What does World mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
κόσμου an apt and harmonious arrangement or constitution 59
κόσμον an apt and harmonious arrangement or constitution 40
κόσμῳ an apt and harmonious arrangement or constitution 35
κόσμος an apt and harmonious arrangement or constitution 29
οἰκουμένην the inhabited earth. / the universe 8
תֵּבֵ֥ל world. 5
תֵּבֵ֑ל world. 4
תֵּבֵ֖ל world. 4
οἰκουμένης the inhabited earth. / the universe 4
תֵבֵֽל world. 3
תֵּ֝בֵ֗ל world. 3
תֵבֵ֖ל world. 3
תֵּבֵֽל world. 2
הָאָ֔רֶץ land 2
הָאָ֖רֶץ land 1
וְתֵבֵ֑ל world. 1
תֵ֝בֵ֗ל world. 1
תֵ֭בֵל world. 1
תֵּ֫בֵ֥ל world. 1
וְתֵבֵ֖ל world. 1
תֵבֵ֑ל world. 1
[κόσμου] an apt and harmonious arrangement or constitution 1
תֵּבֵ֛ל world. 1
וּֽמִתֵּבֵ֥ל world. 1
תֵּבֵל֙ world. 1
οἰκουμένη the inhabited earth. / the universe 1
וּמֵעוֹלָ֥ם long duration 1
חָֽלֶד age 1
מֵחֶ֗לֶד age 1
חָֽדֶל rest 1
אָ֑רֶץ land 1
אַרְצ֑וֹ land 1
תֵּ֭בֵל world. 1

Definitions Related to World

G2889


   1 an apt and harmonious arrangement or constitution, order, government.
   2 ornament, decoration, adornment, i.e. the arrangement of the stars, ‘the heavenly hosts’, as the ornament of the heavens. 1 Pet. 3:3.
   3 the World, the universe.
   4 the circle of the earth, the earth.
   5 the inhabitants of the earth, men, the human race.
   6 the ungodly multitude; the whole mass of men alienated from God, and therefore hostile to the cause of Christ.
   7 World affairs, the aggregate of things earthly.
      7a the whole circle of earthly goods, endowments riches, advantages, pleasures, etc, which although hollow and frail and fleeting, stir desire, seduce from God and are obstacles to the cause of Christ.
   8 any aggregate or general collection of particulars of any sort.
      8a the Gentiles as contrasted to the Jews (Rom. 11:12 etc).
      8a of believers only, John 1:29; 3:16; 3:17; 6:33; 12:47 1 Cor. 4:9; 2 Cor. 5:19.
               

G3625


   1 the inhabited earth.
      1a the portion of the earth inhabited by the Greeks, in distinction from the lands of the barbarians.
      1b the Roman empire, all the subjects of the empire.
      1c the whole inhabited earth, the World.
      1d the inhabitants of the earth, men.
   2 the universe, the World.
   

H8398


   1 World.
   

H776


   1 land, earth.
      1a earth.
         1a1 whole earth (as opposed to a part).
         1a2 earth (as opposed to heaven).
         1a3 earth (inhabitants).
      1b land.
         1b1 country, territory.
         1b2 district, region.
         1b3 tribal territory.
         1b4 piece of ground.
         1b5 land of Canaan, Israel.
         1b6 inhabitants of land.
         1b7 Sheol, land without return, (under) World.
         1b8 city (-state).
      1c ground, surface of the earth.
         1c1 ground.
         1c2 soil.
      1d (in phrases).
         1d1 people of the land.
         1d2 space or distance of country (in measurements of distance).
         1d3 level or plain country.
         1d4 land of the living.
         1d5 end(s) of the earth.
      1e (almost wholly late in usage). 1e1 lands, countries.
            1e1a often in contrast to Canaan.
            

H2309


   1 rest, cessation.
   

H2465


   1 age, duration of life, the World.
   

H5769


   1 long duration, antiquity, futurity, for ever, ever, everlasting, evermore, perpetual, old, ancient, World.
      1a ancient time, long time (of past).
      1b (of future).
         1b1 for ever, always.
         1b2 continuous existence, perpetual.
         1b3 everlasting, indefinite or unending future, eternity.
         

Frequency of World (original languages)

Frequency of World (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Light of the World, Parable of the
(John 3) Gospel for Monday of Octave of Pentecost. In the nightly visit of Nicodemus Christ explained the mystery of redemption. Means to it is faith in Jesus as the Christ. The unbeliever is already judged (verse 18) because he remains in darkness by his own free will (verse 19). Moral corruption prevents him from coming to the light (Jesus), lest his rottenness become exposed. Rather than face this he would deny revelation. Light is the symbol of joy (luminous thoughts give us thrills), of life (light vivifies living creatures), of happiness (days of light are days of happiness). Jesus is the giver of light; in redemption He brings to the believer truth, blessing, and peace. The evangelist called the Word Light. "In him (the Word) was life and the life was the light of men," and "The light shineth in darkness, and darkness did not comprehend it" (refused to be enlightened). Christ himself repeatedly announced: "I am the Light of the world" (John 8,9). The sense is clear. In the divine economy we must believe in Christ, to be possessed of tte light of life. But this light must likewise be our moral guide, and reveal the otherwise unfathomable mystery of unbelief.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - New World, the
Official weekly organ of the Archdiocese of Chicago, published in Chicago, Illinois, by the Catholic Press Company. Founded, 1892. See also the publication's web site.
Holman Bible Dictionary - World, the
The created order in the totality of its space and time. The development of the biblical concept and the varieties of ways in which the term is used become evident when the Old Testament uses, Greek concept, and New Testament uses are considered in sequence.
The Old Testament The ancient Hebrews had no word for the “universe.” When speaking of the totality of creation, they used descriptive phrases like “the heavens and the earth” (Genesis 1:1 NIV), “heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them” ( Exodus 20:11 ; compare Philippians 2:10 NIV), or “the heavens, even the highest heavens, and all their starry host, the earth and all that is on it, the seas and all that is in them” ( Nehemiah 9:6 NIV). Evident in these more extended descriptions is the view that the world consisted of an expanse of land (“the earth”) that was surrounded by water and set under the canopy of the heavens. More simply, they could use the inclusive “all” ( Isaiah 44:24 ; Jeremiah 10:16 ; Jeremiah 51:19 ).
Basic to Hebrew thought was the affirmation that God created everything above the earth, on the earth, and under it (Genesis 1:1-2:3 ; Job 38:1 ). The doctrine of creation asserted the sovereignty of God—and the superiority of the God of the Hebrews over the idols worshiped by other peoples. Four Hebrew words have been translated by “world.” The word eretz (2,047 times) normally means “earth” or “land.” It is translated as “world” four times in the KJV and twice in the RSV ( Isaiah 23:17 ; Jeremiah 25:26 ). Olam is translated as “world” twice in the KJV ( Psalm 73:12 ; Ecclesiastes 3:11 ). Its general sense is age , or long duration . Two other rarer words appear predominantly in the poetic writings (tebel , which is synonymous with eretz , 36 times, for instance, Psalm 18:15 ; Job 37:12 ; and cheled , which is synonymous with olam , 5 times, for instance, Psalm 17:14 ; Psalm 49:1 ). The Hebrews, therefore, did not have a single concept of the world but thought of the creation in terms of its geographical and temporal extent.
Greek Thought The word kosmos (from which we get the English words “cosmic” and “cosmology”) originally described anything that was constructed or built, then its order, or by extension its ordered beauty. The world was a perfect unity, beautiful in its order. From the time of the use of kosmos to describe the world, therefore, the order of the world was primary. Precisely this concept of the world as an ordered system is absent from Hebrew thought.
The order of the world was explained variously by the leading schools of philosophy. Plato held that the kosmos included both the visible world and all that could be known by reason. The concepts of world, heaven, and space began to merge. Heraclitus and later Aristotle rejected any notion of a beginning of the world. The world was infinite, without beginning or end. For the Stoics, the logos was the rational principle that gave order to the world. The idea of God as Creator and the world as God's creation was foreign to the Greeks. The world was an extension of the logos that gave it order. Plato considered that a demiurge formed the world in a manner consistent with perfect being. Even for Plato, however, neither was the demiurge fully God nor was the world a creation. It was an extension or emanation of the demiurge.
The use of kosmos in the Septuagint, the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible, marked the beginning of a biblical concept of world . The merging of Hebrew and Greek thought later found its fullest expression in the works of Philo of Alexandria, who used the word more than any other writer in antiquity.
In the New Testament Three words are translated as “world” in the New Testament: oikoumene (15 times, “the inhabited earth”), aion (over 30 times, similar to the Hebrew olam meaning “long duration,” “age,” or “world”), and kosmos (188 times). World can carry various nuances.
1. The whole created order Paul before the Areopagus in Athens spoke of “the God who made the world and everything in it” (Acts 17:24 NIV). The doctrine of creation was still fundamental to the New Testament writers. The early Christians in Jerusalem addressed God as “Sovereign Lord, you made the heaven and the earth and the sea, and everything in them” ( Acts 4:24 NIV). The biblical writers could therefore refer to “the foundation of the world” ( Matthew 25:34 ; Luke 11:50 ; John 17:24 ; Ephesians 1:4 ; Hebrews 4:3 ; Hebrews 9:26 ; 1 Peter 1:20 ; Revelation 13:8 ; Revelation 17:8 ) or the creation of the world (see Romans 1:20 ; compare John 17:5 ).
2. The earth and its inhabitants John 1:9 refers to “the true light which enlightens everyone was coming into the world” (NRSV). Similarly, in the farewell discourse in John, Jesus spoke of His departure from the world ( John 13:1 ; John 16:28 ). The authorities complained that “the world”—meaning all people—had “gone after him” (John 12:19 ). Satan offered Jesus “all the kingdoms of the world” (Matthew 4:8 NIV), and Paul saluted the Christians in Rome, saying, “Your faith is proclaimed throughout the world” ( Romans 1:8 NRSV). The meaning of “the world” in John 3:16 should probably be understood in this sense.
3. The arena of human activity. This especially pertains to wealth and material goods. “The cares of this world” can choke out the word (Mark 4:19 ). Married persons may be especially troubled over worldly affairs (1 Corinthians 7:33-34 ). In this sense, the elder admonished the Johannine community, “Do not love the world or anything in the world” (1 John 2:15 NIV; compare 1 John 2:16-17 ).
“The world” can also designate all that is hostile, rebellious, and opposed to God. Paul referred to the effects of the fall on the whole cosmic order: “The creation was subjected to frustration [1] the creation itself will be liberated from its bondage” (Romans 8:19-25 NIV; compare 2 Peter 1:4 ). The world, therefore, is under the power of “the prince of this world” (John 12:31 ; John 14:30 ; John 16:11 ), “the prince of the power of the air” (Ephesians 2:2 ), the “god of this world” (2 Corinthians 4:4 ); “the whole world is under the control of the evil one” (1 John 5:19 NIV).
Paul contrasted the wisdom of this world with the wisdom of God (1Corinthians 1:20-21,1 Corinthians 1:26-28 ; 1 Corinthians 3:19 ). “The rulers of this age” cannot understand God's wisdom hidden in Christ (1 Corinthians 2:7-8 NIV). Through the cross, Christ triumphed over all the powers of this world ( Colossians 2:15 ). Indeed, God was in Christ “reconciling the world unto himself” (2 Corinthians 5:19 ; Colossians 1:20 ).
The hostile sense of “the world” is especially pronounced in the Johannine writings. Nevertheless, it is important to note that the world is not inherently evil. John still affirmed the creation of the world through the logos ( John 1:3-4 ). Jesus, “the lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world” (John 1:29 NIV), was sent to save the world ( John 3:17 ; John 10:36 ; John 12:47 ). He is, therefore, “the light of the world” (John 8:12 ); the Samaritans acclaimed Him as “the Savior of the world” (John 4:42 ).
The coming of Jesus, however, brought judgment to the world (John 9:39 ; John 12:31 ). The world will hate the disciples as it hated Jesus (John 15:18 ) because they are not of the world (John 15:19 ). Jesus called His disciples to show love for one another that all may recognize them through this love (John 13:35 ) The disciples are to be in the world but not “of the world” (John 17:14-16 ). Victory over the hostility of the world is assured through the cross of Jesus (John 16:33 ) and through faith (1 John 5:4-5 ). The world, in fact, is already passing away (1 John 2:17 ).
In the new Testament, therefore, world is influenced by both Hebrew and Greek thought and may be considered primarily in its natural order, its human order, its fallenness, or its place in God's redemptive order. See Creation ; Earth; Heaven .
R. Alan Culpepper
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Father of the World to Come
Title of Our Lord in Isaias 9:6.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - World
WORLD
1. In OT . In general it may be said that the normal expression for such conception of the Universe as the Hebrews had reached is ‘the heavens and the earth’ ( Genesis 1:1 , Psalms 89:11 , 1 Chronicles 16:31 ), and that ‘world’ is an equivalent expression for ‘ earth. ’ So far as there is a difference, the ‘world’ is rather the fruitful, habitable earth, e.g. , ‘the earth is the Lord’s, and the fulness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein’ ( Psalms 24:1 ; cf. Psalms 50:12 ; Psalms 90:2 , Isaiah 34:1 ). The religious sentiments awakened by the contemplation of Nature appear also in references to the heavens and the sea ( e.g. Psalms 8:1-9 ; Psalms 19:1-14 , Job 38:1-41 ; Job 39:1-30 ). But of the ethical depreciation of the world, so prominent in some NT writings, there are in the OT few traces. The ‘world’ is to be judged in righteousness ( Psalms 9:8 ; Psalms 96:13 ; Psalms 98:9 ), and punished for its evil ( Isaiah 13:11 ). The transient character of its riches and pleasures, with the consequent folly of absorption in them, is perhaps indicated by another Hebrew word (meaning ‘duration‘; cf. ‘ æon ’ below) rendered ‘world’ at Psalms 17:14 (‘men of the world, whose portion is in this life,’ cf. RVm [1] ); also by the same word at Psalms 49:1 (see the whole Psalm). A word of similar meaning is rendered ‘world’ in AV [2] at Psalms 73:12 , Ecclesiastes 3:11 , but RV [3] retains ‘world’ only in the latter passage, and gives quite another turn to the sense.
The ethical aspect of the ‘world’ does not receive any fresh emphasis in the Apocrypha, though in the Book of Wisdom both the scientific interest in regard to the world and the impulses of natural religion are notably quickened ( Wis 7:17-22 ; Wis 9:9 ; Wis 11:17 ; Wis 11:22 ; Wis 13:1-9 , cf. Sir 17:1-32 ; Sir 18:1-33 ). There is ample contrast between the stability of the righteous and the vanity of ungodly prosperity ( e.g. Wis 1:1-16 ; Wis 2:1-24 ; Wis 3:1-19 ; Wis 4:1-20 ; Wis 5:1-23 ), but the latter is not identified with the ‘world.’ It is, noticeable that in the Apocrypha the word kosmos , which in the LXX [4] means ‘adornment,’ has reached its sense of ‘world,’ conceived as a beautiful order; in the NT this becomes the prevalent word.
2. In NT . (1) aiôn (¿on) , ‘ age ,’ is used of the world in its time-aspect: human history is conceived as made up of ages, successive and contemporaneous, converging to and consummated in the Christ. These in their sum constitute the ‘world’: God is their Maker ( Hebrews 1:2 ; Hebrews 11:3 [AV [2] and RV [3] ‘worlds,’ but ‘world’ better represents the thought]) and their King ( 1 Timothy 1:17 RVm [1] , Revelation 15:3 RV [3] ). Hence the phrases ‘since the world began,’ lit . ‘from the age’ ( Luke 1:70 , John 9:32 , Acts 15:18 ); and ‘the end of the world,’ lit . the ‘consummation of the age’ ( Matthew 13:39-40 ; Matthew 13:49 ; Matthew 24:3 ; Matthew 28:20 ) or ‘of the ages’ ( Hebrews 9:26 ). All the ‘ends of the world’ so conceived meet in the Christian era ( 1 Corinthians 10:11 [RV [3] ‘ages’], cf. Hebrews 11:39-40 ). Under this time-aspect, also, the NT writers identify their own age with the ‘world,’ and this, as not merely actual but as typical, is set in new lights. As ‘this world,’ ‘this present world,’ it is contrasted explicitly or implicitly with ‘the world to come’ ( Matthew 12:32 , Mark 10:30 , Luke 18:30 ; Luke 20:34-35 , Ephesians 1:21 ; Ephesians 2:7 , 2 Timothy 4:10 , Titus 2:12 , Hebrews 6:5 ).
In some of these passages there is implied a moral condemnation of this world; elsewhere this receives deeper emphasis. ‘The cares of the world choke the word’ (Matthew 13:22 , Mark 4:19 ): the ‘sons of this world’ are contrasted with the ‘sons of light’ ( Luke 16:8 ; cf. Romans 12:2 , Ephesians 2:2 ‘according to the transient fashion [10] of this material world [11]’). This world is evil ( Galatians 1:4 ), its wisdom is naught ( 1Co 1:20 ; 1 Corinthians 2:6 ; 1 Corinthians 3:18 ), its rulers crucified the Lord of glory ( 1 Corinthians 2:8 ); finally, it is the ‘god of this world’ that has blinded the minds of the unhelieving ( 2 Corinthians 4:4 ). This ethical use of æon = ‘world’ is not found in the Johannine writings.
(2) But the most frequent term for ‘world’ is kosmos , which is sometimes extended in meaning to the material universe, as in the phrases ‘from the beginning (‘foundation,’ ‘creation’) of the world’ ( e.g. Matthew 24:21 ; Matthew 25:34 , Hebrews 4:6 , Romans 1:20 ; for the implied thought of Divine creation cf. Acts 14:17 ; Acts 17:24 ). More commonly, however, the word is used of the earth, and especially the earth as the abode of man. To ‘gain the whole world’ is to become possessed of all possible material wealth and earthly power ( Matthew 16:26 , Mark 8:36 , Luke 9:25 ). Because ‘sin entered into the world’ ( Romans 5:12 ), it is become the scene of the Incarnation and the object of Redemption ( 2 Corinthians 5:19 , 1 Timothy 1:15 , Hebrews 10:5 , John 1:9-10 ; John 1:29 ; John 3:16-17 ; John 12:47 ), the scene also, alien but inevitable, of the Christian disciple’s life and discipline, mission and victory ( Matthew 5:14 ; Matthew 13:38 ; Matthew 26:13 , John 17:16 , Romans 1:8 , 1 Corinthians 3:22 ; 1Co 4:9 ; 1 Corinthians 5:10 ; 1 Corinthians 7:31 , 2 Corinthians 1:12 , Philippians 2:16 , Col 1:8 , 1 Peter 5:9 , Revelation 11:15 ). From this virtual identification of the ‘world’ with mankind, and mankind as separated from and hostile to God, there comes the ethical signification of the word specially developed in the writings of St. Paul and St. John.
( a ) The Epp. of St. Paul . To the Galatians St. Paul describes the pre-Christian life as slavery to ‘the rudiments of the world’ ( Galatians 4:3 , cf. Galatians 4:9 ); through Christ the world is crucified to him and he to the world ( Galatians 6:14 ). Both thoughts recur in Colossians ( Galatians 2:8 ; Galatians 2:20 ). In writing to the Corinthians he condemns the wisdom, the passing fashion, the care, the sorrow of the world ( 1 Corinthians 1:20-21 ; 1 Corinthians 3:19 ; 1 Corinthians 7:31 ; 1 Corinthians 7:33-34 , 2 Corinthians 7:10 ; cf. aiôn above), and declares the Divine choice to rest upon all that the world least esteems ( 1 Corinthians 1:27-28 , cf. James 2:5 ). This perception of the true worth of things is granted to those who ‘received not the spirit of the world, but the spirit which is of God’ ( 1 Corinthians 2:12 ); hence ‘the saints shall judge the world’ ( 1 Corinthians 6:2 ; cf. 1 Corinthians 11:32 ). In the argument of Romans the thought of the Divine judgment of the ‘world’ has incidental place, but in the climax St. Paul conceives of the ‘fall’ of Israel as leading to ‘the riches of the world,’ and of the ‘casting away’ of them as the ‘reconciling of the world’ ( 1 Corinthians 11:12 ; 1 Corinthians 11:16 ; cf. 1 Corinthians 11:32 and 1 Corinthians 5:12-13 ). What. St. Paul condemns, then, is hardly the world as essentially evil, but the world-spirit which leads to evil by its neglect of the unseen and eternal, and by its blindness to the true scale of values revealed in the gospel of Christ crucified.
( b ) The Gospel and First Ep. of St. John . In these two writings occur more than half the NT instances of the word we are considering. That is, the term kosmos is characteristic of St. John, and, setting aside his frequent use of it in the non-ethical sense, especially as the sphere of the incarnation and saving work of Christ, we find an ethical conception of the ‘world’ deeper in its shadows than that of St. Paul. It is true that Jesus is the Light of the world ( John 1:9 ; John 3:19 ; John 8:12 ; John 9:5 ; John 12:46 ), its Life-giver ( John 6:33 ; John 6:51 ), its Saviour ( John 3:17 , John 4:42 , John 12:47 ); yet ‘the world knew him not’ ( John 1:10 ), and the Fourth Gospel sets out its story of His persistent rejection by the world, in language which at times seems to pass beyond a mere record of contemporary unbelief, and almost to assert an essential dualism of good and evil ( John 7:7 , John 8:23 , John 9:39 , John 12:31 , John 14:17 ; John 14:30 , John 16:11 ; John 16:20 ). Here the ‘world’ is not simply the worldly spirit, but the great mass of mankind in deadly hostility to Christ and His teaching. In contrast stand His disciples, his own which were in the world’ ( John 13:1 ), chosen out of the world ( John 15:18 , cf. John 17:6 ), but not of it, and therefore hated as He was hated ( John 15:18-19 , John 17:14 ; John 17:16 ). For them He intercedes as He does not for the world ( John 17:8 ). In the 1st Ep. of St. John the same sharp contrasts meet us. The world lies within the scope of God’s redemptive purpose in Jesus Christ ( John 2:2 , John 4:14 ), yet it stands opposed to His followers as a thing wholly evil, with which they may hold no traffic ( John 2:15-17 , cf. James 4:4 ), knowing them not and hating them ( James 3:1 ; James 3:13 ). It is conceived as under the sway of a power essentially hostile to God, the antichrist ( James 2:18 ; James 2:22 , James 4:3 ; cf. ‘the prince of this world’ John 12:31 ; John 14:30 ; John 16:11 ) and is therefore not to be entreated and persuaded, but fought and overcome by the ‘greater one’ who is in the disciple of Christ ( John 4:4 , John 5:4-5 ). Faith ‘overcometh the world,’ but St. John reserves for his closing words his darkest expression of a persistent dualism of good and evil, light and darkness: ‘We know that we are of God, and the whole world lieth in the evil one’ ( John 5:19 ).
The idiomatic uses of the term ‘world’ in John 7:4 ; John 12:19 , 1 John 3:17 are sufficiently obvious. For the difficult expression ‘the world of iniquity’ applied to the tongue ( James 3:6 ), see the Commentaries.
S. W. Green.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Catholic World
A national monthly magazine of general literature and science, published by the Paulist Fathers in New York; founded 1865; circulation, 10,000.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Eternity of the World
It was the opinion of Aristotle and others that the world was eternal. But that the present system of things had a beginning, seems evident, if we consider the following things.
1. We may not only conceive of many possible alterations which might be made in the form of it, but we see it incessantly changing; whereas an eternal being, forasmuch as it is self-existent, is always the same.
2. We have no credible history of transactions more remote than six thousand years from the present time; for as to the pretence that some nations have made to histories of greater antiquity, as the Egyptians, Chaldeans, Phaenicians, Chinese, &c. they are evidently convicted of falsehood in the works referred to at the bottom of this article.
3. We can trace the invention of the most useful arts and sciences; which had probably been carried farther, and invented sooner, had the world been eternal.
4. The origin of the most considerable nations of the earth may be traced, 1: e. the time when they first inhabited the countries where they now dwell; and it appears that most of the western nations came from the east.
5. If the world be eternal, it is hard to account for the tradition of its beginning, which has almost everywhere prevailed, though under different forms, among both polite and barbarous nations.
6. We have a most ancient and credible history of the beginning of the world: I mean the history of Moses, with which no book in the world, in point of antiquity, can contend. Stillingfleet's Orig. Sacrae. P 15, 106; Winder's Hist. of Knowledge, vol. 2: passim; Pearson on the Creed. p. 58; Doddridge's Lectures, 50: 24; Tillotson's Sermons, ser. 1; Clarke at Boyle's Lectures, p. 22, 23; Dr. Collyer's Scripture Facts, ser. 2.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - World
In the Bible, as in ordinary speech, ‘the world’ may refer to the physical world of God’s creation or to the people who inhabit that world (Psalms 90:2; Psalms 98:7; Psalms 98:9; Matthew 25:34; John 3:16; Romans 10:18). Because of sin, the world has become a place where Satan rules in people’s lives (Matthew 6:31-329; Romans 5:12; 2 Corinthians 4:4; 1 John 5:19). Therefore, the Bible frequently speaks of the present world, or present age, as something that is evil and that is opposed to God (John 7:7; John 17:25; James 4:4; 1 John 2:15). The world in this sense is the subject of the present article – the world of sinful human beings along with all the wrong attitudes that characterize them.
Living in the world
Chief among the characteristics of the ordinary (unbelieving) people of the world are covetousness and pride. Their lives are governed according to what they want to get or want to do, without any regard for God (1 John 2:16). This is worldliness, and it is an evil that the Bible warns Christians against. The lives of Christians are to be governed by an attitude that trusts in God, not in personal possessions or ambitions. To be constantly worried about such things is the attitude of unbelievers, not of Christians (1618383428_40).
The temptation to worldliness may not lie in the more obviously sinful things of life. It may lie in those everyday things that are not sinful in themselves at all, such as food, work, possessions and concern for the future. These things can become wrong when people have wrong attitudes towards them (cf. Romans 1:25).
If Christians cannot see the relation that these things have to the life of faith in God, their attitude to them can readily become worldly. Ambition can very easily become selfish ambition, wisdom become worldly wisdom, and thoughts for the future become faithless anxiety (Matthew 6:33-34; 1 Corinthians 1:20; 1 Corinthians 2:7-8; 1 Corinthians 2:12; 1 Corinthians 3:19; James 3:13-17; James 4:13-17).
Worldly people are those whose values in life are determined by what they understand of the world they see around them. Godly people are those whose values are determined by what they understand of God (2 Corinthians 4:18; 2 Corinthians 5:7; 1 John 2:17). This does not mean that the godly must rid themselves of all possessions, power and status. But it does mean that they will not pursue those things at all costs, and will even sacrifice them when they conflict with their commitment to Jesus Christ (1 John 3:4-616; Galatians 2:20; Galatians 6:14; Philippians 3:7-8).
Overcoming the world
Some Christians build a set of laws for themselves to live by, hoping that the laws will prevent them from doing what they believe to be worldly. But the very act of making laws to live by is worldly. Such people refuse to trust in the indwelling Spirit to direct their enjoyment of the freedom God has given them. Instead they trust in the methods of those who still ‘belong to the world’, who still live ‘in the flesh’ (Galatians 3:3; Galatians 4:9-11; Galatians 5:1; Colossians 2:20-23; see FLESH). The Christians’ liberty does not mean they are free to commit sin (Romans 6:1-2; Romans 6:12; Galatians 5:13; 1618383428_9), but neither do human laws enable them to overcome sin (Colossians 2:23; see FREEDOM).
Christians cannot overcome the temptations of the world by using the methods of the world. They can overcome them only by trusting in the power of Christ, who has conquered Satan, the prince of the world (John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11; John 16:33; 1 John 5:4-5; see TEMPTATION). One day this same Christ will return, to free the world completely from Satan’s power (Revelation 19:16; Revelation 20:2-3; Revelation 20:10).
Meanwhile Christians have to live in an evil world, while not joining in the sins of the world. They may find that, as a result, the people of the world will hate them (John 15:18; John 17:14-17). But they must remain faithful to Christ and keep themselves from being corrupted by the world’s evil. Only in this way can they properly carry out their function of delivering people from the corruption of sin (Matthew 5:13-16; John 17:18; James 1:27).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - World
The conception of the world in the apostolic writings is one of much complexity. Its content is derived partly from the OT, partly from later Judaism; but it has also assimilated an important element from Greek thought, and the peculiar experience of early Christianity has added to it a sinister significance of its own. Thus the various synonyms by which it is expressed reveal so many narrowly differentiated senses in each, and also shade off into each other in such a way, that a delicate problem for exact exegesis is often created. The three terms chiefly to be considered are ἡ οἰκουμένη, ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος, and ὁ κόσμος, which in their proper significance denote the world respectively as a place, a period, and a system.
1. The spatial conception of the world.-The spatial conception of the world as the orbis terrarum, the comprehensive abode of man and scene of human life, is rendered in the OT by àÈøÈö and its more poetical synonym úÌÅáÇi, which in the lxx are translated, the former by γῆ, the latter by οἰκουμένη (vice versa in a few passages in Isaiah). In the apostolic writings γῆ is retained in this sense in quotations from the lxx (e.g. Acts 2:19, Romans 9:17, Hebrews 1:10), also in Acts 17:26, James 5:5, and frequently in the Apocalypse (Revelation 1:5; Revelation 1:7; Revelation 3:10, etc.). The more distinctive term is ἡ οἰκουμένη (sc. γῆ). Originally it was used, with racial self-consciousness, to signify the territorial extent of Greek life and civilization (Herod. iv. 110); but after the conquests of Alexander, and in consequence of the same unifying influences as those by which the Greek dialects were merged in the κοινή, it came to express a view and feeling of the inhabited world as overpassing all national distinctions and boundaries. Later, when the rule of the Caesars seemed to be practically co-extensive with the habitable earth, it acquired a more special sense-the Empire as a territorial unity (e.g. Luke 2:1); but in the apostolic writings it has the larger significance, the world-wide abode of man (Acts 11:28; Acts 17:6; Acts 19:27 by passionate exaggeration, Acts 24:5, Romans 10:18, Revelation 3:10; Revelation 16:14), or, by a natural transition, mankind (Acts 17:31, Revelation 12:9). As an example of the elasticity which characterizes the use of these terms, it may be noted that to express the same thought of the world-wide field for the dissemination of the gospel St. Paul prefers κόσμος (Romans 1:8, Colossians 1:6); and that, on the contrary, the writer of Hebrews gives to οἰκουμένη the proper significance both of κόσμος, the ‘terrestrial order’ (Hebrews 1:6), and of αἰών (cf. the unique τὴν μέλλουσαν οἰκουμένην of Hebrews 2:5 and μέλλοντος αἰῶνος, Hebrews 6:5).
2. The temporal conception of the world.-The temporal conception of the world as a saeculum, a cycle of history, complete within itself yet related to a before and an after, is distinctively expressed by αἰών, or in contrast with the ‘world to come,’ as actually it always is, by ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος (1 Corinthians 1:20; 1 Corinthians 2:6-8; 1 Corinthians 3:18, 2 Corinthians 4:4, Ephesians 1:21; variants, ὁ ἐνεστὼς αἰών, Galatians 1:4; ὁ αἰὼν τοῦ κόσμου τούτου, Ephesians 2:2; ὁ νῦν αἰών, 1 Timothy 6:17, 2 Timothy 4:10, Titus 2:12; ὁ νῦν καιρός, Romans 3:26; Romans 8:18).
The use of in this sense, as denoting the present order of existence, does not occur in the OT (Ecclesiastes 3:11?), but is characteristic of later Hebraism, the contrast between the two ‘aeons’ being an essential feature in the Apocalyptic view of history. Dalman remarks upon the absence of evidence for this form of expression in any extant pre-Christian writing (Words of Jesus, p. 148); it occurs chiefly in the later parts of the Baruch Apocalypse, in 4 Ezra (e.g. 6:9, 7:12, 13, 8:1, 52) and the Slavonic Enoch. In Rabbinism (Dalman, p. 150) the earliest witnesses for the expression are Hillel and Jochanan ben Zakkai (fl. c. a.d. 80). The idea, however, is vouched for by earlier documents, Enoch, Jubilees, Assumption of Moses (see on the whole subject Bousset’s Religion des Judentums2, p. 278 ff.), and the frequency of its occurrence in the NT, with the assumption of its familiarity, seems to imply its popular currency (contrariwise, Dalman-‘the expressions characterised the language of the learned rather than that of the people’ [1]).
But while αἰὼν οὗτος in primarily a time-concept, this world-age in contrast with the future age of the ‘regeneration,’ the temporal element tends to become secondary. The notion of a period of time (emphatic in 1 Corinthians 7:31) is always implied; but the ruling idea approximates to that which properly belongs to the κὀσμος, the organic system of terrestrial existence (e.g. in 1 Corinthians 1:20 ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος and ὁ κόσμος are parallel and synonymous). The opposition between the two ‘aeons’ is qualitative even more than temporal: the one is ‘evil’ (Galatians 1:4), and under the dominion of the Devil (2 Corinthians 4:4) and kindred spirits (1 Corinthians 2:6; 1 Corinthians 2:8), a world of sin and death in contrast with that other eternal world of righteousness (2 Peter 3:13) and life. The two, indeed, are thought of as in a sense contemporaneous; the ‘world to come’ projects itself into the present; its ‘powers’ are already experienced by all in whom the Spirit of God dwells and the work of spiritual quickening and transformation is begun (Hebrews 6:5).
3. The world as an organic system.-The world as an organic system, a universe, is distinctively ὁ κόσμος.
The idea which underlies all the various uses of κόσμος is that of order or arrangement (as in the common Homeric phrases, κατὰ κόσμον = ‘in an orderly manner’; κατὰ κόσμον καθίζειν = ‘to sit in order’), and since the strongest impression of unvarying and reliable order in nature is given by the movement of the heavenly bodies, it was probably to this that the term was first applied in a more special sense. In classical Greek, while it is sometime used with reference to the firmament above, and its sense is not anywhere restricted to the earth, so also in the lxx it translates öÈáÈà, the ‘host’ of heaven (in Enoch also, κόσμος τῶν φωστήρων, xx. 4), and elsewhere appears only in the sense at ‘ornament.’ Pythagoras is credited with having been the first to employ the word to express the philosophical conception of an ordered universe of being (plutarch, de Plac. Phil. 886 B); and from the Pythagoraeans it passed into the common vocabulary of philosophic poetry and speculation. Plato (Gorgias, 508 A) defines κόσμος in its widest extent, οὐρανὸν καὶ γῆν καὶ θεοὺς καὶ ἀνθρώπους τὴν κοινωνίαν συνέχειν καὶ φιλίαν καὶ κοσμιότητα καὶ σωφροσύνην καὶ δικαιότητα, καὶ τὸ ὅλον τοῦτο διὰ ταῦτα κόσμον καλοῦσιν … οὐκ ἀκοσμίαν, οὐδὲ ἀκολασίαν. In Stoicism the idea was further developed in a mystical and pantheistic fashion. The universe, the macrocosm, was conceived after the analogy or the microcosm, man. It was a ζῷον ἔμψυχον καὶ λογικόν; and as the human organism consists of a body and an animating soul, so God was the eternal world-soul animating and ruling the imperishable world-body. Through the influence especially of Posidonius, this conception of the Cosmos became widely influential in the Graeco-Roman world (see P. Wendland, Die hellenistischrömische Kultur, Tübingen, 1907, p. 84ff.). In the OT there is neither term nor conception corresponding to the Hellenic κόσμος (yet cf. Jeremiah 10:16, Ecclesiastes 11:5); it is in Hellenistic compositions such as 2 Maccabees and the Book of Wisdom that they first appear in Judaism. In the latter the idea of the Cosmos is specially prominent. ἡ σύστασις κόσμου is formed by the word of God out of formless matter (Wisdom of Solomon 1:14; Wisdom of Solomon 7:17; Wisdom of Solomon 11:7) and the ever-living Spirit of God is active in all things (Wisdom of Solomon 12:1); Divine wisdom and beauty pervade the world in all its diverse parts, establishing all things by number, measure, and weight (Wisdom of Solomon 7:24, Wisdom of Solomon 8:1, Wisdom of Solomon 11:20), at the same time giving to human intelligence its power to apprehend the Divine ordering of all things (Wisdom of Solomon 7:17-23, Wisdom of Solomon 8:8), a striking anticipation of Romans 1:20. In the same book there is another anticipation of NT usage, the employment, unknown to classical Greek, of κόσμος for the world of mankind, the human race as a unity. Thus Adam is described as πρωτόπλαστος πατὴρ κόσμου Wisdom of Solomon 10:1); a multitude of wise men is the salvation of the world (Wisdom of Solomon 6:24), as the family of Noah was its hope (Wisdom of Solomon 14:6).
Such indications of the penetration of Hellenic influences into Jewish thought explain, from a historical point of view, the use of κόσμος, both as term and as concept, in the apostolic writings, (a) Primarily the Cosmos is the rerum natura, the sum of terrestrial things, without moral reference. Occasionally the conception is simply this (1 Corinthians 8:4, there is no such thing as an idol, ἐν κόσμῳ; 1 Corinthians 14:10, there are various kinds of sounds in it); but normally the thought of God as Creator of the Cosmos is expressed or implied (e.g. Acts 17:24, Romans 1:20, Ephesians 1:4, Hebrews 4:3).
The simple pictorial phrase, ‘the heaven and the earth,’ by which the OT expresses the idea of the visible creation as contrasted with the Creator, is still retained in the liturgical and rhetorical style (Acts 4:24; Acts 14:15; Acts 17:24), and for the sake of special emphasis (Ephesians 1:10, Philippians 2:10, Colossians 1:16; Colossians 1:20, Revelation 20:11; Revelation 21:1). To the same effect Paul uses ἡ κτίσις (Romans 8:19-22, Colossians 1:15; 2 Peter 3:4, Revelation 3:14), but more frequently τὰ πάντα (Romans 9:5; Romans 11:36, 1 Corinthians 8:6; 1 Corinthians 15:28, etc.; cf. Hebrews 1:3; Hebrews 2:8; Hebrews 2:10; Hebrews 3:4, Revelation 4:11).
And when the Cosmos is defined as the ‘terrestrial order’ it is to be remembered that in the apostolic cosmology this includes the heavens with their inhabitants as well as the earth and mankind. The world created in the πρωτότοκος includes ‘all things in the heavens and upon the earth, visible and invisible’ (Colossians 1:16). ‘Heaven,’ in the popular sense of the word, the sphere of God’s immediate self-manifestation, the place of His Throne and Majesty on high (Colossians 3:1; Hebrews 1:3), the sphere from which Christ comes (1 Corinthians 15:47) and to which He returns (1 Corinthians 3:1), the kingdom of eternal light in which believers already have an inheritance (2 Corinthians 5:1, Philippians 3:20, Colossians 1:12), is ‘above all heavens’ (Ephesians 4:10). It does not belong to ‘this world’ or to ‘this age’. All else does. The heavens and the spiritual beings that dwell therein belong naturally and morally to the same cosmic system as the earth and its inhabitants (1 Corinthians 2:6; 1 Corinthians 2:8; 1 Corinthians 4:9; 1 Corinthians 6:2-3; 1 Corinthians 11:10, Ephesians 2:2; Ephesians 6:12, Colossians 1:16; Colossians 1:20; Colossians 2:8; Colossians 2:20).
(b) Yet the immediate interest in the Cosmos lies in its relation to man as the physical environment of his life, and thus it naturally acquires the more limited significance of the terrestrial order in association with mankind-the world of human existence, into which sin comes (Romans 5:12-13), into which Christ comes (1 Timothy 1:15, Hebrews 10:5, 1 John 4:9), where He is believed on (1 Timothy 3:16). (For Jewish parallels see Dalman, p. 173.) Hence also it easily comes to mean (as already in Enoch [2]) mankind in general (1 Corinthians 4:13, Hebrews 11:33); and, by further natural transitions, worldly possessions (1 John 3:17
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Saints: Preserve the World
We saw in Venice a picture of St. Mark and other holy champions delivering the fair city from the devil, who had resolved to raise a great storm in the Adriatic, flood the lagunes, and drown the inhabitants of the 'bride of the sea.' All mere legend and lie, but for all that capable of mirroring the truth that the intercession of saints and God's peculiar regard for them have oftentimes delivered the church.
Webster's Dictionary - Fair-World
(n.) State of prosperity.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Light, Light of the World
That which penetrates and dispels darkness. The concept of “light” appears numerous times in both the Old and New Testaments. God created light (Genesis 1:3 ). However, a careful reading of the Scriptures reveals that the physical entity that we call “light” is actually only the second form of light in the universe, since everywhere the Bible declares that God Himself is light. Psalm 27:1 says, “The Lord is my light.” In Psalm 104:2 , the psalmist testified of the Lord who “covered himself” in light. In John 8:12 Jesus, the God-man, said, “I am the light of the world.” Such expressions make at least two things abundantly clear. First, the origin of light rests with God. Second, in some sense God Himself is the very essence of light. Such statements do not suppose that God is light and nothing more, but they do stress that God is the ultimate source of all knowing and understanding. To this end Psalm 119:105 informs us that God's Word is a “light” to one's path. Here the emphasis lies upon perception and understanding gained when darkness is dispelled and light revealed.
This last concept becomes even clearer in John 3:19 ; people love darkness better than light, because their deeds are evil. Such statements reveal that the character of light is to reveal and to provide understanding and purity, while the opposite of light or darkness is designed to obscure, to deceive, and to harbor impurity.
A small problem confronts the interpreter who discovers that Jesus said to His disciples in Matthew 5:14 , “Ye are the light of the world.” Yet in John 8:12 , Jesus said, “I am the light of the world.” What appears to be a contradiction is not one at all. The moon provides light for the earth just as the sun does. Yet, the actual source of light for both the sun and the moon is the sun. The moon only reflects the light of the sun. By the same token, Jesus, the God-man, is the source of all light. His disciples become reflectors in a darkened world, transmitting through their lives the true light of the eternal Son of God. See Lamps, Lighting, Lampstand .
W. A. Criswell
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - World, Dissolution of
See CONFLAGRATION, DISSOLUTION.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - World, Eternity of
See ETERNITY OF THE WORLD.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Perfection: Marred by the World
The bloom of the hawthorn or White May looks like snow in Richmond Park, but nearer London or by the road side its virgin whiteness is sadly stained. Too often contact with the world has just such an effect upon our piety; we must away to the far off garden of Paradise to see holiness in its unsullied purity, and meanwhile we must be much alone with God if we would maintain a gracious life below.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - World, Ages of
The time preceding the birth of Christ has generally been divided into six ages. The first extends from the beginning of the world to the deluge, and comprehends one thousand six hundred and fifty-six years. The second, from the deluge to Abraham's entering the Land of Promise in 2082, comprehends four hundred and twenty-six years. The third from Abraham's entrance into the promised land to the Exodus in 2523, four hundred and thirty years. The fourth, from the going out of Egypt to the foundation of the temple by Solomon in 2992, four hundred and seventy-nine years. The fifth, from Solomon's foundation of the temple to the Babylonish captivity in 3416, four hundred and twenty-one years. The sixth, from the Babylonish captivity to the birth of Christ, A. M. 4000, the fourth year before the vulgar aera, includes five hundred and eighty-four years.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - World
The whole system of created things. (
See CREATION.) It is taken also for a secular life, the present state of existence, and the pleasure and interests which steal away the soul from God. The love of the World does not consist in the use and enjoyment of the comforts God gives us, but in an inordinate attachment to the things of time and sense.
1."We love the world too much, " says Dr. Jortin, "when, for the sake of any profit or pleasure, we willfully, knowingly, and deliberately transgress the commands of God.
2.When we take more pains about the present life than the next.
3.When we cannot be contented, patient, or resigned, under low and inconvenient circumstances.
4.We love the world too much when we cannot part with any thing we possess to those who want, deserve, and have a right to it.
5.When we envy those who are more fortunate and more favoured by the world than we are.
6.When we honour, and esteem, and favour persons purely according to their birth, fortunes, and success, measuring our judgment and approbation by their outward appearance and situation in life.
7.When worldly prosperity makes us proud, and vain, and arrogant.
8.When we omit no opportunity of enjoying the good things of this life; when our great and chief business is to divert ourselves till we contract an indifference for rational and manly occupations, deceiving ourselves, and fancying that we are not in a bad condition because others are worse than we."
See Jortin's Ser. vol. 3: ser. 9.; Bishop Hopkins on the Vanity of the World; Dr. Stennet's Sermon on Conformity to the World; H. Moore on Education, chap. 9. vol. 2:; R. Walker's Sermons, vol. 4: ser. 20.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Hail, Health of the World
Poem in honor of the members of Christ upon the Cross. It is in seven cantos, with many variations, and is ascribed to Saint Bernard of Clairvaux or Saint Bonaventure.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - World
The biblical concept of world falls into five categories: the physical world, the human world, the moral world, the temporal world, and the coming world.
The Physical World . The physical world at its largest extent includes the whole universe, the cosmos (John 1:9 ; Acts 17:24 ) or the creation (Romans 8:20 ). When biblical writers refer to the world, however, they usually mean the earth itself, not including sun, moon, and stars. No clear Old Testament references appear to the world as a planet, although Isaiah 40:22 , "the circle of the earth, " is suggestive to some. Many Old Testament uses of world or earth (eres, in poetry sometimes tebel [ Genesis 1:1 ) or an expansion of that expression (1 John 2:15-17 ; Nehemiah 9:6 ).
Scripture affirms first of all that God created the world (Genesis 1:1-2:4 ; Acts 4:24 ; 14:15 ; Revelation 10:6 ). Because he created it, he owns it and may be addressed as its Lord (Matthew 11:25 ; Luke 10:21 ; Acts 17:24 ). The whole world is full of its Creator's glory (Isaiah 6:3 ). Because God is Creator and Lord of the earth, it holds only secondary value; a believer must not swear by it (Matthew 5:34-35 ) or accumulate treasure on it (Matthew 6:19 ).
God designed the world to be fruitful. His creation includes provision for animals as well as for people (Psalm 104:10-22 ).
God's judgment encompasses the physical world. He flooded it in Noah's time and it lies ready for his judgment at the end (2 Peter 3:7,10 ). The world's permanence is only relative. At the end God's angels will gather his chosen ones "from the ends of earth to the ends of heaven" (Mark 13:27 ; NRSV ). Until that time the earth is the arena of God's activity through his people. Christians are to witness to Jesus "to the ends of the earth" (Acts 1:8 ).
The Human World . The human world includes dry land where people can live, the inhabited earth where they do live, and by metonymy, the people who live there.
The dry land appears in contrast to the sea in Genesis 1:9-10 and Revelation 10:2 . Much of this dry land makes up the inhabited earth. The inhabited earth was created with delight by God's wisdom (Proverbs 8:27-31 ). Before Jesus' birth Caesar Augustus attempted to take a census of "the whole world" (really only the Roman Empire Luke 2:1 ). The tempter offered Jesus "all the kingdoms" of the inhabited world (Luke 4:5 ; cf. Matthew 4:8 ). Jesus predicted that the gospel would be preached to the whole world (Matthew 24:14 ; 26:13 ; cf. Romans 10:18 ), a prediction so successful that the early church, in its opponents' opinion, upset the whole world (Acts 17:6 ). The whole world is deceived by the devil (Revelation 12:9 ) and will experience great trouble before the end (Luke 21:26 ; Revelation 3:10 ).
The people of the world are called simply the "world" or the "earth" occasionally in the Old Testament and frequently in the New Testament. "Yahweh will judge the world, " or a similar statement, means he will judge the world's inhabitants (Psalm 9:8 ; 96:13 ; Isaiah 13:11 ; 26:9 ). Similar New Testament references to the Christ's or his apostles' authority appear. The Son of Man "has authority on the earth, " authority over the people of the world (Matthew 9:6 ; parallels Mark 2:10 ; Luke 5:24 ). The apostles have a derived authority, the power of "binding and loosing" (Matthew 16:19 ; 18:18 ).
In the Johannine literature the "world" often means the people of the world. The world did not know the Word (John 1:10 ), the Lamb who would take away its sin (John 1:29 ). God loved the world, sending his Son into it to save rather than condemn it (John 3:16-17 ; 12:47 ; 1 John 4:9 ). The Son of God is the "Savior of the world" (John 4:42 ; 1 John 4:14 ), giving life to it as the "bread of life" (John 6:33,51 ).
The Moral World . The moral world includes people indifferent or hostile to God, the God-hostile environment generally, and in the widest sense, corruption and evil summed up under the general term "the world."
If the people of the world can be spoken of as "the world" in a neutral sense, "the world" can also refer to the subclass of indifferent and hostile people who reject God and his ways. Before the flood nearly all the people of the world became corrupt (Genesis 6:11 ). In Jesus' time the world hated him (John 7:7 ) and will hate his followers (John 15:18-19 ). The world, ungodly people, cannot receive the things of God (John 14:17,22 ; 16:8-9 ; cf. 1 John 3:1 ) and is not even worthy of the people of faith who live among them (Hebrews 11:38 ).
In the New Testament the world also appears as a hostile environment. Because of the hatred of the world's people, the Son asks the Father to protect his followers rather than remove them from their alien surroundings (John 17:14-16 ). Paul expresses his indifference to the world by saying he "is crucified" as far as the world is concerned (Galatians 6:14 ). Seven times in 1Corinthians 1-3Paul refers to the world's ignorance of God and its powerlessness to find him without the cross of Christ.
Because of the world's hostility to God, it is full of corruption (2 Peter 1:4 ) and stands as a symbol of corruption. One cannot be friendly with the evil world and love God at the same time (James 4:4 ; Exodus 20:11 ). Believers by their faith must "overcome the world" (1 John 5:4-5 ), killing whatever belongs to their "earthly nature" (Colossians 3:5 ) and denying "worldly passions" (Titus 2:12 ).
The Temporal and Coming Worlds . Although the Old Testament presents the idea that the present world is temporary (Psalm 102:25-27 ), the distinction between this world/age and the world/age to come does not appear clearly until the late intertestamental and New Testament periods. By the time of the New Testament, the distinction is clear and frequent.
Satan rules only this world (John 12:31 ; 14:30 ; 16:11 ; 2 Corinthians 4:4 ), not the next one, while Jesus' kingdom is "not of this world" (John 18:36 ) but belongs to the coming age. Jesus warns that a person may "gain the whole world" (the material things of this passing age) yet lose life in the next (Matthew 16:26 ; parallels Mark 8:36 ; Luke 9:25 ). Paul expresses concern that believers may become so caught up in the affairs of this world that they will experience undue hardship in living for Christ (1 Corinthians 7:29-35 ).
The present world is passing away even now (1 John 2:17 ). Living in this transient world, one must not love it (2 Timothy 4:10 ), become conformed to its ways (Romans 12:2 ), or fall in love with its godless "wisdom" (1 Corinthians 2:6 ; 3:18-19 ; James 3:15 ). Instead one must live a godly life (Titus 2:12 ), avoiding the snares of the "present evil age" from which Christ's death has set his people free (Galatians 1:4 ). The believer may look forward to the new world, "a new heaven and a new earth, the home of righteousness" (2 Peter 3:13 ; cf. Revelation 21:1-5 ).
Carl Bridges, Jr.
See also Age, Ages ; Victory
Bibliography . H. Sasse, TDNT, 1:197-209; 3:867-98.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Foundation of the World
FOUNDATION OF THE WORLD.—The phrase καταβολὴ κόσμου occurs in Matthew 25:34, Luke 11:50, John 17:24 (κόσμου is doubtful in Matthew 13:35, see RVm). It is a common expression in the NT, e.g. Ephesians 1:4, Hebrews 4:3; Hebrews 9:26, 1 Peter 1:20, Revelation 13:8; Revelation 17:8. In general it denotes a time sense, implying a strong declaration of priority. It always occurs with the prepositions ἀπό or πρό. καταβολή primarily means the laying down or founding of anything, hence the absolute beginning. κόσμος is a word of much more varied meaning, into the different phases of which we need not here enter. Its present use as applied to the Universe is well established. The whole expression is equivalent to the phrase found in Mark 10:6; Mark 13:19 ‘from the beginning of the creation’ (ἀπὸ ἀρχῆς κτίσεως). ‘Old Testament Hebrew has no term which would quite correspond to the Greek ὁ κόσμος’ (Dalman, Words of Jesus, p. 162). Matthew 13:35 is an unliteral rendering of Psalms 78:2 סִנִּי־קָרָם, which the LXX translates ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς. ‘The foundation of the world’ stands for the definite epoch when this present Universe was originated.
W. S. Kerr.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Love of the World
See WORLD.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - World, the
The word commonly so rendered in the O.T. is tebel, signifying 'the habitable earth:' it is an expression of limited bearing, applied to that sphere which comes more directly under divine dealings. Psalm 90:2 ; and to the inhabitants, who will be judged. Psalm 9:8 . The word in the N.T. answering to the above, is οἰκουμένη:its various applications can be seen in Luke 2:1 ; Acts 11:28 ; Acts 17:6,31 ; Acts 19:27 ; Hebrews 2:5 . In the last passage it is the coming world, that is, that which is put under the Son of Man, that is spoken of.
In the N.T. κόσμος is the more general word, which in Greek writers signifies 'order, regularity, ornament'; it is translated 'adorning' in 1 Peter 3:3 . The heaven and the earth, because of their order and beauty, are called cosmos , 'the world.' This word is employed for 'world ' in its various meanings, as for instance the material earth, Romans 1:20 ; the inhabitants of the world that will be judged, Romans 3:6 ; and in a moral sense as the condition and spirit which is opposed to God. 1 Corinthians 2:12 ; James 4:4 ; 1 John 2:16 .
Another word, αἰών, 'age, duration,' is applied both to the present age, the course of this world, and to age-enduring, or eternity, Romans 12:2 ; Galatians 1:4 ; Ephesians 1:21 ; Ephesians 6:12 . With a preposition it is translated 'for ever,' and when the word is repeated, 'for ever and ever,' or 'to the ages of ages.' 2 Corinthians 9:9 ; Galatians 1:5 ; Philippians 4:20 ; 1 Timothy 1:17 , etc. In two passages this word refers to the material worlds. Hebrews 1:2 ; Hebrews 11:3 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - World to Come
The word translated 'world' in the following passages is αἰών (see WORLD): it may therefore be rendered 'the age to come.' The Lord declared that the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost of attributing His miracles to the power of Satan, should not be forgiven in the present age, nor in the age to come. Matthew 12:32 . He also promised that those who gave up property or earthly relations for the sake of the kingdom of God, should, beside present blessing, have eternal life in the age to come. Mark 10:30 ; Luke 18:30 . Christ has been exalted above every name named in this world or in the world to come. Ephesians 1:21 . In Hebrews 6:5 Paul speaks of some who had tasted of the powers of the age to come, doubtless alluding to miracles.
The word in Hebrews 2:5 is οἰκουμένη, 'habitable earth.' The habitable earth to come is not put in subjection to angels, but to the Son of man.
The 'present age' was well understood by the Jews to be in contrast to that age which should be introduced by the Messiah. Saints in O.T. times looked forward to this, as forexample Abraham. John 8:66 ; Romans 4:13 ; Hebrews 11:10 . Christians are able by faith to enjoy even now the blessings of that coming age, when the Lord with universalsway will establish His kingdom on earth, and have everything underHis administration. Cf. Romans 14:17 . Every moral question will be settled then.The world to come will usher in eternity. 1 Corinthians 15:24,28 .
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Ages of the World
AGES OF THE WORLD
There have been generally reckoned six ages from the creation of the world to the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ.
YEARS
* The first, from the creation to the flood containing a period of 1656
* The second, from Noah to Abraham 425
* The third, from Abraham to the going forth of Israel from Egypt 430
* The fourth, from the departure from Egypt to Solomon's temple 479
* The fifth from Solomon's in the captivity in Babylon 424
* The sixth, from the going into Babylon to the coming of Christ 584
Webster's Dictionary - World-Wide
(a.) Extended throughout the world; as, world-wide fame.
Webster's Dictionary - World
(1):
(n.) The inhabitants of the earth; the human race; people in general; the public; mankind.
(2):
(n.) In a more restricted sense, that part of the earth and its concerns which is known to any one, or contemplated by any one; a division of the globe, or of its inhabitants; human affairs as seen from a certain position, or from a given point of view; also, state of existence; scene of life and action; as, the Old World; the New World; the religious world; the Catholic world; the upper world; the future world; the heathen world.
(3):
(n.) The earth and its inhabitants, with their concerns; the sum of human affairs and interests.
(4):
(n.) As an emblem of immensity, a great multitude or quantity; a large number.
(5):
(n.) The earth and its affairs as distinguished from heaven; concerns of this life as distinguished from those of the life to come; the present existence and its interests; hence, secular affairs; engrossment or absorption in the affairs of this life; worldly corruption; the ungodly or wicked part of mankind.
(6):
(n.) Any planet or heavenly body, especially when considered as inhabited, and as the scene of interests analogous with human interests; as, a plurality of worlds.
(7):
(n.) Individual experience of, or concern with, life; course of life; sum of the affairs which affect the individual; as, to begin the world with no property; to lose all, and begin the world anew.
(8):
(n.) The customs, practices, and interests of men; general affairs of life; human society; public affairs and occupations; as, a knowledge of the world.
(9):
(n.) The earth and the surrounding heavens; the creation; the system of created things; existent creation; the universe.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - World
World. This word in the A. V. is the translation of five Hebrew and four Greek words. It is therefore not always plain in what sense it is used. The Hebrew terms have these literal meanings: "The earth," "rest," "the grave," Isaiah 38:11; "the world," corresponding to aion in the New Testament, or that which is finite, temporary, Job 11:17; "the veiled," unlimited time, whether past or future; used very frequently, and generally translated "forever;" and, finally, the poetical term for "world," which occurs some 37 times, but in various meanings which are easily understood. When the Hebrews desired to express the universe they employed a phrase like "heaven and earth and the sea, and all that in them is." Exodus 20:11. In the New Testament the Greek words are equally diverse: 1. Aion, "duration," thus used of time past, Luke 1:70, of time present, with the idea of evil, both moral and physical. Mark 4:19. Hence "children of this world," or worldly men, Luke 16:8; and so Satan is called "the god of this world." 2 Corinthians 4:4 Aion is also put for endless duration, eternity, 1 Timothy 6:16, to signify the material world as created by the deity, Hebrews 11:3; also the world to come, the kingdom of the Messiah. 2. Ge, the earth, in contrast to the heavens. Revelation 13:3. 3. Kosmos, used in several senses:(a) the universe, the heavens, and the earth, Matthew 13:35, and thence for the inhabitants of the universe, 1 Corinthians 4:9, and an aggregate. James 3:6. (b) This lower world as the abode of man, John 16:18; the inhabitants of the earth or mankind. Matthew 5:14. (c) The present world, as opposed to the kingdom of Christ, John 12:25; specifically, the wealth and enjoyments and cares of this world. Matthew 16:26, and so for those who seek the opposite things to the kingdom of God, the worldlings. John 15:19. 4. Oikoumene, the inhabited earth, Matthew 24:14, the people of it, Acts 17:31, sometimes the Roman empire, the then civilized world, Acts 17:6, including Palestine and adjacent parts. Luke 2:1; Acts 11:28. The Jews distinguished two worlds, or sons, the present aeon to the appearance of the Messiah, and the future aeon, or the Messianic era, which is to last forever. The closing days of the present order of things were called "the last days." Isaiah 2:2; Micah 4:1; Acts 2:17. The same phraseology is found in the New Testament, but the dividing-line is marked by the second instead of the first advent of the Messiah. Matthew 12:32; 1 Corinthians 10:11; Galatians 4:3; Hebrews 1:2; Hebrews 6:5; Hebrews 9:26.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Runner of the World
(The Runner of the World) A Middle-English poem of about 25,000 lines, mainly in eight-syllable couplets, written by an unknown cleric in northern England, c.1300A.D. It is a sort of religious epic, written in honor of the Blessed Virgin, and purports to give a history of the world as derived from the Old and New Testaments, with the Redemption as the central theme. It is a valuable storehouse of medieval legends. An edition was brought out, 1874-1893, by Dr Richard Morris for Early English Text Society.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - World is Very Evil, the
Hymn not found in the Breviary. Written about 1140 by Bernard of Morlaix, it was translated by J. Neale.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Rulers of the World of This Darkness
One of the several terms Saint Paul (Ephesians 6) applies to the evil spirits, whose leader is the "prince of darkness". As a consequence of original sin the world had been given over to the "world-rulers of this darkness," but by the redeeming death of Christ it was bought back to the kingdom of God and of light.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - World
The earth on which we dwell, 1 Samuel 2:8 ; its inhabitants, John 3:16 , or a large number of them, John 12:19 . In several places it is equivalent to "land," meaning the Roman Empire, or Judea and its vicinity, Luke 2:1 4:3 Acts 11:28 . It also denotes the objects and interests of time and sense, Galatians 6:14 1 John 2:15 .
King James Dictionary - World
WORLD, n. This seems to be a compound word, and probably is named from roundness, the vault but this is not certain.
1. The universe the whole system of created globes or vast bodies of matter. 2. The earth the terraqueous globe sometimes called the lower world. 3. The heavens as when we speak of the heavenly world, or upper world. 4. System of beings or the orbs which occupy space, and all the beings which inhabit them. Hebrews 11 . God--hath in these last days spoken to us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things by whom also he made the worlds. Hebrews 1 .
There may be other worlds, where the inhabitants have never violated their allegiance to their Almighty sovereign.
5. Present state of existence as while we are in the world. Behold, these are the ungodly who prosper in the world. Psalms 73 .
6. A secular life. By the world we sometimes understand the things of this world, its pleasures and interests. A great part of mankind are more anxious to enjoy the world to than secure divine favor. 7. Public life, or society as banished from the world. 8. Business or trouble of life. From this world-wearied flesh.
9. A great multitude or quantity as a world of business a world of charms. 10. Mankind people in general in an indefinite sense. Let the world see your fortitude. Whose disposition, all the world well knows--
11. Course of life. He begins the world with little property, but with many friends. 12. Universal empire. This through the east just vengeance hurld, and lost poor Antony the world.
13. The customs and manners of men the practice of life. A knowledge of the world is necessary for a man of business it is essential to politeness. 14. All the world contains. Had I a thousand worlds, I would give them all for one year more to devote to God.
15. The principal nations or countries of the earth. Alexander conquered the world. 16. The Roman empire. 17. A large tract of country a wide compass of things. I must descry new worlds.
18. The inhabitants of the earth the whole human race. John 3 . 19. The carnal state or corruption of the earth as the present evil world the course of this world. Galatians 1 . Ephesians 2 . 20. The ungodly part of the world. I pray not for the world, but for them that thou hast given men. John 17 .
21. Time as in the phrase, world without end. 22. A collection of wonders. Not in use. In the world, in possibility. All the precaution in the world would not save him.
For all the world,
1. Exactly. Little used. 2. For any consideration.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - World Rulers
* For WORLD RULERS, Ephesians 6:12 , RV, see RULER , No. 3
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - World
1: κόσμος (Strong's #2889 — Noun Masculine — kosmos — kos'-mos ) primarily "order, arrangement, ornament, adornment" (1 Peter 3:3 , see ADORN , B), is used to denote (a) the "earth," e.g., Matthew 13;35 ; John 21:25 ; Acts 17:24 ; Romans 1:20 (probably here the universe: it had this meaning among the Greeks, owing to the order observable in it); 1 Timothy 6:7 ; Hebrews 4:3 ; 9:26 ; (b) the "earth" in contrast with Heaven, 1 John 3:17 (perhaps also Romans 4:13 ); (c) by metonymy, the "human race, mankind," e.g., Matthew 5:14 ; John 1:9 [1]; 1 John 3:10 ; 3:16,17 (thrice),19; 4:42, and frequently in Rom. 1Cor. and 1John; (d) "Gentiles" as distinguished from Jews, e.g., Romans 11:12,15 , where the meaning is that all who will may be reconciled (cp. 2 Corinthians 5:19 ); (e) the "present condition of human affairs," in alienation from and opposition to God, e.g., John 7:7 ; 8:23 ; 14:30 ; 1 Corinthians 2:12 ; Galatians 4:3 ; 6:14 ; Colossians 2:8 ; James 1:27 ; 1 John 4:5 (thrice); 5:19; (f) the "sum of temporal possessions," Matthew 16:26 ; 1 Corinthians 7:31 (1st part); (g) metaphorically, of the "tongue" as "a world (of iniquity)," James 3:6 ; expressive of magnitude and variety.
2: αἰών (Strong's #165 — Noun Masculine — aion — ahee-ohn' ) "an age, a period of time," marked in the NT usage by spiritual or moral characteristics, is sometimes translated "world;" the RV marg. always has "age." The following are details concerning the world in this respect; its cares, Matthew 13:22 ; its sons, Luke 16:8 ; 20:34 ; its rulers, 1 Corinthians 2:6,8 ; its wisdom, 1 Corinthians 1:20 ; 2:6 ; 3:18 , its fashion, Romans 12:2 ; its character, Galatians 1:4 ; its god, 2 Corinthians 4:4 . The phrase "the end of the world" should be rendered "the end of the age," in most places (see END , A, No. 2); in 1 Corinthians 10:11 , AV, "the ends (tele) of the world," RV, "the ends of the ages," probably signifies the fulfillment of the Divine purposes concerning the ages in regard to the church [2]. In Hebrews 11:3 [3] the word indicates all that the successive periods contain; cp. Hebrews 1:2 . Aion is always to be distinguished from kosmos, even where the two seem to express the same idea, e.g., 1 Corinthians 3:18 , aion, 1 Corinthians 3:19 , kosmos; the two are used together in Ephesians 2:2 , lit., "the age of this world." For a list of phrases containing aion, with their respective meanings, see EVER , B.
3: οἰκουμένη (Strong's #3625 — Noun Feminine — oikoumene — oy-kou-men'-ay ) "the inhabited earth" (see EARTH , No. 2), is used (a) of the whole inhabited world, Matthew 24:14 ; Luke 4:5 ; 21:26 ; Romans 10:18 ; Hebrews 1:6 ; Revelation 3:10 ; 16:14 ; by metonymy, of its inhabitants, Acts 17:31 ; Revelation 12:9 ; (b) of the Roman Empire, the world as viewed by the writer or speaker, Luke 2:1 ; Acts 11:28 ; 24:5 ; by metonymy, of its inhabitants, Acts 17:6 ; 19:27 ; (c) the inhabited world in a coming age, Hebrews 2:5 .
Notes: (1) In Revelation 13:3 , AV, ge, "the earth" (RV), is translated "world." (2) For phrases containing aionios, e.g., Romans 16:25 ; 2 Timothy 1:9 ; Titus 1:2 , see ETERNAL , No. 2.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - World: Deception of
AEsop's fable says:: 'A pigeon oppressed by excessive thirst, saw a goblet of water painted on a sign-board. Not supposing it to be only a picture, she flew towards it with a loud whirr, and unwittingly dashed against the sign-board, and jarred herself terribly. Having broken her wings by the blow, she fell to the ground, and was killed by one of the bystanders.'
The mockeries of the world are many, and those who are deluded by them not only miss the joys they looked for, but in their eager pursuit of vanity bring ruin upon their souls. We call the dove silly to be deceived by a picture, however cleverly painted, but what epithet shall we apply to those who are duped by the transparently false allurements of the world!
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - World: Not to Build Too Confidently on it
In Chili where the ground is subject to frequent shocks of earthquake, the houses are built of lowly height and of unenduring structure; it is of little use to dig deep foundations, and pile up high walls where the very earth is unstable; it would be foolish to build as for ages when the whole edifice may be in ruins in a week. Herein we read a lesson as to our worldly schemes and possessions: this poor fleeting world deserves not that we should build our hopes and joys upon it as though they could last us long. We must treat it as a treacherous soil, and build but lightly on it, and we shall be wise.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - World: a Huge Desert
Living in the midst of the church of God is like sailing down the Nile in a boat. One is charmed with the luxuriance of either bank, and with much that is beautiful immediately around; but alas! at a little distance on either side lies a vast uncultivated, we had almost said hopeless, desert. Some are at rest because they never look beyond the borders of the church, but those whose sympathies reach to all humanity will have to carry a life-long 'burden of the Lord.'
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - World: Vanity of Pursuit of
My friends, do you remember that old Scythian custom, when the head of a house died? How he was dressed in his finest dress, and set in his chariot, and carried about to his friends' houses; and each of them placed him at his table's head, and all feasted in his presence! Suppose it were offered to you, in plain words, as it is offered to you in dire facts, that you should gain this Scythian honour, gradually, while you yet thought yourself alive. Suppose the offer were this: You shall die slowly; your blood shall daily grow cold, your flesh petrify, your heart beat at last only as a rusty group of iron valves. Your life shall fade from you, and sink through the earth into the ice of Caina; but day by day your body shall be dressed more gaily, and set in higher chariots, and have more orders on its breast, crowns on its head, if you will. Men shall bow before it, stare and, shout round it, crowd after it up and down the streets; build palaces for it, feast with it at their tables' heads all the night long; your soul shall stay enough within it to know what they do, and feel the weight of the golden dress on its shoulders, and the furrow of the crown edge of the skull; no more. Would you take the offer, verbally made by the death angel? Would the meanest among us take it, think you? Yet practically and verily we grasp at it, every one of us, in a measure; many of us grasp at it in its fullness of horror. Every man accepts it who desires to advance in life without knowing what life is; who means only that he is to get more horses, and more footmen, and more fortune, and more public honour, and: no more personal soul. He only is advancing in life whose heart is getting softer, whose blood warmer, whose brain quicker, whose spirit is entering into living peace.: John Ruskin.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - World: Its Instability
Queen Elizabeth once said to a courtier, 'They pass best over the world who trip over it quickly; for it is but a bog: if we stop, we sink.'
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - World
The conception of the world in the apostolic writings is one of much complexity. Its content is derived partly from the OT, partly from later Judaism; but it has also assimilated an important element from Greek thought, and the peculiar experience of early Christianity has added to it a sinister significance of its own. Thus the various synonyms by which it is expressed reveal so many narrowly differentiated senses in each, and also shade off into each other in such a way, that a delicate problem for exact exegesis is often created. The three terms chiefly to be considered are ἡ οἰκουμένη, ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος, and ὁ κόσμος, which in their proper significance denote the world respectively as a place, a period, and a system.
1. The spatial conception of the world.-The spatial conception of the world as the orbis terrarum, the comprehensive abode of man and scene of human life, is rendered in the OT by àÈøÈö and its more poetical synonym úÌÅáÇi, which in the lxx are translated, the former by γῆ, the latter by οἰκουμένη (vice versa in a few passages in Isaiah). In the apostolic writings γῆ is retained in this sense in quotations from the lxx (e.g. Acts 2:19, Romans 9:17, Hebrews 1:10), also in Acts 17:26, James 5:5, and frequently in the Apocalypse (Revelation 1:5; Revelation 1:7; Revelation 3:10, etc.). The more distinctive term is ἡ οἰκουμένη (sc. γῆ). Originally it was used, with racial self-consciousness, to signify the territorial extent of Greek life and civilization (Herod. iv. 110); but after the conquests of Alexander, and in consequence of the same unifying influences as those by which the Greek dialects were merged in the κοινή, it came to express a view and feeling of the inhabited world as overpassing all national distinctions and boundaries. Later, when the rule of the Caesars seemed to be practically co-extensive with the habitable earth, it acquired a more special sense-the Empire as a territorial unity (e.g. Luke 2:1); but in the apostolic writings it has the larger significance, the world-wide abode of man (Acts 11:28; Acts 17:6; Acts 19:27 by passionate exaggeration, Acts 24:5, Romans 10:18, Revelation 3:10; Revelation 16:14), or, by a natural transition, mankind (Acts 17:31, Revelation 12:9). As an example of the elasticity which characterizes the use of these terms, it may be noted that to express the same thought of the world-wide field for the dissemination of the gospel St. Paul prefers κόσμος (Romans 1:8, Colossians 1:6); and that, on the contrary, the writer of Hebrews gives to οἰκουμένη the proper significance both of κόσμος, the ‘terrestrial order’ (Hebrews 1:6), and of αἰών (cf. the unique τὴν μέλλουσαν οἰκουμένην of Hebrews 2:5 and μέλλοντος αἰῶνος, Hebrews 6:5).
2. The temporal conception of the world.-The temporal conception of the world as a saeculum, a cycle of history, complete within itself yet related to a before and an after, is distinctively expressed by αἰών, or in contrast with the ‘world to come,’ as actually it always is, by ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος (1 Corinthians 1:20; 1 Corinthians 2:6-8; 1 Corinthians 3:18, 2 Corinthians 4:4, Ephesians 1:21; variants, ὁ ἐνεστὼς αἰών, Galatians 1:4; ὁ αἰὼν τοῦ κόσμου τούτου, Ephesians 2:2; ὁ νῦν αἰών, 1 Timothy 6:17, 2 Timothy 4:10, Titus 2:12; ὁ νῦν καιρός, Romans 3:26; Romans 8:18).
The use of in this sense, as denoting the present order of existence, does not occur in the OT (Ecclesiastes 3:11?), but is characteristic of later Hebraism, the contrast between the two ‘aeons’ being an essential feature in the Apocalyptic view of history. Dalman remarks upon the absence of evidence for this form of expression in any extant pre-Christian writing (Words of Jesus, p. 148); it occurs chiefly in the later parts of the Baruch Apocalypse, in 4 Ezra (e.g. 6:9, 7:12, 13, 8:1, 52) and the Slavonic Enoch. In Rabbinism (Dalman, p. 150) the earliest witnesses for the expression are Hillel and Jochanan ben Zakkai (fl. c. a.d. 80). The idea, however, is vouched for by earlier documents, Enoch, Jubilees, Assumption of Moses (see on the whole subject Bousset’s Religion des Judentums2, p. 278 ff.), and the frequency of its occurrence in the NT, with the assumption of its familiarity, seems to imply its popular currency (contrariwise, Dalman-‘the expressions characterised the language of the learned rather than that of the people’ [1]).
But while αἰὼν οὗτος in primarily a time-concept, this world-age in contrast with the future age of the ‘regeneration,’ the temporal element tends to become secondary. The notion of a period of time (emphatic in 1 Corinthians 7:31) is always implied; but the ruling idea approximates to that which properly belongs to the κὀσμος, the organic system of terrestrial existence (e.g. in 1 Corinthians 1:20 ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος and ὁ κόσμος are parallel and synonymous). The opposition between the two ‘aeons’ is qualitative even more than temporal: the one is ‘evil’ (Galatians 1:4), and under the dominion of the Devil (2 Corinthians 4:4) and kindred spirits (1 Corinthians 2:6; 1 Corinthians 2:8), a world of sin and death in contrast with that other eternal world of righteousness (2 Peter 3:13) and life. The two, indeed, are thought of as in a sense contemporaneous; the ‘world to come’ projects itself into the present; its ‘powers’ are already experienced by all in whom the Spirit of God dwells and the work of spiritual quickening and transformation is begun (Hebrews 6:5).
3. The world as an organic system.-The world as an organic system, a universe, is distinctively ὁ κόσμος.
The idea which underlies all the various uses of κόσμος is that of order or arrangement (as in the common Homeric phrases, κατὰ κόσμον = ‘in an orderly manner’; κατὰ κόσμον καθίζειν = ‘to sit in order’), and since the strongest impression of unvarying and reliable order in nature is given by the movement of the heavenly bodies, it was probably to this that the term was first applied in a more special sense. In classical Greek, while it is sometime used with reference to the firmament above, and its sense is not anywhere restricted to the earth, so also in the lxx it translates öÈáÈà, the ‘host’ of heaven (in Enoch also, κόσμος τῶν φωστήρων, xx. 4), and elsewhere appears only in the sense at ‘ornament.’ Pythagoras is credited with having been the first to employ the word to express the philosophical conception of an ordered universe of being (plutarch, de Plac. Phil. 886 B); and from the Pythagoraeans it passed into the common vocabulary of philosophic poetry and speculation. Plato (Gorgias, 508 A) defines κόσμος in its widest extent, οὐρανὸν καὶ γῆν καὶ θεοὺς καὶ ἀνθρώπους τὴν κοινωνίαν συνέχειν καὶ φιλίαν καὶ κοσμιότητα καὶ σωφροσύνην καὶ δικαιότητα, καὶ τὸ ὅλον τοῦτο διὰ ταῦτα κόσμον καλοῦσιν … οὐκ ἀκοσμίαν, οὐδὲ ἀκολασίαν. In Stoicism the idea was further developed in a mystical and pantheistic fashion. The universe, the macrocosm, was conceived after the analogy or the microcosm, man. It was a ζῷον ἔμψυχον καὶ λογικόν; and as the human organism consists of a body and an animating soul, so God was the eternal world-soul animating and ruling the imperishable world-body. Through the influence especially of Posidonius, this conception of the Cosmos became widely influential in the Graeco-Roman world (see P. Wendland, Die hellenistischrömische Kultur, Tübingen, 1907, p. 84ff.). In the OT there is neither term nor conception corresponding to the Hellenic κόσμος (yet cf. Jeremiah 10:16, Ecclesiastes 11:5); it is in Hellenistic compositions such as 2 Maccabees and the Book of Wisdom that they first appear in Judaism. In the latter the idea of the Cosmos is specially prominent. ἡ σύστασις κόσμου is formed by the word of God out of formless matter (Wisdom of Solomon 1:14; Wisdom of Solomon 7:17; Wisdom of Solomon 11:7) and the ever-living Spirit of God is active in all things (Wisdom of Solomon 12:1); Divine wisdom and beauty pervade the world in all its diverse parts, establishing all things by number, measure, and weight (Wisdom of Solomon 7:24, Wisdom of Solomon 8:1, Wisdom of Solomon 11:20), at the same time giving to human intelligence its power to apprehend the Divine ordering of all things (Wisdom of Solomon 7:17-23, Wisdom of Solomon 8:8), a striking anticipation of Romans 1:20. In the same book there is another anticipation of NT usage, the employment, unknown to classical Greek, of κόσμος for the world of mankind, the human race as a unity. Thus Adam is described as πρωτόπλαστος πατὴρ κόσμου Wisdom of Solomon 10:1); a multitude of wise men is the salvation of the world (Wisdom of Solomon 6:24), as the family of Noah was its hope (Wisdom of Solomon 14:6).
Such indications of the penetration of Hellenic influences into Jewish thought explain, from a historical point of view, the use of κόσμος, both as term and as concept, in the apostolic writings, (a) Primarily the Cosmos is the rerum natura, the sum of terrestrial things, without moral reference. Occasionally the conception is simply this (1 Corinthians 8:4, there is no such thing as an idol, ἐν κόσμῳ; 1 Corinthians 14:10, there are various kinds of sounds in it); but normally the thought of God as Creator of the Cosmos is expressed or implied (e.g. Acts 17:24, Romans 1:20, Ephesians 1:4, Hebrews 4:3).
The simple pictorial phrase, ‘the heaven and the earth,’ by which the OT expresses the idea of the visible creation as contrasted with the Creator, is still retained in the liturgical and rhetorical style (Acts 4:24; Acts 14:15; Acts 17:24), and for the sake of special emphasis (Ephesians 1:10, Philippians 2:10, Colossians 1:16; Colossians 1:20, Revelation 20:11; Revelation 21:1). To the same effect Paul uses ἡ κτίσις (Romans 8:19-22, Colossians 1:15; 2 Peter 3:4, Song of Solomon 6:247), but more frequently τὰ πάντα (Romans 9:5; Romans 11:36, 1 Corinthians 8:6; 1 Corinthians 15:28, etc.; cf. Hebrews 1:3; Hebrews 2:8; Hebrews 2:10; Hebrews 3:4, Song of Solomon 8:8).
And when the Cosmos is defined as the ‘terrestrial order’ it is to be remembered that in the apostolic cosmology this includes the heavens with their inhabitants as well as the earth and mankind. The world created in the πρωτότοκος includes ‘all things in the heavens and upon the earth, visible and invisible’ (Colossians 1:16). ‘Heaven,’ in the popular sense of the word, the sphere of God’s immediate self-manifestation, the place of His Throne and Majesty on high (Colossians 3:1; Hebrews 1:3), the sphere from which Christ comes (1 Corinthians 15:47) and to which He returns (1 Corinthians 3:1), the kingdom of eternal light in which believers already have an inheritance (2 Corinthians 5:1, Philippians 3:20, Colossians 1:12), is ‘above all heavens’ (Ephesians 4:10). It does not belong to ‘this world’ or to ‘this age’. All else does. The heavens and the spiritual beings that dwell therein belong naturally and morally to the same cosmic system as the earth and its inhabitants (1 Corinthians 2:6; 1 Corinthians 2:8; 1 Corinthians 4:9; 1 Corinthians 6:2-3; 1 Corinthians 11:10, Ephesians 2:2; Ephesians 6:12, Colossians 1:16; Colossians 1:20; Colossians 2:8; Colossians 2:20).
(b) Yet the immediate interest in the Cosmos lies in its relation to man as the physical environment of his life, and thus it naturally acquires the more limited significance of the terrestrial order in association with mankind-the world of human existence, into which sin comes (Romans 5:12-13), into which Christ comes (1 Timothy 1:15, Hebrews 10:5, 1 John 4:9), where He is believed on (1 Timothy 3:16). (For Jewish parallels see Dalman, p. 173.) Hence also it easily comes to mean (as already in Enoch [2]) mankind in general (1 Corinthians 4:13, Hebrews 11:33); and, by further natural transitions, worldly possessions (1 John 3:17

