the "rejection" of Esau from inheriting "the blessing," Hebrews 12:17
Mordecai - 1:231-233), who probably saw the Medo-Persian chronicles mentioned in Esther 10:2, names a Matacas, Xerxes' chief favorite, the most powerful of the eunuchs
Philippi - Then they journeyed a few miles inland to “Philippi, which is the chief city of that part of Macedonia, and a colony” (Acts 16:12 )
Hebron - At the time of the entry of the Israelites it was held by three chieftains of great stature, Sheshai, Ahiman, and Talmai ( Numbers 13:22 ). Its chief manufactures are glassware and leather water-skins
Sam'Uel - " He visited, in the discharge of his duties as ruler, the three chief sanctuaries on the west of Jordan --Bethel, Gilgal and Mizpeh
Magic - Magicians were among the chief advisers to kings in many ancient countries (Exodus 7:11; Daniel 2:2)
Manna - The chief food of the Israelites in the wilderness
Lachish - The rich and varied finds represent almost all of the periods, but the chief interest for the student of the Bible centers on the periods beginning with the time of the Hebrew invasion of Canaan
Epicureans - ...
To deliver men from ‘the fear of the gods’ was the chief endeavour and, according to his famous follower the Roman poet Lucretius, the crowning service of Epicurus
Milk - Butter and cheese were known among the ancients (1 Samuel 17:18 ) as well as curdled, sour milk which still forms, after bread, the chief food of the poorer classes in Arabia and Syria
Gath - Thence he attached and drew after him 600 Gittite followers, with Ittai their chief (2 Samuel 15:18); probably some at the time of his sojourn in Gath, and most when he smote and subdued the Philistines (2 Samuel 8:1)
Alexandria - It was a chief grain port of Rome, and the grain vessels were large and handsome; usually sailing direct to Puteoli, but from severity of weather at times, as the vessel that carried Paul, sailing under the coast of Asia Minor (Acts 27)
Sifting - Of these farming is the chief, with its floors, fans, etc
Devil - As a mighty commander-in-chief of all evil forces Satan was and is permitted to come before GOD to accuse the believers
Psalms - And hence some have thought, that as the chief scope and tendency of the psalms is to lead to Christ, the former implies his humiliation, and the latter his glory
Seir, Mount - Named so from a Horite chief (Genesis 36:20)
Fish - The "fishgate" at Jerusalem implies an adjoining fish market, supplied chiefly through Tyrian traders who imported it (Nehemiah 13:16; Nehemiah 3:3; Nehemiah 12:39; 2 Chronicles 33:14). The casting net or the larger drag net was the chief instrument used for catching fish (Habakkuk 1:15); the line and hook, and the "barbed iron" or spear, were also used (Amos 4:2; Matthew 17:27; Job 41:7)
Christ - Some types of CHRIST:...
Aaron, Exodus 28:2 (c)...
Adam, Genesis 5:2 (c)...
Ark, (covenant), Exodus 25:10 (c)...
Ark, (Noah's), Genesis 6:14 (c)...
Ass, Genesis 49:14 (c)...
Author, Hebrews 5:9 (c)...
Bishop, 1 Peter 2:25 (a)...
Body, 1 Corinthians 12:12 (a)...
Branch, Zechariah 3:8 (a)...
Bread, John 6:51 (a)...
Bridegroom, Matthew 25:1 (b)...
Bullock, Leviticus 1:5 (c)...
Burnt Offering, Leviticus 1:3 (b)...
Calf, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Captain, Hebrews 2:10 (a)...
Chief, Song of Solomon 5:10 (b)...
Commander, Isaiah 55:4 (b)...
Cornerstone, Isaiah 28:16 (a)...
Covert, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
David, 2 Samuel 19:10 (c)...
Day, Psalm 118:24 (b)...
Door, John 10:9 (a)...
Eagle, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Flour, Leviticus 2:1 (c)...
Foundation, Isaiah 28:16 (b)...
Fountain, Zechariah 13:1 (b)...
Garment, Isaiah 61:10 (b), Romans 13:14...
Gate, Psalm 118:20 (b)...
Gold, Isaiah 13:12 (a)...
Headstone, Psalm 113:22 (b)...
Heir, Hebrews 1:2 (a)...
Hen, Matthew 23:37 (a)...
Hiding Place, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
High Priest, Hebrews 4:14 (a)...
Isaac, Genesis 24:36 (c)...
Jacob, Genesis 32:28 (c)...
Jonah, Matthew 12:40 (a)...
Joseph, Genesis 37:7 (c)...
Joshua, Joshua 1:1 (c)...
Judge, Acts 17:31 (a)...
King, Psalm 2:6 (a)...
Lamb, Revelation 5:6 (a)...
Leaves, Revelation 22:2 (c)...
Light, John 8:12 (a)...
Lily of the Valleys, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Lion, Revelation 5:5 (a)...
Manna, John 6:32 (a)...
Master of the House, Luke 13:25 (b)...
