What does Zephaniah mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
צְפַנְיָֽה the 9th in order of the 12 minor prophets; descendant of king Hezekiah of Judah and prophet in the time of king Josiah of Judah. 1
צְפַנְיָ֖הוּ the 9th in order of the 12 minor prophets; descendant of king Hezekiah of Judah and prophet in the time of king Josiah of Judah. 1
צְפַנְיָ֧ה the 9th in order of the 12 minor prophets; descendant of king Hezekiah of Judah and prophet in the time of king Josiah of Judah. 1
צְפַנְיָ֤ה the 9th in order of the 12 minor prophets; descendant of king Hezekiah of Judah and prophet in the time of king Josiah of Judah. 1
צְפַנְיָ֥ה the 9th in order of the 12 minor prophets; descendant of king Hezekiah of Judah and prophet in the time of king Josiah of Judah. 1
צְפַנְיָ֤הוּ the 9th in order of the 12 minor prophets; descendant of king Hezekiah of Judah and prophet in the time of king Josiah of Judah. 1
צְפַנְיָ֖ה the 9th in order of the 12 minor prophets; descendant of king Hezekiah of Judah and prophet in the time of king Josiah of Judah. 1
צְפַנְיָ֔ה the 9th in order of the 12 minor prophets; descendant of king Hezekiah of Judah and prophet in the time of king Josiah of Judah. 1
צְפַנְיָ֑ה the 9th in order of the 12 minor prophets; descendant of king Hezekiah of Judah and prophet in the time of king Josiah of Judah. 1
צְפַנְיָה֙ the 9th in order of the 12 minor prophets; descendant of king Hezekiah of Judah and prophet in the time of king Josiah of Judah. 1

Definitions Related to Zephaniah

H6846


   1 the 9th in order of the 12 minor prophets; descendant of king Hezekiah of Judah and prophet in the time of king Josiah of Judah.
   2 son of Maaseiah and second priest in the reign of king Zedekiah of Judah; succeeded Jehoiada and an officer of the temple; slain at Riblah on the capture of Jerusalem.
   3 father of Josiah and Hen in the time of the prophet Zechariah.
   4 a Levite.
   Additional Information: Zephaniah = “Jehovah has treasured”.
   

Frequency of Zephaniah (original languages)

Frequency of Zephaniah (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Zephaniah
(zehf uh ni' uh) Personal name meaning, “Yahweh sheltered or stored up” or “Zaphon (god) is Yahweh.” 1. A prophet in the Old Testament whose preaching produced the thirty-sixth book of the Old Testament.
2. Priest whom King Zedekiah sent asking Jeremiah to pray for the nation threatened by Nebuchadrezzar of Babylon (Jeremiah 21:1-7 ; Jeremiah 37:3 ). He reported false prophecy from Babylon to Jeremiah (Jeremiah 29:24-32 ). When Jerusalem fell, the priest was executed (Jeremiah 52:24-27 ).
3. Father of Josiah and Hen (Zechariah 6:10 ,Zechariah 6:10,6:14 ), possibly identical with 2. above. 4. A Levite (1 Chronicles 6:36 ), perhaps the same as Uriel (1 Chronicles 6:24 ).
Paul L. Redditt
Holman Bible Dictionary - Zephaniah, Book of
The Book of Zephaniah, only three chapters in length, looks toward the punishment of all sinful nations, including Judah, followed by the restoration of Judah and the nations as well.
The Prophet Zephaniah The first verse tells all we really know about the prophet. His ancestry is traced back four generations to a man named Hezekiah. Some scholars think Hezekiah was the king of Judah by that name who reigned in the late eighth century during the ministry of Isaiah (2 Kings 18-20 ). If so, Zephaniah would have belonged to the royal line. That would perhaps explain why he did not condemn the king in Zephaniah 1:8 ; Zephaniah 3:3-5 , where he blames most of Judah's upper classes for their sins. Other scholars note that the name Hezekiah was quite common and that the ancestor is not identified as king. Further, Zephaniah's father was named Cushi, which could mean “Cushite” or “Ethiopian.” They suggest that Zephaniah's ancestry was traced four generations to demonstrate that he was indeed Israelite.
The Date of Zephaniah According to Zephaniah 1:1 Zephaniah's ministry occurred during the reign of Josiah (640-609 B.C.). Most scholars date the book in 630 or between 630,621. In 621King Josiah instituted a sweeping reformation of worship in Judah (see 2 Kings 22:3-23:25 ), which officially abolished the worship of Baal and the stars mentioned in Zephaniah 1:4-6 . Jeremiah also condemned those practices (Jeremiah 2:20-28 ; Jeremiah 8:1-3 ). Jeremiah 26:1 shows that the practices flourished again as early as the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim (609 B.C.); it might be the case that such worship continued secretly between 621,609. If that were so, Zephaniah might have prophesied during those years. In short, it is a good guess that he preached between 630,621, but he might have flourished anytime during the reign of Josiah.
Contents of the Book Zephaniah looked toward a future punishment. In Zephaniah 1:2-6 he predicted punishment upon the whole world, including Jerusalem. Zephaniah 1:17-18 depict the inability of sinful humanity to escape God's punishment. The intervening verses further describe the punishment as the Day of the Lord, the Zephaniah 1:14-16 describe the time of God's approaching wrath. Punishment would come upon the nobles at the king's court, those who gained materially through violence, the merchants, and those who denied the power of God to reward good or punish evil.
The second chapter contains a series of threats against the Philistines (Zephaniah 2:4-7 ), the Moabites and Ammonites (Zephaniah 2:8-11 ), the Ethiopians (Zephaniah 2:12 ), and the Assyrians (Zephaniah 2:13-15 ). Zephaniah called all nations to repent and become righteous and meek. Zephaniah would not presume on God's grace by promising forgiveness, but he counseled turning to righteousness and meekness as the means for possibly avoiding punishment on the Day of the Lord.
The third chapter is marked by a change in perspective between versus 7,8. The first seven verses pronounce a woe upon Jerusalem for oppression within her walls. Her princes preyed like lions upon their people; her prophets committed treachery, and her priests polluted the Temple. God indicted the people not only for their sins, but also for their failure to receive instruction from his dealings with other nations.
Beginning with Zephaniah 3:8 , however, the tone is quite positive toward Israel. Many scholars think part or all of Zephaniah 3:8-20 was appended to the book by a later author. Whether written by Zephaniah or a later prophet, the verses complete the message of Zephaniah 3:1 . Zephaniah 3:8 and Zephaniah 3:14 admonish the people to wait for God to act and to rejoice for what He will do, respectively. Zephaniah 3:8-13 promise that God will punish the nations and convert them from idolatry. What is more, He promises to remove the haughty from Mount Zion, leaving behind a meek and humble people. Zephaniah 3:14-20 predict the cessation of punishment and oppression and the return of exiles. God Himself is called the king of Israel ( Zephaniah 3:15 ). His presence alleviates any reason to fear the nations. God will punish the oppressors and bring home the exiles. Thus the book ends with a message of hope, based on God's mercy.
Outline
I. Identification of the Messenger of God's Word (Zephaniah 1:1 )
II. God's Warning of Worldwide Judgment (Zephaniah 1:2-3:8 )
A. God's day of judgment is coming (Zephaniah 1:2-2:3 ).
1. His judgment will include all mankind (Zephaniah 1:2-3 ).
2. His judgment will include His own sinful people who forsake Him (Zephaniah 1:4-6 ).
3. The day of the Lord calls for awesome silence in the face of God's judgment (Zephaniah 1:7-11 ).
4. God's skeptics will see Him in action on His day (Zephaniah 1:12-13 ).
5. God's wrath will be poured out against sin on that day (Zephaniah 1:14-17 ).
6. Wealth is good for nothing on His day (Zephaniah 1:18 ).
7. God calls His humble people to seek Him before it is too late (Zephaniah 2:1-3 ).
B. God's judgment will subject His enemies and bless the remnant of His people (Zephaniah 2:4-15 ).
C. God's righteous justice will be impartial (Zephaniah 3:1-8 ).
III. God Promises to Form a New People (Zephaniah 3:9-20 ).
A. The nations will call on God (Zephaniah 3:9-10 ).
B. A purified remnant will worship Him in humility and with joy (Zephaniah 3:11-13 ).
C. God will reign as King to remove His people's fears (Zephaniah 3:14-17 ).
D. His oppressed people will be exalted (Zephaniah 3:18-20 ).
Paul L. Redditt
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Zephaniah
ZEPHANIAH . 1 . The prophet (see next art.). 2 . A Kohathite ( 1 Chronicles 6:36 ). 3 . Son of Maaseiah the priest in Jerusalem in the time of Zekediah the king and Jeremiah the prophet ( Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 29:25 ; Jeremiah 29:29 ; Jeremiah 37:3 ). As next in rank to Seraiah, grandson of Hilkiah ( 1 Chronicles 6:14 ), Zeph. is called second priest ( 2 Kings 25:18 ). On the occasion of the final overthrow of Jerusalem he was put to death at Riblah ( Jeremiah 52:24 ff.). 4 . The father of one Josiah in Babylon ( Zechariah 6:10 ; Zechariah 6:14 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Zephaniah
Jehovah has concealed, or Jehovah of darkness.
The son of Cushi, and great-grandson of Hezekiah, and the ninth in the order of the minor prophets. He prophesied in the days of Josiah, king of Judah (B.C. 641-610), and was contemporary with Jeremiah, with whom he had much in common. The book of his prophecies consists of: (A) An introduction (1:1-6), announcing the judgment of the world, and the judgment upon Israel, because of their transgressions.
(B) The description of the judgment (1:7-18).
(C) An exhortation to seek God while there is still time (2:1-3).
(D) The announcement of judgment on the heathen (2:4-15).
(E) The hopeless misery of Jerusalem (3:1-7).
(F) The promise of salvation (3:8-20).
The son of Maaseiah, the "second priest" in the reign of Zedekiah, often mentioned in Jeremiah as having been sent from the king to inquire (Jeremiah 21:1 ) regarding the coming woes which he had denounced, and to entreat the prophet's intercession that the judgment threatened might be averted (Jeremiah 29:25,26,29 ; 37:3 ; 52:24 ). He, along with some other captive Jews, was put to death by the king of Babylon "at Riblah in the land of Hamath" (2 Kings 25:21 ).
A Kohathite ancestor of the prophet Samuel (1 Chronicles 6:36 ).
The father of Josiah, the priest who dwelt in Jerusalem when Darius issued the decree that the temple should be rebuilt (Zechariah 6:10 ).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Zephaniah
So far as we know, Zephaniah was the first prophet to appear in Judah since Isaiah and Micah, whose work had come to an end seventy years earlier. His preaching marked the beginning of a new era of prophetic activity in Judah, but it was an era that was to end in the destruction of Jerusalem. Among the prophets who followed him were Jeremiah, Nahum and Habakkuk.
Background to the book
For much of the seventy years before Zephaniah, the wicked Manasseh had reigned. After his reign the spiritual condition of Judah was worse than that for which God had destroyed the Canaanites in the time of Joshua. The destruction of Judah appeared to be inevitable (2 Kings 21:1-16).
The new era was marked not only by the preaching of Zephaniah, but also by the religious reforms of the new king, Josiah (who had come to the throne in 640 BC). It seems that Zephaniah and Josiah were related (Zephaniah 1:1). Josiah’s reforms, which lasted many years, were aimed at removing idolatry and restoring the true worship of God in Jerusalem. (For details of the reforms see 2 Kings 22:3-20; 2 Kings 23:1-25; 2 Chronicles 34; 2 Chronicles 35.)
Zephaniah saw that the improvements in the external forms of religion, though commendable, were no substitute for true reform in heart and life. The wrong attitudes promoted by Manasseh were so deeply rooted that Josiah’s reforms could not remove them (2 Kings 23:26-27). As Zephaniah announced God’s judgment on the nation, he urged people to repent of their wrongdoing and come to a true knowledge of God.
Contents of the book
The preaching of Zephaniah was concerned largely with the certainty of God’s judgment on sinners. The violence, cheating and false religion of Manasseh’s time were still widespread in Jerusalem (1:1-18). But there was hope for those who humbly turned from their sin to the Lord (2:1-3). Examples from the surrounding nations impressed upon the people that evildoers could not escape God’s judgment (2:4-15). Jerusalem’s sin guaranteed a terrible judgment for the city (3:1-8), though when all the sinners had been destroyed, those who had truly repented would enjoy God’s blessing (3:9-20).
Chabad Knowledge Base - Zephaniah
(c. 5th century BCE) A contemporary of Jeremiah, he prophesied shortly before the destruction of the first Holy Temple.
Zephaniah, the book of: The book of Tanach containing Zephaniah's prophecies, foretelling the destruction of Jerusalem as well the Jews' eventual return from exile.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Zephaniah
The Lord is my secret
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Zephaniah
("Jehovah hath hidden") (Psalms 27:5; Psalms 83:3).
1. Ninth of the minor prophets; "in the days of Josiah," between 642 and 611 B.C. "Son of Cushi, the son of Gedaliah, the son of Amariah, the son of Hizkiah." The specification of his father, grandfather, and great grandfather, implies he was sprung from men of note. The omission of the designation "king," or "king of Judah," is against the notion that the "Hizkiah" means king Hezekiah (compare Proverbs 25:1; Isaiah 38:9). He prophesied in the former part of Josiah's reign. In Zephaniah 2:13-15 he foretells Nineveh's fall (625 B.C.), therefore his prophesying was before 625 B.C.; and in Zephaniah 1:4-6 threatens "cutting off" to "the remnant of Baal" and "the name of the (See CHEMARIMS with the priests "; see Hosea 10:5 margin, "and them that worship the host of heaven upon the housetops, and them that worship and that swear by the Lord, and that swear by Malcham."
Fulfilled by Josiah (2 Kings 23:4-5). Josiah's reformation was begun in the 12th year of his reign, and was completed in the 18th. Zephaniah in denouncing the different forms of idolatry paved the way for Josiah's work, and probably cooperated with the king from the 12th to the 18th year. Jewish tradition says that Zephaniah had as his colleagues Jeremiah, labouring in the thoroughfares and market places, and Huldah the prophetess in the college in Jerusalem. His position among the prophets, and his quotations from Joel, Amos, and Isaiah, indicate the correctness of the date assigned to him in Zephaniah 1:1.
In Zephaniah 1:8, "I will punish the king's children" must refer to coming judgments on the foreseen idolatries of the younger members of the royal family (Jeremiah 22:19; Jeremiah 39:6; 2 Kings 23:31-32-36-37; 2 Chronicles 36:5-6; 2 Kings 20:18). Not only the masses, but even princes, should not escape the penalty of idolatry. "The remnant of Baal" (Zephaniah 1:4) implies that Josiah's reformation was already begun but not completed.