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World - World, n. The earth the terraqueous globe sometimes called the lower World. The heavens as when we speak of the heavenly World, or upper World. God--hath in these last days spoken to us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things by whom also he made the Worlds. ...
There may be other Worlds, where the inhabitants have never violated their allegiance to their Almighty sovereign. Present state of existence as while we are in the World. Behold, these are the ungodly who prosper in the World. By the World we sometimes understand the things of this World, its pleasures and interests. A great part of mankind are more anxious to enjoy the World to than secure divine favor. Public life, or society as banished from the World. From this World-wearied flesh. A great multitude or quantity as a World of business a World of charms. Let the World see your fortitude. Whose disposition, all the World well knows-- ...
11. He begins the World with little property, but with many friends. This through the east just vengeance hurld, and lost poor Antony the World. A knowledge of the World is necessary for a man of business it is essential to politeness. All the World contains. Had I a thousand Worlds, I would give them all for one year more to devote to God. Alexander conquered the World. I must descry new Worlds. The carnal state or corruption of the earth as the present evil World the course of this World. The ungodly part of the World. I pray not for the World, but for them that thou hast given men. Time as in the phrase, World without end. In the World, in possibility. All the precaution in the World would not save him. ...
For all the World, ...
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World-Wide - ) Extended throughout the World; as, World-wide fame
World - The biblical concept of World falls into five categories: the physical World, the human World, the moral World, the temporal World, and the coming World. ...
The Physical World . The physical World at its largest extent includes the whole universe, the cosmos (John 1:9 ; Acts 17:24 ) or the creation (Romans 8:20 ). When biblical writers refer to the World, however, they usually mean the earth itself, not including sun, moon, and stars. No clear Old Testament references appear to the World as a planet, although Isaiah 40:22 , "the circle of the earth, " is suggestive to some. Many Old Testament uses of World or earth (eres, in poetry sometimes tebel [ Genesis 1:1 ) or an expansion of that expression (Exodus 20:11 ; Nehemiah 9:6 ). ...
Scripture affirms first of all that God created the World (Genesis 1:1-2:4 ; Acts 4:24 ; 14:15 ; Revelation 10:6 ). The whole World is full of its Creator's glory (Isaiah 6:3 ). ...
God designed the World to be fruitful. ...
God's judgment encompasses the physical World. The World's permanence is only relative. ...
The Human World . The human World includes dry land where people can live, the inhabited earth where they do live, and by metonymy, the people who live there. Before Jesus' birth Caesar Augustus attempted to take a census of "the whole World" (really only the Roman Empire Luke 2:1 ). The tempter offered Jesus "all the kingdoms" of the inhabited World (Luke 4:5 ; cf. Jesus predicted that the gospel would be preached to the whole World (Matthew 24:14 ; 26:13 ; cf. Romans 10:18 ), a prediction so successful that the early church, in its opponents' opinion, upset the whole World (Acts 17:6 ). The whole World is deceived by the devil (Revelation 12:9 ) and will experience great trouble before the end (Luke 21:26 ; Revelation 3:10 ). ...
The people of the World are called simply the "world" or the "earth" occasionally in the Old Testament and frequently in the New Testament. "Yahweh will judge the World, " or a similar statement, means he will judge the World's inhabitants (Psalm 9:8 ; 96:13 ; Isaiah 13:11 ; 26:9 ). The Son of Man "has authority on the earth, " authority over the people of the World (Matthew 9:6 ; parallels Mark 2:10 ; Luke 5:24 ). ...
In the Johannine literature the "world" often means the people of the World. The World did not know the Word (John 1:10 ), the Lamb who would take away its sin (John 1:29 ). God loved the World, sending his Son into it to save rather than condemn it (John 3:16-17 ; 12:47 ; 1 John 4:9 ). The Son of God is the "Savior of the World" (John 4:42 ; 1 John 4:14 ), giving life to it as the "bread of life" (John 6:33,51 ). ...
The Moral World . The moral World includes people indifferent or hostile to God, the God-hostile environment generally, and in the widest sense, corruption and evil summed up under the general term "the World. "...
If the people of the World can be spoken of as "the World" in a neutral sense, "the World" can also refer to the subclass of indifferent and hostile people who reject God and his ways. Before the flood nearly all the people of the World became corrupt (Genesis 6:11 ). In Jesus' time the World hated him (John 7:7 ) and will hate his followers (John 15:18-19 ). The World, ungodly people, cannot receive the things of God (John 14:17,22 ; 16:8-9 ; cf. ...
In the New Testament the World also appears as a hostile environment. Because of the hatred of the World's people, the Son asks the Father to protect his followers rather than remove them from their alien surroundings (John 17:14-16 ). Paul expresses his indifference to the World by saying he "is crucified" as far as the World is concerned (Galatians 6:14 ). Seven times in 1Corinthians 1-3Paul refers to the World's ignorance of God and its powerlessness to find him without the cross of Christ. ...
Because of the World's hostility to God, it is full of corruption (2 Peter 1:4 ) and stands as a symbol of corruption. One cannot be friendly with the evil World and love God at the same time (James 4:4 ; 1 John 2:15-17 ). Believers by their faith must "overcome the World" (1 John 5:4-5 ), killing whatever belongs to their "earthly nature" (Colossians 3:5 ) and denying "worldly passions" (Titus 2:12 ). ...
The Temporal and Coming Worlds . Although the Old Testament presents the idea that the present World is temporary (Psalm 102:25-27 ), the distinction between this World/age and the World/age to come does not appear clearly until the late intertestamental and New Testament periods. ...
Satan rules only this World (John 12:31 ; 14:30 ; 16:11 ; 2 Corinthians 4:4 ), not the next one, while Jesus' kingdom is "not of this World" (John 18:36 ) but belongs to the coming age. Jesus warns that a person may "gain the whole World" (the material things of this passing age) yet lose life in the next (Matthew 16:26 ; parallels Mark 8:36 ; Luke 9:25 ). Paul expresses concern that believers may become so caught up in the affairs of this World that they will experience undue hardship in living for Christ (1 Corinthians 7:29-35 ). ...
The present World is passing away even now (1 John 2:17 ). Living in this transient World, one must not love it (2 Timothy 4:10 ), become conformed to its ways (Romans 12:2 ), or fall in love with its godless "wisdom" (1 Corinthians 2:6 ; 3:18-19 ; James 3:15 ). The believer may look forward to the new World, "a new heaven and a new earth, the home of righteousness" (2 Peter 3:13 ; cf
World, the - Evident in these more extended descriptions is the view that the World consisted of an expanse of land (“the earth”) that was surrounded by water and set under the canopy of the heavens. Four Hebrew words have been translated by “world. ” It is translated as “world” four times in the KJV and twice in the RSV ( Isaiah 23:17 ; Jeremiah 25:26 ). Olam is translated as “world” twice in the KJV ( Psalm 73:12 ; Ecclesiastes 3:11 ). The Hebrews, therefore, did not have a single concept of the World but thought of the creation in terms of its geographical and temporal extent. The World was a perfect unity, beautiful in its order. From the time of the use of kosmos to describe the World, therefore, the order of the World was primary. Precisely this concept of the World as an ordered system is absent from Hebrew thought. ...
The order of the World was explained variously by the leading schools of philosophy. Plato held that the kosmos included both the visible World and all that could be known by reason. The concepts of World, heaven, and space began to merge. Heraclitus and later Aristotle rejected any notion of a beginning of the World. The World was infinite, without beginning or end. For the Stoics, the logos was the rational principle that gave order to the World. The idea of God as Creator and the World as God's creation was foreign to the Greeks. The World was an extension of the logos that gave it order. Plato considered that a demiurge formed the World in a manner consistent with perfect being. Even for Plato, however, neither was the demiurge fully God nor was the World a creation. ...
The use of kosmos in the Septuagint, the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible, marked the beginning of a biblical concept of World . ...
In the New Testament Three words are translated as “world” in the New Testament: oikoumene (15 times, “the inhabited earth”), aion (over 30 times, similar to the Hebrew olam meaning “long duration,” “age,” or “world”), and kosmos (188 times). World can carry various nuances. The whole created order Paul before the Areopagus in Athens spoke of “the God who made the World and everything in it” (Acts 17:24 NIV). The biblical writers could therefore refer to “the foundation of the World” ( Matthew 25:34 ; Luke 11:50 ; John 17:24 ; Ephesians 1:4 ; Hebrews 4:3 ; Hebrews 9:26 ; 1 Peter 1:20 ; Revelation 13:8 ; Revelation 17:8 ) or the creation of the World (see Romans 1:20 ; compare John 17:5 ). The earth and its inhabitants John 1:9 refers to “the true light which enlightens everyone was coming into the World” (NRSV). Similarly, in the farewell discourse in John, Jesus spoke of His departure from the World ( John 13:1 ; John 16:28 ). The authorities complained that “the World”—meaning all people—had “gone after him” (John 12:19 ). Satan offered Jesus “all the kingdoms of the World” (Matthew 4:8 NIV), and Paul saluted the Christians in Rome, saying, “Your faith is proclaimed throughout the World” ( Romans 1:8 NRSV). The meaning of “the World” in John 3:16 should probably be understood in this sense. “The cares of this World” can choke out the word (Mark 4:19 ). Married persons may be especially troubled over Worldly affairs (1 Corinthians 7:33-34 ). In this sense, the elder admonished the Johannine community, “Do not love the World or anything in the World” (1 John 2:15 NIV; compare 1 John 2:16-17 ). ...
“The World” can also designate all that is hostile, rebellious, and opposed to God. The World, therefore, is under the power of “the prince of this World” (John 12:31 ; John 14:30 ; John 16:11 ), “the prince of the power of the air” (Ephesians 2:2 ), the “god of this World” (2 Corinthians 4:4 ); “the whole World is under the control of the evil one” (1 John 5:19 NIV). ...
Paul contrasted the wisdom of this World with the wisdom of God (1Corinthians 1:20-21,1 Corinthians 1:26-28 ; 1 Corinthians 3:19 ). Through the cross, Christ triumphed over all the powers of this World ( Colossians 2:15 ). Indeed, God was in Christ “reconciling the World unto himself” (2 Corinthians 5:19 ; Colossians 1:20 ). ...
The hostile sense of “the World” is especially pronounced in the Johannine writings. Nevertheless, it is important to note that the World is not inherently evil. John still affirmed the creation of the World through the logos ( John 1:3-4 ). Jesus, “the lamb of God who takes away the sin of the World” (John 1:29 NIV), was sent to save the World ( John 3:17 ; John 10:36 ; John 12:47 ). He is, therefore, “the light of the World” (John 8:12 ); the Samaritans acclaimed Him as “the Savior of the World” (John 4:42 ). ...
The coming of Jesus, however, brought judgment to the World (John 9:39 ; John 12:31 ). The World will hate the disciples as it hated Jesus (John 15:18 ) because they are not of the World (John 15:19 ). Jesus called His disciples to show love for one another that all may recognize them through this love (John 13:35 ) The disciples are to be in the World but not “of the World” (John 17:14-16 ). Victory over the hostility of the World is assured through the cross of Jesus (John 16:33 ) and through faith (1 John 5:4-5 ). The World, in fact, is already passing away (1 John 2:17 ). ...
In the new Testament, therefore, World is influenced by both Hebrew and Greek thought and may be considered primarily in its natural order, its human order, its fallenness, or its place in God's redemptive order
Cosmoplastic - ) Pertaining to a plastic force as operative in the formation of the World independently of God; World-forming
Worldly - 1: κοσμικός (Strong's #2886 — Adjective — kosmikos — kos-mee-kos' ) "pertaining to this World," is used (a) in Hebrews 9:1 , of the tabernacle, AV, "wordly," RV, "of this World" (i. , made of mundane materials, adapted to this visible World, local and transitory); (b) in Titus 2:12 , ethically, of "worldly lusts," or desires
Hades - ) The nether World (according to classical mythology, the abode of the shades, ruled over by Hades or Pluto); the invisible World; the grave
World - World...
1. In general it may be said that the normal expression for such conception of the Universe as the Hebrews had reached is ‘the heavens and the earth’ ( Genesis 1:1 , Psalms 89:11 , 1 Chronicles 16:31 ), and that ‘world’ is an equivalent expression for ‘ earth. ’ So far as there is a difference, the ‘world’ is rather the fruitful, habitable earth, e. , ‘the earth is the Lord’s, and the fulness thereof; the World, and they that dwell therein’ ( Psalms 24:1 ; cf. But of the ethical depreciation of the World, so prominent in some NT writings, there are in the OT few traces. The ‘world’ is to be judged in righteousness ( Psalms 9:8 ; Psalms 96:13 ; Psalms 98:9 ), and punished for its evil ( Isaiah 13:11 ). ‘ æon ’ below) rendered ‘world’ at Psalms 17:14 (‘men of the World, whose portion is in this life,’ cf. A word of similar meaning is rendered ‘world’ in AV [3] retains ‘world’ only in the latter passage, and gives quite another turn to the sense. ...
The ethical aspect of the ‘world’ does not receive any fresh emphasis in the Apocrypha, though in the Book of Wisdom both the scientific interest in regard to the World and the impulses of natural religion are notably quickened ( Wis 7:17-22 ; Wis 9:9 ; Wis 11:17 ; Wis 11:22 ; 1618383428_20 , cf. Wis 1:1-16 ; Wis 2:1-24 ; Wis 3:1-19 ; Wis 4:1-20 ; Wis 5:1-23 ), but the latter is not identified with the ‘world. ]'>[4] means ‘adornment,’ has reached its sense of ‘world,’ conceived as a beautiful order; in the NT this becomes the prevalent word. (1) aiôn (¿on) , ‘ age ,’ is used of the World in its time-aspect: human history is conceived as made up of ages, successive and contemporaneous, converging to and consummated in the Christ. These in their sum constitute the ‘world’: God is their Maker ( Hebrews 1:2 ; Hebrews 11:3 [AV [3] ‘worlds,’ but ‘world’ better represents the thought]) and their King ( 1 Timothy 1:17 RVm
In some of these passages there is implied a moral condemnation of this World; elsewhere this receives deeper emphasis. ‘The cares of the World choke the word’ (Matthew 13:22 , Mark 4:19 ): the ‘sons of this World’ are contrasted with the ‘sons of light’ ( Luke 16:8 ; cf. Romans 12:2 , Ephesians 2:2 ‘according to the transient fashion [10] of this material World [11]’). This World is evil ( Galatians 1:4 ), its wisdom is naught ( 1Co 1:20 ; 1 Corinthians 2:6 ; 1 Corinthians 3:18 ), its rulers crucified the Lord of glory ( 1 Corinthians 2:8 ); finally, it is the ‘god of this World’ that has blinded the minds of the unhelieving ( 2 Corinthians 4:4 ). This ethical use of æon = ‘world’ is not found in the Johannine writings. ...
(2) But the most frequent term for ‘world’ is kosmos , which is sometimes extended in meaning to the material universe, as in the phrases ‘from the beginning (‘foundation,’ ‘creation’) of the World’ ( e. To ‘gain the whole World’ is to become possessed of all possible material wealth and earthly power ( Matthew 16:26 , Mark 8:36 , Luke 9:25 ). Because ‘sin entered into the World’ ( Romans 5:12 ), it is become the scene of the Incarnation and the object of Redemption ( 2 Corinthians 5:19 , Psalms 50:12 , Hebrews 10:5 , 1618383428_19 ; 1 Corinthians 1:20-21 ; John 3:16-17 ; John 12:47 ), the scene also, alien but inevitable, of the Christian disciple’s life and discipline, mission and victory ( Matthew 5:14 ; Matthew 13:38 ; Matthew 26:13 , John 17:16 , Romans 1:8 , 1 Corinthians 3:22 ; 1Co 4:9 ; 1 Corinthians 5:10 ; 1 Corinthians 7:31 , 2 Corinthians 1:12 , Philippians 2:16 , Col 1:8 , 1 Peter 5:9 , Revelation 11:15 ). From this virtual identification of the ‘world’ with mankind, and mankind as separated from and hostile to God, there comes the ethical signification of the word specially developed in the writings of St. Paul describes the pre-Christian life as slavery to ‘the rudiments of the World’ ( Galatians 4:3 , cf. Galatians 4:9 ); through Christ the World is crucified to him and he to the World ( Galatians 6:14 ). In writing to the Corinthians he condemns the wisdom, the passing fashion, the care, the sorrow of the World ( John 1:29 ; 1 Corinthians 3:19 ; 1 Corinthians 7:31 ; 1 Corinthians 7:33-34 , 2 Corinthians 7:10 ; cf. aiôn above), and declares the Divine choice to rest upon all that the World least esteems ( 1 Corinthians 1:27-28 , cf. This perception of the true worth of things is granted to those who ‘received not the spirit of the World, but the spirit which is of God’ ( 1 Corinthians 2:12 ); hence ‘the saints shall judge the World’ ( 1 Corinthians 6:2 ; cf. In the argument of Romans the thought of the Divine judgment of the ‘world’ has incidental place, but in the climax St. Paul conceives of the ‘fall’ of Israel as leading to ‘the riches of the World,’ and of the ‘casting away’ of them as the ‘reconciling of the World’ ( John 15:18-194 ; 1 Corinthians 11:16 ; cf. Paul condemns, then, is hardly the World as essentially evil, but the World-spirit which leads to evil by its neglect of the unseen and eternal, and by its blindness to the true scale of values revealed in the gospel of Christ crucified. John, and, setting aside his frequent use of it in the non-ethical sense, especially as the sphere of the incarnation and saving work of Christ, we find an ethical conception of the ‘world’ deeper in its shadows than that of St. It is true that Jesus is the Light of the World ( John 1:9 ; John 3:19 ; John 8:12 ; John 9:5 ; John 12:46 ), its Life-giver ( John 6:33 ; John 6:51 ), its Saviour ( John 3:17 , John 4:42 , John 12:47 ); yet ‘the World knew him not’ ( John 1:10 ), and the Fourth Gospel sets out its story of His persistent rejection by the World, in language which at times seems to pass beyond a mere record of contemporary unbelief, and almost to assert an essential dualism of good and evil ( John 7:7 , John 8:23 , John 9:39 , John 12:31 , John 14:17 ; John 14:30 , John 16:11 ; John 16:20 ). Here the ‘world’ is not simply the Worldly spirit, but the great mass of mankind in deadly hostility to Christ and His teaching. In contrast stand His disciples, his own which were in the World’ ( John 13:1 ), chosen out of the World ( John 15:18 , cf. For them He intercedes as He does not for the World ( John 17:8 ). The World lies within the scope of God’s redemptive purpose in Jesus Christ ( John 2:2 , John 4:14 ), yet it stands opposed to His followers as a thing wholly evil, with which they may hold no traffic ( John 2:15-17 , cf. ‘the prince of this WorldJohn 12:31 ; John 14:30 ; John 16:11 ) and is therefore not to be entreated and persuaded, but fought and overcome by the ‘greater one’ who is in the disciple of Christ ( John 4:4 , John 5:4-5 ). Faith ‘overcometh the World,’ but St. John reserves for his closing words his darkest expression of a persistent dualism of good and evil, light and darkness: ‘We know that we are of God, and the whole World lieth in the evil one’ ( John 5:19 ). ...
The idiomatic uses of the term ‘world’ in John 7:4 ; John 12:19 , 1 John 3:17 are sufficiently obvious. For the difficult expression ‘the World of iniquity’ applied to the tongue ( James 3:6 ), see the Commentaries
Slander: How to Overcome it - Some person reported to the amiable poet Tasso that a malicious enemy spoke ill of him to all the World. How much better is it that he should speak ill of me to all the World, than that all the World should speak ill of me to him
Microcosm - ) A little World; a miniature universe. Hence (so called by Paracelsus), a man, as a supposed epitome of the exterior universe or great World
World - ) In a more restricted sense, that part of the earth and its concerns which is known to any one, or contemplated by any one; a division of the globe, or of its inhabitants; human affairs as seen from a certain position, or from a given point of view; also, state of existence; scene of life and action; as, the Old World; the New World; the religious World; the Catholic World; the upper World; the future World; the heathen World. ) The earth and its affairs as distinguished from heaven; concerns of this life as distinguished from those of the life to come; the present existence and its interests; hence, secular affairs; engrossment or absorption in the affairs of this life; Worldly corruption; the ungodly or wicked part of mankind. ) Any planet or heavenly body, especially when considered as inhabited, and as the scene of interests analogous with human interests; as, a plurality of Worlds. ) Individual experience of, or concern with, life; course of life; sum of the affairs which affect the individual; as, to begin the World with no property; to lose all, and begin the World anew. ) The customs, practices, and interests of men; general affairs of life; human society; public affairs and occupations; as, a knowledge of the World
Simian - ) Of or pertaining to the family Simiadae, which, in its widest sense, includes all the Old World apes and monkeys; also, apelike. ) Any Old World monkey or ape
Olam - World...
Weltanschauung - , World view; a conception of the course of events in, and of the purpose of, the World as a whole, forming a philosophical view or apprehension of the universe; the general idea embodied in a cosmology
Huldah - The World
Love of the World - See World
Spectacle - Paul felt that he was on display before the World. The World did not appreciate the commitment of Paul to Christ but saw Paul as a spectacle, one to watch and perhaps laugh at (1 Corinthians 4:9 )
Thief - Luke 10:30 (c) No doubt these wicked men represent the ungodly World which continually seeks to take away everything we have and return to us nothing but trouble. ...
...
the World welcomes the prize fighter who is winning, but has no use for him when he is losing. ...
the World loves the company of the rich while he can give, but has no use for him when his riches are gone and he has become poor. ...
the World wants the actress who is vivacious, interesting and beautiful. ...
the World has nothing permanent to give, but is always active in taking what we have. Barabbas was a thief, and he represents this wicked World. ...
John 10:1 (b) By this picture we see a symbol of the wicked, religious leaders of the World who would take away from GOD's people their peace, their faith, their time and their money by false teachings
Hexaemeron - (Greek: six days work) ...
The account, in Genesis 1, of the formation of the World. On three more God peoples the World with living beings. The presentation of God's work in six natural days is stylistic embellishment of the essential truth that the World comes from God, and allegorical: as God did, so should man work six days and rest after that
Extramundane - ) Beyond the material World
Tubal - The earth; the World; confusion
World, Eternity of - See ETERNITY OF THE World
Mundivagant - ) Wandering over the World
World - In the Bible, as in ordinary speech, ‘the World’ may refer to the physical World of God’s creation or to the people who inhabit that World (Psalms 90:2; Psalms 98:7; Psalms 98:9; Matthew 25:34; John 3:16; Romans 10:18). Because of sin, the World has become a place where Satan rules in people’s lives (John 12:31; Romans 5:12; 2 Corinthians 4:4; 1 John 5:19). Therefore, the Bible frequently speaks of the present World, or present age, as something that is evil and that is opposed to God (John 7:7; John 17:25; Matthew 5:13-160; 1 John 2:15). The World in this sense is the subject of the present article – the World of sinful human beings along with all the wrong attitudes that characterize them. ...
Living in the World...
Chief among the characteristics of the ordinary (unbelieving) people of the World are covetousness and pride. This is Worldliness, and it is an evil that the Bible warns Christians against. ...
The temptation to Worldliness may not lie in the more obviously sinful things of life. ...
If Christians cannot see the relation that these things have to the life of faith in God, their attitude to them can readily become Worldly. Ambition can very easily become selfish ambition, wisdom become Worldly wisdom, and thoughts for the future become faithless anxiety (Matthew 6:33-34; 1 Corinthians 1:20; 1 Corinthians 2:7-8; 1 Corinthians 2:12; 1 Corinthians 3:19; James 3:13-17; James 4:13-17). ...
Worldly people are those whose values in life are determined by what they understand of the World they see around them. ...
Overcoming the World...
Some Christians build a set of laws for themselves to live by, hoping that the laws will prevent them from doing what they believe to be Worldly. But the very act of making laws to live by is Worldly. Instead they trust in the methods of those who still ‘belong to the World’, who still live ‘in the flesh’ (Galatians 3:3; Galatians 4:9-11; Galatians 5:1; Colossians 2:20-23; see FLESH). ...
Christians cannot overcome the temptations of the World by using the methods of the World. They can overcome them only by trusting in the power of Christ, who has conquered Satan, the prince of the World (John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11; John 16:33; 1 John 5:4-5; see TEMPTATION). One day this same Christ will return, to free the World completely from Satan’s power (Revelation 19:16; Revelation 20:2-3; Revelation 20:10). ...
Meanwhile Christians have to live in an evil World, while not joining in the sins of the World. They may find that, as a result, the people of the World will hate them (John 15:18; John 17:14-17). But they must remain faithful to Christ and keep themselves from being corrupted by the World’s evil
Martin Waldseemuller - Drew up the first modern atlas of the World, a Latinized edition of Ptolemy's geography with 20 additional maps, used the name America in his World map (1507), and made a translation in Latin of the voyages of Amerigo Vespucci
Waldseemuller, Martin - Drew up the first modern atlas of the World, a Latinized edition of Ptolemy's geography with 20 additional maps, used the name America in his World map (1507), and made a translation in Latin of the voyages of Amerigo Vespucci
Cosmolatry - ) Worship paid to the World
Typocosmy - ) A representation of the World
Aeon - In Gnosticism, one of the spiritual powers evolved from the eternal Divine Being by progressive emanation and constituting the Pleroma (plenitude) or invisible spiritual World, as distinct from the Kenoma (chaotic void) or visible material World
Beau Monde - The fashionable World; people of fashion and gayety
World - World. The Hebrew terms have these literal meanings: "The earth," "rest," "the grave," Isaiah 38:11; "the World," corresponding to aion in the New Testament, or that which is finite, temporary, Job 11:17; "the veiled," unlimited time, whether past or future; used very frequently, and generally translated "forever;" and, finally, the poetical term for "world," which occurs some 37 times, but in various meanings which are easily understood. Hence "children of this World," or Worldly men, Luke 16:8; and so Satan is called "the god of this World. " 2 Corinthians 4:4 Aion is also put for endless duration, eternity, 1 Timothy 6:16, to signify the material World as created by the deity, Hebrews 11:3; also the World to come, the kingdom of the Messiah. (b) This lower World as the abode of man, John 16:18; the inhabitants of the earth or mankind. (c) The present World, as opposed to the kingdom of Christ, John 12:25; specifically, the wealth and enjoyments and cares of this World. Matthew 16:26, and so for those who seek the opposite things to the kingdom of God, the Worldlings. Oikoumene, the inhabited earth, Matthew 24:14, the people of it, Acts 17:31, sometimes the Roman empire, the then civilized World, Acts 17:6, including Palestine and adjacent parts. The Jews distinguished two Worlds, or sons, the present aeon to the appearance of the Messiah, and the future aeon, or the Messianic era, which is to last forever
Age - There is the patriarchal age; the Mosaic age or dispensation; the Christian age, in which "the kingdom of God cometh without observation" (and evil predominates outwardly); and the future manifested millennial kingdom: the two latter together forming "the World (Greek: "age") to come," in contrast to "this present evil World" (age) (Ephesians 1:21; Galatians 1:4). The Greek for the physical "world" is kosmos , distinct from aion , the ethical World or "age" (Hebrews 6:5). "This age" (Greek for "world") is under the prince of darkness, the god of this World (Greek: "age") so far as most men are concerned (Ephesians 2:2; Luke 16:8; Matthew 13:22; 2 Corinthians 4:4). "The World" when representing the Greek "age" (aion ) means not the material "world" (Greek kosmos ), but the age in its relation to God or to Satan
Supralapsarianism - An issue within Reformed theology dealing with what may have happened in God's mind regarding the logical order of His considering whom to elect into salvation before the foundation of the World. " This position holds that God first decided that he would save some people and then second that he would allow sin into the World. By contrast, the infralapsarian ("after the fall") position is the reverse in that it holds that God first decided he would allow sin into the World and second that he would then save people from it
Zaphnathpaaneah - ; but as an Egyptian name, which it is, it has been interpreted 'Prince of the life of the World. ' In the LXX the name stands Ψονθομφανήχan equivalent to the Coptic Psotempheneh, which has been thus explained: p represents the article; sote is 'saviour,' m is sign of the genitive case; ph the article; and eneh is 'world. ' 'The saviour of the World
Eternal Creation - Faith clearly teaches that this World did not exist from all eternity, but was created in time, i. ,a measurable span of time has elapsed since the World came into being. Saint Thomas and Suarez deny that we can prove from reason that eternal creation was impossible, that this World could not have existed from all eternity
Reclusion - ) A state of retirement from the World; seclusion
Worldlywise - ) Wise in regard to things of this World
Optimism - In philosophy, the theory proposed by Leibnitz, that the World, as the product of a Perfect, All-Good Creator, is the best conceivable World and essentially good. God foresaw all possible Worlds, and was bound to choose the best. In a more moderate sense, optimism holds that the World is good, and the best possible fulfillment of the purpose of the Creator. It is also an evolutionary theory that the World is constantly tending to a higher and more perfect state (Hegel)
Cosmometry - ) The art of measuring the World or the universe
Antemundane - ) Being or occurring before the creation of the World
Monde - ) The World; a globe as an ensign of royalty
Middle-Earth - ) The World, considered as lying between heaven and hell
Cosmopolite - ) One who has no fixed residence, or who is at home in every place; a citizen of the World. ) Common everywhere; widely spread; found in all parts of the World
Catholic Church, the - Founded by Christ, propagated by His apostles, from Jerusalem through Asia Minor to Rome as its permanent World center, from which it spread throughout the World according to the mandate of its Divine Founder: ...
"Going therefore, teach ye all nations; baptising them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost" (Matthew 28)
Pre-Adamites - The teaching that there was a race of people before Adam and Eve lived in the Garden and that the fall of Satan caused a widespread destruction of the World. The result of this destruction was so vast that the World needed to be re-made with Adam and Eve being the first of the new order
Rulers of the World of This Darkness - As a consequence of original sin the World had been given over to the "world-rulers of this darkness," but by the redeeming death of Christ it was bought back to the kingdom of God and of light
Christianism - ) The Christian World; Christendom
World Rulers - * For World RULERS, Ephesians 6:12 , RV, see RULER , No
Onion - Numbers 11:5 (c) This vegetable is a type of that which the World offers to the Christian in the place of manna from Heaven. The World seeks to feed on these things rather than on the Lord JESUS CHRIST, His Word, and His Work. So those who participate in the things of the World and have no use for the heavenly manna can easily be distinguished by the effect in their lives
Idealism - As applied to the philosophy of Plato it signifies his theory that the visible things of this World are merely copies of the perfect realities of another supersensible, ideal World. In modern times, idealism is the theory which denies reality to the external, physical World, and attributes real existence only to things as they are in the mind. More modified theories admit the problematical existence of the material, sensible World, but hold that things are known only as they appear to us and not as they are in themselves
Famine - This boy left his father's home, which is a type of walking with and loving our Lord, to seek his pleasures in the far-off country, which represents the World. He found that all that the World offered him soon failed. Nothing that the World gives can satisfy the craving of the human heart. The World with its pleasures and its pursuits fails to satisfy the craving of the heart
Fra Mauro - Died c1457 Drew up the most famous medieval World map
Mauro, Fra - Died c1457 Drew up the most famous medieval World map
Heled - This World, (1 Chronicles 11:30 ); called Heleb (2 Samuel 23:29 )
Esparcet - ) The common sainfoin (Onobrychis sativa), an Old World leguminous forage plant
Aera - ...
The ancient Jews made use of several aeras in their computation; sometimes they reckoned from the deluge, sometimes from the division of tongues; sometimes from their departure out of Egypt; and at other times from the building of the temple; and sometimes from the restoration after the Babylonish captivity: but their vulgar aera was from the creation of the World, which falls in with the year of the Julian period 953; and consequently they supposed the World created 294 years sooner than according to our computation. This aera begins with the year of the World 3692, of the Julian Period 4402, and before Christ 312. The aera in general use among the Christians is that from the birth of Jesus Christ, concerning the true time of which chronologers differ; some place it two years, others four, and again others five, before the vulgar aera, which is fixed for the year of the World 4004: but Archbishop Usher, and after him the generality of modern chronologers, place it in the year of the World 4000. The aera of the first olympiad is placed in the year of the World...
3228, and before the vulgar aera of Jesus Christ 776. The taking of Troy by the Greeks, in the year of the World 2820, and before Jesus Christ 1884. The voyage undertaken for the purpose of bringing away the golden fleece, in the year of the World 2760
Antipodean - ) Pertaining to the antipodes, or the opposite side of the World; antipodal
Dropwort - ) An Old World species of Spiraea (S
Coucal - ) A large, Old World, ground cuckoo of the genus Centropus, of several species
Cosmographer - ) One who describes the World or universe, including the heavens and the earth
Mundane - ) Of or pertaining to the World; Worldly; earthly; terrestrial; as, the mundane sphere
Men-Pleaser - ) One whose motive is to please men or the World, rather than God
Apostolate - The office and dignity of an Apostle; the whole bodyof Bishops throughout the World
Olamot elyonim - "supernal Worlds"); in Kabbalistic works there is generally reference made to four spiritual Worlds: Atzilut - Emanation, Briyah - Creation, Yetzirah - Formation, and Asiyah - Action. In each one of these Worlds, the Divine energy becomes progressively more disconnected from its source, thus beginning to feel itself as a separate entity. Our physical World is the lower half of the World of Asiyah, sometimes known as Asiyah HaGashmit
Creation - ) That which is created; that which is produced or caused to exist, as the World or some original work of art or of the imagination; nature. Specifically, the act of bringing the universe or this World into existence
Worldly - ) Pertaining to this World or life, in contradistinction from the life to come; secular; temporal; devoted to this life and its enjoyments; bent on gain; as, Worldly pleasures, affections, honor, lusts, men. ) With relation to this life; in a Worldly manner. ) Relating to the World; human; common; as, Worldly maxims; Worldly actions
Charterhouse of Saint Hugh - The largest Charterhouse in the World, near Cowfold, Sussex, England; founded, 1883, by the Carthusians
Cosmothetic - ) Assuming or positing the actual existence or reality of the physical or external World
Redeemer - ) Specifically, the Savior of the World, Jesus Christ
Tertiaries of the Society of the Atonement - Members of the third congregation of the Society of the Atonement, living in the World
Tziruf - "the process of smelting ore"); an analogy for the spiritual task of refining the World...
Oecology - ) The various relations of animals and plants to one another and to the outer World
Megaderm - ) Any one of several species of Old World blood-sucking bats of the genus Megaderma
Habitable - ) Capable of being inhabited; that may be inhabited or dwelt in; as, the habitable World
Redeemer - The Savior of the World, JESUS CHRIST
Heaven - Who,' saith an old divine, 'chides a servant for taking away the first course at a feast when the second consists of far greater delicacies?' Who then can feel regret that this present World passeth away, when he sees that an eternal World of joy is coming? The first course is grace, but the second is glory, and that is as much better as the fruit is better than the blossom
Secular Clergy - (Latin: secularis, pertaining to the World) ...
A term applied to the clergy, who are not members of a religious order, and whose immediate superior is the bishop of the diocese, to whom they owe obedience and under whose direction they labor for the sanctification of souls, and for this purpose are not bound by rule of cloister, but are more freely in touch with persons of the World
Militant, Church - A name used to describe the Church on earth,fighting (which the word Militant means) or contending against thepowers of the World, to distinguish it from the Church Expectant andthe Church Triumphant. ) In the CommunionOffice the prayer said after the presentation of offerings is called"The Prayer for the Church Militant," which is a pleading for theHoly Church throughout the World offered in union with the GreatSacrifice
i w w - Industrial Workers of the World (the name of two American labor organizations, one of which advocates syndicalism)...
World - The love of the World does not consist in the use and enjoyment of the comforts God gives us, but in an inordinate attachment to the things of time and sense. "We love the World too much, " says Dr. We love the World too much when we cannot part with any thing we possess to those who want, deserve, and have a right to it. When we envy those who are more fortunate and more favoured by the World than we are. When Worldly prosperity makes us proud, and vain, and arrogant. ; Bishop Hopkins on the Vanity of the World; Dr. Stennet's Sermon on Conformity to the World; H
Hades - The unseen World, the spirit World. The word is used in Homer as a proper noon for Pluto, the god of the unseen or lower World. In later writers it signifies the unseen spirit World, the abode of the dead. reads "death," and thus obliterates the important distinction between the realm of the dead or spirit World and the place of torment. Since Christ's descent into Hades, or the unseen, the spirit World, believers need not fear to enter this realm through death
Panislamism - ) A desire or plan for the union of all Mohammedan nations for the conquest of the World
Heathendom - ) That part of the World where heathenism prevails; the heathen nations, considered collectively
Unsecularize - ) To cause to become not secular; to detach from secular things; to alienate from the World
Worldling - A person whose soul is set upon gaining temporal possessions; one devoted to this World and its enjoyments
Wittingly - ...
He knowingly and wittingly brought evil into the World
World - , Matthew 5:14 ; John 1:9 World" is said of Christ, not of "every man;" by His coming into the World He was the light for all men]'>[1]; 1 John 3:10 ; 3:16,17 (thrice),19; 4:42, and frequently in Rom. , John 7:7 ; 8:23 ; 14:30 ; 1 Corinthians 2:12 ; Galatians 4:3 ; 6:14 ; Colossians 2:8 ; James 1:27 ; 1 John 4:5 (thrice); 5:19; (f) the "sum of temporal possessions," Matthew 16:26 ; 1 Corinthians 7:31 (1st part); (g) metaphorically, of the "tongue" as "a World (of iniquity)," James 3:6 ; expressive of magnitude and variety. ...
2: αἰών (Strong's #165 — Noun Masculine — aion — ahee-ohn' ) "an age, a period of time," marked in the NT usage by spiritual or moral characteristics, is sometimes translated "world;" the RV marg. " The following are details concerning the World in this respect; its cares, Matthew 13:22 ; its sons, Luke 16:8 ; 20:34 ; its rulers, 1 Corinthians 2:6,8 ; its wisdom, 1 Corinthians 1:20 ; 2:6 ; 3:18 , its fashion, Romans 12:2 ; its character, Galatians 1:4 ; its god, 2 Corinthians 4:4 . The phrase "the end of the World" should be rendered "the end of the age," in most places (see END , A, No. 2); in 1 Corinthians 10:11 , AV, "the ends (tele) of the World," RV, "the ends of the ages," probably signifies the fulfillment of the Divine purposes concerning the ages in regard to the church
Notes: (1) In Revelation 13:3 , AV, ge, "the earth" (RV), is translated "world
Earthly - Pertaining to the earth, or to this World. Belonging to the earth or World carnal vile as opposed to spiritual or heavenly
Kabbala - They are said to have formed the first World, from which proceeds the second World, that of creation, with its ten Sephiroth of more limited potency. From this proceeds the third World, of formation, with its ten immaterial Sephiroth. The fourth World, of matter, in turn proceeds from the third World. When the Messias is eventually born at the end of days the World will return to the bosom of the Infinite Source, Hell will end and bliss begin. To the Kabbalist, redemption was possible by a mystic influence on God and the World of light through a rigid observance of the law, asceticism, etc
Sun - The Bible recognizes that the sun exercises control over certain processes of life in the World, and it sees this as a sign that God created the World and continues to care for it (Genesis 1:14-18; Deuteronomy 33:13-14; Matthew 5:45). The sun was darkened at the time of Jesus’ crucifixion, and will be darkened again at the time of his return to judge the World (Matthew 27:45; Mark 13:24-27)
Agabus - He came from Judaea to Antioch while Paul and Barnabas were there, and foretold the famine which occurred the next year in Palestine (for a Jew would mean the Jewish World, by "throughout all the World. In the wider sense of "the World," as the prophecy fixes on no year, but "in the days of Claudius Caesar," it may include other famines elsewhere in his reign, one in Greece, two in Rome
Leek - These are used as types of various kinds of pleasures and pursuits offered by the World to those who belong to this World and have never tasted the heavenly manna. The things which the World offer hardly satisfy for more than one day at a time
Sheep-Market, the - (John 5:2 ) The World "market" is an interpolation of our translators
Dispatched - Sent with haste or by a courier express sent out of the World put to death performed finished
Silverbill - ) An Old World finch of the genus Minia, as the M
Zeus - ) The chief deity of the Greeks, and ruler of the upper World (cf
Weltschmertz - ) Sorrow or sadness over the present or future evils or woes of the World in general; sentimental pessimism
Pilgrim - Hebrews 11:13 (b) This name is applied to the Christian's attitude toward the World. His hopes and ambitions are for the other World
Recluse - ) A person who lives in seclusion from intercourse with the World, as a hermit or monk; specifically, one of a class of secluded devotees who live in single cells, usually attached to monasteries. ) Shut up; sequestered; retired from the World or from public notice; solitary; living apart; as, a recluse monk or hermit; a recluse life
Worldly - WorldLY, a. Secular temporal pertaining to this World or life, in contradistinction to the life to come as Worldly pleasures Worldly affairs Worldly estate Worldly honor Worldly lusts. Devoted to this life and its enjoyments bent on gain as a Worldly man a Worldly mind. Human common belonging to the World as Worldly actions Worldly maxims. WorldLY, adv. ...
Subverting Worldly strong and Worldly wise by simply meek
Panpresbyterian - ) Belonging to, or representative of, those who hold Presbyterian views in all parts of the World; as, a Panpresbyterian council
Pluto - ) The son of Saturn and Rhea, brother of Jupiter and Neptune; the dark and gloomy god of the Lower World
Kalpa - At the end of each Kalpa the World is annihilated
Macrocosm - ) The great World; that part of the universe which is exterior to man; - contrasted with microcosm, or man
World to Come - The word translated 'world' in the following passages is αἰών (see World): it may therefore be rendered 'the age to come. Christ has been exalted above every name named in this World or in the World to come. The World to come will usher in eternity
Anza - ) A kind of wild goose, by a flock of which a virtuoso was fabled to be carried to the lunar World
Carnally - ) According to the flesh, to the World, or to human nature; in a manner to gratify animal appetites and lusts; sensually
Adorn, Adorning - ...
B — 1: κόσμος (Strong's #2889 — Noun Masculine — kosmos — kos'-mos ) "a harmonious arrangement or order," then, "adornment, decoration," came to denote "the World, or the universe, as that which is Divinely arranged. Elsewhere it signifies "the World. See World
Christ the King, Feast of - Iesu Christi universorum Regis...
Our Lord Jesus Christ King of All ...
Memorial last Sunday in the liturgical year...
formerly the last Sunday in October ...
About the Feast Instituted to give public homage to Christ, the Ruler of the World, by Pope Pius XI, 1925. Every year on this day is renewed the consecration of the World to the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Feast of Christ the King - Iesu Christi universorum Regis...
Our Lord Jesus Christ King of All ...
Memorial last Sunday in the liturgical year...
formerly the last Sunday in October ...
About the Feast Instituted to give public homage to Christ, the Ruler of the World, by Pope Pius XI, 1925. Every year on this day is renewed the consecration of the World to the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Consummation - ) The act of consummating, or the state of being consummated; completed; completion; perfection; termination; end (as of the World or of life)
Anchorite - ) One who renounces the World and secludes himself, usually for religious reasons; a hermit; a recluse
Disputer - ...
Where is the disputer of this World
Rudiments - ' The Christian is warned against the rudiments of the World, from which he has died with Christ
Elaps - ) A genus of venomous snakes found both in America and the Old World
Malchut - (kingship): sovereignty, the last of the ten Divine sefirot and their corresponding mortal middot; acts as a transitionary link to a lower World ...
Tartak - The word is supposed to signify 'darkness,' or the under-world
Zaphnath-Paaneah - Savior of the World, an Egyptian name given by Pharaoh to Joseph, in commemoration of the salvation wrought through him, Genesis 41:45
Table of Nations - The Genesis 10:1 listing of the descendants of Noah's sons to explain the origin of the nations and peoples of the known World. Second, the account highlights the ethnic makeup of the ancient World, listing some seventy different ethnic groups that formed the basis of the known World. Fourth, Genesis 10:1 provides the basis for understanding Abraham, introducing his World and his relationship to that World. The people and lands of the known World fit into one of three families, the family of Shem, Ham, or Japheth
Lights - , and as symbols of Christ, Light of the World
Dor haflagah - �the generation of the division,�) the generation who constructed the Tower of Babel and as punishment were divided and dispersed throughout the World
Olam haba - �the World to come�); the spiritual realm of the souls in the afterlife; also used to refer to the Era of the Resurrection...
Eorama - ) A hollow globe on the inner surface of which a map of the World is depicted, to be examined by one standing inside
Rhinopome - ) Any old-world bat of the genus Rhinopoma
Shropshire - ) An English breed of black-faced hornless sheep similar to the Southdown, but larger, now extensively raised in many parts of the World
Faith: Overcoming Temptation - ' O believer, if the World tempt thee with its rare sights and curious prospects, thou mayst well scorn them, having been, by contemplation, in heaven, and being able, by faith, to see infinitely better delights every hour of the day. 'This is the victory which overcometh the World, even our faith
Demas - But he declined; for in 2 Timothy 4:10 Paul writes, "Demas hath forsaken (Greek text: "left behind") me, having loved this present World (world course), and is departed unto Thessalonica," probably his home (Chrysostom). Love of Worldly ease and home comforts was his snare, a sad contrast to "all them that love Christ's appearing" (2 Timothy 4:8)
Montenegro - After World War I, Montenegro was part of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, and fell with it to the Axis. After World War II it became part of the Soviet puppet state of Yugoslavia. Ecclesiastically it is governed by the archdiocese of ...
Bar
See also ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
Dominica - Org
World Fact Book
Pratincole - ) Any bird of the Old World genus Glareola, or family Glareolidae, allied to the plovers
Skepticism - Skepticism is the philosophical approach that denies that the World can be objectively known in any absolute sense
Bodhisattwa - ) One who has reached the highest degree of saintship, so that in his next incarnation he will be a Buddha, or savior of the World
Viperoides - ) A division of serpents which includes the true vipers of the Old World and the rattlesnakes and moccasin snakes of America; - called also Viperina
Yuga - ) Any one of the four ages, Krita, or Satya, Treta, Dwapara, and Kali, into which the Hindoos divide the duration or existence of the World
Hermogenians - Hermogenes established matter as his first principle; and regarding matter as the fountain of all evil, he maintained, that the World, and every thing contained in it, as also the souls of men and other spirits, were formed by the Deity from an uncreated and eternal mass of corrupt matter. The opinions of Hermogenes with regard to the origin of the World, and the nature of the soul, were warmly opposed by Tertullian
Sin: Punishment of - The sinful joys of the flesh lead, even in this World, to results most terrible, while in the World to come the daggers of remorse and despair will cut and wound beyond all remedy
Moab - Ruth 1:2 (c) Moab may be taken to represent all that is outside of CHRIST in this World. Let us never think that we can find more blessing in the World among GOD's enemies than in the church among GOD's people
Eschatology - These are, for the individual, death, judgment (particular), heaven or hell (purgatory, as a transitory state), the so- called "four last things," since they constitute the end of man's mortal life, and the immediate and final retribution of that life in another World. To these must be added the end and fate of the physical World or cosmic eschatology
Evil, Powers of - Since original sin is ascribed to the instigation of the devil: "By the envy of the devil, death came into the World" (Wisdom of Solomon 2), and according to Saint Paul (Ephesians 6), the evil spirits are the most dangerous enemies of our souls, the real powers of evil in the World are the fallen angels
Ages of the World - AGES OF THE World...
There have been generally reckoned six ages from the creation of the World to the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ
Runner of the World - (The Runner of the World) A Middle-English poem of about 25,000 lines, mainly in eight-syllable couplets, written by an unknown cleric in northern England, c. It is a sort of religious epic, written in honor of the Blessed Virgin, and purports to give a history of the World as derived from the Old and New Testaments, with the Redemption as the central theme
Catarrhine - ) One of the Catarrhina, a division of Quadrumana, including the Old World monkeys and apes which have the nostrils close together and turned downward
Honeyberry - ) The fruit of either of two trees having sweetish berries: (a) An Old World hackberry (Celtis australis)
Hades - The Greek word hades was used in Bible times as the equivalent of the Hebrew word sheol, the name used in the Old Testament for the World of the dead. This World of the dead was the shadowy destiny that awaited all people, whether good or bad (Acts 2:27; cf. ...
With Christ’s conquest of death, there was no need to fear the World of the dead any longer
Cosmogony - ) The creation of the World or universe; a theory or account of such creation; as, the poetical cosmogony of Hesoid; the cosmogonies of Thales, Anaxagoras, and Plato
Orientalist - ) An inhabitant of the Eastern parts of the World; an Oriental
Eternity of the World - It was the opinion of Aristotle and others that the World was eternal. We can trace the invention of the most useful arts and sciences; which had probably been carried farther, and invented sooner, had the World been eternal. If the World be eternal, it is hard to account for the tradition of its beginning, which has almost everywhere prevailed, though under different forms, among both polite and barbarous nations. We have a most ancient and credible history of the beginning of the World: I mean the history of Moses, with which no book in the World, in point of antiquity, can contend
World, the - In the last passage it is the coming World, that is, that which is put under the Son of Man, that is spoken of. The heaven and the earth, because of their order and beauty, are called cosmos , 'the World. ' This word is employed for 'world ' in its various meanings, as for instance the material earth, Romans 1:20 ; the inhabitants of the World that will be judged, Romans 3:6 ; and in a moral sense as the condition and spirit which is opposed to God. ...
Another word, αἰών, 'age, duration,' is applied both to the present age, the course of this World, and to age-enduring, or eternity, Romans 12:2 ; Galatians 1:4 ; Ephesians 1:21 ; Ephesians 6:12 . In two passages this word refers to the material Worlds
Palace - His house refers to the World in all of its various characters. It refers to the religious World, the political World, the social World, the World of sports, the World of travel and beauty, the World of business, of arts and sciences
Juan de la Cosa - Accompanied Columbus on his second voyage as cartographer, and drew up a celebrated World chart which is considered the first map of America
Ajar - ) In a state of discord; out of harmony; as, he is ajar with the World
Evangelize - ) To instruct in the gospel; to preach the gospel to; to convert to Christianity; as, to evangelize the World
Habitable - ...
That may be inhabited or dwelt in capable of sustaining human beings as the habitable World
Astral Projection - In Eastern metaphysical and new age philosophies, astral projection is the practice of the soul leaving the human body and traveling around this World or other planes of existence
Albanois - They also maintained that the World was from eternity
Angelics - An ancient sect, supposed by some to have got this appellation from their excessive veneration of angels, and by others from maintaining that the World was created by angels
Terek - ) A sandpiper (Terekia cinerea) of the Old World, breeding in the far north of eastern Europe and Asia and migrating to South Africa and Australia
Obtrusion - ) The act of obtruding; a thrusting upon others by force or unsolicited; as, the obtrusion of crude opinions on the World
Lateran - John Lateran, the church being the cathedral church of Rome, and the highest in rank of all churches in the Catholic World
World: Its Instability - Queen Elizabeth once said to a courtier, 'They pass best over the World who trip over it quickly; for it is but a bog: if we stop, we sink
Anchoress - (Greek: anachoreo, withdraw) ...
Men who renounce the World in order to spend their lives alone in penance and prayer; women are known as anchoresses
Anchorite - (Greek: anachoreo, withdraw) ...
Men who renounce the World in order to spend their lives alone in penance and prayer; women are known as anchoresses
Annum Ingressi - It was addressed to the bishops of the World, and reviewed the first twenty-five years of Leo's pontificate
Hermann Boerhaave - World-famed physician
Archontics - Among many other extravagant notions, they held that the World was created by archangels; they also denied the resurrection of the body
Action - The World of: (lit. “deed”); in Kabbalistic terminology, this refers to the lowest of the four spiritual Worlds, the final level in the creative process which includes the physical universe ...
Earthquake - ...
Matthew 28:2 (c) It is symbolical of the fact that things which the World calls "real" are not very stable. The One who made the World is able to shake it
Warbler - ) Any one of numerous species of small Old World singing birds belonging to the family Sylviidae, many of which are noted songsters. They are allied to the Old World warblers, but most of them are not particularly musical
Acheron - ) A river in the Nether World or infernal regions; also, the infernal regions themselves
Ancient of Days - The everlasting Jehovah, as contrasted with the ephemeral transitoriness of the four successive World powers, stable as they seemed for a time
Ant Thrush - ...
(2):...
One of several species of tropical birds, of the Old World, of the genus Pitta, somewhat resembling the thrushes, and feeding chiefly on ants
Jericho - Luke 10:30 (c) In this passage, Jerusalem represents the place of Christian privileges and Jericho represents the way of the World
Militant - From militans, fighting; a term applied to the church on earth, as engaged in a warfare with the World, sin, and the devil; in distinction from the church triumphant in heaven
Water Chestnut - The fruit of Trapa natans and Trapa bicornis, Old World water plants bearing edible nutlike fruits armed with several hard and sharp points; also, the plant itself; - called also water caltrop
Universe - ) All created things viewed as constituting one system or whole; the whole body of things, or of phenomena; the / / of the Greeks, the mundus of the Latins; the World; creation
Assiah - World of Action, The: (lit. �deed�); in Kabbalistic terminology, this refers to the lowest of the four spiritual Worlds, the final level in the creative process which includes the physical universe ...
Affliction: an Incentive to Zeal - So, when our troubles are many we are often by grace made courageous in serving our God; we feel that we have nothing to live for in this World, and we are driven, by hope of the World to come, to exhibit zeal, self-denial, and industry. But how often is it otherwise in better times! for then the joys and pleasures of this World make it hard for us to remember the World to come, and we sink into inglorious ease
Anolis - They take the place in the New World of the chameleons in the Old, and in America are often called chameleons
si'Nim, - a people noticed in (Isaiah 49:12 ) as living at the extremity of the known World
Balm of Gilead - A substance known in the ancient World for its medical properties
Inordinate - ...
Irregular disorderly excessive immoderate not limited to rules prescribed, or to usual bounds as an inordinate love of the World inordinate desire of fame
Tow - Isaiah 1:31 (a) GOD is assuring the World that His enemies will be easily destroyed
Serapis - ) An Egyptian deity, at first a symbol of the Nile, and so of fertility; later, one of the divinities of the lower World
Viper - ) Any one of numerous species of Old World venomous makes belonging to Vipera, Clotho, Daboia, and other genera of the family Viperidae
Degenerate - To become worse to decay in good qualities to pass from a good to a bad or worse state to lose or suffer a diminution of valuable qualities, either in the natural or moral World. In the natural World, plants and animals degenerate when they grow to a less size than usual, or lose a part of the valuable qualities which belong to the species. In the moral World, men degenerate when they decline in virtue, or other good qualities
Menandrians - He taught, that no person could be saved unless he were baptised in his name; and he conferred a peculiar sort of baptism, which would render those who received it immortal in the next World; exhibiting himself to the World with the phrenzy of a lunatic more than the founder of a sect as a promised saviour; for it appears by the testimonies of Irenxus, Justin, and Tertullian, that he pretended to be one of the xons sent from the pleroma, or ecclesiastical regious, to succour the souls that lay groaning under bodily oppression and servitude; and to maintain them against the violence and stratagems of the daemons that hold the reins of empire in this sublunary World
Cosmography - ) A description of the World or of the universe; or the science which teaches the constitution of the whole system of Worlds, or the figure, disposition, and relation of all its parts
Globe - A symbol often shown beneath the feet of the Virgin Mary, to indicate that she is the Queen of the World
Philosophy - The meaning of the word is a rover of wisdom, but most wretchedly applied, when spoken of in reference to the wisdom of this World
Elemental - ) Pertaining to the elements, first principles, and primary ingredients, or to the four supposed elements of the material World; as, elemental air
Macau, China, Diocese of - Org
World Fact Book
diocese of Macau
patron saints index
Effectual Prayer - , "it moves the hand of Him who moves the World
Theism - The teaching that there is a God and that He is actively involved in the affairs of the World
Egypt - Hebrews 11:26 (c) A type of the World with its riches and opportunities
Encompass - ) To circumscribe or go round so as to surround closely; to encircle; to inclose; to environ; as, a ring encompasses the finger; an army encompasses a city; a voyage encompassing the World
Postmillennialism - The belief that through the preaching of the word of God, the entire World will be converted to Christianity and this will usher in the kingdom of Christ
Demogorgon - ) A mysterious, terrible, and evil divinity, regarded by some as the author of creation, by others as a great magician who was supposed to command the spirits of the lower World
Abbey - ) A monastery or society of persons of either sex, secluded from the World and devoted to religion and celibacy; also, the monastic building or buildings
Whereof - Whereof was this house built? How this World, when and whereof created-- ...
Divine Comedy, the - An allegory of human life in the form of a vision of the World beyond the grave written, c. 1311-1321,by Dante Alighieri with the avowed purpose of converting a corrupt World to righteousness
Divina Commedia, la - An allegory of human life in the form of a vision of the World beyond the grave written, c. 1311-1321,by Dante Alighieri with the avowed purpose of converting a corrupt World to righteousness
Devil - ...
Prince of the World, John 12:31 . ...
The god of this World, 2 Corinthians 4:4
Beggar - 1 Samuel 2:8 (b) This unfortunate person warming himself on the dung heap in the backyard is a type of the sinner who seeks to find comfort from the wretched and miserable things offered by this World. When GOD comes into a man's life, He changes him by means of the new birth, so that he no longer wants the dung heap of this World, but sits in the presence of GOD in a glorious atmosphere of heavenly association
Fornication - 2 Chronicles 21:11 (a) The word is used to describe the wickedness of a people who forsake the true GOD, and the blessings which He gives in order to follow the attractions of the ungodly World, and of false gods. ...