Meal, 2 Kings 4:41 (c)...
Mediator (umpire), 1 Timothy 2:5 (a)...
Melchizedek, Genesis 14:18 (c)...
Merchantman, Matthew 13:45 (b)...
Owl, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Ox:, Ezekiel 1:10 (b)...
Passover, 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a)...
Peace Offering, Leviticus 3:1 (c)...
Pelican, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Physician, Jeremiah 8:22 (c)...
Pigeon, Leviticus 12:6 (c)...
Propitiation (mercy seat), Romans 3:25 (a)...
Ram, Genesis 22:13 (a)...
Rock, Matthew 16:18 (a)...
Rock of Ages, Isaiah 26:4 (margin) (a)...
Rose of Sharon, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Root, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sabbath, Colossians 2:16-17 (b)...
Seed, Genesis 3:15 (a)...
Serpent, John 3:14 (a)...
Shepherd, John 10:11 (a)...
Sin, 2 Corinthians 5:21 (a)...
Sin Offering, Leviticus 4:32 (c)...
Solomon, 1 Kings 10:13 (c)...
Sower, Matthew 13:37 (a)...
Sparrow, Psalm 102:7 (a)...
Star, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sun, Malachi 4:2 (a)...
Temple, John 2:19 (a)...
Thief, Revelation 3:3 (a)...
Tree, Revelation 22:2 (b)...
Trespass Offering, Leviticus 5:6 (c)...
Turtle dove, Leviticus 1:14 (c)...
Vine, John 15:5 (a)...
Worm, Psalm 22:6 (a)...
Goat - ]'>[3] ‘chief ones’ Isaiah 14:8 , but RVm Jehu - The skill of Jehu is seen in his making the chief men in the kingdom partners in the crime
Asp - The chief peculiarities of cobras are: (a) a clearly defined neck, which they can dilate at will, and (b) the equality in size of the scales on the back with those on the other parts of the body
Star - ...
Amos 5:26 (b) Each idol was represented by a high priest or a chief priest who had charge of the worship of that idol
Rain - ) The fruit of certain grasses which furnish the chief food of man, as corn, wheat, rye, oats, etc
Elias i, Bishop of Jerusalem - When the Monophysites (Acephali) in Syria, under the leadership of Xenaias of Hierapolis, broke into open insurrection, treating as heretics all who acknowledged the two natures, Elias was one of the chief objects of their attack
Gold - ...
“Gold” was bought and sold as an object of merchandise: “The merchants of Sheba and Raamah, they were thy merchants: they [1] with chief of all spices, and with all precious stones, and gold” ( Rain - ) The fruit of certain grasses which furnish the chief food of man, as corn, wheat, rye, oats, etc
Bel - or BELUS, a name by which many Heathens, and particularly the Babylonians, called their chief idol
Pamphylia - Christianity made way most quickly in the chief centres of thought
God - Throughout the Hebrew Scriptures two chief names are used for the one true divine Being--ELOHIM, commonly translated God in our version, and JEHOVAH , translated Lord . But more, it is not the expression only, or chiefly, of an absolute truth: it is a practical revelation of God, in his essential, unchangeable relation to this chosen people, the basis of his covenant
e'Gypt - The inundation of the Nile fertilizes and sustains the country, and makes the river its chief blessing
Jon'Athan, - (1 Samuel 14:24-45 ) The chief interest of Jonathan's career is derived from the friendship with David, which began on the day of David's return from the victory over the champion of Gath, and continued till his death
Judah - Though not the eldest son he began to take a chief place in the family
Jovianus Flavius, Christian Emperor - Early in the morning the generals and chief officers met to choose an emperor
Petrus, Bishop of Apamea - In 536 Mennas was appointed to the patriarchal chair, and lost no time in summoning a council to pronounce the condemnation of Monophysitism and its chief leaders, Peter and Severus being cut off from communion as men who had "voluntarily chosen the sin unto death," and "shown no signs of repentance and a better mind" ( ib
Scribes - (Matthew 4:17 ) In our Lord's time there were two chief parties:
the disciples of Shammai, conspicuous for their fierceness, appealing to popular passions, using the sword to decide their controversies. For the scribes there were the best places at feasts, the chief seats in synagogues
Age, Old (the Aged) - The office of "elder" took on political connotations when it referred to David's chief servants (2 Samuel 12:17 ), as well as to the elders of Egypt, Moab, or Midian (Genesis 50:7 ; Numbers 22:7 ). They appear frequently in association with the chief priests and scribes
Ezra - " He committed for safety the charge of the gold and silver to 12 priests and 12 Levites (Ezra 8:24 translated "I separated 12 of the chief priests in addition to Sherebiah, Hashabiah, and ten of their brethren with them": compare Ezra 8:18-19). These delivered them up "to the chief of the priests, Levites
ir-ha-Heres - of the modern Cairo, in ancient times the chief centre of the sun-worship in Egypt, and full of obelisks dedicated to the sun-god Ra (‘Cleopatra’s needle,’ now on the Thames Embankment, was originally one of these obelisks, erected by Thothmes iii. ...