2. "The second priest" or sagan , next to the high priest. Son of Maaseiah. Sent by Zedekiah to consult Jeremiah (Jeremiah 21:1). Succeeded to Jehoiada who was in exile. Appealed to by Shemaiah in a letter from Babylon to punish Jeremiah with imprisonment and the stocks for declaring the captivity would be long (Jeremiah 29:25-26; Jeremiah 29:29). Zephaniah read the letter to Jeremiah. This fact and Shemaiah's upbraiding Zephaniah for want of zeal against Jeremiah imply that Zephaniah was less prejudiced against Jeremiah than the others. This was the reason for the king's choosing him as messenger to the prophet (Jeremiah 37:3). Slain by Nebuchadnezzar as an accomplice in Zedekiah's rebellion (Jeremiah 52:24; Jeremiah 52:27). Jeremiah 52:3. Father of Hen or Josiah (Zechariah 6:14). Zechariah 6:4. Ancestor of Samuel and Heman; a Kohathite Levite (1 Chronicles 6:36), called Uriel 1 Chronicles 6:24.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Zephaniah, the Book of
The bulk of the book forms the introduction to the grand closing consummation under Messiah (Zephaniah 1:2 to 3:8; Zephaniah 3:9-20).
I. Threat of judgments (Zephaniah 1:2-7). On whom they shall fall (Zephaniah 1:8-11). Nearness and awfulness of the day of the Lord, and impossibility of escape (Zephaniah 1:12-18). Call to the apostate nation to repentance, and to the meek and righteous to exercise those graces which may avert the day of wrath (Zephaniah 2:1-3). Motive to it: God's coming judgments on Israel's foes, the Philistines, Moabites, Ammonites (the land of which three nations the remnant of Jehovah's people shall possess), Ethiopians, and Nineveh, which shall be a desolation;
"He will famish all the gods of the earth (by destroying the nations worshipping them), and men shall worship Him" each in his own house (Zephaniah 2:4-15). The call being slighted and even Jerusalem being unreformed of her filthiness by the judgments on surrounding nations, the just God is constrained to chastise her (Zephaniah 3:1-7). In all this the Chaldaeans' name, the executioners of God's vengeance on Judah, is not mentioned as in Jeremiah, for the latter being nearer the fulfillment prophesies more explicitly.
II. After her chastisement Jehovah invites the pious remnant of the Jews to wait upon Him, as He is about to interpose for Judah and Jerusalem against the nations gathered against her (Zechariah 12-14). "The remnant of Israel shall no longer do iniquity. The Lord her God shall rejoice over her with joy, and make her a praise among all people," who in consequence shall "all call upon Him and serve Him with one consent" (Zephaniah 3:8-20). The style is graphic and vivid, and the language pure and free from Aramaisms.
Zephaniah 2:14 corresponds to Isaiah 34:11; Zephaniah 2:15 corresponds to Isaiah 47:8; Zephaniah 3:10 corresponds to Isaiah 18:1; Zephaniah 2:8 corresponds to Isaiah 16:6; Zephaniah 1:5 corresponds to Jeremiah 8:2; Zephaniah 1:12 corresponds to Jeremiah 48:11. Romans 15:6 apparently refers to Zephaniah 3:9.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Zephaniah, Theology of
Zephaniah, whose name, translated "Yahweh has hidden/protected, " indicating his parents' personal faith, was himself a faithful messenger to God's people. He prophesied during the reign of Josiah (1:1; 640-609 b.c.), the sixteenth king of Judah and one of its few good rulers. Zephaniah's faithfulness to God was challenged as he matured during or after the corrupt reigns of Josiah's grandfather, Manasseh, and his father, Amon. His conscientious Yahwism is clear from his clarion call of judgment. The book perhaps also underscores Zephaniah's piety by showing his genealogy of four generations going back to Hezekiah (1:1), another godly king of Judah, who was also an ancestor of Josiah. Zephaniah's association with these good kings could imply that he shares their godly qualities.
It is unclear when in Josiah's reign Zephaniah prophesied. Since pagan practices are condemned (1:4-9), many suggest a date prior to 621 b.c., the start of Josiah's religious reforms, calling the people back to a true worship of God. This is not necessarily the case, however, since calling for spiritual renewal and its actualization are two different and not necessarily contemporaneous things. These prophecies could come from later in Josiah's reign, calling the people to obey the same call to godliness to which their king had already responded.
There is theological significance in noting the practices condemned by the prophet. In the religious sphere these include apostasy (1:4-5), the worship of foreign gods, and abandoning the only true God. He also bemoans a lack of integrity on the part of civil and religious leaders, who exploit positions of trust for personal gain (3:3-4).
Even more invidious is the apathy of so many. As wine resting on its dregs stagnates (1:12), so many of God's people are lethargic in their faith. They do not in words deny God's existence, but rather deny his power in their actions, claiming him powerless, or at least inactive, in the history of Israel and in their personal lives. This is a supreme insult to the God who formed them as a nation and acted throughout Israel's history to preserve them. Even the angry questioning of God by Habakkuk and Job is preferable to this glacierlike, grinding boredom. As many marriages are ruined by loss of interest, often leading to infidelity, so these two manifestations of trouble are present in the life of the nation that was betrothed to God.
Because of these wrongs, and more, God turns against his people in judgment. Like a cuckold who finally reacts to continued perfidy, so Yahweh reacts against Israel. This time of reaction in judgment, called "the day of the Lord" or "that day, " is a theme that unites the prophetic collection (see, e.g., 1:7,14; 3:11,16). The "day" is not monolithic, but rather multifaceted. An early conception of it by Israel was as a time of blessing and well-being for them as God's people. God's enemies would be destroyed and those true to him treated well (see Amos 5:18 ). They soon found that this concept was simultaneously right and wrong. It was correct in that followers of God would be blessed but wrong since just because Israel had entered into a covenant relationhip with God at Sinai, their position as blessed people was not henceforth inviolable. While God was true to his covenant, there were also responsibilities for Israel which, if violated, resulted in judgment and loss of covenant blessing. Blessing was bound to obedience, not to a historical relationship. As Israel's history reminded her, and as we need to preach today, there is no second-generation child of God. Faithful ancestors do not assure including the next generation in the covenant. Only fidelity to the covenant can do that.
The day is not only one of judgment, however, but also and simultaneously a day of hope and blessing. Israel was right. Fortune will follow fidelity, so if the latter were restored, the former would follow. Therefore, in addition to Zephaniah's severe warnings of judgment (1:2-3:8), there are also promises of hope (3:9-20). God is both a God of justice and holiness, exacting judgment upon those who oppose him, and also a God of love and compassion, showing these to his faithful followers. Judah is called to abandon her practices as opponents to benefit from his compassion. Instead of abandoning God, Judah is to return to him (2:3), abandoning apathy and syncretism for humility and right living.
The day of the Lord is also shown as international and not just parochial, since judgment will descend on other nations also (Philistines, 2:4-7; Transjordanian Moabites and Ammonites, 2:8-11; Ethiopians or Egyptians, 2:12; or Assyrians, 2:13-15; cf. more generally, 3:6-8). All powers, great or small, are under the power and authority of God. This is in stark and ironic contrast to the denial of this same God by his own people of any power or interest in the world (1:12).
Even more encompassing than the day of the Lord in the structure of Zephaniah is "the Lord" Yahweh himself. His name is not only in the book's opening phrase; it is also its final word, forming an envelope providing the parameters within which Zephaniah's whole message must be viewed. Zephaniah's prophecies in particular, and indeed all of Scripture, are theocentric.
The divine name "Yahweh, " used often in Zephaniah, is theologically significant. Anachronistically translated "Lord" in most English versions, it is God's personal, covenant name revealed to his own people (Exodus 6:2-3 ). Not the universal, impersonal "God, " it connotes intimacy, being restricted to those closely related to God. This is doubly significant in these prophecies of judgment and hope. Judgment follows transgressing the intimate relationship into which the people and their ancestors had voluntarily entered. Their judge is not an impersonal unknown, but one with whom they were intimate and had personally wronged. In spite of the wrong, and the punishment God must dispense, he still reveals himself to Judah as Yahweh, their loving covenant God even though he must punish Israel because she has abandoned him. He cannot abandon them or break his covenant. If the people would only hear, the very name by which he presents himself to them in this judgment is an offer of continued love and hope.
David W. Baker
See also Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the ; God ; Israel ; Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy
Bibliography . E. Achtemeier, Nahum-Malachi ; D. W. Baker, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah ; J. J. M. Roberts, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Zephaniah
1. Son of Maaseiah and 'second' priest in the reign of Zedekiah; he was carried captive to Nebuchadnezzar and slain at Riblah. 2 Kings 25:18 ; Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 29:25,29 ; Jeremiah 37:3 ; Jeremiah 52:24 .
2. Son of Tahath, a Kohathite. 1 Chronicles 6:36,37 .
3. Son of Cushi, and one of the 'minor prophets.' Zephaniah 1:1 .
4. Father of Josiah and of Hen. Zechariah 6:10,14 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Zephaniah, Prophecy of
The only personal detail given of this prophet is his ancestry for four generations: he was the son of Cushi, a descendant of Hizkiah. The date to the prophecy is 'the days of Josiah' king of Judah, who reigned B.C. 641-610. The prophecy gives the judgement of God with respect to the testimony that was being borne when there was an outward reformation under a pious king who trembled at God's law. The Spirit of God could read the hearts of the people, and could see what moral corruption was associated with the outward worship of God: cf. Jeremiah 3:6-10 . The prophet proclaims the judgements that must fall upon the land, and upon Judah and Jerusalem, though with grace to the faithful remnant at the end. Within four years of the close of Josiah's reign Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar, the holy vessels carried away, and the captivity of Judah commenced.
Zephaniah 1 . The prophecy opens with "I will utterly consume all things from off the land, saith Jehovah." God could see the followers of Baal still there, and the Chemarim (idolatrous priests, mentioned in 2 Kings 23:5 and Hosea 10:5 , margin ), and those who worshipped the host of heaven; and those that sware by Jehovah and by Malcham, or 'their king,' that is, Baal: cf. Jeremiah 49:1 , margin. Judgement would surely overtake them, and their gold and silver should not deliver them in the great day of God's wrath upon the whole land of Judah and Jerusalem. Maktesh in Zephaniah 1:11 is literally 'of a mortar' or 'hollow place' as in a rock (cf. Judges 15:19 ; Proverbs 27:22 , where the same Hebrew word occurs), probably signifying Jerusalem, where, as in a mortar, they would be pounded by their enemies.
Zephaniah 2 . The people are addressed as a nation 'without shame' (instead of 'not desired'): they are called to seek Jehovah, if haply a remnant might be hidden in the day of His wrath. Then the various nations are denounced that had been hostile to the land and to God's people. God had from time to time used some of them as the means whereby He punished His chosen people; but they had been filled with pride and had abused their power, therefore His judgements should surely fall upon them: the prophecy however looks on to the future great day of God's wrath.
Zephaniah 3 . Here Jerusalem, the filthy and polluted city, is treated of. The princes, judges, prophets, and priests were all corrupt. The nations of those mentioned in the previous chapter would be completely cut off; and then Jehovah says, Surely Judah will listen to Me! In the future, Jehovah, after punishing the nations, will turn to His people, and a remnant will be brought into blessing. Israel will then be called upon to sing. The King of Israel, even Jehovah, will be in her midst, and she shall have a name and a praise among all the people of the earth. Christ is not, as in other prophecies, introduced here as the Messiah, but as Jehovah. The 'times of the Gentiles' and their four great kingdoms are passed over.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Zephaniah
An eminent prophet, though his writings are small. His name is a compound, from Tzaphan, secret—and Jah, the Lord. And very suited was this name to the prophet; for much of the Lord Jesus is in his prophecy, when opened and explained by God the Holy Ghost. Hence, that Scripture, "the secret of the Lord is with them that fear him, and he will shew them his covenant." (Psalms 25:14)
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Zephaniah
was the son of Cushi, and was probably of a noble family of the tribe of Simeon. He prophesied in the reign of Josiah, about B.C. 630. He denounces the judgments of God against the idolatry and sins of his countrymen, and exhorts them to repentance; he predicts the punishment of the Philistines, Moabites, Ammonites, and Ethiopians, and foretels the destruction of Nineveh; he again inveighs against the corruptions of Jerusalem, and with his threats mixes promises of future favour and prosperity to his people; whose recall from their dispersion shall glorify the name of God throughout the world. The style of Zephaniah is poetical; but it is not distinguished by any peculiar elegance or beauty, though generally animated and impressive.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Zephaniah
Zephaniah (zĕph'a-nî'ah), Jehovah hides. 1. One of the minor prophets, in the days of Josiah. His prophecy was uttered about b.c. 620 to 609. The description of the judgment in ch. 1:14, 15, "The great day of Jehovah is near" (in the Latin version Dies iræ, dies illa), has furnished the basis for the sublime hymn of the Middle Ages, the Dies Iræ ascribed to Thomas a Celano, and often translated. There are four persons of this name mentioned in the Bible.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Zephaniah
1. A Kohathite, in the seventh generation from Levi, 1 Chronicles 6:36 .
2. A priest, high in the sacred order, during the troublous times of king Zedekiah, who often communicated with Jeremiah by his agency. He was among the captives slain by the king of Babylon at Riblah, 2 Kings 25:18-21 Jeremiah 21:1 29:25,29 37:3 52:24-27 .
3. The ninth in order of the minor prophets, of the tribe of Simeon. He prophesied in the early part of king Josiah's reign, before the reforms of that good king were instituted, 2 Chronicles 34:3 Zephaniah 1:4-5 .
This would fix his date about 630 B. C., and the destruction of Nineveh, foretold in Zephaniah 2:13 , occurred in 625 B. C. His prophecy contains two oracles, in three chapters, directed against idolaters in Judah, against surrounding idolatrous nations, and against wicked rulers, priests, and prophets. It closes with cheering promises of gospel blessings. His style and manner are like those of Jeremiah, during whose early years they were contemporary. His subsequent history is unknown.

Sentence search

Zephaniah, Book of - The Book of Zephaniah, only three chapters in length, looks toward the punishment of all sinful nations, including Judah, followed by the restoration of Judah and the nations as well. ...
The Prophet Zephaniah The first verse tells all we really know about the prophet. If so, Zephaniah would have belonged to the royal line. That would perhaps explain why he did not condemn the king in Zephaniah 1:8 ; Zephaniah 3:3-5 , where he blames most of Judah's upper classes for their sins. Further, Zephaniah's father was named Cushi, which could mean “Cushite” or “Ethiopian. ” They suggest that Zephaniah's ancestry was traced four generations to demonstrate that he was indeed Israelite. ...
The Date of Zephaniah According to Zephaniah 1:1 Zephaniah's ministry occurred during the reign of Josiah (640-609 B. In 621King Josiah instituted a sweeping reformation of worship in Judah (see 2 Kings 22:3-23:25 ), which officially abolished the worship of Baal and the stars mentioned in Zephaniah 1:4-6 . If that were so, Zephaniah might have prophesied during those years. ...
Contents of the Book Zephaniah looked toward a future punishment. In Zephaniah 1:2-6 he predicted punishment upon the whole world, including Jerusalem. Zephaniah 1:17-18 depict the inability of sinful humanity to escape God's punishment. The intervening verses further describe the punishment as the Day of the Lord, the Zephaniah 1:14-16 describe the time of God's approaching wrath. ...