Revelation 17:2-4 (a) GOD thus describes the wickedness of that which claims to be the Church of GOD as it supports and invites wicked men of the World to join with them, and to partake of their religious exercises
Cassock - A long black coat, fastened in front and reaching tothe feet, worn by the clergy with or without robes and signifyingseparation from the World
Fishhooks - Amos 4:2 (a) GOD will use means to catch the people of Israel from all over the World in such a way that they cannot escape the punishment He will pour out on them
Mission - Thus Jesus Christ gave his disciples their mission, when he said, "go ye into all the World, and preach the Gospel to every creature
Winked - The former times of ignorance God 'overlooked,' but now commandeth all men everywhere to repent, for a day has been appointed when the Lord Jesus will judge the habitable World in righteousness
Beriah - World of Creation, The: (lit. “creation”); more specifically creation ex nihilo; in Kabbalistic terminology, the second of the four spiritual Worlds, the realm of spiritual existence which represents the first beginnings of a consciousness of self ...
Holarctic - ) designating a realm or region including the northern parts of the Old and the New World
Muscat - ) A name given to several varieties of Old World grapes, differing in color, size, etc
Demas - A fellow-laborer with Paul at Thessalonica, who afterwards deserted him, either discouraged by the hardships of the work, or allured by the love of the World, Colossians 4:14 2 Timothy 4:10 Philippians 1:24
Ruler - ...
3: κοσμοκράτωρ (Strong's #2888 — Noun Masculine — kosmokrator — kos-mok-rat'-ore ) denotes "a ruler of this World" (contrast pantokrator, "almighty"). , and in rabbinic writings, it signifies a "ruler" of the whole World, a World lord. In the NT it is used in Ephesians 6:12 , "the World rulers (of this darkness)," RV, AV, "the rulers (of the darkness) of this World. " The context ("not against flesh and blood") shows that not earthly potentates are indicated, but spirit powers, who, under the permissive will of God, and in consequence of human sin, exercise satanic and therefore antagonistic authority over the World in its present condition of spiritual darkness and alienation from God. The suggested rendering "the rulers of this dark World" is ambiguous and not phraseologically requisite
Cosmorama - ) An exhibition in which a series of views in various parts of the World is seen reflected by mirrors through a series of lenses, with such illumination, etc
Greenland - See also: ...
World Fact Book
Wagtail - ) Any one of many species of Old World singing birds belonging to Motacilla and several allied genera of the family Motacillidae
Whitethroat - ) Any one of several species of Old World warblers, esp
Persia - This was the kingdom, in the government of the World, which succeeded the Babylonish, when Cyrus, king of Persia, had destroyed the Chaldean powers
Narrow (And Forms) - The World thinks that GOD's people are fanatics because they do not follow the ways of the World in sin of many kinds. Because the believer does not spend his time, talents and funds in the ways of the World, they think that the Christian is restricted and hindered
Popery - Lightfoot observes:– 'Yoke-fellows, indeed, are the Jew and Romanist above all people of the World, in a deluded fancying their own bravery and privilege above all the World besides. And is not the style of the Romanists the very same tune? 'How holy the Church of Rome! what superiority and pre-eminence hath the church above all churches, and all the men in the World are heretics, and apostates, and cast-aways, if they be not Romanists
King Going to War, Parable of the - Then it may teach us that the spiritual warfare which we must wage daily against the prince of this World requires detachment from both se)f and the World
Seth - This sense of frailty led the Sethites to calling on God in His covenant relation to His believing people; thus began the church as a people separated from the World, and its service of prayer and praise. While the Cainites, by erecting a city and inventing Worldly arts, laid the foundation of the World kingdom, the Sethites, by joint invocation of Jehovah's name i
Communicatio Idiomatum - For example, John 17:5 is where Jesus, the man, says, "And now, glorify Thou Me together with Thyself, Father, with the glory which I had with Thee before the World was. " We see here that Jesus who was born on earth says He had glory with the Father before the World was
Genesis - (Greek: origin) ...
The first Book of the Bible, containing an account of the origin of the World, of the human race and of the chosen people. The general divisions of the book are as follows: ...
the creation of the World and early history of mankind (1-11), including the Fall, the promise of a Redeemer, and the Deluge; ...
the early history of the Jews (12-50), including Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph
Modest - kosmikos, of the World, which is related to kosmos in its secondary sense as the World), is used in 1 Timothy 2:9 of the apparel with which Christian women are to adorn themselves; in 1 Timothy 3:2 (RV, "orderly;" AV, "of good behavior"), of one of the qualifications essential for a bishop or overseer
R. yosef yitzchak schneersohn of lubavitch - Sixth leader of Chabad-Lubavitch; 1880-1950; lived in Lubavitch, Warsaw and New York; headed the movement�s active resistance against the Communist suppression of religion in Russia and transferred the movement to the US during World War II
Arlic - Numbers 11:5 (c) This is typical of the best things which this earth supplies for the children of this World. Those who partake of the World's goods bear the odor and the influence of them in their lives
Christ - THE ANOINTED an appellation given to the Savior of the World, and synonymous with the Hebrew Messiah
Deism - The belief that God exists but is not involved in the World
Limited Atonement - The teaching held in Reformed (Calvinist) circles of Christianity that Jesus bore only the sins of the elect, and not that of the entire World
Captivities of Judah - The captivities of Judah are generally reckoned four: the first, in the year of the World 3398, under King Jehoiakim, when Daniel and others were carried to Babylon; the second, in the year of the World 3401, and in the seventh year of the reign of Jehoiakim, when Nebuchadnezzar carried three thousand and twenty-three Jews to Babylon; the third, in the year of the World 3406, and in the fourth of Jehoiachin, when this prince, with part of people, was sent to Babylon; and the fourth in the year 3416, under Zedekiah, from which period begins the captivity of seventy years, foretold by the Prophet Jeremiah. Cyrus, in the year of the World 3457, and in the first year of his reign at Babylon, permitted the Jews to return to their own country, Ezra 1:1 . However, they did not obtain leave to rebuild the temple; and the completion of those prophecies which foretold the termination of their captivity after seventy years, was not till the year of the World 3486. In the year of the World 3537, Artaxerxes Longimanus sent Nehemiah to Jerusalem
Pancratium - ) A genus of Old World amaryllideous bulbous plants, having a funnel-shaped perianth with six narrow spreading lobes
Paradise - ) It came in course of time to be used as a name for the World of happiness and rest hereafter (Luke 23:43 ; 2 co 12:4 ; Revelation 2:7 )
Demas - It appears, however, that the love of the World afterwards mastered him, and he deserted the apostle (2 Timothy 4:10 )
Messiah - Christ, the anointed the Savior of the World
American Samoa - See also: ...
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Catholic-Hiearchy
Camp - Hebrews 13:13 (b) The great religious groups of the World established by human agencies and teaching men's theories are called a "camp
Gate of Heaven - (Latin: Janua caeli) ...
Name applied to the Blessed Virgin Mary in the Litany of Loreto, and in the hymn "Alma Redemptoris," because through her Christ came into the World, and on her intercession we largely base our hope of salvation
Heaven, Gate of - (Latin: Janua caeli) ...
Name applied to the Blessed Virgin Mary in the Litany of Loreto, and in the hymn "Alma Redemptoris," because through her Christ came into the World, and on her intercession we largely base our hope of salvation
Sacred Heart Badge - It is the badge of the League of the Sacred Heart (the Apostleship of Prayer), a World-wide society fostered by the Society of Jesus
Knowing - The knowing and intelligent part of the World
Samoa, American - See also: ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hiearchy
Tranquillity - We speak of the tranquillity of public affairs, of the state, of the World, the tranquillity of a retired life, the tranquillity of mind proceeding from conscious rectitude
Cross - It means the denying of luxuries, self-interests and ambitions in order to enter fully into a walk with the rejected CHRIST in a hostile World. The World crucified CHRIST, and that makes the World an enemy of every Christian. But since JESUS was dying for the individual, the Cross means that this individual has been put to death by the World that crucified Christ; therefore, he is dead to the call and the attractions of the World
Juan Perez - Franciscan; died c1513His influence as confessor of Queen Isabella, induced her to aid Christopher Columbus, whom he accompanied on his second voyage; he celebrated the first Mass in the New World (1493)
Emanation - The World of: (lit. �emanation�); in Kabbalistic terminology, the highest of the four spiritual Worlds, the realm of spiritual existence which, although encompassing attributes which have a specific definition, is in a state of infinity and at one with the Infinite Divine Light ...
Demas - Though in Philippians 1:24 Paul identified Demas as a “fellow-labourer,” 2 Timothy 4:10 indicates that this man later deserted Paul, “having loved this present World
Cosmology - ) The science of the World or universe; or a treatise relating to the structure and parts of the system of creation, the elements of bodies, the modifications of material things, the laws of motion, and the order and course of nature
Pigeon - ) Any bird of the order Columbae, of which numerous species occur in nearly all parts of the World
Fumitory - ) The common uame of several species of the genus Fumaria, annual herbs of the Old World, with finely dissected leaves and small flowers in dense racemes or spikes
Aureole of the Saints - According to Thomas Aquinas, the three aureoles are particular rewards added to the essential happiness of eternity, three special points of resemblance to Christ: victory over the flesh in virginity, victory over the World
Havock - ...
To waste and havock yonder World
Ibis - ) Any bird of the genus Ibis and several allied genera, of the family Ibidae, inhabiting both the Old World and the New
Vermilinguia - ) A tribe of Old World lizards which comprises the chameleon
Siluroid - ) Belonging to the Siluroidei, or Nematognathi, an order of fishes including numerous species, among which are the American catfishes and numerous allied fresh-water species of the Old World, as the sheatfish (Silurus glanis) of Europe
Demiurge - ) God, as the Maker of the World
Cainan - There were two of this name in the first ages of the World
Kali - ) The last and worst of the four ages of the World; - considered to have begun B
a'Siel - (1 Chronicles 4:35 ) ...
One of the five swift writers whom Esdras was commanded to take to write the law and the history of the World
Dispersion - The term applied to the nation of Israel as now scattered throughout the World
Naturism -
Philosophic Naturism, based on the idea that there is unity in animated nature and that God is the soul of the World, is the essence of Pantheism, the Neo-Hegelian school, and Transcendentalism.
Science-Naturism teaches the identity of God with nature, the veneration and service of humanity or mankind, and the contemplation of the mysterious and unknown powers of the World
Whore - ...
Revelation 17:1 (a) GOD spares no language in exposing the wickedness of the great false religions of the World, and particularly that cruel, voracious one that has its seat and headquarters in Rome. This religion has corrupted the nations of the World through the centuries
Muggletonians - They pretended to absolve or condemn whom they pleased, and gave out that they were the two last witnesses spoken of in the Revelation, who were to appear previous to the final destruction of the World. They affirmed that there was no devil at all without the body of man or woman; that the devil is man's spirit of unclean reason and cursed imagination; that the ministry in this World, whether prophetical or ministerial, is all a lie and abomination to the Lord; with a variety of other vain and inconsistent tenets
Self-Control - It calls for a self-disciplined life following Christ's example of being in the World but not of the World
Traffick - My father, ...
A merchant of great traffick through the World. The English and Americans traffick with all the World
Naturism - ...
Philosophic Naturism, based on the idea that there is unity in animated nature and that God is the soul of the World, is the essence of Pantheism, the Neo-Hegelian school, and Transcendentalism. ...
Science-Naturism teaches the identity of God with nature, the veneration and service of humanity or mankind, and the contemplation of the mysterious and unknown powers of the World
Cartographers -
John Ruysch (1460-1533), a Benedictine, published a famous map of the World representing the new Spanish and Portuguese discoveries in America.
The most celebrated monument of medieval cartography, a map of the World, in the Biblioteca Marciana, Venice, was the work of a Camaldolese monk, Fra Mauro (1459).
Abraham Ortelius (1527-98), a Catholic of Antwerp, made the first modern atlas which combined the maps of the World and contained a catalog of maps with the names of 99 cartographers who lived before 1570
Cartography -
John Ruysch (1460-1533), a Benedictine, published a famous map of the World representing the new Spanish and Portuguese discoveries in America.
The most celebrated monument of medieval cartography, a map of the World, in the Biblioteca Marciana, Venice, was the work of a Camaldolese monk, Fra Mauro (1459).
Abraham Ortelius (1527-98), a Catholic of Antwerp, made the first modern atlas which combined the maps of the World and contained a catalog of maps with the names of 99 cartographers who lived before 1570
Aeon - αἰών is variously translated as ‘age,’ ‘for ever,’ ‘world,’ ‘course,’ ‘eternal. It expresses the idea of long or indefinite past time, ἀπʼ αἰῶνος, ‘since the World began’ (English Version ; Luke 1:70, Acts 3:21; Acts 15:18; cf. Some of these ‘ages’ are regarded as having come to an end-‘but now once in the end of the World (‘at the end of the ages’ Revised Version ) hath he appeared to put away sin’ (Hebrews 9:28). In Hebrews 1:2 ‘through whom also he made the words’ (ages), and Hebrews 11:3 ‘the Worlds (ages) were made by the word of God,’ we have the striking conception of the ‘ages’ as ‘including all that is manifested in and through them’ (Westcott, Com. (In Wisdom of Solomon 13:9 there is a curious instance of αἰών as referring to the actual World, ‘For if they were able to know so much that they could aim at the World [2], how did they not sooner find out the Lord thereof?’)...
5. There is also attached to the word the significance of ‘age’ as indicating a period or dispensation of a definite character-the present order of ‘world-life’ viewed as a whole and as possessing certain moral characteristics. The general translation in Authorized Version and Revised Version is ‘world,’ though ‘age’ appears always in Revised Version margin and in the text at Hebrews 6:5. ‘Now is the judgment of thin World; now shall the prince of this World be cast out’ (John 12:31, also John 15:19 etc. ), ‘If any man love the World’ (1 John 2:15 etc. They are almost, if not altogether, synonymous in ‘Where is the disputer of this World (‘age,’ αἰών)? Hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this World (κόσμος)?’ (1 Corinthians 1:20). Paul recognized a distinction between them is evident from the phrase κατὰ τὸν αἰῶνα τοῦ κὸσμου τούτου, which is translated both in Authorized Version and in Revised Version ‘according to the course of this World’ (Ephesians 2:2). This ‘world’ or ‘age’ as a moral order includes the current epoch of the World’s life. It is described simply as αἰών, ‘the World’ (Matthew 13:22, Mark 4:19), and its end is emphatically affirmed (Matthew 13:39-40; Matthew 13:49; Matthew 24:3; Matthew 28:20). It is described as ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος, ‘this World’ (Matthew 12:32, Luke 16:8, Romans 12:2, 1 Corinthians 1:20, etc. ); as ὁ αἰὼν ὁ ἑνεστώς, ‘the present … World’ (Galatians 1:4). The future age is described as ὁ αἰὼν μέλλων, ‘the World to come’ (Matthew 12:32, Hebrews 6:5); ὁ ἐρχόμενος, ‘the World to come’ (Matthew 10:30, etc. ); and as ὁ αἰὼν ἐκεῖνος, ‘that World’ (Luke 20:35). ; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , article ‘World’: Westcott, Com. ; Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics , article ‘aeons’ and ‘Ages of the World’; F
Thule - ) The name given by ancient geographers to the northernmost part of the habitable World
Pithecoid - ) Of or pertaining to the anthropoid apes in particular, or to the higher apes of the Old World, collectively
Servites - A religious order in the church of Rome, founded about the year 1233 by seven Florentine merchants, who, with the approbation of the bishop of Florence, renounced the World, and lived together in a religious community on Mount Senar, two leagues from that city
Circumstances - Horace Smith truly and wittily remarks, 'If a letter were to be addressed to that most influential word, circumstances, concluding thus: 'I am, sir, your very obedient humble servant,' the greater part of the World might subscribe it without deviating from the strictest veracity
Eography - ) The science which treats of the World and its inhabitants; a description of the earth, or a portion of the earth, including its structure, fetures, products, political divisions, and the people by whom it is inhabited
Commonwealth - Gentiles are declared to be strangers, outside the community of Israel; having no promises and no hope, and being without God in the World: fit objects for the grace of God
Kagan, r. israel meir hacohen - ("Chafetz Chaim"): 1838-1933; important rabbinical figure of the European Jewish community before World War II; author of Chafetz Chaim (a work on the evils of slander), after which he is called, and the Mishnah Brurah (a codification of Jewish law); lived in Radin, Poland
Erdington Abbey, Birmingham, England - The community, severely depleted by the World War, disbanded, 1922, and the abbey passed to the Redemptorists
Genesis - It includes a period of near two thousand four hundred years, from the beginning of the World to the death of Joseph
Millennium - ) A thousand years; especially, the thousand years mentioned in the twentieth chapter in the twentieth chapter of Revelation, during which holiness is to be triumphant throughout the World
Lass-Snake - The name is applied also to similar species found in the Old World
Atzilut - World of Emanation, The: (lit. �emanation�); in Kabbalistic terminology, the highest of the four spiritual Worlds, the realm of spiritual existence which, although encompassing attributes which have a specific definition, is in a state of infinity and at one with the Infinite Divine Light ...
Earthy - ) Of or pertaining to the earth or to, this World; earthly; terrestrial; carnal
Hoopoe - Any of the Old World birds of the family Upupidae , having a plumed head crest and a long, slender, curved bill
Recluse - Among the Papists, a person shut up in a small cell of an hermitage or monastery, and cut off not only from all conversation with the World, but even with the house
Exaltation of Christ - Consisted in his rising again from the dead on the third day, in ascending up into heaven, in sitting at the right hand of God the Father, and in coming to judge the World at the last day
Sisyphus - He was killed by Theseus, and in the lower World was condemned by Pluto to roll to the top of a hill a huge stone, which constantly rolled back again, making his task incessant
White-Eye - ) Any one of several species of small Old World singing of the genus Zosterops, as Zosterops palpebrosus of India, and Z
Rwanda - Org
World Fact Book
Wight - ...
The wight of all the World who lovd thee best
Corne'Lius - Peter, and thus Cornelius became the firstfruits of the Gentile World to Christ
Chafetz chaim - Rabbi Israel Meir Kagan, 1838-1933; important rabbinical figure of the European Jewish community before World War II; author of Chafetz Chaim (a work on the evils of slander), after which he is called, and the Mishnah Brurah (a codification of Jewish law); lived in Radin, Poland ...
Creation - The act of creating the act of causing to exist and especially, the act of bringing this World into existence. The things created creatures the World the universe
Elements - In this sense it is used in Galatians 4:3,9 ; Colossians 2:8,20 , where the expressions, "elements of the World," "week and beggarly elements," denote that state of religious knowledge existing among the Jews before the coming of Christ, the rudiments of religious teaching. They are "of the World," because they are made up of types which appeal to the senses
Familiar - 1 Samuel 28:7 (a) It was generally thought that certain witches, necromancers, soothsayers, magicians and astrologers were in intimate association with certain spirits in the other World. This group of people taught that those with whom they communicated in the other World would listen to their call and come back to earth with a message
Ibeon - The World has many ways of enticing GOD's people to join up with them. " The World puts on great programs for the relief of humanity, and in which they ask the Christians to join, while at the same time they will not permit the name of CHRIST, nor the Word of GOD, nor the message of the Gospel to have any place in their plans and solicitation
World: Deception of - ' ...
The mockeries of the World are many, and those who are deluded by them not only miss the joys they looked for, but in their eager pursuit of vanity bring ruin upon their souls. We call the dove silly to be deceived by a picture, however cleverly painted, but what epithet shall we apply to those who are duped by the transparently false allurements of the World! ...
...
Ascension - As ascended He became Head of His body the church, Ephesians 1:22 , and gave gifts to men, among which gifts are evangelists who preach to the World, and pastors and teachers to care for and instruct the saints. ...
His ascension is a demonstration through the presence of the Holy Spirit that sin is in the World and righteousness in heaven, for the very One they rejected has been received by the Father into heaven. The ascension is also a tremendous fact for Satan: the prince of this World has been judged who led the World to put the Lord to death; and in His ascension He led captivity captive, having broken the power of death in which men were held, Ephesians 4:8 , for He had in the cross spoiled principalities and powers and made a show of them openly, triumphing over them in it. He has taken His place as man where man never was before, and He is also glorified with the glory which He had before the World was, besides the glory which He graciously shares with His saints
Worldliness (2) - WORLDLINESS. —The teaching of Christianity concerning Worldliness forms one of the most important parts of its practical message to mankind. The error into which it has led man is that of regarding the material World and whatever strictly pertains to it, as inherently evil and anti-spiritual. The source from which it sprang, however, does not affect the gravity of its persistent survival; and inasmuch as the attitude of any faith to the present World must always deeply influence men’s estimate of its claims, a clear apprehension of Christ’s own teaching on the subject becomes of more than ordinary importance. To reveal the basis of our Lord’s doctrine of Worldliness, we must review briefly one or two broad outlines of His message. —Man has contact with two Worlds, (a) Of his communion with the material universe and of the various relationships involved therein, he has by nature a vivid consciousness. This temporal World forms a realm of which, by his birth, he himself has become a part. It provides also certain standards of judgment by which the various experiences of its inhabitants are deemed happy or sad, prosperous or unsuccessful, (b) But man has contact also with another World—the spiritual. Of his communion with this World he has, by nature, but dim and uncertain comprehension. This invisible World is as real as the visible. His teaching concerning communion with this spiritual World. —Now, just as man has communion with the temporal World and its life, so he may have communion with this spiritual World and its life, (a) Christ Himself, as man, constantly enjoyed such fellowship. —Man, therefore, belongs to two Worlds, and may have communion with both. Christ’s teaching upon Worldliness...
1. Christ encouraged no indifference to the claims of the temporal World. —There is an un Worldliness which so emphasizes spiritual realities as to undervalue the material universe and its lawful concerns. The beauty and charm of the visible World appealed to Him (Matthew 6:26; Matthew 6:28). Again, the claims of this World’s lawful authorities always received His ready acknowledgment. Christ therefore calls His followers not to neglect the temporal World, much less to despise it, but to recognize that they have a function to fulfil in it by permeating every part of its life with beauty and truth (Matthew 5:13-16; Matthew 13:33, John 17:15). Christ uttered no condemnation of Worldly possessions. —It is clear, therefore, that in one study of the Christian doctrine of Worldliness we must eliminate what is now seen to be a false antithesis. In view of the unfortunate ambiguity in meaning both of the Greek and of the English word, it is necessary to define closely the sense in which Christianity sets the ‘world’ in opposition to its own life and principles. Romans 13:7): the antithesis He accepted was that of the Heavenly King and ‘the prince of this World’ (John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11 in each case ὁ ἄρχων τοῦ κόσμου or ὁ τοῦ κόσμον ἄρχων). The ‘world’ He condemned is not the material World, in which He Himself took delight, or its claims, which He loyally acknowledged, or (in themselves) its possessions, of which He spoke with guarded moderation, but a certain spirit of the World fundamentally antagonistic to man’s highest life, and the men in whom that spirit has established its abode (cf. It is between Christ’s Kingdom and the ‘world’ in this sense that there is opposition, and in this case the opposition is final and complete (John 15:18-19; John 16:33—note the terms of the contrast, ἐν τῷ κόσμῳ and ἐν ἐμοί—John 17:14, 1 John 2:15; 1 John 3:13; 1 John 4:4-6). The consequent meaning of Worldliness. —The accurate recognition of Christ’s attitude to the temporal World at once yields the accurate conception of Worldliness. Worldliness will clearly consist in devotion to ‘the World,’ not in any sense of that ambiguous term, but in the particular sense in which Christ revealed it to be evil. Inasmuch, therefore, as ‘the World,’ in the only signification in which He condemned it, is the spirit of antagonism (whether expressed as a principle or personified in individuals) to His spiritual kingdom, Worldliness must be the possession of this spirit, and the practice of Worldliness must be its manifestation. Worldliness does not consist in a love of the temporal World and its concerns, for between the Kingdom and ‘the World’ in this sense Christ acknowledges no necessary opposition, and a man may so use both realms as to fulfil the rightful claims of each without setting them in any inevitable antithesis. Nor does Worldliness lie in the performance or nonperformance of any particular actions (Mark 2:18; John 12:5-6; Mark 3:4; Mark 7:5; Mark 7:8; Mark 7:15; Mark 7:21), Luke 11:39-41, John 5:10; John 7:23-24 et passim); for, since it is the possession of a certain spirit, the most scrupulous punctiliousness in outward conduct may coexist with the deepest unspirituality (Matthew 27:6, Mark 2:24; John 18:28; John 19:31; cf. the significant pronouncement in Matthew 21:28-31), and the truest unworldliness with apparent indifference to its formal expression (Matthew 11:18-19). It is quite true that a love of the temporal World and indulgence in particular actions closely associated with it, may constitute manifestations of Worldliness. A realm not evil in itself may easily become the medium of evil, and so, owing to an undue emphasis, man’s fellowship with the temporal World may, both by its positive and by its negative influence, prove injurious to his fellowship with the spiritual. The essence of Worldliness lies deeper than any particular form in which it may of expressed, and, according to the Christian teaching, its essence is found in the mind—in whatever form embodied—which leads a man to identify himself with that ‘world’ which is anti-spiritual in its nature and influence. The manifestation of Worldliness. As our review of Christ’s teaching has shown, man has communion with two Worlds—the temporal and the spiritual. To cling in such crises to the lower communion, in other words, to sacrifice the spiritual to the temporal, this is to be Worldly, for this is to make the temporal World, innocent and good in itself, a vehicle of the anti-spiritual. It is unnecessary, and, in the strict sense, even impossible, to identify particular actions as in themselves involving the anti-spiritual; for, as we have seen, Worldliness in practice is the possession of a certain spirit, and there is no action which must necessarily embody that spirit nor any which cannot be made a medium for it. The whole question of Worldliness in action is ultimately one of arrangement and precedence. The things of the temporal World are right in their right place, but that is the second place in a man’s life. The practice of Worldliness, therefore, consists in such an arrangement of these two elements in life as, from the standpoint of God, is false. The error, however, always lies not in the cultivation of communion with the temporal World, but in the untrue emphasis laid upon it; in the failure to see that, while many things appear desirable, only one thing is needful (Luke 10:41-42, cf. Matthew 13:44-46); in the self-identification with that ‘world’ which is the direct antithesis of the Kingdom of heaven. The Christian’s true relation to the temporal World. —Our Lord’s example and teaching, thus briefly reviewed, enable us to infer the Christian’s true relation to the temporal World, (a) Like his Master, he will be fully cognizant of its charms and fully responsive to its lawful claims. Those who have truly learnt the mind of Christ will never shrink from their obligations to the full-orbed life of the World in which lie has set them. (b) Yet, while the claims of the temporal World will receive their due acknowledgment, the main stress of the Christian’s life will lie elsewhere. He is in the World; but, like his Master (John 8:23), he is not of it (John 17:14-18). Indeed, his whole attitude to the temporal World has been changed. His real World is the spiritual World
Formation - The World of: (Kabbalistic term; lit. �formation�); the third of the four spiritual Worlds, the realm of spiritual existence in which the limited nature of the created beings takes on form and definition; the abode of the lower classes of angelic beings and of the souls of ordinary Jews ...
Communion With Christ: Its Influence on Our Views - When you have been sitting in a well-lighted room and are suddenly called into the outer darkness, how black it seems; and thus when a mam has dwelt in communion with God, sin becomes exceeding sinful, and the darkness in which the World lieth appears like tenfold night
Baboon - ) One of the Old World Quadrumana, of the genera Cynocephalus and Papio; the dog-faced ape
Beacon - This testimony is elevated high and shines plainly so that the light from it illuminates far and wide in this World
Closet - Matthew 6:6 (b) This is any quiet place where one may retire from the busy World to be alone with the Lord
Sheldrake - ) Any one of several species of large Old World ducks of the genus Tadorna and allied genera, especially the European and Asiatic species
Ascended Master - An astral plane is another dimension of reality beyond our World and is outside of time and space
Oriental - ) A native or inhabitant of the Orient or some Eastern part of the World; an Asiatic
Dualism - Haeckel describes as dualism the distinction between God and the World, and between matter and mind, and opposes to it his monism, which identifies both ( Riddle of the Universe , ch. It does distinguish God as Creator from the World as created ( Genesis 1:1 , Isaiah 40:26 , John 1:3 ), and describes God as Spirit in contrast with matter ( John 4:24 ). This conclusion need not be proved further, as this view is implied in all the teaching of the Bible about God, World, man. But, setting aside this new sense of the term, we must consider whether the Bible gives evidence of dualism in the older sense, as opposing to God any antagonist or hindrance in His creating, preserving, and ruling the World. Plato does not harmonize the World of ideas and the World of sense. Neo-Platonism seeks to fill up the gulf between God and the World by a series of emanations. While the OT recognizes the power of sin in the World, yet God’s ultimate causality and sole supremacy are affirmed. In post-exilic Judaism, however, there was a twofold tendency so to assert the transcendence of God that angels must be recognized as mediating between Him and the World, and to preserve His moral perfection by assigning the evil in the World to the agency of evil spirits under the leadership of Satan , the adversary. In the Apocalyptic literature the present World is represented as under Satan’s dominion, and as wrested from him only by a supernatural manifestation of God’s power to establish His Kingdom. )...
While in the Bible there are these traces of the threefold dualism, it is never developed; and monotheism is throughout maintained, God’s sole eternity, ultimate causality, and final victory being asserted, while God is distinguished from the World, and in the World a distinction between matter and mind is recognized
Natural Theology - This science endeavors: ...
To demonstrate the existence of God from the visible things of the World through such principles as those of finality and causality: "For the invisible things of Him, from the creation of the World are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made; His eternal Power also and Divinity" (Romans 1).
To tell us something about God's relation to the World
Theology, Natural - This science endeavors: ...
To demonstrate the existence of God from the visible things of the World through such principles as those of finality and causality: "For the invisible things of Him, from the creation of the World are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made; His eternal Power also and Divinity" (Romans 1).
To tell us something about God's relation to the World
Nativity of Christ - His coming into the World was after the manner of other men, though his generation and conception were extraordinary. Daniel 9:24 ; but the exact year of his birth is not agreed on by chronologers, but it was about the four thousandth year of the World; nor can the season of the year, the month, and day in which he was born, be ascertained. It was in a time when the World stood in need of such a Saviour, and was best prepared for receiving him. By their dispersions among so many nations, by their conversation with the learned men among the heathens and the translation of their inspired writings into a language almost universal, the principles of their religion were spread all over the East; and it became the common belief that a Prince would arise at that time in Judea, who should change the face of the World, and extend his empire from one end of the earth to the other. Now, had Christ been manifest at a more early period, the World would not have been prepared to meet him with the same fondness and zeal; had his appearance been put off for any considerable time, men's expectations would have begun to languish, and the warmth of desire, from a delay of gratification, might have cooled and died away. "The birth of Christ was also in the fulness of time, if we consider the then political state of the World. The World, in the most early ages, was divided into small independent states, differing from each other in language, manners, laws, and religion. At last the Roman ambition undertook the arduous enterprise of conquering the World: They trod down the kingdoms, according to Daniel's prophetic description, by their exceeding strength; they devoured the whole earth, Daniel 7:7 ; Daniel 7:23 . However by enslaving the World, they civilized it, and while they oppressed mankind, they united them together: the same laws were every where established, and the same languages understood; men approached nearer to one another in sentiments and manners, and the intercourse between the most distant corners of the earth was rendered secure and agreeable. ...
The success and rapidity with which they diffused the knowledge of his name over the World are astonishing. Under this situation, into which the providence of God had brought the World, the joyful sound in a few years reached those remote corners of the earth into which it could not otherwise have penetrated for many ages. Thus the Roman ambition and bravery paved the way, and prepared the World for the reception of the Christian doctrine. " If we consider the state of the World with regard to morals, it evidently appears that the coming of Christ was at the most appropriate time. "The Romans, " continues our author, "by subduing the World, lost their own liberty. In this time of universal corruption did the wisdom of God manifest the Christian revelation to the World. What the wisdom of men could do for the encouragement of virtue in a corrupt World had been tried during several ages, and all human devices were found by experience to be of very small avail; so that no juncture could be more proper for publishing a religion, which, independent of human laws and institutions, explains the principles of morals with admirable perspicuity, and enforces the practice of them by most persuasive arguments. " ...
The wisdom of God will still farther appear in the time of Christ's coming, if we consider the World with regard to its religious state. But the deplorable situation of the heathen World called still more loudly for an immediate interposal of the divine hand. Robertson's admirable Sermon on the Situation of the World at Christ's appearance; Edwards's Redemption, 313, 316; Robinson's Claude, vol
World - The conception of the World in the apostolic writings is one of much complexity. The three terms chiefly to be considered are ἡ οἰκουμένη, ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος, and ὁ κόσμος, which in their proper significance denote the World respectively as a place, a period, and a system. The spatial conception of the World. -The spatial conception of the World as the orbis terrarum, the comprehensive abode of man and scene of human life, is rendered in the OT by àÈøÈö and its more poetical synonym úÌÅáÇi, which in the lxx are translated, the former by γῆ, the latter by οἰκουμένη (vice versa in a few passages in Isaiah). 110); but after the conquests of Alexander, and in consequence of the same unifying influences as those by which the Greek dialects were merged in the κοινή, it came to express a view and feeling of the inhabited World as overpassing all national distinctions and boundaries. Luke 2:1); but in the apostolic writings it has the larger significance, the World-wide abode of man (Acts 11:28; Acts 17:6; Acts 19:27 by passionate exaggeration, Acts 24:5, Romans 10:18, Revelation 3:10; Revelation 16:14), or, by a natural transition, mankind (Acts 17:31, Revelation 12:9). As an example of the elasticity which characterizes the use of these terms, it may be noted that to express the same thought of the World-wide field for the dissemination of the gospel St. The temporal conception of the World. -The temporal conception of the World as a saeculum, a cycle of history, complete within itself yet related to a before and an after, is distinctively expressed by αἰών, or in contrast with the ‘world to come,’ as actually it always is, by ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος (1 Corinthians 1:20; 1 Corinthians 2:6-8; 1 Corinthians 3:18, 2 Corinthians 4:4, Ephesians 1:21; variants, ὁ ἐνεστὼς αἰών, Galatians 1:4; ὁ αἰὼν τοῦ κόσμου τούτου, Ephesians 2:2; ὁ νῦν αἰών, 1 Timothy 6:17, 2 Timothy 4:10, Titus 2:12; ὁ νῦν καιρός, Romans 3:26; Romans 8:18). ...
But while αἰὼν οὗτος in primarily a time-concept, this World-age in contrast with the future age of the ‘regeneration,’ the temporal element tends to become secondary. The opposition between the two ‘aeons’ is qualitative even more than temporal: the one is ‘evil’ (Galatians 1:4), and under the dominion of the Devil (2 Corinthians 4:4) and kindred spirits (1 Corinthians 2:6; 1 Corinthians 2:8), a World of sin and death in contrast with that other eternal World of righteousness (2 Peter 3:13) and life. The two, indeed, are thought of as in a sense contemporaneous; the ‘world to come’ projects itself into the present; its ‘powers’ are already experienced by all in whom the Spirit of God dwells and the work of spiritual quickening and transformation is begun (Hebrews 6:5). The World as an organic system. -The World as an organic system, a universe, is distinctively ὁ κόσμος. It was a ζῷον ἔμψυχον καὶ λογικόν; and as the human organism consists of a body and an animating soul, so God was the eternal World-soul animating and ruling the imperishable World-body. Through the influence especially of Posidonius, this conception of the Cosmos became widely influential in the Graeco-Roman World (see P. ἡ σύστασις κόσμου is formed by the word of God out of formless matter (Wisdom of Solomon 1:14; Wisdom of Solomon 7:17; Wisdom of Solomon 11:7) and the ever-living Spirit of God is active in all things (Wisdom of Solomon 12:1); Divine wisdom and beauty pervade the World in all its diverse parts, establishing all things by number, measure, and weight (Wisdom of Solomon 7:24, Wisdom of Solomon 8:1, Wisdom of Solomon 11:20), at the same time giving to human intelligence its power to apprehend the Divine ordering of all things (Wisdom of Solomon 7:17-23, Wisdom of Solomon 8:8), a striking anticipation of Romans 1:20. In the same book there is another anticipation of NT usage, the employment, unknown to classical Greek, of κόσμος for the World of mankind, the human race as a unity. Thus Adam is described as πρωτόπλαστος πατὴρ κόσμου Wisdom of Solomon 10:1); a multitude of wise men is the salvation of the World (Wisdom of Solomon 6:24), as the family of Noah was its hope (Wisdom of Solomon 14:6). The World created in the πρωτότοκος includes ‘all things in the heavens and upon the earth, visible and invisible’ (Colossians 1:16). It does not belong to ‘this World’ or to ‘this age’. ...
(b) Yet the immediate interest in the Cosmos lies in its relation to man as the physical environment of his life, and thus it naturally acquires the more limited significance of the terrestrial order in association with mankind-the World of human existence, into which sin comes (Romans 5:12-13), into which Christ comes (1 Timothy 1:15, Hebrews 10:5, 1 John 4:9), where He is believed on (1 Timothy 3:16). ) Hence also it easily comes to mean (as already in Enoch [2]) mankind in general (1 Corinthians 4:13, Hebrews 11:33); and, by further natural transitions, Worldly possessions (1 John 3:17
World - The conception of the World in the apostolic writings is one of much complexity. The three terms chiefly to be considered are ἡ οἰκουμένη, ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος, and ὁ κόσμος, which in their proper significance denote the World respectively as a place, a period, and a system. The spatial conception of the World. -The spatial conception of the World as the orbis terrarum, the comprehensive abode of man and scene of human life, is rendered in the OT by àÈøÈö and its more poetical synonym úÌÅáÇi, which in the lxx are translated, the former by γῆ, the latter by οἰκουμένη (vice versa in a few passages in Isaiah). 110); but after the conquests of Alexander, and in consequence of the same unifying influences as those by which the Greek dialects were merged in the κοινή, it came to express a view and feeling of the inhabited World as overpassing all national distinctions and boundaries. Luke 2:1); but in the apostolic writings it has the larger significance, the World-wide abode of man (Acts 11:28; Acts 17:6; Acts 19:27 by passionate exaggeration, Acts 24:5, Romans 10:18, Revelation 3:10; Revelation 16:14), or, by a natural transition, mankind (Acts 17:31, Revelation 12:9). As an example of the elasticity which characterizes the use of these terms, it may be noted that to express the same thought of the World-wide field for the dissemination of the gospel St. The temporal conception of the World. -The temporal conception of the World as a saeculum, a cycle of history, complete within itself yet related to a before and an after, is distinctively expressed by αἰών, or in contrast with the ‘world to come,’ as actually it always is, by ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος (1 Corinthians 1:20; 1 Corinthians 2:6-8; 1 Corinthians 3:18, 2 Corinthians 4:4, Ephesians 1:21; variants, ὁ ἐνεστὼς αἰών, Galatians 1:4; ὁ αἰὼν τοῦ κόσμου τούτου, Ephesians 2:2; ὁ νῦν αἰών, 1 Timothy 6:17, 2 Timothy 4:10, Titus 2:12; ὁ νῦν καιρός, Romans 3:26; Romans 8:18). ...
But while αἰὼν οὗτος in primarily a time-concept, this World-age in contrast with the future age of the ‘regeneration,’ the temporal element tends to become secondary. The opposition between the two ‘aeons’ is qualitative even more than temporal: the one is ‘evil’ (Galatians 1:4), and under the dominion of the Devil (2 Corinthians 4:4) and kindred spirits (1 Corinthians 2:6; 1 Corinthians 2:8), a World of sin and death in contrast with that other eternal World of righteousness (2 Peter 3:13) and life. The two, indeed, are thought of as in a sense contemporaneous; the ‘world to come’ projects itself into the present; its ‘powers’ are already experienced by all in whom the Spirit of God dwells and the work of spiritual quickening and transformation is begun (Hebrews 6:5). The World as an organic system. -The World as an organic system, a universe, is distinctively ὁ κόσμος. It was a ζῷον ἔμψυχον καὶ λογικόν; and as the human organism consists of a body and an animating soul, so God was the eternal World-soul animating and ruling the imperishable World-body. Through the influence especially of Posidonius, this conception of the Cosmos became widely influential in the Graeco-Roman World (see P. ἡ σύστασις κόσμου is formed by the word of God out of formless matter (Wisdom of Solomon 1:14; Wisdom of Solomon 7:17; Wisdom of Solomon 11:7) and the ever-living Spirit of God is active in all things (Wisdom of Solomon 12:1); Divine wisdom and beauty pervade the World in all its diverse parts, establishing all things by number, measure, and weight (Wisdom of Solomon 7:24, Wisdom of Solomon 8:1, Wisdom of Solomon 11:20), at the same time giving to human intelligence its power to apprehend the Divine ordering of all things (Wisdom of Solomon 7:17-23, Wisdom of Solomon 8:8), a striking anticipation of Romans 1:20. In the same book there is another anticipation of NT usage, the employment, unknown to classical Greek, of κόσμος for the World of mankind, the human race as a unity. Thus Adam is described as πρωτόπλαστος πατὴρ κόσμου Wisdom of Solomon 10:1); a multitude of wise men is the salvation of the World (Wisdom of Solomon 6:24), as the family of Noah was its hope (Wisdom of Solomon 14:6). The World created in the πρωτότοκος includes ‘all things in the heavens and upon the earth, visible and invisible’ (Colossians 1:16). It does not belong to ‘this World’ or to ‘this age’. ...
(b) Yet the immediate interest in the Cosmos lies in its relation to man as the physical environment of his life, and thus it naturally acquires the more limited significance of the terrestrial order in association with mankind-the World of human existence, into which sin comes (Romans 5:12-13), into which Christ comes (1 Timothy 1:15, Hebrews 10:5, 1 John 4:9), where He is believed on (1 Timothy 3:16). ) Hence also it easily comes to mean (as already in Enoch [2]) mankind in general (1 Corinthians 4:13, Hebrews 11:33); and, by further natural transitions, Worldly possessions (1 John 3:17
Nun - A woman devoted to a religious life, and who lives in a cloister or nunnery, secluded from the World, under a vow of perpetual chastity
Rock of Ages - He is the unchanging CHRIST in a changing World
Yetzirah - World of Formation, The: (Kabbalistic term; lit. �formation�); the third of the four spiritual Worlds, the realm of spiritual existence in which the limited nature of the created beings takes on form and definition; the abode of the lower classes of angelic beings and of the souls of ordinary Jews ...
Deadness - ; dullness; inertness; languor; coldness; vapidness; indifference; as, the deadness of a limb, a body, or a tree; the deadness of an eye; deadness of the affections; the deadness of beer or cider; deadness to the World, and the like
Zaphhath Paaneah - " So a scholium on Septuagint; "saviour of the World
Consummation - The end or completion of the present system of things the end of the World
Unspotted - James 1:27 (b) This is a picture of the defilement which the Christian may encounter during his day's duties as he mingles and mixes in a World filled with sin
Apelleans - They affirmed that Christ, when he came down from heaven, received a body not from the substance of his mother, but from the four elements, which at his death he rendered back to the World, and so ascended into heaven without a body
Marcionite - ) A follower of Marcion, a Gnostic of the second century, who adopted the Oriental notion of the two conflicting principles, and imagined that between them there existed a third power, neither wholly good nor evil, the Creator of the World and of man, and the God of the Jewish dispensation
Cornelius - With his household he was baptized by Peter, and thus Cornelius became the first-fruits of the Gentile World to Christ
Demas - The mournful note is subsequently made that he had forsaken the apostle, "having loved this present World
Lamb - Behold the lamb of God, who taketh away the sin of the World
Tribulation - Matthew 13 ...
In the World ye shall have tribulation
Popularity - The latter belongs to him who makes the praise of men his object, and seeks it by ostentatious piety and hypocritical charity (Matthew 6:2; Matthew 6:5; Matthew 6:16); the former is the accompaniment of that behaviour whose ruling aim is to do the will of God regardless of all Worldly ends (Matthew 6:3-4; Matthew 6:7-8; Matthew 6:17-18; Matthew 6:20-21). His aim was to change the World from within outward—not to attach good fruit to a worthless tree, but to make the tree good, and to await the fruit which in due time it was bound to bear. The latter springs immediately from outside acts which may not be—probably are not—the revelation of the true man: the former is the effect produced upon the World by the outspeaking of the whole man as he is in himself in his relation to God. He perceived it to be the suggestion of the Evil One that He should obtain the dominion of the kingdoms of the World by the external method, by the force of His authority, by the admiration which He could so easily have produced. As the World had hated Him, so would it hate them. ‘If the World hate you, ye know that it hated me before it hated you. If ye were of the World, the World would love its own: but because ye are not of the World, but I have chosen you out of the World, therefore the World hateth you’ (John 15:18-19). But the more the World persecutes them, the more must they bear testimony to the cause of Christ by their loving fellowship one with another. ‘By this,’ He says, ‘shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another’ (John 13:35); and again—‘(I pray) that they also may be one in us: that the World may believe that thou hast sent me’ (John 17:21)—Among the disciples there must be no selfish striving for place or power
Popularity - The latter belongs to him who makes the praise of men his object, and seeks it by ostentatious piety and hypocritical charity (Matthew 6:2; Matthew 6:5; Matthew 6:16); the former is the accompaniment of that behaviour whose ruling aim is to do the will of God regardless of all Worldly ends (Matthew 6:3-4; Matthew 6:7-8; Matthew 6:17-18; Matthew 6:20-21). His aim was to change the World from within outward—not to attach good fruit to a worthless tree, but to make the tree good, and to await the fruit which in due time it was bound to bear. The latter springs immediately from outside acts which may not be—probably are not—the revelation of the true man: the former is the effect produced upon the World by the outspeaking of the whole man as he is in himself in his relation to God. He perceived it to be the suggestion of the Evil One that He should obtain the dominion of the kingdoms of the World by the external method, by the force of His authority, by the admiration which He could so easily have produced. As the World had hated Him, so would it hate them. ‘If the World hate you, ye know that it hated me before it hated you. If ye were of the World, the World would love its own: but because ye are not of the World, but I have chosen you out of the World, therefore the World hateth you’ (John 15:18-19). But the more the World persecutes them, the more must they bear testimony to the cause of Christ by their loving fellowship one with another. ‘By this,’ He says, ‘shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another’ (John 13:35); and again—‘(I pray) that they also may be one in us: that the World may believe that thou hast sent me’ (John 17:21)—Among the disciples there must be no selfish striving for place or power
Oecumenical Councils - (Greek: oikoumene, the inhabited World) ...
Councils to which the bishops, and others entitled to vote, are convoked from the whole World under the presidency of the pope or his legates, and the decrees of which having received papal confirmation, are binding on all the members of the Church
Belgian Congo - ...
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Brazzaville
Bukavu
Kananga
Kinshasa
Kisangani
Lubumbashi
Mbandaka-Bikoro
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Basankusu
Bikoro
Bokungu-Ikela
Boma
Bondo
Budjala
Bunia
Buta
Butembo-Beni
Doruma-Dungu
Goma
Idiofa
Inongo
Isangi
Isiro-Niangara
Kabinda
Kalemie-Kirungu
Kamina
Kasongo
Kenge
Kikwit
Kilwa-Kasenga
Kindu
Kinkala
Kisantu
Kole
Kolwezi
Kongolo
Lisala
Lolo
Luebo
Luiza
Mahagi-Nioka
Manono
Matadi
Mbujimayi
Molegbe
Mweka
Nkayi
Ouesso
Owando
Pointe-Noire
Popokabaka
Sakania-Kipushi
Tshumbe
Uvira
Wamba
Prefectures Apostolic: ...
Likouala
See also: ...
World Fact Book: Republic of the Congo
World Fact Book: Democratic Republic of Congo
patron saints index
Die - The death of the body to this World. The death of the Christian to Worldly and wicked desires. ...
1 Corinthians 15:31 (a) Paul is telling us here that it is his daily experience to consider himself dead to sin and to the sinful calls of the World
Pit - (1) She'ol , "Hades"; the covered, unseen World. ...
(3) Βor , "a pit or cistern once full of water, now empty", with miry clay beneath (Psalms 40:2; Zechariah 9:11); used as dungeon wherein the captive has no water or food; so Jeremiah (Jeremiah 38:6; Jeremiah 38:9), Isaiah 51:14; hence symbolizing "the dishonored grave of the once haughty transgressor", with the idea of condign [2] punishment in the unseen World, shadowed forth by the ignominious state of the body (Ezekiel 31:14; Ezekiel 31:16; Ezekiel 32:18; Ezekiel 32:24)
Ecumenical Councils - (Greek: oikoumene, the inhabited World) ...
Councils to which the bishops, and others entitled to vote, are convoked from the whole World under the presidency of the pope or his legates, and the decrees of which having received papal confirmation, are binding on all the members of the Church
Aecumenical Councils - (Greek: oikoumene, the inhabited World) ...
Councils to which the bishops, and others entitled to vote, are convoked from the whole World under the presidency of the pope or his legates, and the decrees of which having received papal confirmation, are binding on all the members of the Church
Libya - ...
Vicariates and Prefectures Apostolic include: ...
Benghazi
Derna
Misurata
Tripoli
See also: ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
Corruption - Used especially in the KJV to denote the transient nature of the material World—that is, the World's bent toward change and decay (see especially Romans 8:21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:42-57 ; 1 Peter 1:4 ). The World's corruption stands in contrast to the permanent, eternal nature of the resurrection hope
Kerchief - Magic veils, put over the heads of those consulting them, to fit them for receiving a response, rapt in spiritual trance above the World
Amber Room - The amber was removed by occupying German troops during the Second World War and has, as of 1997, never been recovered
Gay - Belinda smiled, and all the World was gay
Apostolic See - The seat or diocese of the pope because only he personally has the right from the Apostles to convert the whole World
Ascetic - One who retires from the World for the purpose of devotion and mortification
Millerite - 1849), who taught that the end of the World and the second coming of Christ were at hand
Discerning of Spirits - This was one of the gifts in the early church, needful for 'testing the spirits,' because even then many false prophets had gone forth into the World
Liturgy - In the Roman Catholic Church it includes all forms and services in any language, in any part of the World, for the celebration of Mass
See, Apostolic - The seat or diocese of the pope because only he personally has the right from the Apostles to convert the whole World
Terrestrial - Pertaining to the World, or to the present state sublunary
y Cross - By reason of its shape, the Cross embroidered on theCHASUBLE (which see) is called the Y Cross, and is intended torepresent the outstretched arms of our Blessed Lord on the Cross,and symbolizes the Sacrifice which He there offered for the sinsof the whole World, of which the Holy Eucharist is the perpetualMemorial
Gaonim - During this period, many decrees were passed, thousands of responsa were sent to Jews throughout the civilized World of the time, and many important books were compiled
Tree of the Knowledge of Good And Evil - But they disobeyed the divine injunction, and so sin and death by sin entered our World and became the heritage of Adam's posterity
Nativity - Birth the coming into life or the World
Atheist - It is used as a description of Gentiles as such by nature, and true of all the heathen World in their ignorance of God: not, as the term is now used, namely, one who wilfully refuses to acknowledge God's existence
Tartarus - By the later poets, also, the name is often used synonymously with Hades, or the Lower World in general
Deep And Depths - The deep, or the great deep, signifies in Scripture, hell, the place of punishment, the bottomless pit, Luke 8:31 , compare Revelation 9:1 11:7 ; the grave, Romans 10:7 ; the deepest parts of the sea, Psalm 69:15 107:26 ; chaos in the beginning of the World, Genesis 1:2
Elements - In the NT it is used of (a) the substance of the material World, 2 Peter 3:10,12 ; (b) the delusive speculations of gentile cults and of Jewish theories, treated as elementary principles, "the rudiments of the World," Colossians 2:8 , spoken of as "philosophy and vain deceit;" these were presented as superior to faith in Christ; at Colosse the worship of angels, mentioned in Colossians 2:18 , is explicable by the supposition, held by both Jews and Gentiles in that district, that the constellations were either themselves animated heavenly beings, or were governed by them; (c) the rudimentary principles of religion, Jewish or Gentile, also described as "the rudiments of the World," Colossians 2:20 , and as "weak and beggarly rudiments," Galatians 4:3,9 , RV, constituting a yoke of bondage; (d) the "elementary" principles (the A
Fabre, Jean Henri - His fame rests chiefly on his "Souvenirs Entomologiques," which merited for him the name of "The Homer of the Insect World. " He was a decided adversary of the theory of evolution, and a firm believer in the realities of the spiritual World
Jean Fabre - His fame rests chiefly on his "Souvenirs Entomologiques," which merited for him the name of "The Homer of the Insect World. " He was a decided adversary of the theory of evolution, and a firm believer in the realities of the spiritual World
Tribulation, the - It will involve the whole World (Revelation 3:10). There will be catastrophes all over the World
Nathanael - Jesus’ mission was to bring God to the World and to make it possible for the World to come to God (John 1:50-51)
Earth - The word is used of the whole World, etc. "The lower parts of the earth," means the unseen World of the dead, Psalm 63:9 Isaiah 44:23 Ephesians 4:9
Babylon, Mystical - Babylon contained many Jews in the apostolic age ("one of the greatest knots of Jews in the World:" Lightfoot, quoted in Smith's Dictionary), and doubtless "the apostle of the circumcision," Peter, who had among his hearers on Pentecost (Acts 2) "the dwellers of Mesopotamia," would visit the Jews there. ...
Then she was "persecuted" by" the dragon, Satan," but nourished by divine Providence for "three and a half times" "in the wilderness" of the Gentile World. " The spiritual Jerusalem has become mystical Babylon; the church has become the harlot! The same truth under the same imagery appears in Isaiah 1:21, "How is the faithful city become an harlot!" That the World should be beastly (Daniel 7) is natural, but that she whose calling was to be the faithful bride should become the Babylonian whore is monstrous (Jeremiah 2:12-13; Jeremiah 2:20). ...
External prevalence over the World, and internal corruption by the World, (the spirit of the World ruling the church) is symbolized by the World-city's name Babylon; the contrast to "Jerusalem above, the mother of all" believers (Galatians 4:26), the "holy Jerusalem, that great city," which shall hereafter on the "new earth" "descend out of heaven from God, having the glory of God" (Revelation 21:10). The Roman Catholic Church is the prominent type of Babylon, resting on the World power, and arrayed like it in its "scarlet" gauds, and ruling it by its claim of supremacy, while the beast or secular power on which it rests is "full of names of blasphemy," which after the harlot's overthrow shall be more glaringly displayed. It and the Greek apostasy are whorish in principle, by external and internal idolatry and systematized Worldliness. ...
The evangelical Protestant church is pure in theory, and eschews image and host-mass worship; but in so far as it yields to "covetousness which is idolatry," and conforms to the World, it partakes of the harlot and ceases to be the bride. ...
When the church forsakes her true Husband for the love of the World (contrast Psalms 45:10-11), the World, the instrument of her sin, becomes the instrument of her punishment. Then "iniquity" shall be no longer as now in "mystery," but openly developed in the last awful Antichrist who shall combine the World against Christ in a system of superstitious credulity and infidelity together (2 Thessalonians 2; Revelation 16:13-16; Revelation 17:17; Revelation 19:19). Rome's forced outward unity, of which its one official language, Latin, is the symbol while inwardly there is spiritual confusion, answers to Babel, the scene of the forced attempt at concentration of power and peoples, issuing in utter confusion of tongues; so too, in a wider sense; does all Christendom in its apostasy from apostolic unworldly purity, faith, and love. ) The Worldliness of the church is therefore the most Worldly of all Worldliness, and shall be terribly judged by God
Hiddekel - This shows the dependence of the important areas of subsequent World history owed their fertility to God's original garden of creation
Grain - Common grains in the biblical World included wheat (Genesis 30:14 ), spelt or emmer (REB vetches) (Exodus 9:32 ), barley (Exodus 9:31 ), and millet (Ezekiel 4:9 )
Pakistan - Org
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patron saints index
Lightning - They represent God's glorious and awful majesty (Revelation 4:5 ), or some judgment of God on the World (20:9)
Witness of the Spirit - (Romans 8:16 ), the consciousness of the gracious operation of the Spirit on the mind, "a certitude of the Spirit's presence and work continually asserted within us", manifested "in his comforting us, his stirring us up to prayer, his reproof of our sins, his drawing us to works of love, to bear testimony before the World," etc