The following are the chief views taken by those who hold that this clause (with or without its context) is not Isaiah’s
Magi - The religion of the Magi fell into disgrace on the death of those ringleaders of that sect who had usurped the sovereignty after the death of Cambyses; and the slaughter that was made of the chief men among them sunk it so low, that Sabianism every where prevailed against it; Darius and most of his followers on that occasion going over to it. The chief reformation this pretended prophet made in the Magian religion was in the first principle of it; for he introduced a god superior both to Ommasdes and Arimanius
Sela - The palace, called Pharaoh's house by the Arabs, is the chief structure not excavated in the mountain that survives in any good degree the ravages of time; it was evidently a gorgeous building. It was the chief city among scores, which once filled that region
Nonnus of Panopolis - "...
The chief modern editions of the Dionysiaca are Graefe (1819–1826); Passow (1834); Le Comte de Marcellus, with interesting introduction, French. The additions are chiefly those of poetical expansion. The chief modern editions are Passow (1834); Le Comte de Marcellus, with French trans
Weights And Measures - The chief unit was the SHEKEL (i. The chief multiple, or higher unit, was the kikkar (i. The measures of the former class have been universally derived, in the first instance, from the parts of the human body; but it is remarkable that, in the Hebrew system, the only part used for this purpose is the hand and fore-arm, to the exclusion of the foot, which was the chief unit of the western nations. ) which appears as the chief Oriental unit from the very building of Noah's ark
Silas - ...
Silas was a Christian prophet (Acts 15:32 ), one of the ‘chief men among the brethren’ (therefore doubtless of Jewish birth), who with ‘Judas called Barsabbas’ was sent as a delegate from the Apostolic Council with Paul and Barnabas, to convey the decision of the Council ( Acts 15:22 ff
Tyrannus - All this is conveyed by the reading of the chief representative of the Western text, but the present writer has no doubt that here, as elsewhere, the reviser has been endeavouring to remove obscurity from the narrative
Hebron - It became the residence also of the rebellious Absalom (2 Samuel 15:10 ), who probably expected to find his chief support in the tribe of Judah, now called el-Khulil
Vanity - This approaches the chief Old Testament understanding that human life apart from God, even at its best, has no ultimate significance and consequently is valueless
Ephesus - ), who there had her chief shrine; and for its theatre, which was the largest in the world, capable of containing 50,000 spectators
Ruler - 1: ἄρχων (Strong's #758 — Noun Masculine — archon — ar'-khone ) "a ruler, chief, prince," is translated "rulers," e
Elder, Eldest - of Genesis 50:7 ; Numbers 22:7 ; (2) in the Jewish nation, firstly, those who were the heads or leaders of the tribes and families, as of the seventy who assisted Moses, Numbers 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 27:1 , and those assembled by Solomon; secondly, members of the Sanhedrin, consisting of the chief priests, "elders" and scribes, learned in Jewish law, e
Asher - ...
From being more numerous at mount Sinai than Ephraim, Manasseh, and Benjamin, in David's time they had become so few that Asher's name is omitted from the chief rulers (1 Chronicles 27:16-22)
Oil - The use of oil in anointing the sick may have had some medicinal purpose, but its chief significance may have been symbolic, demonstrating faith (Mark 6:13; James 5:14)
Shechem - Shechem became the chief city of the Samaritans, and Mt Gerizim became to them a sacred mountain
Sheep - The relation that exists between Christ, "the chief Shepherd," and his members is beautifully compared to that which in the East is so strikingly exhibited by the shepherds to their flocks [1]
Eli - there shall not be an old man in thine house," was being fulfilled in David's days, when "there were more chief men found of the sons of Eleazar (16) than of the sons of Ithamar" (8) (1 Chronicles 24:4)
Gog - ...
Gog is the ideal head of Magog the land and people; also prince of Rosh (Roxolani), Mesech (Moschi), and Tubal (Tibareni); Ezekiel 38:2, "the chief prince," rather "prince of Rosh" (the Scythian Tauri)
Gallio - " So the Greeks, sympathizing with the deputy's disgust at the Jews' intolerance, beat Sosthenes the chief ruler of the Jews' synagogue "before the judgment seat
Magistrate (2) - By our use of the word we usually mean one entrusted with the duty and power of putting laws into force, but the Greek ἄρχων (of which ‘magistrate’ is the translation in the passages before us) has a wider meaning, and may denote ruler, captain, chief, king
Euphrates - Its chief interest for us in the Apostolic Age is its adoption as a term in the allegorical apparatus of Christian polemic and apologetic
Cyrene - It was the chief member of a confederacy of five neighbouring cities; hence the district was called either Pentapolis or Cyrenaica
Fravitta, Bishop of Constantinople - Our chief authority is Nicephorus Callistus, who relates that on the death of Acacius, the emperor Zeno placed on the altar of the great church of Constantinople two sheets of paper
Asylum - The care of widows, the poor, and orphans, was characteristic of the first Christians; and all through history, the faithful have generously supported and endowed institutions for such purposes, while the founders of many religious orders of men and women have made service in such asylums the chief purpose of their orders
Follow - To use to practice to make the chief business as, to follow the trade of a carpenter to follow the profession of law. From such measures, great mischiefs must follow
Abijah - ...