The second chapter contains a series of threats against the Philistines (Zephaniah 2:4-7 ), the Moabites and Ammonites (Zephaniah 2:8-11 ), the Ethiopians (Zephaniah 1:2-32 ), and the Assyrians (Zephaniah 2:13-15 ). Zephaniah called all nations to repent and become righteous and meek. Zephaniah would not presume on God's grace by promising forgiveness, but he counseled turning to righteousness and meekness as the means for possibly avoiding punishment on the Day of the Lord. ...
Beginning with Zephaniah 3:8 , however, the tone is quite positive toward Israel. Many scholars think part or all of Zephaniah 3:8-20 was appended to the book by a later author. Whether written by Zephaniah or a later prophet, the verses complete the message of Zephaniah 3:1 . Zephaniah 3:8 and Zephaniah 3:14 admonish the people to wait for God to act and to rejoice for what He will do, respectively. Zephaniah 3:8-13 promise that God will punish the nations and convert them from idolatry. Zephaniah 3:14-20 predict the cessation of punishment and oppression and the return of exiles. God Himself is called the king of Israel ( Zephaniah 3:15 ). Identification of the Messenger of God's Word (Zephaniah 1:1 )...
II. God's Warning of Worldwide Judgment (Zephaniah 1:2-3:8 )...
A. God's day of judgment is coming (Zephaniah 1:2-2:3 ). His judgment will include His own sinful people who forsake Him (Zephaniah 1:4-6 ). The day of the Lord calls for awesome silence in the face of God's judgment (Zephaniah 1:7-11 ). God's skeptics will see Him in action on His day (Zephaniah 1:12-13 ). God's wrath will be poured out against sin on that day (Zephaniah 1:14-17 ). Wealth is good for nothing on His day (Zephaniah 1:18 ). God calls His humble people to seek Him before it is too late (Zephaniah 2:1-3 ). God's judgment will subject His enemies and bless the remnant of His people (Zephaniah 2:4-15 ). God's righteous justice will be impartial (Zephaniah 3:1-8 ). God Promises to Form a New People (Zephaniah 3:9-20 ). The nations will call on God (Zephaniah 3:9-10 ). A purified remnant will worship Him in humility and with joy (Zephaniah 3:11-13 ). God will reign as King to remove His people's fears (Zephaniah 3:14-17 ). His oppressed people will be exalted (Zephaniah 3:18-20 )
Hizkiah - Ancestor of Zephaniah the prophet. Zephaniah 1:1
Zephaniah, the Book of - The bulk of the book forms the introduction to the grand closing consummation under Messiah (Zephaniah 1:2 to 3:8; Zephaniah 3:9-20). Threat of judgments (Zephaniah 1:2-7). On whom they shall fall (Zephaniah 1:8-11). Nearness and awfulness of the day of the Lord, and impossibility of escape (Zephaniah 1:12-18). Call to the apostate nation to repentance, and to the meek and righteous to exercise those graces which may avert the day of wrath (Zephaniah 2:1-3). Motive to it: God's coming judgments on Israel's foes, the Philistines, Moabites, Ammonites (the land of which three nations the remnant of Jehovah's people shall possess), Ethiopians, and Nineveh, which shall be a desolation;...
"He will famish all the gods of the earth (by destroying the nations worshipping them), and men shall worship Him" each in his own house (Zephaniah 2:4-15). The call being slighted and even Jerusalem being unreformed of her filthiness by the judgments on surrounding nations, the just God is constrained to chastise her (Zephaniah 3:1-7). The Lord her God shall rejoice over her with joy, and make her a praise among all people," who in consequence shall "all call upon Him and serve Him with one consent" (Zephaniah 3:8-20). ...
Zephaniah 2:14 corresponds to Isaiah 34:11; Zephaniah 2:15 corresponds to Isaiah 47:8; Zephaniah 3:10 corresponds to Isaiah 18:1; Zephaniah 2:8 corresponds to Isaiah 16:6; Zephaniah 1:5 corresponds to Jeremiah 8:2; Zephaniah 1:12 corresponds to Jeremiah 48:11. Romans 15:6 apparently refers to Zephaniah 3:9
Hizki'ah - (might of Jehovah ), an ancestor of Zephaniah the prophet. ( Zephaniah 1:1 ) (B
Cushi - Father of the prophet Zephaniah (Zephaniah 1:1 )
Cushi, Cushite - The word Cûshî occurs with the article in Numbers 12:1 , 2 Samuel 18:21 ; without the article in Jeremiah 36:14 , Zephaniah 1:1 . Zephaniah 1:1 . It is borne by (1) the great-grandfather of Jehudi, the latter one of Jehoiakim’s courtiers ( Jeremiah 36:14 ); (2) the father of the prophet Zephaniah ( Zephaniah 1:1 )
Mak'Tesh - (a mortar or deep hollow ), a place evidently in Jerusalem, the inhabitants of which are denounced by Zephaniah. ( Zephaniah 1:11 ) Ewald conjectures that it was the Phoenician quarter" of the city
Cushi - Father of Zephaniah the prophet. Zephaniah 1:1
Hizkiah - An ancestor of the prophet (Zephaniah 1:1 )
Malcham - (mal' kam) KJV form for Malcam (1 Chronicles 8:9 ) and Milcom (Zephaniah 1:5 ). The chief god of the Ammonites (Zephaniah 1:5 , KJV; Malcam, RSV and NAS margins). The Hebrew malcam is sometimes seen as a deliberate scribal misspelling of Milcom (compare Jeremiah 49:1 ,Jeremiah 49:1,49:3 ; Zephaniah 1:5 ), the common name for the Ammonites' god (1Kings 11:5,1 Kings 11:33 ; Zephaniah 1:5 ), the common name for the Ammonites' god (1Kings 11:5,1 Kings 11:33 ; 2 Kings 23:13 )
Cherethites, Cherethim - Ezekiel pronounced judgment on them (Ezekiel 25:16 ), as did Zephaniah (Zephaniah 2:5 )
Nettle - Coarse plants with stinging hairs belonging to the family Urtica ; generally, any prickly or stinging plant (Job 30:7 ; Proverbs 24:31 ; Isaiah 34:13 ; Hosea 9:6 ; Zephaniah 2:9 ). The Hebrew term used at Job 30:7 and Zephaniah 2:9 perhaps refers to wild mustard
Milcom - ) Also called Malcham (Zephaniah 1:5)
Zephaniah - So far as we know, Zephaniah was the first prophet to appear in Judah since Isaiah and Micah, whose work had come to an end seventy years earlier. ...
Background to the book...
For much of the seventy years before Zephaniah, the wicked Manasseh had reigned. ...
The new era was marked not only by the preaching of Zephaniah, but also by the religious reforms of the new king, Josiah (who had come to the throne in 640 BC). It seems that Zephaniah and Josiah were related (Zephaniah 1:1). )...
Zephaniah saw that the improvements in the external forms of religion, though commendable, were no substitute for true reform in heart and life. As Zephaniah announced God’s judgment on the nation, he urged people to repent of their wrongdoing and come to a true knowledge of God. ...
Contents of the book...
The preaching of Zephaniah was concerned largely with the certainty of God’s judgment on sinners
Hen - (rest ), probably a son of Zephaniah, and apparently the same who is called JOSIAH in (Zechariah 6:10 )
Hen - (rest ), probably a son of Zephaniah, and apparently the same who is called JOSIAH in (Zechariah 6:10 )
Woolen Linen - Hence its prohibition in Israel; compare the chemarim (the black attired idolatrous priests' ministers) and those "clothed with strange apparel" (Zephaniah 1:4; Zephaniah 1:8); contrast "the fine linen, clean and white, the righteousness of saints" (Revelation 19:8)
Zephaniah - In Zephaniah 2:13-15 he foretells Nineveh's fall (625 B. ; and in Zephaniah 1:4-6 threatens "cutting off" to "the remnant of Baal" and "the name of the (See CHEMARIMS with the priests "; see Hosea 10:5 margin, "and them that worship the host of heaven upon the housetops, and them that worship and that swear by the Lord, and that swear by Malcham. Zephaniah in denouncing the different forms of idolatry paved the way for Josiah's work, and probably cooperated with the king from the 12th to the 18th year. Jewish tradition says that Zephaniah had as his colleagues Jeremiah, labouring in the thoroughfares and market places, and Huldah the prophetess in the college in Jerusalem. His position among the prophets, and his quotations from Joel, Amos, and Isaiah, indicate the correctness of the date assigned to him in Zephaniah 1:1. ...
In Zephaniah 1:8, "I will punish the king's children" must refer to coming judgments on the foreseen idolatries of the younger members of the royal family (Jeremiah 22:19; Jeremiah 39:6; 2 Kings 23:31-32-36-37; 2 Chronicles 36:5-6; 2 Kings 20:18). "The remnant of Baal" (Zephaniah 1:4) implies that Josiah's reformation was already begun but not completed. Zephaniah read the letter to Jeremiah. This fact and Shemaiah's upbraiding Zephaniah for want of zeal against Jeremiah imply that Zephaniah was less prejudiced against Jeremiah than the others
Maktesh - Zephaniah 1:11 , apparently in or near Jerusalem, and occupied by merchants; but we have no clue to its location
Crashing - Zephaniah 1
Malcham - ) Another form of Milcom and Moloch, the idol of Moab and Ammon (Zephaniah 1:5; Jeremiah 49:1-3; Amos 1:15)
Cottage - Zephaniah 2
Wasteness - Zephaniah 1
Cottage - In Zephaniah 2:6 it is rather a shelter cut out of the rock
Chuldah - A prophetess, descendant of Joshua and Rahab, contemporary of Zephaniah and Jeremiah
Huldah - A prophetess, descendant of Joshua and Rahab, contemporary of Zephaniah and Jeremiah
Chemarim - ' Zephaniah 1
Hizkiah - The ancestor of Zephaniah, the prophet, may have been the same king (Zephaniah 1:1 )
Screech Owl - See Isaiah 34:11 ; Zephaniah 2:14 ) but simply “owls” at Isaiah 14:23 . NRSV used “screech owl” at Zephaniah 2:14
Nettle - A different Hebrew word in Job 30:7 Proverbs 24:31 Zephaniah 2:9 , seems to indicate a larger species
Maktesh - Mortar, a place in or near Jerusalem inhabited by silver merchants (Zephaniah 1:11 )
Bittern - Nineveh and Babylon became a possession for "the bittern" and other wild birds, Isaiah 14:23 34:11 Zephaniah 2:14 . Rich says he found "great quantities" of porcupine quills among the ruins of Babylon; but others think this inconsistent with Zephaniah 2:14 , and understand the word is referring to the common night-heron, a bird like the bittern found among the marshes of Western Asia, resorting to ruined buildings, and uttering a peculiar harsh cry before and after its evening flight
Amari'ah - (Nehemiah 11:4 ) ...
An ancestor of Zephaniah the prophet. (Zephaniah 1:1 )
Alarm - A particular quivering sound of the silver trumpets to give warning to the Hebrews on their journey through the wilderness (Numbers 10:5,6 ), a call to arms, or a war-note (Jeremiah 4:19 ; 49:2 ; Zephaniah 1:16 )
Chemarim - Occurs once only in the English version, Zephaniah 1:4, but frequently in the Hebrew, and is translated "idolatrous priests," as in 2 Kings 23:5; Hosea 10:5 (priests)
Bulwarks - Mural towers, bastions, were introduced by king Uzziah (2 Chronicles 26:15 ; Zephaniah 1:16 ; Psalm 48:13 ; Isaiah 26:1 )
Host of Heaven - When the Jews fell into idolatry they worshipped these (Deuteronomy 4:19 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ; 21:3,5 ; 23:5 ; Jeremiah 19:13 ; Zephaniah 1:5 ; Acts 7:42 )
Zephaniah - ...
Zephaniah, the book of: The book of Tanach containing Zephaniah's prophecies, foretelling the destruction of Jerusalem as well the Jews' eventual return from exile
Thereupon - Zephaniah 2 ...
1
Nettle, - A different Hebrew word in (Job 30:7 ; Proverbs 24:31 ; Zephaniah 2:9 ) seems to indicate a different species
Hiss - ...
Other nations and cities were also the objects of hissing: Edom (Jeremiah 49:17 ); Babylon (Jeremiah 50:13 ); Tyre (Ezekiel 27:36 ); and Nineveh (Zephaniah 2:15 ). Hissing was sometimes accompanied by wagging the head, clapping hands, gnashing teeth (Lamentations 2:15-16 ), and shaking the fist (Zephaniah 2:15 )
Jackdaw - Black and grey bird (Corvus monedula ) related to but smaller than the common crow (Isaiah 34:11 ; Zephaniah 2:14 , NAS margin)
Nettle - A different Hebrew word in Job 30:7; Proverbs 24:31; Zephaniah 2:9, seems to indicate a different species
Gedaliah - Grandfather of Zephaniah the prophet. Zephaniah 1:1
Amariah - An ancestor of Zephaniah the prophet. Zephaniah 1:1
Knob - The word may also refer to the capital of a column (Zephaniah 2:14 )
Chemarim - Occurring once only in the English version, Zephaniah 1:4 , but frequently in the Hebrew, translated "idolatrous priests," 2 Kings 23:5 Hosea 10:5
Bittern - The word occurs in (Isaiah 14:23 ; 34:11 ; Zephaniah 2:14 ) and we are inclined to believe that the Authorized Version is correct
Lintel - Amos 9:1 ; Zephaniah 2:14 (RSV correctly "chapiters," as in A
Hen - In Zechariah 6:14 ‘Hen the son of Zephaniah’ is mentioned amongst those whose memory was to be perpetuated by the crowns laid up in the Temple (so AV Lees - (See Zephaniah 1:12)
Jehucal - He was accompanied by Zephaniah (q
Bittern - The accompaniment of the desolation reigning in Babylon (Isaiah 14:23), Idumea (Isaiah 34:11), Nineveh (Zephaniah 2:14). But the hedgehog or porcupine would never "lodge" or perch on the chapiters of columns," as margin Zephaniah 2:14 says of the qippod
Maktesh - District in or near Jerusalem (Zephaniah 1:11 )
Cushite - ...
...
Son of Gedaliah, and father of the prophet (Zephaniah 1:1 )
Fish Gate - A north gate of the second quarter of Jerusalem (Zephaniah 1:10 ) mentioned in connection with fortifications built by Manasseh (2 Chronicles 33:14 )
Chemarim - Black, (Zephaniah 1:4 ; rendered "idolatrous priests" in 2 Kings 23:5 , and "priests" in Hosea 10:5 )
Gedaliah - ...