Cerdonians - The first they called the Father of Jesus Christ; the latter the Creator of the World
Diaspora - " - applied collectively: (a) To those Jews who, after the Exile, were scattered through the Old World, and afterwards to Jewish Christians living among heathen
Mustard - Its seeds were once thought to be the smallest in the plant World
Persecution: Not to be Feared - Do not fear the frown of the World
Propaganda - (1623-1644) to educate priests for missions in all parts of the World
Partridge - ) Any one of numerous species of small gallinaceous birds of the genus Perdix and several related genera of the family Perdicidae, of the Old World
Bethlehem - Ruth 1:1 (c) From Bethlehem to Moab represents the backsliding of a child of GOD who leaves the "House of Bread" (which is the meaning of the word), the place where GOD blesses, and travels back into the World to enjoy the things that strangers have to offer
Feverish - ) Disordered as by fever; excited; restless; as, the feverish condition of the commercial World
Astral - ) Consisting of, belonging to, or designating, a kind of supersensible substance alleged to be next above the tangible World in refinement; as, astral spirits; astral bodies of persons; astral current
Earthly - ) Pertaining to the earth; belonging to this World, or to man's existence on the earth; not heavenly or spiritual; carnal; Worldly; as, earthly joys; earthly flowers; earthly praise. ) In the manner of the earth or its people; Worldly
Enesis - ) The first book of the Old Testament; - so called by the Greek translators, from its containing the history of the creation of the World and of the human race
Slime - Genesis 11:3 (c) We may think of this material as a substitution offered by the religious World for GOD's revealed truth
Anachorets - Or ANCHORITES, a sort of monks in the primitive church, who retired from the society of mankind into some desert, with a view to avoid the temptations of the World, and to be more at leisure for prayer, meditation, &c
Lychnis - ) A genus of Old World plants belonging to the Pink family (Caryophyllaceae)
Sainte-Chapelle - Built in 1248 by Saint Louis of France to house the relic of the Crown of Thorns, it adjoined his palace of La Cite, and is one of the most admired and imitated structures of its kind in the World
Earth - As the rendering of 'Erets , It means the whole World ( Genesis 1:2 ); the land as opposed to the sea (1:10). Erets Also denotes a country (21:32); a plot of ground (23:15); the ground on which a man stands (33:3); the inhabitants of the earth (6:1; 11:1); all the World except Israel ( 2 Chronicles 13:9 )
Dominican Republic - The island was discovered in 1492 by Columbus who named it Hispaniola, and in 1513 the See of Santo Domingo, the oldest bishopric in the New World, was established by Leo X, and erected into an archdiocese, 1547. ...
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Hyaguata
Santiago de los Caballeros
Santo Domingo
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Baní
Barahona
Bayuna
Concepción de la Vega
La Vega
Magua
Mao-Monte Cristi
Nuestra Señora de la Altagracia en Higüey
Puerto Plata
San Francisco de Macorís
San Juan de la Maguana
San Pedro de Macorís
Other ecclesiastical disivions include ...
Dominican Republic Military Ordinariate
See also: ...
World Fact Book
patron saints index
Mesech - Psalms 120:5, I dwell among people lawless and fierce as "Mesech" at one extremity of the World and "Kedar" at the other. Gog's chief vassal, ideal representative of the pagan barbarian World
Epicureans - this sect maintained that the World was formed not by God, nor with any design, but by the fortuitous concourse of atoms. They denied that God governs the World, or in the least condescends to interfere with creatures below: they denied the immortality of the soul, and the existence of angels; they maintained that happiness consisted in pleasure; but some of them placed this pleasure in the tranquillity and joy of the mind arising from the practice of moral virtue, and which is thought by some to have been the true principle of Epicurus; others understood him in the gross sense, and placed all their happiness in corporeal pleasure
Chaff - ...
Isaiah 33:11 (a) By this term the Lord reveals to us how worthless to Him are the ideas, schemes, and programs of the religious movements of this World. GOD makes foolish the wisdom of this World (See also1Co 3:19)
Washing of Regeneration - ...
The words "saved us by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost," show that there is a present escape and deliverance from the World and its course, and an entrance into those things which characterise the World to come, of which the Holy Ghost is now the revealer and power, even as Israel escaped from Egypt and its shame through the Red Sea, and anticipated Canaan in their song of praise
Satan - The proper name appears five times in the Old Testament, 1 Chronicles 21:1; Job 1:6; Job 1:12; Job 2:1; Zechariah 3:1; in the New Testament 25 times; the word "devil" occurs 25 times; "the prince of this World," three times; "the wicked one," six times; "the tempter," twice. In one remarkable verse several epithets are combined—the old serpent, the devil, and Satan, who deceiveth the whole World
Santo Domingo - The island was discovered in 1492 by Columbus who named it Hispaniola, and in 1513 the See of Santo Domingo, the oldest bishopric in the New World, was established by Leo X, and erected into an archdiocese, 1547. ...
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Hyaguata
Santiago de los Caballeros
Santo Domingo
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Baní
Barahona
Bayuna
Concepción de la Vega
La Vega
Magua
Mao-Monte Cristi
Nuestra Señora de la Altagracia en Higüey
Puerto Plata
San Francisco de Macorís
San Juan de la Maguana
San Pedro de Macorís
Other ecclesiastical disivions include ...
Dominican Republic Military Ordinariate
See also: ...
World Fact Book
patron saints index
Satan - He is also called "the dragon," "the old serpent" (Revelation 12:9 ; 20:2 ); "the prince of this World" (John 12:31 ; 14:30 ); "the prince of the power of the air" (Ephesians 2:2 ); "the god of this World" (2 Corinthians 4:4 ); "the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience" (Ephesians 2:2 ). " His power is very great in the World
Earth - , Matthew 13:5,8,23 ; in 1 Corinthians 15:47 it is said of the "earthly" material of which "the first man" was made, suggestive of frailty; (b) "the earth as a whole, the World," in contrast, whether to the heavens, e. " See COUNTRY , GROUND , LAND , World. " It is translated "world" in every place where it has this significance, save in Luke 21:26 , AV, where it is translated "earth. " See World
Light - Jesus likened his coming into the World to the coming of light into darkness. He is the light of the World, who brings the life and salvation of God into a World that is dark and dead because of sin (Matthew 4:16; John 1:4-5; John 3:19; John 8:12; John 12:35-36; John 12:46; 2 Corinthians 4:6; cf. They become lights in the World, as they take the good news of Jesus Christ to those who are still in darkness (Matthew 5:14-16; Acts 13:47; Philippians 2:15; Revelation 11:4; see WITNESS)
Nicopolis - (nih cahp' oh lihss) Place name meaning, “city of victory,” shared by many cities in the ancient World
Pitta - They are called also ground thrushes, and Old World ant thrushes; but they are not related to the true thrushes
Foehn - ) Any similar wind, as the chinook, in other parts of the World
Damn - ) To doom to punishment in the future World; to consign to perdition; to curse
Carpenter - Of interest to the Christian in that the Lord was not only called 'the carpenter's son,' but also 'the carpenter,' Matthew 13:55 ; Mark 6:3 , which implies that He actually worked as an artizan before He began His heavenly Father's 'business,' for which He specially came into the World
Hesperides - ) The daughters of Hesperus, or Night (brother of Atlas), and fabled possessors of a garden producing golden apples, in Africa, at the western extremity of the known World
Redshank - ) A common Old World limicoline bird (Totanus calidris), having the legs and feet pale red
Baumgartner, Alexander - His most valuable works are a history of the literature of the World in eight volumes, poems for special occasions, and accounts of his travels
Elect, Election - This election occurs before the foundation of the World (Ephesians 1:4) and is according to God's will not man's (Romans 8:29-30; Rom 9:6-23) because God is sovereign (Romans 9:11-16)
Babel - In Genesis 11:1-9, it is the location where the entire World spoke a single language and worked together to build a tower into the heavens
Lucifer - He resembles the leader of this World in the last days
Demas - Fellow-labourer with Paul at Rome, Colossians 4:14 ; Philippians 24 ; of whom Paul had to write some five years later, "Demas hath forsaken me, having loved this present World, and is departed to Thessalonica
Over-Ripe - 1: ξηραίνω (Strong's #3583 — Verb — xeraino — xay-rah'ee-no ) denotes "to dry up, wither," translated in Revelation 14:15 , "over-ripe," RV (AV, "ripe"), said figuratively of the harvest of the earth, symbolizing the condition of the World, political, especially connected with Israel (Joel 3:9,14 ), and religious, comprehensive of the whole scene of Christendom (Matthew 13:38 )
Kingfisher - They are found in nearly all parts of the World, but are particularly abundant in the East Indies
Chalcedony - It is found in most parts of the World, though named after Chalcedon in Bithynia opposite Constantinople; and is much used as a material for cups, vases, and other articles of taste
Pascal - By dating the crucifixion on the day of preparation for the Passover, John suggested the same image of Christ as the paschal lamb who takes away the sin of the World ( John 19:14 ; compare John 1:29 )
Skull - Emblem in art, symbolic of meditation and of detachment from the World, usually associated with hermits and solitaries, especially ...
Saint Bruno
Saint Francis Borgia
Saint Francis of Assisi
Saint Francis of Paola
Saint Gebhard of Constance
Blessed Godfrey of Cappenberg
Saint Jerome
Saint Mary of Egypt
Saint Macarius the Younger
Saint Odilo of Cluny
Blessed Peter of Città di Castello
Demas - ) that even then Demas was not altogether trusted; and later he forsook the Apostle, ‘having loved this present World’ ( 2 Timothy 4:10 )
Waken - Then Homers and Tyraeus martial muse wakend the World
de'Mas - ) At a later period, (2 Timothy 4:10 ) we find him mentioned as having deserted the apostle through love of this present World, and gone to Thessalonica
Chabad - An acronym for Chochmoh, Binah, Da'at (wisdom, understanding and knowledge); the name of a chassidic movement � predicated on the concept of studying and understanding G-d and His relationship with the World � founded by Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi in White Russia in the latter part of the 18th century
es'Dras, the Second Book of - Chapters 3-14 consist of a series of angelic revelations and visions in which Ezra is instructed in some of the great mysteries of the moral World, and assured of the final triumph of the righteous
Platonists - He founded the old academy on the opinions of Heraclitus, Pythagoras, and Socrates; and by adding the information he had acquired to their discoveries, he established a sect of philosophers, who were esteemed more perfect than any who had before appeared in the World. The outlines of Plato's philosophical system were as follows:—that there is one God, eternal, immutable, and immaterial; perfect in wisdom and goodness, omniscient, and omnipresent: that this all-perfect Being formed the universe out of a mass of eternally preexisting matter, to which he gave form and arrangement: that there is in matter a necessary, but blind and refractory force, which resists the will of the supreme Artificer, so that he cannot perfectly execute his designs; and this is the cause of the mixture of good and evil which is found in the material World: that the soul of man was derived by emanation from God; but that this emanation was not immediate, but through the intervention of the soul of the World, which was itself debased by some material admixture; that the relation which the human soul, in its original constitution, bears to matter, is the source of moral evil; that when God formed the universe, he separated from the soul of the World inferior souls, equal in number to the stars, and assigned to each its proper celestial abode: that these souls were sent down to earth to be imprisoned in mortal bodies; hence arose the depravity and misery to which human nature is liable: that the soul is immortal; and by disengaging itself from all animal passions, and rising above sensible objects to the contemplation of the World of intelligence, it may be prepared to return to its original habitation: that matter never suffers annihilation, but that the World will remain for ever; and that by the action of its animating principle it accomplishes certain periods, within which everything returns to its ancient place and state. The second he considered as, νους , the mind, or, λογος , the wisdom or reason of the former, and the δημιουργος , maker of the World. The third he always speaks of as, ψυχη , the soul of the World
Prince (2) - More important is the use of ἄρχων in two of the Gospels as applied to Satan in the phrases ἄρχων τῶν δαιμονίων (Matthew 9:34; Matthew 12:24, Authorized and Revised Versions ‘prince of the devils’), and ἄρχων τοῦ κόσμου τούτου (John 12:31; John 14:30; John 16:11, Authorized and Revised Versions ‘prince of this World’). ‘The prince of this World,’ on the other hand, is a title that belongs to the special Johannine conception of the World as an order of things that is alienated from God and hostile to Him, and of Satan as a power dominating this sinful World and operating in it and through it (cf. But, according to the Johannine view (1 John 4:4), ‘Greater is he that is in you than he that is in the World (ὁ ἐν τῷ κόσμῳ). The prince of this World came and had nothing in Him (John 14:30; cf. ), and especially the offer of ‘all the kingdoms of the World’). The World was Satan’s, but Christ over-came the World (John 16:33). So far from finding in Jesus anything that he could claim as his own, the prince of this World was himself judged by Jesus (John 16:11), and by Him cast out (John 12:31; cf
Conflagration - But the word is more ordinarily restrained to that grand period, or catastrophe of our World, wherein the face of nature is expected to be changed by a deluge of fire, as it was anciently by that of water. The Celts, whose opinions resembled those of the eastern nations, held, that after the burning of the World, a new period of existence would commence. The cosmogony of an ancient Etrurian, preserved by Suidas, limits the duration of the universe to a period of twelve thousand years; six thousand of which passed in the production of the visible World, before the formation of man. The Stoics also maintained that the World is liable to destruction from the prevalence of moisture or of drought; the former producing a universal inundation, and the latter, a universal conflagration. ...
or, as Dryden has translated the passage,—...
"Rememb'ring in the fates a time when fire Should to the battlements of heaven aspire: When all his blazing Worlds above should burn, And all the inferior globe to cinders turn. " ...
Seneca, speaking of the same event, says expressly, "Tempus advenerit quo sidera sideribus incurrent, et omni flagrante materia uno igne, quicquid nunc ex deposito lucet, ardebit;" that is, "the time will come when the World will be consumed, that it may be again renewed; when the powers of nature will be turned against herself, when stars will rush upon stars, and the whole material World, which now appears resplendent with beauty and harmony, will be destroyed in one general conflagration. Philolaus, who flourished in the time of Plato, maintained that the World is liable to destruction both by fire and water. And the Bramins of Siam do not only hold that the World shall be destroyed by fire, but also that a new earth shall be made out of the cinders of the old. The sacred Scriptures announce this general destruction of the World by fire in a variety of passages. Lastly: others have recourse to a still more effectual and flaming machine; and conclude the World is to undergo its conflagration from the near approach of a comet, in its return from the sun. It is most natural to conclude, that, as the Scriptures represent the catastrophe as the work of a moment, no gradually operating natural cause will be employed to effect it, but that He who spake and the World was created, will again destroy it by the same word of his power; setting loose at once the all-devouring element of fire to absorb all others
Michel Benoit - He made a large map of the World, and a general chart of the empire, and translated the "Imitation of Christ" into Chinese
Benoit, Michel - He made a large map of the World, and a general chart of the empire, and translated the "Imitation of Christ" into Chinese
Falkland Islands - Org
World Fact Book
Malvinas - Org
World Fact Book
Joseph Passerat, Venerable - Having become vicar-general over all Transalpine communities, he founded new houses all over the World
Marinus ii, Pope - He was zealous for ecclesiastical reform, and devoted to the poor; he promoted monasticism by his privileges but made little impression on the World as a temporal ruler
Susa (Shushan) - The city of Susa was one of the oldest in the ancient World
Dulcinists - He taught that the law of the Father, which had continued till Moses, was a law of grace and wisdom; but that the law of the Holy Ghost, which began with himself in 1307, was a law entirely of love, which would last to the end of the World
Christ Jesus: the Marrow of Theology - On his death-bed, he was heard to say to a friend, 'Ah, my theology is reduced to this narrow compass: Jesus Christ came into the World to save
Corruptions: Indulgence of - The man of the World in the olden time bowed to the fallen statue of Jupiter, by way of bespeaking the favour of the god in the event of his being again lifted on his pedestal What are those provisions for the flesh, which too many Christians so readily make, but a kind of homage to the old man whom they profess to have renounced? ...
Christendom - ) That portion of the World in which Christianity prevails, or which is governed under Christian institutions, in distinction from heathen or Mohammedan lands
Martin Iii, Pope - He was zealous for ecclesiastical reform, and devoted to the poor; he promoted monasticism by his privileges but made little impression on the World as a temporal ruler
R. yaakov yitzchak of peshischa - (Yid Hakadosh): Rabbi Yaakov Yitzchak of Peshischa, 1766-1813, known in the chassidic World by the title "The Holy Jew" (Yid Hakadosh), was the leading disciple of the "Seer of Lublin," but subsequently split off to form the famous Peshischa movement of Chassidut
Navel - ...
Ezekiel 16:4 (b) In this place it is a type of that which holds one to the World, and to things which attract the soul, and keep one from living entirely for GOD
Naomi - Ruth 1:2, Ruth 1:20 (c) This is the type of a backslider who, having enjoyed the blessing of GOD, leaves the fellowship of GOD to go into the World
Sensorium - ) The seat of sensation; the nervous center or centers to which impressions from the external World must be conveyed before they can be perceived; the place where external impressions are localized, and transformed into sensations, prior to being reflected to other parts of the organism; hence, the whole nervous system, when animated, so far as it is susceptible of common or special sensations
Grenada - Org
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diocese of Saint George's-in-Grenada
Amasa - He casts in his lot with the people of GOD and with the Son of GOD who just now is despised and rejected by the World
Sardonyx - Revelation 21:20 (b) The beauty and the value of these stones probably represent the beauty and the value of the nation of Israel (the twelve tribes) in GOD's program of World development
Aristotelians - They believed in the eternity of the World, and represented the Deity as somewhat similar to a principle of power giving motion to a machine; and as happy in the contemplation of himself, but regardless of human affairs
Temporal - ) Of or pertaining to time, that is, to the present life, or this World; secular, as distinguished from sacred or eternal
Oriole - ) Any one of various species of Old World singing birds of the family Oriolidae
Day Star, - Prophecy is a light in this dark World respecting things here and judgement
Rosary, Confraternity of the Holy - The names of the members must be on the register of the organization, and they are granted a participation in all the good works performed by the members of the Dominican Order throughout the World
Rarotonga, Cook Islands, Diocese of - Org
World Fact Book
patron saints index
Warning - Could warning make the World more just or wise
Prince - It may not be amiss to observe, in a World of this kind, that the Scripture attaches the title of prince to various characters among men. We read of the Dukes of Edom and other places in the first ages of the World. (2 Chronicles 18:25) And even Satan is called the prince of this World, and the prince of the power of the air; (John 12:31; Ephesians 2:2) The general acceptation, therefore, of the term implies somewhat of power and dominion
Victory - Because of Satan’s power in the World, Christians have a conflict with the World and its evil ways, but again through faith in Christ they are guaranteed victory (Romans 8:35-37; James 4:4; 1 John 2:15; 1 John 5:19; see World)
Babylon - Jeremiah 50:14 (b) Throughout chapters 50,51of this book, the actual city of Babylon is directly in view, but what is said about that city indicates clearly that it refers to the great religions and idolatries of the World which seek to depose GOD and enthrone their own philosophies. ...
Revelation 17:5 (b) This is plainly a type of the great false religious systems of the World, particularly Romanism, which knew nothing of the grace of GOD, nor the Blood of CHRIST, nor the personal ministry of the Holy Spirit. ...
Revelation 18:2 (b) As in the above Scripture we see the religious side of false religions So in this verse we find the political aspect of those great apostate religions, the political religious World
Academics - The contradictory systems which had been successively urged upon the World were become so numerous, that, from a view of the variety and uncertainty of human opinions, many were let to conclude that truth lay beyond the reach of our comprehension. A consideration of the principles of these two sects (see EPICUREANS) will lead us to form an idea of the deplorable state of the World at the time of Christ's birth; and the necessity there was of some divine teacher to convey to the mind true and certain principles of religion and wisdom. Jesus Christ, therefore, is with great propriety called the Day Spring from on High, the Sun of Righteousness, that arose upon a benighted World to dispel the clouds of ignorance and error, and discover to lost man the path of happiness and heaven
Fable - The parable's framework is drawn from the dealings of men with one another; or if from the natural World, not a grotesque parody of it, but real analogies. The fable rests on what man has in common with the lower creatures; the parable on the fact that man is made in the image of God, and that the natural World reflects outwardly the unseen realities of the spiritual World. Ezekiel 17:1-10 differs from the fable in not attributing human attributes to lower creatures, and in symbolizing allegorically prophetical truths concerning the World monarchies; it is called chidah , "a riddle," from chaadad "to be sharp", as requiring acumen to solve the continued enigmatical allegory. ) is the oldest in existence; the Hebrew mind had a special power of perceiving analogies to man in the lower World; this power is a relic of the primeval intuition given to Adam by God who "brought every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air, unto Adam to see what he would call them. ...
The analogies in the lower creatures are to man's lower virtues or defects, his Worldly prudence, or his pride, indolence, cunning (compare Matthew 10:16)
Iraq - The country was freed from Turkish dominion during the World War, and in 1928 was established as an independent state. ...
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Arbil (Erbil) (Chaldean Archeparchy)
Babilonia (Chaldean Archdiocese)
Baghdad
Baghdad (Armenian Archeparchy)
Baghdad (Chaldean Archdiocese)
Baghdad (Syrian Archeparchy)
Bassorah (Chaldean Archeparchy)
Kerkuk (Chaldean Archdiocese)
Mardin (Armenian Archdiocese)
Mossul (Chaldean Archeparchy)
Mossul (Syrian Archeparchy)
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Alquoch (Chaldean)
Amadiyah (Chaldean)
Aqra {Akra} (Chaldean)
Gezireh
Mardin (Chaldean Eparchy)
Sulaimaniya (Chaldean)
Zaku (Chaldean)
See also: ...
World Fact Book
Light, Light of the World - In John 8:12 Jesus, the God-man, said, “I am the light of the World. ...
A small problem confronts the interpreter who discovers that Jesus said to His disciples in Matthew 5:14 , “Ye are the light of the World. ” Yet in John 8:12 , Jesus said, “I am the light of the World. His disciples become reflectors in a darkened World, transmitting through their lives the true light of the eternal Son of God
Parthians - The Parthians were esteemed the most expert horsemen and archers in the World; and their skill in discharging arrows while in full flight Is frequently celebrated by Roman poets
Ortelius, Abraham - In 1564 he published an eight-leaved map of the World, which was followed in 1570 by the first great modern atlas, his Theatrum orbis terrarum, containing an index of ancient and modern place names
Kyrgyzstan - See also ...
Wikipedia
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
Candle, Paschal - A large candle, symbolic of the Risen Saviour, the Light of the World which is blessed at the service on Holy Saturday, is used that day in the blessing of the baptismal water, and is lighted on the Gospel side of the sanctuary during solemn services during the paschal season
Enmity - The friendship of the World is "enmity with God" (James 4:4 ; 1 John 2:15,16 )
Novitiate - It is esteemed the bed of the civil death of a novice, who expires to the World by profession
Lantern - In John's ironic scene, the mob comes with “artificial” lights to arrest Jesus, “the light of the World” ( John 8:12 ; John 9:5 ; John 11:9 ; John 12:35-36 ,John 12:35-36,12:40 )
Agabus - ), whose prediction of a famine over the (civilized) World occasioned the sending of alms from Antioch to Jerusalem
Disease - Exodus 15:26 (c) The word may be used to symbolize the wicked habits and ways that this sinful World fastens upon those who belong to it but from which the Christians are delivered
Onesimus - Christianity did not come in to set the World right thus: Onesimus was sent back to his master, and slaves are elsewhere exhorted to be faithful to their masters; but slavery is doubtless one of the fruits of man's sin
Cowpea - Catjang) found throughout the tropics of the Old World
Great White Brotherhood - A New Age term designating the spiritual organization of Ascended Masters (great spiritual leaders of this World and other Worlds) who have moved from the mortal realm to the Astral Plane (another dimension) and exist in a state of immortality
Scapegoat - The live goat which became the scapegoat is a picture of the Saviour living in glory with the marks of Calvary upon Him, having taken away the sin of the World, and having died at Calvary for our sins
Evil - Adam's sin resulted in sin entering the World allowing floods, storms, famines, etc
Voluntarism - ) Any theory which conceives will to be the dominant factor in experience or in the constitution of the World; - contrasted with intellectualism
Abroad - ) Before the public at large; throughout society or the World; here and there; widely
Tantalus - ) A Phrygian king who was punished in the lower World by being placed in the midst of a lake whose waters reached to his chin but receded whenever he attempted to allay his thirst, while over his head hung branches laden with choice fruit which likewise receded whenever he stretched out his hand to grasp them
Sanctification - ) the act of God's grace by which the affections of men are purified, or alienated from sin and the World, and exalted to a supreme love to God; also, the state of being thus purified or sanctified
Euphemia, Saint - Churches in her honor have been erected all over the Christian World; the Greeks celebrate her day with special honors
Abraham Ortelius - In 1564 he published an eight-leaved map of the World, which was followed in 1570 by the first great modern atlas, his Theatrum orbis terrarum, containing an index of ancient and modern place names
Afghanistan - See also ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
Night - The moral darkness of the World, in which men sleep and are drunken
Saint Vincent And the Grenadines - See also ...
World Fact Book ...
Saint Edmund's College - After World War I the existing buildings were repaired and new schools and halls were added
Evil - If Christians believe in a God of love and power who created and controls the World, how can they explain the presence and power of evil in the World? This question commonly puzzles people, but the Bible gives no direct answer to it. )...
Human nature...
God created the World good and he wanted the people of his creation to enjoy it with him (Genesis 1:31; 1 Timothy 4:4; Hebrews 4:4; Hebrews 4:10). ...
Life in a spoiled World...
The Bible commonly speaks of evil in two different but related ways. Because the evil of sin has infected the World, calamities and misfortunes have become part of life in the World. ...
No cause for despair...
Although the entrance of sin into the World has spoiled God’s purposes for the human race, it has not overthrown them. Through Christ’s death, believers can enjoy victory over evil while still living in the present evil World (Romans 6:7-11; Romans 6:14; Galatians 1:4; see SALVATION)
Hear - I speak to the World those things which I have heard of him. They speak of the World, and the World heareth them
Wars - War is the natural consequence of sin being in the World, and men and nations coveting the possessions of others. Their warfare is typical of the conflict of Christians against principalities, powers, and the rulers of the darkness of this World and against spiritual wickedness in the heavenlies. The kings of the habitable World will be gathered at Armageddon to the battle of that great day of God the Almighty
Earth - ( Genesis 2:7 ) ...
Erets is applied in a more or less extended sense-- (1) to the whole World, ( Genesis 1:1 ) (2) to land as opposed to sea, (Genesis 1:10 ) (3) to a country, (Genesis 21:32 ) (4) to a plot of ground, (Genesis 23:15 ) and (5) to the ground on which a man stands. --There seems to be traces of the same ideas as prevailed among the Greeks, that the World was a disk, ( Isaiah 40:22 ) bordered by the ocean, with Jerusalem as its centre, like Delphi as the navel, or, according to another view, the highest point of the World
Lazarus - ...
The rich man called for Lazarus to come and bring relief to his suffering, but he learnt to his disappointment that no person could pass from Lazarus’ World to his (Luke 16:24-26). He then asked to send Lazarus back from the World of the dead into the World of the living, to warn the rich man’s brothers of the horrors that lay ahead
Pleasure - The sons of this World lead effortless lives (Luke 20:34), but Christ’s Kingdom is not of this World (John 18:36). Yet, far more than all this, the pursuit of pleasures is disloyalty, because it is the following after will-o’-the-wisps (as it were) instead of the steadfast regard to the Light of the World (John 8:12; John 9:5). In return, the Lord has unfailing promises of blessedness here and hereafter (Luke 18:29-30, Mark 10:29-30); but the true disciple must renounce everything this World offers, to be counted worthy of the eternal joy (Matthew 16:24, Mark 8:34, Luke 9:23). All the pleasure the World can afford will never compensate for what is lost in such a pursuit (Matthew 16:26, Mark 8:36, Luke 9:25). The pleasures of this World may secure the horrors of hell (Luke 6:25)
Suffering - Before they brought sin into their World, human beings were was in a state of harmony with God and with the natural World, and as a result were free of pain and suffering. God had given the natural World to them for their physical and spiritual well-being, but that World now became a cause of suffering. ...
Unanswered questions...
It is therefore true to say that there is suffering in the World because there is sin in the World. ...
God’s provision...
Jesus was fully human and lived in the World as other people. Therefore, he too experienced the suffering that is in the World through sin, even though he himself never sinned. Through his experiences he learnt the full meaning of obedience to God in a World of sin and suffering (Hebrews 2:10; Hebrews 5:8)
Liechtenstein - See also: ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
Library, Ambrosian - One of the famous libraries of the World, founded by Cardinal Federigo Borromeo at Milan between 1603,1609
Domenichino Zampieri - His masterpiece, "The Communion of Saint Jerome," now in the Vatican collection, is considered one of the great pictures of the World
Domenico Zampieri - His masterpiece, "The Communion of Saint Jerome," now in the Vatican collection, is considered one of the great pictures of the World
Archangel - This World is only twice used in the Bible, 1 Thessalonians 4:16 Jude 1:9
Poor in Spirit - That God has “chosen those who are poor in the eyes of the World to be rich in faith and to possess the kingdom” was regarded as a well-established fact (James 2:5 REB)
Aureole - ) who have overcome the World, the flesh, and the devil
Beans - A leguminous plant (Faba vulgaris ,) grown in the ancient World as food
Phaethon - He is fabled to have obtained permission to drive the chariot of the sun, in doing which his want of skill would have set the World on fire, had he not been struck with a thunderbolt by Jupiter, and hurled headlong into the river Po
Advent - It is intended as a season of devotion, with reference to the coming of Christ in the flesh, and his second coming to judge the World
Ambrosian Library - One of the famous libraries of the World, founded by Cardinal Federigo Borromeo at Milan between 1603,1609
Apostolic, Administration - A special form of diocesan organization of which eight have been created in Europe since World War I ...
Feldkirch, Austria
Tutz, Germany
Miskolcz, Hungary
Tirna va, Czechoslovakia
Targul-Siret, Rumania
Temesvar, Rumania
Subotica, Yugoslavia
Veliki Bechkerek, Yugoslavia
In most cases, where a new boundary of a country intersected an old diocese, the section in the country remote from the diocesan seat was erected into an administration Apostolic, usually under a titular bishop
Fast, Fasting - It is interesting to note that sin entered the World through the disobedience of eating (Genesis 3:6)
Laugh - Psalm 2:4 (a) By this is indicated GOD's complete supremacy as He looks with scorn on the feeble efforts of man to reject His Son from being ruler of this World
Administration Apostolic - A special form of diocesan organization of which eight have been created in Europe since World War I ...
Feldkirch, Austria
Tutz, Germany
Miskolcz, Hungary
Tirna va, Czechoslovakia
Targul-Siret, Rumania
Temesvar, Rumania
Subotica, Yugoslavia
Veliki Bechkerek, Yugoslavia
In most cases, where a new boundary of a country intersected an old diocese, the section in the country remote from the diocesan seat was erected into an administration Apostolic, usually under a titular bishop
a.b.c., an - The first reads: ...
"Almighty, all merciful Queen, to whom all this World fleeth for succor, to have release from sin, sorrow and trouble, Glorious Virgin, flower of all flowers, to thee I fly, confounded in error! Thou mighty, gracious lady, help and relieve me, pity my perilous malady!- My cruel adversary hath vanquished me
Evangelistic Associations - There are 14 bodies grouped under this head: ...
Apostolic Christian Church
Apostolic Faith Movement
Christian Congregation
Church of Daniel's Band
Church of God as Organized by Christ
Church Transcendent
Hephzibah Faith Missionary Association Inc
Lumber River Missions
Metropolitan Church Association
Missionary Bands of the World
Missionary Church Association
Peniel Missions
Pillar of Fire
Voluntary Missionary Society in America
Turtledove - ) Any one of numerous species of pigeons belonging to Turtur and allied genera, native of various parts of the Old World; especially, the common European species (Turtur vulgaris), which is noted for its plaintive note, affectionate disposition, and devotion to its mate
Sacrifice - Sacrifices were in use from the earliest periods of the World, and among all nations
Scandal - Christ speaks of scandal: "Woe to the World because of scandals
Zampieri, Domenichino - His masterpiece, "The Communion of Saint Jerome," now in the Vatican collection, is considered one of the great pictures of the World
Zampieri, Domenico - His masterpiece, "The Communion of Saint Jerome," now in the Vatican collection, is considered one of the great pictures of the World
Reunion - Org
World Fact Book
Ori'on - It is named after a mythical personage of the Greeks, of gigantic stature and "the handsomest man in the World
Chabad-lubavitch - A chassidic movement founded by Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi in the latter part of the 18th century that emphasizes the importance of "Chabad," an acronym for �Chochmoh, Binah, Da�at� (wisdom, understanding and knowledge); the concept of studying and understanding G-d and His relationship with the World
Agnus Dei - " This is the name given tothe prayer "O Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World,have mercy upon us," to be found in the Litany and Gloria inExcelsis
Stewardship - Unfortunately, the sin of humanity interrupted God's plans for His World. Humankind became selfish, seeing the World as a means to its own self-centered ends. The things of the World were now seen as possessions with humans as owners, not as God's stewards. God's intention for His World did not change. Jesus asked for obedience to God's original intention for the World. Jesus was calling for a radical reversal of the World's values (profit) and a revolutionary return to God's purpose (lose life for My sake)
Devil - He is the great principle of evil in the World; and it is his grand object to counteract the good that God desires to do. He is called, "The prince of this World," John 12:31 ; "The prince of the power of the air," Ephesians 2:2 ; "The god of this World," 2 Corinthians 4:4 ; "The dragon, that old serpent, the devil," Revelation 20:2 ; "That wicked one," 1 John 5:18 ; "A roaring lion," 1 Peter 5:8 ; "A murderer," "a liar," John 8:44 ; "Beelzebub," Matthew 12:24 ; "Belial," 2 Corinthians 6:15 ; "The accuser of the brethren," Revelation 12:10 . Almost the whole World has been under his sway. Christ shall bruise the serpent's head; shall dispossess him for the World, as he has done from individuals, and at length confine him for ever in the place prepared for him and his angels, Matthew 25:41
Fishing Net, Parable of the - It thus forewarns the disciples against scandal resulting from the presence of evil in the Kingdom, and reminds them that the establishment of the Kingdom of God will not result in the disappearance of evil from the World. The disciples, therefore, must not expect a sudden, miraculous transformation of the World, which would make it resemble heaven, and must not be scandalized when persecution comes, as it is bound to, from the coexistence of the Kingdom and of evil
Rejection (2) - Jesus knew that He would be rejected, and anticipated the result to Himself (Mark 8:31, Luke 9:22; Luke 17:25), to the Jewish nation (Luke 19:43), and to the World (John 12:48). When the Jews rejected Jesus, they wrote their own sentence of doom, while the Gentiles who have accepted Jesus have secured the leadership of the World
Stephen - They took seriously the commission of Jesus to carry the gospel to the whole World and led to the founding of the World mission movement that took the gospel to the whole Roman Empire in the first century
Sorrow - ” Paul distinguished between godly and Worldly sorrow (2 Corinthians 7:8-11 ). In this World you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the World” (John 16:33 NIV)
Quail - ) Any one of numerous species of Turnix and allied genera, native of the Old World, as the Australian painted quail (Turnix varius). ) Any gallinaceous bird belonging to Coturnix and several allied genera of the Old World, especially the common European quail (C
Earring - Genesis 24:22 (c) The jewelry given to Rebecca is a picture and a type of the blessings which GOD gives in this present World through the Holy Spirit, a sample of the greater riches that a wait us when we actually meet the Lord face to face. ...
Hosea 2:13 (a) The figure is used here to describe those who make themselves attractive to the World and to GOD's enemies, and turn their affections to those things and those people who do not love the Lord, nor want His presence
Valley - But by valley the scriptural and figurative sense is, this lower World. " (Song of Song of Solomon 6:11) What an endearing representation this is of Jesus, coming down into time valley of our World, and taking notice of his own graces given by himself to his own people
Apostleship of the Sea - Society for promoting the spiritual welfare of Catholic seafarers throughout the World, with headquarters in London. Apostleship publicity, broadcast in many languages to the Catholic press throughout the World, has results in the formation of national section in Holland and Spain, regional headquarters in Australia, Canada, India, Italy, New Zealand, and South America
Loss - , "casting away" (apo, "away," ballo, "to cast"), is translated "loss" in Acts 27:22 ; in Romans 11:15 , "casting away," of the temporary exclusion of the nation of Israel from its position of Divine favor, involving the reconciling of the World (i. , the provision made through the Gospel, which brings the World within the scope of reconciliation)
Earthquake - A convulsion of the earth common in volcanic regions, and well known in all parts of the World; probably occasioned by the action of internal heat or fire. A very memorable earthquake was that at our Savior's death, Matthew 27:51 , which some suppose extended throughout the World
Sea, Apostleship of the - Society for promoting the spiritual welfare of Catholic seafarers throughout the World, with headquarters in London. Apostleship publicity, broadcast in many languages to the Catholic press throughout the World, has results in the formation of national section in Holland and Spain, regional headquarters in Australia, Canada, India, Italy, New Zealand, and South America
Atheist - That Atheism existed in some sense before the flood, may be suspected from what we read in Scripture, as well as from Heathen tradition; and it is not very unreasonable to suppose, that the deluge was partly intended to evince to the World a heavenly power, as Lord of the universe, and superior to the visible system of nature. This is true, if they mean that species of refined Atheism, which contrives any impious scheme of principles to account for the origin of the World, without a divine being. ...
Atheism, in its primary sense, comprehends, or at least goes beyond, every heresy in the World; for it professes to acknowledge no religion, true or false. The two leading hypotheses which have prevailed, among Atheists, respecting this World and its origin, are, that of Ocellus Lucanus, adopted and improved by Aristotle, that it was eternal; and that of Epicurus, that it was formed by a fortuitous concourse of atoms. "...
The being of a God may be proved from the marks of design, and from the order and beauty visible in the World; from universal consent; from the relation of cause and effect; from internal consciousness; and from the necessity of a final as well as an efficient cause. Atheism is unreasonable, because it gives no tolerable account of the existence of the World. For he must suppose either that the World is eternal, or that it was formed by chance and a fortuitous concourse of the parts of matter. That the World had a beginning, is evident from universal tradition, and the most ancient history that exists; from there being no memorials of any actions performed previously to the time assigned in that history as the aera of the creation; from the origin of learning and arts, and the liability of the parts of matter to decay. That the World was not produced by chance, is also evident. Samuel Clarke, in his "Demonstration of the Being of a God," says, that Atheism arises either from stupid ignorance, or from corruption of principles and manners, or from the reasonings of false philosophy; and he adds, that the latter, who are the only Atheistical persons capable of being reasoned with at all, must of necessity own that, supposing it cannot be proved to be true, yet it is a thing very desirable, and which any wise man would wish to be true, for the great benefit and happiness of man, that there was a God, an intelligent and wise, a just and good Being, to govern the World. Whatever hypothesis these men can possibly frame, whatever argument they can invent, by which they would exclude God and providence out of the World; that very argument or hypothesis, will of necessity lead them to this concession. If they suppose that the World was made by chance, and is every moment subject to be destroyed by chance again; no man can be so absurd as to contend, that it is as comfortable and desirable to live in such an uncertain state of things, and so continually liable to ruin, without any hope of renovation, as in a World that is under the preservation and conduct of a powerful, wise, and good God. If they argue against the being of God, from the faults and defects which they imagine they can find in the frame and constitution of the visible and material World; this supposition obliges them to acknowledge that it would have been better the World had been made by an intelligent and wise Being, who might have prevented all faults and imperfections. If they argue against providence, from the faultiness and inequality which they think they discover in the management of the moral World; this is a plain confession, that it is a thing more fit and desirable in itself, that the World should be governed by a just and good Being, than by mere chance or unintelligent necessity. Lastly, if they suppose the World to be eternally and necessarily self-existent, and consequently that every thing in it is established by a blind and eternal fatality; no rational man can at the same time deny, but that liberty and choice, or a free power of acting, is a more eligible state, than to be determined thus in all our actions, as a stone is to move downward, by an absolute and inevitable fate
Joseph, Litany of Saint - ...
God the Son, Redeemer of the World, Have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the World, have mercy on us
Litany of Saint Joseph - ...
God the Son, Redeemer of the World, Have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the World, have mercy on us
Ruler - In Ephesians 6:12 ‘the rulers of the darkness of this World’ (Authorized Version ) might be more exactly rendered ‘the World-rulers of this darkness’ (Revised Version ). The reference here is to spiritual powers of evil to which this World is really in bondage, while all the time it falsely asserts its independence of the only true God. This World is the realm of darkness of these powers
Oblate Sisters of Providence - It was the first congregation in the New World for women of African descent; their mission was the education of black children
Little Brothers of Mary - In 24 provinces and 3 districts of World-wide distribution there are 8562 members and novices, and 575 schools
Marist School Brothers - In 24 provinces and 3 districts of World-wide distribution there are 8562 members and novices, and 575 schools
Friary of la Rabida - Franciscan convent near Palos, Andalusia, Spain, where Columbus stopped with his son Diego on his way to France to seek aid for his expedition to the New World
la Rabida, Friary of - Franciscan convent near Palos, Andalusia, Spain, where Columbus stopped with his son Diego on his way to France to seek aid for his expedition to the New World
Kelly, William - He innovated several improvements in the manufacture of iron, and first converted cast iron into malleable steel by what is now known throughout the World as the Bessemer process
Faith: Triumph of - At length one of them, addressing the old lady, said: 'Mother, are you not afraid?' 'No,' said the mother in Israel; 'I rejoice to know that I have a God 1hai can shake the World
Ur - Though it is mentioned in the Bible only as the place from which Abraham originally came (Genesis 11:27-31; Genesis 15:7; Nehemiah 9:7), it was an important city in the ancient World
Lucifer - In the blessing of the Easter candle it signifies Christ, the "light of the World
Meliorism - (Latin: melior, better) ...
A philosophic theory which holds that though things in the World are bad they can be improved, and that man can find some satisfiaction in laboring to increase the happiness of his fellow men
Sins: Home-Born Our Worst Foes - We want more Protestants against sin, more Dissenters from carnal maxims, and more Nonconformists to the World
Allinule - The purple gallinule of America is Ionornis Martinica, that of the Old World is Porphyrio porphyrio
Razor - ...
Isaiah 7:20 (a) This is the largest razor in all the World
Perfection: Marred by the World - Too often contact with the World has just such an effect upon our piety; we must away to the far off garden of Paradise to see holiness in its unsullied purity, and meanwhile we must be much alone with God if we would maintain a gracious life below
Ahura-Mazda - ) The supreme deity, the principle of good, creator of the World, and guardian of mankind
Corruption - ...
Romans 8:21 (b) The bondage of living in this World of sin and death is compared to vile, rotten, evil things
Footmen - If they make the man of the World weary so, that his company is not desired, then what would the Worldling do, if he were taken to Heaven where Christians were glorified and are perfect and holy? Horses represent perfect Christians in Heaven
Enmity - The friendship of the World is enmity with God
Appropriation - It is a term also often used in the religious World as referring to that act of the mind by which we apply the blessings of the Gospel to ourselves
Yellowwood - All these Old World trees furnish valuable timber
Lees - A very significant type of the poor apathetic World, and of the self-satisfied and unconcerned spirit of Christendom
William Kelly - He innovated several improvements in the manufacture of iron, and first converted cast iron into malleable steel by what is now known throughout the World as the Bessemer process
Sierra Leone - Ecclesiastically, the country is governed by the archdiocese of ...
Freetown and Bo
and the dioceses of ...
Kenema
Makeni
See also ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
Ball And the Cross, the - The title, suggested by the ball on Saint Paul's Cathedral and the cross on the Westminster dome, is also the title of a caption for an editorial section of the Catholic World
Dispensation - In the Patriarchal, Mosaic, and Christian dispensations, God has commenced, enlarged, and perfected his revelation of himself and his grace to this World, Ephesians 1:10 Colossians 1:25
Wickedness, Spirits of - Lest the force of their spiritual attack from the "high places" be thought of too lightly, Saint Paul warns emphatically: "For our wrestling is not against flesh and blood; but against principalities and powers, against the rulers of the World of this darkness, against the spirits of wickedness in the high places" (Ephesians 6)
Lambeth Conference - The first meeting was heldin 1867; the second in 1878; the third in 1888, and the fourth in1897; the Bishops thus coming together every ten years for mutualcounsel and advice concerning the great work of the AnglicanCommunion throughout the World
Sovereignty of God - ...
Creative Sovereignty God is the Lord of creation, the source of all things, who brought the World into being and who guides His creation toward a meaningful end. God's purpose is to bring His creation—His whole creation—to fullness and completion, to fellowship with Him: “God was in Christ, reconciling the World unto himself” (2 Corinthians 5:19 ). ...
Sovereignty and Freedom Divine sovereignty does not mean that everything which occurs in the World is God's will. God has created a World in which freedom is a real possibility. This freedom means that sovereignty must always be distinguished from “fate” or “destiny,” the belief that everything which occurs in the World has been predetermined, scheduled in advance, by God
Infinite - According to the Vatican Council, He is infinite in intellect and will and every perfection, really and essentially distinct from the World, infinitely blessed in Himself and through Himself and inexpressibly above all things that can exist and be thought of besides Him
East Country - The East Country and West Country of Zechariah 8:7 refer to the whole World
David, Key of - Christ is set over the House of God (Ephesians 1; Hebrews 3), and exercises all authority in heaven and on earth (Matthew 28) and even in the nether World (Apocalypse 1)
Key of David - Christ is set over the House of God (Ephesians 1; Hebrews 3), and exercises all authority in heaven and on earth (Matthew 28) and even in the nether World (Apocalypse 1)
Catholic Citizenship - (Catholic Citizenship) A fortnightly review, published in Rome, which treats political, social, and religious questions from the Catholic standpoint, gives the news of the World, and criticizes important books
Heracleonites - A sect of Christians, the followers of Heracleon, who refined upon the Gnostic divinity, and maintained that the World was not the immediate production of the Son of God, but that he was only the occasional cause of its being created by the demiurgus
Tartak - Tartak may be of Persian origin, meaning "the prince of darkness", belonging to the under World or some planet of ill fortune
Courage: Strengthened by Past Deliverances - Sir Francis Drake, being in a dangerous storm in the Thames, was heard to say, 'Must I who have escaped the rage of the ocean, be drowned in a ditch?' Will you, experienced saints, who have passed through a World of tribulation lie down and die of despair, or give up your profession because you are at the present moment passing through some light affliction? Let your past preservation inspire you with courage and constrain you to brave all storms for Jesus' sake
Holy Land, Commissariat of the - There are 40 commissariats throughout the Christian World, seven in English-speaking countries; in the United States one is established at Mount Saint Sepulcher, Washington, DC
Parnassian - They inhabit the mountains, both in the Old World and in America
Agnosticism - ) The doctrine that the existence of a personal Deity, an unseen World, etc
Algeria - ...
Ecclesiastically the country is governed by the archdiocese of ...
Alger
and the dioceses of ...
Constantine-Hippone
Laghouat
Oran
See also, ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
American Federation of Catholic Societies - During the World War it was merged into the National Council of Catholic Men
Weaned - Psalm 131:2 (a) The heart of the Psalmist, and his life, had been so changed by GOD that he lived in heavenly places and walked with his Lord separate from the World
Wryneck - ) Any one of several species of Old World birds of the genus Jynx, allied to the woodpeckers; especially, the common European species (J
Abaddon - Abaddon frequently occurs in the Hebrew, and is translated "destruction," meaning often the World of the dead
Obscurity - A state of retirement from the World a state of being unnoticed privacy
Saint Paul's Outside the Walls - It was destroyed by fire in 1823; the whole World contributed to its restoration which was completed in 1854
Solomon Islands - Org
World Fact Book
Catholic - The church of Christ is called catholic, because it extends throughout the World, and during all time
University of Saint Thomas - During World War II it served as a training base for naval officers
Saint Thomas, University of - During World War II it served as a training base for naval officers
Sanctification - In an evangelical sense, the act of God's grace by which the affections of men are purified or alienated from sin and the World, and exalted to a supreme love to God
ju'Piter - The Olympian Zeus was the national god of the Hellenic race, as well as the supreme ruler of the heathen World, and as such formed the true opposite to Jehovah
Jewels - In Malachi 3:17 it is used symbolically for the remnant that will be precious to the Lord of hosts in a future day, as the saints are now during the rejection of the Lord Jesus by the World
Apol'Lyon - " From the occurrence of the word in (Psalm 88:11 ) the rabbins have made Abaddon the nethermost of the two regions into which they divide the lower World; but that in (Revelation 9:11 ) Abaddon is the angel and not the abyss is perfectly evident in the Greek
Lectern - Lecterns as usedin our churches are sometimes constructed of wood or stone,but frequently of polished brass, in the form of an eagle withoutstretched wings, (on which the Bible rests) to symbolize theflight of the Gospel message throughout the World
Stoics - ’ Nature both in the World and in man is to be interpreted by its highest manifestation Reason which appears in the World as the all-pervading ethereal essence or spirit, forming and animating the whole; and in man as the soul. This World-spirit occupies the place of God in the Stoic system
Saturnians - The World and its inhabitants were, according to the system of Saturnius, created by seven angels, which presided over the seven planets. He endowed with rational souls the beings who inhabited this new system, to whom their creators had imparted nothing more than the animal life; and, having divided the World into seven parts, he distributed them among the seven angelic architects, one of whom was the God of the Jews, and reserved to himself the supreme empire over all. When the creatures of the World fell from their allegiance to the supreme Deity, God sent from heaven into our globe a restorer of order, whose name was Christ
Lamps, Lighting, Lampstand - Jesus is depicted often in John as the light of the World (John 1:4-5 ,John 1:4-5,1:7-9 ; John 3:19 ; John 8:12 ; John 9:5 ; John 11:9-10 ; John 12:35-36 ,John 12:35-36,12:46 ). Jesus' disciples are also described as the light of the World (Matthew 5:14-16 ). See Light, Light of the World ...
Dennis Cole...
...
Death - ...
Dead in sin - Ephesians 2:1...
Dead to the World - Galatians 6:14. The meaning of all of this evidently is that the believer in CHRIST JESUS takes his place with CHRIST in His rejection from the World, and identifies himself with this rejected Lord. He does not now take part in, nor love, the things that this World offers to the unsaved
Crucifixion - Paul could say that he was crucified with Christ; and that by Christ the World was crucified to him, and he to the World. He accepted the judgement of himself in the cross, and he was cut off from the World by the same means
Sand - Genesis 22:17 (a) This refers to the prevalence of Israel all over the World, as sand is found all over the World. Also represents their power to control the nations of the World (the sea and its waves), as will one day be true when Israel is the head of the nations
Christmas - Before the fourth century, churches in the East—Egypt, Asia Minor, and Antioch—observed Epiphany, the manifestation of God to the World, celebrating Christ's baptism, His birth, and the visit of the Magi. The practice spread widely and rapidly, so that most parts of the Christian World observed the new festival by the end of the century. Thus, the festival of the sun became a festival of the Son, the Light of the World
Swedenborgians - ever since the time of Job, but is now revived by Emanuel Swedenborg, who uses it as a key to the spiritual or internal sense of the sacred Scripture; every page of which, he says, is written by correspondence, that is, by such things in the natural World as correspondent unto and signify things in the spiritual World. That all those passages in the Scripture generally supposed to signify the destruction of the World by fire, and commonly called the last judgment, must be understood according to the above-mentioned science of correspondences, which teaches, that by the end of the World, or consummation of the age, is not signified the destruction of the World, but the destruction or end of the present Christian church, both among Roman Catholics and Protestants, of every description or denomination; and that this last judgment actually took place in the spiritual World in the year 1757; from which aera is dated the second advent of the Lord, and the commencement of a new Christian church, which, they say, is meant by the new heaven and new earth in the Revelation, and the New Jerusalem thence descending
Element - ’ In the same sense the apocryphal Book of Wisdom ( Wis 7:17 ) employs the word, and speaks of ‘the constitution of the World and the operation of the elements. The exact meaning of the phrase ‘elements of the World’ in the four texts of Galatians 4:3 ; Galatians 4:9 and Colossians 2:8 ; Colossians 2:20 has been found difficult to determine. It is argued that the context in both these Epistles favours this opinion, and the express statement that the Galatians ‘were in bondage to them that by nature are no gods,’ and the admonition in Colossians against ‘philosophy, vain deceit, and worshipping of the angels,’ show that the Apostle had in mind a current superstitious belief in cosmic spiritual beings, and a worshipping of them as princes of the powers of the air and World-rulers of darkness. ’ ( b ) But probably the majority of interpreters understand by these ‘elements of the World’ the ordinances and customs of Jewish legalism, which tied the worshipper down to the ritualism of a ‘worldly sanctuary’ (cf. ’ Such are no longer ‘held in bondage under the rudiments of the World,’ for Christ sets them free from dependence upon rites, ordinances, vows, sacrifices, observance of times and seasons, which all belong to the elementary stages and phases of the lower religious cults of the World
Lucifer - The language is primarily drawn from that of Satan himself, the spirit that energized the pagan World power Babylon, that now energizes the apostate church, and shall at last energize the last secular antichrist (the fourth kingdom little horn) and his champion, the false prophet (the third kingdom little horn), the harlot's successor, who shall oppress Israel, as the fourth kingdom little horn oppresses the Gentile World: Daniel 7:8-26 (Chaldee); Daniel 8:9-11 (Hebrew); Revelation 13:4; Revelation 16:13-14; 2 Thessalonians 2:9
Regeneration - Only twice in the New Testament: Titus 3:5 of the regeneration of the soul by the Holy Spirit, and Matthew 19:28 the regeneration of the body and of the material World. Nations and society shall be first regenerated in the millennial World, with Israel as their priest-kingly head (Isaiah 2:2-4; Isaiah 2:11); wars shall cease, and even the wild beasts cease to rage
Light - Hence Jesus, God Incarnate, is called ‘the Light of the World’ ( John 1:4-5 ; John 1:9 ; John 18:12 ), ‘an effulgence of the glory of God’ ( Hebrews 1:3 ); and salvation is defined as walking in His light and being enlightened by it ( John 8:12 ; John 12:36 ; John 12:38 , 1Jn 1:7 , 2 Corinthians 4:6 , Ephesians 5:8 ; Ephesians 5:14 , 1 Thessalonians 5:5 , 1 Peter 2:3 ). And Christians as His representatives and witnesses are the light of the World ( Matthew 5:14 ; Matthew 5:16 , Philippians 2:15 )
Lodge - Isaiah 1:8 (a) The lesson to be learned from this type is that the people of Israel had forsaken the gardens of GOD, the flowers and fruits of GOD's love and grace, and preferred to dwell among the pleasures of this World. The tree with its many branches represents an unnatural growth in which wicked spirits feel at home in the various divisions of the great apostate religious World. So the present religious institutions filled with all sorts of evil doctrines, Worldly practices and unsaved persons is not according to the will of GOD
Har-Magedon - ]'>[1] Armageddon) , the kings of the lower World are to be gathered together by the Dragon, the Beast, and the false prophet, to make war upon God. While the reference is apocalyptic, it seems probable on the whole that the word perpetuates Megiddo as the synonym of the battle-field whether above the earth or in the under World on which the final victory over evil was to be won
Foundation of the World - FOUNDATION OF THE World. ‘The foundation of the World’ stands for the definite epoch when this present Universe was originated