A descendant of Eleazar, the son of Aaron, a chief of one of the twenty-four orders into which the priesthood was divided by David (1Chronicles 24:10)
Canaanites - The chief object of their worship was the sun-god, who was addressed by the general name of Baal, "lord
Albion - The chief authority for the life of Alboin, Paulus Diaconus, lived towards the end of the 8th cent
Silas - A chief (Greek "leading") man of the church at Jerusalem, a prophet (Acts 15:22-32)
Sheba (2) - The Sabeans were famed for myrrh, frankincense, and cinnamon, their chief city being Mariaba (Strabo 16:777), named also Seba, the one being the city the other the fortress (near the famous dyke el 'Arim, built to store water and avert mountain torrents
Antinomians - Some of the chief of those who have been charged as favouring the above sentiments are, Crisp, Richardson, Saltmarsh, Hussey, Eatom, Town, &c
Ambassador - In this way they acquire a richer content, of which the chief component ideas are the bearing of a message, the dealing, in a representative character, with those to whom one is sent, and the solemn investiture, before starting out, with a delegated authority sufficient for the task (cf
Dalmatius, Monk And Abbat - He is sometimes addressed as chief of the monasteries of Constantinople; but it is uncertain whether this was a complimentary or official title
Lunatics - It evinced an intimate knowledge both of his person and character, which was hidden from the "wise and prudent" of the nation, the chief priests, scribes, and Pharisees
Arabia - The chief inhabitants were known as Ishmaelites, Arabians, Idumeans, Horites, and Edomites
Babylon (2) - It was chiefly between the Euphrates and Tigris rivers. Their chief deities were Bel, Merodach, and Nebo
Judge - In the history of Israel, a chief magistrate, with and military powers
Mock, Mocker, Mocking - The word is used (a) prophetically by the Lord, of His impending sufferings, Matthew 20:19 ; Mark 10:34 ; Luke 18:32 ; (b) of the actual insults inflicted upon Him by the men who had taken Him from Gethsemane, Luke 22:63 ; by Herod and his soldiers, Luke 23:11 ; by the soldiers of the governor, Matthew 27:29,31 ; Mark 15:20 ; Luke 23:36 ; by the chief priests, Matthew 27:41 ; Mark 15:31
Jehu - ...
Jehu’s massacre of all the chief administrators left Israel’s government weak and unstable (2 Kings 10:11)
Philippus, of Side - His chief work, entitled A Christian History , was divided into 36 books and about a thousand chapters
James, Letter of - It causes Christians to live like the ordinary people of the world, whose chief concern is for their own advancement regardless of God’s will and God’s values (4:13-5:6)
Gilead - ...
Chief towns of Gilead that feature in the Old Testament story are Jabesh-gilead (Judges 21:8-12; 1 Samuel 11:1; 1 Samuel 31:8-13), Mahanaim (Genesis 32:1-2; Joshua 21:38; 2 Samuel 2:29; 2 Samuel 17:24), Ramoth-gilead (Joshua 21:38; 1 Kings 22:3-4; 2 Kings 8:28; 2 Kings 9:1-3), Succoth (Genesis 33:17; Joshua 13:27; Judges 8:4-16) and Penuel (Genesis 32:31; Judges 8:4-17; 1 Kings 12:25)
Jehoiakim - ...
Conflict with Jeremiah...