The grandfather of the prophet Zephaniah, and the father of Cushi (Zephaniah 1:1 )
Maher-Shalal-Hash-Baz - Plunder speedeth; spoil hasteth, (Isaiah 8:1-3 ; Compare Zephaniah 1:14 ), a name Isaiah was commanded first to write in large characters on a tablet, and afterwards to give as a symbolical name to a son that was to be born to him (Isaiah 8:1,3 ), as denoting the sudden attack on Damascus and Syria by the Assyrian army
Noon - Noon is frequently associated with death and destruction (2 Samuel 4:5 ; 1 Kings 20:16 ; 2 Kings 4:20 ; Psalm 91:6 ; Jeremiah 6:4 ; Jeremiah 15:8 ; Jeremiah 20:16 ; Zephaniah 2:4 )
Cormorant - Another Hebrew word, translated "cormorant" in Isaiah 34:11; Zephaniah 2:14, A
Cormorant - The Hebrew word translated "cormorant" in Isaiah 34:11 Zephaniah 2:14 , should rather be translated, as it is in other passages, "pelican," Leviticus 11:17
Hen (Person) - Hebrew word for “grace, favor” used as either a proper name or a title (meaning “favored one”) of Josiah son of Zephaniah (Zechariah 6:14 ; compare Zechariah 6:10 ) if the present Hebrew text is original
Malcam - , RSV, "their king;" Jeremiah 49:1,3 , RSV; Zephaniah 1:5 ), the national idol of the Ammonites
Chemarim - ]'>[1] this word is found only in Zephaniah 1:4 ; but the original of which it is the transliteration is used also at 2 Kings 23:5 and Hosea 10:5 , and in both instances Chĕmârim is placed in the margin of AV Wolf - ]'>[3] , zeeb ‘wolf’), Genesis 49:27 , Isaiah 11:6 ; Isaiah 65:25 , Jeremiah 5:6 , Ezekiel 22:27 , Habakkuk 1:8 , Zephaniah 3:8 . It is seldom seen to-day, and never goes in packs, though commonly in couples; it commits its ravages at night, hence the expression ‘wolf of the evening’ ( Jeremiah 5:6 , Zephaniah 3:3 ); it was one of the greatest terrors of the lonely shepherd ( John 10:12 ); persecutors are compared to wolves in Matthew 10:18 , Acts 20:29
Bittern - Isaiah 14:23 ; Isaiah 34:11 ; and Zephaniah 2:14 . Harmer, "that a word which occurs but three times in the Hebrew Bible should be translated by three different words, and that one of them should be otter!" Isaiah, prophesying the destruction of Babylon, says that "the Lord will make it a possession for the bittern, and pools of water;" and Zephaniah 2:14 , prophesying against Nineveh, says that "the cormorant and bittern shall lodge in the upper lintels of it: their voice shall sing in the windows
Zephaniah - He prophesied in the early part of king Josiah's reign, before the reforms of that good king were instituted, 2 Chronicles 34:3 Zephaniah 1:4-5 . , and the destruction of Nineveh, foretold in Zephaniah 2:13 , occurred in 625 B
College - Zephaniah 1:10, answering to Akra N
Cherethim - (Ezekiel 25:16 ), more frequently Cherethites, the inhabitants of Southern Philistia, the Philistines (Zephaniah 2:5 )
Wolf - Fierce (Genesis 49:27; Ezekiel 22:27; Habakkuk 1:8; Matthew 7:15); prowling in the night (Jeremiah 5:6; Zephaniah 3:3); devouring lambs and sheep (John 10:12); typifying persecutors and heretical leaders (Matthew 10:16; Matthew 7:15; Acts 20:29); hereafter about to associate peacefully with the lamb under Messiah's reign (Isaiah 11:6; Isaiah 65:25)
Cormorant - In Isaiah 34:11 and Zephaniah 2:14 the Hebrew is qaath, and signifies PELICAN,q
Owl - A number of species of the owl are mentioned in the Bible, (Leviticus 11:17 ; 14:16; Isaiah 14:23 ; 34:15 ; Zephaniah 2:14 ) and in several other places the same Hebrew word is used where it is translated ostrich
Meekness - The cultivation of this spirit is enjoined (Colossians 3:12 ; 1 Timothy 6:11 ; Zephaniah 2:3 ), and is exemplified in Christ (Matthew 11:29 ), Abraham (Genesis 13 ; 16:5,6 ) Moses (Numbers 12:3 ), David (Zechariah 12:8 ; 2 Samuel 16:10,12 ), and Paul (1 Corinthians 9:19 )
Fold - Sheep-folds are mentioned Numbers 32:16,24,36 ; 2 Samuel 7:8 ; Zephaniah 2:6 ; John 10:1 , etc
Cormorant - But for "cormorant" in Isaiah 34:11; Zephaniah 2:14, translated "pelican," Hebrew qa'ath
Nineveh - The prophets of God assured them of a fitting divine punishment (Isaiah 10:5; Isaiah 10:12-16; Nahum 1:1; Nahum 3:1-7; Zephaniah 2:13; see NAHUM). It was never rebuilt (Nahum 2:9-10; Nahum 3:1; Nahum 3:7; Zephaniah 2:13-15)
Nettle - chârûl ( Job 30:7 , Proverbs 24:31 , Zephaniah 2:9 ), more probably a generic name for thorn bushes growing in the wilderness, such as the Zizyphus and varieties of acacia
Chemarim - In Zephaniah 1:4 distinct from "the priests," from chamar "to burn" or "blacken," the black-attired ministers of the idol priests, who felled the victim at the altar
College - ]'>[2] correctly renders ‘second quarter,’ a quarter of the city lying to the north ( Zephaniah 1:10 ), and possibly referred to in Nehemiah 11:9 , where our versions have ‘second over the city
Ethiopia - This country was known to the Hebrews, and is described in Isaiah 18:1 ; Zephaniah 3:10 . ...
Ethiopia is spoken of in prophecy (Psalm 68:31 ; 87:4 ; Isaiah 45:14 ; Ezekiel 30:4-9 ; Daniel 11:43 ; Nahum 3:8-10 ; Habakkuk 3:7 ; Zephaniah 2:12 )
Amariah - An ancestor of Zephaniah, the prophet (Zephaniah 1:1 )
Yirmiyahu - (a) (5th century BCE) A contemporary of Zephaniah and Huldah, son of the High Priest Hilkiah
Jah - Thus Isaiah, Jeremiah, Zephaniah, Zechariah, etc
Zephaniah - Zephaniah (zĕph'a-nî'ah), Jehovah hides
Chaff - " The destruction of the wicked, and their powerlessness, are likened to the carrying away of chaff by the wind (Isaiah 17:13 ; Hosea 13:3 ; Zephaniah 2:2 )
Jeremiah - (a) (5th century BCE) A contemporary of Zephaniah and Huldah, son of the High Priest Hilkiah
Cherethites or Cherethim - A portion of the Philistines, supposed by many to have originated in Crete, 1 Samuel 30:14 Ezekiel 25:16 Zephaniah 2:5 ...
2
Pelican - Other passages (Psalm 102:6 ; Isaiah 34:11 ; Zephaniah 2:14 ) associate the same Hebrew term with deserted ruins, an unlikely habitat for the pelican
Cherethites And Pelethites - The Cherethites were a Philistine clan ( 1 Samuel 30:14 ), dwelling on the coast ( Ezekiel 25:16 , Zephaniah 2:5 ); and the name Pelethites may have been a corrupt form of Philistines . ]'>[1] of Ezekiel 25:16 , Zephaniah 2:5 uses Cretans as the equivalent of Cherethites
Zephaniah - Zephaniah
Lees - "Men settled on their lees" (Zephaniah 1:12 ) are men "hardened or crusted
Bittern - Is found three times in connection with the desolations to come upon Babylon, Idumea, and Nineveh (Isaiah 14:23 ; 34:11 ; Zephaniah 2:14 )
Wolf - The habits of the wolf are described in Jeremiah 5:6 ; Habakkuk 1:8 ; Zephaniah 3:3 ; Ezekiel 22:27 ; Matthew 7:15 ; 10:16 ; Acts 20:29
Uriel - A Kohathite Levite, son of Tahath (1 Chronicles 6:24); if the lists proceeded from father to son, without omission of intermediate links in the genealogy, Uriel would answer to Zephaniah son of Tahath (1 Chronicles 6:36)
Lintel - In Amos 9:1 ; Zephaniah 2:14 the word is kaphtor, which is elsewhere translated 'knop
Ashkelon - One of the five cities of the Philistines by the sea and ten miles north of Gaza; taken by Judah, Judges 1:18; visited by Samson; Judges 14:19; and its destruction predicted in Jeremiah 47:5; Jeremiah 47:7; Amos 1:8; Zechariah 9:5; Zephaniah 2:7
Ekron - Its ruin was foretold, Amos 1:8 Zephaniah 2:4 Zechariah 9:5,7
Nahum, Book of - ...
Jonah had already uttered his message of warning, and Nahum was followed by Zephaniah, who also predicted (Zephaniah 2:4-15 ) the destruction of the city, predictions which were remarkably fulfilled (B
Zephaniah, Prophecy of - ...
Zephaniah 1 . Maktesh in Zephaniah 1:11 is literally 'of a mortar' or 'hollow place' as in a rock (cf. ...
Zephaniah 2 . ...
Zephaniah 3
Bittern - KJV translation for an animal of desolation mentioned three times in the Bible (Isaiah 14:23 ; Isaiah 34:11 ; Zephaniah 2:14 )
Malcam - In Zephaniah 1:6 Malcam is apparently the name of an idol, and might be rendered literally ‘their king,’ as in the margin of AV Milcom - In 2 Samuel 12:30 , 1 Chronicles 20:2 , Jeremiah 49:3 , and Zephaniah 1:5 Malcam (‘their king’) is probably an incorrect vocalization of Milcom
Meadow - Meadows are also used in pictures of God's judgment (Jeremiah 25:37 ; Hosea 4:16 , NIV; Hosea 9:13 , NAS; Zephaniah 2:6 , NRSV)
Lees - Hence such wines are used as a symbol of gospel blessings, Isaiah 25:6 ; also of a nation or community that, from long quiet and prosperity, has become rich and luxurious, and has settled down in carnal security, Jeremiah 48:11 Zephaniah 1:12
Amariah - Zephaniah 1:1 , great-grandfather of the prophet Zephaniah, and son of a Hezekiah who may be the king
Astrologers - These superstitions were prevalent among the Chaldeans, Assyrians, Egyptians, Phoenicians, and Arabians, and were closely connected with the worship of the sun, moon, and stars, Deuteronomy 4:19 17:3 2 Kings 23:5,12 Jeremiah 19:13 Ezekiel 8:16 Zephaniah 1:5
Lehi - God did not make water to flow out of the tooth socket of the jawbone which Samson threw away, to slake his thirst, but "cleft an hollow place (maqtesh ; Zephaniah 1:11) in Lehi," from whence" water" miraculously "came out
Isles - " Genesis 10:5, "the isles of the Gentiles" (Psalms 72:10; Isaiah 41:5; Zephaniah 2:11)
Gomorrah - One of the five cities in the vale of Siddim, Genesis 14:1-11; destroyed for its wickedness, Genesis 18:20; Genesis 19:24; Genesis 19:28; made a warning by Moses, Deuteronomy 29:23; Deuteronomy 32:32; referred to by Isaiah 1:9-10; by Jeremiah 23:14; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; by Amos 4:11; by Zephaniah 2:9 : by our Saviour, Matthew 10:15; Mark 6:11, A
Cherethites - The Cherethites and Pelethites were people who lived among the Philistines and who, like the Philistines, probably came originally from Crete (1 Samuel 30:14; Ezekiel 25:16; Zephaniah 2:5; see PHILISTIA)
Gedaliah - The first was a musician in the time of David (1 Chronicles 25:3; 1 Chronicles 25:9), the second an ancestor of the prophet Zephaniah (Zephaniah 1:1), the third an official in Jerusalem who opposed Jeremiah (Jeremiah 38:1-6), and the fourth a priest in the time of Ezra (Ezra 10:18)
Guest - Figurative uses of guest include Zephaniah 1:7 where consecrated guests are an image of invading armies the Lord invited to punish Judah
Lees - Zephaniah 1:12 pictures the inhabitants of Jerusalem who did not believe God would act as wine resting on the lees
Mortar - Mortar is used as a proper name for a district of Jerusalem in Zephaniah 1:11
Silence - (Zephaniah 3:17) In relation to the ordinary silence of the Hebrews, I refer to the word Salutation
Zephaniah - The style of Zephaniah is poetical; but it is not distinguished by any peculiar elegance or beauty, though generally animated and impressive
Moloch - ), and Malcham (Zephaniah 1:5 )
Goodness of God - " God is infinitely and unchangeably good (Zephaniah 3:17 ), and his goodness is incomprehensible by the finite mind (Romans 11 :: 3536,36 )
Knop - In Amos 9:1 instead of "lintel" (kaphtor ), and Zephaniah 2:14 translated "the sphere-like capital of the column
Gaza - Gaza was peopled by the descendants of Ham, Genesis 10:19; by the Anakim, Joshua 11:22; given to Judah, Joshua 15:47; the scene of Samson's exploits, Judges 16:1-31; under Solomon's rule and called Azzah, 1 Kings 4:24; smitten by Egypt, Jeremiah 47:1; Jeremiah 47:5; prophesied against, Amos 1:6-7; Zephaniah 2:4; Zechariah 9:5; noticed in New Testament only in Acts 8:26; a chief stronghold of paganism and the worship of the god Dagon
Owl - Owls nesting in ruins are a common image of desolation (Psalm 102:6 ; Isaiah 34:11 ,Isaiah 34:11,34:15 ; Zephaniah 2:14 )
Dung - The word is used ( a ) to express contempt and abhorrence, as in the case of the carcase of Jezebel ( 2 Kings 9:37 ); and in that of the Jews ( Jeremiah 9:22 , Zephaniah 1:17 )
Cottage - ...
...
In Zephaniah 2:6 it is the rendering of the Hebrew Keroth , which some suppose to denote rather "pits" (RSV marg
Maaseiah - ...
...
The father of the priest Zephaniah (Jeremiah 21:1 ; 37:3 )
Maktesh - The deep valley between the temple and upper city, crowded with merchant bazaars (Grove): Zephaniah 1:11
Lees - The effect of undisturbed prosperity on the ungodly is to harden in undisturbed security (Zephaniah 1:12)
Tortoise - Some have even conjectured that "the tortoise" is meant by the word translated "bittern" in the prophecies of Isaiah and Zephaniah
Zoar - The southern division of the Dead Sea (apparently of comparatively recent formation), abounding with salt, and throwing up bitumen, and its shores producing sulphur and nitre, answers to the valley of Siddim, "full of slime pits,"; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; Zephaniah 2:9; 2 Peter 2:6)
Habakkuk - ...
Zephaniah 1:7 is an imitation of Habakkuk 2:20; now Zephaniah (Zephaniah 1:1) lived under Josiah, and prophesied (compare Zephaniah 3:5; Zephaniah 3:15) after the restoration of Jehovah's worship, i
Nettle - , "wild vetches"); Job 30:7 ; Zephaniah 2:9
Zephaniah, Theology of - Zephaniah, whose name, translated "Yahweh has hidden/protected, " indicating his parents' personal faith, was himself a faithful messenger to God's people. Zephaniah's faithfulness to God was challenged as he matured during or after the corrupt reigns of Josiah's grandfather, Manasseh, and his father, Amon. The book perhaps also underscores Zephaniah's piety by showing his genealogy of four generations going back to Hezekiah (1:1), another godly king of Judah, who was also an ancestor of Josiah. Zephaniah's association with these good kings could imply that he shares their godly qualities. ...