Paradise - This famous garden is indeed commonly known by the name of "the terrestrial paradise," and there is hardly any part of the World in which it has not been sought. And in Revelation 2:7 22:14 , the natural features of the scene where innocence and bliss were lost, are used to depict the World where these are restored perfectly and forever
Mustard - ...
As the parable indicates, Christendom presents a sort of Christianity that has become conformed to the principles and ways of the World, and the World has favored this debased Christianity
Devil - ; dragon, Revelation 12:7; Revelation 20:2; the god of this World, 2 Corinthians 4:4; the evil one, from whom, in the Lord's prayer, we are to pray to be delivered, Matthew 6:13; Matthew 13:19; Matthew 13:38; Luke 11:4, A. reads day star; murderer, John 8:44; prince of the power of the air, Ephesians 2:2; prince of this World, John 12:31; serpent. From the beginning of the World the devil has had a hand, and sometimes a controlling one, in the most important events in the history of man. Matthew 4:1; he "entered into Judas," Luke 22:3; he is the deceiver which deceiveth the whole World, Revelation 12:9, etc
Bernabe Cobo - His "History of the New World," until recently neglected, is invaluable from a historical and scientific viewpoint
Froissart, Jean - Froissart is a reporter rather than an historian, for he lacks critical sense, but his descriptions of the feudal World entering upon its decadence are vivid and picturesque
Diego Alvarez Chanca - The site of one of the first Christian settlements in the New World, Isabella, ten leagues east of Cape Monte Christi, Haiti, was decided on as a result of his advice
Sinim - The ‘land of Sinim’ ( Isaiah 49:12 ) must, from the context, have been in the extreme south or east of the known World
Jean Froissart - Froissart is a reporter rather than an historian, for he lacks critical sense, but his descriptions of the feudal World entering upon its decadence are vivid and picturesque
Chanca, Diego Alvarez - The site of one of the first Christian settlements in the New World, Isabella, ten leagues east of Cape Monte Christi, Haiti, was decided on as a result of his advice
Cornelius - He became the first fruit of the Gentile World to Christ
Anna - When she was eighty-four years old, she entered the temple at the moment when the aged Simeon uttered his memorable words of praise and thanks to God that he had fulfilled his ancient promise in sending his Son into the World (Luke 2:36,37 )
Andropogon - ) A very large and important genus of grasses, found in nearly all parts of the World
Epaphroditus - The name Epaphroditus was common in the first century Greek-speaking World
Tammuz - This caused great mourning in the ancient World, and was why the women in Jerusalem wept
Consumption - , ‘Christ shall sit … at the right hand of God till the consumption of the World
Decease - word exodos (‘exodus,’ ‘outgoing’) is translated ‘decease’ in Luke 9:31 and 2 Peter 1:15 , the meaning being departure out of the World
Prophet, the - He was the perfect exponent of God's mind to the Jews (Acts 3:22 ; Acts 7:37 ), and the proclaimer of God's grace to a guilty World
Immanuel - This passage has been cited by Matthew, and specially applied to the birth of Christ, Matthew 1:22-23, who is rightly regarded as "God with us" and as ever present in his church and with his people through the ages of the World
Hilton, Walter - " It is written for the spiritual guidance of religious people of wealth and social position in the World, and explains how they can sanctify their lives, and turn all to the honor and glory of God
Abuse, Abusers - , "to use overmuch" (kata, "down," intensive, chraomai, "to use"), is found in 1 Corinthians 7:31 , with reference to the believer's use of the World (marg
Walter Hilton - " It is written for the spiritual guidance of religious people of wealth and social position in the World, and explains how they can sanctify their lives, and turn all to the honor and glory of God
Gibraltar - Org
diocese of Gibraltar
World Fact Book
patron saints index
Lamb And Flag - John Baptist, "the Lamb of God thattaketh away the sins of the World
Selfishness - What we find Him teaching is not that the World is evil, but that the soul of man is good; that the soul is eternal, not of time, and therefore that in God alone, to whom it is akin, can it attain its complete satisfaction (Matthew 6:19-21 || Luke 12:33-34). He sets moral self-love over against natural selfishness (Matthew 16:25 || Mark 8:35), and He insists that the perfect, the eternal development of the human personality is to be found not in separation and independence, but in union and communion with universal life,—life as it is in God, life as God has put it into the World (cf. To pour out oneself in love, to lose oneself for Christ’s sake, to give oneself to God and to the World of men, is ‘to find,’ ‘to save’ oneself in Him. To make the law of God, the Creator of the World and the Heavenly Father of each human soul, the fundamental law of one’s life, is to render all temporal and corruptible things innocuous. ‘What is a man profited,’ Christ asks, ‘if he shall gain the whole World and lose his own soul?’ To preserve and to save his soul is thus a man’s highest profit, his one great task. But to seek to save it in the Worldly sense is to lose it in the spiritual and eternal. Even the gaining of the whole World by the natural self is worthless if it entails spiritual loss; for to lose the true self is to have but the life of time, is to miss that of eternity (cf. It is in the light of eternity that man must view the World. It is true that life eternal is the grand reward, but in that life he is already a sharer who makes God’s service his aim in this World. The complete perfection of the self comes only when sin has passed away with mortal life; but there will be no gap between this World and the next. The good of the self is itself the good of the World, the fulfilment of the will of God; and even the reward is nothing other than the enlargement of the human powers so that the man becomes capable of yet greater labour for the World’s welfare. Spiritual self-love is the self’s completion, God’s glory and the World’s joy
Bernadette Soubirous, Blessed - When only 14 years of age she witnessed 18 apparitions of Our Lady at Lourdes, instructing her to make known to the World the miraculous healing powers which the Blessed Virgin would give to the waters there by her presence
Kikuyu Affair - The incident created a wide stir in ecclesiastical circles and threatened for a time to disrupt relations between high and low Churchmen in all parts of the World
Old Sarum - The cathedral, completed in 1266, is the flrst important building in the early English style, and its spire, regarded as the finest in Europe, is among the loftiest in the World
Christian - Also, the name of the religion which He founded, of its doctrines and precepts; of the life, habits of virtue, piety, spirit and character of His followers; of the Church which is rightly known by this name, as against sects which assume it (Christian Scientists, Christian Socialists); of the civilization which this religion developed in the World as distinguished from the civilizations of paganism, Islamism, Judaism
Offense, Mount of - The Mount is venerated by Christians as a favorite resort of Our Lord during the last days of His public life; it is the spot where He wept over Jerusalem (Luke 19) and prophesied its ruin and the end of the World (Matthew 24)
Olivet, Mount - The Mount is venerated by Christians as a favorite resort of Our Lord during the last days of His public life; it is the spot where He wept over Jerusalem (Luke 19) and prophesied its ruin and the end of the World (Matthew 24)
Mount of Offense - The Mount is venerated by Christians as a favorite resort of Our Lord during the last days of His public life; it is the spot where He wept over Jerusalem (Luke 19) and prophesied its ruin and the end of the World (Matthew 24)
Mount Olivet - The Mount is venerated by Christians as a favorite resort of Our Lord during the last days of His public life; it is the spot where He wept over Jerusalem (Luke 19) and prophesied its ruin and the end of the World (Matthew 24)
Taxing - This decree for the taxing referred to the whole Roman World, and not to Judea alone
Borrellists - They assert that all the Christian churches of the World have degenerated from the pure apostolic doctrines, because they have suffered the word of God, which is infallible, to be expounded, or rather corrupted, by doctors who are fallible
Buchanites - Buchan, of Glasgow, who gave herself out to be the woman spoken of in the Revelations; and that all who believed in her should be taken up to heaven without tasting death, as the end of the World was near
Augustus - His decree that "all the World should be taxed" was the divinely ordered occasion of Jesus' being born, according to prophecy (Micah 5:2 ), in Bethlehem
Chaos - Moses, the earliest of all writers, derives the origin of this World from a confusion of matter, dark, void, deep, without form, which he calls TOHUBOHU; which is precisely the chaos of the Greek and barbarian philosophers
Bugle - ) A plant of the genus Ajuga of the Mint family, a native of the Old World
Iceland - Org
World Fact Book
patron saints index
Transfiguration - The transfiguration preceded Jesus' time on the cross and may have been the Father's preparatory provision to strengthen Jesus as He prepared to bear the sins of the World
Abraham's Bosom - It is a figurative phrase that appears to have been drawn from a popular belief that the righteous would rest by Abraham's side in the World to come, an opinion described in Jewish literature at the time of Christ
Methuselah - The history of the fall and of the World before the flood was carried thus through only one person to Noah
Week - It was shared with the ancient World through the Bible and the religious practice of both Jews and Christians
Vanity - The term is likewise applied to this World, as unsatisfactory, Ecclesiastes 1:2 ; to lying, Psalms 4:2 ; to idols, Deuteronomy 32:21 ; to whatever disappoints our hopes, Psalms 60:11
Air Machine Blessing - A formula for blessing air machines, approved by the Congregation of Rites, March 24, 1920, and inserted in the Roman Ritual, as follows: ...
"O God who hast ordained all things for Thine own, and devised all the elements of this World for the human race; bless, we beseech thee, this machine consigned to the air; that it may serve for the praise and glory of Thy Name and, free from all injury and danger, expedite human interests and foster heavenly aspirations in the minds of all who use it
Guam - ...
World Factbook
Catholic-Hierarchy
Adultery - As those who are married may turn against each other secretly to find another companion, so one who is married to CHRIST and takes the place of being a Christian may turn against the Saviour and become a lover of the World and the things of Satan
Vision - In the first ages of the World the Lord was pleased to manifest himself to the children of God by vision; sometimes by open revelations, at other times by dreams in the night
Silicon - Silicon is characteristically the element of the mineral kingdom, as carbon is of the organic World
Confederacy - The friendships of the World are oft confederacies in vice
Angola - ...
Ecclesiastically, the country is governed by the archdioceses of ...
Huambo
Luanda
Lubango
and the dioceses of ...
Angola e Congo
Benguela
Cabinda
Carmona e São Salvador
Dundo
Henrique de Carvalho
Kwito-Bié
Luso
Lwena
Malanje
Mbanza Congo
Menongue
Ndalatando
Ngunza
Nova Lisboa
Novo Redondo
Ondjiva
Pereira de Eça
Sá da Bandeira
Saurimo
Serpa Pinto
Silva Porto
Uije
See also: ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
Immortal - Destined to live in all the ages of this World imperishable as immortal fame
Repentance - ...
There is true and false repentance, "For the sorrow that is according to the will of God produces a repentance without regret, leading to salvation; but the sorrow of the World produces death" (2 Corinthians 7:10)
Torch - "Reason is the natural sun in the mental World
Machiavelianism - This work has been translated into many languages, and wrote against by many authors, though the World is not agreed as to the motives of the writer; some thinking he meant to recommend tyrannical maxims; others, that he only delineated them to excite abhorrence
Outer - ) Being on the outside; external; farthest or farther from the interior, from a given station, or from any space or position regarded as a center or starting place; - opposed to inner; as, the outer wall; the outer court or gate; the outer stump in cricket; the outer World
Ramble - ) To walk, ride, or sail, from place to place, without any determinate object in view; to roam carelessly or irregularly; to rove; to wander; as, to ramble about the city; to ramble over the World
Adoration of the Cross - Following the Collects in the Mass of the Presanctified, the veiled crucifix is gradually uncovered, with the threefold chanting of "Ecce lignum crucis, in quo Salva tor mundi pependit" (Behold the wood of the Cross, on which hung the Saviour of the World)
Eastern Churches - They comprise numerous bodies in eastern Europe and Asia and a few divisions, the result of immigration, in America, Africa, and other parts of the World
Affair, Kikuyu - The incident created a wide stir in ecclesiastical circles and threatened for a time to disrupt relations between high and low Churchmen in all parts of the World
Diamond - But it is questionable whether, in the early ages of the World, the art or cutting and engraving the diamond was understood
Trumpets Feast of - This feast—described in Numbers 29:1-6; Leviticus 23:24—was the New Year's day of the civil year, coming on the first of Tisri (October), and was further called by the rabbins "the birthday of the World," because in Tisri the late fruits were gathered and seed was sown
Ladder - The comforting vision of the heavenly ladder shown to the fugitive Jacob, assured him of the omnipresent providence of God, and of his communication of all needed good to his people in the desert of this World, Hebrews 1:14
Soubirous, Bernadette, Blessed - When only 14 years of age she witnessed 18 apparitions of Our Lady at Lourdes, instructing her to make known to the World the miraculous healing powers which the Blessed Virgin would give to the waters there by her presence
Salisbury - The cathedral, completed in 1266, is the flrst important building in the early English style, and its spire, regarded as the finest in Europe, is among the loftiest in the World
Neighbor - But our Savior informed them that the whole World was neighbors; that they ought not to do to another what they would not have done to themselves; and that this charity extended even to enemies
Comforter - As Jesus helped disciples during His earthly ministry, so the Spirit helps them after the ascension as they face a hostile World
Whale - It is the largest animal of which we have any account, and probably the largest in the World
Altar Cross - The Cross is placed over the middle of theAltar, in the most sacred and prominent part of the Church, "inorder that the holy symbol of our Faith may be constantly beforethe eyes of all who worship therein, to shine through the gloom ofthis World and point them to the skies
Victory - νικάω), which is used by our Lord in John 16:33 ‘I have overcome the World,’ and in many other passages throughout the NT, to express the idea of ‘overcoming. It is not the triumph over social and financial difficulties which issues in Worldly success, but that mastery over our lower nature and the powers of evil within and around us which issues in self-control, and the subjection of the whole life to the will of God. This victory brings with it such blessings as forgiveness, deliverance from the dominion of sin and from the fear of death, a deep sense of the moral order of the World, peace with God, and life everlasting
Personal Work - I once heard a story of an American, who declared he could fight the whole British army, and when he was asked how he could draw so long a bow as that, he said, 'Why, this is what I would do: I know I am the best swordsman in the World, so I would go and challenge one Britisher, and kill him; then take another, and kill him. If we want to conquer the World for the Lord Jesus Christ, rest assured we must do it in the Yankee's fashion; we must take men one by one, and these ones must be brought to Christ, or otherwise the great mass must remain untouched
Table - He feeds them on heavenly dainties as they travel through this World. They have sources of joy that the World does not have
Epoch - The first epoch is the creation of the World, which, according to the Vulgate Bible, Archbishop Usher fixes in the year 710 of the Julian period, and 4004 years before Jesus Christ. The second is the deluge, which, according to the Hebrew text, happened in the year of the World 1656
Sanctification - Sanctification in this World must be complete; the whole nature must be sanctified, all sin must be utterly abolished, or the soul can never be admitted into the glorious presence of God, Hebrews 12:14 ; 1 Peter 1:15 ; Revelation 21:27 ; yet the saints, while here, are in a state of spiritual warfare with Satan and his temptations, with the World and its influence, 2 Corinthians 2:11 ; Galatians 5:17 ; Galatians 5:24 ; Romans 7:23 ; 1 John 2:15-16
Kidron - As Cæsar crossed the Rubicon for the military conquest of the World, so Christ crossed the Kedron for the salvation of the World
Death - "The gates of death," Job 38:17 , signify the unseen World occupied by departed spirits. Death is also figuratively used to denote the insensibility of Christians to the temptations of a sinful World, Colossians 3:3
Paul, Conversion of Saint - Paul, throughwhose preaching God caused the Light of the Gospel to shinethroughout the World. Paul had the care of all the churches and by hislabors contributed very much to the propagation of the Gospelthroughout the World
Race - In spite of the many ethnic groups in the World, there is one race that includes them all, the human race. The fact that this saviour was himself a human being meant that he had to come from one of the World’s many races and nations. ...
Through being God’s channel of blessing to the World, Israelites enjoyed certain blessings, but that did not mean that they automatically received salvation from the penalty of sin. God intends his church to be a showpiece to the World
Pantheism - The earliest Grecian pantheist of whom we read was Orpheus, who called the World the body of God, and its several parts his members, making the whole universe one divine animal. According to Cudworth, Orpheus and his followers believed in the immaterial soul of the World: therein agreeing with Aristotle, who certainly held that God and matter are co-eternal; and that there is some such union between them, as subsists between the souls and bodies of men. " This force they call the soul of the World; as also, a mind of perfect wisdom, and, consequently, God
Heavens, New - In 2 Peter 3:13 the new World is described as one “in which righteousness dwells” (NAS). The new World is the old World gloriously transformed. Further, the new World is marked by perfect fellowship of the saints with one another and with God
Basilidians - The inhabitants of the lowest heavens, which touched upon the borders of the eternal, malignant, and self-animated matter, conceived the design of forming a World from that confused mass, and of creating an order of beings to people it. ...
This design was carried into execution, and was approved by the Supreme God, who to the animal life, with which only the inhabitants of this new World were at first endowed, added a reasonable soul, giving at the same time to the angels the empire over them. These angelic beings, advanced to the government of the World which they had created, fell by degrees from their original purity, and soon manifested the fatal marks of their depravity and corruption. ...
Hence, the Supreme God, beholding with compassion the miserable state of rational beings, who groaned under the contest of these jarring powers, sent from heaven his son Nus, or Christ, the chief of the aions, that, joined in a substantial union with the man Jesus, he might restore the knowledge of the Supreme God, destroy the empire of those angelic natures which presided over the World, and particularly that of the arrogant leader of the Jewish people
Hymenaeus - It came from the masters of Gnosticism, who from Simon Magus onwards had taught the inferior or evil character of matter, in opposition to the fathers of the Catholic Church, who assigned to the World a sacramental character. For, when you release the World, you yourselves are not undone, but are lords over creation and over all corruption. A further implication is that the moment of regeneration, or of passing through the third gate, overshadowed in the Gnostic mind the incident of physical death, as not merely giving a change of status, but as being an actual admission into the Divine World, and therefore into a World over which physical death had no jurisdiction. )...
The delivering of Hymenaeus and Alexander to Satan is to be understood as an excommunication from the fold of grace and safety, and a consequent transition into the World outside the Church where Satan has his throne-the World of suffering, disease, and death
Atheist - Because it gives no tolerable account of the existence of the World. Was ever any considerable work, in which there was required a great variety of parts, and a regular and orderly disposition of those parts, done by chance! Will chance fit means to ends, and that in ten thousand instances, and not fail in any one? How often might a man, after he had jumbled a set of letters in a bag, fling them out upon the ground, before they would fall into an exact poem; yea, or so much as make a good discourse in prose? And may not a little book be as easily made by chance as the great volume of the World? How long might a man be in sprinkling colours upon canvass with a careless hand, before they would happen to make the exact picture of a man? And is a man easier made by chance than his picture? How long might twenty thousand blind men, who should be sent out from several remote parts of England, wander up and down before they would all meet upon Salisbury plain, and fall into rank and file in the exact order of an army? And, yet, this is much more easy to be imagined than how the innumerable blind parts of matter should rendezvous themselves into a World. ...
A man that sees Henry the Seventh's chapel at Westminster might with as good reason maintain (yea, with much better, considering the vast difference betwixt that little structure and the huge fabric of the World) that it was never contrived or built by any means, but that the stones did by chance grow into those curious figures into which they seem to have been cut and graven; and that upon a time (as tales usually begin) the materials of that building, the stone, mortar, timber, iron, lead, and glass, happily met together, and very fortunately ranged themselves into that delicate order in which we see them now, so close compacted, that it must be a very great chance that parts them again. What would the World think of a man that should advance such an opinion as this, and write a book for it? If they would do him right, they ought to look upon him as mad; but yet with a little more reason than any man can have to say, that the World was made by chance, or that the first men grew up out of the earth as plants do now. And yet, these shameful beggars of principles give this precarious account of the original of things; assume to themselves to be the men of reason, the great wits of the World, the only cautious and wary persons that hate to be imposed upon, that must have convincing evidence for every thing, and can admit of nothing, without a clear demonstration of it" ...
See EXISTENCE OF GOD
Supernatural - ’ In ordinary speech, ‘supernatural’ would appear to mean anything outside the ordinary course of the phenomenal World. And by this is apparently meant that the spiritual or volitional cause of the sounds is in an unusual relation to the material World. ...
Those who hold that the World was made and is ruled by God, have to imagine to themselves in some shape the mode in which God exercises His sway. For ordinary purposes it suffices to treat the World as an independent organization, carried on by laws which are regarded as invariable, and it is unnecessary to refer continually to the Primary Cause of all. This view of the World is harmless enough, but it has the disadvantage of developing an inveterate tendency or habit of thought, by which the World is set up over against God, as equivalent to ‘nature’ or the ‘natural order’; while all action on the part of God is treated as having the character of disturbance or interference in an order which possesses independent rights, or as being supernatural, in virtue of the fact that it does interfere or disturb. ...
Two things are clear in regard to this difficulty: (1) that the source of it lies in the (unverified) dualism between God and the World; (2) that there is a real point involved in the distress of the plain man at what he thinks is an attenuation of the meaning of miracle. Their uniformity represents His normal action and will for the World
Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic - The personal dimension of that which opposes God's purposes in His World. ...
God began His self-revelation in the ancient World of polytheism (belief in many gods). It is clear that from the very moment of the creation of this World that Satan and fallen angels were on the scene, rebels against God. John saw Satan as the prince of this World (John 12:31 ; John 14:30 ; John 16:11 ) with the whole World in his power (1 John 5:19 ). ...
The apostle Paul's World view teaches that Satan is the god of this age. The cosmos or unredeemed World is at present under Satan's power. In fact, Jesus came into the World to “destroy the works of the devil” (1 John 3:8 )
Messias - " Kings, like priests, were anointed in Israel; and the future king, who was to be the Saviour of His people and the World, came to be spoken of as "the Anointed One
Druzes - Copies of these sacred books of the Druzes, hidden from the World for eight centuries, are now in European libraries
Monaco, Country / Archdiocese - Org
World Fact Book
archdiocese of Monaco
patron saints index: Monaco
Florentine School of Painting - Founded 14th century, largely through the efforts of Giotto di Bondone, and in the 15th century the leading school of the World
Panama - ...
Ecclesiastically the country is governed by ...
the archdiocese of Panamá
the diocese of ...
Chitré
Colón-Kuna Yala
David
Penonomé
Santiago de Veraguas
and ...
the territorial prelature of Bocas del Toro
the vicariate apostolic of Darién
See also, ...
World Fact Book
patron saints index
Carillon - The Riverside Baptist Church of New York, when completed, will have the heaviest carillon in the World, weighing 226,000 lbs
Canons Regular of Saint Augustine - Since the 12th century the Abbey Nullius of Saint Maurice of Agaunum, the oldest monastery in the World, has been under the care of the canons regular, who engage in teaching and parochial duties
Star, Morning - All the glory of the World shall end in being the glory of the Church
Nergal - ’ The god is sometimes in the non-Semitic texts called Ner-unu-gal , ‘hero of the lower World,’ evidently indicating his connexion with death and destruction
Temptations: From Friends to be Watchfully Resisted - So when the dearest friends we have, out of mistaken tenderness would persuade us to avoid persecution by relinquishing principle, and doing as others do, we should thank them for their love, but with unbending decision refuse to be numbered with the World
Omorrah - Genesis 13:10 (c) The word means "a rebellious people" and may be taken as a type of the people of the World who refuse and reject CHRIST and His Word and prefer to live in their sins and iniquities
Life: Uncertain Tenure of - There is a talk of giving fixity of tenure in Ireland; can they find it in England, or for the matter of that, in all the World? No, we are all tenants, liable to be ejected without an hour's notice
Giorgio Giorgione - " Ruskin declared his "Madonna," in the church of Castelfranco, one of the two most perfect pictures in the World
Giorgione, Giorgio Barbarelli - " Ruskin declared his "Madonna," in the church of Castelfranco, one of the two most perfect pictures in the World
Samson - I refer to his life as is recorded in the book of the Judges; and shall only make one observation upon it, namely that the Holy Ghost hath made honourable mention of him by enrolling his name among those worthies, so eminent for their faith, who are said to be such of whom "the World was not worthy
Battlement - In this way there will not be a mingling of Christians with the unsaved and no mixture of the Christian program with the World's plans and schemes. ...
Jeremiah 5:10 (b) We understand from this that the World puts up barriers to prevent the Word of GOD from being preached to them, and to prevent the people of GOD from teaching the Word to them
Widow - It is a term which is used to describe the great unrighteous religious World, which boasts that she has sufficient prosperity and power to take care of herself
Moon - It shines in and upon a dark World as we should do. So when Worldliness enters and clouds the church, the light of her testimonies obscured
Armageddon - The Hebrew name of the place where the kings of the earth and of the whole World will be gathered together to make war against the Lord Jesus in the great day of Almighty God
Antoninus, Saint - Among his writings are a valuable work on moral theology and a history of the World
Comely - ...
O what a World is this, when what is comely envenoms him that bears it
Enlighten - His lightnings enlightened the World
Shoelatchet - It is a lesson to us that we should depend entirely on the Lord for our prosperity, and not on the favors of this wicked World
Interest in Christ - A term often made use of in the religious World; and implies our having a right to claim him as our mediator, surety, advocate, and saviour, and with him all thse spiritual blessings which are purchased and applied by him to those whom he has redeemed
Manners - Without some one of these defects no man will behave himself ill for want of experience; or of what, in the language of some, is called knowing the World
Terrestrial - ) Of or pertaining to the World, or to the present state; sublunary; mundane
Knife - KNIFE, KNIVES...
In the early ages of the World, before that instruments of metal were formed, the eastern inhabitants used sharp stones for the purpose of cutting
Devil - ) the god of this World, (2 Corinthians 4:4
me'Sech, me'Shech - (Ezekiel 27:13 ) In (Psalm 120:5 ) they are noticed as one of the remotest and at the same time rudest nations of the World
na'Amah -
One of the four women whose names are preserved in the records of the World before the flood; all except Eve being Cainites
Wheat - Is the principal and most valuable kind of grain for the service of man, and is produced in almost every part of the World, Genesis 30:14 Deuteronomy 8:8 Judges 6:11 Matthew 13:25 1 Corinthians 15:37
Lanch - L'ANCH, To dart or fly off to push off as, to lanch into the wide World to lanch into a wide field of discussion
Diamond - The largest diamonds known in the World, procured from India and Brazil, are guarded among the royal treasures of England, Russia, etc
Restitution - Restitution of all things, the putting the World in a holy and happy state
el'Iphaz - On him falls the main burden of the argument, that God's retribution in this World is perfect and certain, and that consequently suffering must be a proof of previous sin
na'Amah -
One of the four women whose names are preserved in the records of the World before the flood; all except Eve being Cainites
Fulness of the Time - Paul (Galatians 4:4) to mark the opportuneness of the coming of Christ into the World, and the ripeness of the age for the great religious revolution He was to effect. Along different lines of historical development a situation had been created at the very centre of the World’s life, that was singularly favourable to the planting and spread of a loftier faith. At all events, nowhere else in the World did there exist so vivid a conception of the Divine holiness or so high a recognized standard of morality; nowhere else, therefore, were there so many devout minds ready to receive a new spiritual revelation, or so well fitted to furnish heralds and apostles for its propagation. It was a time of high-strung unrest and expectancy; yet although the prospect of political emancipation was to a large extent entertained, there were multitudes of earnest souls yearning for a higher form of deliverance, the dawn of a reign of righteousness and peace, in the benefits of which not Israel only, but the whole World, should share. Thus the conception of the Divine unity and righteousness was being spread over a large section of the heathen World. So far, therefore, both at home and abroad the Jewish people had fulfilled their mission in the moral and religious preparation of the World for the entrance of Christianity. The aim of this Graeco-Jewish school was to make the purer religious faith and knowledge of Israel accessible to the World. That the entire known World was then embraced within Rome’s imperial sway was a momentous factor in the situation which had been reached. The whole World was but one country; and from the Euphrates to the Atlantic there was settled government, order, and the rule of law under one sovereign sceptre. In this way Rome had performed its distinctive part by bringing about a political condition of the World hitherto unexampled in history. ...
It is worthy of note also that the little country of Palestine, where the Founder of Christianity was to appear, lay at the very centre of the then known World; and in view of the fact that through the provision of a common language and free means of movement and intercourse the avenues of access were opened to every land, it becomes clear that the most signal facilities were afforded for the dissemination of a faith that was destined to wield a World-wide power
Mosiac Law - Or the law of Moses, is the most ancient that we know of in the World, and is of three kinds; the moral law, the ceremonial law, and the judicial law. The moral law, or ten commandments, for instance, was delivered on the top of the mountain, in the face of the whole World, as being of universal influence, and obligatory on all mankind
Fight - ...
1 Corinthians 9:26 (a) By this strong word, Paul describes his resistance to sin, to Satan and to the World. We are to stand against the attacks of the World, the flesh and the Devil at every opportunity
Battle - Psalm 18:39 (b) There will be a conflict in the soul of every believer between the flesh and the Spirit, between the World and GOD the Father, between Satan and the Lord JESUS. It is used, however, as a figure of the warfare that is constantly being waged between the church and the World or between the Christian and Satan
Wonder - ...
Wonders of the World. The seven wonders of the World were the Egyptian pyramids, the Mausoleum erected by Artemisia, the temple of Diana at Ephesus, the walls and hanging gardens of Babylon, the colossus at Rhodes, the statue of Jupiter Olympius, and the Pharos or watch-tower of Alexandria
Jethro - The primitive faith still had its representatives here and there in the Gentile World after Abraham's call, e. Jethro of Midian (Abraham's descendant) celebrated a sacrificial meal with Aaron and Israel's elders; the representative firstfruits of the pagan who would afterward enter into fellowship with God and His people; as Amalek, another descendant of Abraham, represents on the contrary the pagan World hostile to the Lord and His people
Ministry, the - " This was Hiscommission to the Apostles, and to them He promised, "Lo, I am withyou always even unto the end of the World. " This promise implies atransmission of this commission, so that the Ministry should neverdie out, but be continued from generation to generation and fromcentury to century, "even to the end of the World
Light - Light is the first of the Creator's works, manifesting the divine operation in a World that is darkness and chaos without it. Jesus declares that he is "the light of the World" (John 8:12 ; 9:5 ). The revealed will of God provides light to the heart, soul, and mind of humanity, providing guidance in a dark World (Psalm 19:7-10 ; 119:105,130 ). ...
A Light to the World . God is light, who dispels the darkness of this World. Jesus came as the light of the World, breaking through the darkness of sin by his work on the cross. It follows that believers are a light to the World as well. Paul indicates to believers in Asia Minor and Macedonia that their lives are a shining light of witness to the World around them (Ephesians 5:8 ; Philippians 2:15 ). All those who have entered into the light now bear responsibility as missionaries of Christ, shining out as "lights in a dark World" with the light of God himself (Philippians 2:15 )
Prosperity - The World with all its various productions was formed by the Almighty for the happiness of man, and designed to endear himself to us, and to lead our minds up to him. ...
Where this divine principle influences the mind, prosperity may be enjoyed and become a blessing; for "While bad men snatch the pleasures of the World, as by stealth, without countenance from God, the proprietor of the World; the righteous sit openly down to the feast of life, under the smile of heaven. Their piety reflects sunshine from heaven upon the prosperity of the World; unites in one point of view the smiling aspect, both of the powers above, and of the objects below
Artaxerxes - He was the son of Xerxes, and grandson of Darius Hystaspes, and reigned in Persia from the year of the World 3531 to 3579. He permitted Ezra, with all those inclined to follow him, to return into Judea, in the year of the World 3537, Ezra 7:8 . Afterward, Nehemiah also obtained leave to return, and to build the walls and gates of Jerusalem, in the year of the World 3550, Nehemiah 1:11 . Artaxerxes reigned forty-seven years, and died in the year of the World 3579, and before Jesus Christ 425
Book, Book of Life - Within the classical World, citizenship was not an automatic right, but a strictly protected honor. In the Gospel story of the seventy sent out into the World, Jesus assures these disciples that their names will be written in heaven (Luke 10:20 ). In the letter to the church at Sardis, heavenly citizenship, exemplified by listing in the Book of Life, is promised to those who overcome the World (Revelation 3:5 )
Drunk - ...
Revelation 17:2 (a) The great false church, particularly Romanism, has offered to the World freedom of lust, liberty in sin, cruelty in action, and the great powers of the World have reveled in these liberties, so that the nations that are controlled by this church act accordingly. ...
Revelation 17:6 (a) This no doubt refers to the wicked practices of the great false religions of the World, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, which through the centuries has reveled in the blood of saints and martyrs
Fell - ...
Luke 10:30 (b) This picture probably represents the treatment that the World gives to most of its own people. The World takes from its followers their money, their health, their time, and oftentimes their lives. The World gives nothing in exchange for this robbery, but leaves the victim half dead. When he turned against the Saviour, denied Him, and sold Him, then he lost that exalted place, and became the World's worst
Seed Growing Secretly, Parable of the - A natural fact in the vegetable World to which Christ, in a short four verse parable, likens the Kingdom of Heaven. The Church germinates and increases as a Divine seed even to the end of the World. Putting in the sickle signifies the end of the World
Flood - God’s means of preserving Noah’s family, along with enough animals to repopulate the animal World, was through an ark that God told Noah to build (Genesis 6:8-22; see Hebrews 11:7; 1 Peter 3:20; see ARK; NOAH). )...
The important point of the flood story is that the flood was a total judgment on that ungodly World (except for Noah and his family), as God had warned (Genesis 6:17). It is a reminder that, at the return of Jesus Christ, sudden judgment will again fall on an ungodly World, though again God will preserve the righteous (Matthew 24:36-39; 2 Peter 2:5; 2 Peter 2:9; cf
Litany of the Holy Name of Jesus - ...
God, the Son, Redeemer of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Jesus, father of the World to come, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the World, Spare us,O Jesus!...
Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the World, Hear us, O Jesus!...
Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the World, Have mercy on us, O Jesus!...
Jesus, hear us. Who lives and reigns, one God, World without end
Litany of the Holy Name - ...
God, the Son, Redeemer of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Jesus, father of the World to come, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the World, Spare us,O Jesus!...
Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the World, Hear us, O Jesus!...
Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the World, Have mercy on us, O Jesus!...
Jesus, hear us. Who lives and reigns, one God, World without end
Holy Name, Litany of the - ...
God, the Son, Redeemer of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Jesus, father of the World to come, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the World, Spare us,O Jesus!...
Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the World, Hear us, O Jesus!...
Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the World, Have mercy on us, O Jesus!...
Jesus, hear us. Who lives and reigns, one God, World without end
Behmenists - His next production is called, "The Three Principles," by which he means the dark World, or hell; the light World, or heaven; and the external, or visible World, which we inhabit. Whence there is good and evil in all this temporal World; and what is meant by the curse that dwells in it. In this work he treats more largely of the state of man in this World: that he has,...
1. The life of this external and visible World
Pantheism - (Greek: pan, all; theos, god) ...
The opinion that everything is divine, that the World is an emanation or part of the essence of God
Lindisfarne Gospels - 700,in round characters by Eadfrid, Bishop of Lindisfarne (698-721), ornamented with exquisite tracery and illumination hy Ethelwold (724-740), and enclosed in a jewel-studded metal cover wrought by Bilfrid, the anchorite, over the Latin words, the priest Aldred wrote the Saxon, c950 One of the most beautiful books in the World, it is preserved in the British Museum
Laplace, Pierre Simon - " His "System of the World," and "The Mechanics of the Heavens," containing explanations of his theories and discoveries in astronomy, secured his admission to the French Academy of Sciences (1785)
Nepal - Org
World Fact Book
Vicariate Apostolic of Nepal
John Bosco, Saint - This was the foundation of the Salesian Society, which now cares for thousands of boys all over the World, and was approved by Pope Pius IX in 1874
Introduction to the Devout Life - Work written by Saint Francis de Sales, intended to lead "Philothea" (philos, loving; Theos, God), the soul living in the World, into the paths of devotion
Money-Changer - There was a class of men, who frequented the temple courts, who exchanged at a certain premium foreign moneys for these half-shekels to the Jews who came up to Jerusalem from all parts of the World
Minstrel - Elisha called for a minstrel to withdraw his mind from the outer World, so that his spirit might be in a state to receive the divine revelation (2 Kings 3:15)
Theosophists - They ascribe it to the singular manifestation of divine benevolence, that they are able to make such a use of the element of fire in the chemical art, as enables them to discover the essential principles of bodies, and to disclose stupendous mysteries in the physical World
Seleucians - He also maintained that the World was not made by God, but was co-eternal with him; and that the soul was only an animated fire created by the angels; that Christ does not sit at the right hand of the Father in a human body, but that he lodged his body in the sun, according to Psalms 19:4 ; and that the pleasures of beatitude consisted in corporeal delight
Heart: Its Aberrations - True hearts in this wicked World, and in this fleshly body, are all too apt to swerve, but they still show their inward and persistent tendency to point towards heaven and God. On board iron vessels it is a common thing to see a compass placed aloft, to be as much away from the cause of aberration as possible: a wise hint to us to elevate our affections and desires; the nearer to God the less swayed by Worldly influences
Money-Changers - The moneychangers whom Christ, for their impiety, avarice, and fraudulent dealing, expelled from the temple were the dealers who supplied half-shekels, for such a premium as they might be able to exact, to the Jews from all parts of the World who assembled at Jerusalem during the great festivals, and were required to pay their tribute or ransom money in the Hebrew coin
Bittern - The animal represents the wild and mysterious World humans do not control
Lucius - Thus an African was one of the first Christian evangelists and had an important part in the early days of the church of Antioch and in beginning the Christian World missions movement
Hong Kong - Org
World Factbook
diocese of Hong Kong
Whale - ...
Matthew 12:40 (b) This again is a type of the nations of the World who have swallowed up Israel, but have not been able to digest her, nor absorb her
Ankle - No longer does he travel in the ways of the World, but rather he is led to the house of GOD, and led to walk among the people of GOD
Deaf - ...
Isaiah 42:19 (b) This is a description of the child of GOD who refuses to listen to the call of the World and of sin
Sandals - In the eastern part of the World the going barefoot was considered as a token of respect in the presence of a superior; hence, when the Lord called to Moses from the bush, he commanded him to put off his shoes from his feet, for the ground was holy on which he stood, being made so by the divine presence
Propitiation - ' Propitiation represents in scripture that aspect of the death of Christ in which has been vindicated the holy and righteous character of God, and in virtue of which He is enabled to be propitious, or merciful, to the whole World
Anguilla - See also, ...
World Fact Book
Trap - Their treatment of the Lord JESUS revealed their wicked hearts, and their hatred against the sweetest and best man in the World
Massalians - Jortin, that this sect did not last long; that these sluggards were soon starved out of the World; or, rather, that cold and hunger sharpened their wits, and taught them to be better interpreters of Scripture
Giants - GIANT, GIANTS...
The Scripture speaks of such characters in the old World, Genesis 6:4
Adoption, - (Galatians 4:4,5 ; Romans 8:14-17 ) He is received into God's family from the World, and becomes a child and heir of God
Nature - In Scripture the word nature expresses the orderly and usual course of things established in the World
Seth - Seth was the chief of "the children of God," as the Scripture calls them, Genesis 6:2 that is, those who before the flood preserved true religion and piety in the World, while the descendants of Cain gave themselves up to wickedness
Thomas - Ancient tradition says, that in the distribution which the Apostles made of the several parts of the World, wherein they were to preach the Gospel, the country of the Parthians fell to the share of St
Lazarus - In the parable by which our Saviour illustrates the retributions of the future World one of the parties is named Lazarus
Rhodes - He might have there seen fragments of the greatest of the Seven Wonders of the World—the famous Colossus of Rhodes
Space - According to Einstein the real space of the World is curved, and hence the physical universe must be finite
Spatium - According to Einstein the real space of the World is curved, and hence the physical universe must be finite
Seleucians - They did not practise baptism; by hell they understood the present World; resurrection was explained as merely the procreation of children
Limit - World sometimes signifies the universe, and sometimes its signification is limited to this earth
Money-Changers - The money-changers whom Christ, for their impiety, avarice and fraudulent dealing, expelled from the temple were the dealers who supplied half-shekels, for such a premium as they might be able to exact, to the Jews from all parts of the World who assembled at Jerusalem during the great festivals, and were required to pay their tribute or ransom money in the Hebrew coin
Seleucians - They did not practise baptism; by hell they understood the present World; resurrection was explained as merely the procreation of children
Gehenna - " The second is Hades, which also occurs in theoriginal Greek of the Creed, and means the hidden, covered,intermediate World where the soul rests between death and thegeneral Resurrection
Altar Lights - They are used to symbolizeour Lord as the Light of the World in His two Natures, Humanand Divine
Litany of the Sacred Heart - ...
God, the Son, Redeemer of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, spare us, O Lord. ...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, graciously hear us, O Lord,...
Lamb of God who takest away the sins of the World, have mercy on us. Almighty and everlasting God, look upon the Heart of Thy well-beloved Son and upon the acts of praise and satisfaction which He renders unto Thee in the name of sinners; and do Thou, in Thy great goodness, grant pardon to them who seek Thy mercy, in the name of the same Thy Son, Jesus Christ, who liveth and reigneth with Thee, World without end
Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - ...
God, the Son, Redeemer of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, spare us, O Lord. ...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, graciously hear us, O Lord,...
Lamb of God who takest away the sins of the World, have mercy on us. Almighty and everlasting God, look upon the Heart of Thy well-beloved Son and upon the acts of praise and satisfaction which He renders unto Thee in the name of sinners; and do Thou, in Thy great goodness, grant pardon to them who seek Thy mercy, in the name of the same Thy Son, Jesus Christ, who liveth and reigneth with Thee, World without end
Directions (Geographical) - Israel saw Jerusalem with its Mount Zion as the center of the World (Isaiah 2:2 ; Ezekiel 5:5 ). As expressed later in the Jewish midrash, “just as the navel is in the center of a person, so is the land of Israel in the middle of the World. ” Christians in the first centuries after Christ took over this type of geographical description and made Golgotha, considered the grave of Adam and of Christ, the middle point of the World. In a biblical World reaching about 5300 kilometers from Persia in the east to Spain in the west and about 3000 kilometers from Armenia in the north to Yemen in the south, Israel was a small strip of land with geographical unity. Joined together, the two expressions signified the expanse of the World between its most widely-separated points (Psalm 50:1 ; Isaiah 45:6 )
Judgment - He will judge the World in righteousness and the peoples in his truth" (Psalm 96:13 ). As he drew near to his death Jesus said, "Now is the time for judgment on this World, now the prince of this World will be driven out" (John 12:31 ). And in the upper room as he spoke of the coming of the Holy Spirit, he said that the Spirit would convict the World of judgment, "because the prince of this World now stands condemned (lit
Sacred Heart, Litany of the - ...
God, the Son, Redeemer of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, spare us, O Lord. ...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, graciously hear us, O Lord,...
Lamb of God who takest away the sins of the World, have mercy on us. Almighty and everlasting God, look upon the Heart of Thy well-beloved Son and upon the acts of praise and satisfaction which He renders unto Thee in the name of sinners; and do Thou, in Thy great goodness, grant pardon to them who seek Thy mercy, in the name of the same Thy Son, Jesus Christ, who liveth and reigneth with Thee, World without end
Carpocrates, Philospher - Carpocrates taught that from the one unknown unspeakable God different angels and powers had emanated, and that of these the lowest in the series, far below the unbegotten Father, had been the makers of the World. The privilege of the higher souls was to escape the rule of those who had made the World; even by magical arts to exercise dominion over them, and ultimately, on leaving the World, to pass completely free from them to God Who is above them. His superiority to ordinary men consisted in this, that His soul, being steadfast and pure, remembered those things which it had seen in the revolution ( τῇ περιφορᾷ ) in which it had been carried round with the unbegotten God, and therefore power [1] had been sent from God enabling Him to escape the makers of the World. Their souls, too, might remember the truths they had witnessed; if they despised the rulers of the World as much as Jesus did, they would be given the same privileges as He, and higher if they despised them more. ...
In the opening statement concerning the making of the World, the doctrine ascribed to Carpocrates is almost identical with that ascribed to Saturninus; but in the next paragraph the language is distinctly taken from the myth in Plato's Phaedrus, in which human knowledge is made to be but a recollection of what the soul had seen when carried round with the gods in their revolution, and permitted to see the eternal forms of things. ...
The doctrine of the duty of despising the rulers of the World received among the Carpocratians an interpretation which enabled them to practise immorality without scruple. A doctrine concerning the transmigration of souls which was taught by other Gnostic sects, and which harmonized well with Platonic teaching, was adopted by the Carpocratians in the form that a soul which had had its complete experience passed at once out of the dominion of the rulers of the World, and was received up to society with the God above them: those which had not were sent back to finish in other bodies that which was lacking to them; but all ultimately would be saved. " The "adversary" (whom, Epiphanius tells us, they named Abolus, a corruption, doubtless, from the Diabolus of Irenaeus) was one of the World-making angels, whose office it was to conduct the soul to the principal of these angels, "the judge. The doctrine that we ought to imitate the freedom with which our Lord despised the rulers of the World raises the question, Did Carpocrates intend to impute immorality to Him? On this point Carpocrates was misunderstood either by Hippolytus or by his own disciples. Whereas the latter represented the God of the Jews and Maker of the World as an evil Being who ought to be resisted, the former only spoke of the makers of the World as inferior beings whose restrictions it is true enlightenment to despise; and the arguments of Epiphanes, derived from the equality that reigns in nature, assume that the creation is so far conformed to the will of God that from the laws which pervade it we may infer what is pleasing to the supreme power. ...
According to Neander, the Carpocratian system sees in the World's history one struggle between the principles of unity and of multiplicity. But the finite spirits who rule over several portions of the World counteract this universal striving after unity. In this way they escape the dominion of the finite mundane spirits; their souls are freed from imprisonment in matter, and they obtain a state of perfect repose (corresponding to the Buddhist Nirwana) when they have completely ascended above the World of appearance
Ladies of Charity - An association of "women of the World" who endeavor by coordinating their charitable work, to accomplish greater and more desirable results than would be possible by individual isolated efforts. In 1617 there were only two branches with 52 members; now the number of branches spread over the World totals 1720 with a membership of many thousands
Mercy: Continual - ' 'I will uphold you in the hour of death, and as you are passing into the World of spirits, my mercy shall still continue with you, and when you land in the World to come there shall still be MORE TO FOLLOW
Almighty - ...
2 Corinthians 6:18 (a) This title describes the GOD who is able to supply every temporal need of His own people who refuse the provision of this World, and refuse to accept deliverance or provision from the children of Satan. Those who sever themselves from a place of dependence from the World and reject Satan's schemes, find that GOD is able to furnish them with all their necessities
Hoof - Those who walk with GOD should not pretend to be walking with the World. Those who walk with the World should not pretend to the walking with GOD
Wilderness - ...
Revelation 12:6 (b) Probably this refers to the condition of Israel as scattered throughout the World, where they have weary feet, longing eyes, and heavy hearts. ...
Revelation 17:3 (b) This wilderness no doubt represents the various nations of the World in which the great apostate and religious system operates
Begotten - ...
d, μόνογενής, a name of peculiar affection for the Lord Jesus in His eternal Sonship as existing before He came into the World, and referred to as the only begotten Son, the only begotten of the Father. The angels were called to worship Him when He was brought into the World, Hebrews 1:6 ; and He is said to be the firstborn from among the dead
Earth - ) The globe or planet which we inhabit; the World, in distinction from the sun, moon, or stars. Also, this World as the dwelling place of mortals, in distinction from the dwelling place of spirits. ) Worldly things, as opposed to spiritual things; the pursuits, interests, and allurements of this life
Satan - By collecting the passages where Satan, or the devil, is mentioned, it may be concluded, that he fell from heaven with his company; that God cast him down from thence for the punishment of his pride; that by his envy and malice, sin, death, and all other evils came into the World; that, by the permission of God, he exercises a sort of government in the World over subordinate apostate angels like himself; that God makes use of him to prove good men, and chastise bad ones; that he is a lying spirit in the mouth of false prophets and seducers; that it is he, or his agents, that torment or possess men, and inspire them with evil designs, as when he suggested to David, the numbering of the people, to Judas to betray his Lord and Master, and to Ananias and Sapphira to conceal the price of their field; that he is full of rage like a roaring lion, and of subtlety like a serpent, to tempt, to betray, to destroy, and involve us in guilt and wickedness; that his power and malice are restrained within certain limits, and controlled by the will of God; in a word, that he is an enemy to God and man, and uses his utmost endeavours to rob God of his glory, and men of their souls
Earthquake - One happened in the twenty-seventh year of Uzziah, king of Judah, in the year of the World 3221. Many have thought that this was perceived throughout the World
Rather - ...
Light is come into the World, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil. He sought throughout the World, but sought in vain, and no where finding, rather fear'd her slain
Thief, Thieves - 1: κλέπτης (Strong's #2812 — Noun Masculine — kleptes — klep'-tace ) is used (a) literally, Matthew 6:19,20 ; 24:43 ; Luke 12:33,39 ; John 10:1,10 ; 12:6 ; 1 Corinthians 6:10 ; 1 Peter 4:15 ; (b) metaphorically of "false teachers," John 10:8 ; (c) figuratively, (1) of the personal coming of Christ, in a warning to a local church, with most of its members possessed of mere outward profession and defiled by the World, Revelation 3:3 ; in retributive intervention to overthrow the foes of God, Revelation 16:15 ; (2) of the Day of the Lord, in Divine judgment upon the World, 2 Peter 3:10 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:2,4 ; in 1 Thessalonians 5:2 , according to the order in the original "the word 'night' is not to be read with 'the day of the Lord,' but with 'thief,' i
Day (That) - Thus ‘that day’ is a phrase to denote the terrible day which is ever imminent, the day of Christ’s coming to judge the World and inaugurate His universal reign. But among His last words the Lord included warnings of the fate of Jerusalem as well as of the doom of the World. These messages about the end of the city and the end of the World are intertwined in the Synoptic records of the close of His ministry. ‘That day’ is in the foreknowledge of God alone; it will come on the whole World as a snare to the unready
Worldliness - To elucidate the conception of Worldliness in the apostolic writings, we must start from the primary truth that the World is God’s World, His by creation and sustenance, by sovereign purpose and control (see artt. Unity and World). While he is bound to exclude from intimacy those who are unsympathetic with his inner life (1 Corinthians 5:9), he is by no means to hold aloof from ordinary intercourse with all sorts and conditions of men (Galatians 5:19-21,), but here also is to find a field for that exercise of Christian principles and virtues (2 Corinthians 1:12, Colossians 4:5-6) by which he shall shine as a light in the World (Philippians 2:12; cf. In a higher sense than to other men the World belongs to the Christian (1 Corinthians 3:22), as a system of Divinely appointed duties and opportunities, all subservient to the education and development of Christian character-as that apprenticeship in doing the will of God which is most perfectly adapted to his present capabilities and needs (1 Corinthians 7:24). This is not merely an end for which the World may be used, but the end for which it exists. When these conditions are absent, when life in the World is not inspired by love to God, to the higher self, and to one’s neighbour as oneself, it inevitably becomes ‘worldly’; and even when these are present, Worldliness is a danger still to be guarded against. The terrestrial environment appeals directly not to the spiritual but to the psychical and animal nature, and where, as even in the Christian, life is not entirely emancipated from the bias of sin, whore higher and lower elements mingle and contend, there is necessarily a tendency for the relatively good to displace the absolutely good; and if this tendency is not counteracted and overcome, the uses and enjoyments of the World-innocent in themselves and capable of being elevated to the higher range of values-become the means of chaining life to the lower. The single passage in the apostolic writings that suggests a psychology of Worldliness is 1 John 2:16, where its constituents are given as ‘the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the vainglory of life. ’ Here it is seen that the World exerts its downward pull upon human nature principally in two ways: by the desire (ἐπιθυμία) it excites, and by the false confidence (ἀλαζονεία) it inspires. The sensuality of the pagan World is the subject of unsparing indictment (Romans 1:24 ff. (b) The second chief element in the Worldly temper is what St. John calls ‘the vainglory of life’-the delusive satisfaction, the baseless sense of security (atheistic) or of superiority (egoistic) which the attainment of Worldly desire engenders. And no less characteristic of the Worldly mind are the uneasiness and distress consequent upon the lack of such sense of security: God-forgetting anxiety, painful and harmful as it is futile (Philippians 4:6, 1 Peter 5:7); repining over Worldly losses and disappointments, the ‘sorrow of the World’ that ‘worketh death’ (2 Corinthians 7:10), reaching its climax in that sense of instability and vanity in all earthly things which, without its counterpoise of faith in spiritual reality, leads directly to the inverted Worldliness of pessimism, and by rebound to cynical hedonism-‘let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die’ (1 Corinthians 15:32). The adulation of the populace is fatal to the Worldly prince (Acts 12:22-23); the rich are tempted to be ‘highminded’ (1 Timothy 6:17); the consciousness of superior insight, ‘puffeth up’ (1 Corinthians 8:1) those in whom it is not united with love and a sense of love’s responsibilities. Finally, this whole view of life, for which spiritual realities are non-existent, finds expression in the ‘wisdom of this World’ (1 Corinthians 1:20, ‘fleshly wisdom,’ 2 Corinthians 1:12), the wisdom whose furthest horizon is that of the present age (1 Corinthians 2:6), which moves, however skilfully, only on the plane of material things and interests (τὰ ἐπίγεια φρονοῦντες, Philippians 3:19), and which therefore inspires much self-sufficiency in men (
Leo Xii, Pope - As pope, he combated the indifferentism and Protestant proselytism of the period, and stimulated the devotion of the Catholic World by the jubilee of 1825
Demiurge - In the sense of a World-maker, distinct from the Supreme God, Demiurge became a common term in the various systems of Gnosticism