The chief opponent of Jehoiakim was the prophet Jeremiah, who had begun his preaching earlier, in the reign of Josiah (Jeremiah 1:1-3)
Satan - The chief of these evil angelic spirits is one known as the adversary – the adversary of God, his people, and all that is good. There are good angels and evil angels, Satan being chief of the evil ones (Matthew 25:31; Matthew 25:41; Ephesians 6:12; Judges 1:9; Revelation 12:7-9; see ANGELS; DEMONS)
Mediator, Mediation - Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 15:1 ) singles out Moses and Samuel as the chief representatives of this form of prayer. 17) preserves the great intercessory prayer of Jesus after the Last Supper, and intercession is declared to be a chief exercise of Christ’s mediatorial function in heaven ( Romans 8:34 , Hebrews 7:25 , 1 John 1:1 )
Dives - Lazarus, while the other chief character, the rich man, is significantly nameless, and that the parable has no prefatory introduction, such as ‘He spake another parable,’ or the like, have given rise to the conjecture that this is not a parable pure and simple, but that it is either a narrative of facts, or that persons more or less known are alluded to in the story. 13–16; yet Dives’ chief sin most evidently was that he left undone the things which he ought to have done
Ezekiel - The city’s leaders were the chief cause of its downfall (11:1-13), though God would preserve the faithful minority (11:14-25). The tribes of Israel were given equal portions for their respective tribal territories (47:13-48:29), but the chief blessing was that God now dwelt in the midst of his people for ever (48:30-35)
Paul - The sudden light from heaven; the voice of Jesus speaking with authority to his persecutor; Saul struck to the ground, blinded, overcome; the three-days suspense; the coming of Ananias as a messenger of the Lord and Saul's baptism, --these were the leading features at the great event, and in these we must look for the chief significance of the conversion. Thereupon these pagans took the apostles for gods, calling Barnabas, who was of the more imposing presence, Jupiter, and Paul, who was the chief speaker, Mercurius. ( Acts 15:35-40 ) Silas, or Silvanus, becomes now a chief companion of the apostle. Corinth was the chief city of the province of Achaia, and the residence of the proconsul. The inquiry only elicited confused outcries, and the "chief captain" seems to have imagined that the apostle might perhaps be a certain Egyptian pretender who recently stirred up a considerable rising of the people. The chief captain set him free from bonds, but on the next day called together the chief priests and the Sanhedrin, and brought Paul as a prisoner before them. The chief captain, Claudius Lysias determined to send him to Caesarea to Felix, the governor or procurator of Judea. At Puteoli they found "brethren," for it was an important place and especially a chief port for the traffic between Alexandria and Rome; and by these brethren they were exhorted to stay a while with them
the Wedding Guest Who Sat Down in the Lowest Room - The two sons of Zebedee chose out the chief rooms for themselves, their mother encouraging them to do it. " My brethren, you will not be long troubled with that guest choosing out the chief rooms for himself. If you would have all the chief rooms to yourselves, and to your children, frequent those feasts, and engineer to get your children invited to those feasts, to which none but Thomas Shepard's disciples are invited. Till the only difficulty at the Marriage Supper of the Lamb will be to get the chief rooms at that Supper to be filled with their proper guests
Eustathius, Bishop of Sebaste - 27, 359, Eustathius occupied a prominent place in its tumultuous and indecisive proceedings, and was the head of the ten episcopal deputies, Basil of Ancyra, Silvanus of Tarsus, and Eleusius of Cyzicus being other chief members, sent to Constantinople to lay their report before Constantius. No mention was made of the new Macedonian heresy concerning the Holy Spirit, now infecting the Eastern church, of which Eustathius and the other deputies were among the chief promulgators. He recommended persons as fellow-helpers who, as Basil bitterly complains, turned out to be spies of his actions and words, interpreting all in a malevolent sense and reporting to their chief (ib. In 376 he visited Sebaste and other chief places in the province, oppressing Basil's adherents, whom he compelled to undertake onerous and costly public duties, and loading the followers of Eustathius with the highest honours ( ib
Ammonites - Their chief and peculiar deity is, in Scripture, called Moloch. Rabbah" (the chief city) "of the Ammonites shall be a desolate heap. The country is divided between the Turks and the Arabs, but chiefly possessed by the latter. " So literally true is it, although Seetzen, and Burckhardt, and Buckingham, who relate the facts, make no reference or allusion whatever to any of the prophecies, and travelled for a different object than the elucidation of the Scriptures,—that "the chief city of the Ammonites is a stable for camels, and a couching place for flocks. "...
"Rabbah" (Rabbah Ammon, the chief city of Ammon) "shall be a desolate heap
Joseph - After a while the "chief of the cupbearers" and the "chief of the bakers" of Pharaoh's household were cast into the same prison (40:2). ...