It is unclear when in Josiah's reign Zephaniah prophesied. Therefore, in addition to Zephaniah's severe warnings of judgment (1:2-3:8), there are also promises of hope (3:9-20). ...
Even more encompassing than the day of the Lord in the structure of Zephaniah is "the Lord" Yahweh himself. His name is not only in the book's opening phrase; it is also its final word, forming an envelope providing the parameters within which Zephaniah's whole message must be viewed. Zephaniah's prophecies in particular, and indeed all of Scripture, are theocentric. ...
The divine name "Yahweh, " used often in Zephaniah, is theologically significant. Baker, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah ; J. Roberts, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah
Pelican - read "pelican" for "cormorant" in Isaiah 34:11; Zephaniah 2:14
Cormorant - In Isaiah 34:11 , Zephaniah 2:14 (but in RSV, "pelican") the Hebrew word rendered by this name is Ka'ath
Jehoiada - Leading priest in the time of Jeremiah preceding Zephaniah (Jeremiah 29:25-26 )
Candle - Of the all-seeing accuracy with which Jehovah will search out sinners, so that in no dark grainer can they escape punishment (Zephaniah 1:12; Amos 9:3)
Milcom - Worshiping Milcom was turning one's back on Yahweh ( Zephaniah 1:5-6 )
Pelican - קאת , Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 ; Psalms 102:7 ; Isaiah 34:11 ; Zephaniah 2:14 ; a very remarkable aquatic bird, of the size of a large goose
Amon - To Amon's reign we must refer the terrible picture which the prophet Zephaniah gives of the moral and religious state of Jerusalem
Molech, Moloch, or Milcom - A king, 1 Kings 11:5,7 Acts 7:43 ; supposed also to be intended by Malcham, or "their king," in Jeremiah 49:1 Amos 1:15 Zephaniah 1:5 , the name of a heathen deity, worshipped by the Ammonites
Ammonite - From the very beginning (Deuteronomy 2:16-20 ) of their history till they are lost sight of (Judges 5:2 ), this tribe is closely associated with the Moabites (Judges 10:11 ; 2 Chronicles 20:1 ; Zephaniah 2:8 ). The prophets predicted fearful judgments against the Ammonites because of their hostility to Israel (Zephaniah 2:8 ; Jeremiah 49:1-6 ; Ezekiel 25:1-5,10 ; Amos 1:13-15 )
Lintel - Zephaniah 2:14, "the capitals of her columns," margin "the knops" ("pomegranate like at the tops of the houses," Grotius) or chapiters (capitals)
Prince - (Compare Zephaniah 1:8 which distinguishes princes and king's sons
Wolf - (See also Zephaniah 3:3)
Hiding Place - ...
Zephaniah 2:3 (a) This is a great promise concerning the godly people who have submitted their hearts and lives to the Lord of Heaven
Nettles - The first is חרול , Job 30:7 ; Proverbs 24:31 ; Zephaniah 2:9
Woe - , in numerous passages, especially of the Old Testament, Habakkuk 2:6,9,12,15,19 Zephaniah 3:1
Pelican - One of the ‘unclean’ birds ( Leviticus 11:18 , Deuteronomy 14:17 ) inhabiting the ruins of Nineveh ( Zephaniah 2:14 , where AV Pelican - kaath , sometimes translated "cormorant," as ( Isaiah 34:11 ; Zephaniah 2:14 ) though in the margin correctly rendered "pelican"), a voracious waterbird, found most abundantly in tropical regions
Commerce - (Nehemiah 13:15,16 ; Zephaniah 1:10 ) The traders in later times were allowed to intrude into the temple, in the outer courts of which victims were publicly sold for the sacrifice
Fish - There was a regular fish-market apparently in Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 33:14 ; Nehemiah 3:3 ; 12:39 ; Zephaniah 1:10 ), as there was a fish-gate which was probably contiguous to it
Sodom - This city and its awful destruction are frequently alluded to in Scripture (Deuteronomy 29:23 ; 32:32 ; Isaiah 1:9,10 ; 3:9 ; 13:19 ; Jeremiah 23:14 ; Ezekiel 16:46-56 ; Zephaniah 2:9 ; Matthew 10:15 ; Romans 9:29 ; 2 Peter 2:6 , etc
Wolf - The following are the scriptural allusions to the wolf: Its ferocity is mentioned in ( Genesis 49:27 ; Ezekiel 22:27 ); Habb 1:8; Matthew 7:15 Its nocturnal habits, in ( Jeremiah 5:6 ; Zephaniah 3:3 ); Habb 1:8 Its attacking sheep and lambs, (Matthew 10:16 ; Luke 10:3 ; John 10:12 ) Isaiah (Isaiah 11:6 ; 65:25 ) foretells the peaceful reign of the Messiah under the metaphor of a wolf dwelling with a lamb: cruel persecutors are compared with wolves
Chemarim - This word occurs only once in our version of the Bible: "I will cut off the remnant of Baal, and the name of the Chemarims (Chemarim) with the priests," Zephaniah 1:4 ; but it frequently occurs in the Hebrew, and is generally translated "priests of the idols," or "priests clothed in black," because chamar signifies blackness
Ashkelon - At times they suffered from the attacks of various invaders (Jeremiah 47:5; Zephaniah 2:4)
Bible, Books of the - According to the Council of Trent, there are three groups in the Old Testament, embracing 46 books: ...
21 historical books:
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy
Josue
Judges
Ruth
1,2Kings (1,2Samuel)
3,4Kings (1,2Kings)
1,2Paralipomenon (1,2Chronicles)
Esdras
Nehemiah
Tobias
Judith
Esther
1,2Machabees
7 didactical books:
Job
Psalms
Proverbs
Ecclesiastes
Canticle of Canticles (Song of Solomon)
Wisdom and
Ecclesiasticus (Sirach)
18 prophetical books:
Isaias
Jeremias (with Lamentations)
the major prophets
Baruch
Ezechiel
Daniel
the minor prophets
Osee
Joel
Amos
Abdias or Obadiah
Jonas
Micah
Nahum
Habacuc
Sophonias or Zephaniah
Aggeus or Haggai
Zacharias
Malachias
The difference between the Jewish and Catholic counting is due to the fact that the Catholics accept also the so-called deuterocanonical books
Zephani'ah - His pedigree is traced to his fourth ancestor, Hezekiah, (Zephaniah 1:1 ) supposed to be the celebrated king of that name
Ekron - Zephaniah 2:4 plays on her name, 'Εkron tee'akeer ," the firm-rooted one shall be rooted up
Chaff - "(Before) the day pass as the chaff" in Zephaniah 2:2 means, Before the day of repentance pass, and with it you, ungodly, pass away as the chaff
Island, Isle - The islands of the Gentiles or heathen ( Genesis 10:6 , Zephaniah 2:11 ) are apparently the coasts of the W
Maaseiah - Father of Zephaniah, a priest in the reign of Zedekiah
Pelican - Leviticus 11:18 , sometimes translated cormorant, Isaiah 34:11 Zephaniah 2:14 ; a voracious waterfowl, somewhat gregarious and migratory, frequenting tropical climates, and still found on the waters of Egypt and Palestine
Cush - Hither we may refer the river Gihon, Genesis 2:13 Zephaniah 3:10
Gath - (Zephaniah 2:4 ; Zechariah 9:5,6 ) It is familiar to the Bible student as the scene of one of the most romantic incidents in the life of King David
Wolf - זאב , in Arabic, zeeb, Genesis 49:27 ; Isaiah 11:6 ; Isaiah 65:25 ; Jeremiah 5:6 ; Ezekiel 22:27 ; Zephaniah 3:3 ; Habakkuk 1:8 ; λυκος , Matthew 7:15 ; Matthew 10:16 ; Luke 10:3 ; John 10:12 ; Acts 20:29 ; Ecclesiastes 13:17. The rapacious and cruel conduct of the princes of Israel is compared by Ezekiel 22:27 , to the mischievous inroads of the same animal: "Her princes in the midst thereof are like wolves ravening the prey, to shed blood, to destroy lives, to get dishonest gain;" and Zephaniah 3:3 , says, "Her princes within her are roaring lions, her judges are evening wolves: they gnaw not the bones till the morrow
Rest - The Triune God shall rejoice in the work of His hands (Zephaniah 3:17)
Apparel - ...
Zephaniah 1:8 (b) The word in this passage probably refers to false doctrines, false beliefs, and false faiths
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
Habakkuk...
610...
Jehoiakim,...
Zephaniah
Ekron - Like the other Philistine cities, it is made the subject of denunciation by Jeremiah, Amos, Zephaniah, and the anonymous prophet whose writing occupies Zechariah 9:1-17 ; Zechariah 10:1-12 ; Zechariah 11:1-17
Salt - 11 ; Zephaniah 2. Some travellers have found here quicksand pits in which camels and horses have been swallowed up and lost, Genesis 14:10 Zephaniah 2:9
Ashdod - Jeremiah, Amos, Zephaniah, and Zechariah speak denunciations against it
Josiah - Zephaniah. Son of Zephaniah, at whose house Zechariah assembled the chief men of the captivity when Joshua the son of Josedech was crowned
Queen of Heaven - The Massoretes evidently took the first word as m e le’kheth (‘work,’ ‘creation’) supposing that the silent aleph (’) had been omitted and considered the expression a synonym for ‘Host of Heaven’ ( ts e bhâ’ hash-shâmayîm , Jeremiah 8:2 ; Jeremiah 19:13 , Zephaniah 1:5 , Deuteronomy 4:19 ; Deuteronomy 17:3 etc
Gaza - The prophets denounce the judgments of God against it (Jeremiah 25:20 ; 47:5 ; Amos 1:6,7 ; Zephaniah 2:4 )
Baal - It prevailed also for a time in the kingdom of Judah (2 Kings 8:27 ; comp 11:18; 16:3; 2 Chronicles 28:2 ), till finally put an end to by the severe discipline of the Captivity (Zephaniah 1:4-6 )
Cherethims - The name is a national name; a tribe of the Philistines (1 Samuel 30:14; compare 1 Samuel 30:16; Ezekiel 25:16; Zephaniah 2:5)
Habakkuk, Theology of - Baker, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah ; R. Patterson, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah ; J. Roberts, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah ; R. Szeles, Habakkuk and Zephaniah ; J. Watts, The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah
Goodness of God - He is immutably and unchangeably good, Zephaniah 3:17
Nineveh - 606) is referred to by Nahum and Zephaniah ( Nahum 2:13 )
Decree - ]'>[5] ‘statute,’ which is used in various places of God’s sovereign appointments in nature and providence ( Job 28:26 , Psalms 148:6 , Proverbs 8:29 , Jeremiah 5:22 , Zephaniah 2:2 )
ir-ha-Heres - Queen Candace's chamberlain whom Philip met on his return from worshipping at Jerusalem, is an earnest of a fuller conversion to come (Zephaniah 3:9; Zechariah 14:9; Revelation 7:9)
Salt - Therefore, a conqueror may have sprinkled salt over a destroyed city to symbolize that it was to be left in permanent desolation (Deuteronomy 29:23; Judges 9:45; Jeremiah 17:6; Zephaniah 2:9)
Ashdod - ...
These calamities were foretold Jeremiah 25:20; Amos 1:8; Zephaniah 2:4; Zechariah 9:5-6, "a bastard shall dwell in Asdod," i
Maaseiah - Father of the priest Zephaniah (Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 29:25 ; Jeremiah 37:3 )
Josiah - Son of Zephaniah ( Zechariah 6:10 )
Candle - ...
Zephaniah 1:12 (a) Here we learn of the meticulous care of GOD in all His detail of searching out the things He must expose
Ethiopia - One of the great kingdoms in Africa, frequently mentioned in Scripture under the name of Cush, the various significations of which in the Old Testament have been mentioned under the article Isaiah 18:1-7 Zephaniah 3:10
Josi'ah - ...
The son of Zephaniah, at whose house took place the solemn and symbolical crowning of Joshua the high priest
Fish - (2 Chronicles 33:14 ; Nehemiah 3:3 ; 12:39 ; Zephaniah 1:10 ) The Orientals are exceedingly fond of fish as an article of diet
Darkness - Therefore, the Bible may speak symbolically of a day of judgment as a day of darkness (Amos 5:20; Zephaniah 1:15)
Day of the Lord - ”...
The Old Testament prophets used a term familiar to their audience, a term by which the audience expected light and salvation (Amos 5:18 ), but the prophets painted it as a day of darkness and judgment (Isaiah 2:10-22 ; Isaiah 13:6 ,Isaiah 13:6,13:9 ; Joel 1:15 ; Joel 2:1-11 ,Joel 2:1-11,2:31 ; Joel 3:14-15 ; Amos 5:20 ; Zephaniah 1:7-8 ,Zephaniah 1:7-8,1:14-18 ; Malachi 4:5 )
Ammon - Ammon seized on the cities of Gad from which Tiglath Pileser had carried the Israelites (Jeremiah 49:1-6; Zephaniah 2:8-9). Compare Zephaniah 1:5; 2 Samuel 12:30
Shemaiah - The Nehelamite, a false prophet at Babylon, who wrote urging Zephaniah the deputy priest to show his gratitude to God for his promotion to Jehoiada's place by exercising his power in imprisoning Jeremiah as "mad" (compare 2 Kings 9:11; Matthew 21:23; Acts 26:24; John 10:20 the Antitype) and putting him in stocks, because he had recommended the Jewish captives at Babylon to build, plant, and settle there as for a long time, in opposition to those who flattered them with promises of a speedy release. Jeremiah on hearing Shemaiah's letter read by Zephaniah, who was less prejudiced against him, declared from Jehovah, "Shemaiah shall not have a man to dwell among this people, neither shall he behold the good" (namely, the future restoration from Babylon), "because he caused you to trust a lie" and "hath taught rebellion against Jehovah," namely, against God's revealed will as to the time of the restoration (Jeremiah 29:24-32, compare Jeremiah 29:10; Jeremiah 28:16)
Josiah - ...
Religious affairs...
One possible influence that led Josiah to begin his reforms was the preaching of the prophet Zephaniah (Zephaniah 1:1)
How the Prophetic Gift Was Received - --Of the sixteen prophets, four are usually called the great prophets, namely, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel, and twelve the Minor prophets, namely, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakuk,Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi. They may be divided into four groups: the prophets of the northern kingdom --Hosea, Amos, Joel, Jonah; the prophets of the southern kingdom --Isaiah, Jeremiah, Obadiah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah; the prophets of the captivity --Ezekiel and Daniel; the prophets of the return --Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi. They may be arranged in the following chronological order, namely, Joel, Jonah, Hoses, Amos, Isaiah, Micah, Nahum, Zephaniah, Habakkuk, Obadiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi
Remnant - Later, Zephaniah spoke of the humble and the lowly as the ones who would find refuge among the remnant (Zephaniah 2:3 ; Zephaniah 3:12-13 )
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - ...
In the Old Testament the expression "day of the Lord" occurs eighteen times in prophetic literature, most often in the books of Joel and Zephaniah. Zephaniah 2:6-15 ). Zephaniah's description (1:15-16a) is vivid as he mixes direct description and metaphor: ...