Omniscience - In God there is no successsion of acts, all is present to Him always, the past as well as the future, everything is as if it were happening now, nor is there anything in all the World which is not present to Him always
Archives, Vatican - Compiled for administrative purposes, they furnish a mine of information for historians, and are the most important archives in the World
Following of Christ - It is a series of counsels of perfection written in Latin in a familiar style, and divided into four books: ...
Useful admonitions for a spiritual life
Admonitions concerning spiritual things
Of interior consolation
Of the Blessed Sacrament, usually omitted in Protestant editions
It aims to instruct the soul in Christian perfection with Christ as the Divine Model and, next to the Bible, is perhaps the most widely read spiritual book in the World
John Baptist Mary Vianney, Saint - In 1818 he was made parish priest at Ars, a remote French hamlet, where his exercise of the sacred ministry, especially in the direction of souls, made him known throughout the Christian World
Irvingites - Statistics are not available, but the number of churches is not more than 80 throughout the World
Birt, Dom Henry Norbert - He entered the Benedictine Order at Downside Abbey, England, 1880, was ordained, 1889, and after a period of teaching and parochial work at Coventry, became assistant and secretary to Abbot Francis Gasquet, army chaplain during the South African war, and to the home forces during the World War
Census - A census or enrollment of the people is mentioned several times in the Old Testament and notably in the New Testament (Luke 2), the enrollment of "the whole World" which occasioned the journey of Joseph and Mary to Bethlehem wherc Christ was born
Ham - ) ...
The race of Ham were the most energetic of all the descendants of Noah in the early times of the post-diluvian World
Death: Desired by Few - Burckhardt states, that although the Arabs are strict predestinarians, yet when the plague visited Medina, many of the townsmen fled to the desert, alleging as an excuse that although the distemper was a messenger from heaven sent to call them to a better World, yet being conscious of their own unworthiness, and that they did not merit this special mark of grace, they thought it more advisable to decline it for the present, and make their escape from the town
Saint - One separated from the World and consecrated to God; one holy by profession and by covenant; a believer in Christ (Psalm 16:3 ; Romans 1:7 ; 8:27 ; Philippians 1:1 ; Hebrews 6:10 )
Self-Knowledge - and is of the greatest utility, as it is the spring of self-possession, leads to humility, steadfastness, charity, moderation, self-denial, and promotes our usefulness in the World
Boreal - ) Designating or pertaining to a terrestrial division consisting of the northern and mountainous parts of both the Old and the New World; - equivalent to the Holarctic region exclusive of the Transition, Sonoran, and corresponding areas
Imitation of Christ - It is a series of counsels of perfection written in Latin in a familiar style, and divided into four books: ...
Useful admonitions for a spiritual life
Admonitions concerning spiritual things
Of interior consolation
Of the Blessed Sacrament, usually omitted in Protestant editions
It aims to instruct the soul in Christian perfection with Christ as the Divine Model and, next to the Bible, is perhaps the most widely read spiritual book in the World
Memlinc, Hans - " "Christ the Light of the World," with its naive pageantry, is in the Munich Gallery
Memling, Hans - " "Christ the Light of the World," with its naive pageantry, is in the Munich Gallery
Rahab (2) - " Egypt is put foremost, as first of the great World powers that opposed God
so: God so Loved Etc - In these days of advanced mechanism even greater marvels in miniature have been achieved, but never has so much meaning been compressed into so small a space as in that famous little word 'So,' in the text which tells us that 'God so loved the World, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life
Holy See, Archives of the - Compiled for administrative purposes, they furnish a mine of information for historians, and are the most important archives in the World
Centurion - In Acts 10:1 , the conversion of the centurion Cornelius marked the beginning of the church's outreach to the Gentile World
Mistress - Rome was mistress of the World
Maimed - In the ancient World the maimed had difficulty finding work and relied on the generosity of others (Luke 14:13 )
Rasshopper - They are closely related to the migratory locusts of the Old World
Plantain - It is a native of Europe, but now found near the abode of civilized man in nearly all parts of the World
Archives of the Holy See - Compiled for administrative purposes, they furnish a mine of information for historians, and are the most important archives in the World
Hans Memlinc - " "Christ the Light of the World," with its naive pageantry, is in the Munich Gallery
Hans Memling - " "Christ the Light of the World," with its naive pageantry, is in the Munich Gallery
Ambassador - 2 Corinthians 5:20 (a) This title is given to those Christians who carry GOD's message to a lost and hostile World
Christian - ...
It was not long, alas! before the outward profession of Christbecame separated from true faith in Him in the great mass who were recognised as Christians in the World, and in practice they became anything but followers of Christ, as both scripture and history show
Irdle - GOD had intended Israel as a wonderful nation, but she mingled with the World around her and became a rotten, useless people
Cloven - ...
Acts 2:3 (c) This probably represents the messages which the Holy Spirit brings, one to the saved, the Church, and the other to the unsaved, the World
Principality - The status of those who hold the first place, as rulers among men, Titus 3:1 ; but the word especially refers to the spiritual high powers in the unseen World, whether good or bad
Henry Birt - He entered the Benedictine Order at Downside Abbey, England, 1880, was ordained, 1889, and after a period of teaching and parochial work at Coventry, became assistant and secretary to Abbot Francis Gasquet, army chaplain during the South African war, and to the home forces during the World War
Covenant Theology - The covenants have been made since before the World was made (Hebrews 13:20)
Silver - In the sandy desert, as well as in this wicked World, the sinner needs a sure foundation, a safe resting place
Devil - He is often called Lucifer which is a Latin translation of "light bearer" found in Isaiah 14:12, and also the accuser of the brethren in (Revelation 12:10), dragon (Revelation 12:9), the devil (Matthew 4:1), the tempter (Matthew 4:3), the accuser (Revelation 12:10), the prince of demons (Luke 11:15), the ruler of this World (John 12:31), See Isaiah 14:12-15 for a description of the fall of the devil
Ablution - A ceremony in use among the ancients, and still practised in several parts of the World
Incorporeality of God - If God were corporeal, he could not be present in any part of the World where body is; yet his presence is necessary for the support and, motion of body
Amaurites - He acknowledged the divine Three, to whom he attributed the empire of the World
Frigate - After the application of steam to navigation steam frigates of largely increased size and power were built, and formed the main part of the navies of the World till about 1870, when the introduction of ironclads superseded them
Eriugena, John Scotus - 847), and acquired prominence in the World of letters through his translation of the works of Pseudo-Dionysius
Agabus - A prophet who came from Jerusalem to Antioch, and foretold a famine "throughout all the World: which came to pass in the days of Claudius Caesar
Huldah - Her name is the same as the Hebrew name for the World
Merodachbaladan - Hezekiah was glad of this, but it was accepting the friendship of the World, to which as a result his posterity would be captives
Monk - ) A man who retires from the ordinary temporal concerns of the World, and devotes himself to religion; one of a religious community of men inhabiting a monastery, and bound by vows to a life of chastity, obedience, and poverty
Vatican Archives - Compiled for administrative purposes, they furnish a mine of information for historians, and are the most important archives in the World
Potsherds - The ruins of many of the most ancient cities in the World show little but such fragments of pottery covering the ground; it is usually coarse in grain, but well glazed
Saint Lucia - Org
World Fact Book
Vianney, John Baptist Mary, Saint - In 1818 he was made parish priest at Ars, a remote French hamlet, where his exercise of the sacred ministry, especially in the direction of souls, made him known throughout the Christian World
Sabbatical Year - God appointed the observance of the Sabbatical year, to preserve the remembrance of the creation of the World; to enforce the acknowledgment of his sovereign authority over all things, particularly over the land of Canaan, which he had given to the Hebrews; and to inculcate humanity on his people, by commanding that they should resign to servants, to the poor, to strangers and to brutes, the produce of the fields, of their vineyards, and of their gardens
World: Not to Build Too Confidently on it - Herein we read a lesson as to our Worldly schemes and possessions: this poor fleeting World deserves not that we should build our hopes and joys upon it as though they could last us long
Secundus, a Gnostic - Irenaeus reports two things as peculiar in his teaching: (1) he divided the primary Ogdoad into two Tetrads, a right-hand and a left-hand one, the one being called light, the other darkness; (2) he did not allow the Sophia out of whose passions, according to the Valentinian theory, the material World took its origin to have been one of the 30 primary Aeons
Providence - ...
God’s providence is evident everywhere – in the physical creation (Psalms 29:3-6; Psalms 78:13-16; Psalms 104:27-28; Matthew 6:26; Matthew 6:28; Acts 14:17), in the events of World history (Proverbs 21:1; Amos 9:7; Luke 1:52; Acts 17:26; Romans 9:17) and in the lives of individuals (Genesis 30:1-2; Job 1:21; Proverbs 16:33; Matthew 6:25; Matthew 6:30; Matthew 10:30; Luke 1:53). Neither the World of nature nor the World of humankind is the helpless subject of unalterable impersonal laws that determine the course of events
Paganism - The second sort, called physic, or natural, was studied and taught by the philosophers, who, rejecting the multiplicity of gods introduced by the poets, brought their theology to a more natural and rational form, and supposed that there was but one Supreme God, which they commonly make to be the sun; at least, an emblem of him, but at too great a distance to mind the affairs of the World, and therefore devised certain demons, which they considered as mediators between the Supreme God and man; and the doctrines of these demons, to which the apostle is thought to allude in 1Ti_4:1. Thus things continued in the Gentile World, until the light of the Gospel was sent among them: the times before were times of ignorance, as the apostle calls them: they were ignorant of the true God, and of the worship of him; and of the Messiah, and salvation by him. that they were then without Christ; aliens from the commonwealth of Israel; strangers from the covenants of promise: having no hope, and without God in the World; and, consequently, their theology was insufficient for their salvation
Nippur - Although it is never mentioned in the Bible, its history is important in the larger context of the biblical World. The records, known as the Murashu documents after the banking family responsible for them, give some indication of the extent of Jewish involvement in the business World after the time of the Babylonian Exile. He was thought of as god of the terrestrial World and the father of other gods
Leviathan - But it is at least equally probable that the allusion is to the creation of the World ( Psalms 74:16-17 ), and to the mythological sea-monsters then vanquished. ]'>[3] ‘their mourning’) aroused by magicians ( Job 3:8 ) is most likely a denizen of the abyss which threatens the World with destruction. It will be noted that there is a close connexion between leviathan and the watery World
Generation - ...
In Luke 16:8, "the children of this World are in respect to their own (so the Greek) generation (i. in relation to men of their own kind, men of this World) wiser than the children of light," are in respect to their generation (men of their kind, godly, men of the World to come)
Gentiles - ...
With all the superiority of the gentile great World kingdoms, in military prowess, commerce, luxury, and the fine arts, Israel stood on an immense moral elevation above them, in the one point, nearness to God, and possession of His revealed will and word (Exodus 19:5-6; Psalms 147:19-20; Psalms 148:14; Romans 3:1-2). ...
"The times of the Gentiles" began with Judah's depression and captivity under Nebuchadnezzar, to whom God delegated the World empire (Jeremiah 27:6-7), from whence Jeremiah's counsel to the Jews to submit to hint was true patriotism, not cowardice. " "The receiving of them shall be life from the dead" to the whole World (Micah 5:7; Isaiah 2:2-4; Revelation 11:2-15)
Idleness - "He neither lives to God, to the World, nor to himself. He lives not to the World, nor for the benefit of his fellow-creatures around him. While all creation is full of life and activity, and nothing stands still in the universe, he remains idle, forgetting that mankind are connected by various relations and mutual dependencies, and that the order of the World cannot be maintained without perpetual circulation of active duties
Stoics - Their distinguishing tenets were, that God is underived, incorruptible, and eternal; possessed of infinite wisdom and goodness: the efficient cause of all the qualities and forms of things; and the constant preserver and governor of the World: That matter, in its original elements, is also underived and eternal; and is by the powerful energy of the Deity impressed with motion and form: That though God and matter subsisted from eternity, the present regular frame of nature had a beginning originating in the gross and dark chaos, and will terminate in a universal conflagration, that will reduce the World to its pristine state: That at this period all material forms will be lost in one chaotic mass; and all animated nature be reunited to the Deity: That from this chaotic state, however, the World will again emerge by the energy of the efficient principle; and gods, and men, and all forms of regulated nature be renewed and dissolved, in endless succession: And that after the revolution of the great year all things will be restored, and the race of men will return to life
Day of the Lord - Israelites of Old Testament times looked for the day when God would intervene in the affairs of the World, righting the wrongs and establishing his just rule on the earth. ...
Jesus Christ’s first coming was, in a sense, a day of the Lord, for through Christ God intervened in the affairs of the World to conquer Satan, deal with sin and proclaim his kingdom (Matthew 3:11-12; Matthew 4:14-17; Acts 2:16-21; see KINGDOM OF GOD). They will reach their climax when Christ returns at the end of the age to purge the World of sin and bring his kingdom to its victorious completion (Isaiah 2:2-4; Matthew 24:29-31; Matthew 25:31-32; 2 Peter 3:3-4; 2 Peter 3:10). The spirit of antichrist, which has always been in the World, will express itself in a final great rebellion against God. ...
In a series of devastating judgments, God will pour out his wrath upon a rebellious World (Mark 13:32-372; Revelation 6:17; Revelation 14:9-11; Revelation 16:2). ...
However, no one knows when the end of the age will come, and Christians should not behave foolishly by thinking the World is about to come to an end (Matthew 24:36; 2 Thessalonians 2:1-2; 2 Thessalonians 3:11-12)
Jew - God, to carry out his purpose and preserve his church, called Abraham to leave his father's house and his country, and separated him and his household from the rest of mankind; gave him special promises, made covenants with him, and constituted him the "Father of the Faithful" to the World. From that time, for two thousand years, the visible church of God was confined to the family of this man; and for fifteen centuries the history of this family is the only sacred history of the World. They were separated from the World by most stringent laws; and it was necessary during all that time for the rest of mankind, through the Jews, to learn the way to be saved. Nothing can more conclusively show the hand of God in directing the history of the World, and in controlling the affairs of nations, than the prophecies and the facts connected with the history of Abraham and of his descendants. In some of these the World has an interest. And he informs us that the World is again to be indebted to the Jews; he says: "Now if the fall of them be the riches of the World and the diminishing of them the riches of the Gentiles; how much more their fulness?" Romans 11:11-12. They have long been the great bankers of the World. The number of Jews in the World is estimated at 9,000,000, of whom 50,000 live in New York city, where they accumulate great wealth
Poetry - About one-third of the Old Testament is poetry, the oldest, the purest, and the most sublime in the World. There are no lyrics in the World comparable with the Psalms of David, no gnomic poetry equal to the Proverbs, and no didactic poem so perfect in form, so profound and majestic in thought or so exalted and spiritual in conception as the book of Job
Devotion to the Sacred Heart - On the feast of the Sacred Heart celebrated on the Friday after the Octave of Corpus Christi an act of reparation is prescribed for recitation in every church in the World. In spite of much opposition the feast was allowed in 1765, and extended to the World in 1856; in 1929 it was raised to the highest rank
Order of Friars Preachers - The Friars Preachers have also made notable contributions to the World of art. Although they suffered a considerable decrease in numbers and property due to the Reformation and the French Revolution, their spread in the New World counterbalanced these losses
Order of Preachers - The Friars Preachers have also made notable contributions to the World of art. Although they suffered a considerable decrease in numbers and property due to the Reformation and the French Revolution, their spread in the New World counterbalanced these losses
Dominicans - The Friars Preachers have also made notable contributions to the World of art. Although they suffered a considerable decrease in numbers and property due to the Reformation and the French Revolution, their spread in the New World counterbalanced these losses
Man - Therefore, if Adam had come into the World as a child he could not have lived in it. Not by the natural law of evolution, but by the Creator's special interposition, man came into the World, the priest of nature, to interpret her inarticulate language and offer conscious adoration before God
Sobriety - In our pursuit of this World, as opposed to covetousness. In the use and estimate of the things of this World, as opposed to excess
Noah - In consequence of the hopeless wickedness of the World at this time, God resolved to destroy it. On coming from the ark he built an altar, made an offering, and received a promise that the World should never again be destroyed by a flood
Judgment the Day of - In the World, however, the ungodly are often seen to prosper, and the righteous to be oppressed. Men might be judged either individually, each on his departure from the World, or collectively
Hilarianus (1) Quintus Julius, Latin Chiliast Writer - ...
The second treatise, Chronologia sive Libellus de Mundi Duratione, is founded on a dispute about the date of the end of the World. The author counts 5,530 years from the Creation to the Passion; gives the World 6,000; and would therefore end it c
Influences, Divine - What doctrine can be more reasonable? "The operations which the power of God carries on in the natural World are no less mysterious than those which the Spirit performs in the moral World
Genesis - " Genesis gives us a history of the origin of the World, of the human family, of sin, of the promise of redemption, and of the Jewish people. Its value cannot be overestimated as a fragment of literature or as a work of history, and it has been well observed that in the first page of Genesis a child may learn more in an hour than all the philosophers in the World learned without it in a thousand years
Lamb - He, the submissive and spotless One, was "like a lamb dumb before his shearer," and was proclaimed by John as "the Lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the World;" and again as 'the Lamb of God' as an object for the soul's contemplation. He will always bear the character of the chosen One of God "that taketh away the sin of the World" on the ground of the sacrifice of Himself
Object - When we say, "God created the World," World denotes the thing produced, and is the object after the verb created
Sacred Heart, Devotion to the - On the feast of the Sacred Heart celebrated on the Friday after the Octave of Corpus Christi an act of reparation is prescribed for recitation in every church in the World. In spite of much opposition the feast was allowed in 1765, and extended to the World in 1856; in 1929 it was raised to the highest rank
Daniel, the Book of - He does not, as they writing amidst the covenant people do, make God's people the foreground; but writing in a pagan court he makes the World kingdoms the foreground, behind which he places the kingdom of God, destined ultimately to be all in all. The judgment of the World given to the saints, and the destruction of the blasphemous king at the Lord's coming, (Daniel 7:8; Daniel 7:25; Daniel 11:36) foretold by Daniel, are further unfolded by Paul (1 Corinthians 6:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:3-12). The miracles, like those of Moses in Egypt, were designed to show to the seemingly victorious World power the really superior might of the seemingly prostrate kingdom of God, and so to encourage the captive Jews to patient trustfulness in God. The language of Daniel from Daniel 2:4 to the end of Daniel 7 is Chaldee, the World empire's language, the subject here being about the World at large. ...
(1) That the four World monarchies should rise (Daniel 2; Daniel 7), Babylon, Medo-Persia, Greece, and Rome, and that Rome in a tenfold divided form should be the last, and should be overthrown by Messiah's kingdom alone; Charlemagne, Charles V, and Napoleon have vainly tried to raise a fifth. ...
But when God's people rested on the World powers the instrument of their sin was made the instrument of their punishment. Daniel's position in the Babylonian court answers to the altered relations of the theocracy and the World power; see above. He represents the covenant nation in exile, and in subjection to the World power externally. His high dignities in the World typify the ultimate giving of the earth kingdom "to the people of the saints of the Most High" (Daniel 7:27). Daniel 2-7 represent the World powers developed historically; Daniel 8-12 their development in relation to Israel. The period of Daniel's prophecies is that from the downfall of the theocracy to its final restoration; it is the period of the World's outward supremacy, "the times of the Gentiles" (Luke 21:24; Daniel 9:27; Daniel 12:7), not set aside by Christ's first coming (John 18:36; Matthew 4:8-10); for Satan yet is "prince of this World," and Israel has been depressed and Judah's kingdom prostrate ever since the Babylonian captivity. But His second advent shall usher in the restored Israelite theocracy and His Worldwide manifested kingdom. In Daniel 2 the World kingdoms are seen by the pagan king in their outward unity and glory, yet without life, a metal colossus; in Daniel 7 they appear to the prophet of God in their real character as instinct with life, but mere beast life, terrible animal power, but no true manhood; for true manhood can only be realized by conscious union with God, in whose image man was made. ...
The universal expectation of a Savior existed even in the Gentile World at the very time He came; doubtless due to Daniel's prophecy carried far and wide by the Jews (Tacitus, Hist
Gnosticism - Over against the gnostic assertion that the true God would not enter our World, John stressed in his Gospel that Jesus was God's incarnate Son. The gnostic Marcion thus rejected the Old Testament, pointing out that the lesser or subordinate god revealed in it dealt with matter, insisted on law rather than grace, and was responsible for our decaying, tragedy-filled World. The spiritual Christians were the true Christians who belonged to the heavenly World which was the true one. This belief that the spiritual Christians did not really belong to this World resulted in some Gnostics seeking to withdraw from the World in asceticism. Salvation was thus seen by the gnostics in a cosmic rather than a moral context—to be saved was to be enabled to return to the one true deity beyond this World. ” In this view, gnosticism resulted from the attempt of early Christian thinkers to make Christianity understandable, acceptable, and respectable in a World almost totally permeated by Greek assumptions about the reality of the World. The expansion of Christianity from Palestine and its Jewish World of thought to the Roman Empire where Greek thought reigned called for an interpretation of Christianity that was more understandable. In particular, the ultimate goal of the Gnostics—to return to the absolute deity beyond matter and to be in some sense absorbed into the deity—belongs to near eastern pre-Christian mystical thought and not primarily to the Hellenistic World. ...
Although the radical conclusions of some scholars regarding a highly developed pre-Christian gnosticism have been discounted, it does seem clear that there were many ideas, assumptions, and perceptions about deity, reality, and the relationships of persons to gods and the World that were incorporated into the gnostic sects from outside Hellenistic sources. The early Christian preachers and writers, seeking to speak and write to be understood, used terms current in the first century World in the vague context of gnostic religious longings and gave them new meaning in the context of the incarnation, death, and resurrection of Jesus
Dualism - ...
(2) The existence in the World of two kinds of being or substance, matter and mind, produced by one and the same cause
Bermudas - Org
diocese of Hamilton
World Fact Book
Liberia - Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Monrovia
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Cape Palmas
Gbarnga
See also: ...
World Fact Book
Kibroth-Hattaavah - It is to find death in the pot, when we seek that from the creature which the Creator only can supply, Oh, how many Kebroth-hattaavahs doth the present World afford, as well as the wilderness to Israel!...
Heir - Believers are heirs of the "promise," "of righteousness," "of the kingdom," "of the World," "of God," "joint heirs" with Christ (Galatians 3:29 ; Hebrews 6:17 ; 11:7 ; James 2:5 ; Romans 4:13 ; 8:17 )
Reproach - Besides, it has a tendency to humble us, detach us from the World, and excite in us a desire for that state of blessedness where all reproach shall be done away
Easter - This controversy was determined in the council of Nice, when it was ordained that Easter should be kept upon one and the same day, which should always be Sunday, in all Christian churches in the World
Smyrna - God encouraged them with the promise that, no matter how much they might suffer in the present World, he would preserve the faithful for his heavenly kingdom (Revelation 2:10-11)
Martyr d'Anghiera, Peter - His writings include the first account of Spanish discoveries in the New World, the voyages of Columbus, Balboa, etc
Money - Christians have a responsibility to give their money generously, both as an offering to God and as a service to his work in the World (2 Corinthians 9:6-13; see GIVING)
Disallow - God disallows that Christians should conform to the immoral practices of the World
Japheth - ’ The peoples connected with Japheth ( Genesis 10:1-4 ) occupy the northern portion of the known World, and include the Madai (Medes) on the E
Ministry - He directs the affairs of this World by the ordinary ministry of second causes
Rise (up) - ...
Revelation 13:1 (a) Most commentators believe that this is a development of the antichrist who emerges from among the common people (the sea), who assumes great power and presents himself as the CHRIST who is to rule the World
Professor - A term commonly used in the religious World, to denote any person who makes an open acknowledgment of the religion of Christ, or who outwardly manifests his attachment to Christianity
Promises of God - Watts says, "he could dare put into the hands of every Christian, among all their divided sects and parties in the World
Watchfulness - We are to watch against the insinuations of Satan; the allurements of the World; the deceitfulness of our hearts; the doctrines of the erroneous; and, indeed, against every thing that would prove inimical to our best interests
Fishers - Jeremiah 16:16 (a) These are messengers of GOD sent throughout the World to find His people, the Jews, and bring them to Him for judgment
Belie - Slander doth belie all corners of the World
Antigua - See also, ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
Guilty - Wicked corrupt sinful as a guilty World
Sick - ...
Song of Solomon 2:5 (b) The wise man is telling us by this expression that his whole soul and being is given up to love and loving, so that nothing else in the World matters
Atonement - Jesus atoned for the sins of the World (1 John 2:2)
Hail - It will also form a notable part of the judgements of God in His future dealings with this guilty World
Ethiopia - ...
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Addis Abeba
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Adigrat
Other ecclesiastical divisions include: ...
Asmara (Vicariate Apostolic)
Awasa (Vicariate Apostolic)
Dessié (Prefecture Apostolic)
Emdeber (Apostolic Exarchate)
Endeber (Prefecture Apostolic)
Gambella (Prefecture Apostolic)
Gondar (Prefecture Apostolic)
Harar (Vicariate Apostolic)
Jimma-Bonga (Prefecture Apostolic)
Meki (Vicariate Apostolic)
Nekemte (Vicariate Apostolic)
Soddo-Hosanna (Vicariate Apostolic)
See also: ...
World Fact Book ...
patron saints index: Ethiopia
Lobe - ) A round model of the World; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; - called also artificial globe
Rhodes - This statue was seventy cubits high, and bestrode the mouth of the harbour, so that ships could sail between its legs, and it was accounted one of the seven wonders of the World
Zephaniah - He denounces the judgments of God against the idolatry and sins of his countrymen, and exhorts them to repentance; he predicts the punishment of the Philistines, Moabites, Ammonites, and Ethiopians, and foretels the destruction of Nineveh; he again inveighs against the corruptions of Jerusalem, and with his threats mixes promises of future favour and prosperity to his people; whose recall from their dispersion shall glorify the name of God throughout the World
Lobe - ) A round model of the World; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; - called also artificial globe
Witness - ...
The apostles were witnesses, in proclaiming to the World the facts of the gospel, Acts 1:8,22 2:32 2 Peter 1:12,16-18 ; and Christ is a "faithful witness," in testifying to men of heavenly things, John 3:12 Revelation 1:5
el Salvador - Org
World Fact Book
patron saints index
Second Cumberland Presbyterian Church in the Unite - While accepting the Westminster Confession of Faith, in general, they emphasize the following points: ...
(1) There are no eternal reprobates;
(2) Christ died not for a part only, but for all mankind;
(3) all persons dying in infancy are saved through Christ and the sanctification of the Spirit;
(4) the Spirit of God operates in the World coextensively with Christ's atonement, in such a manner as to leave all men inexcusable
Lights on the Altar - ) In addition to what isset forth in the article to which the reader is referred, wereproduce from Wheatley on the Prayer Book the following: "Amongother ornaments of the Church were two lights enjoined by theInjunctions of King Edward VI to be set upon the Altar as asignificant ceremony to represent the Light which Christ's Gospelbrought into the World
Advent - The word isused of the first coming of Christ at His Birth, and of His SecondComing to judge the World
Hospitality - ...
Hospitality in the ancient World focused on the alien or stranger in need. In the ancient World the practice of hospitality meant graciously receiving an alienated person into one's land, home, or community and providing directly for that person's needs. ...
Some forms of hospitality toward nonforeign strangers appear to have been commonly practiced among the nations of the biblical World. In the ancient World, to share food with someone was to share life. Symbolically Jesus came as an alien figure to "tabernacle" in a World that did not recognize or receive him (John 1:10-14 ). Jesus, the guest, also becomes the host who receives an alienated World. Those who confess Jesus as Christ become aliens and strangers in the World (John 15:18-19 ; 1 Peter 1:1 ; 2:11 ). In a general sense, Christians now serve as co-hosts with Christ to a World consisting of those who are "excluded from the citizenship in Israel and foreigners to the covenants of the promise" (Ephesians 2:12 ). Certainly, held up before the Christian is the model of Jesus, who serves as host to an alienated World, who commended hospitality in his teaching, and who himself is encountered as one receives the alienated person (Matthew 10:40 ; 25:31-46 ). Herron, Word and World 6 (1986): 76-84; R. Malina, Social-Scientific Criticism of the New Testament and Its Social World, pp
Apostle - The term is applied to Jesus Christ, who was God's envoy to save the World, Hebrews 3:1 ; though, more commonly, the title is given to persons who were envoys commissioned by the Savior himself. After his resurrection, he sent them into all the World, commissioned to preach, to baptize, to work miracles, etc
Montmartre - Built in Romanesque style surmounted by a Byzantine dome, it has cost something over $8,000,000, and is one of the most imposing of modern religious edifices in the World. Motivated by a like desire to make expiation, a new confraternity of the Sacred Heart of Jesus was established in Montmartre, 1876, and in 1894 was privileged to incorporate into itself other confraternities, of like name and object, throughout the World
Maelmhaedhoc o'Morgair - They purport to be brief descriptions of all the future popes from the time of the vision to the end of the World. This does not mean to indicate that the end of the World will occur in the reign of the last pope; the last prophecy is couched in special terms, viz
Malachy, Saint - They purport to be brief descriptions of all the future popes from the time of the vision to the end of the World. This does not mean to indicate that the end of the World will occur in the reign of the last pope; the last prophecy is couched in special terms, viz
Mystical Numbers - Four is the symbol of the material World, of man, of God's kingdom on earth. This signifies that they will judge all men, for there are four quarters of the World, East, West, North, and South
Title - Aramaic (which was spoken ordinarily by the people of Jerusalem and the pilgrims from Palestine), Latin (the official language), and Greek (the lingua franca of the World). The Evangelist sees, in this announcement in the three languages of the Roman Empire, a symbol of the proclamation to the World of the Messiahship of Jesus, notwithstanding the efforts of the Jews to cover Him with ignominy
Branch - Fruit bearing, so as to "fill the face of the World with fruit" (Isaiah 27:6). Believers being such "as He is in this World" (1 John 4:17) are also "branches" in Him the living vine, yielding fruit instinctively, spontaneously, naturally, their love corresponding to His (John 15), "the branch of My planting" (Isaiah 60:21)
Prince - "); "r" in Acts 3:17 ; 4:5,8 ; 13:27 ; 14:5 ; (e) of rulers of synagogues, Matthew 9:18,23 , "r;" so Luke 8:41 ; 18:18 ; (f) of the Devil, as "prince" of this World, John 12:31 ; 14:30 ; 16:11 ; of the power of the air, Ephesians 2:2 , "the air" being that sphere in which the inhabitants of the World live and which, through the rebellious and godless condition of humanity, constitutes the seat of his authority; (g) of Beelzebub, the "prince" of the demons, Matthew 9:24 ; 12:24 ; Mark 3:22 ; Luke 11:15
Salt - Apart from its obvious use in cooking, salt was widely used in the ancient World to keep perishable foods from decay (Leviticus 2:13; Job 6:6). If they are living as they should, Christians will be a good influence in a World corrupted by sin (Matthew 5:13; Mark 9:50)
Transfiguration - In coming into the World, Jesus had laid that glory aside, but now it reappeared briefly, displayed through a human body. ...
The Father’s final words, ‘Hear him’, indicated that this one, besides being the kingly Messiah and the suffering servant, was the great prophet who announced God’s message to the World (Matthew 17:5; cf
Backsliding - ...
The causes of backsliding are the cares of the World; improper connections; inattention to secret or closet duties; self-conceit, and dependence; indulgence; listening to and parleying with temptations. A backsliding state is manifested by indifference to prayer and self-examination; trifling or unprofitable conversation; neglect of public ordinances; shunning the people of God; associating with the World; thinking lightly of sin; neglect of the Bible; and often by gross immorality
Bourignonists - The Light of the World, and The Testimony of Truth. She held many extravagant notions, among which, it is said, she asserted that Adam, before the fall, possessed the principles of both sexes; that in an ecstacy, God represented Adam to her mind in his original state; as also the beauty of the first World, and how he had drawn from it the chaos; and that every thing was bright, transparent, and darted forth life and ineffable glory with a number of other wild ideas
Numbers, Mystical - Four is the symbol of the material World, of man, of God's kingdom on earth. This signifies that they will judge all men, for there are four quarters of the World, East, West, North, and South
Patience of God - There are many instances of his patience recorded in the Scriptures; with the old World, Genesis 6:3 ; the inhabitants of Sodom, Gen. in the Gentile World
Reflectiveness - —This is the habit of bending back the attention of the mind from action and experience to scrutinize and contemplate the nature and meaning of self and the World. Deep, steady reflectiveness is rare amid the extraordinary preoccupation in business of the modern World which, like briers, chokes the word
Communion (2) - This communion cannot be interrupted by any local mutations: it is far superior to all outward services and ordinances whatsoever; it concerns the whole soul, all the affections, faculties, and motions of it being under its influence: it is only imperfect in this life, and will be unspeakably enlarged in a better World. the advantages of communion with God are, deadness to the World, Philippians 3:8
Nature - It is used also, for the system of the World, and the Creator of it; the aggregate powers of the human body, and common sense, Romans 1:26-27 . Some understand it in a more comprehensive sense, as signifying those stated orders by which all the parts of the material World are governed in their several motions and operations
Earthquake - It must have been a terrible one, since two and a half centuries later it was still being made an epoch in Zechariah 14:5; his sin in the spiritual World was connected with the convulsion in the natural World
Valentinians - The sister of Nous they called Aletheia or Truth; and these constituted the first quaternity of AEons, which were the source and original of all the rest; for Nous and Aletheia produced the World and life, and from these two proceeded man and the church. Her Enthymese or Thought, dwelling near the Pleroma, perfected by the Christ, produced every thing that is in this World by its divers passions
Certain - It is not unlike, for importance, the phrase of a man of God, to distinguish from a man of the World; or the natural man, to distinguish from the spiritual and the inward man of the heart, to denote somewhat from that which is merely outward. All men, from our first father, have left Bethlehem-judah, the land of bread, for so the name means; and Jerusalem, the holy city; and by going down to the Moabs and the Jerichos of the World, have fallen among thieves, and been left more than half dead by the great enemy of souls
Dispensations - These have varied in several ages of the World, and have been adapted by the wisdom and goodness of God to the circumstances of his intelligent and accountable creatures. All these were adapted to the conditions of the human race at these several periods; all, in regular succession, were mutually connected and rendered preparatory one to the other; and all were subservient to the design of saving the World, and promoting the perfection and happiness of its rational and moral inhabitants
Reconciliation - God was in Christ, when Christ was on earth, reconciling the World unto Himself, not imputing unto them their trespasses; but now that the love of God has been fully revealed in the cross, the testimony has gone out World wide, beseeching men to be reconciled to God
Owner - It was not so common among them as among the Greeks and Romans, and the condition of the slave in the Jewish social economy was much happier than in the Gentile World. The terrible punishment mentioned in Luke 12:46 (‘the lord of that servant … will cut him in sunder [1], and appoint him his portion with the unbelievers’) is probably taken from the punishments which were practised in the Gentile World
Polycrates, Bishop of Ephesus - When Victor of Rome sought to unify the practice of the whole Christian World in the matter of Easter celebration, he first asked for meetings of bishops in different places to report on the practice of their localities. Polycrates himself had followed the traditions of his kindred, seven of whom had been bishops before him, and had been confirmed in his view by his own study of the whole Scripture and by conference with brethren from all the World
Sunday-Schools - Suchschools gradually spread and increased, until to-day it issaid that the Sunday-schools of the World number three millionsof teachers and over thirty millions of scholars. Theseperplexing problems no doubt arise from two main causes, (1)a practical, though oftentimes unconscious, ignoring of the Church'sown order and method and (2) from the mixed conditions of thereligious World of to-day "by reason of our unhappy divisions
Anglican Communion, the - Under this term are included the Churchof England, the Church of Ireland, the Church of Scotland, theChurches in British North America, the West Indies, Australia, SouthAfrica and in all the English colonies throughout the Worldwherever established. " The Anglican Communion is one of the most powerfulforces in our modern religious World. The following Table taken from theNew York World Almanac for 1901 gives some idea of...
THE RELIGION OF ENGLISH-SPEAKING PEOPLE
Thousand Years - ) On the same just principle they who have suffered for Christ, and not worshipped the Godopposed World power, shall come to life again and reign with Christ (2 Timothy 2:12), at His coming, a thousand years. "...
Ten, the "world number", raised to the third power, the "divine number", expresses the World pervaded by God. did not treat the World's riches, ambitions, and pleasures as their portion. ...
As long as he rules in the darkness of the World we live in an atmosphere tainted with evil physical and spiritual (Ephesians 2:2). Christ's coming will purify the World (Malachi 3:3). Satan will no longer seduce the flesh, nor be the "god" and "prince of this World" (John 14:30; 2 Corinthians 4:4), which now "lieth in the wicked one" (1 John 5:19). ...
This will be the manifestation of "the World ("age", aion ) to come" already set up invisibly in the saints in "this World" (Hebrews 2:5; Hebrews 5:5). As each seventh year was Israel's year of remission, so of the World's seven thousands the seventh shall be its sabbatism (Hebrews 4:9, margin). ...
"When Christianity became a Worldly power under Constantine, the future hope was weakened by joy over present success" (Bengel); the church becoming a harlot ceased to be the bride going to meet her Bridegroom. Church and state will be coextensive; and the church and the World no longer in mutual repulsion. The distinction between them shall cease, for the church will be co-extensive with the World. The veil shall be taken off Israel first, then off all people, and the kingdoms of this World shall be the kingdoms of Christ (Revelation 11:15; Isaiah 25:7). the translated church, Israel, the World of nations. In the judgment on this, the World of nature is destroyed and renewed, as the World of history was before the millennium. the wife of the Lamb; for the elect church shall hold the primacy among the redeemed throughout eternity, because she alone shall have witnessed for Christ in the face of an opposing World and the prince of darkness (Revelation 21:24)
Michael - Daniel 10:21, "none holdeth with me in these things, but Michael your prince," means that Michael alone, with the angelic speaker, had the office of protecting Israel, the World powers were all against Israel. When the World powers seemed to have overwhelmed the kingdom of God so utterly, Israel needed to have her faith in God's promises of restoration reinvigorated by a glimpse into the background of history in the World of spirits, and to see there the mighty angelic champions who are on her side under the Son of God (2 Kings 6:17)
Sun - " (Malachi 4:2) And indeed when we consider that the Sun, as the creature of God, becomes the source and fountain of light and life to the whole World, of animal and vegetable life; there is certainly a great beauty in the allusion to him, the Sun of righteousness, from whom the whole of the spiritual as well as the natural World, derive their very being, their upholding, and prosperity. But the emblem of the Sun of this lower World, considered as referring to Christ the Sun of righteousness, falls far short in a thousand instances where Jesus becomes most precious to his people
Sidon - or ZIDON, a celebrated city and port of Phenicia, and one of the most ancient cities in the World; as it is supposed to have been founded by Sidon, the eldest son of Canaan, which will carry it up to above two thousand years before Christ. Add to this, they were, if not the first shipwrights and navigators, the first who ventured beyond their own coasts, and in those early ages engrossed the greatest part of the then commerce of the World. In all these respects, however, Sidon was totally eclipsed by her neighbour and rival, Tyre; whose more enterprising inhabitants pushed their commercial dealings to the extremities of the known World, raised their city to a rank in power and opulence unknown before, and converted it into a luxurious metropolis, and the emporium of the produce of all nations
Natural - Nor does it signify one who is entirely governed by his fleshly appetites, or what the World calls a voluptuary, or sensualist. The Apostle manifestly takes his "natural man" from among such as the World hold in the highest repute for their natural parts, their learning, and their religion. These are the persons whom he terms the wise, the scribes, the disputers of this World—men to whom the Gospel was a stumbling block and foolishness, 1 Corinthians 1:20 ; 1 Corinthians 1:23
Care - ...
In Matthew 13:22 in Christ's parable of the four seeds, the third person is represented by the seed that was choked out by the "cares of the World. " The enigmatic meaning of the parable is that preoccupation with the World depletes one's devotion to God. Because the World is temporal, inordinate care for the World causes preoccupation with the result of not caring for eternal things; consequently, the Word does not become deeply implanted
Sin (2) - National sins are punished in this World, as nations have no life beyond the grave (Proverbs 14:34). The punishment of the individual's sins are remedial, disciplinary, and deterrent in this World; and judicially retributive in the World to come. But Satan has had his triumph in bringing sin and death into the World; his sharing the sinner's eternal punishment will be the reverse of a triumph; the abiding punishment of the lost will be a standing witness of God's holy hatred of sin, and a preservative against any future rebellion
Death of Christ - —The aim of the present article is to examine the place of the death of Christ in the moral order of the World. What is the moral order of the World? The question may be answered as follows:—The will and purpose of God are in the way of coming to realization in the individual and social life and destiny of humanity. This is what is here understood as the moral order of the World. But it is necessary, in order to prevent confusion of ideas, to mark the important distinction that exists in the nature of things as they now are in man’s moral history, between the moral order of the World and the moral course of the World. The moral order of the World as just defined is only one of the constituent factors of the World’s moral course. These three factors constitute that actual moral course that the World is ever following; and the predestined end of their relation to one another will be realized in the complete and eternal victory and triumph of righteousness over sin, through the unerring and all-sufficient administrative judgments of God’s moral government of the World (Matthew 13:41-43, 1 Corinthians 15:24-28). It is the moral course of the World as so understood that explains the nature and methods of the historical revelation, contained in the Bible, of God’s will and purpose in their relation to man’s moral life and destiny. The course of the World as so understood occupied a determinative place in our Lord’s conceptions of man’s moral life and destiny (See Progress). It was on the place of His death in the moral order of the World, and as therein related to man’s sin and God’s governmental judgment, that He depended for the victory and triumph of Righteousness over Sin in the dispensation of the Spirit (John 17:7-11). This means that although He appeared and lived and died in the moral course of the World, He was not of the World, had absolutely no fellowship with it in so far as it was under the domination of sin. But sin He hated with perfect hatred; and He lived and died to save men and the moral course of the World from it. His life of perfect union with His Father’s will and purpose in all things implied not only that He lived entirely on the side and in the interests of the moral order of the World, but also that the latter found in Him, for the first time on earth, the One Individual moral Being in whom it had secured its perfect form of manifest realization, in so far as this was possible in one life in human form. It was this fact, on the one hand, and the hatred of the men over whom the World’s sin had gained complete domination on the other, that determined His way to His destiny on Calvary. Saying after saying of His, bearing on this point, seems almost to convey the impression that He must have regarded this sinful and guilty opposition, without which He would not have been put to death, as not required by the interests and objects of the moral task which He had come into the World to accomplish (Matthew 23:33-39, Luke 13:31-35; Luke 23:23-27, John 7:19; John 8:21-59; John 15:17-27; John 19:10-11). (2) Then, again, His own words show that the inward ‘moral’ struggles and agonies of His life arose out of the prospect and contemplation of the development of the manifestations of the World’s sin and unbelief against Him and against His claim to be entirely identified with His Father’s will and purpose in all His words and deeds. This achievement from beginning to end was made by Him in His position as internally related to the moral order of the World, and through it to the World in its character, aspirations, and activities as under the domination of sin. ...
In the first place, the fact has its validity in the established nature of the moral order of the World and in Christ’s own place in this order. This is an order of things which has its foundations in the moral nature of God; in the moral nature of man as made in the image of God as a Moral Being; in the fact and in the nature of the moral relations between God and men and between man and man; and also in the fact that Christ as the Son of God came into the World to qualify Himself for occupying His momentous position of mediation within the sphere of the moral relations of God to men and of men to God. What, then, does His attitude of unreserved and bold antagonism to the legal system of Judaism imply in the point of view here considered? (1) It implies that in His position in the moral order of the World He stood on the eternal fact and truth that the direct relations between God as a Moral Being and men as moral beings are inward and therefore essentially moral. He came into the World, as He Himself always represented, on one entirely homogeneous moral undertaking; and when this undertaking was fulfilled, He spoke of it in terms which show that He regarded the finished task as one homogeneous moral result (John 17:4; John 19:28). He lived and died determined by the same moral principle, in the same spirit of love and self-sacrifice and service, and in the same spirit of perfectly wise and loyal regard to all the demands of God’s will and purpose on Him, and to all the demands on Him of the World’s moral needs. All the moral powers of holy love, self-sacrifice, and service that were individualized in Him as the incarnate Son of God and man’s Redeemer,—these powers, which were His life, He laid down, consecrated, employed, every moment and in every situation of His life of free activity, in order perfectly to fullil His life’s vocation as determined for Him by His Father’s will and purpose, and by the moral necessities of the World which He had come to save. ...
(2) But if His life prepared Him for dying, His death on the cross raised the moral splendour and value of His whole life to its highest powers of revelation and effect in the human soul and in the moral history of the World. The complex event for which the cross stands is the most momentous and the most creative moral event in the history of the World’s moral course. It now remains to note, from the standpoint of the moral order of the World, some features of our Lord’s place and work therein, as the Mediator between God and men. —(5) The moral means in question consist in the revelation of the holy gracious love or righteousness of God as realized by Christ, and manifested in His life and death of perfect self-sacrifice for the World’s salvation. —(7) This internal, immediate union of the individual with Christ, and therefore with God, is the true way of salvation and life for man (John 14:6) This secures not only forgiveness, but every moral or spiritual blessing that the individual needs for this World and the next, every blessing that God has to give or that it is possible for Him to bestow in Christ and through the work of His Spirit in the heart
Daniel, Theology of - ...
The narratives of chapters 1-6 have in common a single theme: Daniel and his three friends successfully bear witness to their faith before a hostile World. The historical section in general forms a theology of history in which God delivers those who faithfully represent him in the World and humiliates the proud who fail to acknowledge him. Other Old Testament prophets knew that Yahweh, the god of Israel, was sovereign over the whole World, including the other nations. Through both the narratives and visions, Daniel demonstrates the lordship of God over the whole World, not just Jerusalem and the Israelites. ...
The sovereignty of God is played out in the rest of the book in the conflict between the proud and arrogant rules of the World and the kingdom of God. Rather than present sermons against Israel's immediate neighbors, Daniel sees visions of future empires that oppose God Worldwide and oppress his people everywhere. Both the historical narratives and the visions portray a struggle between these successive rulers of the World and God's kingdom. God's sovereignty over the proud and arrogant rules of the World climaxes in Michael's final victory provided for all who are written in "the book" (12:1). In the visions of chapters 7-12, the arrogance of future World leaders is the enemy of God and his people. ...
The pride of the World empires is central to the ideas of chapters 7-12. The scheme of empires in chapters 7,8 is a succession of World leaders, which depicts the limits of imperial pride, reaching the climax at the little horn with the big mouth (7:8). ...
Prevalent in this book is the idea of four great World kingdoms followed by a fifth (chaps. During the postponement, God's faithful people will endure severe testing and persecution at the hands of proud, irreligious leaders of the World. ...
In other words, the details of eschatology are not as crucial as eschatological ethics: behaving Christ-like now in this World, and living in the expectation and anticipation of Christ's return
God - ...
God as Present with Us God is present in His World in a unique manner. As spirit, God has the perfect capability of being present everywhere in the World at once. He enters into personal relationships with the people who inhabit His World. Theologians used the term omnipresence , derived from Latin, to speak of God's presence everywhere in all the World's space. God is living, working in His World, and relating to His people. ...
God's power is His ability to accomplish His purposes and carry out His will in the World. He works for the right, seeking to extend righteousness and justice throughout the World. ...
God at Work in His World God is not an inert being far removed from the World. God is the personal God who cares about and works in the World He created. The sovereign God exercises His lordship or ownership of the World by continuing to work in His World and through His people. The sovereign, absolute Lord will accomplish His will in His World. It is an explicit formulation of the doctrine of God in harmony with the early Christian message that “God was in Christ, reconciling the World unto himself” (2 Corinthians 5:19 )
Animals - In Genesis 1 , God's approval of the created World is regularly expressed by the phrase "and God saw that it was good. Jesus reaffirms the value of the animal World in Luke 12:6 : "Are not five sparrows sold for two pennies? Yet not one of them is forgotten by God. "...
As Creator, God is Lord over the World, including animals, for, "The earth is the Lord's and everything in it" (1Col 10:26; cf. Christ's work of creating, sustaining, and reconciling all things also includes the animal World (Colossians 1:16-17 ). Human salvation is inseparable from the liberation of the created World, including animals. The concept of dominion in Genesis 1:28 involves wise stewardship and rsponsible care for the animal World. Further, humanity is responsible to God with respect to this stewardship, for the created World remains God's World. However, a very strong link exists between the animal World and humanity since in Genesis 1:24-31 both are created on the same day, and in Genesis 2:7,19 both the man and the animals are formed from the ground. ...
Illustrations from the Animal World Since the people of the Bible interacted regularly with animals they often used images from the animal World as illustrations. The image is used in another way in John 1:29 : "Look, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the World!" In Revelation Jesus is regularly spoken of as the Lamb. ...
Similarly, Jesus used illustrations from the animal World in his parables and teaching
Missions - The OT, especially in the portions which express the ideals and spirit of prophecy, is full of principles and promises which find their fulfilment in the World-wide mission of Christianity (Horton, The Bible as a Missionary Book). It is one of the paradoxes of history, that the missionary propaganda which aimed at the conversion and blessing of the World, sprang from a people whose predominant characteristics were pride in racial privileges, expectation of national greatness, and contempt for all who were not of the seed of Abraham. ‘As thou hast sent (ἀτέστειλας) me into the World, even so have I also sent (ἀτέστειλα) them into the World’ (John 17:18). It is an entire misreading of the Gospel history to imagine that the glorious conception of a World-wide mission was an afterthought, which only occurred to the disciples, or was suggested to them, after the resurrection of our Lord. Indications of a World mission in the teaching of Jesus. —Apart from the essentially universal character of the gospel, which inevitably involved a universal mission, there are indications that the World-wide view was brought before the minds of the disciples prior to the time when the great commission was given. The disciples were to be ‘the salt of the earth’ and ‘the light of the World’ (Matthew 5:13-14). So also, when defending the woman who had anointed Him with the box of ointment, He said, ‘Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached in the whole World, this … shall be told for a memorial of her’ (Matthew 26:13). In the interpretation of the parable of the Tares (one of the earlier parables) it is said that ‘the field is the World’ (Matthew 13:38). Direct intimations of a World mission are not awanting, as in the apocalyptic discourses in the Synoptics, which are prefaced with a declaration of the destruction of the Temple (‘There shall not be left one stone upon another which shall not be thrown down,’ Matthew 24:2, Mark 13:2, Luke 21:6), and contain the announcement that ‘this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the World, for a witness to all the nations’ (Matthew 24:14 || Mark 13:10). In the Fourth Gospel the evidence of a World view as part of the instruction given to the disciples is very plain. In connexion with the visit of the Greeks, He uttered the pregnant and impressive prophecy, ‘I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all men unto me’ (John 12:32); and a little further on in the same chapter we find the words, ‘I came not to judge the World, but to save the World’ (John 12:47). In the private converse of our Lord and His disciples, in the last days of the earthly ministry, the vision of the World is repeatedly brought before the minds of the disciples as the object of the Saviour’s thought and the scope of the disciples’ mission, as—’That the World may know that I love the Father … even so I do’ (John 14:31); ‘As thou hast sent me into the World, even so have I also sent them into the World’ (John 17:18; also John 12:46-48, John 16:8-11, John 17:2; John 17:21). Judas (not Iscariot) is even represented as asking, ‘How is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us and not unto the World?’ (John 14:22), as if the limitation of His work was a source of perplexity to him. Unless we are to regard the Gospels as entirely unhistorical, and all such universal references as due to the mind of the Church (which would then be greater than its Lord) at a later time, it must be admitted that the disciples were aware of the World-wide character of the work they were to undertake. The frequency of the World references in the earthly ministry May to some extent account for the fact that the missionary commission is mentioned only once in each of the Gospels (Matthew 28:16-20 || Mark 16:15 || John 20:21 || Luke 24:46-48), and in Acts 1:8. Go ye into all the World, make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you all the days, unto the consummation of the age’ (πάσας τὰς ἡμέρας ἕως τῆς συντελείας τοῦ αἰῶνος, 1618383428_7). If any reliance is to be placed on Acts as an historical document, it is abundantly evident that the first disciples did know of the World mission, and that they were moving ill the line of their instructions
East - The word Kedem Is used when the four quarters of the World are described ( Genesis 13:14 ; 28:14 ); and Mizrah When the east only is distinguished from the west ( Joshua 11:3 ; Psalm 50:1 ; 103:12 , etc
Guardian - The guardian appears to be an image for the “elemental things of the World,” that is, of celestial or demonic powers regarded as gods by pagan Gentiles
Benedict of Nursia, Saint - A brother of Saint Scholastica, when only 17 he renounced the World, and the wealth and position of his family and took refuge in a cave at Subiaco, in the Sabine mountains, where he lived as a hermit for several years and established twelve monasteries for his followers, over which he ruled as abbot