This led to Joseph's being remembered subsequently by the chief butler when Pharaoh also dreamed
Ezekiel, Book of - Gog and Magog will be the chief opponents. In Ezekiel 38:2 , instead of "O Gog, the chief prince of Meshech and Tubal," the LXX reads, "O Gog, . This is held to be the true meaning and that Rosh refers to Russia, and that it will be the head of that nation that will be the chief enemy of Israel when they are brought back to their own land
God - The first is used exclusively in the first chapter of Genesis; chiefly in the second book of Psalms, Psalms 42:1-11; Psalms 43:1-5; Psalms 44:1-26; Psalms 45:1-17; Psalms 46:1-11; Psalms 47:1-9; Psalms 48:1-14; Psalms 49:1-20; Psalms 50:1-23; Psalms 51:1-19; Psalms 52:1-9; Psalms 53:1-6; Psalms 54:1-7; Psalms 55:1-23; Psalms 56:1-13; Psalms 57:1-11; Psalms 58:1-11; Psalms 59:1-17; Psalms 60:1-12; Psalms 61:1-8; Psalms 62:1-12; Psalms 63:1-11; Psalms 64:1-10; Psalms 65:1-13; Psalms 66:1-20; Psalms 67:1-7; Psalms 68:1-35; Psalms 69:1-36; Psalms 70:1-5; Psalms 71:1-24; Psalms 72:1-20, called the Elohim Psalms, and occurs alternately with the other names in the other parts of the Old Testament. This belief in God as one was a chief mark of the Jewish religion
Reconciliation - The chief passages in which it and related terms are employed are Romans 5:10-11 (RV Devotion to the Holy Family - It is, to a great extent, under the direction of the Redemptorist Fathers, the rector of the Redemptorist community at Liege being its chief director
Family, Holy - It is, to a great extent, under the direction of the Redemptorist Fathers, the rector of the Redemptorist community at Liege being its chief director
Zechariah - One of the chief men with whom Ezra consulted at the river Ahava ( Ezra 8:15 ; cf
Passover - The name given to the chief of the three great historical annual festivals of the Jews
Goshen - Goshen may have been the chief city of the region at one time
Uzzia(h) - Uzziah mounted a successful campaign against the Philistines, destroying the walls of some of their chief cities, Gath, Jabneh, and Ashdod
Divine Freedom - Absolute freedom is one of the chief attributes of God
Hinnom, Valley of - The chief data are found in Joshua 15:8 ; Joshua 18:16 , where the boundary of Judah and Benjamin is described
Taxes - The taxes, not the idolatry, of Solomon caused the revolt under his son; and Adoram, as over the tribute, was the chief object, of hatred (1 Kings 12:4; 1 Kings 12:18)
Hebron - In the 40th year of David's reign 2,700 of them, at Jazer in Gilead, "mighty men of valor," superintended for the king the two and a half tribes "in matters pertaining to God and the king" (1 Chronicles 26:30-32); Jerijah was their chief
Searching - ), than it did upon the lips of the chief priests and Pharisees (John 7:52)
Mother - That which has preceded in time the oldest or chief of any thing as a mother-church
Holy Family, Devotion to the - It is, to a great extent, under the direction of the Redemptorist Fathers, the rector of the Redemptorist community at Liege being its chief director
Ephraim - After the raising of Lazarus, Jesus departed, in consequence of the plots of the chief priests against Him, ‘unto a country ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘into the country’) near to the wilderness, into a city called Ephraim, and there continued with his disciples
Exegesis - Saint John Chrysostom and Theodoret are the chief glories of this school. The Latin Church glories chiefly in Saint Augustine and the greatest of all biblical scholars, Saint Jerome. The post-patristic period in the Greek Church was famous chiefly for its compilations of excerpts from the Greek Fathers
Exegete - Saint John Chrysostom and Theodoret are the chief glories of this school. The Latin Church glories chiefly in Saint Augustine and the greatest of all biblical scholars, Saint Jerome. The post-patristic period in the Greek Church was famous chiefly for its compilations of excerpts from the Greek Fathers
Excommunication - While not vindictive, excommunication is the Church's most serious penalty, its chief purpose being the correction of the guilty
Regeneration - The change in regeneration consists in the recovery of the moral image of God upon the heart; that is to say, so as to love him supremely and serve him ultimately as our highest end, and to delight in him superlatively as our chief good
Isa'Iah, Book of - 13-23 contain chiefly a collection of utterances, each of which is styled a "burden," fore-telling the doom of Babylon, Philistia, Moab, Ethiopia, Egypt and Tyre. (Matthew 3:3 ; Luke 4:17 ; Acts 8:28 ; Romans 10:16,20 ) (b) The unity of design which connects these last 27 chapters with the preceding; the oneness of diction which pervades the whole book; the peculiar elevation and grandeur of style which characterize the second part as well as the first; the absence of any other name than Isaiah's claiming the authorship; lastly, the Messianic predictions which mark its inspiration and remove the chief ground of objection against its having been written by Isaiah
Tribe - ...
This separation may be looked upon as the chief cause of those great misfortunes that afterward happened to those two kingdoms, and to the whole Hebrew nation
Tribute - As to the children of Israel, he would not suffer one of them to be employed upon them, but made them his soldiers, ministers, and chief officers, to command his armies, his chariots, and his horsemen
Kings - In Scripture many persons are called kings, whom we should rather denominate chiefs or leaders; and many single towns, or, at most, together with their adjacent villages, are said to have had kings. Moses was the chief, the leader, the guide of his people, fulfilling the duties of a king; but he was not king in the same sense as David or Solomon was afterward
Accomplish, Accomplishment - The main distinction is that teleo more frequently signifies "to fulfill," teleioo, more frequently, "to make perfect," one of the chief features of the Epistle to the Hebrews, where it occurs nine times
Behemoth - On land, indeed, he finds the chief part of his food
Benjamin - A Benjamite chief
See, Roman - The death of Saint Peter in the Roman See has for all time irrevocably fixed it as the chief see of the Christian Church
Roman See - The death of Saint Peter in the Roman See has for all time irrevocably fixed it as the chief see of the Christian Church
Devil - A fallen angel; and particularly the chief of them, the devil, or Satan
Ramah - The chief difficulty is found in the account of Saul's first visit to Samuel, 1 Samuel 9:4-12 10:2
Isaac - ...