That day will be a day of wrath, A day of distress and anguish A day of trouble and ruin, A day of darkness and gloom, A day of clouds and blackness A day of trumpet and battle cry. Zephaniah, emphasizing the destructive nature of that day, compares it to a sacrifice (1:8). Zephaniah announces that great distress will come on the people, to the point that "their blood shall be poured out like dust. Zephaniah's roll call is more extensive (Gaza, Moab, Ethiopia, Assyria) and the accusations include reproaching God's people (2:8,10) and arrogance (2:15). One striking consequence of the day of the Lord for nations will be a recognition of Yahweh (Joel 3:17 ), but not without desolation (Zephaniah 2:13-14 ) and death (Zephaniah 2:12 ). In the words of Zephaniah, God will "restore their [1] fortunes" (2:7), an expression that implies the restoration of a desirable situation, a recovery of what has been lost. In the words of Zephaniah, "The Lord your God is with you, he is mighty to save. Still, pictures of Gentile response given elsewhere (such as Psalm 96 ) are reinforced by Zephaniah's classic description of the day of the Lord: "From beyond the rivers of Cush my worshipers, my scattered people, will bring me offerings" (3:10; Zephaniah and the description of the cosmos being annihilated through fire ( 2 Peter 3:10-13 ) are two impressive ways of insisting on the truth that God is fully in charge
Philistines - They regained their full liberty, however, under the later kings of Judah; and we see by the menaces uttered against them by the prophets Isaiah, Amos, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, that they brought many calamities on Israel, for which God threatened to punish them with great misfortunes, Jeremiah 47:1-7 Ezekiel 25:15 Amos 1:6-8 Obadiah 1:19 Zechariah 9:5 . Their land, once rich and covered with cities and towns, is now desolate, Zephaniah 2:4-7
Nin'Eveh - Zephaniah, about B. 630, couples the capital and the kingdom together, (Zephaniah 2:13 ) and this is the last mention of Nineveh as an existing city. These are exclusively contained in the books of Nahum and Zephaniah. (Nahum 3:18 ) The fullest and the most vivid and poetical picture of Nineveh's ruined and deserted condition is that given by Zephaniah, who probably lived to see its fall. (Zephaniah 2:13-15 ) Site of the city
Moabite - Between the time of Isaiah and the commencement of the Babylonian captivity we have very seldom any reference to Moab (Jeremiah 25:21 ; 27:3 ; 40:11 ; Zephaniah 2:8-10 )
Sodom - ...
In later generations people likened great moral sin to the sin of Sodom and Gomorrah, and likened a devastating judgment to the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah (Deuteronomy 29:23; Isaiah 3:9; Isaiah 13:19; Jeremiah 23:14; Jeremiah 49:18; Ezekiel 16:46-56; Zephaniah 2:9; Matthew 10:15; Luke 17:28-29; 2 Peter 2:6; Judges 1:7)
Inquire of God - Other methods of discerning God's will rejected by the biblical writiers include: consulting mediums, wizards, and necromancers (Deuteronomy 18:10-11 ; 1Samuel 28:3,1 Samuel 28:7 ; Isaiah 8:19 ); consulting teraphim (Judges 17:5 ; Judges 18:13-20 ; Hosea 3:4 ; Zechariah 10:2 ); and consulting pagan dieties (Baal-zebub, 2Kings 1:2-3,2 Kings 1:16 ; Malcham or Milcom, Zephaniah 1:5 )
Gaza or Azzah - It was often referred to by the prophets, Jeremiah 25:20 47:5 Amos 1:6,7 Zephaniah 2:4 Zechariah 9:5
ma-Ase'Iah - ...
Father of Zephaniah, who was a priest in the reign of Zedekiah
Ethiopia - Writers frequently used its name poetically to symbolize the unlimited extent of God’s sovereign rule (Psalms 68:31; Isaiah 11:11; Ezekiel 30:4-5; Zephaniah 3:10)
Encouragement - ...
A common form of encouragement is to give comfort and help, whether to those who are sorrowful (2 Samuel 10:2; Isaiah 61:2; Matthew 5:4; Romans 12:15; see SORROW), those who fear (Exodus 14:13; Psalms 23:4; Matthew 14:27; Revelation 2:10; see FEAR), those who are persecuted (Psalms 86:17; Isaiah 49:13; John 16:33; 1 Peter 4:12-14; see PERSECUTION), or those who are experiencing any other form of weakness, despair or suffering (Isaiah 40:1-2; Zephaniah 3:16; Matthew 9:2; Matthew 9:22; Acts 23:11; see SUFFERING)
Judge - Despite these laws, in later times Israel’s administration became so corrupt that judges and priests favoured anyone who paid them well (Amos 2:6-7; Amos 5:12; Micah 3:11; Zephaniah 3:3)
Ethiopia - Compare Jeremiah 13:23, "can the Ethiopian change his skin?" "The rivers of Ethiopia" (Zephaniah 3:10) are the two branches of the Nile and the Astabbras (Tacazze). The dispersed Israelites shall be brought as an offering by the nations to the Lord (Zephaniah 3:8-9; Isaiah 66:20; Isaiah 60:9), from both the African and the Babylonian Cush, where the ten tribes were scattered in Peter's time (1 Peter 1:1; 1 Peter 5:13; Isaiah 11:11, "from Cush and from Shinar"
Nineveh - how is she become a desolation, a place for beasts to lie down in!" Zephaniah 2:11; Zephaniah 2:13-15
Hezekiah - An ancestor of the prophet Zephaniah ( Zephaniah 1:1 ), possibly to be identified with the king of the same name
Dust - Dust is used in figures of speech for a multitude (Genesis 13:16 ; Numbers 23:10 ; Isaiah 29:5 ) or for an abundance (of flesh, Psalm 78:27 ; of silver, Job 27:16 ; of blood, Zephaniah 1:17 )
Day of the Lord - According to Zephaniah ( Amos 1:2-15 , Amos 2:4-15 ), punishment was now to come upon all wicked persons, both Jews and Gentiles, because of wrong
Meekness - To obtain this spirit, consider that it is a divine injunction, Zephaniah 2:3
Moabites - It is under Turkish government, but is inhabited chiefly by migratory Arabs, Zephaniah 2:8-9
Lie - A hatred of lying is one indication that they are God’s people (Zephaniah 3:13; Revelation 14:5)
Fish - The Fish Gate was an entrance in Jerusalem’s city wall that fishermen and traders used when bringing their fish into the city to sell (Nehemiah 13:16; Zephaniah 1:10-11)
Dress - Dyed robes were imported from foreign countries, particularly from Phoenicia (Zephaniah 1:8 ). ...
Extravagance in dress is referred to in Jeremiah 4:30 ; Ezekiel 16:10 ; Zephaniah 1:8 (RSV, "foreign apparel"); 1 Timothy 2:9 ; 1 Peter 3:3
Shepherd - Shepherds guarded their flocks at night whether in the open (Luke 2:8 ) or in sheepfolds (Zephaniah 2:6 ) where they counted the sheep as they entered (Jeremiah 33:13 )
Prophecy - ...
There is in like manner a large number of prophecies relating to those nations with which the Jews came into contact, as Tyre (Ezekiel 26:3-5,14-21 ), Egypt (Ezekiel 29:10,15 ; 30:6,12,13 ), Ethiopia (Nahum 3:8-10 ), Nineveh (Nahum 1:10 ; 2:8-13 ; 3:17-19 ), Babylon (Isaiah 13:4 ; Jeremiah 51:7 ; Isaiah 44:27 ; Jeremiah 50:38 ; 51:36,39,57 ), the land of the Philistines (Jeremiah 47:4-7 ; Ezekiel 25:15-17 ; Amos 1:6-8 ; Zephaniah 2:4-7 ; Zechariah 9:5-8 ), and of the four great monarchies (Daniel 2:39,40 ; 7:17-24 ; 8:9 )
Trumpets, Feast of - The trumpets' sound imaged God's voice and word (Isaiah 58:1; Hosea 8:1; Zephaniah 1:16; Revelation 1:10; Revelation 4:1)
Azariah - Son of Zephaniah, descendant of Kohath
Assyr'ia, as'Shur, - The prophecies of Nahum and Zephaniah (Zephaniah 2:13-15 ) against Assyria were probably delivered shortly before the catastrophe
Day of the Lord - They called this divine intervention the day of the Lord (Isaiah 2:12-19; Isaiah 13:6; Isaiah 13:9; Zephaniah 1:14-16; Zechariah 14:9). The reason for this was that they believed that God would punish Israel’s enemies and bring in Israel’s golden age (Jeremiah 46:10; Zephaniah 3:16-20)
Cush - It was the country now known to us as Nubia and Abyssinia (Isaiah 18:1 ; Zephaniah 3:10 , Heb
Hart - "...
Easily agitated (Song of Solomon 2:7; Song of Solomon 3:5), so that the hunter must advance on them with breathless caution if he would take them; an emblem of the resting (Zephaniah 3:17) but easily grieved Holy Spirit (Ezekiel 16:43; Matthew 18:7; Ephesians 4:30)
Gath - , Zephaniah 2:4-5; Zechariah 9:5-6, Gath is omitted; probably it had lost by that time its place among the five primary cities
Salt - (See also Judges 9:45 where Abimelech used it as a curse; see also Ezekiel 47:11; Zephaniah 2:9)
Josiah - ...
Josiah spared not even the high places which pious Hezekiah had left, nor those of Solomon in his apostasy, nor their priests (Chemarim), as Zephaniah 1:4 foretold; also Manasseh his grandfather's grove (Asherah) in the Lord's house (2 Kings 21:7; 2 Kings 23:6). Josiah's reformation had not removed the deep seated evil (as Jeremiah and Zephaniah testify), so that the deceased Manasseh's sin, acting still far and wide though hiddenly now, awaited God's fierce anger on Jerusalem, as he was warned by God through Huldah (2 Kings 22:16-20). Josiah, son of Zephaniah cheen ("grace") (Zechariah 6:9; Zechariah 6:15)
Cush - Isaiah promised that people who fled from Judah and were exiled in Cush would see God's deliverance (Isaiah 11:11 ; compare Zephaniah 3:10 )
Judge (Office) - Zephaniah described the judges of Jerusalem as wolves on the prowl (Jeremiah 3:3 )
Blindness - Zephaniah reveals that this condition is divinely imposed upon the hardhearted (1:17)
Canaanites - "Canaanites;" Compare Zephaniah 1:11 ; Ezekiel 17:4 )
Baal (1) - Such an animistic conception is evident from the fact that they were worshipped in high places and in groves, where such rites as prophecy ( Jeremiah 22:13 ), fornication ( Jeremiah 7:9 ), self-mutilation ( 1 Kings 18:28 ), and child-sacrifice ( Jeremiah 19:5 ) were practised under the guidance of kemârim or idolatrous priests ( Zephaniah 1:4 )
Judgment Day - A day of wrath was spoken of as a specific time in which God would act in temporal judgment (Job 21:30 ; Proverbs 11:4 ; Ezekiel 7:12 ; Zephaniah 1:15 ,Zephaniah 1:15,1:18 )
Prophecy - ...
Jonah...
856-784...
Amos...
810-785...
Hosea...
810-725...
Isaiah...
810-698...
Joel...
810-660...
Micah...
758-699...
Nahum...
720-698...
Zephaniah...
640-609...
Jeremiah...
628-586...
Habakkuk...
612-598...
Daniel...
606-534...
Obadiah...
588-583...
Ezekiel...
595-536...
Haggai...
520-518...
Zechariah...
520-518...
Malachi...
436-420...
Color, Symbolic Meaning of - The terms "darkness" and "night" parallel this usage (Job 3:3-7 ; Joel 2:2 ; Zephaniah 1:15 )
Divine Freedom - Some of the characteristics of God's nature that influence His actions toward His creation are grace (2 Corinthians 8:9 ), justice (Zephaniah 3:5 ), love (John 3:16 ), and mercy (Micah 7:18 ; Titus 3:5 )
Meekness - The single most frequently attested context in which the meek are mentioned in the Bible is one in which they are vindicated and rewarded for their patient endurance (Psalm 22:26 ; 25:9 ; 37:11 ; 76:9 ; 147:6 ; 149:4 ; Isaiah 11:4 ; 29:19 ; 61:1 ; Zephaniah 2:3 ; Matthew 5:5 )
Hezeki'ah - (1 Chronicles 3:23 ) ...
The same name, though rendered in the Authorized Version HIZKIAH , is found in (Zephaniah 1:1 ) ...
Ater of Hezekiah
False Worship - The prophet Zephaniah, who lived and prophesied in this time, condemned those who “worship the host of heaven upon the house tops” (Zephaniah 1:5 )
Darkness - The time of God's ultimate judgment, the day of the Lord, is portrayed in both the Old Testament and New Testament as a day of darkness (Joel 2:2 ; Amos 5:18,20 ; Zephaniah 1:15 ; Matthew 24:29 ; Revelation 6:12-17 )
Lion - The king is frightening in his anger (Proverbs 19:12 ; 20:2 ), the soldier courageous (2 Samuel 17:10 ), national leaders vicious (Ezekiel 22:25 ; Zephaniah 3:3 ), enemy nations destructive (Isaiah 5:29 ; Jeremiah 2:15 ) and protective of their conquests (Isaiah 5:29 ), and personal enemies stealthy in their pursuit to harm (Psalm 10:9 ; 17:12 )
Sun - The housetop was the place of sun altars and incense burning (Zephaniah 1:5)
Rebel - ” Zephaniah gave a vivid image of the nature of the rebellious spirit: “Woe to her that is rebellious and defiled, the oppressing city! She listens to no voice, she accepts no correction
Josiah - Their degeneracy was so invincible, that the almighty Sovereign was provoked to inflict upon them those calamities which were denounced by the Prophet Zephaniah
Nations - The teaching of the oldest prophets looked in the same direction (see Amos 2:11 ; Amos 3:15 ; Amos 5:11 ; Amos 5:25 ; Amos 6:8 ; Amos 8:5 , Hosea 2:19 ; Hosea 8:14 ; Hosea 9:10 ; Hosea 10:13 ; Hosea 12:7 ff; Hosea 14:4 , Isaiah 2:6 ; Isaiah 10:4 ; Isaiah 17:10 , Zephaniah 1:8 ; Ezekiel 43:1-27 , Jeremiah 35:1 ff; Jeremiah 37:6 f. It was in Babylon that Ezekiel drew up the programme of worship and organization for the nation after the Return, laying stress on the doctrine that Israel was to be a holy people, separated from other nations (see Ezekiel 40:1-49 ; Ezekiel 41:1-26 ; Ezekiel 42:1-20 ; Zephaniah 1:11 ; Ezekiel 44:1-31 ; Ezekiel 45:1-25 ; Ezekiel 46:1-24 ; Ezekiel 47:1-23 ; Ezekiel 48:1-35 )
Azari'ah - ) ...
Another Azariah is inserted between Hilkiah, in Josiah's reign, and Seraiah who was put to death by Nebuchadnezzar, in (1 Chronicles 6:13,14 ) ...
Son of Zephaniah, a Kohathite, and ancestor of Samuel the prophet
Cloud, Cloud of the Lord - ...