Fabiola, Saint - She renounced the World and devoted her immense wealth to the needs of the poor and sick
Jean Besse - During the World War he directed the weekly publication of the newspaper, "L'Univers
Doxology - Doxology the Less, was anciently only a single sentence without a response, running in these words: "Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost, World without end, amen
Winds - The rush of invaders is figuratively spoken of as a whirlwind (Isaiah 21:1 ); a commotion among the nations of the World as a striving of the four winds (Daniel 7:2 )
Nursia, Benedict of, Saint - A brother of Saint Scholastica, when only 17 he renounced the World, and the wealth and position of his family and took refuge in a cave at Subiaco, in the Sabine mountains, where he lived as a hermit for several years and established twelve monasteries for his followers, over which he ruled as abbot
Dissolution - The dissolution of the World is an awful event, which we have reason to believe, both from the Old Testament and the New, will certainly take place
Soul: Needing Something to Cling to - And just as in a neglected garden you may see the poor creepers making shift to sustain themselves as best they can; one convolvulus twisting round another, and both draggling on the ground; a clematis leaning on the door, which will by-and-by open and let the whole mass fall down; a vine or a passion-flower wreathing round a prop which all the while chafes and cuts it; so in this fallen World it is mournful to see the efforts which human souls are making to get some sufficient object to lean upon and twine around
Accursed - ...
Sometimes it is that which the World would call a "blessing," for the Lord said, "I will curse your blessings," Malachi 2:2
Countenance - The form of the face of the Jew identifies him at once in every part of the World
Perilous Times - This plainly shows (and the solemn fact is confirmed by other passages) that so far from the World being converted before the Lord returns, even the professing church itself has been hopelessly corrupted, and the path of the Christian becomes more and more difficult as he seeks to avoid the multiplied dangers and seductions by which he is surrounded
Augustus, Caius Julius Caesar Octavianus - After punishing Caesar's murderers, he eliminated Lepidus, and with Antony governed the Roman World
Millennium - Postmillennialism teaches that through the preaching of the Word of God, the World will be converted and will then usher in Christ and the kingdom of God
Righteousness - No one in the World is righteous in the eyes of the Lord, that is, except the Christian
Jonathan - Saul's son, David's dear friend, (1 Samuel 18:1) His death, with that of Saul, gave birth to one of the most poetical as well as devout elegies the World ever knew
Conversion - "He shall reprove, saith Jesus, the World of sin, and of righteousness, and of judgment
Gaza - (Hebrew: the strong) ...
City in Syria, the modern Ghuzzeh, 50 miles southwest of Jerusalem, one of the oldest cities in the World, mentioned in Genesis 10, and first occupied by the Hevites
Aven - It appears, however, highly probable, by the behaviour of Pharaoh to Joseph and Jacob, and especially by Joseph's care to preserve the land to the priests, Genesis 47:22-26 , that the true religion prevailed in Egypt in his time; and it is incredible that Joseph should have married the daughter of the priest of On, had that name among the Egyptians denoted only the material light; which, however, no doubt they, like all the rest of the World, idolized in after times, and to which we find a temple dedicated among the Canaanites, under this name, Joshua 7:2
East - one of the four cardinal points of the World; namely, that particular point of the horizon in which the sun is seen to rise
Light - Hence the beauty and force of the expressions, "God is light," 1 John 1:5 , and "the Father of lights," James 1:17 ; Christ is the "Sun of righteousness," and "the light of the World," John 1:9 8:12
Gold - A well-known valuable metal, found in many parts of the World, and obtained anciently in Ophir, Job 28:16 ; Parvaim, 2 Chronicles 3:6 ; Sheba, and Raamah, Ezekiel 27:22
Paulicianism - Originally they held the following: ...
the God of the material universe and the God of the spirItual World are distinct ...
all matter is evil ...
the Old Testament is to be rejected ...
Christ was not incarnate but was an angel whose mother was the heavenly Jerusalem ...
Baptism and the Eucharist consist in hearing the Word of God ...
there are no other sacraments ...
They were also Iconoclasts
Christian - They were known to each other as, and were among themselves called, brethren, ( Acts 15:1,23 ; 1 Corinthians 7:12 ) disciples , ( Acts 9:26 ; 11:29 ) believers , ( Acts 5:14 ) saints , ( Romans 8:27 ; 15:25 ) The name "Christian," which, in the only other cases where it appears in the New Testament, (Acts 26:28 ; 1 Peter 4:16 ) is used contemptuously, could not have been applied by the early disciples to themselves, but was imposed upon them by the Gentile World
Existence of God - The innumerable alterations and manifest dependence every where observable in the World, prove that the things which exist in it neither are nor could be from eternity. It is self-evident that they never could form themselves out of nothing, or in any of their respective forms; and that chance, being nothing but the want of design, never did nor could form or put into order any thing; far less such a marvellous and well connected system as our World is. Moreover, when we consider the diversified and wonderful forms of creatures in the World, and how exactly those forms and stations correspond with their respective ends and uses; when we consider the marvellous and exact machinery, form, and motions of our own bodies; and especially when we consider the powers of our soul, its desires after an infinite good, and its close union with and incomprehensible operations on our bodies, we are obliged to admit a Creator of infinite wisdom, power, and goodness. "It is argued from the support and government of the World. , are generally greatest; the prolonging of men's lives, when the World needed to be peopled, and now shortening them when that necessity hath ceased to exist; the almost universal provision of food, raiment, medicine, fuel, &c. , in a manner different from and contrary to the carnal policy of those concerned; and especially the strangely similiar but diversified erection, preservation, and government of the Jewish and Christian churches: who, I say, can consider all these things, and not acknowledge the existence of a wise, merciful, and good God, who governs the World, and every thing in it?" ...
5. "It is proved from the miraculous events which have happened in the World; such as the overflowing of the earth by a flood; the confusion of languages; the burning of Sodom and the cities about by fire from heaven; the plagues of Egypt; the dividing of the Red Sea; raining manna from heaven, and bringing streams of water from flinty rocks; the stopping of the course of the sun, &c. It is impossible that these predictions, which were so exactly fulfilled in their respective periods, and of the fulfilment of which there are at present thousands of demonstrative and sensible documents in the World, could proceed from any but an all-seeing and infinitely wise God. "The existence of God farther appears from the fearful punishments which have been inflicted upon persons, and especially upon nations, when their immoralities became excessive, and that by very unexpected means and instruments; as in the drowning of the old World; destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah; plagues of Pharaoh and his servants; overthrow of Sennacherib and his army; miseries and ruin of the Canaanites, Jews, Syrians, Assyrians, Chaldeans, Persians, Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Saracens, Tartars, and others
Jesus Christ - ” Proper name of the Savior of the World. Jesus is the clearest picture of God the World has ever seen—that is the affirmation of believing hearts. Rather, they were caught up in the historical reality of what God was doing for them and all the World through Jesus Christ. None before or since had seen a person bring God's resurrection life to bear on this World's most pressing problem, death. Until that coming, Christians were to live in the World by the ethical injunctions He gave (Matthew 5-7 ) and in the kind of love He had shown and commanded (John 14-16 ). His return heralds the end and brings an end to the struggle of good and evil, the battle between the kingdoms of this World which must become the kingdom of our God and of His Christ (Revelation 11:15 ). His followers must go and tell; His followers must unite the hope of eschatology and the life of ethics in a fashion that will share the gospel with all the World (Matthew 28:19-20 ). All of these will find His people faithful, even as He is to His promise—found faithful even as God was to God's promises in sending this Child of promise to the World. God determined, before the foundation of the World, that the redemption of the World would be accomplished through Jesus, the Lord of Glory (Ephesians 1:1 ). John pulled out all the stops in his melodic introduction of Jesus Christ: the Word who made the World (John 1:1-3 ), the Life (John 1:4 ), the Light (John 1:5 ), the Glory of God (John 1:14 ), One full of grace and truth (John 1:17 ), the Son who makes the Father known (John 1:18 ). His way of being in the World was a way of obedience, faithfulness, and service. In the great deed of the cross they saw the salvation of the World
Apocalyptic - Type of biblical literature that emphasizes the lifting of the veil between heaven and earth and the revelation of God and his plan for the World. ...
Apocalyptic and Revelation The fundamental conviction of apocalyptic is that the World may be understood, but only by revelation that enables understanding. Similarly there are earthly counterparts of heavenly realities, seen for instance in the ghastly pairing of the two women who are also cities in Revelation 17-21 : on the one hand the Great Whore, who enslaves the World by war and commerce, and on the other the Bride of Christ, who brings healing to the nations. ...
God's Rule over a Chaotic World The basic message of Daniel 2-5 is that "the Most High God is sovereign over the kingdoms of men and sets over them anyone he wishes" ( Daniel 5:21 ). ...
As in the Book of Job, no reason is given for the presence of such things in God's World, but a profound answer is provided nonetheless: All these things issue from the scroll that only the slain Lamb is worthy to open (5:1-10). Such evils are permitted to exist in the World only because the LambGod himself in Christhas suffered them all firsthand (especially the final one). ...
Ultimately, God's rule over the World is to be expressed by the overthrow of the powers that produce such evils (Revelation 6:15-17 ; foreshadowing the climactic overthrow of Babylon the Great in chapters 17-19 ). ...
Similarly between the sixth and seventh trumpets another interlude occurs (Daniel 7:18:13 ) that concerns the preaching of the gospel before a hostile World. ...
The message of the book is that, even though we cannot avoid bearing the mark of the beast as inhabitants of this World-order (13:16), yet, viewed from heaven, we also bear the name of God and of the Lamb on our foreheads, and are secure with him (14:1-5). The powers of this World will be overthrown and replaced by the kingdom of God. This means both secular World powers and the power of evil that lie behind them. The vision that energizes apocalyptic is the day when "the kingdom of the World has become the kingdom of our Lord and of his Christ" (Revelation 11:15 )
Knowledge - To be known by God may mean that a nation or individual is chosen by God to play a part in God's purposes in the World (Jeremiah 1:5 ; Amos 3:2 ; Galatians 4:9 ). Jesus' knowledge of the Father consists of His hearing God's word and obediently expressing it to the World. So the Christian is caught up into God's mission of love to the World in order that the World may come to know and believe in Jesus as the revelation of the Father's love for the World
Adultery - A fallen World undergoing a gradual course of remedial measures needs anomalies to be pretermitted for a time (Romans 3:25 margin; Acts 17:30), until it becomes fit for a higher stage, in its progress toward its finally perfect state. God sanctions nothing but perfection; but optimism is out of place in governing a fallen World not yet ripe for it. " The once faithful church has ceased to be persecuted by conforming to the godless World and resting upon it. But the divine principle is, when the church apostatizes from God to intrigue with the World, the World, the instrument of her sin, shall at last be the instrument of her punishment
Cross, Crucifixion - The Gospel of Mark indicates that it is at the cross that we recognize Jesus as God's divinely appointed Savior of the World (10:45; 15:39). ...
The cross of Christ is the center of the work that God did in Christ, "reconciling the World to himself" (2 Corinthians 5:19 ). He did not stumble onto it by accident but chose the weak and foolish things of the World in order deliberately to confound the wise and to shame the strong. Thus, a fourth element, and perhaps the most radical, of God's character is demonstrated in the cross: the love of God for the despised of the World. Galatians 3:13-14 ) and thereby serves not only to state the radical nature of Christ's humiliation, but by implication to judge the World and all its inhabitants as being "the despised" who must identify with a crucified messiah in order to receive God's salvation. So now a third theological category is defined by the cross, that of ministry in the World. Those who are compelling others to be circumcised are avoiding being persecuted "for the cross of Christ" (6:12), and Paul expressly declares that he will never boast in anything except "the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which the World has been crucified to me, and I to the World" (v
the Merchant Man Who Sold All That he Had And Bought the Pearl of Great Price - ...
Now, the World of books, to begin with, is not unlike a merchant man seeking goodly pearls. But as time goes on, and as the real use of a good book, and the real rarity of a good book, become revealed to him, the true reader will be found giving up all his reading time, and all his reading outlay, to the really great and life-long books of the World, and to them alone. ...
You may not be much of a merchant man in the World of books, and yet this parable may be found entirely true of you in some other World of your own. " And all the World knows how John Wesley sold, so to speak, every other doctrine in order to hold and to preach immediate and soul-saving faith, and with what immediate and soul-saving results. As Law did also in a whole World of doctrines, and habits, and practices, connected with secret prayer. "What is a man profited," our Lord demands of every man among us, "if he shall gain the whole World and lose his own soul? Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?" Our Lord was the last to undervalue the World which He had made, and of which He is the Heir, and yet He says that if any man should have this whole World in one hand, and his immortal soul in the other hand, he will be a fool of the first water if he holds to the whole World and lets go his immortal soul. Oh, what a mad market that is in which men's souls, worth more than the whole World, are sold away every day for nought, and for far less than nought. He who alone knows the exchangeless value of our immortal souls, He came and redeemed our souls at a price which was worth far more than the whole World, and all our souls to the bargain. " All of you, then, who are seeking for goodly pearls, whether in the World of books, or of doctrines, or of any other kind of good things; here, under your very eye; here, to your very hand, is the greatest and the best Pearl in all the World
Creation - The term is therefore most generally applied to the original production of the materials whereof the visible World is composed. The accounts of the creation of the World which have existed among different nations, are called Cosmogonies. Most of the writers who come nearest to Moses in point of antiquity have favoured the World with cosmogonies; and there is a wonderful coincidence in some leading particulars between their accounts and his. The problem of creation has been said to be, "Matter and motion being given, to form a World;" and the presumption of man has often led him to attempt the solution of this intricate question. But the true problem was, "Neither matter nor motion being given, to form a World. " At first, the cosmogonists contented themselves with reasoning on the traditional or historical accounts they had received; but it is irksome to be shackled by authority; and after they had acquired a smattering of knowledge, they began to think that they could point out a much better way of forming the World than that which had been transmitted to them by the consenting voice of antiquity. From his day to ours, the World has been annoyed with systems; but these are now modified by the theories of chemists and geologists, whose speculations, in so far as they proceed on the principle of induction, have sometimes been attended with useful results; but, when applied to solve the problem of creation, will serve, like the systems of their forerunners, to demonstrate the ignorance and the presumption of man. ...
Here we see all the principal objects of creation mentioned exactly in the same order which Moses had assigned to them in his writings; and when we consider what follows;—the war of the giants; the general corruption of the World; the universal deluge; the preservation of Deucalion and Pyrrha; their sacrifices to the gods on leaving the vessel in which they had been preserved;—there can scarcely remain a doubt that Ovid borrowed, either directly or at second hand, from Moses. This train of reasoning would lead us to conclude that Ovid, and indeed the whole Heathen World, derived their notions respecting the creation, and the early history of mankind, from the sacred Scriptures: and it shows how deficient their own resources were, when the pride of philosophy was forced to borrow from those whom it affected to despise. When the sole self-existing Power, himself undiscerned, but making this World discernible, with five elements and other principles of nature, appeared with undiminished glory, expanding his idea, or dispelling the gloom. They introduce two eternal principles, the one good, called Oromasdes, the other evil, called Arimanius; and they make these two principles contend with each other in the creation and government of the World. The cosmogony of the northern nations, as may be collected from the Edda, supposes an eternal principle prior to the formation of the World. Plato supposed the World to be produced by the Deity, uniting eternal, immutable ideas, or forms, to variable matter. Aristotle had no cosmogony, because he supposed the World to be without beginning and without end
Behmenists - Whence there is good and evil in all this temporal World, in all its creatures, animate and inanimate; and what is meant by the curse that dwells every where in it. ...
The year after he wrote his Three Principles, by which are to be understood the dark World, or hell, in which the devils live; the light World, or heaven, in which the angels live; the external or visible World, which has proceeded from the internal and spiritual Worlds, in which man, as to his bodily life, lives; ...
Behmen produced this Three fold Life of Man, according to the Three Principles. In this work he treats more largely of the state of man in this World: ...
1. The life of the third principle, or of this external and visible World
Benson, Robert Hugh - His writings include "The Light Invisible," "By What Authority?," "The Conventionalists," "Lord of the World," "Come Rack! Come Rope!," "The Coward," "Oddsfish," "Initiation," "The Queen's Tragedy," "The Upper Room," "The Mirror of Shalott," "The Dawn of All," "Confessions of a Convert," "An Average Man," "Paradoxes of Catholicism," "The Friendship of Christ," "Book of the Love of Jesus," "The City Set on a Hill," "The Religion of a Plain Man," "Alphabet of the Saints in Rhyme," and "A Mystery Play in Honor of the Nativity of Our Lord
Denmark - Org
World Fact Book
diocese of Copenhagen
patron saints index: Denmark
patron saints index: Copenhagen
Order of Servants of Mary - She held in her hand the black habit, and a nearby angel bore a scroll reading Servants of Mary Mary told them, ...
You will found a new order, and you will be my witnesses throughout the World
Theatre - From the cities of Greece proper, theatres spread all over the Greek and Roman World
Catholic Women's League - Internationally, the Catholic Women's League of England and Wales is part of a World-wide organization, consisting of about 55 Leagues corresponding to 26 nationalities, designed to place the organized energies of Catholic women at the service of the Church, for the defense of Catholic principles
Harlot - Many of these follow the practice of the mother church in seeking the favor and the gifts of the World
Taxing - The first is said to have been the result of an edict of the emperor Augustus, that "all the World (i
Merchant - After the Hebrews became settled in Palestine they began to engage in commercial pursuits, which gradually expanded (49:13; Deuteronomy 33:18 ; Judges 5:17 ), till in the time of Solomon they are found in the chief marts of the World (1 Kings 9:26 ; 10:11,26,28 ; 22:48 ; 2 Chronicles 1:16 ; 9:10,21 )
Terah - What a wonderful part the descendants of this Chaldean shepherd have played in the history of the World! ...
Conviction: of Sin - But, blessed be God, we are thus judged and sentenced in ourselves that we may not be condemned with the World
Election - That gracious and almighty act of the Divine Spirit, whereby God actually and visibly separates his people from the World by effectual calling, John 15:19
Be - ) To exist actually, or in the World of fact; to have ex/stence
Word, the - Philo's Logos ("word") on the contrary excludes personality, and is identical at times with God, at other times with the World
Presumption: Rebuked by Trial - The Brahmins say that Benares is not a part of this sinful earth; but that it is on the outside of the World
Spikenard - Brought from distant India it suggested our Lord's declaration, "wheresoever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole World, this also that she hath done shall be spoken of for a memorial of her
Prophets, False - the Lord, early in His ministry, warned His hearers to beware of false prophets, Matthew 7:15 ; and in the church, the spirits are to be tried, for many false prophets have gone forth into the World
Miracle - A miracle is an out-of-the-ordinary direct and divine intervention in the World
Vials - There are seven direct judgements of the wrath of God (they are no longer mere providential actings) upon the settled sphere of God's dealings, whereby those who have received the mark of the beast are grievously affected; and upon masses of people outside that sphere, and upon the sources of national life and prosperity; also on those in authority in the World; also on the Euphrates, that it may be dried up to make way for the kings from the sun rising; followed by a general break up of human governments introductory to the reign of Christ
Integrity - Many hold, that a certain artful sagacity, founded upon knowledge of the World, is the best conductor of every one who would be a successful adventurer in life, and that a strict attention to integrity would lead them into danger and distress
Sword - The word (λόγος) of God is likened to a two-edged sword, Hebrews 4:12 , and the words of the Lord Jesus when He will come forth in judgement on Christendom and the World are compared to a "sharp two-edged sword
Be - ) To exist actually, or in the World of fact; to have ex/stence
Robert Benson - His writings include "The Light Invisible," "By What Authority?," "The Conventionalists," "Lord of the World," "Come Rack! Come Rope!," "The Coward," "Oddsfish," "Initiation," "The Queen's Tragedy," "The Upper Room," "The Mirror of Shalott," "The Dawn of All," "Confessions of a Convert," "An Average Man," "Paradoxes of Catholicism," "The Friendship of Christ," "Book of the Love of Jesus," "The City Set on a Hill," "The Religion of a Plain Man," "Alphabet of the Saints in Rhyme," and "A Mystery Play in Honor of the Nativity of Our Lord
Servant Friars - She held in her hand the black habit, and a nearby angel bore a scroll reading Servants of Mary Mary told them, ...
You will found a new order, and you will be my witnesses throughout the World
Servites - She held in her hand the black habit, and a nearby angel bore a scroll reading Servants of Mary Mary told them, ...
You will found a new order, and you will be my witnesses throughout the World
Pestilence - Like the Asiatic cholera, it is one of the most appalling scourges sin has brought on this World; and may in this point of view correspond with the "plagues" referred to in the Bible, Exodus 9:14 11:1 1 Kings 8:37
Religious of Perpetual Adoration - Retreats are conducted by the religious and instruction given to children and converts, but the special work of the community is the direction of the Association of Perpetual Adoration and Work for Poor Churches (in America, popularly known as the "Tabernacle Society"), a World-wide organization, having its center in Rome, enjoying fullest papal approbation and enriched with many indulgences and spiritual favors
Society of the Divine Saviour - The congregation has been assigned a new mission field in the province of Fu-kien, China, to replace the Prefecture Apostolic of Assam, India, transferred after World War I to the Salesians
Salvatorians (2) - The congregation has been assigned a new mission field in the province of Fu-kien, China, to replace the Prefecture Apostolic of Assam, India, transferred after World War I to the Salesians
Regeneration - Regeneration may also signify, in a cosmic sense, renewal of the Stoic World-cycle; and, in Christian eschatology, the resurrection of the dead (Matthew 19)
Saint John's Seminary, England - This school did not survive long, and after World War I Bishop Amigo of Southwark founded the College of Saint Joseph at Mark Cross, Sussex, for the boys in humanities
John, First Epistle of - There were those who, denying this great foundation of the faith, spoke as of the World, and who had the World's approval. The character of God morally, which had been seen in Christ, is now seen in those who are the objects of His love; they are identified even in this World with Christ as He is, from whom they derive everything in new creation. It is in loving one another that believers come out before the World as the disciples of Christ. Those born of God get the victory over the World — those, in fact, who believe that Jesus is the Son of God. The glory of His person eclipses all that naturally appeals to them, and they are thus delivered from the influence of the World. Then they know that they are of God, and that the whole World lies in the wicked one — the difference morally between Christians and the World
Eternity - The Jew found himself in an evil World. If the eternal, omnipotent God ruled the World, then all this must surely end. The Day of the Lord would come for oppressed Israel, for the oppressors, for the whole World, and (in Apocalyptic literature, Ps-Sol 3:16, 13:9 etc. Then the present evil World (עוֹלִם הַוְּה) would give place to a new and glorious era (עוֹלִם הַכָּא, see Generation). Later Judaism developed the idea, probably borrowed from the Zend religion, of a series of World epochs (cf. the World empires of Daniel’s vision), followed by the Messianic age. He retained and perhaps developed the view of a new age (עוֹלָם חַפָא) about to dawn on the World as opposed to the present (עוֹלָם הַוָּה; Matthew 12:32, cf
Proverbs, Book of - In this book God has furnished, through the wisest of men, principles and precepts for the guidance and security of the believer in passing through the temptations to which he is exposed in an evil World. Under symbolic terms, such as 'the evil man' and 'the strange woman,' the great forms of evil in the World, violent self-will, and corrupting folly, are laid bare in their course and end. ...
In detail the book refers to the World, showing what things are to be sought and what to be avoided, and evinces that in the government of God a man reaps according to what he sows, irrespective of the spiritual blessings of God in grace beyond and above this World. ...
Proverbs 3 shows that it is the fear of God, and subjection to Hisword, that is the only true path in an evil World. Again the World has its counter attractions by the strange woman; but the dead are there, and her guests in the depths of Sheol. ...
Christians should study the Book of Proverbs, for (even when properly occupied with heavenly things, and the interests of Christ on earth) they are apt to overlook the need of wisdom from heaven to pass through this evil World, and to manage their affairs on earth in the fear of God
Borrow - ...
As they had spoiled Israel by the bondservice unremunerated, so Israel, Jehovah's host (Exodus 12:41) marched forth "with an high hand" (Exodus 14:8)," by strength of Jehovah's hand" (Exodus 13:16), having "spoiled" their spoilers, an earnest of the saints' and Israel's final victory over the World powers and the prince of this World (Zechariah 14:14)
Faithfulness of God - Gill, in the performance of what he has said with respect to the World in general, that it shall not be destroyed by a flood, as it once was, and for a token of it, has set his bow in the clouds; that the ordinances of heaven should keep their due course, which they have done for almost 6000 years exactly and punctually; that all his creatures should be supported and provided for, and the elements all made subservient to that end, which we find do so according to his sovereign pleasure, Genesis 9:1-29 . He fulfilled his threatening to the old World in destroying it
Savior - There Christ is a savior for the outcasts of Israel (Luke 2:11 ) and the savior of the World (John 4:42 ; also 1 John 4:14 ). In a pagan World offering numerous “saviors” such as the pagan gods Zeus and Asclepius, the Roman emperor, and various philosophers, the church witnessed to Christ as the savior who could rescue humanity from the penalty and power of sin
Language - It is plain from Scripture, that in the early ages of the World, "the whole earth was of one language and of one speech. But while men have thus employed their time and attention to the discovery of what, even if it could have been attained, would not have profited, the word of God teaches the cause of speech in the great Giver of all good, and the diversity of speech when the entrance of sin into the World had made man rebellious
Horse - ...
Zechariah 6:3 (b) The black horse - represents World-wide famine which naturally follows great wars both international and internal. ...
Zechariah 6:3 (b) The white horse - probably represents a man-made peace which will be forced upon the World by the antichrist under the guise of religion and righteousness
Alexandria - The Pharos lighthouse was visible for miles at a height of over 400 feet and is remembered today as one of the seven wonders of the World. The finest library in the ancient World with over 500,000 volumes attracted many scholars
Leg - ...
Song of Solomon 5:15 (b) In the World of sports the leg and its strength and power to endure are prime requisites for success. The nation was upheld in its position as a World ruler by these two elements of strength
Light - He not only exposed all the evil in the World and all the false pretensions of the leaders of Israel; but "the life was the light of men. In the midst of darkness they are set to shine as lights in the World
Diana - In the heavens she was Luna, (the moon,) on earth Diana, in the unseen World Hectate. It was 220 years in building, and was one of the seven wonders of the World
Judgment - ...
THE DAY OF JUDGMENT, for which the word "judgment" alone is sometimes used, is that great day, at the end of the World and of time, when Christ shall sit as judge over all the universe, and when every individual of the human race will be judged and recompensed according to his works, whether they be good or evil. It will break upon the World suddenly, and with a glorious but awful majesty
Kingdom of Heaven - They afterwards learned that his kingdom was not of this World, John 18:36-37 ; that its origin, spirit, means, and ends were spiritual and heavenly. It has indeed its outward form, the visible church, Matthew 13:47 , and bestows on the World the richest of temporal blessings; but its true dominion is in the souls of men
Hell - It really means the place of the dead, the unseen World, without deciding whether it be the place of misery or of happiness. The word Hades , like Sheol sometimes means merely "the grave," ( Acts 2:31 ; 1 Corinthians 15:55 ; Revelation 20:13 ) or in general "the unseen World
Course - It is translated "course" in Ephesians 2:2 , "the course of this World," i. See AGE , ETERNAL , EVER , World
Jesus - " Thus Joshuawas a type of the spiritual Saviour of the World. When then we profess our belief in JESSUas we do in the Creed, it is as if we said, "I believe that JESUS,in the highest and utmost importance of that Name, to be the Saviourof the World
Litany of Loreto - ...
God the Son, Redeemer of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, spare us, O Lord. ...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, graciously hear us O Lord...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, have mercy on us
Loreto, Litany of - ...
God the Son, Redeemer of the World, have mercy on us. ...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, spare us, O Lord. ...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, graciously hear us O Lord...
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the World, have mercy on us
Crucified - The reader will not need to be told, that thus they treated the Lord of life and glory, whom none of the princes of this World knew, until that the holy Sufferer fainted from beneath the load and severity of his pain, when they compelled one that was passing by to bear the cross for the Lord Jesus. Over this view only, let the reader and writer for a moment pause, while listening to the call of the Holy Ghost by his servant the Baptist, "Behold the Lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the World!" (John 1:29)...
Was there ever such an object proposed to the mind of contemplation as the Lord Jesus Christ on the cross? It should seem as if the Lord Jesus, thus stretched forth and thus lifted up, was inviting, with his arms extended and his heart bleeding, all his redeemed to come to him. Oh, for grace, with Paul, to determine "to know nothing among men, save Jesus Christ and him crucified!" And with the same holy indignation as he felt, against every thing that would check the ardour of his love, to cry out, "God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the World is crucified unto me and I unto the World!" (Galatians 6:14)...
Anchor - But Christian hope reaching out towards the eternal World is something much greater than our familiar human hopes of blessings yet unrealized; and the use which this writer made of an anchor to represent the hope of the Christian soul at once transformed the figure (as the Catacombs bear witness) into one of the dearest symbols of the Christian religion. This is really a mixture of metaphors-the metaphor of an anchor entering into the unseen World to which Christian hope clings, and another metaphor by which the Holy of Holies becomes a type of that World unseen. ) as a pattern of heaven itself where Christ appears before God on our behalf (Hebrews 9:24), the figurative faultiness of the language is more than atoned for by its rich suggestiveness as to the Christian’s grounds of hope with regard to the World to come
Noah - reveals the fact thatNoah had faith, and that in godly fear he prepared the ark, in obedience to God's warning, for the saving of his house, thereby condemningthe World and becoming heir of the righteousness which is by faith. It was a new beginning in a new earth: the "heavens and the earth which are now " are in 2 Peter 2:5 ; 2 Peter 3:6,7 , put in contrast to the "world that then was ," the 'old World. ' Alas! in this new World failure at once characterised the man to whom government had been entrusted
Age - It is also used in speaking of the times past since the creation of the World. The several ages of the World may be reduced to three grand epochas, viz. The Jews call the third age, the age to come, or the future age; denoting by it the time from the advent of the Messiah to the end of the World. Among the poets, the four ages of the World are, the golden, the silver, the brazen, and the iron age
Bouddhists - The Bouddhists do not believe in a First Cause: they consider matter as eternal; that every portion of animated existence has in itself its own rise, tendency, and destiny; that the condition of creatures on earth is regulated by works of merit and demerit; that works of merit not only raise individuals to happiness, but, as they prevail, exalt the World itself to prosperity; while, on the other hand, when vice is predominant, the World degenerates till the universe itself is dissolved. They suppose, however, that there is always some superior deity, who has attained to this elevation by religious merit; but they do not regard him as the governor of the World. The Bouddhists are taught that there are four superior heavens which are not destroyed at the end of "kulpu," that below these there are twelve other heavens, followed by six inferior heavens; after which follows the earth; then the World of snakes; and then thirty-two chief hells; to which are to be added, one hundred and twenty hells of milder torments
Noah - reveals the fact thatNoah had faith, and that in godly fear he prepared the ark, in obedience to God's warning, for the saving of his house, thereby condemningthe World and becoming heir of the righteousness which is by faith. It was a new beginning in a new earth: the "heavens and the earth which are now " are in 2 Peter 2:5 ; 2 Peter 3:6,7 , put in contrast to the "world that then was ," the 'old World. ' Alas! in this new World failure at once characterised the man to whom government had been entrusted
Pilgrim (2) - The disciple must travel through the World with heart detached and his treasure laid up in heaven (Luke 12:33, Matthew 6:19). The disciples are to be sojourners who guard against the dangers of an alien World from which they must be detached (cf. Everywhere He speaks of Himself as sojourning in the World for a Divine purpose (John 8:14, John 16:28, John 13:37); the disciples must so look upon their life (John 12:35, John 17:16). They are in the World, but not of it (John 17:15-18, John 15:19); their true home would be in God
Ecclesiastes - ...
Not only does God control affairs in people’s lives; he is the Creator who has given them his World. Therefore, they should accept whatever God determines for them and find enjoyment in God’s World and in all their activities in that World (2:24; 9:7-10). Having set out the central message of his book, the writer turns to consider some related matters: the control of God over life’s affairs (3:1-15), the widespread injustice in the World (3:16-4:3), and the uselessness of self-centred achievement (4:4-16)
Mission(s) - The mission of the churches is to send our missionaries to all parts of the World until everyone has had the opportunity to hear the message of Jesus and accept Him as Lord. The mission begins with Jesus who was sent to earth to reveal the Father (John 1:18 ; John 14:9 ), to glorify Him (John 13:31 ; John 14:13 ; John 17:1 ,John 17:1,17:6 ), to bring the kingdom of God on earth (Matthew 12:22-32 ), and to make God's love and mercy known to a lost World. Each of the Gospels and Acts contains an account of His mandate to His followers, telling them to go to all the World, make disciples, baptize them, and preach the gospel (Matthew 28:19-20 ; Mark 16:15-16 ; Luke 24:46-49 ; John 20:21-22 ; Acts 1:8 ). Instead of looking to foreigners to come to Jerusalem as did the Old Testament, the church's mission is to go into all the World and not wait for the World to come to it. Christ has promised that He will be with the church until “the end of the World. ” With this assurance, the church was obedient, for the gospel was presented first in Jerusalem (Acts 1-8 ), then in Samaria (Acts 8-12 ) and finally to all the World (Acts 13-28 ). In fact, the disciples were not to go out into the World until the Holy Spirit had come upon them (Acts 1:8 ). The church's mission to the World was strengthened through its intimate fellowship and unity (Acts 2:44 ), and every effort was made to maintain this characteristic (Acts 6:1-7 ; Acts 15:1 ; and Paul's letters to the churches in Corinth and Galatia)
Elements - ...
From Plato downwards στοιχεῖα frequently denotes the elements of which the World is composed. στοιχεῖοα has this meaning in Wisdom of Solomon 7:17 : ‘For himself gave me an unerring knowledge of the things that are, to know the constitution of the World, and the operation of the elements’ (καὶ ἐνέργειαν στοιχείων; cf. Those who are in bondage to the στοιχεῖα of the World are compared with heirs who are still under guardians and stewards (Galatians 4:2-3), where the parallel suggests the personality of the στοιχεῖα. The observance of times and seasons is according to the στοιχεῖα of the World, not according to Christ (Colossians 2:8)-a contrast which suggests that the στοιχεῖα and Christ are personal rivals. When men died with Christ from the στοιχεῖα of the World (Colossians 2:20), this was more than a death to rudimentary teaching. 1315) the spirits who come before the king say: ‘We are the στοιχεῖα, the rulers of this under World’ (οἱ κοσμοκρἀτορες τοῦ σκότους τούτου). The belief in a World of intermediate spirits is the basal thought of Gnosticism, which St. ‘Jewish worship of law and pagan worship of gods are for him fundamentally the same bondage under the lower World-powers which stand between God and men. ‘This may or may not seem strange to us, but we must ever learn anew that bygone times had a different conception of the World’ (Hollmann in Die Schriften des NT, ii
Deluge - From this flood, the state of the World is divided into diluvian and ante-diluvian. Can an universal deluge be more clearly expressed? If the deluge had only been partial, there had been no necessity to spend an hundred years in the building of an ark, and shutting up all sorts of animals therein, in order to re-stock the World: they had been easily and readily brought from those parts of the World not overflowed into those that were; at least, all the birds never would have been destroyed, as Moses says they were, so long as they had wings to bear them to those parts where the flood did not reach. Bryant, in his Mythology, has pretty clearly proved that the deluge, so far from being unknown to the heathen World at large, is in reality conspicuous throughout every one of their acts of religious worship. But are not most, if not all these hypotheses quite arbitrary, and without foundation from the words of Moses? It is, perhaps, in vain to attempt accounting for this event by natural causes, it being altogether miraculous and supernatural, as a punishment to men for the corruption then in the World
Nabuchodonosor ii - He took pride not only in the arts of war, but in works of peace, and his long reign marks the height of the grandeur reached by the second Babylonian Empire, when, through his efforts, Babylon became one of the wonders of the World
Lauds - Lauds is preeminently the hour in the Office in which the Church praises God, the Light of the World
Francis Bickerstaffe-Drew - During the World War he served with distinction
John Ayscough - During the World War he served with distinction
Discipline, Congregation of - Regarding the regulars in other parts of the World, its duty was to offer the pope suggestions for the promotion of regular discipline
Neo-Scholasticism - Since then it has spread throughout the whole Catholic World
Liberius, Pope - At the time of his election, the Christian World was perturbed by the exiling of Saint Athanasius and the activities of the Arians
Estonia - ...
See also: ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
Bickerstaffe-Drew, Francis - During the World War he served with distinction
Michael - He is also represented as warning against "that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole World" (Revelation 12:7-9 )
Unicorn - Most probably, however, the word denotes the Bos primigenius ("primitive ox"), which is now extinct all over the World
Hypocrites: Seeking Their Own Advantage - God is in the hypocrite's mouth, but the World is in his heart, which he expects to gain through his good reputation. ' ...
Thus some, by the name they get for great saints, advance their Worldly interests, which lie at the bottom of all their profession
Refine - Metal-workers were common in the ancient World, and used their skills in a variety of ways (Genesis 4:22; Exodus 31:4; Judges 17:4; Isaiah 41:7; Isaiah 44:12; Isaiah 54:16)
Hearing: Carelessly - We had no object in the World but merely amusement and curiosity, to watch the simple machinery by which the same current is made to drift the boat in opposite directions from side to side
Diamond - first discovered diamonds for the western World in India
Theodicy - The study of the problem of evil in the World
Judgment-Day: Forgotten - Is it not foolish to be living in this World without a thought of what you will do at last? A man goes into an inn, and as soon as he sits down he begins to order his wine, his dinner, his bed; there is no delicacy in season which he forgets to bespeak
Life: Explains Religion - There is no language in the World so eloquent as a holy life
Man (the Good): Beneficial Influence of the Good Man - There it was, a legend clearly printed by the finger of God on the side of these silent hills, teaching the passer-by how needful a good man is, and how useful he may be in a desert World
World, Ages of - The first extends from the beginning of the World to the deluge, and comprehends one thousand six hundred and fifty-six years
Sceptre - Psalms 125:3, "the sceptre of the wicked (world power; "Persia" at this time) shall not rest (permanently) upon the lot of the righteous," namely, on the Holy Land: a psalm written after the return from Babylon
Ayscough, John - During the World War he served with distinction
Again - ...
There is not, in the World again, such a commerce as in London
Appoint - ...
He hath appointed a day in which he will judge the World
Ephraim - This is a type of the religious man of the World whose human attitudes are above reproach, but who has not a proper relationship to GOD
Bear - ...
Daniel 7:5 (b) This animal is used as a type of the Medo-Persian empire which was the second great World kingdom to appear following the fall of Babylon
Predestinate - " (Ephesians 1:5) Hence it will follow, that all the purposes of God in Christ concerning redemption are first formed in the Lord Jesus, and then the church in him; and hence the church is represented as saying: with one voice, (2 Timothy 1:9) "Who hath saved us, and called us with an holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose and grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before the World began
Behold - Behold the lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the World
Foundation - Original rise as the foundation of the World
Hinduism - Bound up with its castes, and its intricate social customs, it is a national, not a World religion
Jew - It was in this kingdom that the Deuteronomic reform occurred, which was the first step in the creation of an organized religion sharply differentiated from the other religions of the World
Jordan - The argument evidently is that if in this life the people of this World are wearied with the realities of eternity, what would be their condition if they were transported across the river into Heaven, where there are none of the things that attract the unsaved
Tribulation - Besides the application of this term to any time of distress, and its special reference to this dispensation, respecting which it is said, "In the World ye shall have tribulation," John 16:33 — the Lord spoke of a distinct period of distress, such as never had been, or should be again
Adam - For their sin God expelled them from Paradise and they were condemned to pain and hardship in the outer World
Abyssinian Church - They claim there is but one nature in Christ, reject all the aecumenical councils since Ephesus, have some minor heresies of their own, and practise probably the lowest type of Christianity in the World
Epistle to the Romans - In the Epistle he dwells on the justification of mankind through faith in Christ, the sinfulness of the World, the meaning and fruits of justification, why Israel failed to come unto the law of justice, what faith is, and why it is essential, and its fruits, viz:, humility, obedience, unity, and charity
Esthonia - ...
See also: ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
Adore - But in the Eastern World, the customs and methods observed in acts of reverence among men, from the humbler to the higher ranks, too nearly approach that homage, which is due only to the Lord
Serpent, Brazen - John 3:14 , declares, that "as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up," alluding to his own death, which, through faith, was to give life to the World
Babylon - Nabuchodonosor made it one of the wonders of the World
Romans, Epistle to the - In the Epistle he dwells on the justification of mankind through faith in Christ, the sinfulness of the World, the meaning and fruits of justification, why Israel failed to come unto the law of justice, what faith is, and why it is essential, and its fruits, viz:, humility, obedience, unity, and charity
Eclipse of the Sun - The darkness that overspread the World at the crucifixion cannot with reason be attributed to an eclipse, as the moon was at the full at the time of the passover
Religious Orders - In the American Church there are many religiousorders composed of men or women who have separated themselves fromthe World that they may devote themselves by associated effort moreunreservedly to the Church's work
Devotion to the Holy Family - Since the three holiest persons the World has ever beheld, Jesus Christ, the Incarnate Son of God, His immaculate mother, Mary, and His foster-father, Saint Joseph, dwelt together for many years in the humble home of Nazareth, it is natural that Catholics should venerate them not only as individuals but also as a family. Pope Leo XIII, in his Apostolic letter "Neminem fugit" (June 14, 1892) and in his brief "Quum nuper" (July 2, 1892), affiliated to this society all the similar organizations throughout the World and enriched it with many privileges and indulgences. In 1847 the organization was approved by Pope Pius IX, who elevated the confraternity of Liege to the dignity of an archconfraternity, with the right to affiliate to itself other confraternities throughout the World and to communicate to them its spiritual privileges
Family, Holy - Since the three holiest persons the World has ever beheld, Jesus Christ, the Incarnate Son of God, His immaculate mother, Mary, and His foster-father, Saint Joseph, dwelt together for many years in the humble home of Nazareth, it is natural that Catholics should venerate them not only as individuals but also as a family. Pope Leo XIII, in his Apostolic letter "Neminem fugit" (June 14, 1892) and in his brief "Quum nuper" (July 2, 1892), affiliated to this society all the similar organizations throughout the World and enriched it with many privileges and indulgences. In 1847 the organization was approved by Pope Pius IX, who elevated the confraternity of Liege to the dignity of an archconfraternity, with the right to affiliate to itself other confraternities throughout the World and to communicate to them its spiritual privileges
Holy Family, Devotion to the - Since the three holiest persons the World has ever beheld, Jesus Christ, the Incarnate Son of God, His immaculate mother, Mary, and His foster-father, Saint Joseph, dwelt together for many years in the humble home of Nazareth, it is natural that Catholics should venerate them not only as individuals but also as a family. Pope Leo XIII, in his Apostolic letter "Neminem fugit" (June 14, 1892) and in his brief "Quum nuper" (July 2, 1892), affiliated to this society all the similar organizations throughout the World and enriched it with many privileges and indulgences. In 1847 the organization was approved by Pope Pius IX, who elevated the confraternity of Liege to the dignity of an archconfraternity, with the right to affiliate to itself other confraternities throughout the World and to communicate to them its spiritual privileges
Philosopher, Philosophy - This latter is variously designated in scripture as the wisdom of this World, fleshly wisdom, wisdom of man, the wisdom that does not come from above. ...
The Colossian saints were warned against being spoiled by such philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the World; which stands in contrast to what is 'after Christ. ...
Again, another class resort to spirits, and let them teach them: they imagine the inhabitants of the unseen World must be able to tell them what is true, and these spirits even profess to interpret scripture for them
Power - He rejects the offer of World empire (Luke 4:6; Luke Luk_4:8), and warns those whom He sent forward to tell of His approach not to rejoice even in the exercise of His delegated power (Luke 10:20). His Kingdom was to be coextensive with the World and its nationalities (Matthew 8:11; Matthew 26:13; Matthew 28:19, John 10:16; John 17:20). The gift of His life, offered freely and apart from external constraint, was to be the bond of union among His disciples (Matthew 26:26-28, John 15:12-13), and was to be the power that would draw the World unto Him (John 3:14; John 12:32). The impression thus made upon His disciples became in turn the testimony which they gave to the World—‘The Word was made flesh and dwelt among us (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only-begotten of the Father) full of grace and truth’ (John 1:14). —Christ declared of His Kingdom that it was not of this World (John 18:36). Those Worldly kingdoms were of the sword, established by and for physical dominion. The new and wonderful element that made its citizenship not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man (John 1:13), consisted in this, that whereas in the kingdoms of the World there had been an ever-ascending scale of power, man living unto himself, and governments existing for the sake of the governing classes, so there was in this Kingdom a correspondingly descending scale of service in which all those features were precisely reversed. The constitution and aspirations of the Kingdom, as embodied in the Sermon on the Mount, not only surpass all similar requirements of government, but seem to invert all that the World had hitherto counted great and noble. It was in vain to go out to the conquest of the World unless this base of operations was safeguarded. ...
The second charge affected the World that was to be His possession, the nations that were to bring each its special riches and glory into His Kingdom (Matthew 28:19-20, cf. He recognized the right and claim of the World to wait until it received sufficient evidence that He had been sent to be its Ruler. The World that will say the Church is one will say that Christ is Lord (John 10:16; John 17:21-23)
Flood - A miraculous deluge of water God used to discipline His World made evil through human sin. This evangel with its penetrating analysis of the nature of God, the human possibility for righteousness or for alienation, and its relevance to salvation history is the proclamation by which Abram was to bring blessing to the entire World (Genesis 12:3 ). Accordingly, He vowed never to doom the World again despite the enormous, continuing evil of the human creatures, an evil inconsistent with all God made and intended. Informed, instructed, provided for, covenanted with to become the head of a new race and blessed to be productive and to increase on earth, Noah was made the mediator of a World-encompassing covenant where the image of God would guarantee equality in society. Here the Flood account highlights a person's potential: to walk with God, to be blameless and righteous in a wicked World, to be a mediator of divine grace possible for all people, and to know that the future was safe and sure by the oath God had sworn. Such was and is the revelation God committed to Abram to herald and to bring the blessing of the knowledge of God to the whole World
Inheritance - As the biblical history of Israel unfolds, the promised inheritance specifies a righteous remnant who will inherit the World as an everlasting possession (Psalm 2:8 ; Isaiah 54:3 ; Daniel 7:14 ). The reality of the inheritance of the land was deferred to the future and intertestamental literature emphasized the inheritance of eternal life and the World to come. This idea was broadened in the rabbinic literature where having an inheritance or share in the World to come was a primary aspiration of the Jews. A notable dichotomy existed between those who would inherit the future World (the redeemed) and those who would not (the condemned). The initial promise to Abraham of the land of Canaan ( Hebrews 11:8 ) is broadened to include "the World" (Romans 4:13 ). Inheriting the "world to come" is a guarantee for all those who belong to God's family
Hatred - The Christians of the Apostolic Age could not but love the World which ‘God so loved’ (John 3:18), and for whose sins Christ is the propitiation (1 John 2:2). Their ‘world’ hated them, and, in many instances, ended by murdering them; but persecution and bloodshed only constrained them to love the more, in accordance with the precepts of the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:44). The early Church extorted from that pagan World the beautiful tribute, ‘See how these Christians love one another!’ The Spirit of Christ moved His followers to ‘put away all bitterness and wrath … with all malice,’ to be ‘kind one to another’ (Ephesians 4:31 f. While they could recall the time when they were ‘hateful, hating one another’ (στυγητοί, μισοῦντες ἀλλήλους, Titus 3:3; Vulgate ‘odibiles, odientes invicem’), the spirit of the new life was φιλαδελφία (love of the brethren), to which was added a World-wide ἀγάπη (2 Peter 1:7). ...
To orthodox Judaism, as well as to cultured Hellenism and the hard pagan Roman World, it seemed natural to love only one’s friends. Into a World dominated by such ideas Christianity brought that enthusiasm of humanity which is the reflexion of Christ’s own redeeming love
Angel - Others suppose that he did this because of the proneness of the Gentile World, and even the Jews, to idolatry; but a better reason has been assigned by others, viz. that this first history was purposely and principally written for information concerning the visible World; the invisible, of which we know but in part, being reserved for a better life. Some think that the idea of God's not creating them before this World was made, is very contracted. To suppose, say they, that no creatures whatever, neither angels nor other Worlds, had been created previous to the creation of our World, is to suppose that a Being of infinite power, wisdom, and goodness, had remained totally inactive from all eternity, and had permitted the infinity of space to continue a perfect vacuum till within these 6000 years; that such an idea only tends to discredit revelation, instead of serving it. Matthew 13:39 , and live for ever in the World of glory, Luke 20:36 . ...
The authors who have written on this subject have been very numerous; we shall only refer to a few: Reynolds's Enquiry into the State and Economy of the Angelical World; Doddridge's Lect
Separation - —In discourses descriptive of the present condition and future prospects of the Kingdom of God, Christ taught that the Kingdom in its ideal state of purity would not be realized till the end of the World, when the object in view is to be attained by means of a judicial separation between real members and those who are members only in outward appearance or profession (Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:36-43; Matthew 13:47-50). But the evil element referred to in the parables is not that which has always existed in the World, and must be expected to continue, but that which has entered the Kingdom in the course of, and as the result of, its own operations, which tend to gather within its pale spurious adherents as well as genuine (Matthew 13:47). , that the evil element is in the World, the good element in the Kingdom, and the blending of the two merely contiguity or co-existence in space. It is hard to see why our Lord should have been at such pains to point out what must be perfectly obvious to everybody, that the World is evil, and why He should recommend a tolerant attitude toward the evil, instead of making it a reason for earnest evangelistic effort. It could by no possibility give rise to the painful reflexion and inquiry described in the parable (Matthew 13:27, which are in reality due to the circumstance that the sin which exists in the World ‘is always forcing its way anew into the circle in which the Kingdom of God is being realized. It is almost needless to remark that if the Son of Man at the end of the World is to ‘gather out of his kingdom all things that offend (πάντα τὰ σκάνδαλα), and them which do iniquity,’ they must have existed previously within it (Matthew 13:41). The wide and sweeping character of its operations exposed it to the risk of gathering into its bosom some who might do it serious discredit in the eyes of those who had its purity and welfare at heart, as well as of the World at large (Matthew 13:47). Besides, the exercise of a decisive judgment would in many cases require a delicacy of discrimination and an insight into human character possessed only by a Divine person, and it is accordingly reserved for the Son of Man, in His capacity as Judge, at the end of the World
Monk - (Greek: monachos) ...
Term originally applied to hermits or anchorites but from an early period, by popular rather than scientific designation, a cenobite, or member of a community of men living apart from the World, under the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, in accordance with the rule of a particular order
Diabolism - Witchcraft, real or alleged, has brought misfortune and cruelty into the World; many phenomena of spiritism, or spiritualism, hear unmistakable characteristics of maleficent spiritual agencies
Didache - The second part begins with an instruction on Baptism; the third speaks of teachers or doctors in general, and the last chapter exhorts to watching and tells the signs of the end of the World
Doctrine of the Twelve Apostles - The second part begins with an instruction on Baptism; the third speaks of teachers or doctors in general, and the last chapter exhorts to watching and tells the signs of the end of the World
Day of Christ - According to 2 Peter 3:10 that day will be unexpected and will be accompanied by signs in the World of nature
Judas Thaddeus, Saint - After the Lord's Supper, Judas asked Christ why He would not manifest Himself to the World (John 14)
Jude, Saint - After the Lord's Supper, Judas asked Christ why He would not manifest Himself to the World (John 14)
Maximus of Constantinople, Saint - Of noble parentage, he became secretary to Emperor Heraclius, but left the World, 630, to enter the monastery at Chrysopolis, where he was later elected abbot
Chile - ...
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Antofagasta
Concepci´n
La Serena
Puerto Montt
Santiago de Chile
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Arica
Chillán
Copiapó
Iquique
Linares
Los Angeles
Melipilla
Osorno
Punta Arenas
Rancagua
San Bernardo
San Carlos de Ancud
San Felipe
Talca
Temuco
Valdivia
Valparaíso
Villarrica
Other ecclesiastical divisions include: ...
Aysén Vicariate Apostolic
Calama Territorial Prelature
Chile Military Ordinariate
Illapel Territorial Prelature
Magallanes Prefecture Apostolic
See also: ...
World Fact Book
patron saints index: Chile
patron saints index: Chilean army
patron saints index: Chilean navy
Dante Alighieri - In 1309, in anticipation of the visit to Italy of Emperor Henry VII, he wrote his famous treatise on the monarchy "De Monarchia" and in 1317, having settled at Ravenna, completed hig masterpiece, the "Divina Commedia," an allegory of human life in the form of a vision of the World beyond the grave, Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, written with the avowed object of converting a corrupt society
Shem - , Genesis 10:21-31 ) Shem, the ‘son’ of Noah, is the eponymous ancestor of several peoples, occupying, roughly speaking, the central portions of the known World
Millennium - The triumph of the gospel, it is held, must be looked for by the wider and more efficient operation of the very forces that are now at work in extending the gospel; and that Christ will only come again at the close of this dispensation to judge the World at the "last day