The next chief event in his life was the blessing of his sons (Genesis 27:1 )
Heart, Heartily - ), the chief organ of physical life ("for the life of the flesh is in the blood," Leviticus 17:11 ), occupies the most important place in the human system
Josiah - Son of Zephaniah, at whose house Zechariah assembled the chief men of the captivity when Joshua the son of Josedech was crowned
Murder - We find a reference to this group in Acts 21:38, where the chief captain (ὁ χιλίαρχος), finding that St
Zidon - Zidon appears in Scripture as the chief city of Phœnicia, giving her name to the whole people ( Genesis 10:15 , Judges 10:12 etc. The chief occupations are fishing, and the cultivation of the gardens and orange groves for which modern Zidon is famous
Magi - ) The word is Persian or Median; it appears in Rab-mag, "chief of the magicians" (Jeremiah 39:3), brought with Nebuchadnezzar's expedition, that its issue might be foreknown. " Accordingly the very guide they look to is a star (a meteor probably), and the question they ask is "where is He that is born King of the Jews?"...
Moreover, Daniel, "chief of the Magi," had foretold Messiah's kingdom (Daniel 2:44; Daniel 9:25); naturally the Magi ("wise men") looked for the kingdom and the king among the people of him whose fame as a Magian they had heard of
Melita - Publius is called (Acts 28:7)" chief man of the island," not from his "possessions," his father being still alive, but as lieutenant of the printer of Sicily, to whose province Malta was attached (Cicero, chief (protos , primus ) of the Maltese
Elder - In the New Testament, frequent reference is made to the elders of the Jews, usually in conjunction with the chief priests or scribes (for example, Matthew 21:23 ; Mark 14:43 ). Often, perhaps usually, bishops were chosen from the ranks of the presbyters, thus making the bishops the “chief presbyters
Scorn - Such an instance is recorded (Matthew 21:23-27) when Jesus met the question of the chief priests and scribes, ‘By what authority doest thou these things?’ with a counter question, and on their refusal to answer declined in turn to reply to their question. Still more impressive was the silent scorn with which He met His accusers at the various stages of His trial, refusing in turn to answer the accusation of false witnesses (Matthew 26:60-63, Mark 14:61) and the questions of the chief priests and elders (Matthew 27:12, Mark 15:3; Mark 15:5), of Herod (Luke 23:9), and lastly of Pilate himself (Matthew 27:14, John 19:9)
Moab And the Moabite Stone - ...
The chief cities of northern Moab were Hesbon, Medeba, and Dibon. The chief cities of Moab proper were Kir-hareseth (present-day Kerak) and a place called Ar Moab (possibly to be identified with the present-day village of Rabbah approximately nine miles northeast of Kerak)
Guest - —Hospitality was, and to a large extent still is, one of the chief virtues of Oriental life. Luke 7:36 (of a meal at which Jesus was present as a guest) Luke 14:8 (in Christ’s warning against seeking the chief places); cf
Felix Iii, Bishop of Rome - ...
The pontificate of this Felix was chiefly remarkable for the commencement of the schism of 35 years between Rome and the Eastern patriarchates. Thus the two chief bishops of Christendom stood mutually excommunicated, and the first great schism between the East and West began. To him, therefore, from a Roman synod, Felix addressed a synodical letter in which, in the name of Peter, the chief of the apostles and the head of all sees, he pronounced his deposition and excommunication
Isaacus, Egyptian Solitary - The chief account of this Isaacus is also in Palladius ( Dialog. ) that there were two chief anchorites named Isaac; one who lived in the Scetic desert, and another called Thebaeus, often mentioned in the Vitae Patrum and in Pratum Spirituale , c
Army - On the outbreak of a tumult in the Temple at Jerusalem, the chief captain of the band came on the scene, as he afterwards reported, σύν τῷ στρατεύματι (Authorized Version ‘with an army,’ Revised Version ‘with the soldiers’). The supreme authority was now entrusted to a legatus legionis, who was the deputy of the Emperor as commander-in-chief of the whole army
Rab - Those who chiefly apply to the letter of Scripture are called Caraites, Literalists. Those who chiefly study the traditions and oral laws of the Talmud are called Rabbanists. The chief function of the rabbins is to preach in the synagogue, to make public prayers there, and to interpret the law; they have the power of binding and loosing, that is, of declaring what is forbidden, and what allowed. Then the rabbin applies himself to instruction only, unless it be thought proper to call him into the council to give his advice, in which case he takes the chief place
Love to God - The supreme love of God is the chief, therefore, of what have sometimes been called our theopathetic affections. It chooses God as the chief good of the soul, the enjoyment of which assures its perfect and eternal interest and happiness: "Whom have I in heaven but thee? and there is none upon earth that I desire beside thee," is the language of every heart, when its love of God is true in principle and supreme in degree. The love of God is a fruit of the Holy Spirit; that is, it is implanted by him only in the souls which he has regenerated; and as that which excites its exercise is chiefly, and in the first place, a sense of the benefits bestowed by the grace of God in our redemption, and a well grounded persuasion of our personal interest in those benefits, it necessarily presupposes our reconciliation to God through faith in the atonement of Christ, and that attestation of it to the heart by the Spirit of adoption
Leave, Left - ...