In a negative sense, clouds are used to symbolize prideful self-exaltation (of the wicked, Job 20:6 ; of Satan, Isaiah 14:14 ); misery or gloom (at the day of Job's birth, Job 3:5 ; at the day of the Lord, Isaiah 60:2 ; Jeremiah 13:16 ; Ezekiel 30:3 ; 34:12 ; Joel 2:2 ; Zephaniah 1:15 ); pervasiveness (of enemy invasion, Ezekiel 38:9,16 ); transitoriness (of Job's prosperity and life, Job 7:9 ; 30:15 ; of Israel's love and life, Hosea 6:4 ; 13:3 ); futile, idle activity (Ecclesiastes 11:4 ); dimness (of eyesight in old age, Ecclesiastes 12:2 ; of a nation's splendor following divine judgment, Lamentations 2:1 ; Ezekiel 30:18 ); swiftness (of divine judgment, Jeremiah 4:13 ); and covering or concealing (of divine mercy in judgment, Lamentations 3:44 ). The eschatological day of the Lord is several times described as a day of cloud-mass and dark storm cloud for the nation(s) being judged (Ezekiel 34:12 ; Joel 2:2 ; Zephaniah 1:15 ; cf
Moloch - Moloch's priests took precedence of the princes, "Chemarim" (Jeremiah 49:3; 2 Kings 23:5; Hosea 10:5; Zephaniah 1:4)
Gath - This conclusion is reinforced by the fact that Gath is obviously omitted in the lists of Philistine sites mentioned by the prophets (Jeremiah 25:20 ; Amos 1:6-8 ; Zephaniah 2:4 ; 1618091715_34 )
Prophet - , Isaiah, Jeremiah, Obadiah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah
High Places - ...
The priests whom the kings of Judah ordained to burn incense in the high places were called Chemarim; compare Hosea 10:5; Zephaniah 1:4 idol priests not having reached the age of puberty, meaning "ministers of the gods," the Tyrian camilli, (black attired ministers, subordinate to the priests, they felled the victim), from chaamar "to be black
Shame - ...
Shameless people flaunt their unholiness, calloused to God (Zephaniah 3:5 ) and glorying in their shame (Philippians 3:19 )
Gaza - Or "Pharaoh" Hophra, on his return from the unavailing attempt to save Jerusalem from Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 37:5; Jeremiah 37:7; Jeremiah 47:1) (Calvin) In Zephaniah 2:4 there is a play on like sounds; Gazah gazuwbah , "Gaza shall be forsaken
Gomorrah - ...
Scripture does not say the cities were immersed in the sea, but that they were destroyed by fire from heaven (Deuteronomy 29:23; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; Zephaniah 2:9; 2 Peter 2:6; Judges 1:4-7, "an example unto those that after should live ungodly"; Amos 4:11)
Salt - Too much salt produced barrenness (Deuteronomy 29:23; Zephaniah 2:9)
Meek, Meekness - of Zephaniah 3:12 , "meek and lowly;"
Freedom - They should see that God wants people to have freedom from sin and all its evil consequences: freedom from disease and suffering (Mark 5:1-6; Mark 5:18-19; Luke 13:16; Acts 10:38); freedom from hunger and poverty (Deuteronomy 15:1-11; Deuteronomy 24:19-22; Galatians 5:1; Acts 11:27-29); freedom from the domination of foreign nations and oppressive rulers (Exodus 6:6; Nahum 3:18-19; Zephaniah 3:19; Revelation 19:20); freedom from human slavery and social injustice (Exodus 22:21-27; Deuteronomy 23:15-16; Luke 4:17-19; James 5:4-6); in fact, freedom from every kind of bondage, even the bondage in the world of nature (Romans 8:21-24)
Nahum, Theology of - Baker, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah: An Introduction and Commentary ; K. Smith, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Books of Micah, Zephaniah, and Nahum
Vine, Vineyard - As in the case of the olive, the culture of the vine needs a peaceful, settled population, as the plants require several years’ care before bearing fruit ( Zephaniah 1:13 ), and constant attention if they are to maintain their excellence; hence to sit under one’s ‘own vine and fig tree’ was a favourite image of peace ( 1 Kings 4:25 , Micah 4:4 , Zechariah 3:10 )
Desert - ...
Tsiyyah points to a dry region ( Job 30:3 ; Psalm 78:17 ; Psalm 105:41 ; Isaiah 35:1 ; Jeremiah 50:12 ; Zephaniah 2:13 )
Pride - When the prophets accuse Israel of pride (Jeremiah 13:9 ; Ezekiel 7:10,20 ; 16:56 ; Hosea 5:5 ; 7:10 ; Amos 6:8 ; 8:7 ; Zephaniah 2:10 ), the word hybristes [ ὑβριστής ]'>[5] connotes a wanton, insolent person
Shepherd - Hence the "shepherd's tent" came to symbolize desolation (Ezekiel 25:4; Zephaniah 2:6)
Clouds - Dark clouds overshadow the judgment day of Yahweh, which the prophets announced (Ezekiel 30:3 ,Ezekiel 30:3,30:18 ; Joel 2:2 ; Zephaniah 1:15 )
Nineveh - Nahum (Nahum 2) and Zephaniah (Zephaniah 2:13-15) foretold its doom; and Ezekiel (Ezekiel 31) shortly after attests the completeness of its overthrow, as a warning of the fatal issue of pride, Isaiah 10:7-14; Diodorus (ii. However Zephaniah 2:14 mentions "the cedar work," cedars from Lebanon may have reached from wall to wall with openings for light
Assyria - In the reign of Josiah, when Zephaniah prophesied, Nineveh and the kingdom of Assyria were standing; and their fall was predicted by that Prophet, Zephaniah 1:3 ; Zephaniah 2:13
Remnant - Theologically, remnant language clusters in several Old Testament books, the authors of which lived at some hinge point in history: Isaiah (37:31-32) and Micah (4:7; 7:18) near the time of Israel's collapse; Jeremiah (11:23; 50:20) and Zephaniah (2:7-9) near the time of Judah's fall; and Paul near the time of the emergence of the church (Romans 11:5 ). By God's measure, more on the order of righteousness, his triumph is not in doubt (Zephaniah 3:11-13 )
Philistia - The term "Canaan" ("merchant") applied to the Philistine land (Zephaniah 2:5) proves its commercial character. After the Babylonian captivity (Ezekiel 25:15-17) the Philistines vented their "old hatred" on the Jews, for which God as He foretold "executed vengeance on them with furious rebukes, and destroyed the remnant," namely, by Psammetichus, Necho (Jeremiah 25:20), and Nebuchadnezzar who overran their cities on his way to Egypt (Jeremiah 47), and finally by Alexander the Great, as foretold (Zechariah 9:5-6, "the king shall perish from Gaza"; Alexander bound Betis the satrap to his chariot by thongs thrust through his feet, and dragged round the city; the conqueror slew 10,000, and sold the rest as slaves: Zephaniah 2:4-5)
Assyria - 625), and Assyria fell according to the prophecies of (Isaiah 10:5-19 ), (Nahum 3:19 ), and (Zephaniah 3:13 ), and the many separate kingdoms of which it was composed ceased to recognize the "great king" (2 Kings 18:19 ; Isaiah 36:4 )
Candlestick - Zechariah's candlestick (Zechariah 4) is prophetical of that final church which shall join in one all the earth under Messiah the King, reigning in Jerusalem as the spiritual center and rallying point of all (compare Zephaniah 3:9; Zechariah 14:9; Zechariah 14:16-17; Jeremiah 3:17)
Anger - But his wrath will be fully expressed on the dies irae, the day of wrath at the end of the age, when all wrongs will be punished (Zephaniah 1:14-18 )
Wrath, Wrath of God - ...
The Old Testament often speaks of a “day” coming in the future which will be “The great day of the Lord a day of wrath” (Zephaniah 1:14-15 NRSV)
Corner-Stone - In Zephaniah 1:16; Zephaniah 3:6 the same word is translated ‘towers,’ as the corners of the wall were especially fortified; and in 2 Chronicles 26:15 ‘bulwarks’ ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 in all three passages ‘battlements’)
Assyria - Accordingly, in the prophecies of Nahum and Zephaniah, we find denunciations predicting the entire downfall of this haughty power. Nahum 1:1-15; Nahum 2:1-13; 1618091715_41; Zephaniah 2:13-15
Baal (1) - A remnant of it and an effort to combine idolatry with Jehovah worship still in part survived until the final purgation of all tendency to idols was effected by the severe discipline of the Babylonian captivity (Zephaniah 1:4-6)
Philistim - Lastly, they regained their full liberty under the later kings of Judah; and we may see, by the menaces made against them by the Prophets Isaiah, Amos, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, that they brought a thousand hardships and calamities on the children of Israel, for which God threatened to punish them with great misfortunes. —O Canaan, the land of the Philistines, I will even destroy thee, that there shall be no inhabitant; and the sea coast shall be dwellings and cottages for shepherds, and folds for flocks," Zephaniah 2:4-6
Salt - References to saltpits or saltpans, or to both, are found in Zephaniah 2:9 , 1Ma 11:25
Ebal - Why should the crown, both our and their glory, be our stumbling-block? See Micah 5:7; Zechariah 8:13; Zephaniah 3:20; Romans 11:12; Romans 11:15
Gilgal - ...
The "reproach of Egypt rolled off" is (like "the reproach of Moab" Zephaniah 2:8, and "Syria" Ezekiel 16:57) that heaped on Israel by Egypt, namely, that Jehovah had brought them into the wilderness to slay them (Exodus 32:12; Numbers 14:13-16; Deuteronomy 9:28)
Remnant - ...
Zephaniah, a seventh-century prophet, identified the “remnant” with the poor and humble (2:3, 7; 3:12-13)
Nineveh - , the period of the foundation of Rome, it was taken by the Medes under Arbaces; and nearly a century and a half later, according to the predictions of Nahum, Nahum 1:1-3:19 , and Zephaniah 2:13 , it was a second time taken by Cyaraxes and Nabopolassar; after which it no more recovered its former splendor
House - (2 Kings 23:12 ; Jeremiah 19:13 ; 32:29 ; Zephaniah 1:6 ; Acts 10:9 ) At the time of the feast of tabernacles booths were erected by the Jews on the top of their houses
Salt - (Ezekiel 47:11) And the prophets Jeremiah and Zephaniah have much the same expressions concerning the perpetual barrenness of lands given to salt, (Jeremiah 17:6; Zephaniah 2:9) The psalmist saith, (Psalms 107:34) that the Lord turneth a fruitful land into saltness, (so the margin renders it) for the wickedness of them that dwell therein
Decrees - Hence, despite the "decree" of the destruction, Zephaniah can call the people to seek God "before the decree takes effect Perhaps you will be hidden in the day of the Lord's anger" (2:1-3 NASB)
Bone - ...
Zephaniah 3:3 (a) The prophet uses this figure to tell us that the rulers of Jerusalem were deliberate in their wickedness and went about their sinful practices leisurely
Day - The term may refer to an era (Matthew 24:37 ) or to the span of human history (Genesis 8:22 ), or specify a memorable event (Isaiah 9:4 ) or a significant time (Zephaniah 1:14-16 )
Joy - , Psalms 104:31 ), and ‘rejoices over’ His people ‘for good’ ( Deuteronomy 30:9 , Zephaniah 3:17 etc
Foreigner - There would be one humanity (Isaiah 19:23-25 ), speaking a purified language (Zephaniah 3:9 )
Prophecy - Hence we read concerning the acts of Manasseh, that they were written among the sayings of the Seers, (2 Chronicles 33:19)...
It were unnecessary to remark, what every reader of the Bible is supposed to know, that we have recorded, from the grace of God the Holy Spirit, the writings of four of what, by way of distinction, are called the greater prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel; and the Writings of the twelve of lesser prophets, as they are named, Hoses, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi
Day of Judgment - After Amos the Day of Jahweh never lost its religious colouring, but its use was extended until it included in its scope not only wicked Israel but a wicked world (Zephaniah 1:2-18; Zephaniah 2:4-15; Zephaniah 3:8; Zephaniah 3:14-20)
Jeremiah - 2 6), and the prophecies of his contemporary Zephaniah (wh. The war-cloud of the Scythian invasion overhangs the sky of Zephaniah, and of Jeremiah at the outset of his ministry. Here Jeremiah is on the same ground as Zephaniah. The post-reformation conflict now opening was more deadly than the pre-reformation conflict shared with Zephaniah
Prophecy, Prophets - Similarly prophecies of “the day of the Lord” had several fulfillments (partial) which also foreshadowed a final fulfillment (Obadiah 1:15 ; Joel 1:15 ; Joel 2:1 ; Zephaniah 1:7 ,Zephaniah 1:7,1:14 ; Ezekiel 30:3 ; compare 2 Peter 3:10 )
Poetry - ...
Poetry in the Old Testament...
Numbers 12:6-842 ; Genesis 3:14-19 ; Genesis 3:23-24 ; Genesis 8:22 ; Genesis 9:25-27 ; Genesis 14:19-20 ; Genesis 16:11-12 ; Genesis 25:23 ; Genesis 27:27-29 ,Genesis 27:27-29,27:39-40 ; Genesis 48:15-16 ; Genesis 49:2-27 ...
Exodus 15:1-18 ,Exodus 15:1-18,15:21 ...
Leviticus 10:3 ...
Numbers 6:24-27 ; Numbers 10:35-36 ; 1618091715_9 ; Numbers 21:14-15 ; Numbers 21:17-18 ,Numbers 21:17-18,21:27-30 ; Numbers 23:7-10 ; Numbers 23:18-24 ; Numbers 24:3-9 ,Numbers 24:3-9,24:15-24 ...
Deuteronomy 32:1-43 ; Deuteronomy 33:2-29 ...
Joshua 10:12-13 ...
Judges 5:2-31 ; Judges 14:14 ,Judges 14:14,14:18 ; Judges 15:16 ...
Ruth 1:16-17 ,Ruth 1:16-17,1:20-21 ...
1 Samuel 2:1-10 ; 1Samuel 15:22-23,1 Samuel 15:33 ; 1 Samuel 18:7 ; 1 Samuel 21:11 ; 1 Samuel 29:5 ...
2 Samuel 1:19-27 ; 2 Samuel 3:33-34 ; 2 Samuel 22:2-51 ; 2 Samuel 23:1-7 ...
1 Kings 8:12-13 ; 1 Kings 12:16 ...
2 Kings 19:21-28 ...
1 Chronicles 16:8-36 ...
2 Chronicles 5:13 ; 2 Chronicles 6:41-42 ; 2 Chronicles 7:3 ; 2 Chronicles 10:16 ; 2 Chronicles 20:21 ...
Ezra 3:11 ...
Job 3:2-42:6 ...
Psalm 1-150 ...
Proverbs 1-31 ...
Ecclesiastes 1:2-11 ,Ecclesiastes 1:2-11,1:15 ,Ecclesiastes 1:15,1:18 ; Ecclesiastes 3:2-9 ; Ecclesiastes 7:1-13 ; Ecclesiastes 8:1 ; Ecclesiastes 10:1-4 ,Ecclesiastes 10:1-4,10:8-20 ; Ecclesiastes 11:1-4 ...