Steel - It has been inferred from a passage in (Jeremiah 15:12 ) that the "iron from the north" there spoken of denoted a superior kind of metal, hardened in an unusual manner, like the steel obtained from the Chalybes of the Pontus, the iron smiths of the ancient World
Love - "Simon, LOVEST (phileis ) thou Me?" Love to one another is the proof to the World of discipleship (John 13:35)
East - In Luke 1:78 it is used metaphorically of Christ as "the Dayspring," the One through whom light came into the World, shining immediately into Israel, to dispel the darkness which was upon all nations
East, Turning to the - When converts toChristianity were baptized, which was usually in the early morning,they first turning to the west where the night was fast receding,renounced the World and the powers of darkness, then turning tothe east where the sun was rising as the source of all light, theyconfessed their belief in Christ who, in Holy Scripture is Himselfcalled the EAST, "the Dayspring from on high
Christian: Professor Cannot be Neutral - ' So remember, you who profess to be followers of the Lord Jesus, that to yon indifference is impossible; you must bless the church and the World by your holiness, or you will curse them both by your hypocrisy and inconsistency
Tarshish - Tarshish was a wealthy trading nation of the ancient World (Psalms 72:10; Ezekiel 27:25) and built large ships to carry goods far and wide to many countries (Jonah 1:3; Jonah 4:2)
Candle - In beautiful contrast, as the woman in the parable "lit the candle, swept the house, and sought diligently until she found" the lost piece of silver, so God (Luke 15:8) searches out His elect so that not one is lost, and takes each out of the darkness of this World, and restores the divine image, with a view to their salvation
Diana - It was built outside the city walls, and was one of the seven wonders of the ancient World
Beelzebul - Zebul means "dwelling," lord of this lower World, "prince of the power of the air" (Ephesians 2:2), and taking up his "dwelling" in human bodies (Matthew 12:45)
Worm, - There is the same allusion in (Isaiah 66:24 ) which words are applied by our Lord, (Mark 9:44,46,48 ) metaphorically to the torments of the guilty in the World of departed spirits
Zebulun - The glory of Zebulun was that from its territory came the Messiah, who brought God’s light into a dark World (Isaiah 9:1; Matthew 4:12-16; see NAZARETH)
Slander - The Bible shows that slander is a mark of the unregenerate World (James 4:11-12 ; 1 Peter 2:12 ; 1 Peter 3:16 )
Pearl - ...
Matthew 13:45 (b) This gem is a type of the church which is hidden in the World, and sought out by our Lord JESUS CHRIST who paid the great price at Calvary to purchase us with His own Blood
Hosea - Before the coming of the Messiah there was probably no more Christ-like teacher than the prophet of Mount Ephraim, who provided our Lord with His favourite quotation, ‘I will have mercy [1] and not sacrifice’; and it is evident that his prevision of a new covenant, linking Divine and human love in everlasting bonds, was scarcely less precious to the Apostle of the Gentiles than to the Saviour of the World
Joshua - Platonic and Philonic-teaching as to the distinction between visible things and their heavenly ideas, says that the rest which Joshua gave the Israelites, when he led them into the promised land, was after all not the Rest of God, but only the material symbol suggesting the spiritual reality-the Sabbath-rest which remains in the unseen World for the people of God (Hebrews 4:8-9)
Rat - These were introduced into America from the Old World
Depart - ) To quit this World; to die
Jehoshaphat (2) - , which reads, "The Lord judgeth"), but to either (a) the scene of great victories, as those of the Maccabees; or (b) the general judgment at the end of the World; or (c) the truth that God's persecuted people he will defend and vindicate
Alighieri, Dante - In 1309, in anticipation of the visit to Italy of Emperor Henry VII, he wrote his famous treatise on the monarchy "De Monarchia" and in 1317, having settled at Ravenna, completed hig masterpiece, the "Divina Commedia," an allegory of human life in the form of a vision of the World beyond the grave, Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, written with the avowed object of converting a corrupt society
Dung - ...
Philippians 3:8 (a) Paul uses this figure to show his utter contempt for the things in the World - things which he formerly had thought were profitable and helpful to him
Shame - So that our first parents in the garden, before sin entered into the World, knew nothing of shame
Contend - If these Worldly religionists are made weary by the feeble Christian influences around them here, what will they do when they are really in the presence of the Lord?...
"Footmen" represent Christians in this World who have a feeble, halting walk and yet live very much better lives than the ungodly
Crooked - ...
Isaiah 40:4 (b) Our Lord is promising that things in this World, or in the life of His child which may be unrighteous, ungodly, harmful and hindering may be straightened out by His power and be made to fit into GOD's plan
Hem of the Garment - All the Israelites were to wear on the border of their garment a riband of blue (the colour of heaven) that they might look upon it and remember the commandments and be holy unto God: typical of the walk of the Christian as being heavenly in its character, not according to this World, but according to the good and perfect and acceptable will of God
Cedar - ...
Zechariah 11:2 (b) This is a type of the great nation of Israel which had grown to be a World power and then because of disobedience to GOD was cut down and destroyed as a nation
Foul - Revelation 18:2 (a) In this way GOD reveals His utter hatred for the wicked practices and the evil beliefs which prevail in those great World systems of religion which are described as Babylon
Badgers' Skins - Typically the badgers' skins refer to the holy, separate walk of the Lord Jesus, in entire protection from all the contaminations of the World: He was always morally 'separate from sinners
Frogs - The three unclean spirits like frogs (Revelation 16:13) symbolize...
(1) "proud infidelity", opposing Christ and God, "out of the dragon's mouth";...
(2) "the spirit of the World", whether lawless socialistic democracy or despotism, setting man above God, "out of the beast's mouth";...
(3) "lying spiritualism", superseding the harlot and proceeding "out of the false prophet's mouth
Star of the Wise Men - The star was probably a meteoric body employed by the God of nature to be His instrument in the World of revelation, to guide the wise men to the divine Messiah
Austria - ...
Archdioceses: ...
Salzburg
Vienna
Dioceses: ...
Eisenstadt
Feldkirch
Graz-Seckau
Gurk
Innsbruck
Linz
Sankt Pölten
Other ecclesiastical divisions: ...
Faithful of Eastern Rite (Byzantine) (Ordinariate)
Military Ordinariate
Wettingen-Mehrerau (Territorial Abbey)
See also: ...
World Fact Book
patron saints index
Pelagianism - Every infant born into the World is in the same condition as Adam before the fall and becomes a sinner because he sins
Thorns, Thistles - There are about a dozen different words translated 'thorns,' and 'thistles,' showing how plentiful these results of the curse are in this sin-stained World
Science - ) Especially, such knowledge when it relates to the physical World and its phenomena, the nature, constitution, and forces of matter, the qualities and functions of living tissues, etc
Universal - ) Constituting or considered as a whole; total; entire; whole; as, the universal World
Abbey, Solesmes - The community of Solesmes has achieved World-wide reputation for erudition; the restoration of the true Gregorian chant of the Church is perhaps its greatest work
Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs, Congregation - It was reestablished by him after his exile, June 18, 1814, as the Extraordinary Congregation for the Ecclesiastical Affairs of the Catholic World
Ernest Psichari - In 1914 he resolved to join the Dominicans, but was killed in the opening days of World War I
Jesus Christ - Hence the Hebrews call him, Jehoshuah, or Joshua, or Joshuah, he who shall save; and as Christ means, anointed of JEHOVAH, the Sent, the Sealed of the Father; full of grace and truth; both names together carry this blessed meaning with them, Jesus Christ the Saviour of the World by the anointing of JEHOVAH to all the purposes, of salvation
Air - When the air is tainted with malaria it permeates everywhere and poisons everything; so Satan has such power that his poisonous spirit morally contaminates everything in the World, of which he is the god
Monitor - ) Any large Old World lizard of the genus Varanus; esp
Jehoahaz - He was twenty-three years old when he began to reign, and he reigned about three months only in Jerusalem, in the year of the World 3395
Joel - The principal predictions contained in this book are the Chaldean invasion, under the figurative representation of locusts; the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus; the blessings of the Gospel dispensation; the conversion and restoration of the Jews to their own land; the overthrow of the enemies of God; and the glorious state of the Christian church in the end of the World
Rainbow - The 'bow set in the clouds' was given by God to Noah as a token that He would not again destroy the World by a flood
Grove - In the religions of the ancient heathen World groves play a prominent part
Week - It is clear that if not in Paul's time, yet very Soon after, the Roman World had adopted the hebdomadal division
Transfiguration - Besides its great purpose, the attestation of Christ's Messiahship and divinity, this scene demonstrated the continued existence of departed spirits in an unseen World, furnished in the Savior's person an emblem of humanity glorified, and aided in preparing both him and his disciples for their future trials
Bahia - Thome de Sousa, first governor of Brazil, arrived at Bahia in 1549 with six Jesuits, the first to come to the New World, and two days later the first Mass was said there
Solesmes Abbey - The community of Solesmes has achieved World-wide reputation for erudition; the restoration of the true Gregorian chant of the Church is perhaps its greatest work
Thaddeus, Judas, Saint - After the Lord's Supper, Judas asked Christ why He would not manifest Himself to the World (John 14)
Tribute - Every Jew throughout the World was required to pay an annual tribute or capitation-tax of half a shekel, about twenty-five cents, in acknowledgment of God's sovereignty and for the maintenance of the temple service, Exodus 30:12-15
Theatre - A place of action or exhibition as the theater of the World
Sabellianism - The Sabellians first taught that the Father became Man in Christ and gave His life for the redemption of the World
Sabellians - The Sabellians first taught that the Father became Man in Christ and gave His life for the redemption of the World
Sabellius - The Sabellians first taught that the Father became Man in Christ and gave His life for the redemption of the World
Temporal - Pertaining to this life or this World or the body only secular as temporal concerns temporal affairs
Sabellianism - The Sabellians first taught that the Father became Man in Christ and gave His life for the redemption of the World
Gloria Patri - "Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost,As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, World withoutend
Nicolas - convert to Judaism from the heathen World, had been given office in the Church, up to this point
Retreat - It is a cheering sign of spiritual revival which many willwelcome, to see Bishop and Clergy thus meeting and withdrawing fora season from the World, for prayer, for intercommunion andinstruction
Providence - The notion of a providence is founded upon this truth, that the Creator has not so fixed and ascertained the laws of nature, nor so connected the chain of second causes, as to leave the World to itself, but that he still preserves the reins in his own hands, and occasionally intervenes, alters, restrains, enforces, suspends, &c, those laws by a particular providence. Simplicius argues thus for a providence: If God does not look to the affairs of the World, it is either because he cannot or will not; but the first is absurd, since, to govern cannot be difficult where to create was easy; and the latter is both absurd and blasphemous. After this he shows that the Deity exercises a particular providence over the World, taking care of small no less than great things. In proving this he observes "that a superior nature of such excellence as the divine, which hears, sees, and knows all things, cannot, in any instance, be subject to negligence or sloth; that the meanest and the greatest part of the World are all equally his work or possession; that great things cannot be rightly taken care of without taking care of small; and that, in all cases, the more able and perfect any artist is, (as a physician, an architect, or the ruler of the state,) the more his skill and care appear in little as well as great things. "...
The term providence, in its primary signification, simply denotes foresight; and if we allow the existence of a supreme Being who formed the universe at first, we must necessarily allow that he has a perfect foresight of every event which at any time takes place in the natural or moral World. The providence of God is implied in his very existence as an intelligent Creator; and it imports not only an abstract foresight of all possible events, but such a predisposition of causes and effects, such an adjustment of means and ends, as seems to us to exclude that contingency of human actions with which, as expectants of positive rewards and punishments in another World, we firmly believe it to be altogether consistent. " If, then, the Deity pervades and actuates the material World, and his unremitting energy is the cause to which every effect in it must be traced; the spiritual World, which is of greater consequence, cannot be disregarded by him. Is there not one atom of matter on which he does not act; and is there one living being about which he has no concern? Does not a stone fall without him; and does, then, a man suffer without him? The inanimate World is of no consequence, abstracted from its subserviency to the animate and reasonable World; the former, therefore, must be preserved and governed entirely with a view to the latter. The Deity cannot be an indifferent spectator of the series of events in that World to which he has given being. We cannot conceive of any reasons that can influence the Deity to exercise any providence over the World, which are not likewise reasons for extending it to all that happens in the World. If we are persuaded that God governs the World, that he has the superintendence and direction of all events, and that we are the objects of his providential care; whatever may be our distress or our danger, we can never want consolation, we may always have a fund of hope, always a prospect of relief
John, Theology of - The prologue introduces the incarnation of the preexistent Word and poetically sets the stage for all that is to follow: God discloses his Son in the World of darkness; he is popularly rejected; a select group of followers discover life; and even though the darkness tries, it cannot defeat this Son. In a World of falsehood and error, Jesus cuts a path, a way, to God that is true and life-giving (14:6). The Word eternally existed with God in eternity and was God's agent in creating this World. Seven signs not merely display the miraculous power of Jesus, but reveal his role as the Son of God and savior of the World. These are gifts possessed exclusively by those who belong to Jesus' flock (10:1-10) and which remain mysterious to those in the World, whose domain is darkness. The World is dead (5:24), but Jesus offers life to those who believe (1:4; 3:15-16,36; 4:14; 5:24; 6:35,47; 8:12; 10:10). In 8:12 light and life are juxtaposed: "I am the light of the World. " As the World is in death (and needs life), so, too, it exists in darkness and needs light (1:5; 11:10; 12:35-36,46; 1 John 2:8,11 ). John the Baptist sounds this note when Jesus is introduced (1:29): "Look, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the World. " Thus in 6:51b Jesus says, "This bread is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the World. This describes the Spirit as an advocate, a defender who will stand with the disciples, strengthening them before the World (15:18-27; 16:8-10). Moreover, they belong to a community that has stepped out of the World and its darkness and built a refuge for others who seek community. And, to no one's surprise, it experiences conflict with the World. ...
John anticipates a life of spiritual and moral dedication that is completely devoted to God (10:36) and conscious of its separation from the World (1 John 2:15-17 ). Believers are not removed from the World; they live in it (17:15-19) and therefore are subject to temptation and evil. ...
Conflict in the World . The Worldview of the Johannine literature is consistently dualistic. Believers are reminded that they no longer belong to the World (15:19) because the World is openly hostile to Jesus and his followers. The experience of Jesus becomes the paradigm for discipleship: "If the World hates you, keep in mind that it hated me first" (15:18). The hatred of the World is everywhere (1 John 3:13 ) because it is under the power of the evil one (1 John 5:19 ). The World brings theological falsehood through its religious corruption and false teachers (1 John 4:3-5 ; 2 John 1:7 ). But the Christian who is diligent and faithful will conquer the World (1 John 5:4 )
Magisterium - The Church exercises this teaching power infallibly in matters of faith and morals, in virtue of the promise of Divine assistance given her by Christ, "And behold I am with you all days even to the consummation of the World" (Matthew 28). When all the bishops in the World agree in their teaching on a particular doctrine of faith or morals, which is not solemnly defined, this constitutes an infallible teaching of the Ecclesia Docens, because the Church as a whole cannot fall into error in these matters
Ararat - And certainly not among the mountains of Ararat or of Armenia generally, nor those of any part of the World where I have been, have I ever seen one whose majesty could plead half so powerfully its claims to the honor of having once been the stepping-stone between the old World and the new
Christ: the Soul's Only Defence - Thy riches are no security, for Satan can make these a snare to thee, and if thou shouldst mount so high, the bird of prey can follow thee and rend thee in pieces! The busy World with all its cares cannot shelter thee, for here it is that the great enemy is most at home; he is the prince of this World, and seizes men who find their joys therein as easily as a kite lays hold upon a sparrow
Glass - ...
Glass was known in the ancient World from about 2600 B. During this period, Alexandria, Egypt, became World famous as a center for the production of glassware
Horn - The four horns in Zechariah 1:18 represent the four ruling powers of the World, to be superseded finally by Messiah's kingdom: Babylon, Medo-Persia, Greece, and Rome. (On "the little horn" of the third and of the fourth World powers (Daniel 7:8; Daniel 8:9)
Preadamite - But this being expressly contrary to the first words of Genesis, Pereyra had recourse to the fabulous antiquities of the Egyptians and Chaldeans, and to some idle rabbins, who imagined there had been another World before that described by Moses. " It is also clear from Genesis 3:20 , where it is said, that "Adam called his wife's name Eve, because she was the mother of all living, " that is, she was the source and root of all men and women in the World; which plainly intimates that there was no other woman that was such a mother
Artemis - Often standing beside her is a fawn or stag on each side representing her relation to the animal World. Artemis was the chief deity of Ephesus, and her temple was one of the seven wonders of the ancient World
Conclude - The World will conclude I had a guilty conscience. The World will conclude that I ahd a guilty conscience--that is here the object, referring to the subsequent clause of the sentence
Gulf - Some commentators have discovered in Jesus’ employment of this term (‘chasm’), as well as in His assertion of the possibility of conversation, an approval in general terms of a current Rabbinical belief that the souls of the righteous and of the wicked exist after death in different compartments of the same under World (see J. There is, moreover, an evident implication in the context that the gulf is not confined to the World beyond the grave
Apocalypse - He pictures various phases of the Church's conflict with the World by means of different symbolical visions. ...
Chapters 12:1 to 19:10, describe the struggle between the Church and the World, ending in the destruction of Babylon
Allegory - The Old Testament writers were very partial to this way of teaching, in conveying divine truths through the medium of human illustrations; and sometimes by other objects from the World of nature and art. Well might it be said, as it is said, when Jesus, who had been secretly set up from everlasting the glorious Head of his body the church, was openly to be brought into the World,"Let all the angels of God worship him!" (Hebrews 1:6) It will be a blessed view of this sweet allegory, now so graciously explained to us as it is, by the Holy Ghost himself, if both he that writes and he that reads, when summing up the wonderful account, can say with the apostle, "We are not children of the bond-woman, but of the free
Religion And Science - Religion and science lie in different provinces and each has its own legitimate field; the former deals mostly with the World of unseen realities which science cannot know, the latter mostly with the World of sense and matter about which religion has little to say
Science, Religion And - Religion and science lie in different provinces and each has its own legitimate field; the former deals mostly with the World of unseen realities which science cannot know, the latter mostly with the World of sense and matter about which religion has little to say
Noah - His efforts to reform the degenerate World, continued as some suppose for one hundred and twenty years, produced little effect, Matthew 24:37 ; the flood did not "find faith upon the earth. ...
Numerous traces of traditions respecting Noah have been found all over the World
Rest - But sin entered into the World by man, with all its baneful consequences; and unless God were to acquiesce in a World of sin and moral woe He must needs work in grace
Tongues, Confusion of - The belief that the World, after the Flood, was re-populated by the progeny of a single family, speaking one language, is reconciled in the Bible with the existing diversity of tongues by a story which relates how the descendants of Noah, in the course of their wanderings, settled in the plain of Shinar, or Babylonia, and there built of brick a city, and a tower high enough to reach heaven, as a monument to preserve their fame, and as a centre of social cohesion and union. Among these was the prevalence in the World of different languages, which contributed so greatly to produce between the various peoples, who were thus unintelligible to one another, feelings of mutual suspicion and fear (cf. At the same time, all languages must have arisen from certain faculties and instincts common to human nature; and the presence, in languages belonging to distinct families, of onomatopoetic, or imitative, words serves to illustrate the essential similarity of human tendencies in the sphere of speech all the World over
Confidence - To put one's ultimate trust or confidence either in human ability and power or in false gods and the things of this World is to discover with the men of Shechem the ultimate weakness of the mundane World (Judges 9:26 ). ...
This developing sense of confidence in the Lord provided the basis for a sense of assurance to Israel for living in this World as a people of God
Noah - This patriarch is rightly regarded as the connecting link between the old and the new World. The judgment-threatened now fell on the guilty World, "the World that then was, being overflowed with water, perished" (2 Peter 3:6 )
Exaltation (2) - So it is a law of the Kingdom of God that life in this World must be sacrificed, if need be, that life eternal may be gained as a permanent possession. When the heavenly voice spoke, the Saviour was consoled and uplifted by the thought that He would cast out the prince of this World, and be lifted up (ὑψωθῶ) as a victorious conqueror. The outwardly shameful death of the cross would be His true exaltation as the World’s Saviour. ‘He rose again from the dead on the third day, He ascended up into heaven, He sitteth on the right hand of God the Father, He shall come to judge the World at the last day
Mirror - So this World of time and sense, as apprehended by the human mind, imperfectly mirrors the true and eternal World, leaving many things ‘enigmatic. 514) in his well-known simile of the cave compares our sense-impressions to shadow-shapes that come and go, giving but hints of the real World beyond; and the figure of the mirror is found in such Platonists as the writer of Wisdom (Wisdom of Solomon 7:26) and Philo (de Decal
Enmity - The friendship (φιλία, which implies ‘loving’ as well as ‘being loved’) of the World, which loves its own (John 15:19), is enmity with God (James 4:4, Vulgate inimica est dei). Just because he is not of the World, the World hates him (John 15:18 ff
Earth Earthen Earthy Earthly - Earth (γῆ) is used in a variety of meanings, which may be distinguished as follows: (1) the dust or matter of which the first man was made (1 Corinthians 15:47); (2) the fertile soil which yields grass and herbs and fruit (Hebrews 6:7, James 5:7, Revelation 9:4); (3) the solid ground upon which men stand or fall (Acts 9:4; Acts 9:8); (4) the land in contrast with the sea (2 Peter 3:5, Revelation 10:5); (3) the whole World as the abode of men (Acts 1:8, etc. Hebrews 8:1); (8) the earth in contrast with the underworld (Philippians 2:10, Revelation 5:3; Revelation 5:13); (9) the earth with a moral connotation, as the sphere of a merely Worldly life to which is opposed the heavenly life with Christ in God (Colossians 3:2; Colossians 3:5). In Philippians 2:10, while ‘things on earth’ are contrasted with ‘things in heaven’ the meaning of ἐπίγειος itself is that suggested by (5), the ‘things on earth’ being the inhabitants of the whole World; and there is a further contrast with the ‘things under the earth,’ the inhabitants of the under World (cf
Foot - ...
Matthew 5:13 (a) Here we find a type of the actions of the World against the professing Christian who claims that he belongs to the Lord, yet shows no proofs of it in his daily life. Neither the World nor the church has any confidence in that man, and refuses to receive his testimony. ...
Matthew 18:8 (b) In this way the Lord is telling us that if we want to walk in the ways of the World so that the feet take us astray to the picture show, the tavern, the dance, it is best to cut off that foot so that such desires cannot and will not keep us away from CHRIST
Covenant - For so the apostle was commissioned by the Holy Ghost, to inform the church concerning that eternal life which was given us, he saith, in Christ Jesus, "before the World began?" (Titus 1:2; 2 Timothy 1:9) So that this everlasting covenant becomes the bottom and foundation in JEHOVAH'S appointment, and security of all grace and mercy for the church here, and of all glory and happiness hereafter, through the alone person, work, blood-shedding, and obedience of the Lord Jesus Christ. It is on this account that his church is chosen in Christ before the foundation of the World. (Ephesians 1:4) And from this appointment, before all Worlds, result all the after mercies in time, by which the happy partakers of such unspeakable grace and mercy are regenerated, called, adopted, made willing in the day of God's power, and are justified, sanctified, and, at length, fully glorified, to the praise of JEHOVAH'S grace, who hath made them accepted in the Beloved. But the whole purport, plan, design and grace, originating as it did in the purposes of JEHOVAH from all eternity, had all the properties in it of an everlasting covenant; and Christ always, and from all eternity, "was considered the Lamb slain from the foundation of the World
Philippians, Epistle to the - The testimony is not viewed as opposed by the Jewish leaders, as in the beginning of the Acts, nor in conflict with Judaising influences, as at Antioch; but as in contact with the World power (Rome), which was holding Paul, the vessel of it, in bondage. This was in order that, in the complete abnegation of self, as to the state of their minds, by the death of Christ, they might by God's power be manifest as a divine generation (children of God), occupying collectively the place which Christ had occupied in the World — lights in the World, holding forth the word of life
Only Begotten - " In John 3:16 the statement, "God so loved the World that He gave His only begotten son," must not be taken to mean that Christ became the only begotten son by incarnation. In 1 John 4:9 the statement "God hath sent His only begotten son into the World" does not mean that God sent out into the World one who at His birth in Bethlehem had become His Son
Prince - There is difference of opinion as to who are ‘the princes of this World’ (RV_ ‘rulers of this World,’ RVm_ ‘age’) here referred to. But others find in the passage an allusion to the evil spirits to which there was a tendency in later Judaism to assign part at least of the government of the World
Phenicia - ...
Phoenicia lay in the very centre of the old World, and was the natural entrepot for commerce with foreign nations. " "The trade routes from all Asia converged on the Phoenician coast; the centres of commerce on the Euphrates and Tigris forwarding their goods by way of Tyre to the Nile, to Arabia, and to the west; and, on the other hand, the productions of the vast regions bordering the Mediterranean passing through the Canaanite capital to the eastern World. The far-reaching commercial activity of the Phoenicians, especially with Tarshish and the western World, enriched them with vast wealth, which introduced boundless luxury and developed among them a great activity in all manner of arts and manufactures. ) ...
The Phoenicians were the most enterprising merchants of the old World, establishing colonies at various places, of which Carthage was the chief
Baptism - Immediately upon trusting CHRIST the believer is reckoned as having been baptized in or buried with the Lord JESUS in contrast with his former position of being buried in the World. The believer is said to be "in Christ," whereas, before, he was "in the World. ...
Colossians 2:12 (b) Here again baptism is a symbol of burial in order that the World may know that the Christian is dead and buried so far as the World is concerned
Day-Star - Christ was the Sun, the Light of the World. 234) had called Christ not a Star but the Sun and the Light of the World, in Revelation Christ calls Himself the Morning-Star as ‘the herald and introducer of a new era,’ and the gift of the Morning-Star means ‘the dawn of a brighter day and a new career. In the squalid place of the World (Revised Version margin ἐν αὐχμηρῷ τόπῳ-the adj. Such hopes 2 Peter holds before Christians in the squalidness of a World where God is not known
Glory - The presence of God once dwelt in the World in the glory that filled the tabernacle or temple, but now that glory dwelt in the World in the form of a human being (John 1:14; Romans 8:17-18). This was partly because Christ’s glory during his earthly life was not a visible majestic splendour, such as he had as God before the World began. In being born into this World he laid that glory aside; though the event known as the transfiguration was a foretaste of a greater glory that would yet be his (Matthew 17:1-6; John 17:5; see TRANSFIGURATION)
Paradise (2) - The strangely mingled life man lives, half in, half out of the spiritual World, will not suffer a system which ignores so large a portion of his consciousness. This man never knew much of any World beyond his own World of violence and rapine. Hutton, The Soul in the Unseen World, 155 ff
Colossians, Letter to the - People had to worship them and win their favour if they wanted protection against the evil forces at work in the World (Colossians 2:8; Colossians 2:18). Paul asserted that Christ is God, and he is over and above every being in the spirit World and the material World (Colossians 1:15-19; Colossians 2:9). Through him, God has entered the World of human experience and is as inseparably united with his redeemed people as the head is with the body (Colossians 1:18; Colossians 2:19)
Body - Jesus' body becomes the locus for God's redemptive activity in the World. Indeed his body is both temple and sacrifice in that it manifests the glory of God and atones for the sins of the World (Mark 14:22 ; Luke 22:19 ; John 1:14 ; 2:21 ; Romans 3:24-25 ; Hebrews 9:14 ; 1 Peter 2:19,24 ). The primary allegiance of the body is not to the things of this World or to the sinful desires of the flesh (Romans 6:12-23 ). This special presence of God constitutes a community of faith whose identity cannot be confined to this World. Vogel, Body Theology: God's Presence in Man's World
Evil - Matter, he conceives, resists the will of the supreme Artificer, so that he cannot possibly execute his designs; and this is the cause of the mixture of good and evil, which is found in the material World. " What that property of matter is which opposes the wise and benevolent intentions of the first Intelligence, Plato has not clearly explained; but he speaks of it as ξυμφυτος επιθυμια , an intimate propensity to disorder, and says, that before nature was adorned with its present beautiful forms, it was inclined to confusion and deformity, and that from this habitude arises all the evil which happens in the World. Some of the Stoics adopted the notion of the Platonists concerning the origin of evil and ascribed it to the defective nature of matter, which it is not in the power of the great Artificer to change; asserting, that imperfections appear in the World, not through any defect of skill in its author, but because matter will not admit of the accomplishment of his designs. Thus, when Chrysippus was asked whether diseases were to be ascribed to Divine providence, he replied that it was not the intention of nature that these things should happen; nor were they conformable to the will of the Author of nature and Parent of all good things; but that, in framing the World, some inconveniences had adhered by necessary consequence, to his wise and useful plan. To others the question concerning the origin of evil appeared so intricate and difficult, that, finding themselves unequal to the solution of it, they denied either that there is any God at all, or, at least, any author or governor of the World. The Epicureans belonged to this class; nor does Lucretius allege any other reason for denying the system of the World to be the production of a Deity beside its being so very faulty. And thus all sorts of evils have entered into the World, without any diminution to the infinite goodness of its Creator and Governor
Claim - ...
The narrative of the Gospels describes how Christ moved amid the social and religious relationships of the World into which He came. His kingdom is declared to be entirely distinct from that of the World, and it is only when challenged on a question of right conduct that He lays down the principle that whatever Caesar has an undisputed claim upon ought to be regarded as his, and whatever belongs to God should be rendered to Him only. With regard to all such relationships and connected claims Christ uses the vocabulary and valuation current in the World. Afterwards, to one who understood it all, it was evident that attention to their own claims had blinded the religious leaders of Israel to the presence of the Lord of Glory (1 Corinthians 2:8), just as the worship of nature, degraded and degrading, had darkened and alienated from God the heart of the Gentile World (Romans 1:21). ...
It is thus evident from the Gospel narratives that the Hebrew-Roman World, into which Christ came as the Son of Man, had reached a high stage of development with regard to social authority and obedience. ...
It was largely due to this prevalence of legal relationship that the first presentation of the gospel to the World took the familiar form of forensic process and judicial pronouncement. ...
There were, however, two great relationships in the Hebrew-Roman World that were strangely marked by aloofness and disruption, namely, spiritual fellowship between God and man, and the racial status of Jew and Greek. In the Roman World, the most sincere and eloquent teacher of the age (Lucretius) had shown that there was no Divine care for man as had been once supposed, for in his vision of the opened heavens he had seen the gods in a happy seclusion of their own, undisturbed by the sound of human pain and sorrow (de Rer. It must have been indescribably wonderful in such an age to learn that ‘God was in Christ reconciling the World unto himself’ (2 Corinthians 5:19)
Creation - One of the most convincing proofs of the composite authorship of the Pentateuch has always been found in the existence side by side of two independent and mutually irreconcilable accounts of the creation of the World. ]'>[1] starts with a description ( Genesis 2:2 ) of the primeval chaos a dark formless watery abyss, out of which the World of light and order was to be evolved. The World whose origin is here described is a solid expanse of earth, surrounded by and resting on a World-ocean, and surmounted by a rigid vault called the firmament , above which the waters of a heavenly ocean are spread. Such a World is unknown to science; and the manner in which such a World was conceived to have come into being cannot truly represent the process by which the very different World of science and fact has been evolved. From these Assyriologists have deciphered a highly coloured mythological epic, describing the origin of the World in the form of a conflict between Marduk, god of light and supreme deity of the pantheon of Babylon, and the power of Chaos personified as a female monster named Ti’âmat (Heb. The material is derived from some form of the Babylonian cosmogony, and shares the imperfection and error incident to all pre-scientific speculation regarding the past history of the World. In opposition to the heathen theogonies, the World is affirmed to have been created, i. The spirituality of the First Cause of all things, and His absolute sovereignty over the material He employs, are further emphasized in the idea of the word of God as the agency through which the various orders of existence were produced; and the repeated assertion that the World in all its parts was ‘good,’ and as a whole ‘very good,’ suggests that it perfectly reflected the Divine thought which called it into being
Gentiles - The history of the Apostolic Age is mainly the history of how Christ was brought to the Gentile World, and how the Jewish nation ‘hardened its heart more and more against the appeal of Christianity’ (Harnack, op. In the OT, it disclosed certain fundamental principles which, when we study them in the light of Christianity, we perceive to have been also promises of a purpose of mercy for the whole World. ...
Very little is taught by the pre-Exilic prophets as to the World being Israel’s mission-field, but much is said about God’s chastising the nations. When we read those words, and ‘the Servant of the Lord Songs,’ with their bright outlook on the Gentile World, the expectation is raised that the missionary calling of Israel is about to be fulfilled. -Was there present to the mind of Christ, while accomplishing the work of Him that sent Him, a purpose of salvation that included the Gentiles? Did He look beyond ‘the lost sheep of the house of Israel’ to other sheep far off from the mountains of Canaan, who had also to be sought and found? When Satan showed Him the kingdoms of the World, did He turn away from the sight of the World with the repugnance of a Jew of His time, or did the sight move Him to compassion, and enkindle a great hope in His heart? It is not easy to see how the Christian Church can cease believing that Christ had a purpose of mercy for the World, and the expectation of subduing it unto Himself, unless she is to revise her whole doctrine of the Person of her Lord. ‘The day and the hour’ may be unknown to Christ as the Son, but the Father’s purpose of love for the World cannot be unknown; if He be the Son, He must have made that purpose His own. be admitted, His using the title also pointed to His coming Lordship over the World. 64), it follows that the sayings, ‘The gospel must first be preached unto all the nations’ and ‘Wheresoever the gospel shall be preached throughout the whole World’ (Acts 13:10; Acts 14:9), were put on record in little more than twenty years after they were spoken. This sentence occurs in one of the last parables of judgment (Matthew 21:43), but other sayings reported before lead up to it, as: ‘Many shall come from the east and west’; ‘The field is the World’; ‘The last shall be first, and the first last’ (Matthew 8:11; Matthew 13:38; Matthew 20:16). This Gospel is the crowning proof that there was present to the mind of our Lord from the beginning a purpose of salvation which comprehended the Gentile World. For here Jesus calls Himself ‘the light of the World,’ speaks of ‘giving his flesh for the life of the World,’ and of ‘sending his disciples into the World in like manner as the Father sent him into the World’; to the woman at the well He speaks of the hour when, not the coming to God at the ancient sanctuaries, but the coming to the Father ‘in spirit and truth,’ will be the mark of the sincere worshipper; He resides two days with the Samaritans; He proclaims to the leaders of the Jewish Church that He has ‘other sheep, not of this fold,’ whom
Light - ’s version of the Sermon on the Mount it occurs in a context laying stress upon the supreme need of the heavenly mind in religion; and as the main rival to God in man’s affections is the World, in the shape of material wealth, the pursuit of the single mind is naturally correlated with the avoidance of covetousness. As the functions of the physical life depend largely upon the soundness of the organs of vision, by means of which men move safely and freely in the outside World, so the mental and moral health of man is bound up with the condition of his inner life. When the latter is darkened by the intrusion of a divided affection, especially in the form of some appetite such as covetousness or Worldliness, then ‘how great is the darkness’! For religion, as Christ taught it, is not admitting God into life. And nothing can be more ominous than when the soul, which is man’s delicate faculty for seeing and choosing God, is diverted to double-mindedness or to an attempt to reconcile the competing interests of God and of the World. The disciples are cautioned against the tendency, whether due to modesty or to cowardice, to refrain from letting their faith tell upon the World. In Luke 11:33 it is impossible to trace any very obvious connexion between this and what precedes, any more than between it and what follows, unless the idea of the editor is that Solomon’s wisdom and Jonah’s preaching were frank and open to the World (hence Luke 11:33), while no sign (Luke 11:29) is needed if the inner heart be pure and true (Luke 11:34-38). Jesus is warning His disciples that while their relation to the outside World is often full of annoyance and suffering, yet this bitter experience (Matthew 5:10 f. ‘You are the light of the World,’ He urges. What Jesus inculcates is an attitude of consistent goodness, void of monasticism and ostentation alike, as corresponding to the nature of His Kingdom, whose property and destiny it is to become manifest to the World (cf. ‘Heaven means both the World of light above us and the World of hope within us, and the earliest name of the Divine beings is simply “the bright ones. But if they were simply metaphors, they would show how closely the World without is adapted to express and render definite the yearnings and the fears of the World within’ (J. It is not Christians but Christ, the incarnate Logos, who is the Light of the World (John 1:4; John 8:12; John 9:5; John 12:46). This antithesis means more, however, than a metaphysical dualism running through the World. ‘The true light, which lightens every man, was coming into the World’; i. Later on, this is frankly stated by Jesus Himself at the feast of Tabernacles, when brilliant illuminations were held every night—a symbolism which may have suggested the cry, ‘I am the light of the World’ (John 8:12; cf
Simon Maccabaeus - Later writers have increased the blasphemy of this doctrine, and said that Simon declared himself to the Samaritans as the Father, to the Jews as the Son, and to the rest of the World as the Holy Ghost. He gave himself out as "the great power of God," that is, a person in whom divine power resided: and, after he had heard the Apostles, he seems to have so far enlarged his doctrine, as to have said, that the God whose minister he was, and who had always been worshipped in Samaria, had revealed himself to the Jews by his Son, and to the rest of the World by the Holy Ghost. To this he added, that the Holy Ghost, by which God was revealed to the Gentiles, resided in himself: and this I take to be the real origin of the story, that he was the God who revealed himself as the Father to the Samaritans, as the Son to the Jews, and as the Holy Ghost to the rest of the World. By another mental process, in which this first idea was a partner, he produced the angels, and they created the World. This then was the doctrine of Simon: the supreme God, by a mental process, produced different orders of angels, and they created the World. If I have argued rightly, I have freed the doctrine of Simon Magus from some of its impieties; but there is still much which is absurd, and much which is impious; for he believed that the World was created, not by the supreme God, but by inferior beings: he taught also, that Christ was one of those successive generations of aeons which were derived from God; not the aeon which created the World; but he was sent from God to rescue mankind from the tyranny of the demiurgus, or creative aeon. His other doctrines were, that the writers of the Old Testament were not inspired by the supreme God, the Fountain of good, but by those inferior beings who created the World, and who were the authors of evil. Hence we find him embracing the opinion, that the World was created by angels, who were themselves produced from God. The first intelligences of Plato were employed by God to create the World: Simon also taught that the angels, or aeons, created the World; but in one respect the Gnostics had totally changed the philosophy of Plato; for they taught that the angel, or angels, who created the World, acted contrary to the wishes of the Supreme God
Gnostics - Thus we find in it the Platonic doctrine of ideas, and the notion that every thing in this lower World has a celestial and immaterial archetype. Hence arose their fundamental tenet, that the creator of the World, or Demiurgus, was not the same with the supreme God, the Author of good, and the Father of Christ. Those who embraced the doctrine of two principles supposed the World to have been produced by the evil principle; and, in most systems, the creator, though not the father of Christ, was looked upon as the God of the Jews, and the author of the Mosaic law. Some, again, believed that angels were employed in creating the World; but all were agreed in maintaining that matter itself was not created, that it was eternal, and remained inactive, till...
Dispositam, quisquis fuit ille Deorum, Congeriem secuit, sectamque in membra redegit: OVID. These successive aeons or emanations appear to have been inferior each to the preceding; and their existence was indispensable to the Gnostic scheme, that they might account for the creation of the World without making God the author of evil. At length, one of the aeons passed the limits of the pleroma, and, meeting with matter, created the World, after the form and model of an ideal World which existed in the pleroma or in the mind of the supreme God. Added to which, we are to suppose that the Demiurgus formed the World without the knowledge of God; and that, having formed it, he rebelled against him. Christ was sent into the World to remedy the evil which the creative aeon or Demiurgus had caused. We have seen that the God who was the father or progenitor of Christ, was not considered to be the creator of the World
Spirituality - Christian spirituality is not a gnostic renunciation of the created World nor the Platonic flight of the soul from the body. The World is the object of God's love (John 3:16 ), and we are to glorify God in our bodies ( Romans 12:1 ; 1 Corinthians 6:19-20 ). Spirituality must be practiced in this World, which God made good (Mark 7:19 ) and which God is in the process of redeeming (Romans 8:18-25 ). As in the Old Testament, spirituality does not imply that one is to flee this World to find God, but that one must find God and grow in grace in this World, even discovering avenues (i. When a Christian mixes the Christian construal with other construals (such as a materialistic conception of the World), then there is a kind of double vision that leads to conflicts, hypocrisy, and the like (see Matthew 6:19-24 ). Initially, this begins by repenting (metanoia [1] turning our spiritual eyes away from our former conceptions of the World to see life from Christ's vantage point), followed by concentrating on, focusing on, conceptualizing, and even imaging Christ's character and God's presence and activity primarily through Scripture reading and prayer in the context of the fellowship of believers. Through this work of the indwelling presence of the Spirit of Christ and our response we come to have the "mind of Christ"Christ's way of seeing the World that becomes "second nature" in us (Philippians 2:1-5 )
Monotheism - Thus the Prologue of the Fourth Gospel, tracing all things back to God with whom the Word is one (John 1:1), asserts nothing less than the uniqueness as well as the eternity and sovereignty of Him from whom they proceed; and the true Light entering into the World enlighteneth not this or that nation only, but every man (John 1:9). The area and claims of the Divine Kingdom, the Kingdom of God, are explicitly enlarged beyond any mere national limits, and made to embrace the whole World (Luke 16:16, John 4:21 ff. It is indeed not bodily or material (Luke 17:21), but transcends the World (John 18:36). ‘The field’ in which the seed is sown is ‘the World’ (Matthew 13:38); and the final injunction to Christ’s followers is that they are to go into all the World to make disciples of all the nations (Matthew 28:19). ...
The same teaching is conveyed with more or less directness in the assertion of the subordination and judgment of the prince of this World (John 16:11); in the stress laid upon the unique obligation and importance of love to God as constituting the first and greatest commandment (Matthew 22:37 || Mark 12:30, Luke 10:27); in the appeal made by Christ Himself to a similar unique obligation of worship and service to the one only God (Matthew 4:10 || Luke 4:8); in the emphatic affirmation of a common Fatherhood and Godhead (John 20:17; cf. , Glasgow, 1894; Orr, Christian View of God and the World1 [1] , pp
Zabii - Townley's "Essays:"—The Zabii, or Zabians, were a sect of idolaters who flourished in the early ages of the World, considerable in their numbers, and extensive in their influence. Maimonides says, "This people," that is, the Zabii, "had filled the whole World. They maintained the doctrine of the eternity of the World. "All the Zabii," says Maimonides, "believe in the eternity of the World; for, according to them, the heavens are God. " Holding the eternity of the World, they easily became Pre-Adamites, affirming that Adam was not the first man. "...
The modern Sabians, who inhabit the country round about Mount Libanus, believe the unity of God, but pay an adoration to the stars, or the angels and intelligences which they suppose reside in them, and govern the World under the supreme Deity
Adam - It is enough for any man, or for any school of men, to be enabled to take us back to the first beginnings of this present system of things, when as yet our earth was without form and void, and to lead us up step after step, age after age, till we open our eyes on this wonderful World as it now is. Even after they have led us so far up on the shining path of scientilic truth, we feel sure that there are still sources and paths and fields uf light, as well as shadows and belts and whole Worlds of darkness, over which we have been hurried, and into which we have not been led or let look. 'The Scripture begins,' says Butler, 'with an account of God's creation of the World, in order to ascertain who He is concerning whose providences, commands, promises, and threatenings this sacred book all along treats, the Maker and Proprietor of the World, He whose creatures we are-the God of Nature, Revelation, indeed, considers the common affairs of this World, and what is going on in it, as a mere scene of distraction, and cannot be supposed to give any account of this wild scene for its own sake. This earth, our habitation, has everywhere the appearance of being a ruin, and revelation comes in on the supposition that this World is in a ruined state. It is a fashion with the prevailing philosophy of our day to decry and contemn the old, orthodox, and fruitful argument from final causes; but I shall continue, in this matter also, to follow Bishop Butler, to me by far the deepest and the wisest philosopher the World has ever seen. ...
Now, the multiplication and the increase of the image of God is an altogether worthy reason, adequate explanation, and final cause for the creation of this World, and for all the processes, preparations, and providences through which this World has passed. All of God's wisdom and power that was expended on this World, and on Adam its possessor and its priest, was all to find its reward and its return in a World replenished with a race of creatures who were to be such partakers of the divine nature that they would live for ever and grow for ever in the love, in the holy fellowship, in the blessed service, and in the full enjoyment of God. That was why God prepared such a home for man as this World in Adam's day was, and still in our day is. And this World is a sad mixture of false good and real evil; a widespread scene of all sorts of trials, vexations, and miseries, all arising from the frame and nature and condition both of man and the World. My first attempt, therefore, upon any man, to convince him of Adam's fall as the ground of Christ's redemption, should be an attempt to do that for him which affliction, disappointment, sickness, pain, and the approach of death have a natural tendency to do; that is, to convince him of the vanity, poverty, and misery of his life and condition in this World. I would appeal at first to nothing but his own nature and condition in this World to demonstrate this capital truth of Holy Scripture that all mankind lie in a fallen state. Now, Death made his first approach to this World in that hour of Adam and Eve's first temptation. It runs thus: 'Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the World, and death by sin, therefore, as by the offence of one judgment came upon all men to condemnation, even so by the righteousness of one the free gift came upon all men unto justification of life. ' To Paul's so comprehensive mind, so far-sweeping imagination, and so righteousness-hungry heart, Adam and Christ are the two poles upon whom this whole World of human life revolves
Anne, Saint - From these we learn that Anne and Joachim had reached old age and still remained childless; their prayers were answered, an angel of the Lord announcing to Anne that the fruit of her womb would be blessed by all the World
Knights of Columbus - The charitable accomplishments of the Knights of Columbus include beds endowed in Catholic hospitals, seholarships provided in Catholic colleges, the maintenance of free employment bureaus, distinguished services during the World War, the foundation of a chair in American History at the Catholic University of America, etc
Kolping, Adolph - Father Kolping was elected president of this society; with Cologne as his headquarters, he visited the industrial centers of Germany, Austria, Hungary, and Switzerland, and established a widespread organization of societies called Gesellenverein (society of young journeymen), throughout the German-speaking World, with a priest at the head of each
Lima, Peru - The Jesuits arrived at Lima in 1567, founded schools and colleges, and introduced the printing press, from which a catechism, the first book printed in the New World, was issued
de Rossi, Giovanni Battista - As a result of his explorations and researches De Rossi became a famous authority on epigraphy and Roman topography, and stirred up a World-wide interest in Christian antiquities
Jashar, Book of - In the OT there are two quotations from this book ( a ) Joshua 10:12-13 ; the original form must have been a poetical description of the battle of Gibeon, in which would have been included the old-world account of Jahweh casting down great stones from heaven upon Israel’s enemies
Kingdom of God - Not only a place or goal to be attained, but an influence under which our minds come when we are one with Christ and acting under His ideals; the sway of Grace, in our hearts; the rule of God in the World, Thy kingdom come; the place where God reigns; the goal at which we have to aim; the Church, which exercises this influence, administers the sacraments as a means of this grace, upholds even in persecution the laws of God, tabernacles the Body and Blood of His Divine
Kingdom of Heaven - Not only a place or goal to be attained, but an influence under which our minds come when we are one with Christ and acting under His ideals; the sway of Grace, in our hearts; the rule of God in the World, Thy kingdom come; the place where God reigns; the goal at which we have to aim; the Church, which exercises this influence, administers the sacraments as a means of this grace, upholds even in persecution the laws of God, tabernacles the Body and Blood of His Divine
Pallen, Conde Benoist - He edited Church Progress and the Catholic World, 1887-1897; was Catholic revisory editor for Encyclopedia Americana and the New International Encyclopedia
Chaucer, Geoffrey - He defended the Church against age-long calumnies in "The Franklin's Tale" and "The Parson's Tale," but he depicted the Plantagenet World as it was: where the churchman type was gross he represented it grossly; he did not attempt to make it better
Abel - He therefore slighted the promised seed, and redemption by, Christ: and stands in the front of the Bible, the first desit the World ever knew
Zoan - "The whole constitutes one of the grandest and oldest ruins in the World
Debt - Debt in this sense is a reminder of the difficulties of life in the everyday World, where debts can easily bring a person to ruin
Leopard - "The mountains of the leopard" (Song of Solomon 4:8), namely, Lebanon and Hermon, where still they are found; "the mountains of prey" (Psalms 76:4), symbolizing the rapacious World kingdoms
Steward - ...
Christians are God’s stewards, appointed by him to look after his interests in the World
Athens - The capital of Attica, the most celebrated city of the ancient World, the seat of Greek literature and art during the golden period of Grecian history
Gebal - Still its fame for building ships and trading throughout the World continued
Hylozoism - , protests against a mechanical view of the World, but tends to make all beings conform to a uniform pattern
Prince - Satan is often described as “the prince of this World” (John 12:31 ; John 14:30 ; John 16:11 ; compare Matthew 9:34 ; Matthew 12:24 ; Ephesians 2:2 )
Engrave - Signet rings engraved with the sign or symbol of the owner were quite common throughout the ancient World (Genesis 38:18 ; Esther 3:12 ; Jeremiah 22:24 )
Pillar of Cloud And Fire - Jesus' self-presentation as the incarnate Light of the World ( John 8:12 ) recalls the guiding light of the wilderness wanderings
Tin - ) There call be little doubt that the mines of Britain were the chief source of supply to the ancient World, [1] ("Tin ore has lately been found in Midian
Advocate - The Spirit was promised to remain with Jesus' disciples always (14:16), to "teach" (14:26), to "testify" about Christ and to enable them to testify (15:26), and to "convict the World of guilt" (16:7)
Commination - It is substituted in the room of that godly discipline in the primitive church, by which ( as the introduction to the office expresses it ) "such persons as stood convicted of notorious sins were put to open penance, and punished in this World, that their souls might be saved in the day of the Lord; and that others, admonished by their example, might be the more afraid to offend
Theatre - ) In 1 Corinthians 4:9 "spectacle" is literally, "theatrical spectacle," a spectacle in which the World above and below is the theater, and angels and men the spectators
Muth-Labben - Saul slain by the Philistines by whom he had sought to slay David, and receiving the last thrust from one of the Amalekites whom he ought to have destroyed, and Nabal ("fool") dying after his selfish surfeit when churlishly he had refused aught to David's men who had guarded him and his, are instances of the death of such World-wise "fools" (1 Samuel 25:26; 1 Samuel 25:38; 2 Samuel 3:33; Psalms 14:1)
Macedonia - The third great World-kingdom, the Macedonian empire, received its name from this comparatively little spot
Honduras - ...
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Tegucigalpa
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Choluteca
Comayagua
Juticalpa
San Pedro Sula
Santa Rosa de Copán
Trujillo
See also: ...
World Fact Book
patron saints index
Old Testament - The Law (Genesis—Deuteronomy) begins with the creation of the World and concludes as Israel is about to enter the Promised Land
Moon (2) - So when Christ prophesies the end of the World, ‘The moon shall not give her light’ (Matthew 24:29, Mark 13:24)
Alway - stand also for Anno Mundi, in the year of the World
Always - stand also for Anno Mundi, in the year of the World
Assurance - Conversation with the World will give them knowledge and assurance
Giovanni de Rossi - As a result of his explorations and researches De Rossi became a famous authority on epigraphy and Roman topography, and stirred up a World-wide interest in Christian antiquities
Guatemala - See also: ...
World Factbook
Catholic-Hierarchy
Asp - The prophetic vision is God's restoration of the World order so that small children can play around the holes of poisonous snakes without fear (Isaiah 11:8 )
God, Kingdom of - Not only a place or goal to be attained, but an influence under which our minds come when we are one with Christ and acting under His ideals; the sway of Grace, in our hearts; the rule of God in the World, Thy kingdom come; the place where God reigns; the goal at which we have to aim; the Church, which exercises this influence, administers the sacraments as a means of this grace, upholds even in persecution the laws of God, tabernacles the Body and Blood of His Divine
Albania - ...
Ecclesiastically the country is governed by the archdioceses of ...
Shkodrë-Pult
Tiranë-Durrës
the dioceses of ...
Lezhë
Pult
Rrëshen
Sapë
and the Byzantine Apostolic Administration ...
Albania Meridionale
See also, ...
World Fact Book
Catholic-Hierarchy
Creator - The heathen World are charged with serving the creature more than the Creator. by whom also he made the Worlds
Balaam - 2 Peter 2:15 (b) This man is typical of one who claims to be a servant of GOD and is sometimes used of GOD, but for the sake of permanence and prosperity is willing to lead his flock astray and to invite Worldliness to come in among the members. This is typical of modern-day preachers who will promote and permit wicked, Worldly things and who will teach error because of the pay they receive from those who like to hear them. ...
Revelation 2:14 (b) Here we see a type of those in the church who invite unsaved men of the World to bring in their ideas and to lead the church to engage in things which are not according to the Scriptures, and which are quite opposed to the will of GOD
Wormwood - He will make the so-called pleasures and attraction of the World bitter and offensive in the eyes of those who indulge in them
Hiding Place - The World generally thinks of Him as being a careless, indifferent person, who can be easily avoided and carelessly disobeyed
Sanctuary - The sanctuary was where, in retirement from man and the World, God's glory was seen, and His mind apprehended; it was where the sacrifices were offered, and God was worshipped. Here it is called 'worldly,' (κοσμικός) in reference possibly to its order, and its contrast to the true tabernacle which the Lord pitched, and not man </