1: ἀφίημι (Strong's #863 — Verb — aphiemi — af-ee'-ay-mee ) apo, "from," and hiemi, "to send," has three chief meanings, (a) "to send forth, let go, forgive;" (b) "to let, suffer, permit;" (c) "to leave, leave alone, forsake, neglect. leave" (AV, "suffer" and "suffered"); in John 19:38 , of Pilate's permission to Joseph to take away the body of the Lord; in Acts 21:39 , of Paul's request to the chief captain to permit him to address the people, RV, "give
Feasts - ...
Haman, Persia’s chief minister, had gained the king’s approval for a plan to destroy the Jewish people. In the end, however, Haman was executed and Mordecai made chief minister in his place
Sanhedrin (2) - (1) Most important of all were the ἀρχιερεῖς, the chief priests, the members of the sacerdotal aristocraey. See chief Priests, High Priest. According to the Greek sources, as appears from the above, the Sanhedrin was composed of chief priests, elders, and scribes, and was presided over by the high priest. The chief priests and elders belonged in general to the Sadducee party, while the scribes formed the Pharisee element, which, however influential among the people, was seldom in the ascendant in the Sanhedrin. At its head was the high priest, who was assisted by a γερουσία consisting chiefly of members of the aristocratic sacerdotal caste. At the time of John Hyrcanus, therefore, the Sanhedrin consisted of adherents of the Hasmonaean dynasty—the new aristocracy combined with the remnants of the old, representing two of the three elements of the later court, the chief priests and the elders—and was overwhelmingly, if not exclusively, Sadducee. ...
From that time onwards the Sanhedrin consisted of chief priests, elders, and scribes
Passover - The feast began by the handing around of a cup of wine mixed with water; over which the head of the family or the chief of the association pronounced the benediction
Monasteries, Suppression of - chief of the investigators were Layton, Legh, Ap Rice, and London, who made their accusations in letters reporting on their work, and in the document "Comperta Monastica" which they drew up for Cromwell
Sun - The Hebrews must have been well acquainted with the idolatrous worship of the sun during the captivity in Egypt, both from the contiguity of On, the chief seat of the worship of the sun, as implied in the name itself (On being the equivalent of the Hebrew Bethshemesh, "house of the sun") (Jeremiah 43:13 ) and also from the connection between Joseph and Potipherah("he who belongs to Ela") the priest of On, (Genesis 41:45 ) After their removal to Canaan, the Hebrews came in contact with various forms of idolatry which originated in the worship of the sun; such as the Baal of the Phoenicians, the Molech or Milcom of the Ammonites, and the Hadad of the Syrians
Cambridge, England, University of - ...
Gonville and Caius known as Caius, (pronounced Keys), founded 1348, as the "Hall of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary" by Edmund Gonvil (Gonevill); refounded and enlarged by John Caius, 1557; the chief medical college
Synagogue - The arrangements for the women's place in a separate gallery or behind a partition of lattice-work; the desk in the centre, where the reader, like Ezra in ancient days, from his 'pulpit of wood,' may 'open the book in the sight of all of people and read in the book of the law of God distinctly, and give the sense, and cause them to understand the reading' (Nehemiah 8:4,8 ); the carefully closed ark on the side of the building nearest to Jerusalem, for the preservation of the rolls or manuscripts of the law; the seats all round the building, whence 'the eyes of all them that are in the synagogue' may 'be fastened' on him who speaks (Luke 4:20 ); the 'chief seats' (Matthew 23:6 ) which were appropriated to the 'ruler' or 'rulers' of the synagogue, according as its organization may have been more or less complete;", these were features common to all the synagogues
Sargon - He records that he thoroughly repaired the walls of Nineveh, which he raised to be the first city of the empire; and that near it he built the palace and town (Khorsabad) which became his chief residence, Dursargina; from it the Louvre derived its series of Assyrian monuments
Elam - A Benjamite chief, one of Shashak's sons (1 Chronicles 8:24)
Elect, Elected, Election - signifies "picked out, chosen" (ek, "from," lego, "to gather, pick out"), and is used of (a) Christ, the "chosen" of God, as the Messiah, Luke 23:35 (for the verb in Luke 9:35 see Note below), and metaphorically as a "living Stone," "a chief corner Stone," 1 Peter 2:4,6 ; some mss
Crown - Gold was the chief material of the king's crown (Psalms 21:3); compare 2 Samuel 12:30, the Ammonites' crown, with its precious stones, was worth (rather than "weighed") a talent of gold