Song of Song of Solomon 1-8 ...
Isaiah—largely poetry...
Jeremiah—poetic selections throughout except for 32–45...
Lamentations 1-5 ...
Ezekiel 19:2-14 ; Ezekiel 23:32-34 ; Ezekiel 24:3-5 ; Ezekiel 26:17-18 ; Ezekiel 27:3-9 ; Ezekiel 27:25-36 ; Ezekiel 28:1-10 ; Ezekiel 28:12-19 ; Ezekiel 28:22-23 ; Ezekiel 29:3-5 ; Ezekiel 30:2-4 ; Ezekiel 30:6-8 ; Ezekiel 30:10-19 ; Ezekiel 31:2-9 ; Ezekiel 32:2-8 ; Ezekiel 32:12-15 ; Ezekiel 32:19 ...
Daniel 2:20-23 ; Daniel 4:3 ; Daniel 4:34-35 ; Daniel 6:26-27 ; Daniel 7:9-10 ; Daniel 7:13-14 ; 7:23-27 Hosea—all poetry except for 1; Daniel 2:16-20 ; Daniel 3:1-5 ...
Joel—all poetry except for Daniel 2:30-3:8 ...
Amos—largely poetry...
Obadiah 1:1 ...
Jonah 2:2-9 ...
Micah 1-7 ...
Nahum 1-3 ...
Habakkuk 1-3 ...
Zephaniah 1-3 ...
Zechariah 9-11:3 ; Zechariah 11:17 ; Zechariah 13:7-9 ...
Parallelism The predominant feature of Hebrew poetry is parallelism
Gentiles - ...
Solomon's prayer of dedication made clear that the door was never closed to the foreigner who wished to serve the Lord (1 Kings 8:41-43 ), and prophetic words and some Psalms depict the nations gathering to worship the God of Jacob (Psalm 86:9 ; Psalm 102:15-17 ; Isaiah 2:2-4 ; Zephaniah 3:9-10 )
Lamp - ]'>[1] except in Zephaniah 1:12 (but Amer
Idolatry, - (2 Kings 23:12 ; Jeremiah 19:3 ; 32:29 ; Zephaniah 1:5 ) (The modern objects of idolatry are less gross than the ancient, but are none the less idols
Justice - Sinners can have hope only because of the perfect harmony of justice and mercy within the divine nature (Exodus 34:6-7; Zephaniah 3:5; cf
Nineveh - Zephaniah also (2:13-15) predicts its destruction along with the fall of the empire of which it was the capital
Incense - This shall be consummated at Christ's appearing (Zechariah 14:9; Zephaniah 3:9)
Abstain, Abstinence - The destruction of wine is noted as a calamity in the life of Israel (Deuteronomy 28:30-39 ; Isaiah 62:8 ; 65:21 ; Micah 6:15 ; Zephaniah 1:13 )
Refuge - " And it is so translated in the margin of the Bible in Zephaniah 3:9 which see
Prophets - Zephaniah, soon after the beginning of the reign of Josiah, and before the destruction of Nineveh
Jeremiah - Zedekiah in the tenth year, through Jehucal and Zephaniah, begged Jeremiah, "pray for us," as the issue between Nebuchadnezzar and Pharaoh Hophra (Apries) was at that time as yet undecided. Zedekiah again sent Pashur and Zephaniah to Jeremiah to inquire of him, and received the reply that submission to the Chaldees is the only way of life (Jeremiah 21:1-9; Jeremiah 38:2 ff); and then the princes accused Jeremiah of weakening the hands of the warriors by such words, and the weak prince left. ...
Even among the captives at Babylon were false prophets, Ahab, Zedekiah, and Shemaiah (the writer to Zephaniah at Jerusalem that he should imprison Jeremiah as "mad"), who held out delusive hopes of a speedy return
Testimony - ...
The Old Testament prophets also reveal God's mind and will when testifying against Israel (2 Chronicles 24:19 ; Amos 3:13 ) and the nations (Zephaniah 3:8 ). As accuser, God testifies against Israel because of their sin (Psalm 50:7,21 ; Isaiah 57:16 ; Hosea 4:1 ; Micah 1:2 ; 6:2 ; Malachi 2:14 ); as judge, he reaches a just verdict on the basis of his own testimony (Hosea 12:2 ; Micah 6:2,9-16 ; Zephaniah 3:7-8 ; Malachi 3:5 )
Gestures - The lifting up of one's hand or the shaking of one's fist means defiance (2 Samuel 18:28 ; Isaiah 10:32 ; Zephaniah 2:15 )
Perseverance - ...
In the Septuagint the word refers to either confidence in or tense expectation of ("waiting on") the power or the faithfulness of God, who delivers his people (Psalm 37:9 ; Isaiah 51:5 ; Micah 7:7 ; Zephaniah 3:8 )
Book of Life - of Sophonias (Zephaniah), translation L
Ammon - But the Ammonites’ violence, cruelty and arrogance were inexcusable, and God’s prophets assured them of a fitting punishment (Jeremiah 49:1-6; Amos 1:13-15; Zephaniah 2:8-11)
God, Names of - " The name yhwh is prominent in salvation oracles ( Zephaniah 3:14-17 ) and in petitions (Psalm 79:5,9 ; 86:1 ). In stressful times one calls on the name of the Lord (Psalm 79:5 ; 99:6 ; Zephaniah 3:9 )
Fear - People are afraid of death (Genesis 32:11 ), of disaster (Zephaniah 3:15-16 ), of sudden panic (Proverbs 3:25 ), of being overtaken by adversity (Job 6:21 ), and of the unknown (Genesis 19:30 )
Jehoiada - This accords with the false prophet at Babylon, Shemaiah's, accusation by letter against Zephaniah, who was promoted to Jehoiada's place, for ingratitude to God in not apprehending Jeremiah, seeing that (in Shemaiah's view) "the Lord had made him priest in the stead of Jehoiada the priest" for this very purpose (Jeremiah 29:25-29; 2 Kings 25:18)
Samaria - " But it was fear, not love; it was a vain combination of incompatible worships, that of Jehovah and of idols (Zephaniah 1:5; Ezekiel 20:39; 1 Kings 18:21; Matthew 6:24)
Zedekiah - ) Brother of Zephaniah
Righteous, To Be - ”...
The word tsedâqâh, which occurs 157 times, is found throughout the Old Testament (except for Exodus, Leviticus, 2 Kings, Ecclesiastes, Lamentations, Habbakuk, and Zephaniah)
Gentiles - Sirach 50:26); they are the bençnçkhâr, ‘the strangers’ (in a hostile sense), ‘whose mouth speaketh vanity, and their right hand is a right hand of falsehood,’ in Psalms 144:11 (contrast Zephaniah 3:13). ‘His house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples’ (Isaiah 56:7), but it is Jewish feasts that the nations shall keep there (Zechariah 14:16-19), and they shall be joined to Israel by absorption, not by co-ordination (Isaiah 45:20-25, Jeremiah 12:16, Zephaniah 3:9, Zechariah 8:20-23)
Messiah - Zephaniah and Obadiah make no reference to the Messianic King. In the closing verses (14–20) of Zephaniah (obviously an addition belonging to the late-exilic or early post-exilic period) it is Jahweh who is Israel’s King in the midst of His people, their mighty Hero who wards off the nation’s foes (Haggai 2:15-19)
Exile - In addition, the prophets Micah, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, Habakkuk, and Ezekiel agreed that Judah would fall
Sea, the Salt - , were immersed in the sea, but that they were overthrown by fire from heaven (Deuteronomy 29:23; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; Zephaniah 2:9; 2 Peter 2:6)
Prophets, the - ...
Others follow closely, as Micah, who prophesies concerning Samaria and Jerusalem, though no personal reference is made to a king of Israel; and, either before or contemporary with the captivity of Judah, Jeremiah and Zephaniah
Kings, the Books of - The mention of Seraiah and Zephaniah as slain by Nebuchadnezzar (2 Kings 25:18) accords with Jeremiah 21:1; Jeremiah 29:25-29, wherein Zephaniah appears as of the faction that opposed Jeremiah and was headed by priests and false prophets
Minerals And Metals - The “saltpits” of Zephaniah 2:9 were probably located just south of the Dead Sea
High Priest - Zephaniah was described as the “second priest” (2 Kings 25:18 ; Jeremiah 52:24 )
Nineveh - How is she become a desolation, a place for beasts to lie down in," Zephaniah 2:13-15
Prophecy, Prophet - ...
If prophets were truly God’s messengers, their chief concern was not with foretelling events, but with leading people to repentance and obedience (Micah 3:8; Micah 7:18; Zephaniah 2:1-3)
Nahum - In this respect he contrasts especially with his contemporary Zephaniah, who also looked for the collapse of the Assyrian kingdom, but saw clearly a similar fate about to overtake the sinners of Israel
House - Retributively in kind, as they burnt incense to Baal the god of fire, the Chaldeans should burn the houses, the scene of his worship, with fire (Zephaniah 1:5)
Idol, Idolatry - In the end God promises to destroy all the gods of the nations (Zephaniah 2:11 ) and looks forward to the day when the people will throw away their idols and return to him (Isaiah 30:22 )
Antichrist - The forced unity marked by Rome's ritual being everywhere in Latin is the premature counterfeit of the true unity, only to be realized when Christ, God's true Vicar on earth, shall appear, and all the earth shall "in a pure language serve the Lord with one consent" (Zephaniah 3:9)
Wine And Strong Drink - In the further course of maturing, in order to prevent the wine from thickening on the lees ( Zephaniah 1:12 RVm Zechariah, Book of - 12, leads us immediately into the familiar apocalyptic conception introduced by Zephaniah, and developed by Ezekiel and Joel
Receive, Receiving - ...
A — 11: εἰσδέχομαι (Strong's #1523 — Verb — eisdechomai — ice-dekh'-om-ahee ) "to receive into" (eis), is used only in 2 Corinthians 6:17 , where the verb does not signify "to accept," but "to admit" (as antithetic to "come ye out," and combining Isaiah 52:11 with Zephaniah 3:20 )
Animals - For example, both animals and people are dependent on the providence of God ( Psalm 104:10-30 ; Luke 12:22-24 ) and animals bear the consequences of God's judgment along with people (Genesis 6:7 ; Exodus 9:1-7 ; Jeremiah 14:5-6 ; Zephaniah 1:2-3 )
Lord - The prophets Hosea, Jeremiah, Zephaniah, and Ezekiel spoke out against the hidden “Baalizing” of the religion of Yahweh
Ammonites - Ammon shall be a perpetual desolation," ...
Ezekiel 25:2 ; Ezekiel 25:5 ; Ezekiel 25:7 ; Ezekiel 25:10 ; Ezekiel 21:32 ; Jeremiah 49:2 ; Zephaniah 2:9
Time, Meaning of - A final day when God would judge the world was “the day of the Lord” (Amos 5:18-19 ; Isaiah 13:6 ; Zephaniah 1:7 )
Priest, Priesthood - Numbers 16:10 ; for Korah's rebellion against the Aaronic exclusivity, and Joshua 18:7 ; for the "priesthood" of the tribe of Levi as a whole), and the Aramaic masculine noun kahen [ 2 Kings 23:5 ; Hosea 10:5 ; Zephaniah 1:4 ) referring exclusively to priests of foreign gods
Joel, Theology of - The fact that the first mention of this theme in the book calls it simply "the day" (1:15) probably indicates that it was an established concept, that Joel was drawing on earlier prophetic voices such as Amos (5:18-20), Obadiah (15), or Zephaniah (1:7,14) in his depiction of the crisis present to his people
Esdras, the Second Book of - A connexion has been suggested between them and the Apocalypse of Zephaniah, of which fragments are extant in Coptic
Assur - 2 and Zephaniah 2:13-15 shortly before the catastrophe foretold it; and Ezekiel (Ezekiel 31) shortly afterward about 586 B
Josiah - And so it has been, and so it will be, with thousands of the sons of mothers like Jedidah, and with thousands of the scholars and young communicants of ministers like Jeremiah and Zephaniah
War - 810, and are subsequently mentioned in Zephaniah 1:16
Canaan, History And Religion of - Similar association may be found in passages such as Hosea 12:7-8 ; Ezekiel 17:4 ; Zephaniah 1:11
Leadership - God sent prophets to sound a warning before the northern kingdom fell to Assyria (Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Micah) and before Babylon took Judah (Zephaniah, Habakkuk, Jeremiah, Ezekiel)
Dead Sea Scrolls - One approach to such interpretation was the production of continuous commentaries on the following Old Testament books: Habakkuk, Micah, Psalms, Isaiah, Hosea, Nahum, and Zephaniah
High Priest - ) Seraiah ends the series, taken by Nebuzaradan and slain by Nebuchadnezzar, along with Zephaniah, the second priest or sagan (2 Kings 25:18)
Jesus Christ - If Jesus Christ be God, the event answers the prophecy; if not, the event is not come to pass, for Christians in general worship Jesus, which is idolatry, if he be not God, Isaiah 2:1-22 : Zephaniah 2:11
House - ), also for prayer and meditation ( Acts 10:9 ), lamentation ( Isaiah 15:3 , Jeremiah 48:38 ), and even for idolatrous worship ( Jeremiah 19:13 , Zephaniah 1:5 )
Bible - gives us Nahum, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Habakkuk among the prophets, also Deuteronomy, and at the beginning of this century we have the earliest complete historical books, Samuel and Judges
Apocalyptic Literature - The Apocalypse of Zephaniah
Apocalypse - In addition to these extant books are 4, which are known to us only through citations In Origen and other Fathers: (j) The Prayer of Joseph; (k) The Book of Eldad and Medad; (l) The Apocalypse of Elijah; (m [14] ) The Apocalypse of Zephaniah
Omnipresence - If we assume the genuineness of the words above cited, they seem to show that Christ’s Messianic consciousness included the ability to fulfil such OT predictions as " translation="">Joel 2:27 ‘Ye shall know that I am in the midst of Israel’; " translation="">Zephaniah 3:17 ‘The Lord thy God in the midst of thee is mighty
Bible - There have been printed separately the Psalms, Canticles, some chapters of Genesis, Ruth, Joel, Jonah, Zephaniah, Malachi, and the New Testament, all which have been since reprinted in the Polyglot of London
Babel - The one primitive language is now lost, dispersed amidst the various tongues which have severally appropriated its fragments, about to rise again with reunited parts in a new and heavenly form when Jehovah will "turn to the people a pure language, that they may all call upon the name of Jehovah, to serve Him with one consent" (Zephaniah 3:9)
New Jerusalem - : ‘And I will … throughly purge away thy dross, and will take away all thy tin: and I will restore thy judges as at the first, and thy counsellors as at the beginning: afterward thou shalt be called The city of righteousness, the faithful city’; Zephaniah 3:12 f
Bible - the Pentateuch or five books of Moses, called Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, the books of Joshua, Judges, Ruth , 1 & 2 Samuel , 1 & 2 Kings , 1 & 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Song of Solomon, the prophecies of Isaiah, Jeremiah with his Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi