What does Woman mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
γυνὴ a woman of any age 49
הָֽאִשָּׁ֔ה man. 17
הָאִשָּׁ֖ה woman 17
הָֽאִשָּׁה֙ woman 14
γυναῖκα a woman of any age 11
אִשָּׁ֥ה woman 10
אִשָּׁ֔ה woman 10
γυναικὸς a woman of any age 10
γύναι a woman of any age 9
אִשָּׁ֣ה woman 9
אִשָּׁ֗ה woman 7
אִשָּׁ֛ה woman 6
אִשָּׁ֑ה woman 6
הָ֣אִשָּׁ֔ה woman 5
הָאִשָּׁ֨ה woman 5
הָאִשָּׁ֤ה woman 5
הָאִשָּׁ֣ה woman 5
γυναικὶ a woman of any age 5
γυνή a woman of any age 5
אִשָּׁ֖ה woman 4
הָאִשָּׁ֑ה woman 4
παιδίσκης a young girl 4
הָאִשָּׁ֗ה woman 4
כַּיּוֹלֵדָֽה to bear 4
וְאִשָּׁ֗ה woman 4
הַֽנַּעֲרָ֔ה girl 3
γυναικός a woman of any age 3
אִשָּׁ֤ה woman 3
הָאִשָּׁ֥ה woman 3
γυναικί a woman of any age 3
הָאִשָּׁ֜ה woman 3
אִשָּׁה֙ woman 3
αὕτη this. 3
הָאִשָּׁ֛ה woman 3
לָאִשָּׁ֖ה woman 2
וְאִשָּׁ֛ה woman 2
הָֽאִשָּׁ֑ה woman 2
הַֽנַּעֲרָ֖ה girl 2
אִשָּׁ֞ה woman 2
אִשָּֽׁה woman 2
נַעֲרָ֣ה girl 2
זָרָ֑ה to be strange 2
הַֽנַּעֲרָ֔ girl 2
אֵ֣שֶׁת woman 2
מֵאֵ֥שֶׁת woman 2
וְאִשָּׁה֙ woman 2
הָאִשָּׁה֩ woman 2
אֵ֥שֶׁת woman 2
וְהָאִשָּׁ֣ה woman 2
(הַֽנַּעֲרָ֖ה) girl 2
וְאִשָּׁ֕ה woman 2
אִשָּׁ֜ה woman 2
וְאִשָּׁ֥ה woman 2
וְאִשָּׁ֡ה woman 2
(הַֽנַּעֲרָה֙) girl 2
וְהַֽנַּעֲרָ֖ה girl 1
כַּיּוֹלֵֽדָה to bear 1
מִתְנַכֵּרָֽה to recognise 1
כַּיּוֹלֵדָ֖ה to bear 1
זָר֑וֹת to be strange 1
בְזָרָ֑ה to be strange 1
כְּחוֹלָ֜ה to be or become weak 1
וַחֲלָלָה֙ slain 1
וַחֲלָלָ֣ה slain 1
יֽוֹלֵדָ֖ה to bear 1
יֽוֹלֵדָ֑ה to bear 1
הַנִּדָּ֔ה impurity 1
כַּיּוֹלֵדָ֣ה to bear 1
! כַּיֹּלֵדָֽה to bear 1
כַּיּ֣וֹלֵדָ֔ה to bear 1
כַּיּֽוֹלֵדָ֑ה to bear 1
הַיַּלְדָּ֥ה girl 1
הַמַּרְדּ֑וּת rebellion 1
הַמִּרְשַׁ֔עַת wickedness. 1
(הַֽנַּעֲרָ֛ה) girl 1
αὐτὴ himself 1
(הַֽנַּעַרָ֖ה‪‬‪‬‪‬) girl 1
הַֽנַּעֲרָ֜ה girl 1
לַשּׁוּנַמִּ֣ית an inhabitant of Shunem. 1
רַ֤חַם womb. 1
עֲקֶ֬רֶת barren 1
וְהָעֲנֻגָּ֗ה dainty 1
וְהַמְּעֻנָּגָ֔ה to be soft 1
וְלַנְּקֵבָ֑ה female. 1
נְקֵבָ֖ה female. 1
נַעֲרָ֤ה girl 1
הַנַּעֲרָ֥ה girl 1
הַֽנַּעֲרָ֡ה girl 1
הַֽנַּעֲרָ֗ה girl 1
הַֽנַּעֲרָה֙ girl 1
הַֽנַּעֲרָ֖ girl 1
(לַֽנַּעֲרָֽה) girl 1
הַֽנַּעֲרָֽ girl 1
וְהַֽנַּעֲרָ֗ girl 1
וְנַעֲרָ֜ה girl 1
זֹ֛את this 1
וְהַנַּעֲרָ֤ה girl 1
וְהַֽנַּעֲרָ֗ה girl 1
(נַעֲרָ֤ה) girl 1
(לַֽנַּעֲרָ֖ה) girl 1
(וְלַֽנַּעֲרָה֙‪‬) girl 1
(הַֽנַּעֲרָ֗ה) girl 1
(נַעֲרָ֣ה) girl 1
(הַֽנַּעֲרָ֜ה) girl 1
הַנַּעֲרָ֣ה girl 1
הָֽאִשָּׁ֧ה woman 1
וְזֹ֤את this 1
וְאִשָּׁ֑ה woman 1
הָֽאִשָּׁ֖ה woman 1
לְאִשָּׁ֑ה woman 1
וְהָאִשָּׁ֑ה woman 1
אֵ֖שֶׁת woman 1
כְּאִשָּׁ֗ה woman 1
אִשָּׁ֡ה woman 1
לָֽאִשָּׁ֑ה woman 1
וְהָ֣אִשָּׁ֔ה woman 1
וְאִשָּׁ֣ה woman 1
וְלָאִשָּׁ֤ה woman 1
הָֽאִשָּׁ֜ה woman 1
וְאִשָּׁ֜ה woman 1
וְהָאִשָּׁ֤ה woman 1
וּלְאִשָּׁ֖ה woman 1
אִשָּׁה֩ woman 1
הָאֲרוּרָ֤ה to curse. 1
הָאָמָ֣ה maid-servant 1
הָאָמָ֥ה maid-servant 1
στεῖρα hard 1
πιστὴ trusty 1
παιδίσκην a young girl 1
ἐρήμου solitary 1
ἑκάστη each 1
γυναικὸς〉 a woman of any age 1
γυνή› a woman of any age 1
γυναιξίν⧽ a woman of any age 1
הָֽאִשָּׁ֡ה woman 1
כְאִשָּׁ֧ה woman 1
הָרָ֥ה pregnant. 1
מֵאֵ֣שֶׁת woman 1
הָרָה֙ pregnant. 1
וּגְרוּשָׁ֑ה to drive out 1
וּגְרוּשָׁה֙ to drive out 1
וּגְרוּשָׁ֔ה to drive out 1
וּמִגָּרַ֣ת to sojourn 1
؟ בְּתוּלָֽה virgin. 1
בַּת־ daughter. / young women 1
בְעוּלָ֖ה to marry 1
בֶּ֚ן son 1
אֵ֝֗שֶׁת woman 1
אִ֭שָּׁה woman 1
מֵאִשָּׁ֣ה woman 1
וְאֵ֥שֶׁת woman 1
וְאִשָּׁ֔ה woman 1
מֵאֵ֖שֶׁת woman 1
נָ֭שִׁים woman 1
אֵֽשֶׁת־ woman 1
לָֽאִשָּׁ֔ה woman 1
הָֽאִשָּׁה֮ woman 1
הָאִשָּׁה֮ woman 1
לְנָשִׁים֒ woman 1
הָֽאִשָּׁ֨ה woman 1
לָאִשָּׁ֑ה woman 1
؟ הָאִשָּׁ֖ה woman 1
הָֽאִשָּׁ֛ה woman 1
؟ אִשָּֽׁה woman 1
שְׂ֭נוּאָה to hate 1

Definitions Related to Woman

G1135


   1 a Woman of any age, whether a virgin, or married, or a widow.
   2 a wife.
      2a of a betrothed Woman.
      

H802


   1 Woman, wife, female.
      1a Woman (opposite of man).
      1b wife (Woman married to a man).
      1c female (of animals).
      1d each, every (pronoun).
      

G3814


   1 a young girl, damsel.
   2 a maid-servant, a young female slave.
      2a a maid servant who has charge of the door.
      Additional Information: For synonyms see entries 3808, paidarion; 3813, paidion; 3816, pais; 5043, teknon; and 5207, huios.
      See entry 5868 for comparison of synonyms.
      

H3205


   1 to bear, bring forth, beget, gender, travail.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to bear, bring forth.
            1a1a of child birth.
            1a1b of distress (simile).
            1a1c of wicked (behaviour).
         1a2 to beget.
      1b (Niphal) to be born.
      1c (Piel).
         1c1 to cause or help to bring forth.
         1c2 to assist or tend as a midwife.
         1c3 midwife (participle).
      1d (Pual) to be born.
      1e (Hiphil). 1e1 to beget (a child). 1e2 to bear (fig.
         —of wicked bringing forth iniquity).
      1f (Hophal) day of birth, birthday (infinitive).
      1g (Hithpael) to declare one’s birth (pedigree).
      

H1121


   1 son, grandson, child, member of a group.
      1a son, male child.
      1b grandson.
      1c children (pl.
      —male and female).
      1d youth, young men (pl.
      ).
      1e young (of animals).
      1f sons (as characterisation, ie sons of injustice [for un- righteous men] or sons of God [for angels].
      1g people (of a nation) (pl.
      ).
      1h of lifeless things, ie sparks, stars, arrows (fig.
      ).
      1i a member of a guild, order, class.
      

H5291


   1 girl, damsel, female servant.
      1a girl, damsel, little girl.
         1a1 of young Woman, marriageable young Woman, concubine, prostitute.
      1b maid, female attendant, female servant.
      

G3778


   1 this.
   

H519


   1 maid-servant, female slave, maid, handmaid, concubine.
      1a of humility (fig.
      ).
      

H2114


   1 to be strange, be a stranger.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to become estranged.
         1a2 strange, another, stranger, foreigner, an enemy (participle).
         1a3 loathsome (of breath) (participle).
         1a4 strange Woman, prostitute, harlot (meton).
      1b (Niphal) to be estranged.
      1c (Hophal) to be a stranger, be one alienated.
      

G1538


   1 each, every.
   

G4103


   1 trusty, faithful.
      1a of persons who show themselves faithful in the transaction of business, the execution of commands, or the discharge of official duties.
      1b one who kept his plighted faith, worthy of trust.
      1c that can be relied on.
   2 easily persuaded.
      2a believing, confiding, trusting.
      2b in the NT one who trusts in God’s promises.
         2b1 one who is convinced that Jesus has been raised from the dead.
         2b2 one who has become convinced that Jesus is the Messiah and author of salvation.
         

H6135


   1 barren, sterile.
   

H8130


   1 to hate, be hateful.
      1a (Qal) to hate.
         1a1 of man.
         1a2 of God.
         1a3 hater, one hating, enemy (participle) (subst).
      1b (Niphal) to be hated.
      1c (Piel) hater (participle).
         1c1 of persons, nations, God, wisdom.
         

H4849


   1 wickedness.
   

H7767


   1 an inhabitant of Shunem.
   Additional Information: Shunammite = see Shunen “double resting place”.
   

H779


   1 to curse.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to curse.
         1a2 cursed be he (participle used pr in curses).
      1b (Niphal) to be cursed, cursed.
      1c (Piel) to curse, lay under a curse, put a curse on.
      1d (Hophal) to be made a curse, be cursed.
      

H1323


   1 daughter.
      1a daughter, girl, adopted daughter, daughter-in-law, sister, granddaughters, female child, cousin.
         1a1 as polite address.
         1a2 as designation of women of a particular place.
   2 young women, women.
         1a3 as personification.
         1a4 daughter-villages.
         1a5 description of character.
         

G2048


   1 solitary, lonely, desolate, uninhabited.
      1a used of places.
         1a1 a desert, wilderness.
         1a2 deserted places, lonely regions.
         1a3 an uncultivated region fit for pasturage.
      1b used of persons.
         1b1 deserted by others.
         1b2 deprived of the aid and protection of others, especially of friends, acquaintances, kindred.
         1b3 bereft.
            1b3a of a flock deserted by the shepherd.
            1b3b of a women neglected by her husband, from whom the husband withholds himself.
            

G4723


   1 hard, stiff.
      1a of men and animals.
   2 barren.
      2a of Woman who does not conceive.
      

H5234


   1 to recognise, acknowledge, know, respect, discern, regard.
      1a (Niphal) to be recognised.
      1b (Piel) to regard.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to regard, observe, pay attention to, pay regard to, notice.
         1c2 to recognise (as formerly known), perceive.
         1c3 to be willing to recognise or acknowledge, acknowledge with honour.
         1c4 to be acquainted with.
         1c5 to distinguish, understand.
      1d (Hithpael) to make oneself known.
   2 to act or treat as foreign or strange, disguise, misconstrue.
      2a (Niphal) to disguise oneself.
      2b (Piel).
         2b1 to treat as foreign (profane).
         2b2 to misconstrue.
      2c (Hithpael).
         2c1 to act as alien.
         2c2 to disguise oneself.
         

H4780


   1 rebellion, rebelliousness.
   

H6028


   1 dainty, delicate.
   

G846


   1 himself, herself, themselves, itself.
   2 he, she, it.
   3 the same.
   Additional Information: Wigram’s frequency count is 4913 not 5117.
   

H1644


   1 to drive out, expel, cast out, drive away, divorce, put away, thrust away, trouble, cast up.
      1a (Qal) to thrust out, cast out.
      1b (Niphal) to be driven away, be tossed.
      1c (Piel) to drive out, drive away.
      1d (Pual) to be thrust out.
      

H2030


   1 pregnant.
   

H1166


   1 to marry, rule over, possess, own.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to marry, be lord (husband) over.
         1a2 to rule over.
      1b (Niphal) to be married.
      

H2470


   1 to be or become weak, be or become sick, be or become diseased, be or become grieved, be or become sorry.
      1a (Qal) to be weak, be sick.
      1b (Piel).
         1b1 to be or become weak, feel weak.
         1b2 to become sick, become ill.
         1b3 (CLBL) to entreat, pray, beg.
      1c (Niphal).
         1c1 to make oneself sick.
         1c2 to be made sick.
         1c3 to be tired.
      1d (Pual) to be made weak, become weak.
      1e (Hithpael) to make oneself sick.
      1f (Hiphil).
         1f1 to make sore.
         1f2 to make sick.
         1f3 to show signs of sickness, become sick.
         1f4 to grieve.
      1g (Hophal).
         1g1 to be made sick.
         1g2 to be wounded.
         

H3207


   1 girl, damsel, marriageable girl.
   

H5347


   1 female.
      1a Woman, female child.
      1b female animal.
      

H2491


   1 slain, fatally wounded, pierced.
      1a pierced, fatally wounded.
      1b slain adj.
   2 (CLBL) profaned.
      2a defiled, profaned (by divorce).
      

H1481


   1 to sojourn, abide, dwell in, dwell with, remain, inhabit, be a stranger, be continuing, surely.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to sojourn, dwell for a time.
         1a2 to abide, stay, temporarily dwell.
      1b (Hithpolel).
         1b1 to seek hospitality with.
         1b2 to assemble oneself.
   2 to stir up trouble, strife, quarrel, gather together.
      2a (Qal).
         2a1 to stir up strife.
         2a2 to quarrel.
      2b (Hithpolel) to excite oneself.
   3 to dread, fear, stand in awe, be afraid.
      3a (Qal).
         3a1 to fear, be afraid.
         3a2 to be in awe, stand in awe.
         

H5079


   1 impurity, filthiness, menstruous, set apart.
      1a impurity.
         1a1 of ceremonial impurity.
         1a2 of menstruation.
      1b impure thing (fig.
      ).
         1b1 of idolatry, immorality.
         

H7356


   1 womb.
   2 compassion.
   

H1330


   1 virgin.
   

H6026


   1 to be soft, be delicate, be dainty.
      1a (Pual) to be delicate.
      1b (Hithpael).
         1b1 to be of dainty habit, be pampered.
         1b2 to be happy about, take exquisite delight.
         1b3 to make merry over, make sport of.
         

Frequency of Woman (original languages)

Frequency of Woman (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ethiopian Woman
ETHIOPIAN WOMAN . According to Numbers 12:1 (JE [1] ), when the children of Israel were at Hazeroth, Miriam and Aaron ‘spake against’ Moses on account of his marriage with an Ethiopian (RV [2] ‘Cushite’) woman. As the ‘Ethiopian woman’ is mentioned nowhere else, and the death of Moses’ wife Zipporah is not recorded, some of the early interpreters thought the two must be identical; and this view is favoured by the Jewish expositors. But it is more likely that a black slave-girl is meant, and that the fault found by Miriam and Aaron was with the indignity of such a union. It may perhaps be inferred from the context that the marriage was of recent occurrence.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Woman
WOMAN
1. In OT ( ’ishshâh , ‘woman,’ ‘wife’; nĕqçbâh [1], ‘female’) woman’s position is one of inferiority and subjection to man ( Genesis 3:13 ); and yet, in keeping with the view that ideally she is his companion and ‘help meet’ ( Genesis 2:18-24 ), she never sinks into a mere drudge or plaything. In patriarchal times, Sarah, Rebekah, and Rachel stand side by side with their husbands. In the era of the deliverance from Egypt, Miriam is ranked with Moses and Aaron (cf. Micah 6:4 ). In the days of the judges, Deborah is not only a prophetess (wh. see), as other women in Israel were, but is herself a judge ( Judges 4:4 ). Under the monarchy, Jezebel in the Northern Kingdom and Athaliah in the Southern, afford illustrations of the political power and influence that a woman might wield. In religious matters, we find women attending the Feasts along with men ( 1 Samuel 1:1 ff. etc.), taking part with them in acts of sacrifice ( Judges 13:20 ; Judges 13:23 etc.), combined with them in the choral service of the Temple ( Ezra 2:65 etc.). And though in the Deut. code woman’s position is one of complete subordination, her rights are recognized and safeguarded in a way that prepares the soil for the growth of those higher conceptions which find utterance in Malachi’s declaration that divorce is hateful to Jehovah ( Ezra 2:16 ), and in the picture of the virtuous wife with which the Book of Proverbs concludes (ch. 31). See, further, Family, Marriage.
2. In NT ( gynç , ‘woman,’ ‘wife’; thçleia [2], ‘female’; gynaikarion [3], EV [4] ‘silly women’). Owing to the influence of Rabbinism, Jewish women had lost some of their earlier freedom (ct. [5] with the scene at the well of Haran [6] the surprise of the disciples by the well of Sychar when they found Jesus ‘speaking with a woman’ [7]). But Jesus wrought a wonderful change. He did this not only by His teaching about adultery ( Matthew 5:27 f.) and marriage and divorce ( Matthew 5:31 f., Matthew 19:3 ff.), but still more by His personal attitude to women, whether good and pure like His own mother (there is nothing harsh or discourteous in the ‘Woman’ of John 2:4 ; cf. John 19:26 ) and the sisters of Bethany, or sinful and outcast as some women of the Gospels were ( Luke 7:37 ff; Luke 8:2 , John 4:1-54 ). The work of emancipation was continued in the Apostolic Church. Women formed an integral part of the earliest Christian community ( Acts 1:14 ), shared in the gifts of Pentecost ( Acts 2:1 ff., cf. Acts 2:17 ), engaged in tasks of unofficial ministry ( Romans 16:1 f., Philippians 4:2 f.), and by and by appear ( 1 Timothy 3:11 ) as holding the office of the deaconess (wh. see), and possibly ( 1 Timothy 5:3 ) that of the ‘ widow ’ (wh. see, and cf. Timothy [8], § 5 ). St. Paul’s conception of woman and of man’s relation to her is difficult ( 1 Corinthians 7:1-40 ), but may be explained partly by his expectation of the Parousia ( 1 Corinthians 7:29-31 ), and partly by the exigencies of an era of persecution ( 1 Corinthians 7:26 ). In a later Pauline Epistle marriage becomes a type of the union between Christ and the Church ( Ephesians 5:22-33 ). And if by his injunction as to the silence of women in the Church ( 1 Corinthians 14:34 ff.) the Apostle appears to limit the prophetic freedom of the first Christian days ( Acts 2:4 ; Acts 2:17 ), we must remember that he is writing to a Church set in the midst of a dissolute Greek city, where Christian women had special reasons for caution in the exercise of their new privileges. Elsewhere he announces the far-reaching principle that in Christ Jesus ‘there can be no male and female’ ( Galatians 3:28 ).
J. C. Lambert.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Woman
In an age of women's liberation, modern Bible readers have understandably scrutinized Scripture for its teachings on gender. Assessments have alternately found it hopelessly patriarchal and gloriously redemptive. A brief survey can do no more than scratch the surface of key issues and perspectives.
Creation . In the first creation account, God fashions man and woman as fully equal bearers of his image. They jointly receive his blessing and commission to rule the earth (Genesis 1:26-31 ). In the second account, it is specified that God created the man first, and that he created the woman from the man's rib only after all the animals proved inadequate companions (Genesis 2:18-23 ). The controversial words, "suitable helper" in verse 18 have traditionally been taken to imply a functional subordination of the woman to the man as part of God's design in creation, but this interpretation is increasingly being rejected. Certainly, the emphasis of Adam's outburst, "bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh" (v. 23) highlights the similarity rather than any differences between these first two human beings.
The Fall . The utter goodness of this primeval human pair (Genesis 1:31 ) quickly turns into rebellion. The serpent coaxes the woman to eat forbidden fruit, and her husband, in apparently more conscious disobedience (1 Timothy 2:14 ), follows suit. As a result, God utters a three-part curse on the triad of rebels. To the woman he promises increased pain in childbearing and then adds, "your desire will be for your husband, and he will rule over you" (Genesis 3:16 ). For those who see hierarchy in Genesis 2 , what was intended to be fully harmonious will now deteriorate into seduction and tyranny. For others, here is where relationships of authority and submission first appear. "To love and to cherish" has degenerated into "to desire and to dominate."
Old Testament Culture . Old Testament culture was overwhelmingly patriarchal. Women were valued most for their roles as wives and mothers, as bearers and rearers of children. Because of the importance of having children to preserve the family line and inheritance, barren women were particularly disgraced. On several key occasions, God miraculously intervened to overcome such barrenness (as with Sarah—Genesis 16 ; and Hannah1 Samuel 1 ). Although never condoned, this same desire for progeny could lead to illicit sexual relationships (e.g., Lot's daughters with their father Genesis 19:30-38 ; Tamar with Judah Genesis 38 ).
Old Testament wives can function as windows to their husband's career and character. David's first wife, Michal, aids his escape from Saul (1 Samuel 19:9-17 ). Abigail stands out for her intelligence and good judgment (1 Samuel 25:3,33 ) and comes to the fore during David's ascendancy to the kingship. Bathsheba, as the victim of David's seduction and adultery (2 Samuel 11 ), portends the decline of David's family and fortunes.
Yet despite all these androcentric illustrations, the ideal woman of Old Testament times can seem surprisingly modern. The wife of noble character (Proverbs 31:10-31 ) works industriously not only in traditional domestic spheres but in running a business out of her house, purchasing property, making investments, speaking wisely, and ruling her household. Men should value such a prudent wife far above property and wealth (Proverbs 19:14 ; 18:22 ).
The Old Testament consistently commends women to monogamous marriage and sexual fidelity, based on God's creation ordinance (Genesis 2:24 ; endorsed again by both Jesus [1] and Paul [2]). Song of Songs celebrates the erotic bliss of newlyweds, often from the woman's perspective and initiative. Subsequent faithfulness remains equally crucial (Ecclesiastes 9:9 ; Malachi 2:14-16 ). The ordeal for a suspected adulteress seems harsh today (Numbers 5:11-31 ), as does Ezra's edict for the Israelites to divorce their newly but illegally married foreign wives (Ezra 9-10 ). But the positive side of each of these episodes is the high value placed on sexual and spiritual fidelity. The notion that polygamy was common or condoned in ancient Israel is seriously misguided. Polygamy remained the exception rather than the rule; in twelve of the thirteen Old Testament instances in which it occurred, the husbands were men of great wealthkings and aristocrats. Few others could afford such luxury! Solomon's many wives clearly led to his ruin (1 Kings 11:1-13 ); concubines often played more a political than a romantic role (2 Samuel 16 ).
As in all ages of human history, the Old Testament shows women who were victimized by abuse, rape, and even murder: Dinah (Genesis 34 ), Tamar (2 Samuel 13:1-22 ), Jephthah's daughter (Judges 11:29-30 ), and the Levite's concubine (Judges 19 ). The latter two atrocities illustrate the depravity of a society in near-anarchy; the former two are each avenged by kinsmen. In other instances, women seduce men (Delilah and Samson Judges 16 ) or unjustly accuse them (Potiphar's wife and Joseph Genesis 39 ). God never condones such behavior, but, like evil in general, he often permits it. An overriding and encouraging message of the Old Testament is God's sovereign outworking of his plans in spite of his people's failures.
In the same vein, the queens of God's own people may prove murderous and idolatrous, leading them to ruin (Athaliah 2 Kings 11 ; Jezebel 1 Kings 21 ). Or God may use the compassion of pagan royalty to preserve and nurture the savior of his own people (Pharaoh's daughter and Moses Exe 2:1-10). Perhaps the paradigm of God's sovereignty through the grace of unlikely heroines is the story of Rahab, the Canaanite prostitute, who believes in the God of the Israelites, protects their spies from her own officials (Joshua 2 ), and becomes one of the great persons of faith praised in Hebrews 11 (v. 31). Similarly, Ruth the Moabitess epitomizes the foreigner who attaches herself to Israel. Her devotion to her mother-in-law Naomi leads to her covenant-faithfulness to Yahweh and to a surprising proposal of marriage to her redeemer-kinsman Boaz ( Ruth 3:9 ).
Old Testament Legislation . Old Testament laws also send mixed signals. In some places, women are clearly prized as equals to men. Both father and mother deserve equal honor from their children (Exodus 20:12 ) and share in the trial of a rebellious child (Deuteronomy 21:18-19 ). In cases of alleged rape, if unable to summon help, the woman is given the benefit of the doubt (Deuteronomy 22:23-27 ). But women consistently remain under the control of their fathers or husbands (Exodus 21:7 ; Numbers 30:3-15 ), although in the (unusual) absence of such men may be granted equal rights with them (Numbers 27:1-11 ). Various laws seem to value women less than men. They incur greater uncleanness for menstruation than do men for seminal emissions (Leviticus 15:16-33 ) and for giving birth to female children than for males (Leviticus 12:1-5 ). Male slaves command a higher price than do females (Leviticus 27:1-8 ); the more important sacrifices require male animals only (Numbers 15:22-29 ). In other cases, certain laws simply did not apply to women (Exodus 23:17 ). Some of these injunctions may be seen as accommodations to the prevailing cultures, but it is hard to explain them all in this fashion.
Widows are consistently presented as a paradigm of the dispossessed. Because they came under no specific man's care, they became the responsibility of the whole community (Exodus 22:22-24 ).
Old Testament Leadership . Although women were not permitted to be priests, they did on occasion hold other offices or leadership roles in Israel. Deborah was a judge (the "political" leader of her day) and, like Miriam (Exodus 15:20-21 ) and Huldah (2 Kings 22:11-20 ), a prophetess (Judges 4 ). Jael (Judges 4 ) and the anonymous woman of Judges 9:53 proved timely and valiant in battle. Although Athaliah was a wicked queen, Esther, who came to power in Persia under most unusual circumstances, used her position to save her Jewish kinsfolk. The wise women of Tekoa ( 2 Samuel 14 ) and of Abel Beth Maacah (2 Samuel 20:14-22 ) probably were the heads of city councils. Although each of these examples of women in leadership were exceptions and not norms, there is no evidence to support the claim that God used women only when there were no available or willing men.
Jesus and Women . The first-century Jewish world shared many of the cultural assumptions of the Old Testament concerning women. In the Hellenistic world, women at times gained greater wealth, freedom, or privilege. Against these prevailing cultures, Jesus' own teachings and practices stand out as radically liberating. God highly favored Mary with the privilege of bearing and rearing his Son; the most detailed accounts of Christ's birth seem to reflect Mary's (and Elizabeth's) perspective and may well have been transmitted by her (Luke 1-2 ). Several of the recipients of Jesus' healing were women (Jairus's daughter Matthew 9:23-26 ; and the crippled woman Luke 13:10-17 ). In two instances their faith is particularly praised (the hemmorhaging woman Matthew 9:22 ), even when one is not a Jew but a Syrophoenician (Matthew 15:21-28 anticipating the church's ministry to Gentiles ). In another episode, the woman healed was Jewish but still illustrates Jesus' ministry of compassion to the outcasts of society (Simon's mother-in-law [3]), as the third in a series of such miracles (cf. Matthew 8:1-4,5-13 ). In the same spirit, Jesus forgives a notoriously sinful woman who demonstrates her repentance through her love, even when she expresses it in culturally suspect ways (Luke 7:36-50 ). The later, similar actions of Mary of Bethany elicit Jesus' praise in language evocative of the memorializing of Jesus himself in the Lord's Supper (Mark 14:9 )!
Women play an important role among Jesus' followers. An unspecified number forms part of the larger company of disciples that regularly follows him on the road and forms his "support team" (Luke 8:1-3 ; cf. Acts 1:14-15 ). Jesus specifically praises Mary of Bethany for choosing to "sit at his feet" and learn from him (Luke 10:38-42 )a quasi-technical reference to a disciple being trained by a rabbi and a practice usually denied to women in Jewish circles. Martha's traditional preoccupation for domestic chores receives only censure! Jesus chooses women as the first witnesses to his resurrection (Luke 24:1-12 ), even though their testimony would have been thrown out of a legal court, and Mary Magdalene becomes the "apostle to the (male ) apostles" (John 20:1-2,18 ). No woman appears among the company of the Twelve; but it is not clear if this reflects any timeless principle besides a commitment to present the gospel to a given culture in ways which will most likely speed its acceptance.
Jesus' ethics preserve and intensify the strong Old Testament emphasis on sexual propriety (Matthew 5:27-30 ; 19:1-12 ), but for the first time make clear that women and men will be judged by identical standards (Matthew 5:32 ; Mark 10:11-12 ). Luke frequently pairs episodes in which men and women function in identical ways. Both Elizabeth and Zechariah praise under the Spirit's inspiration (Luke 1:41-45,67-79 ). Both Simeon and Anna prophesy that in Christ they have seen Israel's salvation (2:25-38). Male and female cripples receive identical healings (13:10-17; 14:1-6). The parables of the mustard seed and leaven (like the lost sheep and coin), each make the same point but alternate between male and female protagonists (13:18-21; 15:1-10). Clearly Luke wants to highlight God's care for both genders and Jesus' concern to relate to both. The story of Jesus meeting the Samaritan woman perhaps epitomizes his commitment to revolutionizing the lot of the disenfranchised of his day. Despite strong cultural taboos against any social exchange between a Jewish holy man and a sexually promiscuous Samaritan woman, Jesus speaks to this woman in private, affirms her personhood and leads her to faith in himself and to service as an evangelist (John 4:1-42 ).
Acts . With the arrival of Pentecost comes the fulfillment of Joel's prediction about the egalitarian outpouring of the Spirit (Acts 2:17-21 ). Women as well as men prophesy. Apart from the ministry of the New Testament writers, Christian prophecy does not supplement or contradict the canon but applies spiritual truth to specific contexts in the lives of God's people. To the extent that contemporary preaching involves this spiritual gift, gifted women must be encouraged to preach. Acts also describes a significant Christian woman teacher, Priscilla, who with her husband Aquila enabled Apollos to learn and disseminate correct doctrine (18:26). Inasmuch as her name more often than not appears before her husband's (cf. vv. 18,19), she may well have been the more prominent.
Women in Acts continue to receive other spiritual blessings. As in the Gospels, they benefit from miraculous healings (the slave girl 16:16-18) and resurrections (slave Tabitha 9:36-42). Lydia is the first-mentioned European convert (17:11-15); Paul's willingness to preach to a group of God-fearing women without any men present itself carries on Jesus' tradition of boundary breaking. Damaris, a woman, is among the few to respond favorably to Paul's Areopagus address (17:34).
The Epistles . Just as in the Old Testament women enjoyed many prominent roles save one, the rest of the New Testament reveals women in all positions of spiritual leadership save that of elder or overseer. But their participation in these roles was much more common and accepted than in Old Testament times. Paul calls Phoebe a diakonos [4] (probably "deacon") and prostatis [1]6 (most likely "patron") of the church in Cenchreae. First Timothy 3:11 is best understood as containing injunctions for women deacons rather than deacons' wives (it would be incongruous for Paul to be concerned about deacons' wives but not overseers' wives!). Junia(s) in Romans 16:7 is most likely a woman, and she is called "an apostle." This will be in Paul's broader sense of the term as a missionary or church planter.
Chloe in Corinth (1 Corinthians 1:11 ) and Nympha in Colossae (Colossians 4:15 ) are women whose households figure prominently (and the fact that the households are attributed to these women suggest that no male heads are present). The elect ladies of 2 John 1,13 almost certainly refer to house-churches, although quite possibly hosted by individual Christian women (as more clearly with Nympha). Paul calls Euodia and Syntyche his fellow workers ( Philippians 4:2-3 ) and frequently praises women as co-laborers in ministry (Romans 16:6,12 ). First Timothy 5:2 commands respect for older Christian women. The term used here, presbytera, is the feminine form of "elder" (presbyteros [6]), but the context and parallel passage in Titus 2:3 , which uses a more unambiguous term for "old woman" (presbytis [6]), suggests a nontechnical sense. Titus 2:4-5 also insists that older women train younger women in godliness, which includes being good "home-workers."
In the domestic sphere, wives must remain submissive to their husbands, who are the heads of the family (Ephesians 5:22-24 ; Colossians 3:18 ). Attempts to interpret "head" (kephale [ 1 Peter 3:7 ) probably has nothing to do with physical or emotional weakness but rather refers to a voluntarily adopted position of greater "vulnerability."
Two passages in the epistles that do not directly refer to women doing anything nevertheless have far-reaching implications. First Corinthians 12:7,11, makes clear that God's Spirit dispenses his spiritual gifts as he wills, which surely implies "irrespective of gender." This means that Paul envisioned women not only as apostles, prophets, and teachers but speaking in tongues, working miracles, ministering as evangelists, and pastors/shepherds (11:5; 12:8-10; Ephesians 4:11 ), indeed, exercising every other spiritual gift that God may choose to give them. Galatians 3:28 proves even more programmatic, declaring that in Christ, "there is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female." It cannot be demonstrated from this statement that Paul thereby imagined no timeless role differentiation among women and men; clearly patriarchal rabbinic sources could nevertheless make quite similar claims. But the baptismal context (v. 27) does suggest that Paul had more in mind than merely equal access to salvation. As an initiation rite that included women (unlike Jewish circumcision), baptism publicly affirmed the equal value of women and men in a way that suggests that the church should continue to seek outward, visible forms for demonstrating this equality.
Restrictions on Leadership . Notwithstanding the overwhelming emphasis on liberation, privilege, freedom, and equality for women that characterizes most of the New Testament teaching, three passages stand out as implying certain limits on women in church leadership, perhaps analogous to the relationship of wife and husband in the family. At least they have traditionally been so taken, throughout almost all of church history, corresponding to the general lack of women in the highest or most authoritative positions of ecclesial office (even as women's roles in all other positions of leadership have been more plentiful than the average textbook of church history discloses). Today, however, Christian feminists have seriously challenged the traditional interpretations of all three of these passages.
In 1 Corinthians 11:3-16 , Paul commands women to cover their heads (with either veils or long hair) as a sign of respect to their spiritual headstheir husbands. The cultural impropriety of women either unveiled or with short hair (often involving sexually misleading connotations) probably lay behind these commands. But a timeless principle appears as well: "man did not come from woman but woman from man; neither was man created for woman, but woman for man" (vv. 8-9). These observations are immediately qualified with reminders of the mutual interdependence of the genders in Christ (vv. 11-12), but it is not obvious that these verses imply the reversibility of the statements in verses 8-9. Although not immediately germane to the question of church office, the reminder of the relevance of the structure of the family for church life probably provides a foundation for Paul's teaching in the next two passages below.
In 1 Corinthians 14:33b-38 Paul enjoins women to be silent in church. In view of 11:5, this cannot be an absolute prohibition. Many have taken it to be entirely time-bound (due, e.g., to gossiping or noisy or uneducated women), but Paul bases his rationale in the law (v. 34) and says nothing of these cultural phenomena. Others take verses 33b-35 to be a Corinthian slogan that Paul refutes in verses 36-38, but this relatively new interpretation ignores the quite different length, style, and content of all other Corinthian slogans (e.g., 6:12-13; 7:1; 8:1). Inasmuch as twenty of the other twenty-one references to "speak" ( laleo [8]) in 1 Corinthians 14 refer to tongues, their interpretation, prophecy, or evaluation, it is probably better to see one of these forms of speech in view. Given that the first three of these are spiritual gifts that the immediate context is one of the proper response to prophecy (vv. 29-33a), and that the ultimate responsibility of reevaluating prophecy would have fallen to the (presumably) all male leadership of the Corinthian congregation, it is best to limit Paul's prohibition to speech in the context of the church's authoritative response to prophecy.
The text which is most hotly debated of all is 1 Timothy 2:8-15 . Here Paul forbids women "to teach or to have authority over a man" (v. 12) in church (3:15). Again this prohibition cannot be absolute (recall Acts 18:26 ), and in view of Paul's penchant for hendiadys, or pairs of largely synonymous expressions in 1 Timothy 2 (cf. vv. 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3,4, 5,7a, 7b, etc.), it is probable that "teach" and "have authority" are mutually interdefiningPaul is prohibiting "authoritative teaching." In view of the distinction between (apparently) all male overseers and both male and female deacons in 3:1-13, a plausible interpretation of 2:12 is that women may not hold the highest office in a given ecclesial context (perhaps roughly analogous to modern-day senior pastors in congregationally governed churches). Again, egalitarians have regularly proposed some historical background (most notably the presence of heresy in Ephesus 1 Timothy 1:3-7 ) as the rationale for Paul's mandate, which is then seen as culturally limited in application. But Paul's own explanation appeals instead to the order of creation (1 Timothy 2:13 ); the explicit evidence of women's roles in the Ephesian heresy elsewhere in the Pastorals is entirely limited to their roles as victims rather than propagators (2 Timothy 3:6-7 ).
Conclusion . Christianity will doubtless be divided for the foreseeable future over women's roles in the contemporary home and church. The scriptural evidence is sufficiently ambiguous that room must be given for both complementarian and egalitarian perspectives. Charges that one or the other are heretical are unfounded and destructive. Church history does not inspire much confidence that Christian consensus will ultimately be based on exegesis rather than the trends of secular society. But Bible-believing Christians should stand against this tide and seek to ground their views on the best understandings of Scripture possible. Perhaps team-ministry remains the most appropriate model, in which team leaders remain male but in which women are warmly encouraged to participate and exercise pastoral gifts. So too, in the home, if husbands do retain any unique authority, they must exercise it entirely in seeking the well-being of their wives.
Craig L. Blomberg
See also Eve ; Family Life and Relations ; Head, Headship ; Marriage ; Person, Personhood ; Sexuality, Human ; Widow
Bibliography . A. Berlin, Poetics and Interpretation of Biblical Narrative ; G. Bilezikian, Beyond Sex Roles ; E. Cantarella, Pandora's Daughters ; D. Dockery, CTR 1 (1987): 363-86; R. B. Edwards, The Case for Women's Ministry ; E. S. Fiorenza, In Memory of Her ; M. Hayter, The New Eve in Christ ; J. B. Hurley, Man and Woman in Biblical Perspective ; ISBE, 4:1089-97; W. C. Kaiser, Jr., Toward Old Testament Ethics ; R. C. and C. C. Kroeger, I Suffer Not a Woman ; A. Mickelsen, ed., Women, Authority and the Bible ; J. Piper and W. Grudem, eds., Recovering Biblical Manhood and Womanhood ; A. B. Spencer, Beyond the Curse ; J. Stott, Issues Facing Christians Today ; L. Swidler, Biblical Affirmations of Woman ; P. Trible, Texts of Terror ; R. A. Tucker and W. Liefeld, Daughters of the Church ; L. Wilshire, NTS 34 (1988): 120-34; B. Witherington, NTS 27 (1981): 593-604.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ethiopian Woman
The wife of Moses (Numbers 12:1 ). It is supposed that Zipporah, Moses' first wife (Exodus 2:21 ), was now dead. His marriage of this "woman" descended from Ham gave offence to Aaron and Miriam.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Woman
Was "taken out of man" (Genesis 2:23 ), and therefore the man has the preeminence. "The head of the woman is the man;" but yet honour is to be shown to the wife, "as unto the weaker vessel" (1 Corinthians 11:3,8,9 ; 1 Peter 3:7 ). Several women are mentioned in Scripture as having been endowed with prophetic gifts, as Miriam (Exodus 15:20 ), Deborah (Judges 4:4,5 ), Huldah (2 Kings 22:14 ), Noadiah (Nehemiah 6:14 ), Anna (Luke 2:36,37 ), and the daughters of Philip the evangelist (Acts 21:8,9 ). Women are forbidden to teach publicly (1 Corinthians 14:34,35 ; 1 Timothy 2:11,12 ). Among the Hebrews it devolved upon women to prepare the meals for the household (Genesis 18:6 ; 2 Samuel 13:8 ), to attend to the work of spinning (Exodus 35:26 ; Proverbs 31:19 ), and making clothes (1 Samuel 2:19 ; Proverbs 31:21 ), to bring water from the well (Genesis 24:15 ; 1 Samuel 9:11 ), and to care for the flocks (Genesis 29:6 ; Exodus 2:16 ). The word "woman," as used in Matthew 15:28 , John 2:4,20:13,15 , implies tenderness and courtesy and not disrespect. Only where revelation is known has woman her due place of honour assigned to her.
Webster's Dictionary - Herb-Woman
(n.) A woman that sells herbs.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Woman
The position of woman in any section or period of society is a recognized test of the contemporary level of morality and general enlightenment. Apostolic Christianity need not fear this test. In fact, the exaltation of womanhood is justly claimed as one of the best examples of what Christianity has done for the world. Doubtless this feature of its influence has often been exaggerated, either by painting too darkly the vices of paganism or by neglecting the actual Limitations of historical Christianity. We must certainly beware lest we take the sixth Satire of Juvenal as descriptive of the character and conduct of women in general in the 1st cent. of the Roman Empire. ‘At the worst, these vices infected only a comparatively small class, idle, luxurious, enervated by the slave system, depraved by the example of a vicious court.… Both the literature and the inscriptions of that age make us acquainted with a very different kind of woman’ (S. Dill, Roman Society from Nero to Marcus Aurelius2, p. 87). Nor must we forget that the just rights of married women were much more fully recognized by Roman law than by the ecclesiastical law which replaced it: ‘it is by the tendency of their doctrines to keep alive and consolidate the former [1], that the expositors of the Canon Law have deeply injured civilisation’ (H. S. Maine, Ancient Law, new ed., 1907, p. 163; cf. EBr 11 xxviii. 783). J. Donaldson (one of the editors of the Ante-Nicene Christian Library) indeed went so far as to say that ‘in the first three centuries I have not been able to see that Christianity had any favourable effect on the position of women, but, on the contrary, that it tended to lower their character and contract the range of their activity’ (CR lvi. [2] 433). So far as this somewhat questionable judgment is sound, it relates to the asceticism of the Church subsequent to the Apostolic Age. The Pauline ‘asceticism’ springs from a different source, i.e. the expectation of a rapidly approaching end to all earthly things. This is an important fact to remember, for the attitude of apostolic Christianity to woman is largely due to the interaction of two distinct principles-the fundamental Christian assertion of the intrinsic worth of human personality, and the eschatological foreshortening of the time, which could not fail to hinder the social application of the former principle.
1. The religious equality of woman with man before God is clearly asserted by Paul: ‘as many of you as were baptized into Christ did put on Christ. There can be neither Jew nor Greek, there can be neither bond nor free, there can be no male and female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus’ (Galatians 3:27-28). The mutual dependence of man and woman, and their common origin in God, teach that the male has no exclusive place ‘in the Lord’ (1 Corinthians 11:11-12). This result of the evangelical evaluation of human nature (see art. Man) lifts the Christian idea of woman clearly above that of the contemporary Judaism, which in several noticeable ways differentiated woman religiously from man (cf. Bousset, Die Religion des Judentums2’, p. 490 f.). The morning service of Judaism still retains the ancient thanksgiving: ‘Blessed art thou, O Lord our God, King of the universe, who hast not made me a woman’ (Authorised Daily Prayer Book, p. 6). We naturally think of the ‘Court of the Women’ in the Temple, beyond which no woman might pass. ‘Her work is to send her children to be taught in the synagogue: to attend to domestic concerns, and leave her husband free to study in the schools: to keep house for him till he returns’ (C. Taylor, Sayings of the Jewish Fathers2. Cambridge, 1897, p. 15). If such significant limitations as these are found in contemporary Judaism, notwithstanding the general humanity of its relationships and the intensity of the national religion, it need not surprise us to find no effective assertion of the religious equality of woman emanating from Roman patriotism or Greek philosophy. Plato, it is true, had argued that the differentiae of sex ought not to constitute any barrier to the exercise of a woman’s personal powers: ‘None of the occupations which comprehend the ordering of a state belong to woman as woman, nor yet to man us man; but natural gifts are to be found here and there, in both sexes alike; and, so far as her nature is concerned, the woman is admissible to all pursuits as well as the man; though in all of them the woman is weaker than the man’ (Republic, 455, Eng. tr. 3 by J. Ll. Davies and D. J. Vaughan, London, 1906, p. 161 f.). But this theoretical judgment relates to social, not religious, equality. Probably the nearest parallel to the welcome given to woman in Christian worship could be found in the cults of Isis and Magna Mater, which became so popular in the early Christian centuries (not to be found in Mithraism; cf. F. Cumont, Les Mystères de Mithra3, Brussels, 1913, p. 183). To the welcome which those cults gave to woman they owed no small measure of their success; by its deeper satisfaction of woman’s needs Christianity was helped to win its victory over them. That there is much in the gospel of the Cross to appeal to the peculiar nature and temperament of woman needs no argument. There is some measure of truth in the assertion that ‘the change from the heroic to the saintly ideal, from the ideal of Paganism to the ideal of Christianity, was a change from a type which was essentially male to one which was essentially feminine’ (Lecky, History of European Morals8, vol. ii. p. 362). But the full truth is seen rather in the perfect humanity of Christ; as F. W. Robertson has well said (Sermons, 2nd ser., London, 1875, p. 231): ‘His heart had in it the blended qualities of both sexes. Our humanity is a whole made up of two opposite poles of character-the manly and the feminine.’
2. A larger life of social fellowship and service was thrown open to women by apostolic Christianity. The story of the primitive Church significantly begins with the inclusion of women in the apostolic meetings for prayer (Acts 1:14). Their presence and activity are clearly illustrated by the references to Tabitha (9:36), Mary the mother of John Mark (12:12), Lydia (16:14), Damaris (17:34), Priscilla (18:2). The story of Sapphira (5:7f.) implies the comparatively independent membership and responsibility of women within the Christian community. Priscilla illustrates their active evangelism (18:26). Attention is expressly called to the ‘multitudes’ of women converts added to the Church (5:14). The story of Thekla (Acts of Paul and Thekla, in F. C. Conybeare’s Monuments of Early Christianity2, London, 1896, pp. 61-88) doubtless rests on some historic basis. ‘Thekla became the type of the female Christian teacher, preacher, and baptiser, and her story was quoted as early as the second century as a justification of the right of women to teach and to baptise’ (W. M. Ramsay, The Church in the Roman Empire, London, 1893, p. 375). Clement of Rome, at the end of the century, refers to the sufferings endured by women under the Neronian persecution (Ep. ad Cor. i. 6). The spread of Christianity amongst women of high rank is probably exemplified in Pomponia Graecina (Tacitus, Annals, xiii. 32), the wife of Plautius, the conqueror of Britain. Another probable example is supplied by Domitilla (banished in a.d. 96), the niece of the Emperor Domitian (Dio Cassius, lxvii. 14).
The details of Church life which we gather from the Pauline Epistles, particularly as to the Church at Corinth, amply confirm what has been said (e.g. Philippians 4:2-3, 1 Corinthians 1:11; the numerous salutations to women in Romans 16). Paul speaks of Phœbe as a ‘deaconess’ of the Church at Cenchreae (Romans 16:1), in terms that suggest her ability and will to give generous help to poorer Christians. The deaconesses of whom Pliny speaks, early in the 2nd cent. (Ep. x. 96), were slave girls. It is clear that women equally with men could be regarded as the organs of the prophetic spirit in the Corinthian Church (cf. Priscilla and Maximilla among the Montanists), since Paul desires that every woman praying or prophesying shall have her head veiled (1 Corinthians 11:5). This is a corollary from the admission of women into the Church, since Christian fellowship is essentially constituted by the gift of the Spirit (Romans 8:14). To this proof of woman’s religious equality with man there seems to be no necessary contradiction in the fact that Paul a little later (1 Corinthians 14:34) forbids women to speak (λαλεῖν) in the churches (see, however, the Commentaries on this disputed passage); the contrast simply shows that the Spirit could over-ride ordinary social conventions (cf. the prophesying of the four daughters of Philip the evangelist, Acts 21:9; the virginity of these, as of the daughters named in 1 Corinthians 7:36, does not yet constitute an ‘order’). In the Pastoral Epistles we find a regular roll of ‘widows’ (see art. Widows), who have provision made for them by the Church (1 Timothy 5:3 f.; cf. Acts 6:1; Acts 9:39; Acts 9:41). Thus Christianity met the physical needs of a class specially likely to suffer (cf. E. Renan, Les Apôtres, Paris, 1866, p. 122), as it met the spiritual needs of women in general.
3. The place of women in marriage gained a higher interpretation. The Greek world is characterized by the practical absence of family life in the best sense; the Greek wife lived in seclusion and ignorance. ‘The courtesan was the one free woman of Athens’ (Lecky, op. cit., ii. 293). The Roman matron had indeed held a high place in the ancient Roman home, though she passed into the absolute legal power of her husband by the older type of religions marriage. Under the early Roman Empire, the position of married women was often one of social and legal independence (Friedländer, Roman Life and Manners, Eng. tr. , i. 236), but this was the outcome of the newer type of marriage as a civil contract; its laxity of divorce and the break-up of the older family life show its peculiar perils. Roman morality, in fact, broke down, here as elsewhere, because it had not found its reinforcement and transfiguration in religion (cf. W. Warde Fowler, The Religious Experience of the Roman People, London, 1911, p. 466). It was in the identification of morality and religion that the strength of Judaism lay. The Jewish wife, it is true, held a legal position decidedly inferior to that of the husband. But the relationship was redeemed by the quality of the humanity which was so typical a product of the OT religion. Consequently, the family life of the Hebrew-Jewish people, in some measure, prepared for the applications of the principle of woman’s religions equality made by apostolic Christianity (cf. the fine portrait of the ‘virtuous woman’ in Proverbs 31:10 f.). What these were may be seen from Paul’s statement of the mutual relationship of husband and wife (Ephesians 5:22-33). Not only is the spirit of that relationship to be the new law of love, but the relationship itself is made sacramental by its comparison with that existing between Christ and the Church. We can hardly exaggerate the gulf that separates this idea of marriage from that in which the relationship is primarily physical. Indeed, the religious disabilities of women seem to rest, at least in part, on primitive sexual tabus (cf. W., Robertson Smith, The Religion of the Semites2, London, 1894, pp. 299 n. , 379 n. ; A. E, Crawley, The Mystic Rose, London, 1902, p. 52). Christianity, in principle, if not always in practice, has lifted woman above the sexual level, at which her chief raison d’être is the gratification of man’s passions, and has joined her personality to his, as contributory to a common social life. Marriage is to be held in honour among all (Hebrews 13:4; cf. 1 Timothy 4:3). Paul, indeed, prefers celibacy because of the peculiar conditions of the time (i.e. on eschatological grounds). But he recognizes both the innocence of the sexual tie and the equal claims of the man and the woman in regard to it (1 Corinthians 7:3 f.)-surely a disproof of any ‘asceticism’ in the ordinary sense of the word. The emphasis on chastity (6:13f., Ephesians 5:3), so characteristic of early Christian ethics, is based on the principle that the body is the temple of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19); the condemnation of extramarital sexual relationships is the natural complement of the attitude to marriage itself (1 Thessalonians 4:4). The moral tie that unites the Christian even to an unbelieving partner is fully recognized (1 Corinthians 7:12 f.); the unbelieving husband may be won by the conduct of the Christian wife (1 Peter 3:1), which is a better adornment than that of outward apparel (v. 3f.; cf. 1 Timothy 2:9). The ideals of Christianity in the 1st cent. in regard to womanly conduct are well summarized in the exhortation of Clement of Rome: ‘Let us guide our women toward that which is good: let them show forth their lovely disposition of purity; let them prove their sincere affection of gentleness; let them make manifest the moderation of their tongue through their silence; let them show their love, not in factious preferences but without partiality towards all them that fear God, in holiness’ (ad Cor. xxi. 7, The Apostolic Fathers, tr. J. B. Lightfoot, London, 1891; cf. Titus 2:3 f.).
4. The limitations of apostolic Christianity in regard to women were such as were inevitable from its historical origin and eschatological outlook. The Jewish training of Paul, for example, accounts for much in his attitude, such as the argument that women should be veiled ‘because of the angels’ (1 Corinthians 11:10). The expectation of a speedy end largely explains his preference of celibacy to marriage (1 Corinthians 7:7; cf. Revelation 14:4), which is certainly not due to his Judaism (cf. Bousset, op. cit., p. 493). The asceticism of Paul must be ascribed to a cause different from and more innocent than the dualistic (Greek) asceticism of the later Church. Naturally, some of the premisses in the NT arguments for woman’s subjection to man no longer appeal to us, even if the conclusion does (e.g. 1 Timothy 2:12 f.). Westermarck’s criticism of this ultimately Jewish emphasis on woman’s subjection to man, as being ‘agreeable to the selfishness of men’ (Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas, i. 654), ignores the atmosphere which redeems it, i.e. its moral and religious interpretation in the Christianity of the NT. We should rather recognize, as Dobschütz does (Christian Life in the Primitive Church, p. 377) in regard to Paul’s asceticism, that ‘Christ triumphs in him over the spirit of the age.’
Literature-L. Friedländer, Sittengeschichte Roms8, Leipzig, 1910, Roman Life and Manners, Eng. tr. of 7th ed., 3 vols., London, 1908-09, vol. i. ch. v.; W. E. H. Lecky, History of European Morals8, 2 vols., do., 1888, ii. 275-372; C. L. Brace, Gesta Christi, do., 1882, bk. i. chs. iii., iv.; R. S. Storrs, The Divine Origin of Christianity, do., 1885, pp. 146 f., 466f.; C. von Weizsäcker, Das apostolische Zeitalter der christlichen kirche, Freiburg i. B., 1886. Eng. tr. , The Apostolic Age, 2 vols., London, 1895, bk. v. ch. iii. § 7; J. Donaldson. ‘The Position of Women among the Early Christians,’ CR lvi. [2] 433; J. Gottschick, ‘Ehe, christliche’, in PRE 3 v. 182f.; W. F. Adeney, art. ‘Woman,’ In HDB lv. 933-936; E. von Dobschütz. Die urchristliehe Gemeinde, Leipzig, 1902, Eng. tr. , Christian Life in the Primitive Church, London, 1904; A. Harnack, Mission und Ausbreitung des Christentums2, Leipzig, 1906, Eng. tr. , The Mission and Expansion of Christianity2, 2 vols., London, 1908, vol. ii. ch. ii. § 4 (best survey of the data); S. Dill, Roman Society from Nero to Marcus Aurelius2, do., 1905; J. McCabe, The Religion of Woman, do., 1905 (attacks the Christian claims); W. Bousset, Die Religion des Judentums im neutest. Zeitalter2, Berlin, 1906; E. Westermarck, The Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas, i. [4] ch. xxvi., ii. [5] ch. xl.; T. G. Tucker, Life in the Roman World of Nero and St. Paul, do., 1910, ch. xvi.; A. Robertson and A Plummer, ICC , ‘1 Corinthians,’ Edinburgh, 1911, pp. 130-162, 230-236, 324-328; C. Clemen, Primitive Christianity and its Non-Jewish Sources, Edinburgh. 1912, Index, s.v. ‘Woman’; W. M. Ramsay, The Teaching of Paul in Terms of the Present Day, London, 1913, sect. xlv., ‘The Family in the Teaching of Paul.’
H. Wheeler Robinson.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Woman (2)
WOMAN.—The relation of Christ to woman is one of the most interesting and one of the most difficult topics in the Gospels. In order to estimate it aright it will be necessary to say something of the position of woman at the time when our Lord was born. In the East generally, the penal code of Babylon well describes her abject humiliation: ‘If a husband say unto his wife, Thou art not my wife, he shall pay half a mina and be free. But if a woman repudiate her husband, she shall be drowned in the river.’ And her position was not much better in Judaea, where any, even the most frivolous, pretext could be given for divorce. ‘The Jewish Law unquestionably allowed divorce on almost any ground’ (Edersheim, Life and Times, ii. 333). The school of Hillel declared it a sufficient ground for divorce if a woman had spoiled her husband’s dinner. In Greece the dignity of married life was very inadequately appreciated; even Socrates invites the courtesan Aspasia to talk with him ‘as to how she might ply her occupation with most profit.’ In Rome there were signs of better things. There was always a halo over the old Roman matron, and though time dissipated this, and divorce was so common that Seneca tells us that ladies reckoned their ages not by the consuls, but by the number of their husbands,* [1] yet women were gradually acquiring more and more influence and being more widely educated. In parts of the Roman Empire, especially in Macedonia, ‘her social position was higher than in most parts of the civilized world. At Philippi, at Thessalonica and Berœa, the women—in some cases certainly, in all probably, ladies of birth and rank—take an active part with the Apostle (Paul).… The extant Macedonian inscriptions seem to assign to the sex a higher social influence than is common among the civilized nations of antiquity.’† [2] But however this position might vary in different parts of the Empire, it was clearly exceptional for the relation of woman to man to be other than a degrading one. The many exceptions only draw attention to the prevailing feeling.
This relation was necessarily profoundly modified by our Lord’s birth of the virgin Mother. This fact, though it could have been known to only a very few during His lifetime, had nevertheless its own particular bearing. It brought Mary into a prominence which otherwise would have been unaccountable. It is true that Joseph may have died when our Lord was a child or before He began His ministry, but even this does not fully account for the position the mother occupies in the Gospels. It is not much we learn, for we know it was her habit to ponder over and keep to herself the secrets connected with His early life (Luke 2:19; Luke 2:51), but that one scene at the village wedding (John 2) is sufficient to give us a clear conception of her importance. She alone knew how great He was, and how wonderful the destiny that was promised Him. And yet she was not so overwhelmed by its greatness as to lose her own personality. The ordinary Oriental mother would not have presumed to guide or direct the life of one so mysteriously born and whose future was so infinitely great. But she has so long been accustomed to suggest, if not to direct, that it is natural for her, when she sees an opportunity for the display of His power and the satisfaction of a need, to point it out. The reply, seemingly so harsh to us, only marks out her position the more clearly. The words, ‘Woman, what have I to do with thee? mine hour is not yet come,’ could not have been said to one who had occupied but a subservient position in the home; on the contrary, they suggest that for many years she had been accustomed to speak freely as to her wishes for Him, and that this time was now over. From this it may be inferred that our Lord rejoiced in the true development of womanhood, was glad that the mother should not be a mere drudge or slave, but one occupying a definite position with definite duties and responsibilities. Further, it is clear from her question that He had not checked her interest in the wider events of the world and the Kingdom of God. A veil will always rest over the frequent communings between the Mother and the Son, but it is quite clear from the use of the expression ‘mine hour,’ that she had been led to think of and desire that time of manifestation when His Personality should be revealed. From the beginning, even before His birth, her mind had often been occupied with that revelation from the spiritual world in which the angel had spoken of a ‘throne’ and a ‘kingdom’ (Luke 1:32-33). Her mind, then, was not to be confined to the limited sphere of the household duties of the peasant’s home. At the same time, it is clear that the natural desire, even in one so humble and lowly as she was, to have some share in the events which would lead to the bringing in of the Kingdom, was not to be gratified. Her part lay in the careful training, educating, and helping of that great Life which was entrusted to her.
It is singular, and some have thought that it was designed with a view to checking the Mariolatry which in the years to come was to dominate a large section of the Church, that Jesus refuses to allow the unique distinction which Mary certainly had in being the mother of the world’s Redeemer to weigh against the worth of religious character. It was natural that one who recognized the beauty of His character and the power of His words should say, ‘Blessed be the womb that bare thee, and the breasts that thou didst suck’ (Luke 11:27); but the answer, whilst admitting the blessing, pointed to a higher one within the reach of all. ‘Yea rather, blessed are they that hear the word of God and keep it’ (v. 28). This teaching is akin to that He gave when some one directed His attention to the fact that His mother and brethren were waiting to see Him. ‘Who is my mother, and who are my brethren?’—He cried—and then stretching forth His hand towards His disciples, He said, ‘Behold my mother and my brethren! For whosoever shall do the will of my Father which is in heaven, he is my brother, and sister, and mother’ (Matthew 12:47 ff.). From this it is clear that whilst He gave her, who was blessed indeed amongst women in being His mother, full opportunities for the development of her mind and spirit, never checking during those thirty years those natural desires to know all that He would tell her of the Kingdom of which the angel had spoken to her, yet He chiefly valued in her the growth of those spiritual graces which had led to her being selected for the high position she held. And nothing is more remarkable than the response she gave. During those three years she almost disappears from sight; and when at the very last she is seen beside the cross, her attitude expresses that dignity, reserve, and self-control which she had learned of Him. When the great tragedy is being enacted, and the greatest possible excitement prevails, she, like her Divine Son, maintains an attitude of quiet self-restraint. The Oriental, even the Jewish, mother would have been prostrate, with dishevelled hair and garments; Mary is found ‘standing’ (John 19:25). There is no mention of words, not even of tears. Silently and quietly at the direction of her Son she leaves the cross, though we know that a sword was at the time piercing her through and through.
We have given much time to the study of the Virgin Mother because she was the only woman really educated by Christ, in the sense that St. John and St. Peter were, and we see in the little that is told of her what a true woman ought to be. The relation of Christ to the other women of the Gospels is just what we should expect from our knowledge of His relation to His mother. There is a freedom which surprises even His disciples (John 4:27), and a readiness to help which laid His character open to misconception (Luke 7:39). There is also the most delicate sensitiveness to the inner consciousness of shame in the sinner which at once wins confidence. His hatred of the sin never dominates over His love of the sinner. Simon was right in feeling that a prophet who knew the character of the woman who had intruded into his house would never have allowed her such close fellowship as the Saviour allowed. None but He, the sinless, could have done so. Again, none but He would have shown such patience as was seen in His treatment of the woman of Samaria (John 4). When He makes it plain that He knows her sin, and she changes the subject, He does not refuse to follow her, but makes the very controversy she introduces a means of spiritual help. It was this combination of strength and tenderness, of respect for the individuality of the soul and yet desire to disentangle it from its sins, that gave Him just that same pre-eminent place amongst the women as amongst the men of His day. They were glad to be of what assistance they could to His work, and ministered of their substance (Luke 8:3). It is characteristic that whilst they show a courage which surpasses that of the Twelve, they also show a wealth of devotion which is unintelligible to them. The presence of some near the cross, where they would be exposed to insults and rudeness, is as remarkable as St. Mary’s gift of the alabaster cruse of ointment in the last week of His life. They respond more readily and easily to the power of His words and Personality. From Martha our Lord obtains a confession, even fuller and more far-reaching than that of St. Peter (John 11:24-27). And from the heathen Canaanitish woman He received one of the most remarkable illustrations of faith, the woman’s insight penetrating beyond the words to the love which lay underneath them (Matthew 15:22 ff., Mark 7:25 ff.).
The great respect in which Jesus held the position of woman, the high dignity He attached to it, is shown not only by His actions and words, but by the new sanctity which He gave to marriage. The words, ‘The twain shall become one flesh’ (Matthew 19:5 = Mark 10:3), placed the wife at once on a level with the husband, and made the divorces that were so common impossible. Directly this teaching was received, it was impossible that woman should be deprived of her right as wife on the flimsiest excuse, or without any excuse at all. The revolution such a declaration made is realized only when we hear the comment of the spiritually minded disciples, ‘If the case of the man is so with his wife, it is not expedient to marry’ (Matthew 19:10). That woman had a position in life of equal importance with that of man is made plain by the whole story of the Gospels: Anna, Elisabeth, the Virgin Mary, Martha, Mary, and Mary Magdalene rivalling in their own spheres St. Peter, St. John, St. James, St. Andrew. Without the part played by woman, that story would have been altogether incomplete.
One other suggestion as to the influence of woman which St. Matthew gives us is as interesting as it is unexpected. The dream of Pilate’s wife is an evidence of the power that Christ’s life and teaching exercised beyond the narrow circle of Jewish thought. Pilate, governor though he is, neither hears nor sees anything, and even when face to face with Christ is only puzzled not convinced. His wife, on the other hand, is deeply interested in all that she hears. Her mind is full of the doings of the Prophet of Nazareth. Her sleep is disturbed. She wakes frightened, and so convinced of the greatness of the issue her husband is trying, that she dares to interfere, though without success (Matthew 27:19). Not too much can be made of this; but it is an indication, which the Gospel narrative emphasizes, that women are more susceptible to religious impressions than men, and are ready to make larger sacrifices. As women ministered at the Birth, the Presentation in the Temple, and during those early years when His mother was His chief teacher, so they ministered at the Entombment, when they anointed His body; at the Resurrection, when they carried the news to the frightened disciples; and at the Ascension, when they with the Apostles and the rest of His disciples received His blessing. Cf. next article.
Literature.—Edersheim, LT [2].] ; Dill, Roman Society from Nero to Marcus Aurelius; PRE [4] 3 [4]6 , art. ‘Familie und Ehe’; Brace, Gesta Christi; Church, Pascal, and other Serm. 264; Moore, God is Love, 184; Lightfoot, Serm. on Special Occasions, 220; Gunsaulus, Paths to the City of God, 232.
G. H. S. Walpole.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Woman
A female human. The picture of woman revealed in the Bible is far from one-dimensional. Frequently subjected to the rule of her male counterpart, often adored for her beauty and purity, and occasionally praised for her leadership in times of crisis, woman emerges from the pages of the Bible with as much complexity as man.
Woman in Bible times lived in a patriarchal society. Both the Old and New Testament worlds normally restricted the role of woman primarily to the sphere of home and family, although a few strong women emerged as leaders. In religious life she was subordinate to man. Father and then husband or other male relatives gave protection and direction to woman. Jesus raised the window for women. He paid attention to them. His manner was inclusive and acknowledged their place in the kingdom He proclaimed. By what He did and what He said He elevated the status of woman. Paul also caught Jesus' vision. Although Paul faced the need to preserve order in the early church, he exclaimed in Galatians 3:28 : “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus.” The final barrier preventing woman from fully participating in the kingdom of God toppled under Jesus' influence.
What the Old Testament Teaches About Woman The Old Testament shows woman in at least two lights. The predominant view is one of woman in subjection to man. However, at times, woman is also the object of adoration and admiration. The creation narratives in Genesis foreshadow two different perspectives regarding woman. In the account in Genesis 1:26-30 , man and woman are created simultaneously (Genesis 1:27 ). Woman, like man, is made in the image of God. Together, man and woman reflect the image of God. Woman is not in an inferior place in creation. In Genesis 2:7-25 , man is created before woman. In this second account woman is viewed as being created for man as his helper. This account is often cited as supportive of the view that woman should remain subject to man since she has a subordinate position in creation, but the narrative describes woman as a “suitable partner” (Genesis 2:20 REB) for whom man leaves his family.
The subordination of woman appears more clearly in a close reading the Ten Commandments. The Commandments are addressed to men, a fact evidenced by the use of masculine pronouns. A major of evidence of women's subordination is the reference to man not coveting any of his neighbor's property. His wife is included in the list of possessions (Exodus 20:17 ). Marriage and divorce are areas in which woman's rights were subordinate to those of man. If a woman about to be married was suspected of not being a virgin, she was required to submit to a test. If her virginity was not established, she could be stoned to death at her father's door (Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ). No such requirement was made for a man. Adultery was seen as a crime against a husband's rights. Both male and female caught in the act of adultery were stoned, but it was the husband's rights which were being vindicated (Deuteronomy 22:22 ). A husband who was jealous of his wife and had some fears about her faithfulness could take her to the priest and have her submit to an intricate test to determine her innocence or guilt (Numbers 5:11-31 ). No such avenue was open for a woman who suspected her husband of being unfaithful.
Divorce was also slanted toward the husband. He could obtain a divorce from his wife “because he finds something objectionable about her” (Deuteronomy 24:1 NRSV). The phrase “something objectionable” was variously interpreted by the Jews and ran the gamut from adultery to burned toast!
Inequity between boy and girl babies existed from the very beginning of life. A mother who bore a girl baby was considered unclean for twice as long as a mother who bore a male child. During her “purifying” time after the birth of a baby, a mother was not to “touch any holy thing, or come into the sanctuary, until the days of her purification are completed” (Leviticus 12:2-5 ).
Aside from specific inequities in the way men and women were treated, the Old Testament, particularly the Book of Proverbs, warned of tempting, “loose” (Leviticus 2:16 NRSV), “loud,” “ignorant” ( Leviticus 9:13 NRSV), and “contentious” ( Leviticus 21:9 NRSV) women. Women were also seen as fearful ( Isaiah 19:16 ). Proverbs 31:1 also pictured the hardworking, praiseworthy, “virtuous” woman.
Woman's most positive image was wife and mother. Against the predominant pattern of women in subordinate roles, several positive images of women emerged from the Old Testament. Undoubtedly, woman was venerated in her role as wife and mother. The Ten Commandments cite a son's duty to honor both his father and mother (Exodus 20:12 ). The ideal woman, eulogized in Proverbs 31:1 , is a wife and mother who fulfills well both roles in addition to engaging profitably in the business world.
The birth of children was a sign of God's favor bestowed upon a good woman. A particular sign of God's favor was the birth of male children (Genesis 29:31-30:24 ). The story of Ruth is a good example of a traditional woman who was admired for her role as a good daughter-in-law. Ruth and Naomi, whose husbands died, were women of worth whom God aided by sending Boaz as their protector (Ruth 1-4 ).
A thread which crosses the dominant pattern of the subjection of women is one which depicts women positively. Wisdom, which held high value for the Hebrew people, was personified as “she” (Proverbs 1:20 ; Proverbs 7:4 ). The prophet Isaiah used a mother's love for her child as a model for God's love for His people. (Isaiah 49:15 : Isaiah 66:13 ). Several women—including Miriam, Deborah, Huldah, and Esther—earned the respect and admiration of the Israelite nation by playing a significant role in times of national crisis. See Deborah ; Esther ; Huldah ; Miriam .
What the New Testament Teaches About Woman Jesus was able to retain the best in the Hebrew tradition and yet cut away some of the rigid structure that restricted it. He was able to do the same for woman. Without radically changing her roles, Jesus enlarged and transformed women's possibilities for a full life. His manner and teachings elevated her status and gave her an identity and a cause. Jesus' manner in His interactions with women is at least as significant as His teachings about woman. At the risk of censure from a male-oriented society, Jesus talked to women, responded to their touch, healed them, received their emotional and financial support, and used them as main characters in His stories. Jesus saw women as persons. Martha wanted Jesus to make Mary help with the serving duties, but Jesus affirmed Mary's choice to learn as a disciple. Women of that day could not be disciples of rabbis, but Jesus recognized women's potential for intelligent thought and commitment (Luke 10:38-42 ).
On another occasion, Jesus welcomed a woman's anointing His head as indicative of her understanding of His real mission. Instead of rejecting her public display or chiding her for extravagance, He commended her for her act of love. He treated her as a person of insight and feeling (Mark 14:3-9 ). The woman at the well in Samaria is another example of Jesus seeing women as persons. Jesus would not have talked theology to her if He had related to her primarily as a woman or as a Samaritan. However, He saw her as a person, so He was not restricted in His interaction by her sex or race (John 4:1-42 ). The woman caught in adultery was treated as a person. Her action was not condoned by Jesus, but neither did He allow her to be subjected to a double standard by her male accusers. Jesus offered her new possibilities of living with His directive: “Neither do I condemn you. Go your way, and from now on do not sin again” (John 7:53-8:11 NRSV).
Besides seeing women as persons, Jesus involved them in His earthly ministry. Luke mentioned a group of women who traveled with Jesus as He journeyed from town to town (Luke 8:1-3 ). Among them were Mary of Magdala, Joanna, and Susanna. These women provided financial support for Jesus and the twelve apostles. Women also proclaimed the gospel. In His encounter with the Samaritan woman, Jesus revealed Himself as the Messiah. She immediately left and began telling people, “He told me everything I have ever done” (John 4:39 NRSV). Many Samaritans believed in Jesus because of the woman's testimony.
Women were the first at the tomb after the resurrection; and, as such, they were the first to broadcast His victory over death (Luke 23:55-24:11 ). Matthew, Mark, and Luke all called attention to the loyal women who participated in Jesus' Galilean ministry and followed Him all the way to the cross and the grave. They shared the greatest news: “He is not here, but has risen” (Luke 24:5 NRSV).
As a master teacher, Jesus used parables to teach about the kingdom of God. He reached out to the women in His audience by telling stories about their life experiences. By capturing their attention and commitment through parables, He offered them a place in the kingdom.
God's seeking activity is the theme of two parables, the lost sheep begins, “What man of you” and the parable of the lost coin, “What woman.” The woman looking for the lost coin represented God's activity in seeking the lost, just as the man represented God's seeking activity. Jesus appealed to women through their housekeeping experiences. He elevated their experiences by likening them to God's activity.
The twin parables in Luke 13:18-20 point to the way the kingdom of God grows. Again Jesus used the life experience of woman to illuminate an eternal truth. Jesus meant for women to identify with His mission. He meant to involve them in spreading the gospel. His parables taught that both women and men would be involved in the kingdom work.
Jesus spoke directly to the matter of treating a woman as a sex object. In the Sermon on the Mount, He redefined adultery to include a lustful look (Matthew 5:28 ). While making religion a matter of the heart instead of the law, Jesus elevated women to the level of full personhood, from the level of sexual exploitation. Marriage and divorce were issues of great importance to women, since their lives were lived mainly in the roles of wife and mother. Their emotional, social, and financial security was dependent on their marriages. Jesus said that divorce is a testimony to the hardness of the human heart, not God's will (Matthew 19:1-9 ). To those who were casually divorcing their wives, Jesus stated plainly that they were committing adultery. Responsive to the plight of women, He offset the male bias toward divorce and strengthened marriage as a permanent union. (See Matthew 5:31-32 ; Matthew 19:1-12 ; Mark 10:1-12 ; Luke 16:18 .)
Jesus' parable of the ten maidens, five foolish and five wise, hints at the way Jesus saw and dealt with woman (Matthew 25:1-13 ). He saw women as neither inferior nor superior, but simply as persons. He saw their potential, their sinfulness, their strengths and weaknesses, and He dealt with them directly. As a group, He elevated their status and strengthened their participation and influence in their world. But as individuals, He treated them as friends and disciples.
Paul's theological vision (Galatians 3:28 ) was that there was no partiality among persons with God. Yet Paul felt the tension of maintaining order in the New Testament church. He often fell back on Jewish social customs of the day to ensure that the fledgling church would not be seen unfavorably by the rest of the world. A man of his time, he still had a vision toward which he strove.
Paul moved ahead of his Jewish background when he called for mutual submission between husbands and wives (Ephesians 5:21-33 ). The prevailing custom was for wives to be submissive. However, Paul reflected Jesus' concern that all relationships reflect the grace extended by God.—Responsibilities of both husbands and wives to love each other follow the initial exhortation to submit to each other in love. In other passages Paul implied a hierarchy of submission from God, to Christ, to man, to woman, to child as the sequence. However, the tone of this hierarchy was not military, but voluntary and self-sacrificing. Here again was a concession to order and not the ideal (1 Corinthians 11:2-16 ; 1 Corinthians 14:33-40 ; 1 Timothy 2:8-15 ).
Paul wrote in response to problems in churches. Paul was concerned that the Christians should “give no offense to Jews or to Greeks or to the church of God” (1 Corinthians 10:32 NRSV). Therefore, he wrote responses to the way specific problems should be handled in different churches. Some of his remarks do not have direct relevance to our day. For example, he spoke of meat offered to idols ( Romans 14:1 ), and women wearing jewelry and braiding their hair (1 Timothy 2:8-12 ). In contrast to these specific problems, Paul espoused basic principles which have relevance to every age: (1) A Christian should take into account how his or her actions may influence others (1 Corinthians 8:13 ) and (2) A Christian should do all things to the glory of God (1 Corinthians 10:31 ).
Of equal weight with what Paul said regarding women is how he related to them. Paul welcomed women as colaborers in the churches and commended them for their gifts and faithfulness (Romans 16:1 ,Romans 16:1,16:3-5 ). Phoebe, Prisca, Lydia, and others were seen as partners in the gospel. To the Roman church Paul said, “I commend to you our sister Phoebe, a deacon of the church at Cenchreae” (Romans 16:1 NRSV). He called Phoebe a “benefactor of many and of myself as well” ( Romans 16:2 NRSV). Evidently Paul relied on women to exercise their gifts ( 1 Corinthians 12:1 ) as a part of the body of Christ. See Deacon ; Offices; Phoebe ; Prisca .
Summary Woman is the subject of many questions and controversies in the church today. Is she equal to man? Can she exercise the same spiritual gifts as man in the church? Should she be subject to her husband in all matters? As Christians turn to the Bible for guidance in responding to these questions, they must be careful not to focus on one verse or passage. The total impact and message of the Bible should become the guiding spirit in answering these and other questions.
The Old Testament clearly subjected woman to the will and protection of her husband. She was extolled for performing her important roles as wife and mother. On occasion she rose above those roles and led the Jewish nation in times of crisis.
The New Testament brings a different picture of woman into focus. Jesus, and later Paul, elevated the status of woman so that she could be a full participant in the kingdom of God. However, she is urged to use her responsibility as well as her freedom to find her place in the body of Christ. The spirit of freedom and love in Christ is woman's as well as man's. See Divorce ; Family ; Marriage ; Sex, Teaching on.
Kay W. Shurden
Holman Bible Dictionary - Strange Woman
See Adventuress .
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Woman
Lamentations 1:17 (a) The city where GOD had placed His name had become a vile, filthy community. That which emanated from this city was offensive to GOD, and shameful in every aspect. Her manners and her ways were repulsive to the holy GOD who had chosen her. (See also Ezekiel 16:30; Ezekiel 23:44; Ezekiel 36:17).
Zechariah 5:7 (b) This woman represents Israel from the commercial standpoint. The ephah, which was a measure, represents her business enterprises. It was the burden of the nation, as it still is. Their object in life was to make money, gain power, and rise to places of distinction.
Matthew 13:33 (b) Here is a type of apostate Christendom, and false religions. They use much of the Word of GOD (the meal), but they mingle with it their false and evil explanations which poison the souls of those who partake of it. Every false religion, in so-called Christendom, uses much of the Bible in their writings and utterances. They poison these messages by interjecting their own explanation and false deductions which produce wrong conclusions. The result is that CHRIST JESUS is not honored and the Word of GOD is dishonored.
Revelation 12:1 (b) This woman represents the nation of Israel with her twelve patriarchs (or tribes), and JESUS was the child born from Israel.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal
BEING the first-born son in His mother's house, it would fall to the Holy Child Jesus to perform the part laid down for the first-born son in the feast of unleavened bread. And thus it was that after Joseph had struck the lintel and the two doorposts with the blood that was in the basin, and after the whole family had hurriedly eaten each a portion of the pascal lamb, and a piece of the unleavened bread, at that appointed moment the eldest son of the house came forward and said, Father, what mean you by this service? What mean you by the blood, and the unleavened bread, and the bitter herbs? And Joseph would say, It is the Lord's passover, because He passed over the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt, when He smote the Egyptians and delivered our houses. And Joseph, and Mary, and Jesus, and James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas, and their sisters, all bowed their heads and sang the Hundred and Thirteenth and the Hundred and Fourteenth Psalms. And once every year till the Holy Child came to the full stature of the Christ of God: every returning passover He entered deeper and deeper into this great ordinance, both hearing Joseph and asking him questions. Till He came to be of more understanding about the feast of unleavened bread than all His teachers: and understood both the blood, and the bread, and the bitter herbs, far better than all the ancients.
As long as He was still a child, He spake as a child, He understood as a child, He thought as a child. And the great haste that the unleavened bread signified, was enough for His imagination and His mind and His heart as long as He was a child. But then, as time went on, He would watch His mother at her housewife-work, and would observe how her leaven spread till her three measures of meal was all leavened. And as He meditated on the process going on under His eyes, He would again see in the leaven and in the meal another parable of the kingdom of God. And He would lay up the leaven and the meal in His mind and in His imagination and in His heart for some of His future sermons. And thus it was that on that great day of teaching and preaching when He sat by the sea-side, He had already given out parable after parable, till any other preacher but Himself would have been exhausted; but He still went on as fresh and as interesting and as instructive as when He began in the morning. "I am full of matter," said Elihu. "The spirit within me constraineth me. I will speak that I may be refreshed." And our Lord was like Elihu in that. For though He had already that day illustrated and applied the kingdom of God by a long and splendid series of parables, His mind was still as full of matter as ever. And the more He tried to put the kingdom of God into this and that parable, the more He saw other things in that inexhaustible kingdom for which no parable had as yet been provided. And thus it was that at this point, and as if to teach them to keep their eyes always open for their own future preaching, their Master suddenly turned to His disciples and asked them whether any of them had any light to cast upon the subject in hand. As if He were asking some of them to help Him out with His great subject, He said to them-"Whereunto shall I go on to liken the kingdom of God?" And when none of them had a word more to say concerning the inwardness, and the hiddenness, and the all-assimilating power, of that kingdom, He called to mind a former reflection of His own which came to Him one day beside His mother's kneading-trough. He remembered that day her three measures of meal, and the way that she took to turn that raw meal into wholesome and palatable bread. "And so is the kingdom of God in some respects," He said. "It is in some respects like leaven which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal till the whole was leavened." And here are we tonight, and in this church, suddenly transported back into Mary's little kitchen in Nazareth, in order to learn there yet another of her Son's parables about the kingdom of God.
Beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, He said to His disciples on one occasion. Now, what did He mean by that saying, do you suppose? What would you say was the leaven of the Pharisees? I do not know any more than you do, but I will tell you what I think. Leaven, to begin with, is something that is hidden and inward, and then it works inwardly and secretly, till it works its way through the whole surrounding measures of meal. Now, what was the leaven of the Pharisees? It must have been something inward and hidden, to begin with. And then it had by that time worked its way through their whole heart and character till they were the Pharisees who were bent on our Lord's death and destruction. Well, a little lump of leaven that a woman can hold in her hand does not look to be much, nor to have much power in it. But wait and see. And a little self-esteem in a young man's heart is not very much to be suspected or denounced, is it? But wait and see. Let that young man set out on his life with that little lump of self-esteem in his secret heart, and, as sure as he lives, this will be his experience, and the experience of all who have to do with him. So many and so unavoidable are the oppositions, and the contradictions, and the collisions of life, that if his self-esteem is not by means of all these things, and by means of the grace of God co-operating with all these things, chastened and subdued and cast out, then all these collisions, and corrections, and contradictions, will only the more increase and exasperate his self-esteem, till he will end his days as full of self-righteousness, and pride, and hardness of heart, as very Lucifer himself. On the other hand, humility, that is to say disesteem of a man's self, is so much good leaven hidden in a good man's heart. These are the words of well-known master in Israel,-"Humility does not consist in having a worse opinion of ourselves than we deserve, or in abasing ourselves lower than we really are. But as all virtue is founded in truth, so humility is founded in a true and just sense of our weakness, misery, and sin. So much so, that he who rightly feels and lives in this sense of his condition lives in humility." That is to say, he who at all rightly knows himself is done for ever with all self-esteem. There is not left in all his inward parts so much as a single ounce of that leaven of the Pharisees. But that sect in Israel were so set against all introspection, as they called it: their doctors of the law so denounced that sanctifying habit of mind and heart, that their scholars ended with crucifying the Lord of Glory. To such a lump of villainy and wickedness will a little leaven of self-esteem grow under the fit conditions, and in the fit heart, and left fitly alone. Now our Lord saw, only far too well, that evil leaven already at work in His twelve disciples. I do not take it upon me to say how far it is at work in any of you. I will not insist that your self-esteem is eating through your whole heart and is destroying your whole life and character. I will not fall out with you about that. I will not insist on what you call introspection, but I for one both feel and confess the truth of His words when my Lord says to me-Preacher, Beware! lest having discoursed so beautifully on humility to others, you yourself, through your self-esteem, should be a castaway from the kingdom of God. Till it has to be my prayer, with the candle of the Lord in may hand continually-Search me, O God, and know my heart: try me, and know my thoughts: and see if there be any of this wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting!
The Apostle Paul also has this on this same parable: "Purge out therefore the old leaven. Know ye not that a little leaven leaveneth the whole lump? Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth." Now, what is malice and wickedness? We have seen what self-esteem is, and how it works till it leavens the whole lump. But what is the leaven of malice? You may be old enough to know without being told. You may have enough of it in yourself, and you may have suffered enough from it in others; but there are new beginners in self-esteem, and in malice, and the word must be rightly divided to meet their case as well as yours. Now, you who are new beginners in morals and in religion-what think you is malice? For you cannot purge it out, nor keep it purged out, if you do not know it when you see it. Well, malice also is like leaven in this. Its first beginning is so small as not to be worth speaking about in a dignified pulpit. You do not like some one. Nothing is so common, surely, as that. Already, at school, at college, in the office, in the workshop, in the house, you do not like some one. Well, that is your first half-ounce of the leaven of malice. And your feelings toward that man, and your thoughts about him, and your words about him, and your actions toward him, are like the three measures of meal with the little leaven at its heart. You just dislike that man-that is all as yet. But then full-grown men are so leavened with that same dislike that they actually come to hate one another. And-"hates any man the thing he would not kill?" You see then where you are. You see on what road you are travelling. You are travelling on the road of the Pharisees. You are travelling on the road to hell. And there is no surer, no shorter, and no more inevitable, road to hell than hatred, which is just dislike, and umbrage, and a secret grudge, come to their three measures of meal. Malice is bad blood, as we say. It is ill-will. It is resentment. It is revenge. Till it is in God's sight very murder itself; hidden, as yet, it may be from your introspection in its three measures of surrounding and smothering-up meal. And it is while this red-handed murder is still at its early stages of dislike, and antipathy, and animosity, that Paul beseeches you to purge it out. But in order to purge it out. you must take a candle like this to the work. A clear candle like this. You have a neighbour. He may at one time have been a friend. He may never suspect but that he is a friend still. He may be befriending you all the time. But at heart you are not his friend any more. Something has happened to you. Something that you must search out and admit about yourself. However humbling, however self-condemning, however self-hating, it may turn out to be, you cannot be a good and a true man any more till you have found yourself out. Your friend forgot you on some occasion. Or he preferred some one else to you. Or he took his own judgment and conscience for his guide in some matter in which you demanded to dictate to him. Or he got some promotion, or praise, or reward, that you had not humility and love enough to stomach. Track out your heart, sir! Heaven and hell hang on your tracking out your heart in that matter. No. Hell does not hang upon it, for hell has possession of your heart already. That wicked heat in your heart at the mention of his name, that is hell. That blackness which we all see in your very look, that is the smoke of your torment already begun. Purge it out, implores Paul. Ah! it is easy saying purge it out. Did Paul manage to purge it out himself, after all his most earnest preaching about it? No: he did not. No more than you and I. And it was when he had lighted all the candles he could lay his hands on; and when with them all he could not get down to all the malice that was still hiding in his heart, it was then that his Master had mercy on His miserable servant, and said to him, My grace is sufficient for thee: for My strength is made perfect in weakness.
And though Pharisaic self-esteem and diabolical malice are all the instances to which our Lord's parable is applied first by Himself and then by His best Apostle, yet the parable is equally true of all the other leavenings of the devil that are insinuated into our souls. A little of the leaven of pride-think it out, with home-coming illustrations, for yourself. A little of the leaven of anger-think it out, with home-coming illustrations, for yourself. A little of the leaven of suspicion, and of jealousy, and of envy-with illustrations and instances taken from yourself. A little of the leaven of sensuality-"the inconceivable evil of sensuality"-as Newman calls it-with a whole portfolio of illustrations taken from yourself. A foul thought, a foul hint, a foul innuendo, a foul word, a foul image; a foul-mouthed boy in the playground; a foul-mouthed man in the workshop, in the office, in the bothy; a foul-mouthed woman in the workroom, in the kitchen, in the field; a foul book, a foul picture, a foul photograph in a shop-window in passing,-think it out, with a thousand illustrations taken from your own experience, and you will be wiser in this universal leaven of sensuality than all your teachers. You will yet be a master in Israel yourself in such sickening, but at the same time necessary, self-knowledge.
It is surely very striking to discover that while our Lord says so plainly that the kingdom of God is like leaven, yet both He, and His best Apostle, descend into the kingdom of Satan for all their best instances, and all their most pungent applications of the leaven. They would seem in this to leave it to ourselves to apply and to verify the parable in its application to the things of the kingdom of God. Whereunto shall I liken it? He said to His disciples. As much as to say-find out more and better instances, and illustrations, and verifications, for yourselves. And His example, and Paul's example, would seem to say to all preachers-give your people one or two illustrations taken from things they are only too well acquainted with already, and then leave them to prosecute the parable further for themselves. Would, said Moses, that all the Lord's people were prophets! And I will leave this parable where our Lord and His Apostle left it, only saying over it and over you, Would that all the Lord's people wore expositors and preachers, and that out of their own observation and experience!
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - the Woman With the Issue of Blood
OUR Lord was on His way to raise the ruler's little daughter from the dead. Now, this woman who overtook Him on the way was not actually dead like the ruler's little daughter, but she often wished she was, for she was worse than dead. She had tried everything for her deadly disease. There was not a physician far nor near that she had not consulted as to whether he could cure her. She had spent all her living upon physicians, till, today, she is beside herself with downright despair. And so am I. I am not dead, but I often wish I were. For I, too, am all my life sick to death. And I have tried everything. Every preacher, every author, every discipline, every medicine of the soul. And I am worse tonight than ever I was. I am in a strait betwixt two. I love my work more than ever. I love my family more than ever. No man ever loved his family more than Martin Luther did, but all the time he told his hearers who had head enough and heart enough to understand him, that he had no real joy in his children because of his sin. And I, for one, am exactly like Luther in that.
But to return to the text. "And a certain woman, which had an issue of blood twelve years, and had suffered many things of many physicians, and had spent all that she had, and was nothing bettered but rather worse-when she heard of Jesus, came in the press behind, and touched the hem of His garment. For she said within herself, If I may but touch His clothes I shall be whole. And straightway the fountain of her blood was dried up, and she felt in her body that she was healed of her plague." Well, blood is blood; and blood is bad enough; but blood at its worst is not sin. Sin is Sin. Sin has no fellow. Sin has no second, unless it is death and hell. Sin tries Christ Himself to His utmost, as this woman's bloody issue tried and found wanting all the best physicians in all the cities round about. Christ could cure a twelve year old issue of blood incidentally, and just by the way, as we say; ere ever He was aware He had healed that woman of her blood, but not for all her remaining life of her sin. All her days, you may depend upon it, she was nothing better of her sin, but rather worse. None of the three evangelists tell it, but it is as true as if they had all told it in the same words. She followed Him about with her sin wherever He went. She went up to Jerusalem after Him with her sin. She was one of the women who were beholding afar off when He died on the tree for her sin. She often went out all her days to the Garden of Gethsemane, and lay all night on her face because of her sin. And sometimes at a passover season, and such like, she felt in herself as if she was going to be healed this time; but, before the sun set, she was worse with her secret sinfulness than ever. And, till her innermost soul ran pure sin day and night, and would not be staunched of heaven or earth. And all that is our own very exact case to a scriptural parable. Long after we have sold all to win Christ; long after He has begun at times to shed abroad all that He has promised to shed abroad in our heart; long after that we will still be nothing better, but infinitely far worse. One stolen touch was sufficient for an issue of blood; but a long and close lifetime of absolute clasp of Christ will not heal us of our sin. Oh, the malice of sin! Oh, the height, and the depth, and the hold, and the absolute incurableness, of sin! Only, with all that we must not despair. We must not go back. We must not give over. Even if it is incurable, let us not say so. It is; but let us not say it even within ourselves. Let us be like this bleeding woman. Tonight, put out your hand and touch Christ. Never mind the gaping crowd pressing behind and before on Him and on you. They are nothing to you, and you are nobody to them. Never mind what they do, or do not do. They are not bleeding to death like you, and they are no rule to you. They did not come up here tonight on your errand. You are as good as dead, and this may be your last chance of Christ. Make a grasp at Him. Make a great grasp, however unceremonious and desperate, at the hem of His garment. Actually stretch out your hand where you now sit, and the stretch of your hand will sacramentally help your heart. Never mind the people in the same seat staring at you, and thinking you are mad. So you are, and you need not sit and look as if you were not. Never mind that you have not all your days till tonight so much as once touched Christ by faith. This woman had suffered enough to drive her beside herself for twelve years before she ever thought of the hem of His garment, and she went home that night healed of her plague. Press through, and grasp tight, and hold fast till you hear Him say, 'Somebody is detaining me.' And till you go home laughing in your guilty heart at your new-found peace and strength and joy. What a power you have, O sinner, and what an opportunity! "Somebody hath touched Me; for I perceive that virtue has gone out of Me."
And then, if you succeed in touching Him tonight, you must not do that once for all, and never again. You must touch Him every day; and if you will not call me extravagant, and carried away, I will say-Do the same thing every hour and every moment of the week. One thing all the week is needful. And that is to keep that hem firm in your hand. Even when you feel completely disenchanted of this scripture and this night and this house; even when you feel shame as you look back at your intensity tonight; even when you feel that this woman, and Christ, and this church, and the present preacher are all a piece of the same entire dream-still grope after His garment. Believe in Him and in His garment. Keep believing and keep praying when no one knows. Lift up your heart to Him even in the press of business, and among the cumber of the house, and week-day and all. And He will let down into your hand the hem of His High Priestly garment, all tingling with bells, and all laden with pomegranates, and all shining with strength and with beauty. And when again your evil heart runs with envy, and anger, and pride, and ill-will, and unkindness, and all the rest of the bad blood of hell,-all that the more grasp you at Him and at His garment. It is like the precious ointment upon the head, that ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard, that went down to the skirts of his garment: His grace and His Salvation, that is. Here love runs down, and here joy in your neighbour's joy, and here sweetness of temper, and here humility of mind, and here goodwill, and here attraction to people, and here brotherly kindness, and all the rest of that holy oil.
The healing of His seamless dressIs by our beds of pain;We touch Him in life's throng and press,And we are whole again.Now, why was it, did you ever think, that when our Lord healed so thoroughly this woman's sick body, He did not in an equally immediate, and in an equally thorough way, heal her far more sick soul? Why did He stop short at her blood? Why did He not work a far better cure on her sin? Was it because she was not sick of sin? Was it because she had not come, with all those twelve years, to know the plague of her own heart? Or was it because He did not come the first time to this world with a full salvation? Or was it, and is it, because sin is such a mystery of iniquity that it takes not only both His first and His second comings to heal our souls of sin; but long time, and great labour, and great pain, and great faith, and great prayer on our part also, before even His Divine power can perform and pronounce a perfect cure? Yes, that is it. Be sure that it is. Even if this woman had come on a very much better errand than she did come; and with a far better kind of faith and love; even had she come as David and Paul and Luther came all their days; she would only have gone home to a more horrible pit in her own heart than ever, and to a more corrupt and abominable and burdensome body of death than ever, and to a loneliness that the happiest home in Canaan could not have comforted; to a lifelong death indeed, of which her twelve years' issue of blood was but a far off and feeble emblem. Did you ever read Richard Baxter's Reasons why the Rest that remains for the people of God is never entered on and enjoyed here? What a splendid debate that seraphic preacher holds with all those saints of God whose hearts are broken continually with an unalleviable pain and with an insatiable hunger after holiness. What depths, both in God and man, Baxter sounds on that great subject, and what heights he scales! O my brethren, be pleaded with to read almost exclusively the books that are pertinent to your sinful and immortal souls-such as The Saint's Rest. Listen to the great saints as they come together to tell and to hear from one another what God has done for their souls. And O, as many of you as are torn to pieces every day with the torture of sin, as well as covered with inward shame at the degradation and pollution of sin, keep yourselves in life by hope. You are saved by hope. Keep every day numbering your days, and forecasting that Great Day on which Christ shall come to you and shall make you perfect as He and His Father are perfect. Give reins to your imagination and think,-all sin for ever gone! Think of that! All sin gone clean out of your sinful heart for ever! I cannot believe it possible. All things are possible to me but that. I, for one, will not be the same man, if ever that crowning work of Omnipotence is wrought in me. I will not know myself, that it is myself. Now, nothing but sin and misery; and then, nothing but love, and holiness, and unspeakable blessedness. This horrible and loathsome incubus, myself, for ever cast off, and for ever cast down into the depths of hell, never to come up again. And I set free from myself for ever, and admitted to the New Jerusalem to walk with Christ and with His saints, in all the holiness and all the beauty of the Divine Nature! "Comfort ye, comfort ye my people, saith your God. Speak ye comfortably to Jerusalem, and cry to her that her warfare is accomplished, that her iniquity is pardoned. What are these which are arrayed in white robes? and whence came they? These are they which came out of great tribulation. And God shall wipe all tears from their eyes. And there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away. And He that sat upon the throne said to me: These things are true and faithful."
Chabad Knowledge Base - The shunamite Woman
Childless woman who regularly hosted Elisha when he traveled through Shunam. In appreciation, Elisha blessed her with a son. When he died several years later, Elisha miraculously resurrected him.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Woman
It is evident from scripture that women were anciently held in much more honour and esteem in Eastern countries than they are now. Solomon, speaking of women, said that such as his soul sought for he did not find one in a thousand. Ecclesiastes 7:28 . This tells of fallen human nature; but the true thought of woman is that she is the glory of the man, his true helpmeet. This is fulfilled in the relationship of the church to Christ.
In the N.T. the true place of the woman in subjection to the man is plainly stated, as indicated in creation; and in the assembly the woman is to be silent, and not to teach. Her bearing and deportment are expressive of what she learns as taught of Christ. 1 Corinthians 11:3-15 ; 1 Corinthians 14:34,35 ; 1 Timothy 2:11 . 12 . Nevertheless women were greatly honoured in ministering to the Lord, and are accredited as helping on the work of the Lord in the gospel and among the saints. Luke 8:2,3 ; Luke 23:27,55,56 ; Romans 16:1,3,6 ; Philippians 4:2,3 ; 2 John 1,10 .
Webster's Dictionary - Tire-Woman
(1):
(n.) A dresser in a theater.
(2):
(n.) A lady's maid.
Webster's Dictionary - Woman
(1):
(v. t.) To act the part of a woman in; - with indefinite it.
(2):
(v. t.) To make effeminate or womanish.
(3):
(v. t.) To furnish with, or unite to, a woman.
(4):
(n.) A female attendant or servant.
(5):
(n.) The female part of the human race; womankind.
(6):
(n.) An adult female person; a grown-up female person, as distinguished from a man or a child; sometimes, any female person.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Woman
Ishshâh (אִשָּׁה, Strong's #802), “woman; wife; betrothed one; bride; each.” This word has cognates in Akkadian, Ugaritic, Aramaic, Arabic, and Ethiopic. It appears about 781 times in biblical Hebrew and in all periods of the language.
This noun connotes one who is a female human being regardless of her age or virginity. Therefore, it appears in correlation to “man” (ish): “… She shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man” (Gen. 2:23). This is its meaning in its first biblical usage: “And the rib, which the Lord God had taken from man [1], made he a woman, and brought her unto the man” (Gen. 2:22). The stress here is on identification of womanhood rather than a family role.
The stress on the family role of a “wife” appears in passages such as Gen. 8:16: “Go forth of the ark, thou, and thy wife, and thy sons, and thy sons’ wives with thee.”
In one special nuance the word connotes “wife” in the sense of a woman who is under a man’s authority and protection; the emphasis is on the family relationship considered as a legal and social entity: “And Abram took Sarai his wife and Lot his brother’s son, and all their substance that they had gathered …” (Gen. 12:5).
In Lam. 2:20 'ishshâh is a synonym for “mother”: “Shall the women eat their [2]?” In Gen. 29:21 (cf. Deut. 22:24) it appears to connote “bride” or “betrothed one”: “And Jacob said unto Laban, Give me my wife, for my days are fulfilled, that I may go in unto her.” Eccl. 7:26 uses the word generically of “woman” conceived in general, or womanhood: “And I find more bitter than death the woman, whose heart is snares and nets …” (cf. Gen. 31:35).
This word is used only infrequently of animals: “Of every clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens, the male and his female: and of beasts that are not clean by two, the male and his female” (Gen. 7:2).
This word can also be used figuratively describing foreign warriors and/or heroes as “women,” in other words as weak, unmanly, and cowardly: “In that day shall Egypt be like unto women: and it shall be afraid and fear because of the shaking of the hand of the Lord of hosts …” (Isa. 19:16).
In a few passages 'ishshâh means “each” or “every”: “But every woman shall borrow of her neighbor, and of her that sojourneth in her house …” (Exod. 3:22; cf. Amos 4:3). A special use of this nuance ouurs in passages such as Jer. 9:20, where in conjunction with re’ut (“neighbor”) it means “one” (female): “Yet hear the word of the Lord, O ye women, and let your ear receive the word of his mouth, and teach your daughters wailing, and every one her neighbor lamentation.”
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Well of the Samaritan Woman
(Hebrew: Bir Yakub; Bir Samariyeh)
Well on the highroad from Jerusalem, one mile and a half from Nablus, and almost one mile from the village of Askar or Sichar (John 4). Here Christ met the Samaritan woman. It is called Jacob's Well because the patriarch who "drank thereof himself, and his children, and his cattle" gave it to the tribe of Joseph. The opening of the well lies now in a crypt of a Crusader's chapel, over which the Greeks have built a church. The well itself Isaiah 7.5 feet in diameter, lined with masonry, and is still 75 deep. It seems to be fed by an underground rivulet, which occasionally runs dry in summer.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Samaritan Woman
A woman of Sichar, a city of Samaria, who was converted by Our Lord at the well of Jacob (John 4). She had come to draw water from the well for her material needs, but Jesus gradually aroused in her sinful soul a desire for the supernatural waters that spring up into life everlasting.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Woman, Samaritan
A woman of Sichar, a city of Samaria, who was converted by Our Lord at the well of Jacob (John 4). She had come to draw water from the well for her material needs, but Jesus gradually aroused in her sinful soul a desire for the supernatural waters that spring up into life everlasting.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Woman
Is spoken of in Scripture as the beloved and honored companion and helpmeet, not the servant, of man, Genesis 2:23,24 , created as the necessary completion of man, Genesis 3:16 1 Corinthians 11:3,8,9 14:34,35 1 Timothy 2:11-14 , yet specially qualified for that sphere, and as necessary in it as man in his. Man and woman are indeed essentially one, the natural qualities of each so responding to those of the other as to lay the foundation of the most tender and abiding unity. The Bible thus raised the Jewish woman high above the woman of heathenism; and the Old Testament contains some of the finest portraitures of female character. But still greater is the contrast between the women of heathenism and those of Christianity: the former with mind and soul undeveloped, secluded, degraded, the mere toys and slaves of their husbands; the latter educated, refined, ennobled, cheering and blessing the world. Christianity forbids a man to have more than one wife, or to divorce her for any cause but one, Matthew 5:32 19:3-9 ; declares that bond and free, male and female, are all one in Christ, Galatians 3:28 ; and that in heaven they are no more given in marriage, but are as the angels of God, Matthew 22:33 . If woman was first in the Fall, she was honored in the exclusive parentage of the Savior of mankind; and women were the truest friends of Christ while on earth. The primal curse falls with heaviest weight on woman; but the larger proportion of women in our churches may indicate that it was the purpose of God to make his grace to man "yet more abound" to her who was the first in sinning and suffering.
In the East, women have always lived in comparative seclusion, not appearing in public unless closely veiled, not mingling in general society, nor seen the men who visit their husbands and brothers, nor even taking their meals with the men of their own family. Their seclusion was less in the rural districts than in towns, and among the Jews than among most to her nations. They were chiefly engaged in domestic duties, Proverbs 31:1-31 ; among which were grinding flour, baking bread, making cloth, needle work, etc. The poor gleaned the remnants of the harvest; the daughters of he patriarchs joined in tending their fathers' flocks, Genesis 29:9 Exodus 2:16 ; and females of all classes were accustomed to draw water for family use, bearing it in earthen pitchers on their shoulders often for a considerable distance, Genesis 24:15-20 John 7:28 .
King James Dictionary - Woman
WOMAN, n. plu. women. a compound of womb and man.
1. The female of the human race, grown to adult years. And the rib, which the Lord god had taken from the man, made he a woman. Genesis 2 .
Women are soft, mild, pitiful, and flexible.
We see every day women perish with infamy, by having been too willing to set their beauty to show.
I have observed among all nations that the women ornament themselves more tan the men that wherever found, they are the same kind, obliging, humane, tender beings, inclined to be gay and cheerful, timorous and modest.
2. A female attendant or servant. WOMAN, To make pliant.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Ethio'Pian Woman
The wife of Moses is to described in (Numbers 12:1 ) She is elsewhere said to have been the daughter of a Midianite, and in consequence of this some have supposed that the allusion is to another wife whom Moses married after the death of Zipporah.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Woman
1: γυνή (Strong's #1135 — Noun Feminine — gune — goo-nay' ) for which see also WIFE , is used of a "woman" unmarried or married, e.g., Matthew 11:11 ; 14:21 ; Luke 4:26 , of a "widow;" Romans 7:2 ; in the vocative case, used in addressing a "woman," it is a term not of reproof or severity, but of endearment or respect, Matthew 15:28 ; John 2:4 , where the Lord's words to His mother at the wedding in Cana, are neither rebuff nor rebuke. The question is, lit., "What to Me and to thee?" and the word "woman," the term of endearment, follows this. The meaning is "There is no obligation on Me or you, but love will supply the need." She confides in Him, He responds to her faith. There was lovingkindness in both hearts. His next words about "His hour" suit this; they were not unfamiliar to her. Cana is in the path to Calvary; Calvary was not yet, but it made the beginning of signs possible. See also John 4:21 ; 19:26 .
In Galatians 4:4 the phrase "born of a woman" is in accordance with the subject there, viz., the real humanity of the Lord Jesus; this the words attest. They declare the method of His Incarnation and "suggest the means whereby that humanity was made free from the taint of sin consequent upon the Fall, viz., that He was not born through the natural process of ordinary generation, but was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit ... To have written 'born of a virgin' would have carried the argument in a wrong direction ... Since that man is born of woman is a universal fact, the statement would be superfluous if the Lord Jesus were no more than man" (Notes on Galatians, by Hogg and Vine, pp. 184f.).
2: γυναικάριον (Strong's #1133 — Noun Neuter — gunaikarion — goo-nahee-kar'-ee-on ) a diminutive of No. 1, a "little woman," is used contemptuously in 2 Timothy 3:6 , "a silly woman."
3: πρεσβύτερος (Strong's #4245 — Adjective — presbuteros — pres-boo'-ter-os ) "elder, older," in the feminine plural, denotes "elder women" in 1 Timothy 5:2 . See ELDER , A, No. 1
4: πρεσβῦτις (Strong's #4247 — Noun Feminine — presbutis — pres-boo'-tis ) the feminine of presbutes, "aged," is used in the plural and translated "aged women" in Titus 2:3 .
5: θῆλυς (Strong's #2338 — Adjective — theleia — thay'-loos ) the feminine of the adjective thelus, denotes "female," and is used as a noun, Romans 1:26,27 . See FEMALE.

Sentence search

Quean - ) A low Woman; a wench; a slut. ) A Woman; a young or unmarried Woman; a girl
Virago - ) A Woman of extraordinary stature, strength, and courage; a Woman who has the robust body and masculine mind of a man; a female warrior. ) Hence, a mannish Woman; a bold, turbulent Woman; a termagant; a vixen
Mistress - ) A married Woman; a wife. ) A Woman regarded with love and devotion; she who has command over one's heart; a beloved object; a sweetheart. ) A Woman filling the place, but without the rights, of a wife; a concubine; a loose Woman with whom one consorts habitually. ) A Woman having power, authority, or ownership; a Woman who exercises authority, is chief, etc. ) A title of courtesy formerly prefixed to the name of a Woman, married or unmarried, but now superseded by the contracted forms, Mrs. , for a married, and Miss, for an unmarried, Woman. ) A Woman well skilled in anything, or having the mastery over it
Forewoman - ) A Woman who is chief; a Woman who has charge of the work or workers in a shop or other place; a head Woman
Womanly - ) Becoming a Woman; feminine; as, Womanly behavior. ) In the manner of a Woman; with the grace, tenderness, or affection of a Woman
Entlewoman - ) A Woman who attends a lady of high rank. ) A Woman of good family or of good breeding; a Woman above the vulgar
Women - ) of Woman...
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(n. of Woman
Women - ) of Woman...
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(n. of Woman
Mermaid - ) A fabled marine creature, typically represented as having the upper part like that of a Woman, and the lower like a fish; a sea nymph, sea Woman, or Woman fish
Wife - ) A Woman; an adult female; - now used in literature only in certain compounds and phrases, as alewife, fishwife, goodwife, and the like. ) The lawful consort of a man; a Woman who is united to a man in wedlock; a Woman who has a husband; a married Woman; - correlative of husband
Workwoman - ) A Woman who performs any work; especially, a Woman skilled in needlework
Enchantress - ) A Woman versed in magical arts; a sorceress; also, a Woman who fascinates
Bunter - ) A Woman who picks up rags in the streets; hence, a low, vulgar Woman
Wench - ) A low, vicious young Woman; a drab; a strumpet. ) A colored Woman; a negress. ) A young Woman; a girl; a maiden
Curatrix - ) A Woman who cures. ) A Woman who is a guardian or custodian
Adulteress - ) A Woman who commits adultery. ) A Woman who violates her religious engagements
Frau - ) In Germany, a Woman; a married Woman; a wife; - as a title, equivalent to Mrs
White Slave - A Woman held in involuntary confinement for purposes of prostitution; loosely, any Woman forced into unwilling prostitution
Per'Sis - (a Persian Woman ), a Christian Woman at Rome, ( Romans 16:12 ) whom St
Lady - ) A Woman of social distinction or position. In England, a title prefixed to the name of any Woman whose husband is not of lower rank than a baron, or whose father was a nobleman not lower than an earl. ) A Woman of refined or gentle manners; a well-bred Woman; - the feminine correlative of gentleman. ) A Woman who looks after the domestic affairs of a family; a mistress; the female head of a household. ) A Woman having proprietary rights or authority; mistress; - a feminine correlative of lord. ) A Woman to whom the particular homage of a knight was paid; a Woman to whom one is devoted or bound; a sweetheart
Risette - ) A French girl or young married Woman of the lower class; more frequently, a young working Woman who is fond of gallantry
Waistcoateer - , a Woman wearing one uncovered, or thought fit for such a habit; hence, a loose Woman; strumpet
Womanhood - ) Women, collectively; Womankind. ) The state of being a Woman; the distinguishing character or qualities of a Woman, or of Womankind
Girl - gerula, a young Woman employed in tending children and carrying them about, from gero, to carry a word probably received from the Romans while in England. A female child, or young Woman. In familiar language, any young unmarried Woman
Feminine - ) Of or pertaining to a Woman, or to women; characteristic of a Woman; Womanish; Womanly. ) Having the qualities of a Woman; becoming or appropriate to the female sex; as, in a good sense, modest, graceful, affectionate, confiding; or, in a bad sense, weak, nerveless, timid, pleasure-loving, effeminate. ) A Woman
Dame - ) A mistress of a family, who is a lady; a Woman in authority; especially, a lady. ) A Woman in general, esp. an elderly Woman
Effeminately - ) In an effeminate or Womanish manner; weakly; softly; delicately. ) By means of a Woman; by the power or art of a Woman
Womanish - ) Suitable to a Woman, having the qualities of a Woman; effeminate; not becoming a man; - usually in a reproachful sense
Bitch - ) An opprobrious name for a Woman, especially a lewd Woman
Countrywoman - ) A Woman born, or dwelling, in the country, as opposed to the city; a Woman born or dwelling in the same country with another native or inhabitant
Bride - A Woman new married. But the name is applied to a Woman at the marriage festival, before she is married, as well as after the ceremony. A Woman espoused, or contracted to be married
Crone - ) An old Woman; - usually in contempt. ) An old man; especially, a man who talks and acts like an old Woman
Dower - ) The property with which a Woman is endowed...
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(n. ) That which a Woman brings to a husband in marriage; dowry. ) That portion of the real estate of a man which his widow enjoys during her life, or to which a Woman is entitled after the death of her husband
Bitter Water - The water drunk by a Woman suspected of adultery (Numbers 5:11-31 ). If a man suspected his wife had been unfaithful to him but was not a witness to the act and could not produce witnesses to the act, the Woman was taken to the priest who arranged an ordeal to determine the Woman's innocence or guilt. When the man brought the Woman to the priest, he brought an offering of jealousy or remembrance (a cereal offering of barley). The priest seated the Woman before the sanctuary facing the altar. The Woman's hair was unbound as a sign of her shame. The Woman held the offering, and the priest held the vessel containing the bitter water. At this point the Woman took an oath: if she was innocent, the water would not harm her; if she was guilty, then her “thigh would rot” and her “body swell. ” The Woman affirmed the oath with a double, “amen. The priest then took the offering and burned it upon the altar, after which the Woman drank the bitter water. The Woman, on the other hand, bore the consequences of her guilt (Numbers 5:31 )
Wench - A young Woman. A young Woman of fame
Wife, Wives - 1: γυνή (Strong's #1135 — Noun Feminine — gune — goo-nay' ) denotes (1) "a Woman, married or unmarried" (see Woman); (2) "a wife," e. , Matthew 1:20 ; 1 Corinthians 7:3,4 ; in 1 Timothy 3:11 , RV, "woman," the reference may be to the "wives" of deacons, as the AV takes it. ...
2: γυναικεῖος (Strong's #1134 — Adjective — gunaikeios — goo-nahee-ki'-os ) an adjective denoting "womanly, female," is used as a noun in 1 Peter 3:7 , AV, "wife," RV, "woman
She - ) A Woman; a female; - used substantively. ) This or that female; the Woman understood or referred to; the animal of the female sex, or object personified as feminine, which was spoken of
Mulier - ) A Woman. ) A Woman; a wife; a mother
Mistress - A Woman who governs correlative to servant, slave, or subject. A Woman teacher an instructress of a school. A Woman beloved and courted. A Woman in keeping for lewd purposes
Talitha-Cumi - Young Woman
Lapidoth - Some have rendered the expression "a Woman of a fiery spirit," under the supposition that Lapidoth is not a proper name, a Woman of a torch-like spirit
Midwife - supposed by Junius and Skinner to be meedwife, a Woman that has a reward. The word is a compound of mid, with, and wif,a Woman in analogy with the L. ...
A Woman that assists other women in childbirth
Wife - , a Woman. The lawful consort of man a Woman who is united to man in the lawful bonds of wedlock the correlative of husband. A Woman of low employment as strawberry wives
Feme - ) A Woman
Damaris - A little Woman
Eshtaol - A strong Woman
Aviatrix - ) A Woman aviator
Chauffeuse - ) A Woman chauffeur
Carlin - ) An old Woman
Fiancee - ) A betrothed Woman
Citess - ) A city Woman...
Disseizoress - ) A Woman disseizes
Hebrewess - ) An Israelitish Woman
Brahmani - ) Any Brahman Woman
Herb-Women - ) of Herb-woman...
Tire-Women - ) of Tire-woman...
Mulierose - ) Fond of Woman
Jewess - ) A Hebrew Woman
Misogynist - ) A Woman hater
Knavess - ) A knavish Woman
Nurse - A Woman that has the care of infants, or a Woman employed to tend the children of others. A Woman who suckles infants. A Woman that has the care of a sick person. An old Woman in contempt. To attend and take care of in child-bed as, to nurse a Woman in her illness
Witch - A Woman who by compact with the devil, practices sorcery or enchantment. A Woman who is given to unlawful arts
Maiden - An unmarried Woman, or a young unmarried Woman a virgin. Pertaining to a young Woman or virgin as maiden charms
Cateress - ) A Woman who caters
Conqueress - ) A Woman who conquers
Corruptress - ) A Woman who corrupts
Offendress - ) A Woman who offends
Persecutrix - ) A Woman who persecutes
Comfortress - ) A Woman who comforts
Fabricatress - ) A Woman who fabricates
Correctress - ) A Woman who corrects
Demandress - ) A Woman who demands
Directress - ) A Woman who directs
Divineress - ) A Woman who divines
Sinneress - ) A Woman who sins
Competitress - ) A Woman who competes
Farmeress - ) A Woman who farms
Hebrewess - An Israelitish Woman
Womanlike - ) Like a Woman; Womanly
Trubtall - ) A short, squat Woman
Decipheress - ) A Woman who deciphers
Temptress - ) A Woman who entices
Protectrix - ) A Woman who protects
Seductress - ) A Woman who seduces
Tormentress - ) A Woman who torments
Translatress - ) A Woman who translates
Waileress - ) A Woman who wails
Ynarchy - ) Government by a Woman
Tauntress - ) A Woman who taunts
Ministress - ) A Woman who ministers
Eshtemoa - The bosom of a Woman
Niddah - (a) The state women enter with the onset of menstrual bleeding; a Woman in this state. Physical contact between husband and wife is suspended during this period, until the Woman immerses in a mikvah
Deaconess - ) A Woman set apart for church work by a bishop. ) A Woman chosen as a helper in church work, as among the Congregationalists
Basbleu - ) A bluestocking; a literary Woman
Amorosa - ) A wanton Woman; a courtesan
Herb-Woman - ) A Woman that sells herbs
Iantess - ) A Woman of extraordinary size
Ennuyee - ) A Woman affected with ennui
Fornicatress - ) A Woman guilty of fornication
Fishwoman - ) A Woman who retails fish
Fruiteress - ) A Woman who sells fruit
Dowress - ) A Woman entitled to dower
Old-Womanish - ) Like an old Woman; anile
Womanless - ) Without a Woman or women
Slammerkin - ) A slut; a slatternly Woman
Murderess - ) A Woman who commits murder
Legislatrix - ) A Woman who makes laws
Herdswoman - ) A Woman who tends a herd
Factoress - ) A factor who is a Woman
Benefactress - ) A Woman who confers a benefit
Boatwoman - ) A Woman who manages a boat
Wife - See Family ; Marriage ; Woman
Mother - See Family Life and Relations ; Marriage ; Woman ...
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Adulatress - ) A Woman who flatters with servility
Dictatress - ) A Woman who dictates or commands
Freewoman - FREE'WOMAN, n. A Woman not a slave
Shopwoman - ) A Woman employed in a shop
Oratress - ) A Woman who makes public addresses
Tragedienne - ) A Woman who plays in tragedy
Randam - ) An old Woman; specifically, a grandmother
Yneolatry - ) The adoration or worship of Woman
Jezebel - ) A bold, vicious Woman; a termagant
Kitchenmaid - ) A Woman employed in the kitchen
Mooress - ) A female Moor; a Moorish Woman
Jointress - ) A Woman who has a jointure
Treasuress - ) A Woman who is a treasurer
Votaress - ) A Woman who is a votary
Jewess - A Hebrew Woman
Jezebel - An impudent, daring, vitious Woman
Harlot - A Woman who prostitutes her body for hire a prostitute a common Woman
Matron - , a Woman who manages the domestic economy of a public instution; a head nurse in a hospital; as, the matron of a school or hospital. ) A wife or a widow, especially, one who has borne children; a Woman of staid or motherly manners
Commandress - ) A Woman invested with authority to command
Blowze - ) A ruddy, fat-faced Woman; a wench
Pundle - ) A short and fat Woman; a squab
Dairywoman - ) A Woman who attends to a dairy
Adulteress - A married Woman guilty of incontinence
Equestrienne - ) A Woman skilled in equestrianism; a horsewoman
Favoress - ) A Woman who favors or gives countenance
Rixatrix - ) A scolding or quarrelsome Woman; a scold
Unipara - ) A Woman who has borne one child
Torril - ) A worthless Woman; also, a worthless horse
Ynecocracy - ) Government by a Woman, female power; gyneocracy
Jill - ) A young Woman; a sweetheart
Female - 1: θῆλυς (Strong's #2338 — Adjective — thelus — thay'-loos ) an adjective (from thele, "a breast"), is used in the form thelu (grammatically neuter) as a noun, "female," in Matthew 19:4 ; Mark 10:6 ; Galatians 3:28 ; in the feminine form theleia, in Romans 1:26 , "women;" Romans 1:27 "woman. " See Woman
Virgin - A Woman who has had no carnal knowledge of man. A Woman not a mother
Agunah - anchored Woman�); a Woman whose husband has disappeared and it is not known with certainty whether he is dead or alive; she is thus forbidden to marry unless a) the husband is located and grants her a legal divorce, or b) careful investigation by rabbinical authorities uncovers admissible evidence of his death ...
Cucquean - ) A Woman whose husband is unfaithful to her
Seamstress - ) A Woman whose occupation is sewing; a needlewoman
Ranny - ) A grandmother; a grandam; familiarly, an old Woman
Flirt-Gill - ) A Woman of light behavior; a gill-flirt
Fostress - ) A Woman who feeds and cherishes; a nurse
Executrix - ) A Woman exercising the functions of an executor
Conductress - ) A Woman who leads or directs; a directress
Putanism - ) Habitual lewdness or prostitution of a Woman; harlotry
Ranny - ) A grandmother; a grandam; familiarly, an old Woman
Oratrix - ) A Woman plaintiff, or complainant, in equity pleading
Relict - ) A Woman whose husband is dead; a widow
Conservatrix - ) A Woman who preserves from loss, injury, etc
Persis - A Christian Woman saluted in Romans 16:12
Maid - ) An unmarried Woman; usually, a young unmarried Woman; esp
Hemorrhage - Mosaic law said any discharge of blood, whether associated with the birthing process (Leviticus 12:7 ), with menstruation (Leviticus 15:19 ), or continued bleeding (Leviticus 15:25 ; Matthew 9:20 ), rendered a Woman unclean. The Woman suffering from a hemorrhage (Matthew 9:20 ; Mark 5:29 ; Luke 8:43-44 ) was thus a religious and social outcast who only dared approach Jesus from behind. Contrary to expectations, the Woman did not give her uncleanness to Jesus. Rather Jesus' healing power made the Woman clean
Tradeswoman - ) A Woman who trades, or is skilled in trade
Silly - * For SILLY, 2 Timothy 3:6 , See Woman No
Bondwoman - ) A Woman who is a slave, or in bondage
Harridan - ) A worn-out strumpet; a vixenish Woman; a hag
Airwoman - ) A Woman who ascends or flies in an aircraft
Priestess - ) A Woman who officiated in sacred rites among pagans
Pigsney - ) A word of endearment for a girl or Woman
Enwoman - ) To endow with the qualities of a Woman
Shepherdess - ) A Woman who tends sheep; hence, a rural lass
Putage - ) Prostitution or fornication on the part of a Woman
Victress - ) A Woman who wins a victory; a female victor
Transfeminate - ) To change into a Woman, as a man
Womanize - ) To make like a Woman; to make effeminate
Mopsy - ) A slatternly, untidy Woman
Concubinage - ) A plea, in which it is alleged that the Woman suing for dower was not lawfully married to the man in whose lands she seeks to be endowed, but that she was his concubine. ) The cohabiting of a man and a Woman who are not legally married; the state of being a concubine
Modiste - ) A female maker of, or dealer in, articles of fashion, especially of the fashionable dress of ladies; a Woman who gives direction to the style or mode of dress. Woman, who makes, or deals in, articles of fashion, esp
Lady - A Woman of distinction. Originally, the title of lady was given to the daughters of earls and others in high rank, but by custom, the title belongs to any Woman of genteel education
Cantiniere - ) A Woman who carries a canteen for soldiers; a vivandiere
Canoness - ) A Woman who holds a canonry in a conventual chapter
Saleswoman - ) A Woman whose occupation is to sell goods or merchandise
Charwoman - ) A Woman hired for odd work or for single days
Anility - ) The state of being and old Woman; old-womanishness; dotage
Franion - ) A paramour; a loose Woman; also, a gay, idle fellow
Demirep - ) A Woman of doubtful reputation or suspected character; an adventuress
Primipara - ) A Woman who bears a child for the first time
Cozbi - The Midianitish Woman who was slain by Phinehas
Hazelelponi - A Woman of the tribe of Judah
Eezer - ) A queer old fellow; an old chap; an old Woman
Wifelike - ) Of, pertaining to, or like, a wife or a Woman
Mutch - ) The close linen or muslin cap of an old Woman
Woman - Woman, n. And the rib, which the Lord god had taken from the man, made he a Woman. Woman, To make pliant
Marry - ) To join according to law, (a man) to a Woman as his wife, or (a Woman) to a man as her husband. ) To unite in wedlock or matrimony; to perform the ceremony of joining, as a man and a Woman, for life; to constitute (a man and a Woman) husband and wife according to the laws or customs of the place
Courtesan - ) A Woman who prostitutes herself for hire; a prostitute; a harlot
Bondager - a Woman who works in the field
Bellibone - ) A Woman excelling both in beauty and goodness; a fair maid
Prelatess - ) A Woman who is a prelate; the wife of a prelate
Keturah - Woman Abraham married after Sarah's passing
Waitress - ) A female waiter or attendant; a waiting maid or waiting Woman
Traitress - ) A Woman who betrays her country or any trust; a traitoress
Unwoman - ) To deprive of the qualities of a Woman; to unsex
Jill-Flirt - ) A light, giddy, or wanton girl or Woman
Tutoress - ) A Woman who performs the duties of a tutor; an instructress
Julia - Christian Woman at Rome to whom Paul sent salutations
Adultery - It seems clear, that as far as the man was concerned, if he had intercourse with a Woman unless it was with a married Woman, he would not be charged with adultery, though he himself might be married; indeed how could he be when he was allowed more wives than one, as well as concubines and slaves? If he committed adultery with a married Woman or with one betrothed, both were to be put to death. With the Woman it was stricter, she must have no intercourse with any man but her husband. But we do not read that any man or Woman was stoned for adultery, nor that any Woman drank the bitter waters. It may be that the men themselves had not good consciences, like those who brought the adulterous Woman to the Lord in John 8:3 . The Lord declared that a man morally committed adultery (or fornication) in his heart if he lusted after a Woman
Magdalene - A mistaken notion has prevailed that this Mary was a Woman of bad character, that she was the Woman who is emphatically called "a sinner" (Luke 7:36-50 )
Harlot - ) A Woman who prostitutes her body for hire; a prostitute; a common Woman; a strumpet
Seduction - ) The act of seducing; enticement to wrong doing; specifically, the offense of inducing a Woman to consent to unlawful sexual intercourse, by enticements which overcome her scruples; the wrong or crime of persuading a Woman to surrender her chastity
Ammer - ) An old wife; an old Woman; - correlative of gaffer, an old man
Schoolmistress - ) A Woman who governs and teaches a school; a female school-teacher
Tawpie - a slothful or slovenly Woman
Odmother - ) A Woman who becomes sponsor for a child in baptism
Preceptress - ) A Woman who is the principal of a school; a female teacher
Millionairess - ) A Woman who is a millionaire, or the wife of a millionaire
Mavourneen - ) My darling; - an Irish term of endearment for a girl or Woman
Claudia - (clayyoo' dih uh) Woman who sent greetings to Timothy (2 Timothy 4:21 )
Clau'Dia - (lame ), a Christian Woman mentioned in ( 2 Timothy 4:21 ) as saluting Timotheus
Ammoni'Tess, - a Woman of Ammonite race
Adventuress - ) A female adventurer; a Woman who tries to gain position by equivocal means
White Slaver - A person engaged in procuring or holding a Woman or women for unwilling prostitution
Testatrix - ) A Woman who makes and leaves a will at death; a female testator
Masseuse - ) A Woman who practices massage
Damaris - A Woman at Athens who believed the gospel preached by Paul
Claudia - A Christian Woman, probably a convert of Paul at Rome 2 Timothy 4:21
Jew'Ess, - a Woman of Hebrew birth, without distinction of tribe
Childbed - ) The state of a Woman bringing forth a child, or being in labor; parturition
Dell - ) A young Woman; a wench
Wet Nurse - A nurse who suckles a child, especially the child of another Woman
White Slaving - The action of one who procures or holds a Woman or women for unwilling prostitution
Odalwoman - ) A man or Woman having odal, or able to share in it by inheritance
Ruth - (Hebrew: reuth, friend) ...
A Moabite Woman whose story is recorded in the Book of Ruth
Delilah - The Philistine Woman who betrayed Samson into the hands of the Philistines
Rebbetzin - (Yiddish) (a) wife of a rabbi or Rebbe; (b) a pious Woman of great spiritual achievements...
Foundress - ) A female founder; a Woman who founds or establishes, or who endows with a fund
Daggle-Tail - ) A slovenly Woman; a slattern; a draggle-tail
Upsitting - ) A sitting up of a Woman after her confinement, to receive and entertain her friends
Trollop - , an idle, untidy Woman; a slattern; a slut; a whore
Fraulein - ) In Germany, a young lady; an unmarried Woman; - as a title, equivalent to Miss
Lorn - ) Forsaken; abandoned; solitary; bereft; as, a lone, lorn Woman
Laundress - ) A Woman whose employment is laundering
Womankind - WomanKIND, n. Woman and kind
Ethiopian Woman - ETHIOPIAN Woman . ]'>[2] ‘Cushite’) Woman. As the ‘Ethiopian Woman’ is mentioned nowhere else, and the death of Moses’ wife Zipporah is not recorded, some of the early interpreters thought the two must be identical; and this view is favoured by the Jewish expositors
Danseuse - ) A professional female dancer; a Woman who dances at a public exhibition as in a ballet
Monandry - ) The possession by a Woman of only one husband at the same time; - contrasted with polyandry
Monogyny - ) Marriage with the one Woman only
Myriologue - ) An extemporaneous funeral song, composed and sung by a Woman on the death of a friend
Eve - The name Woman seems to be a corruption of womb-man, because taken out of man; for the very reason thus assigned by our first father so explains it. But in all the after circumstances the Woman is to be the womb of creation. But as both the man and the Woman are equally involved in sin, in the redemption for both the Lord will make a new thing in the earth, and a Woman shall compass a man. (Jeremiah 31:22) The man of the earth, therefore, Adam and all his race, shall have no hand in this generation; yea, the womb of the Woman only shall be no more than but for the deposit of this Holy Thing. So that though Christ is of the seed of David, according to the flesh, and the seed of the Woman, according to promise, and thus literally and truly belonging to both, yet indeed, and in truth, unconnected with either
Polyandry - ) The possession by a Woman of more than one husband at the same time; - contrasted with monandry
Actress - ) A female stageplayer; a Woman who acts a part
Barmaid - ) A girl or Woman who attends the customers of a bar, as in a tavern or beershop
Cutty - ) A light or unchaste Woman
Peeress - ) The wife of a peer; a Woman ennobled in her own right, or by right of marriage
Mutton - ) A loose Woman; a prostitute
Concubine - A Woman who cohabits with a man, without the authority of a legal marriage a Woman kept for lewd purposes a kept mistress
Woman - ) To act the part of a Woman in; - with indefinite it. ) To make effeminate or Womanish. ) To furnish with, or unite to, a Woman. ) The female part of the human race; Womankind
Brunette - ) A girl or Woman with a somewhat brown or dark complexion
Biddy - ) An Irish serving Woman or girl
Urbane - Rather Urban or Urbanus; a man, not a Woman (Romans 16:9); a Christian fellow labourer whom Paul salutes
Prudish - ) Like a prude; very formal, precise, or reserved; affectedly severe in virtue; as, a prudish Woman; prudish manners
Bold-Faced - ) Somewhat impudent; lacking modesty; as, a bold-faced Woman
Froe - ) A dirty Woman; a slattern; a frow
Matronal - ) Of or pertaining to a matron; suitable to an elderly lady or to a married Woman; grave; motherly
Jadish - ) Unchaste; - applied to a Woman
Liaison - ) A union, or bond of union; an intimacy; especially, an illicit intimacy between a man and a Woman
Delilah - A Philistine Woman, whom Samson loved, and who betrayed him to the enemies of Israel, Judges 16:1-31
ho'Desh - (new moon ), a Woman named in the genealogies of Benjamin, ( 1 Chronicles 8:9 ) as the wife of Shaharaim
Exaggeration - In certain ancient Italian frescoes Mary Magdalene is drawn as a Woman completely enveloped in her own hair, which reaches to her feet and entirely wraps up her body as in a seamless garment. These queer draughtsmen must needs exaggerate; granted that the Woman had long hair, they must enfold her in it like a silkworm in its own silk. Truth is as comely and beautiful as a Woman with flowing hair, but exaggeration is as grotesque and ugly as the Magdalene, all hair from head to foot
Maiden - ) An unmarried Woman; a girl or Woman who has not experienced sexual intercourse; a virgin; a maid. ) Never having been married; not having had sexual intercourse; virgin; - said usually of the Woman, but sometimes of the man; as, a maiden aunt
Debtors, the Two - (Luke 7) Parable, spoken by Our Lord in the house of Simon the Pharisee, when the latter was wondering that Jesus should allow the Woman to bathe His feet with her tears and wipe them with her hair. Our Lord then declares that the love shown so clearly by the Woman is the reason why her sins are forgiven her. Thus what the Woman has done to Him has been done to God, and Jesus is the Divine creditor who may remit the sinner's debt, as indeed the Woman, whose faith Jesus praises, had believed that Jesus could do
Two Debtors, the - (Luke 7) Parable, spoken by Our Lord in the house of Simon the Pharisee, when the latter was wondering that Jesus should allow the Woman to bathe His feet with her tears and wipe them with her hair. Our Lord then declares that the love shown so clearly by the Woman is the reason why her sins are forgiven her. Thus what the Woman has done to Him has been done to God, and Jesus is the Divine creditor who may remit the sinner's debt, as indeed the Woman, whose faith Jesus praises, had believed that Jesus could do
Avoirdupois - ) Weight; heaviness; as, a Woman of much avoirdupois
Carmelitess - (cahr' muhl i tehssss) A Woman who resided in or was a citizen of the town of Carmel
Philogynist - ) A lover or friend of women; one who esteems Woman as the higher type of humanity; - opposed to misogynist
Syntyche - A believing Woman at Philippi whom Paul exhorted along with Euodias to be of the same mind
Marchioness - ) The wife or the widow of a marquis; a Woman who has the rank and dignity of a marquis
Jez're-Elitess, - a Woman of Jezreel
Chignon - ) A knot, boss, or mass of hair, natural or artificial, worn by a Woman at the back of the head
Slut - ) An untidy Woman; a slattern
Julia - A Christian Woman at Rome to whom Paul sent his salutations (Romans 16:15 ), supposed to be the wife of Philologus
Seducer - ) One who, or that which, seduces; specifically, one who prevails over the chastity of a Woman by enticements and persuasions
Precieuse - ) An affected Woman of polite society, esp
Eve - (Hebrew: hawwah, living, life) ...
The name of the first Woman, the wife of Adam, the mother of Cain, Abel, and Seth
Ribibe - ) An old Woman; - in contempt
Euodias - A Christian Woman at Philippi who is exhorted with Syntyche to be "of the same mind in the Lord
Discoverture - ) A state of being released from coverture; freedom of a Woman from the coverture of a husband
Vixen - ) A cross, ill-tempered person; - formerly used of either sex, now only of a Woman
Oddess - ) A Woman of superior charms or excellence
Euo'Dias - (fragrant ), a Christian Woman at Philippi
Bat - ”); used as part of a Woman’s formal name, followed by the name of either her father or mother...
Sotah - a Woman suspected of immodest conduct whose fidelity is put to the test; discussed in Numbers, ch. 5; also, the Talmudic tractate of that name...
Sotah (the "wayward wife"): (a) A Woman suspected by her husband of adultery
Eve - First Woman, mother of all mankind
Persis - (puhr' ssihss) Personal name meaning, “Persian Woman
Dowdy - ) An awkward, vulgarly dressed, inelegant Woman
Parapherna - ) The property of a Woman which, on her marriage, was not made a part of her dower, but remained her own
Sibyl - ) A Woman supposed to be endowed with a spirit of prophecy
Muliebrity - ) The state of being a Woman or of possessing full Womanly powers; Womanhood; - correlate of virility
Elisabeth - A devout Woman, "of the daughters of Aaron," the wife of Zacharias, and mother of John the Baptist, Luke 1:5-25,36,39-80
or'Pah - (a gazelle ), a Moabite Woman wife of Chilion son of Naomi, and thereby sister-in-law to Ruth
Chava - First Woman, mother of all mankind
Woman - The picture of Woman revealed in the Bible is far from one-dimensional. Frequently subjected to the rule of her male counterpart, often adored for her beauty and purity, and occasionally praised for her leadership in times of crisis, Woman emerges from the pages of the Bible with as much complexity as man. ...
Woman in Bible times lived in a patriarchal society. Both the Old and New Testament worlds normally restricted the role of Woman primarily to the sphere of home and family, although a few strong women emerged as leaders. Father and then husband or other male relatives gave protection and direction to Woman. By what He did and what He said He elevated the status of Woman. ” The final barrier preventing Woman from fully participating in the kingdom of God toppled under Jesus' influence. ...
What the Old Testament Teaches About Woman The Old Testament shows Woman in at least two lights. The predominant view is one of Woman in subjection to man. However, at times, Woman is also the object of adoration and admiration. The creation narratives in Genesis foreshadow two different perspectives regarding Woman. In the account in Genesis 1:26-30 , man and Woman are created simultaneously (Genesis 1:27 ). Woman, like man, is made in the image of God. Together, man and Woman reflect the image of God. Woman is not in an inferior place in creation. In Genesis 2:7-25 , man is created before Woman. In this second account Woman is viewed as being created for man as his helper. This account is often cited as supportive of the view that Woman should remain subject to man since she has a subordinate position in creation, but the narrative describes Woman as a “suitable partner” (Genesis 2:20 REB) for whom man leaves his family. ...
The subordination of Woman appears more clearly in a close reading the Ten Commandments. Marriage and divorce are areas in which Woman's rights were subordinate to those of man. If a Woman about to be married was suspected of not being a virgin, she was required to submit to a test. No such avenue was open for a Woman who suspected her husband of being unfaithful. Proverbs 31:1 also pictured the hardworking, praiseworthy, “virtuous” Woman. ...
Woman's most positive image was wife and mother. Undoubtedly, Woman was venerated in her role as wife and mother. The ideal Woman, eulogized in Proverbs 31:1 , is a wife and mother who fulfills well both roles in addition to engaging profitably in the business world. ...
The birth of children was a sign of God's favor bestowed upon a good Woman. The story of Ruth is a good example of a traditional Woman who was admired for her role as a good daughter-in-law. ...
What the New Testament Teaches About Woman Jesus was able to retain the best in the Hebrew tradition and yet cut away some of the rigid structure that restricted it. He was able to do the same for Woman. Jesus' manner in His interactions with women is at least as significant as His teachings about Woman. ...
On another occasion, Jesus welcomed a Woman's anointing His head as indicative of her understanding of His real mission. The Woman at the well in Samaria is another example of Jesus seeing women as persons. Jesus would not have talked theology to her if He had related to her primarily as a Woman or as a Samaritan. The Woman caught in adultery was treated as a person. In His encounter with the Samaritan Woman, Jesus revealed Himself as the Messiah. Many Samaritans believed in Jesus because of the Woman's testimony. ...
God's seeking activity is the theme of two parables, the lost sheep begins, “What man of you” and the parable of the lost coin, “What Woman. ” The Woman looking for the lost coin represented God's activity in seeking the lost, just as the man represented God's seeking activity. Again Jesus used the life experience of Woman to illuminate an eternal truth. ...
Jesus spoke directly to the matter of treating a Woman as a sex object. )...
Jesus' parable of the ten maidens, five foolish and five wise, hints at the way Jesus saw and dealt with Woman (Matthew 25:1-13 ). In other passages Paul implied a hierarchy of submission from God, to Christ, to man, to Woman, to child as the sequence. ...
Summary Woman is the subject of many questions and controversies in the church today. ...
The Old Testament clearly subjected Woman to the will and protection of her husband. ...
The New Testament brings a different picture of Woman into focus. Jesus, and later Paul, elevated the status of Woman so that she could be a full participant in the kingdom of God. The spirit of freedom and love in Christ is Woman's as well as man's
Head - Besides the common use of this as 'chief,' referring to the heads of families and heads of tribes, the word was used symbolically of government and power, as when God declared that the Seed of the Woman should bruise the serpent's 'head. the term κεφαλή is employed for the relative position of man in nature, and of Christ and of God: the head of the Woman is the man; the head of every man is Christ; and the head of Christ is God. ...
In Revelation 12:3 the 'head' symbolises a form of power or kingdom; and in Revelation 17:3,9 , the seven heads are seven mountains on which the Woman sitteth, representing Rome, which was commonly described as built upon seven hills, and the Woman signifies Papal Rome
Prude - ) A Woman of affected modesty, reserve, or coyness; one who is overscrupulous or sensitive; one who affects extraordinary prudence in conduct and speech
Salome - Honorable mention is made of this Woman in her attendance on the Lord Jesus, Mark 15:40; Mar 16:1
Angelus, the - Millet (1859), showing a peasant man and Woman standing in the fields at sunset, with heads bowed in prayer
Toady - ) A coarse, rustic Woman
Mulatto - ) The offspring of a negress by a white man, or of a white Woman by a negro, - usually of a brownish yellow complexion
Prostitute - ) A Woman giver to indiscriminate lewdness; a strumpet; a harlot. ) To offer, as a Woman, to a lewd use; to give up to lewdness for hire
Chicken - a young Woman; a maiden
Damaris - An Athenian Woman converted by Paul's preaching (Acts 17:34
Riffe - ) The offspring of a mulatto Woman and a negro; also, a mulatto
Couvade - ) A custom, among certain barbarous tribes, that when a Woman gives birth to a child her husband takes to his bed, as if ill
Mamzer - A child born from an incestuous or adulterous relationship--specifically, a relationship between a man and a Woman who halachically cannot be bonded in marriage
Vivandiere - ) In Continental armies, especially in the French army, a Woman accompanying a regiment, who sells provisions and liquor to the soldiers; a female sutler
Landlady - ) A Woman having real estate which she leases to a tenant or tenants
Women - of Woman
Bride - ) A Woman newly married, or about to be married
Administratrix - ) A Woman who administers; esp
Alma - (Hebrew: young Woman) Word used in the prophecy of Isaias, 7, and interpreted by Saint Matthew 1, as applying to the Virgin Mother of the Messias
Persis - A Christian Woman at Rome, to whom Paul sent a salutation
Effeminacy - ) Characteristic quality of a Woman, such as softness, luxuriousness, delicacy, or weakness, which is unbecoming a man; Womanish delicacy or softness; - used reproachfully of men
Trapes - ) A slattern; an idle, sluttish, or untidy Woman
ap'Phia - (fruitful ) a Christian Woman addressed jointly with Philemon and Archippus in Philippians 2 ; apparently a member of Philemon's household, and not improbably his wife
Jacob's Well - There He met and conversed with a Samaritan Woman on the subject of living water. The well currently shown as the scene of the encounter of Jesus with the Samaritan Woman certainly is an ancient well and is generally accepted to be the place referred to in the Gospel
Women: Preaching - ...
When Boswell told Johnson one day that he had heard a Woman preach that morning at a Quaker's meeting, Johnson replied,' Sir, a Woman preaching is like a dog's walking on his hind legs
Vanity Box - A small box, usually jeweled or of precious metal and worn on a chain, containing a mirror, powder puff, and other small toilet articles for a Woman
Pythoness - ) Any Woman supposed to have a spirit of divination; a sort of witch
Overness - ) A female governor; a Woman invested with authority to control and direct; especially, one intrusted with the care and instruction of children, - usually in their homes
Marrried - ) Being in the state of matrimony; wedded; as, a married man or Woman
Moppet - ) A rag baby; a puppet made of cloth; hence, also, in fondness, a little girl, or a Woman
Damaris - ” An Athenian Woman who became a Christian following Paul's sermon at Mars' Hill, the highest court in Athens (Acts 17:34 )
Syntyche - ” Woman in the church at Philippi addressed by Paul concerning an argument with Euodia (Philippians 4:2 )
Tryphosa - (Τρυφῶσα, a Greek name)...
A Woman saluted by St
Ancilla Dei - (Latin: handmaid of God) Title given in early Christian inscriptions to a deceased Woman, but from the time of Gregory the Great, 7th century, only applied to nuns
Elopement - ) The act of eloping; secret departure; - said of a Woman and a man, one or both, who run away from their homes for marriage or for cohabitation
Persis - A Christian Woman, saluted and praised by Paul (Romans 16:12) as having "laboured much in the Lord"; compare Priscilla' s ministrations as to Apollos (Acts 18:26)
Manhood - ) The state of being man as a human being, or man as distinguished from a child or a Woman
Old Wives' - 1: γραώδης (Strong's #1126 — Adjective — graodes — grah-o'-dace ) an adjective, signifying "old-womanish" (from graus, "an old Woman"), is said of fables, in 1 Timothy 4:7
ju'Lia - (feminine of Julius), a Christian Woman at Rome, probably the wife of Philologus, in connection with whom she is saluted by St
Simon - Simon the Leper, at whose house 'a Woman' anointed the head of the Lord. By comparing these passages with John 12:1-3 it seems evident that Martha and Mary lived in Simon's house (they were perhaps in some way related to him), and that Mary was the Woman alluded to. Simon the Pharisee, who invited the Lord to his house, where a Woman 'who was a sinner' anointed the feet of the Lord. The Pharisee judged that the Lord could not be a prophet, or He would have known that the Woman was a sinner; but he was rebuked, and the Woman was forgiven. There is no authority for supposing that this Woman was Mary Magdalene
Woman - 1: γυνή (Strong's #1135 — Noun Feminine — gune — goo-nay' ) for which see also WIFE , is used of a "woman" unmarried or married, e. , Matthew 11:11 ; 14:21 ; Luke 4:26 , of a "widow;" Romans 7:2 ; in the vocative case, used in addressing a "woman," it is a term not of reproof or severity, but of endearment or respect, Matthew 15:28 ; John 2:4 , where the Lord's words to His mother at the wedding in Cana, are neither rebuff nor rebuke. , "What to Me and to thee?" and the word "woman," the term of endearment, follows this. ...
In Galatians 4:4 the phrase "born of a Woman" is in accordance with the subject there, viz. Since that man is born of Woman is a universal fact, the statement would be superfluous if the Lord Jesus were no more than man" (Notes on Galatians, by Hogg and Vine, pp. 1, a "little Woman," is used contemptuously in 2 Timothy 3:6 , "a silly Woman
Adulterer - ) A man who commits adultery; a married man who has sexual intercourse with a Woman not his wife
Dotation - ) The act of endowing, or bestowing a marriage portion on a Woman
Galgani, Gemma - A holy Woman who received the Stigmata and other marks of Our Lord's Passion
The shunamite woman - Childless Woman who regularly hosted Elisha when he traveled through Shunam
Unsex - , to make unfeminine in character, manners, duties, or the like; as, to unsex a Woman
Heroine - ) A Woman of an heroic spirit
Matrimony - ) The union of man and Woman as husband and wife; the nuptial state; marriage; wedlock
Gemma Galgani - A holy Woman who received the Stigmata and other marks of Our Lord's Passion
Cohabitation - ) The living together of a man and Woman in supposed sexual relationship
Damaris - A heifer, an Athenian Woman converted to Christianity under the preaching of Paul (Acts 17:34 )
Pillion - , a pad or cushion put on behind a man's saddle, on which a Woman may ride
Grown - Having arrived at full size or stature as a grown Woman
Weakly - ) Not strong of constitution; infirm; feeble; as, a weakly Woman; a man of a weakly constitution
Rebec - ) A contemptuous term applied to an old Woman
Thyatira - ...
Towards the end of the first century, the church in Thyatira was troubled by a Woman who was encouraging the Christians to join in idolatrous feasts and their accompanying immoral practices. The apostle John wrote to the church to warn the Woman and her followers of the judgment for which they were heading, and to encourage the true Christians to remain faithful to God (Revelation 2:19-29)
Damsel - A young Woman. Formerly, a young man or Woman of noble or genteel extraction as Damsel Pepin Damsel Richard, prince of Wales
Herself - The Woman was deranged, but she is now herself again. In her true character as, the Woman acts like herself
Gehazi - He appears in the story of the Shunammite Woman, 2 Kings 4:14-37 , and in that of Naaman the Syrian, form whom he fraudulently obtained a portion of the present his master had refused. We afterwards find him recounting to king Jehoram the wonderful deeds of Elisha, at the moment when the providence of god brought the Woman of Shunem before the king, to claim the restoration of her lands, 2 Kings 8:1-6
Beguine - ) A Woman belonging to one of the religious and charitable associations or communities in the Netherlands, and elsewhere, whose members live in beguinages and are not bound by perpetual vows
Discovert - ) Not covert; not within the bonds of matrimony; unmarried; - applied either to a Woman who has never married or to a widow
Light-o'-Love - ) Hence: A light or wanton Woman
Widowhood - ) The state of being a widow; the time during which a Woman is widow; also, rarely, the state of being a widower
Dam'Aris - (a heifer ), an Athenian Woman converted to Christianity by St
Dibri - ” Israelite Woman who had a son with an Egyptian father
Bloomer - ) A Woman who wears a Bloomer costume
Lydia - A Woman of Thyatira, for whose conversion Paul was called by a vision to preach at Philippi
Udder - ) One of the breasts of a Woman
Mannish - ) Fond of men; - said of a Woman
Tamar - A Canaanitish Woman, mother of Pharez and Zarah, Genesis 38:1-30
Del'Ilah, - (languishing ) a Woman who dwelt in the valley Of Sorek, beloved by Samson
Amoret - ) An amorous girl or Woman; a wanton
Shua - Woman descended from Asher (1 Chronicles 7:32 ), with slightly different Hebrew spelling
Groat - Piece of money mentioned by Our Lord in the parable of the Woman who has ten groats and loses one (Luke 15); it is identical with the drachma, and has the same value
Worthless - ) Destitute of worth; having no value, virtue, excellence, dignity, or the like; undeserving; valueless; useless; vile; mean; as, a worthless garment; a worthless ship; a worthless man or Woman; a worthless magistrate
Midwife - ) A Woman who assists other women in childbirth; a female practitioner of the obstetric art
Birthstool - An object upon which a Woman sat during labor (Exodus 1:16 )
Effeminate - effoeminatus, from effoeminor, to grow or make Womanish, from foemina, a Woman. See Woman. Having the qualities of the female sex soft or delicate to an unmanly degree tender Womanish voluptuous. Womanish weak resembling the practice or qualities of the sex as an effeminate peace an effeminate life. Womanlike, tender, in a sense not reproachful. EFFEM'INATE, To make Womanish to unman to weaken as to effeminate children. ...
EFFEM'INATE, To grow Womanish or weak to melt into weakness
Ethiopian Woman - His marriage of this "woman" descended from Ham gave offence to Aaron and Miriam
Aunt - ) An old Woman; and old gossip
Premiere - ) The leading Woman of a group, esp
Alamoth - (al' uh mawth) Musical notation meaning literally “upon or according to young Woman
Tasty - ) Having a good taste; - applied to persons; as, a tasty Woman
Leviratical - ) Of, pertaining to, or in accordance with, a law of the ancient Israelites and other tribes and races, according to which a Woman, whose husband died without issue, was married to the husband's brother
Aunt - ) An old Woman; and old gossip
Prophetess - 1: προφῆτις (Strong's #4398 — Noun Feminine — prophetis — prof-ay'-tis ) the feminine of prophetes (see above), is used of Anna, Luke 2:36 ; of the self-assumed title of "the Woman Jezebel" in Revelation 2:20
Rich: Danger of the - A holy Woman was wont to say of the rich: 'They are hemmed round with no common misery; they go down to hell without thinking of it, because their staircase thither is of gold and porphyry
Espousals - The act of contracting or affiancing a man and Woman to each other a contract or mutual promise of marriage
Alewife - ) A Woman who keeps an alehouse
Personable - ) Having a well-formed body, or person; graceful; comely; of good appearance; presentable; as, a personable man or Woman
Frump - , an old Woman; a gossip
Peninnah - (pih nihn' nuh) Personal name perhaps meaning, “woman with rich hair,” “coral,” or “pearl
Bawd - ) A person who keeps a house of prostitution, or procures women for a lewd purpose; a procurer or procuress; a lewd person; - usually applied to a Woman
Thebez - ) A Woman with a millstone, from the tower which was the last, stronghold not yet taken, killed him (Judges 9:50-55; 2 Samuel 11:21)
Sirrah - ) A term of address implying inferiority and used in anger, contempt, reproach, or disrespectful familiarity, addressed to a man or boy, but sometimes to a Woman
Slattern - ) A Woman who is negligent of her dress or house; one who is not neat and nice
Fornicator - An unmarried person, male or female, who has criminal conversation with the other sex also, a married man who has sexual commerce with an unmarried Woman
Washerwoman - ) A Woman who washes clothes, especially for hire, or for others
Adultery - Where polygamy was allowed, as among the ancient Jews, illicit intercourse between a married man and a Woman who was not married, nor betrothed, constituted not adultery, but fornication. ...
By the Law of Moses, both the man and the Woman who had committed adultery were punished with death, Leviticus 20:10 ; 21:9 ; John 8:5 . A Woman suspected of this crime might, in order to clear herself, drink the "water of jealousy," as prescribed in Numbers 5:1-31
Woman - This tells of fallen human nature; but the true thought of Woman is that she is the glory of the man, his true helpmeet. the true place of the Woman in subjection to the man is plainly stated, as indicated in creation; and in the assembly the Woman is to be silent, and not to teach
Concubinage - The act of living with a Woman to whom the man is not legally married. It is also used for a marriage with a Woman of inferior condition (performed with less solemnity than the formal marriage, ) and to whom the husband does not convey his rank
Nahash - Nahash was a Woman. The Amorite ruler Nahash and Jesse were at different times the husband of the same Woman
Amazon - ) A tall, strong, masculine Woman; a virago
Madeleine de la Peltrie - A noble-woman noted for her charity; born Caen, France, 1603; died Quebec, Canada, 1677
uz'Zen-She'Rah - (ear (or point) of Sherah ) a town founded or rebuilt by Sherah, an Ephraimite Woman the daughter either of Ephraim himself or of Beriah
Patrial - Thus Romanus, a Roman, and Troas, a Woman of Troy, are patrial nouns, or patrials
Elope - ) To run away, or escape privately, from the place or station to which one is bound by duty; - said especially of a Woman or a man, either married or unmarried, who runs away with a paramour or a sweetheart
Distaff - ) Used as a symbol of the holder of a distaff; hence, a Woman; women, collectively
Matchmaking - ) Busy in making or contriving marriages; as, a matchmaking Woman
Lorette - ) In France, a name for a Woman who is supported by her lovers, and devotes herself to idleness, show, and pleasure; - so called from the church of Notre Dame de Lorette, in Paris, near which many of them resided
Chilion - With his parents, he emigrated to Moab, where he married a Moabite Woman named Orpah
Chloe - ” A Woman whose household members informed Paul of dissension within the church at Corinth (1 Corinthians 1:11 )
Beruriah - An extremely learned Woman who was proficient in the Scriptures and would studied three hundred halachot (Torah laws) daily; the sages would consult her on matter of halachah
Shimeath - 2 Chronicles 24:26 takes the apparently feminine form of the Hebrew name and identifies the parent as an Ammonite Woman
Shulam(m)Ite - (sshuh' lam ite) Description of Woman in Song of Song of Solomon 6:13 either as from Shunem through a copying change; from Shulam, an otherwise unknown town; Solomonite, referring to a relationship to Solomon; or a common noun meaning, “the replaced one
Princess - ) A female prince; a Woman having sovereign power, or the rank of a prince
Fornication - ) Unlawful sexual intercourse on the part of an unmarried person; the act of such illicit sexual intercourse between a man and a Woman as does not by law amount to adultery
Placket - ) A Woman's pocket. an under petticoat; hence, a cant term for a Woman
Achsa - Othniel took the city and the Woman
Milliner - ) A person, usually a Woman, who makes, trims, or deals in hats, bonnets, headdresses, etc
Ma - ) In Oriental countries, a respectful form of address given to a Woman; mother
Deflour - ) To deprive of virginity, as a Woman; to violate; to ravish; also, to seduce
Helpmeet - KJV term for Woman as a helper precisely adapted to man (Genesis 2:18 ). The adjective “meet” (translated suitable, comparable, or corresponding) stresses that Woman, unlike the animals (Genesis 2:20 ), can be truly one with man (Genesis 2:24 ), that is, enjoy full fellowship and partnership in humanity's God-given task (Genesis 1:27-28 )
Abelians - They regulated marriage after the example of Abel, who, they pretended, was married, but lived in a state of continence: they therefore allowed each man to marry one Woman, but enjoined them to live in the same state. To keep up the sect, when a man and Woman entered into this society, they adopted a boy and a girl, who were to inherit their goods, and to marry upon the same terms of not having children, but of adopting two of different sexes
Woman - "The head of the Woman is the man;" but yet honour is to be shown to the wife, "as unto the weaker vessel" (1 Corinthians 11:3,8,9 ; 1 Peter 3:7 ). The word "woman," as used in Matthew 15:28 , John 2:4,20:13,15 , implies tenderness and courtesy and not disrespect. Only where revelation is known has Woman her due place of honour assigned to her
Jezebel - When Elijah caused 450 prophets of Baal to be put to death this wicked Woman threatened to slay Elijah, but he escaped. Indeed, her character throughout exhibits her as a remarkably able and decisive but impious Woman. A symbolical name of a Woman in the church at Thyatira, who corrupted the people; so called in allusion to Ahab's idolatrous wife
Harlot - , a Woman consecrated or devoted to prostitution in connection with the abominable worship of Asherah or Astarte, the Syrian Venus. ...
Jephthah's mother is called a "strange Woman" (Judges 11:2 ). nokriyah, the "strange Woman" (1 Kings 11:1 ; Proverbs 5:20 ; 7:5 ; 23:27 ). , the sinful, "woman
Almah - עלמה , a Hebrew word signifying properly, a virgin, a young Woman, unacquainted with man. Jerom, in his commentary on this passage, observes, that the Prophet declined using the word bethaul which signifies any young Woman, or young person, but employed the term almah, which denotes a virgin never seen by man. ...
The Jews, that they may obscure this plain text, and weaken this proof of the truth of the Christian religion, pretend that the Hebrew word signifies a young Woman, and not a virgin. It surely could be no wonder, that a young Woman should conceive a child; but it was a very extraordinary circumstance that a virgin should conceive and bear a son
Euodia - ), for a Woman is intended
Damsel - ) A young unmarried Woman; a girl; a maiden
Shunem - One of David's wives, and the generous Woman to the prophet Elisha, were each called by this name
Dowry - ) The money, goods, or estate, which a Woman brings to her husband in marriage; a bride's portion on her marriage
Saree - ) The principal garment of a Hindoo Woman
Ravish - ) To have carnal knowledge of (a Woman) by force, and against her consent; to rape
Madam - ) A gentlewoman; - an appellation or courteous form of address given to a lady, especially an elderly or a married lady; - much used in the address, at the beginning of a letter, to a Woman
Jilt - ) A Woman who capriciously deceives her lover; a coquette; a flirt
ga'Zez - (shearer ), a name which occurs twice in ( 1 Chronicles 2:46 ) --first as son of Caleb by Ephah his concubine, and second as son of Haran, the son of the same Woman
Christ, Bride of - ...
(2) A Woman who vows her chastity to God, foregoing marriage in order to be more united with Christ
Christ, Spouse of - ...
(2) A Woman who vows her chastity to God, foregoing marriage in order to be more united with Christ
Foursome - It is called a mixed foursome when each side consists of a man and a Woman
Daughter - ) A female descendant; a Woman
Shaul - Son of Simeon by a Canaanitish Woman
Magdalene - Designation of a Woman named Mary, 'out of whom went seven demons,' to signify that she was a native of Magdala
Goddess - In the language of love, a Woman of superior charms or excellence
Tit - ) A Woman; - used in contempt
Spouse of Christ - ...
(2) A Woman who vows her chastity to God, foregoing marriage in order to be more united with Christ
Tekoa, Tekoah - From this place Joab procured a "wise Woman," who pretended to be in great affliction, and skilfully made her case known to David. The object of Joab was, by the intervention of this Woman, to induce David to bring back Absalom to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 14:2,4,9 )
Nurse - Woman who breast-feeds an infant (Genesis 21:7 ; Exodus 2:7 ; 1 Samuel 1:23 ). Woman who cares for a child such as a governess or nanny (Ruth 4:16 ; 2 Samuel 4:4 )
Witch - ) One who exercises more than common power of attraction; a charming or bewitching person; also, one given to mischief; - said especially of a Woman or child. ) An ugly old Woman; a hag
Jade - ) A young Woman; - generally so called in irony or slight contempt. ) A disreputable or vicious Woman; a wench; a quean; also, sometimes, a worthless man
Cozbi - ” A Midianite Woman who was slain by Phinehas after being brought into the tent of an Israelite man named Zimri (Numbers 25:15 )
Eunice - She was a Jewish Woman whose husband was a Gentile
Julia - In Romans 16:15 , a Christian Woman to whom Paul the apostle extended a greeting
Amenable - ) Easy to be led; governable, as a Woman by her husband
Amiable - , which causes one to be liked; as, an amiable Woman
Water of Jealousy - (Numbers 5:11-31 ) The ritual prescribed consisted in the husband's bringing before the priest the Woman suspected of infidelity, and the essential part of it is unquestionably the oath to which the "water" was subsidiary, symbolical and ministerial. " and having thrown the handful of meal on the altar, "caused the Woman to drink" the potion thus drugged, she moreover answering to the words of his imprecation, "Amen, amen. " Josephus adds, if the suspicion was unfounded, she obtained conception; if true, she died infamously, (This was entirely different from most trials of this kind, for the bitter water the Woman must drink was harmless in itself, and only by a direct act of God could it injure her it guilty while in most heathen trials the suspected party must take poison, or suffer that which only a miracle would save them from if they were innocent
Marry - To unite in wedlock or matrimony to join a man and Woman for life, and constitute them man and wife according to the laws or customs of a nation. We say, a man marries a Woman or a Woman marries a man
Rahab - Had she been a Woman of ill fame, would Salmon, a prince of the tribe of Judah, have taken her to wife! Or could he have done it by the law? Beside, the spies of Joshua would hardly have gone to lodge with a common harlot, they who were charged with so nice and dangerous a commission. Those who maintain that she was a harlot, pretend that she was perhaps one of those women who prostituted themselves in honour of the Pagan deities; as if this could extenuate her crime, or the scandal of her profession if she was a public Woman. Thus Jesus Christ condescended to reckon this Canaanitish Woman among his ancestors
Courtship - ) The act of wooing in love; solicitation of Woman to marriage
Barren - For a Woman to be barren was accounted a severe punishment among the Jews (Genesis 16:2 ; 30:1-23 ; 1 Samuel 1:6,27 ; Isaiah 47:9 ; 49:21 ; Luke 1:25 )
Nun - A Woman devoted to a religious life, and who lives in a cloister or nunnery, secluded from the world, under a vow of perpetual chastity
Forsooth - ) In truth; in fact; certainly; very well; - formerly used as an expression of deference or respect, especially to Woman; now used ironically or contemptuously
Admiration - ) Wonder mingled with approbation or delight; an emotion excited by a person or thing possessed of wonderful or high excellence; as, admiration of a beautiful Woman, of a landscape, of virtue
Estovers - , of sustenance to a man confined for felony of his estate, or alimony to a Woman divorced out of her husband's estate
Effeminate - ) Womanlike; Womanly; tender; - in a good sense. ) Having some characteristic of a Woman, as delicacy, luxuriousness, etc. ; soft or delicate to an unmanly degree; Womanish; weak. ) To make Womanish; to make soft and delicate; to weaken. ) To grow Womanish or weak
Coquette - ) A vain, trifling Woman, who endeavors to attract admiration from a desire to gratify vanity; a flirt; - formerly sometimes applied also to men
Abduction - It consists in the forcible carrying off or detention of a Woman against her will, and it renders a marriage with her invalid so long as she remains in the power of the abductor
Mass, Nuptial - If the Woman has received it at a previous marriage it is not repeated. It is directed rather to the Woman than to the man, that "her marriage may be to her a yoke of peace, and that they may see their children's children, even to the third and fourth generation
Nuptial Mass And Blessing - If the Woman has received it at a previous marriage it is not repeated. It is directed rather to the Woman than to the man, that "her marriage may be to her a yoke of peace, and that they may see their children's children, even to the third and fourth generation
Divorce - The separation of a married Woman from the bed and board of her husband, a mensa et thoro. To separate, as a married Woman from the bed and board of her husband
Feminine - femininus, from femina, Woman. Pertaining to a Woman, or to women, or to females as the female sex
Marriage - The act of uniting a man and Woman for life wedlock the legal union of a man and Woman for life
Mother - The wise Woman who appealed to Joab as 'a mother in Israel,' was at once listened to. The children of the virtuous Woman arise and call her blessed
Ahinoam - A Woman of Jezreel, wife of David and mother Amnon
Timna - A Woman of the Esau clan of Horites ( Genesis 36:22 , 1 Chronicles 1:39 )
Thebez - During the seige of Thebez, a Woman of the city fatally wounded Abimelech by throwing an upper millstone on his head (Judges 9:50-53 ; 2 Samuel 11:21 )
Elegantly - Richly with rich or handsome materials well disposed as a room elegantly furnished a Woman elegantly dressed
Fornication - The incontinence or lewdness of unmarried persons, male or female also, the criminal conversation of a married man with an unmarried Woman
Paramour - ) A lover, of either sex; a wooer or a mistress (formerly in a good sense, now only in a bad one); one who takes the place, without possessing the rights, of a husband or wife; - used of a man or a Woman
Morganatic - ) Pertaining to, in the manner of, or designating, a kind of marriage, called also left-handed marriage, between a man of superior rank and a Woman of inferior, in which it is stipulated that neither the latter nor her children shall enjoy the rank or inherit the possessions of her husband
Betrothal - That portion of the Marriage Service in which the manand the Woman join hands and give their troth (i
Betroth - of a Woman
Folly - ) Scandalous crime; sin; specifically, as applied to a Woman, wantonness
Forget - Can a Woman forget her sucking child? Yea, they may forget, yet will I not forget thee
Snout - Proverbs 11:22 (a) What could be more obnoxious than to see a beautiful golden ornament in the nose of a pig? Our Lord compares this with the unhappy acts, or the shameful actions of a beautiful Woman who has a place of affection and honor in the minds and hearts of her friends
Sychar - City of Samaria in the vicinity of which was Jacob's well, where the Lord met the Woman of Samaria, and where He stayed two days, and many of the Samaritans believed on Him
Vestal - ) A virgin; a Woman pure and chaste; also, a nun
Ravishment - ) The act of ravishing a Woman; rape
Prostitution - ) The act or practice of prostituting or offering the body to an indiscriminate intercourse with men; common lewdness of a Woman
Betroth - 1: μνηστεύω (Strong's #3423 — Verb — mnesteuo — mnace-tyoo'-o ) in the Active Voice, signifies "to woo a Woman and ask for her in marriage;" in the NT, only in the Passive Voice, "to be promised in marriage, to be betrothed," Matthew 1:18 ; Luke 1:27 ; 2:5 , RV, "betrothed," (AV, "espoused")
Samaritan Woman - A Woman of Sichar, a city of Samaria, who was converted by Our Lord at the well of Jacob (John 4)
Woman, Samaritan - A Woman of Sichar, a city of Samaria, who was converted by Our Lord at the well of Jacob (John 4)
Scarlet - The Woman was sheltered because of the red cord. ...
Revelation 17:3 (b) It indicates the enormous sin and wickedness of this Woman whose stain of sin covered her completely. The Woman represents the apostate church
Basemath - A Hittite Woman whom Esau married, grieving his parents, Isaac and Rebekah (Genesis 26:1 : 34-35 ; Genesis 27:46 ). Apparently, all three passages refer to the same Woman
Damaris - 7) makes Damaris the wife of Dionysius the Areopagite, as does the Latin of Codex E (‘cum uxore suo’), though the Greek has only ‘a Woman. She seems to have been a person of some importance, since her name is mentioned, and it is open to doubt whether a prominent Athenian Woman would have been present
Cushite - ...
...
Moses married a Cushite Woman (Numbers 12:1 )
Baggage - ) A Woman of loose morals; a prostitute
Debauch - ) To lead away from purity or excellence; to corrupt in character or principles; to mar; to vitiate; to pollute; to seduce; as, to debauch one's self by intemperance; to debauch a Woman; to debauch an army
Sha'ul -
The son of Simeon by a Canaanitish Woman, (Genesis 48:10 ; Exodus 6:15 ; Numbers 26:13 ; 1 Chronicles 4:24 ) and founder of the family of the Shaulites
Beauty - a beautiful Woman
Distaff - Figuratively, a Woman, or the female sex
Dowry - The money, goods or estate which a Woman brings to her husband in marriage the portion given with a wife
Lappidoth - Some commentators take the term to be descriptive of the character of Deborah, ‘a Woman of lightning flashes
Prudent - ) Frugal; economical; not extravagant; as, a prudent Woman; prudent expenditure of money
Harlot - A Woman given up to fornication: there were such as early as Genesis 38:15
Duenna - ) Any old Woman who is employed to guard a younger one; a governess
Skimmington - ) A word employed in the phrase, To ride Skimmington; that is to ride on a horse with a Woman, but behind her, facing backward, carrying a distaff, and accompanied by a procession of jeering neighbors making mock music; a cavalcade in ridicule of a henpecked man
Repudiate - ) To divorce, put away, or discard, as a wife, or a Woman one has promised to marry
Whore - ) A Woman who practices unlawful sexual commerce with men, especially one who prostitutes her body for hire; a prostitute; a harlot
Dorcas - The name of a Christian Woman at Joppa, ‘full of good works and almsdeeds,’ who, having died, was raised by St
Shunem - Two resting-places, a little village in the tribe of Issachar, to the north of Jezreel and south of Mount Gilboa (Joshua 19:18 ), where the Philistines encamped when they came against Saul (1 Samuel 28:4 ), and where Elisha was hospitably entertained by a rich Woman of the place. On the sudden death of this Woman's son she hastened to Carmel, 20 miles distant across the plain, to tell Elisha, and to bring him with her to Shunem. This Woman afterwards retired during the famine to the low land of the Philistines; and on returning a few years afterwards, found her house and fields in the possession of a stranger
Neat - The vessels are kept neat the Woman keeps her house very neat. Cleanly preserving neatness as a neat Woman
Eve - Eve is little more, in Genesis, than a personification of human life which is perpetuated by Woman. that Adam was ‘not deceived,’ in the fundamental manner that Eve was, for ‘the Woman being completely deceived has come into [1] transgression
Gracious - ’ And from this it came to signify ‘attractive,’ as Proverbs 11:16 ‘a gracious Woman retaineth honour,’ lit. ‘a Woman of grace,’ that is, of attractive appearance and manner; Luke 4:22 ‘the gracious words which proceeded out of his mouth,’ lit
Queen - ) A Woman eminent in power or attractions; the highest of her kind; as, a queen in society; - also used figuratively of cities, countries, etc. ) A Woman who is the sovereign of a kingdom; a female monarch; as, Elizabeth, queen of England; Mary, queen of Scots
Adultery - Strictly denotes uncleanness between a man and a Woman, either of whom is married. Christ says that whosoever looketh on a Woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her already in his heart
Sit (Downsitting) - ...
Zechariah 5:7 (b) Probably the Woman represents Israel, while lead represents the heavy burdens and the weight of sorrow in which Israel is sitting. ...
Revelation 17:1 (b) The Woman represents the apostate church, while the waters represent peoples, nations and tongues. The great apostate church of Rome, which is undoubtedly intended by the picture of the Woman, does rule with vigor, cruelty and power in every country where she controls the government
Living Waters - (1) Spring water as contrasted with well-water, promised by Our Lord to the Samaritan Woman at the well of Jacob (John 4; Isaiah 12; Jeremias 2; Ezechias 47; Zacheriah 14)
Customer - ) A lewd Woman
Convenient - of Agrippa’s Van Artes (1684) ‘She sang and danc’d more exquisitely than was convenient for an honest Woman
Adulterer - A man guilty of adultery a man who has sexual commerce with any married Woman, except his wife
Phebe - A christian Woman commended by the apostle to the saints at Rome as 'a servant of the church
Contentious - A continual dropping in a rainy day, and a contentious Woman are alike
Gad - Give the water no passage, neither a wicked Woman liberty to gad abroad
Silly - ) Weak in intellect; destitute of ordinary strength of mind; foolish; witless; simple; as, a silly Woman
Mill, Millstone - A Woman, or sometimes two sit at the mill, turning the upper stone, casting in the grain occasionally through a hole in it Larger mills are also referred to, the stone being turned by an ass
Bettered - 1: ὠφελέω (Strong's #5623 — Verb — opheleo — o-fel-eh'-o ) in the Active Voice signifies "to help, to succor, to be of service;" in the Passive "to receive help, to derive profit or advantage;" in Mark 5:26 , "was (nothing) bettered," of the Woman who had an issue of blood
Waters, Living - (1) Spring water as contrasted with well-water, promised by Our Lord to the Samaritan Woman at the well of Jacob (John 4; Isaiah 12; Jeremias 2; Ezechias 47; Zacheriah 14)
Woman - Man and Woman are indeed essentially one, the natural qualities of each so responding to those of the other as to lay the foundation of the most tender and abiding unity. The Bible thus raised the Jewish Woman high above the Woman of heathenism; and the Old Testament contains some of the finest portraitures of female character. If Woman was first in the Fall, she was honored in the exclusive parentage of the Savior of mankind; and women were the truest friends of Christ while on earth. The primal curse falls with heaviest weight on Woman; but the larger proportion of women in our churches may indicate that it was the purpose of God to make his grace to man "yet more abound" to her who was the first in sinning and suffering
Adultery - ...
Although adultery is prohibited by the law of God, yet some have endeavored to explain away the moral turpitude of it; but it is evident, observes Paley, that, on the part of the man who solicits the chastity of a married Woman, it certainly includes the crime of seduction, and is attended with mischief still more extensive and complicated: it creates a new sufferer, the injured husband, upon whose affection is inflicted a wound the most painful and incurable that human nature knows. The infidelity of the Woman is aggravated by cruelty to her children, who are generally involved in their parents' shame, and always made unhappy by their quarrel. The married offender, therefore, incurs a crime little short of perjury, and the seduction of a married Woman is little less than subornation of perjury. By the Jewish law it was punished with death in both parties, where either the Woman was married, or both. Among the Egyptians, adultery in the man was punished by a thousand lashes with rods, and in the Woman by the loss of her nose. Canute ordered the man to be banished, and the Woman to have her nose and ears cut off
Womanliness - WOMANLINESS. —Christianity is distinguished for the honour it assigns, the liberty it allows to Woman. ‘Christianity raises Woman from the slavish position which she held, both in Judaism and in heathendom, to her true moral dignity and importance, makes her an heir of the same salvation with man, and opens to her a field for the noblest and loveliest virtue’ (Schaff’s Apostolic Christianity, p. ...
The sphere of Woman is the home, not the world. ‘But Woman is at home in the region of feeling and affection, and she finds her highest vocation in the cultivation of those loves and sympathies that make home the dearest spot on earth. ’ Man, being thus active and even combative, develops ‘pertinacity and self-assertion; whereas the receptive nature of Woman manifests itself rather in patient endurance and tender devotion to the service of loved ones. On the other hand, where moral as well as intellectual considerations come into view, Woman’s judgment is likely to be as just as that of man, whose decisions are frequently based on grounds of reason alone’ (Bruce, The Formation of Christian Character, p. May we find any such signs of Womanliness in the character or teaching of Jesus?...
Jesus assigned great importance to marriage and family, the sanctity and unity of the home. Does not the modesty of the Woman appear in His reference to the lustful glance (Matthew 5:28), and His stooping to write upon the ground when the Woman taken in her sin stood before Him (John 8:6)? Jesus understood the heart of a, Woman in penitence (Luke 7:47) and in gratitude (John 12:7-8). In His resignation and obedience to His Father’s will (Matthew 11:26; Matthew 11:29) is there not a Womanly rather than a manly submissiveness? The prominence He gives in the Beatitudes to the passive graces of endurance rather than the active virtues of endeavour (Matthew 5:3-10) vindicates the distinctive excellence of Womanhood. ...
Doubtless it was this Womanliness in Jesus that attracted and attached so many women to Him during His earthly ministry: and they received from Him a loving welcome such as they did not find in any other religious teacher of the age. His disciples were astonished that He was speaking to the Woman of Samaria (John 4:27), and doubtless the prejudices of many were offended by His action regarding women. His defence of the sinful Woman and of Mary has been already noted. The reverence that the mother of Jesus has properly inspired has given to Womanhood a glory, and to Woman a position and influence in the Christian Church, never before and nowhere else recognized. His treatment of a Woman on three occasions appears harsh, but a consideration of the circumstances in each case removes this impression. the rebuke of Peter, Matthew 16:23); His repulse of the Syrophœnician mother (Mark 7:27) was His own indignant protest against Jewish exclusiveness; His requirement that the Woman healed by touching His garment should confess her deed was no violence done to her sense of modesty, but was intended to replace the uncertainty of a cure snatched unawares by the assurance of healing willingly bestowed (Mark 5:34). What Christ has been to and done for women throughout the history of Christendom, and what women have suffered and accomplished for His Church and Kingdom on earth, afford abundant and conclusive evidence of the Womanliness of Jesus in presenting in His character all Womanly grace as well as manly virtue, and offering in His salvation what meets the deepest needs, and fulfils the loftiest hopes of Womanhood in all lands and ages. See also Woman
Morganatic Marriage - (Latin: morganatica, a dowry given the morning after a wedding) ...
The valid and licit union of a prince or a member of a ruling house with a Woman of greatly inferior rank, contracted with the understanding that the children have no right to succeed to the title of their father
Marriage, Morganatic - (Latin: morganatica, a dowry given the morning after a wedding) ...
The valid and licit union of a prince or a member of a ruling house with a Woman of greatly inferior rank, contracted with the understanding that the children have no right to succeed to the title of their father
Mankind - Thou shalt not lie with mankind as with Womankind. Resembling man in form, not Woman
Pregnant - ) A pregnant Woman
Agar - The unfortunate Woman determined to abandon the boy to death in the wilderness but hearkened to the angel who foretold his people as the progenitor of a great people, the Ismaelites
Abishag - ) The beautiful young Woman of Shunem in Issachar, who cherished David in his old age
Concubine - ) A Woman who cohabits with a man without being his wife; a paramour
Skull - 2 Kings 9:35 (c) This peculiar incident may teach us the lesson that the thoughts and decisions of the wicked Woman Jezebel remained to defile the people after she had gone from the scene
Dowry - The sum paid by a man to the relatives of the Woman who becomes his wife
Ruth - A Moabitish Woman who married a son of Naomi and left her own country to follow her mother-in-law into Judæa
Tekoa - Here originated the wise Woman who was Joab's agent, 2 Samuel 14:2 , and Amos the prophet, Amos 1:1
Woman - Woman...
1. In OT ( ’ishshâh , ‘woman,’ ‘wife’; nĕqçbâh [1], ‘female’) Woman’s position is one of inferiority and subjection to man ( Genesis 3:13 ); and yet, in keeping with the view that ideally she is his companion and ‘help meet’ ( Genesis 2:18-24 ), she never sinks into a mere drudge or plaything. Under the monarchy, Jezebel in the Northern Kingdom and Athaliah in the Southern, afford illustrations of the political power and influence that a Woman might wield. code Woman’s position is one of complete subordination, her rights are recognized and safeguarded in a way that prepares the soil for the growth of those higher conceptions which find utterance in Malachi’s declaration that divorce is hateful to Jehovah ( Ezra 2:16 ), and in the picture of the virtuous wife with which the Book of Proverbs concludes (ch. In NT ( gynç , ‘woman,’ ‘wife’; thçleia [2], ‘female’; gynaikarion [3] the surprise of the disciples by the well of Sychar when they found Jesus ‘speaking with a Woman[7]). ), but still more by His personal attitude to women, whether good and pure like His own mother (there is nothing harsh or discourteous in the ‘Woman’ of John 2:4 ; cf. Paul’s conception of Woman and of man’s relation to her is difficult ( 1 Corinthians 7:1-40 ), but may be explained partly by his expectation of the Parousia ( 1 Corinthians 7:29-31 ), and partly by the exigencies of an era of persecution ( 1 Corinthians 7:26 )
Skirt - “To reveal a skirt” (literal reading of Deuteronomy 22:30 ; Deuteronomy 27:20 ) is a euphemism for sexual relationships, since placing the skirt over a Woman of marriageable age was the same as claiming her for marriage (Ruth 3:7-14 ). In some passages it refers to the loose garment of a Woman
Junias Junia - If the name is that of a Woman, she was the sister, or more likely the wife, of Andronicus. Paul should include a Woman among the apostles in the wider sense of accredited missionaries or messengers, a position to which their seniority in the faith may have called this pair
Eve - Eve being formed from a rib taken out of Adam, which God 'built' into a Woman, and hence called by him Isha, is a beautiful type of the church being of Christ and presented to Him: cf. A Woman is to be silent in the church: she is not to exercise authority over the man, for Adam was formed before Eve; and Adam was not deceived, but she was
Gray - " The Greek word is rendered an old Woman, and in this passage of Hesiod, is supposed to mean certain deities. The probability is, that it is applied to an old Woman, because she is gray
Mother - ) An old Woman or matron. ) A female parent; especially, one of the human race; a Woman who has borne a child
Water of Jealousy - The husband brought the Woman before the priest, bearing the tenth of an ephah of barley meal, which was thrown on the blazing altar. As she stood holding the offering, so the priest held an earthen vessel of holy water mixed with the dust of the floor of the sanctuary, and declared her freedom from hurt if innocent, but cursed her if guilty; he then wrote the curses in a book and washed them INTO (so translated Numbers 5:23) the bitter water, which the Woman had then to drink, answering "amen" to the curse. Thus the law provided a legal vent for jealousy, mitigating its violent outbursts, so terrible in orientals, protecting the Woman if innocent, and punishing her by divine interposition if guilty. The oath and the solemn ritual accompanying would deter a guilty Woman from facing it
Enmity - "I will put enmity between thee and the Woman, between thy seed and her seed" (Genesis 3:15 )
Eve - ” The first Woman created and thus original ancestor of all people (Genesis 3:20 ; compare Genesis 4:1-2 ,Genesis 4:1-2,4:25 )
Giving - A Woman who was known to be very poor, came to a missionary meeting in Wakefield, and offered to subscribe a penny a-week to the mission fund, 'Surely,' said one, 'you are too poor to afford this?' She replied, 'I spin so many hanks of yarn a-week for my living, and I'll spin one hank more, and that will be a penny a-week for the society
Dorcas - ” A Christian Woman of Joppa who was known for her charitable works (Acts 9:36 )
Temptations (2) - One of the ancient fathers, we are told, had, before his conversion, lived with an ill Woman, and some little time after, she accosted him as usual
Waterpot - Large pots stored water (1 Kings 18:33 ; John 2:6 ); smaller pots a Woman could carry on her shoulder (John 4:28 )
Cook - One whose occupation is to prepare victuals for the table a man or Woman who dresses meat or vegetables for eating
Eve - SEe Genesis 2:21-22, "the rib built (the usual Hebrew word for founding a family: Genesis 16:2; Genesis 30:3 margin) He up into a Woman"; not as Speaker's Commentary, "the side He built up," etc. "Woman was not made out of his head to top him, not out of his feet to be trampled upon by him, but out of his side to be equal with him, under his arm to be protected, and near his heart to be beloved. The oneness of flesh is the foundation of the inseparable marriage union of one man with one Woman (Malachi 2:15; Matthew 19:5). ...
"This is now (Hebrew this time, as contrasted with the creatures heretofore formed besides Adam) bone of my bones," he exclaims in joyful surprise; and, with the intuitive knowledge wherewith he had named the other creatures according to the? natures, he names her "woman" ('ishah ) as being taken out of "man" ('ish ). Thus, marriage is the holy appointment of God, based on the relations by creation between man and Woman. So, the Woman is sentenced next after Satan, and Adam is sentenced last. ) Her name Chawah , "life", implies both her being mother of all living and her being mother of the promised "Seed of the Woman" who should give LIFE to the human race now subjected to death. Adam as a believer fitly gives her this name directly after God's promise of life through "the Seed of the Woman
Matrimony - The valid union of a man and a Woman, by which they give themselves each to the other for mutual helpfulness and society, and for the begetting of children. The name of this union is derived from the Latin matris munus, the office of mother, signifying that the man and Woman are united principally that the Woman, if possible, may have the privilege of lawful motherhood. It is a true contract; the parties bind themselves to each other for certain definite objects, which are that the Woman may become a mother if possible, that each may be a helpmate to the other, and that carnal temptations and sins may be more easily avoided. ...
Christian matrimony, the union of baptized Christians, is a sacrament which unites a Christian man and Woman in lawful marriage. The contracting parties are the real ministers of this sacrament; its "matter" is the mutual giving of each to the other, and its "form" consists in the words or outward signs by which the man and the Woman express their agreement and intention to be husband and wife
Foligno, Angela of, Blessed - She was a worldly and frail Woman who, after her conversion, established a community at Foligno of the Third Order of Saint Francis
Beautiful - A beautiful Woman is one of the most attractive objects in all nature's works
Betroth - From the time of betrothal the Woman was regarded as the lawful wife of the man to whom she was betrothed (Deuteronomy 28:30 ; Judges 14:2,8 ; Matthew 1:18-21 )
Shu'Lamite, the, - one of the personages in the poem of Solomon's (Song of Solomon 6:13 ) The name denotes a Woman belonging to a place called Shulem, which is probably the same as Shunem
en-Dor - A town of Manasseh in the territory of Issachar ( Joshua 17:11 ); the home of a Woman with a familiar spirit consulted by Saul on the eve of the battle of Gilboa ( 1 Samuel 28:1-25 ); and, according to a psalmist ( Psalms 83:10 ), the scene of the rout of Jabin and Sisera
Junias - whether a man or a Woman is intended
Ditch - ...
Proverbs 23:27 (a) This is a terrible description and indictment of an evil Woman
Herself - ) Her own proper, true, or real character; hence, her right, or sane, mind; as, the Woman was deranged, but she is now herself again; she has come to herself
Scold - , a rude, clamorous Woman; a shrew
Angela of Foligno, Blessed - She was a worldly and frail Woman who, after her conversion, established a community at Foligno of the Third Order of Saint Francis
Wicked - ) Evil in principle or practice; deviating from morality; contrary to the moral or divine law; addicted to vice or sin; sinful; immoral; profligate; - said of persons and things; as, a wicked king; a wicked Woman; a wicked deed; wicked designs
Fury - ) A stormy, turbulent violent Woman; a hag; a vixen; a virago; a termagant
Shunem - David's nurse, Abishag, was of Shunem, 1 Kings 1:3, and it was the residence of the Shunammite Woman who entertained Elisha
Lydia - A Woman of Thyatira, residing at Philippi in Macedonia, and dealing in purple cloths
Widow - A Woman who has lost her husband by death
Bow, Bend - To “bow down upon” a Woman was a euphemism for sexual intercourse (Job 31:10). A Woman in process of giving birth was said to “bow down” ( Hair - Regarding the latter (a) it is used to signify the minutest detail, as that which illustrates the exceeding care and protection bestowed by God upon His children, Matthew 10:30 ; Luke 12:7 ; 21:18 ; Acts 27:34 ; (b) as the Jews swore by the "hair," the Lord used the natural inability to make one "hair" white or black, as one of the reasons for abstinence from oaths, Matthew 5:36 ; (c) while long "hair" is a glory to a Woman (see B), and to wear it loose or dishevelled is a dishonor, yet the Woman who wiped Christ's feet with her "hair" (in place of the towel which Simon the Pharisee omitted to provide), despised the shame in her penitent devotion to the Lord (slaves were accustomed to wipe their masters' feet), Luke 7:38,44 (RV, "hair"); see also John 11:2 ; 12:3 ; (d) the dazzling whiteness of the head and "hair" of the Son of Man in the vision of Revelation 1:14 is suggestive of the holiness and wisdom of "the Ancient of Days;" (e) the long "hair" of the spirit-beings described as locusts in Revelation 9:8 is perhaps indicative of their subjection of their satanic master (cp. The word is found in 1 Corinthians 11:15 , where the context shows that the "covering" provided in the long "hair" of the Woman is as a veil, a sign of subjection to authority, as indicated in the headships spoken of in 1 Corinthians 11:1-10 . ...
B — 1: κομάω (Strong's #2863 — Verb — komao — kom-ah'-o ) signifies "to let the hair grow long, to wear long hair," a glory to a Woman, a dishonor to a man (as taught by nature), 1 Corinthians 11:14,15
Castile, Blanche of - She was an energetic Woman and had excellent counsellors in Friar Guerin, Chancellor Barthelemy of Roye, and the papal legate, Frangipani
Ruby - The price of a virtuous Woman is said to be "far above rubies" (Proverbs 31:10 )
Junias - Some recent commentators see the person as a Woman and possibly as the wife of Andronicus
Harpy - ) A fabulous winged monster, ravenous and filthy, having the face of a Woman and the body of a vulture, with long claws, and the face pale with hunger
Lemuel - This section of Proverbs apparently comes from a non-Israelite Woman
Nard - The term appears twice in the Song of Solomon (Romans 1:12 ; Romans 4:13-14 ) and in two of the gospel accounts of the Woman anointing Jesus at Simon's house in Bethany (Mark 14:3 ; John 12:3 ; “spikenard,” KJV)
Own - ) The ordinary outer dress of a Woman; as, a calico or silk gown
Abihail - Woman in family list of Judah (1 Chronicles 2:29 )
Angustia Loci - (Latin: smallness of a place) A basis for dispensation from a diriment impediment of matrimony, when, in the place of birth or domicile of a Woman, her relationship is so widely spread that she is unable to meet anyone of a position equal to her own whom she can marry, except a relative by blood or by marriage, so that if no dispensation were granted she would be obliged to leave her country in order to marry
Enmity - I will put enmity between thee and the Woman
Abishag - , "given to") error, a young Woman of Shunem, distinguished for her beauty
Mehetabel - It is further remarkable, that we have the same name for a Woman, Genesis 36:39
Own - ) The ordinary outer dress of a Woman; as, a calico or silk gown
Harlot - An abandoned Woman, Proverbs 29:3 ; a type of idolatrous nations and cities, Isaiah 1:21 Ezekiel 16:1-63 Nahum 3:4
Mary - ' John 2:12; Matthew 4:13; Matthew 13:54-55; Mark 6:1-4 Lastly she was at the cross, and was there commended to the care of the disciple whom Jesus loved: "Woman, behold thy son. Such is all the authentic history we have of the "blessed among women," taught, as no other Woman was, the hard lessons which were to guide her to her Son's eternal kingdom. The mother of John Mark, Acts 12:12, and aunt to Barnabas, Colossians 4:10, a godly Woman residing at Jerusalem at whose house the disciples were convened the night Peter was miraculously delivered from prison. The general impression that she was an unchaste Woman is entirely without foundation. A Christian Woman in Rome to whom Paul sends his salutation
Christian: a Royal Personage - ...
A poor but pious Woman called upon two elegant young ladies, who, regardless of her poverty, invited her to sit down with them in the drawing-room, and entered into conversation with her upon religious subjects
Delilah - ” A Woman from the valley of Sorek who was loved by Samson (Judges 16:4 )
Dower - The property which a Woman brings to her husband in marriage
Midnight - It represents the man or the Woman who calls at your door selling some article, but in his heart there is conviction of sin, and a realization of his need
Dally - To toy and wanton, as man and Woman to interchange caresses to fondle
Haughty - His wife was a Woman of a haughty and imperious nature
Mort - ) A Woman; a female
Priscilla - a Christian Woman, well known in the Acts, and in St
Queen - A Woman who is the sovereign of a kingdom a queen-regent as Elizabeth, queen of England Mary, queen of Scotland
Eve - The history of Woman in all ages has been a striking fulfillment of the distinct penalties pronounced upon her, Genesis 3:16
Man - ...
Ish , "man," as distinguished from Woman, husband
Abimelech - After ruling for three years, his subjects rebelled and a Woman dropped a millstone on his head, fatally wounding him
Woman - The position of Woman in any section or period of society is a recognized test of the contemporary level of morality and general enlightenment. In fact, the exaltation of Womanhood is justly claimed as one of the best examples of what Christianity has done for the world. … Both the literature and the inscriptions of that age make us acquainted with a very different kind of Woman’ (S. This is an important fact to remember, for the attitude of apostolic Christianity to Woman is largely due to the interaction of two distinct principles-the fundamental Christian assertion of the intrinsic worth of human personality, and the eschatological foreshortening of the time, which could not fail to hinder the social application of the former principle. The religious equality of Woman with man before God is clearly asserted by Paul: ‘as many of you as were baptized into Christ did put on Christ. The mutual dependence of man and Woman, and their common origin in God, teach that the male has no exclusive place ‘in the Lord’ (1 Corinthians 11:11-12). Man) lifts the Christian idea of Woman clearly above that of the contemporary Judaism, which in several noticeable ways differentiated Woman religiously from man (cf. The morning service of Judaism still retains the ancient thanksgiving: ‘Blessed art thou, O Lord our God, King of the universe, who hast not made me a Woman’ (Authorised Daily Prayer Book, p. We naturally think of the ‘Court of the Women’ in the Temple, beyond which no Woman might pass. If such significant limitations as these are found in contemporary Judaism, notwithstanding the general humanity of its relationships and the intensity of the national religion, it need not surprise us to find no effective assertion of the religious equality of Woman emanating from Roman patriotism or Greek philosophy. Plato, it is true, had argued that the differentiae of sex ought not to constitute any barrier to the exercise of a Woman’s personal powers: ‘None of the occupations which comprehend the ordering of a state belong to Woman as Woman, nor yet to man us man; but natural gifts are to be found here and there, in both sexes alike; and, so far as her nature is concerned, the Woman is admissible to all pursuits as well as the man; though in all of them the Woman is weaker than the man’ (Republic, 455, Eng. Probably the nearest parallel to the welcome given to Woman in Christian worship could be found in the cults of Isis and Magna Mater, which became so popular in the early Christian centuries (not to be found in Mithraism; cf. To the welcome which those cults gave to Woman they owed no small measure of their success; by its deeper satisfaction of Woman’s needs Christianity was helped to win its victory over them. That there is much in the gospel of the Cross to appeal to the peculiar nature and temperament of Woman needs no argument. Priscilla and Maximilla among the Montanists), since Paul desires that every Woman praying or prophesying shall have her head veiled (1 Corinthians 11:5). To this proof of Woman’s religious equality with man there seems to be no necessary contradiction in the fact that Paul a little later (1 Corinthians 14:34) forbids women to speak (λαλεῖν) in the churches (see, however, the Commentaries on this disputed passage); the contrast simply shows that the Spirit could over-ride ordinary social conventions (cf. ‘The courtesan was the one free Woman of Athens’ (Lecky, op. Consequently, the family life of the Hebrew-Jewish people, in some measure, prepared for the applications of the principle of Woman’s religions equality made by apostolic Christianity (cf. the fine portrait of the ‘virtuous Woman’ in Proverbs 31:10 f. Christianity, in principle, if not always in practice, has lifted Woman above the sexual level, at which her chief raison d’être is the gratification of man’s passions, and has joined her personality to his, as contributory to a common social life. But he recognizes both the innocence of the sexual tie and the equal claims of the man and the Woman in regard to it (1 Corinthians 7:3 f. in regard to Womanly conduct are well summarized in the exhortation of Clement of Rome: ‘Let us guide our women toward that which is good: let them show forth their lovely disposition of purity; let them prove their sincere affection of gentleness; let them make manifest the moderation of their tongue through their silence; let them show their love, not in factious preferences but without partiality towards all them that fear God, in holiness’ (ad Cor. Naturally, some of the premisses in the NT arguments for Woman’s subjection to man no longer appeal to us, even if the conclusion does (e. Westermarck’s criticism of this ultimately Jewish emphasis on Woman’s subjection to man, as being ‘agreeable to the selfishness of men’ (Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas, i. ‘Woman,’ In HDB lv. McCabe, The Religion of Woman, do. ‘Woman’; W
Babylon the Great - It had also been guilty of shedding the blood of the saints and the blood of the martyrs of Jesus It is compared to a Woman arrayed in purple and scarlet, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls, having a cup in her hand, full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication. Could there possibly be drawn a more vivid and life-like portrait of the worldly and idolatrous system of the apostate Church, whose centre is at Rome, than is here drawn by the pen of the Holy Spirit ? To make it doubly sure as to who is represented by the description it is added "The seven heads are seven mountains, on which the Woman sitteth," Revelation 17:9 , 'the seven-hilled city' being a well-known appellation of Rome. ...
It is further revealed that the ten horns (the ten kingdoms of the future Roman empire) will make war with the Woman, make her desolate and naked, will eat her flesh and burn her with fire
Harlot - A harlot is the same name as a prostitute, a Woman of fame, or as we say, a Woman of the town. " (Jeremiah 3:1) It hath supposed by some, that in the case of Rahab the harlot, it was not intended to imply the character of a Woman of fame
Idle - According to Hebrew wisdom, the ideal Woman “eateth not the bread of idleness” (Proverbs 31:27 ), but is an industrious, working Woman who helps provide for the financial needs of her family (Proverbs 31:16 ,Proverbs 31:16,31:24 )
Alabaster - Occurs only in the New Testament in connection with the box of "ointment of spikenard very precious," with the contents of which a Woman anointed the head of Jesus as he sat at supper in the house of Simon the leper (Matthew 26:7 ; Mark 14:3 ; Luke 7:37 ). The Woman "broke" the vessel; i
Simon - Simon learned valuable lessons about love, courtesy, and forgiveness after a sinful Woman anointed Jesus at this event. A leper who hosted Jesus and saw a Woman anoint Jesus with costly ointment (Matthew 26:6-13 ; compare 3
Husband - A man contracted or joined to a Woman by marriage. A man to whom a Woman is betrothed, as well as one actually united by marriage, is called a husband
Adultery - (Exodus 20:14 ) The parties to this crime, according to Jewish law, were a married Woman and a man who was not her husband. The Mosaic penalty was that both the guilty parties should be stoned, and it applied as well to the betrothed as to the married Woman, provided she were free. (22:22-24) A bondwoman so offending was to be scourged, and the man was to make a trespass offering
Virgin - ...
Of the two Hebrew words, the more commonly used is the one that refers to a young Woman who had never had sexual intercourse (Genesis 24:16; Leviticus 21:14; Judges 21:12; 2 Samuel 13:2; 2 Samuel 13:18; cf. Israelites considered it important that a Woman be a virgin at the time of her marriage, and their law set out penalties for the loss of virginity before marriage (Exodus 22:16-17; Deuteronomy 22:13-19; see ADULTERY; FORNICATION). ...
The other Hebrew word is less specific and has been translated by such words as virgin, maiden, girl and young Woman. It refers to any young Woman of marriageable age. But the word translated ‘young Woman’ in the promise to Ahaz was ambiguous. Isaiah used the word with its broader meaning of ‘young Woman’, but Matthew used it with its narrower meaning of ‘virgin’. Usually he begins the process of human life in the womb of a Woman through using a human father, but when he himself entered the stream of human life he began the process miraculously, by the work of his Spirit in the womb of the virgin Mary (Matthew 1:18; Matthew 1:20; Luke 1:26-35; see MIRACLE)
Canaanitish - The word is used to describe the Woman who came out of the borders of Tyre and Sidon, desiring to have her daughter healed who was grievously vexed with a devil. ...
The Woman who came to our Lord was a ‘Canaanite’ in the sense that she belonged to the stock of the old Phœnicians of Syria termed ‘Syro-phœnician’ to distinguish them from those of Africa. This fact makes instructive a comparison between our Lord’s treatment of this Woman and His dealing with the Woman of Samaria; cf
Sychar - Jesus rested by the well and there ministered to a Samaritan Woman
Polygamy - ) The having of a plurality of wives or husbands at the same time; usually, the marriage of a man to more than one Woman, or the practice of having several wives, at the same time; - opposed to monogamy; as, the nations of the East practiced polygamy
Sister - ) A Woman who is closely allied to, or assocciated with, another person, as in the sdame faith, society, order, or community
Shunammite - The 'great Woman' who provided Elisha with a lodging
Rubies, - It is mentioned as a symbol of preciousness: as "the price of wisdom is above rubies"; the value of a virtuous Woman is far above rubies
Elisabeth - A righteous Woman, of the tribe of Aaron, wife of Zacharias, and mother of John the Baptist
Terminus - ) The Roman divinity who presided over boundaries, whose statue was properly a short pillar terminating in the bust of a man, Woman, satyr, or the like, but often merely a post or stone stuck in the ground on a boundary line
Modest - ) Observing the proprieties of the sex; not unwomanly in act or bearing; free from undue familiarity, indecency, or lewdness; decent in speech and demeanor; - said of a Woman
Julia - A Christian Woman at Rome, whom Paul salutes (Romans 16:15), wife or sister of Philologus
Mary - In the New Testament Mary is presented as the true Israelite, the model disciple, the Woman of faith/faithfulness, and a type of the church. ...
Mark presents only a rapid sketch or silhouette of the Jewish Woman who is the mother of Jesus. ...
Paul states (Revelation 12:1-64 ) that Jesus was born of a Woman (who is not named) and because she was a Jewish Woman he was circumcised and submitted to the Law. ...
In 1618388223_34 we see into heaven and there behold the Woman, the dragon, and the Woman's child. In verses 7-12 we read of the archangel Michael and the dragon who move from heaven to earth, and then in verses 13-17 of the dragon, the Woman, and her child, all of whom are on earth. It would appear that the Woman has a primary reference to the people of God, Israel, and the church, with a secondary reference to Mary, mother of the Messiah: she is a "type" of the church. ...
Mary is a unique Woman because she is the mother of the Son of God and also the first Christian disciple
Eve - The description of the Woman being created from the man's rib (Genesis 2:21-22 ) highlights the kind of affinity between man and Woman that is not possible between humans and other creatures. That fact is emphasized in the man's joyful cry of recognition when God presents the Woman to him: "This is now bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh" (v. , the man's prior creation, the Woman's derivation from the man, his designation of her as Woman, and the focus on a man's initiative in the establishment of a marriage relationship [2]). Others suggest the idea of man's subjugation of Woman is introduced only after the fall when God describes the various forms of humiliation, enmity, pain, and drudgery that result from human rebellion against him (3:14-19). ...
The Woman's role in the narrative about the fall is significant, not least because it is she who has the exchange with the serpent, the agent of temptation. ...
The only positive prospect mentioned by God as he spells out the fall's consequences is that, in the context of the ongoing enmity between the Woman and her offspring, on the one hand, and the serpent and his offspring, on the other, the Woman's offspring will dominate the serpent's (3:15). 13) in the statement which, by means of analogy, provides the rationale for the prohibition against a Woman teaching or having authority over a man (v. It cannot be used to support the idea that no Woman may ever teach or exercise leadership in the church (see Acts 18:26 ; Romans 16:1,7 ). Hiebert...
See also Adam ; Fall, the ; Head, Headship ; Woman ...
Bibliography
Handsome - ) Agreeable to the eye or to correct taste; having a pleasing appearance or expression; attractive; having symmetry and dignity; comely; - expressing more than pretty, and less than beautiful; as, a handsome man or Woman; a handsome garment, house, tree, horse
Modest - Ford, the honest Woman, the modest wife
Thebez - Abimelech led his army against this place, because of its participation in the conspiracy of the men of Shechem; but as he drew near to the strong tower to which its inhabitants had fled for safety, and was about to set fire to it, a Woman cast a fragment of millstone at him, and "all to brake his skull" i
Archelaus - Ruler of the people, son of Herod the Great, by Malthace, a Samaritan Woman
Buchanites - Buchan, of Glasgow, who gave herself out to be the Woman spoken of in the Revelations; and that all who believed in her should be taken up to heaven without tasting death, as the end of the world was near
Casement - The wisdom teacher looked through a latticed window to observe a foreign Woman dealing with a naive youth (Proverbs 7:6 )
Paps - These immoralities were always connected with idolatry, and especially so where the idol was a Woman or a female
Pandora - ) A beautiful Woman (all-gifted), whom Jupiter caused Vulcan to make out of clay in order to punish the human race, because Prometheus had stolen the fire from heaven
Adultery - ) The unfaithfulness of a married person to the marriage bed; sexual intercourse by a married man with another than his wife, or voluntary sexual intercourse by a married Woman with another than her husband
Covert - ) Under cover, authority or protection; as, a feme covert, a married Woman who is considered as being under the protection and control of her husband
Martha - This Woman is rendered memorable in the church by reason of her pursuits, being so much engaged in earthly concerns while having conviction on her mind of the importance of heavenly objects
Cruse - ‘flask’) is substituted by Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 for ‘box’ of Authorized Version in Matthew 26:7 (|| Mark 14:3, Luke 7:37) as the designation of the ἀλάβαστρος used by the Woman who anointed our Lord
Painting - Israel is compared to a lewd Woman who painted her eyes
Drab - ) A low, sluttish Woman
Zipporah - ” Moses' first wife (some believe the Woman named in Numbers 12:1 may be a reference to Zipporah, too) and mother of his children, Gershom and Eliezer ( Exodus 2:21-22 ; Exodus 18:4 )
Messiah - in the seed of the Woman (Genesis 3:15)
Venter - ) A pregnant Woman; a mother; as, A has a son B by one venter, and a daughter C by another venter; children by different venters
Ahinoam - David's wife a Woman of Jezreel: she accompanied David in his flight from Saul; and, while residing at Ziklag, was taken captive when the city was burned by the Amalekites; but was recovered
Marriage - ) The act of marrying, or the state of being married; legal union of a man and a Woman for life, as husband and wife; wedlock; matrimony
ja'Cob's Well, - On the curb of the well Jesus sat and discoursed with the Samaritan Woman
Deborah - She sent for Barak, directed him to attack Sisera, and, in the name of God, promised him victory; but Barak refusing to go, unless she went with him, she told him, that the honour of this expedition would be given to a Woman, and not to him
Reputation - With the loss of reputation, a man and especially a Woman, loses most of the enjoyments of life
Eve - (life ), the name given in Scripture to the first Woman
Jehoz'Abad - ) ...
Son of Shomer or Shimrith, a Moabitish Woman, who with another conspired against King Joash and slew him in his bed
Woman (2) - WOMAN. —The relation of Christ to Woman is one of the most interesting and one of the most difficult topics in the Gospels. In order to estimate it aright it will be necessary to say something of the position of Woman at the time when our Lord was born. But if a Woman repudiate her husband, she shall be drowned in the river. The school of Hillel declared it a sufficient ground for divorce if a Woman had spoiled her husband’s dinner. ]'>[2] But however this position might vary in different parts of the Empire, it was clearly exceptional for the relation of Woman to man to be other than a degrading one. The words, ‘Woman, what have I to do with thee? mine hour is not yet come,’ could not have been said to one who had occupied but a subservient position in the home; on the contrary, they suggest that for many years she had been accustomed to speak freely as to her wishes for Him, and that this time was now over. From this it may be inferred that our Lord rejoiced in the true development of Womanhood, was glad that the mother should not be a mere drudge or slave, but one occupying a definite position with definite duties and responsibilities. ...
We have given much time to the study of the Virgin Mother because she was the only Woman really educated by Christ, in the sense that St. Peter were, and we see in the little that is told of her what a true Woman ought to be. Simon was right in feeling that a prophet who knew the character of the Woman who had intruded into his house would never have allowed her such close fellowship as the Saviour allowed. Again, none but He would have shown such patience as was seen in His treatment of the Woman of Samaria (John 4). And from the heathen Canaanitish Woman He received one of the most remarkable illustrations of faith, the Woman’s insight penetrating beyond the words to the love which lay underneath them (Matthew 15:22 ff. ...
The great respect in which Jesus held the position of Woman, the high dignity He attached to it, is shown not only by His actions and words, but by the new sanctity which He gave to marriage. Directly this teaching was received, it was impossible that Woman should be deprived of her right as wife on the flimsiest excuse, or without any excuse at all. That Woman had a position in life of equal importance with that of man is made plain by the whole story of the Gospels: Anna, Elisabeth, the Virgin Mary, Martha, Mary, and Mary Magdalene rivalling in their own spheres St. Without the part played by Woman, that story would have been altogether incomplete. ...
One other suggestion as to the influence of Woman which St
Children And Dogs - (Matthew 15; Mark 7) Parable addressed to a Canaanite Woman who, taking advantage of Jesus' presence near Tyre and Sidon, besought Him to cast a devil out of her daughter. Faith, humility, and persevering prayer, however, such as that of this Woman, merit better treatment than that accorded to the ordinary run of men, and to her, the whelp, was thrown a large crumb from the delicacies the children actually failed to appreciate
Adultery - By the laws of Connecticut, the sexual intercourse of any man, with a married Woman, is the crime of adultery in both: such intercourse of a married man, with an unmarried Woman, is fornication in both, and adultery of the man, within the meaning of the law respecting divorce but not a felonious adultery in either, or the crime of adultery at common law, or by statute
Woman - ...
Zechariah 5:7 (b) This Woman represents Israel from the commercial standpoint. ...
Revelation 12:1 (b) This Woman represents the nation of Israel with her twelve patriarchs (or tribes), and JESUS was the child born from Israel
Aloes - ...
It probably was a part of the perfume brought by the Woman in lu7, who made His traveling garments fragrant. ...
No doubt it was a part of the perfume brought by the unnamed Woman in mr14, when she anointed His head two days before the Passover and made those trial garments fragrant
Suburbs - …” The word may be used of a divorced Woman as in Woman that is “put away from her husband
Jewel - ...
Proverbs 11:22 (a) This gem represents the attractiveness, loveliness and beauty of an unsaved Woman. The swine with the snout represents the unrighteous life which this beautiful Woman may live. The Woman herself needs to be saved, and become a child of GOD, then these gems of beauty will really adorn the person
Rahab - The memorable Woman of the city of Jericho, of whose faith the Holy Ghost hath given such honourable testimony, Hebrews 11:31. And if there be aught upon earth to make sinful dust and ashes proud, surely the faith this Woman possessed formed the strongest temptation to it; when we consider who she was, what she was; where she lived, and how she acted in the cause of the Lord. " Moreover, she was, as we say, a publican, and an harlot, not only kept an inn, exposed to numberless temptations, but a Woman of notoriously known for such a character. And yet with all those disadvantages, this Rahab, this harlot, was a believer in the Lord God of Israel! Oh, the wonders of distinguishing grace! And what tends yet more to raise our views of the Lord's peculiar manifestation and love to this poor harlot, is the consideration that from the stock of this Woman, after the flesh, the Lord appointed the future advent of his dear Son
Bathsheba - She was a beautiful Woman with whom David the king had an adulterous relationship (2 Samuel 11:4 )
John of Sahagun, Saint - He is said to have been poisoned by a Woman whose companion in sin he had converted
Catholic Women's Suffrage Society - " It was affiliated to the International Woman Suffrage Alliance in 1920
Divination - Since demons are the agents inspiring idolatry, 1 Corinthians 10:20 , the young Woman in Acts 16:16 was possessed by a demon instigating the cult of Apollo, and thus had "a spirit of divination
Delilah - Languishing, a Philistine Woman who dwelt in the valley of Sorek (Judges 16:4-20 )
Zimri -
A son of Salu, slain by Phinehas, the son of Eleazar, because of his wickedness in bringing a Midianitish Woman into his tent (Numbers 25:6-15 )
Nose Jewels - This mode of decoration is referred to in Proverbs 11:22 : "As a jewel of gold in a swine's snout, so is a fair Woman which is without discretion
Feast of Asses - They chose a young Woman, the handsomest in the town; made her ride on an ass richly harnessed, and placed in her arms a pretty infant
Midwife - Woman who assists in the delivery of a child (Exodus 1:15-21 )
Samaria - From 1 Kings 16:1 - 1 Kings 22:53 to 2 Kings 1:1 - 2 Kings 25:30, and in the Gospel the Woman of Samaria, John 4:1-54, and numberless other occasions render it memorable
Virgin - When they spoke of a young Woman simply as such, they contented themselves with the expression of youth; but when they meant to speak of a virgin, they called her Almah, and generally subjoined, as in the instance of Rebekah, "neither had any man known her," (Genesis 24:16) and the Hebrew word Almah, at once expresseth this, for it means concealed
Puah - The honourable testimony given of this Woman, as well as Shiphrah, see Exodus 1:15-22; and the houses said to be built for them is rather to be taken figuratively, that the Lord built up their households
Comely - ...
It is comely that a Woman pray to God uncovered? 1 Corinthians 11
Tekoa, Tekoah - The 'wise Woman' Joab employed to speak to the king respecting the return of Absalom was from this city
Waive - ) A Woman put out of the protection of the law
Lydia - a Woman of Thyatira, a seller of purple, who dwelt in the city of Philippi, in Macedonia
Saint Joan's Social And Political Alliance - " It was affiliated to the International Woman Suffrage Alliance in 1920
Sahagun, John of, Saint - He is said to have been poisoned by a Woman whose companion in sin he had converted
jo-an'na -
Son of Rhesa, according to the text of (Luke 3:27 ) and one of the ancestors of Christ; but according to the view explained in a previous article, son of Zerubbabel, and the same as HANANIAH in (1 Chronicles 3:19 ) ...
The name of a Woman, occurring twice in (Luke 8:3 ; 24:10 ) but evidently denoting the same person, (A
Adultery - The law of Moses punished with death both the man and the Woman who were guilty of this crime, Leviticus 20:10 . If a Woman was betrothed to a man, and was guilty of this infamous crime before the marriage was completed, she was, in this case, along with her paramour, to be stoned, Deuteronomy 22:22-24 . After this, both the man and the Woman were conveyed to Jerusalem, and placed before the sanhedrim; the judges of which, by threats and other means, endeavoured to confound the Woman, and make her confess. The other priest then gave her the waters of jealousy, or bitterness, to drink; and as soon as the Woman had swallowed them, he gave her the meal in a vessel like a frying-pan into her hand. For the oath was so regulated, that a Woman of the utmost effrontery could scarcely have taken it without changing colour to such a degree as to betray herself. ...
"In the first place, it was not administered to the Woman in her own house, but she was under the necessity of going to that place of the land where God in a special manner had his abode, and took it there. For the priest conducted her to the front of the sanctuary, and took holy water, that is, water out of the priests' laver, which stood before it, together with some earth off its floor, which was likewise deemed holy; and having put the earth in the water, he then proceeded to uncover the Woman's head, that her face might be seen, and every change on her countenance during the administration of the oath accurately observed: and this was a circumstance which, in the east, where the women are always veiled, must have had a great effect; because a Woman, accustomed to wear a veil, could, on so extraordinary an occasion, have had far less command of her eyes and her countenance than a European adulteress, who is generally a perfect mistress in all the arts of dissimulation, would display. The priest now pronounced the oath, which was in all points so framed that it could excite no terrors in the breast of an innocent Woman; for it expressly consisted in this, that the imprecation water should not harm her if she was innocent. It would seem as if the priest here made a stop, and again left the Woman some time to consider whether she would proceed with the oath. This I infer from the circumstance of his speech not being directly continued in Numbers 5:21 st, which is rather the apodosis of what goes before; and from the detail proceeding anew in the words of the historian, Then, shall the priest pronounce the rest of the oath and the curses to the Woman; and proceed thus. —After this stop he pronounced the curses, and the Woman was obliged to declare her acquiescence in them by a repeated Amen. For the priest had yet to write the curses in a book, which I suppose he did at great deliberation; having done so, he washed them out again in the very imprecation water, which the Woman had now to drink; and this water being now presented to her, she was obliged to drink it, with this warning and assurance, in the name of God, that if she was guilty, it would prove within her an absolute curse, Now, what must have been her feelings, while drinking, if not conscious of purity? In my opinion she must have conceived that she already felt an alteration in the state of her body, and the germ, as it were of the disease springing within her. If it happened but once in an age, God had bound himself to punish it; and if this took place but once, (if but one Woman who had taken the oath was attacked with that rare disease which it threatened,) it was quite enough to serve as a determent to all...
others for at least one generation
Parents - Probably the most basic of all human relationships is that between a man and a Woman. Sex is only one part of a total relationship in which a man and a Woman marry and commit themselves to each other for life (Matthew 19:5-6)
Ephah - The vision of Zechariah 5:7 of a Woman sitting in an ephah basket contains the imaginative images of visions, for any ephah would be far too small for a Woman to sit in
Miss - ) A title of courtesy prefixed to the name of a girl or a Woman who has not been married. ) A young unmarried Woman or a girl; as, she is a miss of sixteen
Mother - A female parent especially, one of the human race a Woman who has borne a child correlative to son or daughter. A familiar term of address or appellation of an old Woman or matron. An appellation given to a Woman who exercises care and tenderness towards another, or gives parental advice as when one says," a Woman has been a mother to me
Woman - In the first creation account, God fashions man and Woman as fully equal bearers of his image. In the second account, it is specified that God created the man first, and that he created the Woman from the man's rib only after all the animals proved inadequate companions (Genesis 2:18-23 ). The controversial words, "suitable helper" in verse 18 have traditionally been taken to imply a functional subordination of the Woman to the man as part of God's design in creation, but this interpretation is increasingly being rejected. The serpent coaxes the Woman to eat forbidden fruit, and her husband, in apparently more conscious disobedience (1 Timothy 2:14 ), follows suit. To the Woman he promises increased pain in childbearing and then adds, "your desire will be for your husband, and he will rule over you" (Genesis 3:16 ). ...
Yet despite all these androcentric illustrations, the ideal Woman of Old Testament times can seem surprisingly modern. Song of Songs celebrates the erotic bliss of newlyweds, often from the Woman's perspective and initiative. In cases of alleged rape, if unable to summon help, the Woman is given the benefit of the doubt (Deuteronomy 22:23-27 ). Jael (Judges 4 ) and the anonymous Woman of Judges 9:53 proved timely and valiant in battle. Several of the recipients of Jesus' healing were women (Jairus's daughter Matthew 9:23-26 ; and the crippled Woman Luke 13:10-17 ). In two instances their faith is particularly praised (the hemmorhaging Woman Matthew 9:22 ), even when one is not a Jew but a Syrophoenician (Matthew 15:21-28 anticipating the church's ministry to Gentiles ). In another episode, the Woman healed was Jewish but still illustrates Jesus' ministry of compassion to the outcasts of society (Simon's mother-in-law [3]), as the third in a series of such miracles (cf. In the same spirit, Jesus forgives a notoriously sinful Woman who demonstrates her repentance through her love, even when she expresses it in culturally suspect ways (Luke 7:36-50 ). No Woman appears among the company of the Twelve; but it is not clear if this reflects any timeless principle besides a commitment to present the gospel to a given culture in ways which will most likely speed its acceptance. The story of Jesus meeting the Samaritan Woman perhaps epitomizes his commitment to revolutionizing the lot of the disenfranchised of his day. Despite strong cultural taboos against any social exchange between a Jewish holy man and a sexually promiscuous Samaritan Woman, Jesus speaks to this Woman in private, affirms her personhood and leads her to faith in himself and to service as an evangelist (John 4:1-42 ). Acts also describes a significant Christian Woman teacher, Priscilla, who with her husband Aquila enabled Apollos to learn and disseminate correct doctrine (18:26). Damaris, a Woman, is among the few to respond favorably to Paul's Areopagus address (17:34). Junia(s) in Romans 16:7 is most likely a Woman, and she is called "an apostle. The term used here, presbytera, is the feminine form of "elder" (presbyteros [6]), but the context and parallel passage in Titus 2:3 , which uses a more unambiguous term for "old Woman" (presbytis [7]), suggests a nontechnical sense. But a timeless principle appears as well: "man did not come from Woman but Woman from man; neither was man created for Woman, but Woman for man" (vv. Hurley, Man and Woman in Biblical Perspective ; ISBE, 4:1089-97; W. Kroeger, I Suffer Not a Woman ; A. , Recovering Biblical Manhood and Womanhood ; A. Swidler, Biblical Affirmations of Woman ; P
Euodia - But the word is the name of a Woman corresponding to the male form Εὐόδιος, which is also found in Greek literature, several early Christian bishops being so called. ...
Euodia was a Woman, prominent in the Church of Philippi, who had a difference of opinion with Syntyche (q. ]'>[1] ) herself, as the term ‘Lydia’ may not be a personal name at all, but may mean simply ‘the Lydian,’ or the native of the province of Lydia in which Thyatira, the home of the Woman, was situated
Divorce - ) The separation of a married Woman from the bed and board of her husband - divorce a mensa et toro (/ thoro), "from bed board
Catamaran - ) A quarrelsome Woman; a scold
Fractio Panis - Seven persons, six men and a Woman, are at a table; one of the men sits apart and is breaking a loaf; in front is a two-handled cup, and on the table, two plates, one containing two fishes, the other five loaves
Panis, Fractio - Seven persons, six men and a Woman, are at a table; one of the men sits apart and is breaking a loaf; in front is a two-handled cup, and on the table, two plates, one containing two fishes, the other five loaves
Bible: Judged by Its Fruits - A Roman Catholic priest in Belgium rebuked a young Woman and her brother for reading that 'bad book' pointing to the Bible
Gospel: Duty of Spreading it - Shall we who have found honey in the rock Christ Jesus, be less considerate of o; fellow men than wasps are of their fellow insects? Ought we not rather like the Samaritan Woman to hasten to tell t good news? Common humanity should prevent one of them from concealing the great discovery which grace has enable us to make
Bachelor - ) An unmarried Woman
Fagot - ) An old shriveled Woman
Purple - The rich man in Luke 16:19 was clothed in purple; and papal Rome is seen as a Woman clothed in purple and scarlet, royalty and splendour
Female - ) Belonging to an individual of the female sex; characteristic of Woman; feminine; as, female tenderness
Handsel - ) A sale, gift, or delivery into the hand of another; especially, a sale, gift, delivery, or using which is the first of a series, and regarded as on omen for the rest; a first installment; an earnest; as the first money received for the sale of goods in the morning, the first money taken at a shop newly opened, the first present sent to a young Woman on her wedding day, etc
Eusebius, Saint Bishop - At the emperor's death he returned, and was slain by a tile thrown by an Arian Woman from the roof of her house
Serpent - In Christian art it is associated with ...
Blessed Virgin Mary where it is often placed beneath her feet: "the seed of the Woman shall crush his head
Tall - We say, a tall man or Woman, a tall boy for his age a tall tree, a tall pole, a tall mast but we never say, a tall house or a tall mountain
Mary - ...
·Mary, a pious Woman whom the apostle Paul mentions. Certainly the Son of God might have assumed a body such as ours, consisting both of flesh and spirit, and formed, as the first earthly man Adam was, of nothing; but then this would not have been what Scripture saith Christ must be, of "the seed of the Woman," and what the promise declared. (See Genesis 3:15) And beside, the triumph of Christ over hell and the prince of darkness, would not have been as the promise declared it should be—"the seed of the Woman to bruise the serpent's head. " Hence, therefore, the Redeemer must be born of a Woman, must be in all points like to his brethren, sin only excepted, both for the salvation of his people and the destruction of his enemies. But still it may be asked, could not all this have been done in Christ becoming man from the Woman, as the Woman originally was from the man. For we road that at the creation, the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and he slept; and he took one of his ribs and closed up the flesh instead thereof: and the rib, which the Lord God had taken from the man, made he a Woman. " (Genesis 2:22) But neither could this have been called a birth, nor of the seed of the Woman; neither would this have suited the purposes of redemption; for the Scripture saith, that "when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a Woman, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons. " (Hebrews 2:11) But had Christ, in his human nature, been produced from the rib of the Woman, there would have been no such relationship as there now is; neither, as before remarked, would Christ have been of the seed of the Woman, neither born under the law. ...
We find then, that for Christ to be of the seed of the Woman, of the same flesh and blood with those he came to redeem, and to be born under the law, to redeem them that are under the law, he must still come nearer to our nature, and be born as the children are born, only with that distinguishing and vast difference, that though he partakes of our nature, yet it is the sinless infirmities of our nature only. The original promise at the fall was, that Christ should be of the "seed of the Woman;" and accordingly we find the prophet, in the after-ages, commissioned by the Holy Ghost to tell the church that "a virgin should conceive, and bear a son. Christ was conceived by the Virgin, not begotten; for it is said, he was made of a Woman
Hannah - A pious Woman, the wife of Elkanah. Thus the prayer of a feeble and barren Woman brings in intervention and blessing of God by His Messiah
ha'Gar - (flight ), an Egyptian Woman, the handmaid or slave of Sarah, ( Genesis 16:1 ) whom the latter gave as a concubine to Abraham, after he had dwelt ten years in the land of Canaan and had no children by Sarah. 4, and Sarah, with the anger, we may suppose, of a free Woman rather than of a wife, reproached Abraham for the results of her own act
Birth - Having no knowledge of the Woman's ovum, they thought that only the male's semen (his “seed”) produced the child. The Woman provided her womb as a receptacle for the protection and growth of the child. The Woman was considered ritually unclean for a period of from 40 to 80 days following birth (Leviticus 12:1-8 ; see Luke 2:22 ). According to Jesus, it is just as necessary to be born of the Spirit as it is to be born of a Woman (John 3:1-7 ). Kings before God tremble like a Woman giving birth (Psalm 48:6 )
Prostitution - That would help explain why the Book of Proverbs speaks of the harlot literally as a “strange” and “foreign” Woman (translated in the RSV as “loose Woman,” “evil Woman”) (Proverbs 2:16 ; Proverbs 5:3 ; Proverbs 6:24 ). ...
The Book of Revelation applies the image of harlot to Rome, which is likened to a Woman in scarlet and jewels, to whom the kings of the earth go (Revelation 17:1-6 )
Sexuality, Human - ...
Accordingly, since narratives of Eden before the fall picture the unsullied created order as God ordained it, they become normative and prescriptive; hence the way that unfallen man interfaced with Woman should provide a working model for male/female relationships in the community of the redeemed. Narratives of fallen humanity (such as the stories of Samson's Womanizing or Solomon's polygyny) are descriptive and provide information about what was, but not always about what ought to have been. ...
Those who see women as inherently inferior to men often appeal to the specific account of the creation of Woman (Genesis 2:18,20-22 ) as shedding further light on the relationship that existed between the sexes in their unfallen state: Woman, they maintain, is a secondary creation, a mere "helpmeet" to the man. Woman is made of the same essence and substance as man and can hardly, therefore, be considered inferior. Some have even argued that since the man was made of dirt and the Woman from the man, she becomes twice refined and, if anything, superior. ...
The Woman's relationship to the man is described by two words: she is ezer [ Genesis 2:20 ). Woman was made because man's being alone was the only thing pronounced "not good" in the creation narrative (2:18). " Woman, accordingly, becomes man's complement or reciprocal, not merely his supplement. ...
On the other hand, rejecting the superiority of the male does not mean that the sexes were undifferentiated and that the term 'adam [1] denotes some sort of androgynous being or "earth creature" from which both man ('is ) and Woman ('issa ) were formed. Clothing was necessary to cover the nakedness of the man and Woman (Genesis 3:7 ) even though they were man and wife. It was only after the fall that God said to the Woman, "Your desire will be for your husband, and he will rule over you" ( Genesis 3:16 ). If, therefore, man's dominion over Woman is a consequence of the fall (Genesis 3:16 ), one of the ramifications of the gospel would be to abolish institutions such as concubinage that reduce her to a chattel. Unless, however, one insists that equality means identity, whatever Woman's redeemed position may be will not be the same as that held by the man. If the reason for the creation of Woman was to enable the man to become whole and a legitimate microcosm of the human species, then it follows that man/woman relations in a redeemed society would be theologically humanizing. Throughout the Gospels it is clear that, whether the Woman was a persistent Canaanite (Matthew 15:22-28 ), a repentant sinner (Luke 7:36-50 ), or a cripple to be healed on the Sabbath (Luke 13:10-17 ), Jesus considered them first of all as human beings. Perhaps the most striking is his interchange with the Samaritan Woman (John 4:5-29 ), who not only belonged to an ethnic group despised by the Jews but also had an unsavory past. Christian marriage can be considered a loving, bonded, sexually exclusive relationships that is publicly declared to exist between a man and a Woman in a manner recognized by society as licit and proper. Its foundations are laid in Genesis 2:23-24 , where the man, seeing the Woman, declares her to be "bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh"; she was to be called "woman" ('issa) because "she was taken out of man ('is) . " The Genesis narrative, considering the union of the man with one of the lower animals unthinkable, sees such a union possible only when Woman, created like man in God's own image, becomes the complement that made not only the human species, but also the male person, whole. The union is between man and Woman; it is heterosexual, not homosexual . The union is between a single man and a single Woman. ...
The canonization of the Song of Solomon caused some ancient rabbis no end of concern because of its frankly erotic dialogue between a man and a Woman, presumably the man's wife. Adam's complement is not found in another man (which would be redundancy, not complementarity), but in a Woman, his corresponding opposite. The pattern ordained by God in Eden is man and Woman, not human and animal. ...
Laws treating rape or seduction seem to be concerned for the economic well-being of the disadvantaged Woman. A Woman who was not a virgin was considered "damaged goods" and was therefore less eligible for marriage, presumably commanding a lower bride-price (Exodus 22:17 ). Whereas the former case (Exodus 22:16-17 ) would have been subject to conventional divorce procedure (Deuteronomy 24:1-4 ), an additional provision is made for the Woman's economic security in the latter case: the man can never divorce her, whatever she does (Deuteronomy 22:28-29 ). The concern for the Woman is also reflected in the distinctions between the two rape cases described in Deuteronomy 22:23-27 : the betrothed Woman raped in the city would have been heard if she had cried for help, but the Woman raped in the country is presumed to have cried out, whether she did or not
Lydia - ...
...
A Woman of Thyatira, a "seller of purple," who dwelt in Philippi (Acts 16:14,15 )
Family - Man and Woman are complementary, and enjoy life in its fulness only by combining their physical, spiritual, moral, social, and economic capacities
Shelomith - Woman of tribe of Dan whose son cursed the divine name, thus being guilty of blasphemy
Joanna Southcott - Originally a Methodist, she became convinced that in herself were lodged supernatural gifts, so she composed rhymed prophecies and declared herself the "woman clothed in the sun" mentioned in Apocalypse 12
Jacob's Well - Here Christ met the Samaritan Woman
Espousal - wiltthou have this Woman to thy wedded wife" and "N
Elisabeth - ” A Woman descended from Aaron who was the wife of Zacharias the priest (Luke 1:5 )
Notable - Active industrious careful as a notable Woman
Honey - The Lord Jesus when in service on earth said to His mother, "Woman, what have I to do with thee?" though when His service was over He commended her to John
Endow - To furnish with a portion of goods or estate, called dower to settle a dower on, as on a married Woman or widow
Gore - If an ox gore a man or a Woman--Exodus 21 ...
Zimri - Son of Salu, a Simeonite: with a Midianitish Woman he was slain by Phinehas
Huldah - (2 Kings 22:14) We cannot sufficiently admire the firmness of this Woman, in the answer she returned to king Josiah
Phebe - Paul had a particular esteem for this holy Woman; and Theodoret thinks the Apostle lodged at her house for some time, while he continued in or near Corinth
Bowels - The true mother of the child whom Solomon commanded to be divided, felt her bowels move, and consented that it should be given to the Woman who was not its real mother, 1 Kings 3:26
Dagon - It is the opinion of some that Dagon was represented like a Woman, with the lower parts of a fish, like a triton or syren
Widow - ) A Woman who has lost her husband by death, and has not married again; one living bereaved of a husband
Rebekah - She was a Woman of personal attractions and became the wife of Isaac, to whom late in life she bore Esau and Jacob
Well of the Samaritan Woman - Here Christ met the Samaritan Woman
Phebe - A Christian Woman of Cenchrea, the eastern port of Corinth, bearer of the epistle of Paul to the Romans, in which he commends her to their confidence and Christian love
Southcott, Joanna - Originally a Methodist, she became convinced that in herself were lodged supernatural gifts, so she composed rhymed prophecies and declared herself the "woman clothed in the sun" mentioned in Apocalypse 12
Archela'us - (prince of the people ), son of Herod the Great by a Samaritan Woman, Malthake, and, with his brother Antipas brought up at Rome
Humiliation of Christ - He was born of a Woman a sinful Woman; though he was without sin, Galatians 4:4 . A poor Woman, Luke 2:7 ; Luke 2:24
Veronica - Veronica (Haemorrhoissa ἡ αἱμοῤῥοοῦσα) the Woman cured of a bloody issue (Mat_9:20). 18) relates that she was a native of Caesarea Philippi and adds that "at the gates of her house on an elevated stone stands a brazen image of a Woman on a bended knee with her hands stretched out before her like one entreating. Opposite to this there is another image of a man erect of the same materials decently clad in a mantle and stretching out his hand to the Woman
the Much Forgiven Debtor And His Much Love - ...
But who and what is this? For, behold a Woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she saw that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee's house, brought an alabaster box of ointment, and stood at His feet behind Him weeping, and began to wash His feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed His feet, and anointed them with the ointment. Now, when the Pharisee which had bidden Him saw it, he spake within himself, saying, This man, if He were a prophet, would have known who and what manner of Woman this is that toucheth Him: for she is a sinner. And He turned to the Woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this Woman? I entered into thine house, thou gavest me no water for My feet: but she hath washed My feet with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head. Thou gavest Me no kiss: but this Woman, since the time I came in, hath not ceased to kiss My feet. My head with oil thou didst not anoint: but this Woman hath anointed My feet with ointment. Love, in short, is always like that Woman. If you would see love at its very best, just look at that Woman. All Simon's shameful treatment of our Lord, and all his deep disgust at that Woman, and all his speeches to himself within himself, all arose from the fact that the holy law of God against all kinds of sin and sinners, and especially against himself, had not yet begun to enter Simon's hard heart. They had been talking over the latest news from Rome and Jerusalem: over the gossip of the town: over the sudden deaths of last week, and over the foul and fair weather of last week: when, suddenly, their talk was cut short by the unaccountable conduct of that Woman. Come to His feet then as that sinful Woman came. Up till tonight a Pharisee like Simon; or up till tonight a harlot like this Woman; equally come. This Woman was on her way to throw herself into the pond when she heard our Lord preaching one of His sermons of salvation: and before He had done with His sermon she was at His feet. A Woman once had the arsenic bought on a Saturday night, when she said to herself that she would go once more to the church before she took it. Let Rutherford take that Woman for his answer. Behold, a Woman in the city, which was a sinner, brought an alabaster box of ointment, and stood at His feet behind Him weeping, and began to wash His feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed His feet, and anointed them with the ointment
Feet (Under) - ...
Revelation 12:1 (a) Probably the description that is given is to inform us that this Woman is the nation of Israel. For that reason in the passage before us, the Lord is identifying the Woman as the one represented by those figures way back in Jacob's day
Abim'Elech - Shortly after he stormed and took Thebez, but was struck on the head by a Woman with the fragment of a millstone, comp. (2 Samuel 11:21 ) and lest he should be said to have died by a Woman, he bade his armor-bearer slay him
Malchus, a Hermit in Syria - His master required him to marry a Woman who was his companion in slavery. Malchus pretended to comply, but secretly told the Woman that he would rather die by his own hand than break his vow of continency
Whore - Jeremiah 3:3 (a) GOD is comparing the brazen effrontery of Israel to that type of a wicked Woman
Gratitude - There is a very touching little story told of a poor Woman with two children, who had not a bed for them to lie upon, and scarcely any clothes to cover them
Attempt - ) To try to win, subdue, or overcome; as, one who attempts the virtue of a Woman
Muggletonians - They affirmed that there was no devil at all without the body of man or Woman; that the devil is man's spirit of unclean reason and cursed imagination; that the ministry in this world, whether prophetical or ministerial, is all a lie and abomination to the Lord; with a variety of other vain and inconsistent tenets
Wilhelminians - A denomination in the 13th century, so called from Wilhelmina, a Bohemian Woman, who resided in the territory of Milan
Perseverance - A poor Woman had a supply of coal laid at her door by a charitable neighbour
Bride - A Woman about to be married, or newly married, used symbolically for those who are closely associated with Jehovah or the Lord Jesus
Abigail - She was "a Woman of good understanding, and of a beautiful countenance
Ramp - ) A romping Woman; a prostitute
Wanton - ) A lewd person; a lascivious man or Woman
Trot - ) One who trots; a child; a Woman
Hagar - An Egyptian Woman, the bond-servant of Sarah, whom the latter gave as a concubine to Abraham, and Hagar despised her mistress
Abigail - This gracious Woman humbled herself, confessed the 'iniquity' of her husband, and appeased David
Hagarenes - But some writers think Hagarene imports south, conformably to the Arabic; hence Hagar, that is, the southern Woman; and Mount Sinai is called Hagar, that is, the southern mountain, Galatians 4:25
Rahab - A Woman of Jericho, who received and concealed two Hebrew spies
Well - It was on a curb of this sort that our Lord sat when he conversed with the Woman of Samaria, (John 4:6 ) and it was this, the usual stone cover, which the Woman placed on the mouth of the well at Bahurim, (2 Samuel 17:19 ) where the Authorized Version weakens the sense by omitting the article
Anna - She was a devout and saintly Woman, worshipping constantly in the temple, with fastings and supplications, night and day; and, like Deborah Huldah of the OT, she had prophetic gifts. Her desire, like the Psalmist’s (Psalms 27:4), was to dwell always in the house of God, though it is hardly likely that a Woman would be allowed literally to dwell within the sacred precincts
Well - A low stone wall for protection (Exodus 21:33) surrounds the brim; on it sat our Lord in conversing with the Samaritan Woman (John 4:6; John 4:11). A stone cover was above; this the Woman placed on the well at Bahurim (2 Samuel 17:19), translated "the Woman spread the covering over the well's mouth
Head - "The seed of the Woman shall bruise the head of the serpent," Genesis 3:15 ; that is, Christ Jesus, the blessed seed of the Woman, shall overthrow the power, policy, and works of the devil. The Apostle mentions this subordination of persons in 1 Corinthians 11:3 : "But I would have you know, that the head of every man is Christ, and the head of the Woman is the man, and the head of Christ is God
Fabiola, Saint - She was a Roman Woman of rank, who, having divorced her first husband, a man of vicious life, and married a second time, later repented her sin, and did public penance
Stool - In the difficult passage Exodus 1:16 the word rendered ‘stools’ in the sense of birth-stools ( sella parturientis ) must be pointed to read ‘stones’ ( ’abnáyim for ’obnáyim , both dual number), the reference being to the two stones or bricks on which a Woman sat during her accouchement
Divorce - A BILL OF DIVORCEMENT must be given to the Woman, the drawing up of which, and having it witnessed, was some little check upon a man's hasty temper
Rebekah - "She can hardly be regarded as an amiable Woman
Gehazi - On one occasion he tried to force a grieving Woman away from the prophet (2 Kings 4:27 )
Bond - Used figuratively to speak of the bonds of wickedness or sin (Isaiah 58:6 ; Luke 13:16 ; Acts 8:23 ), of affliction and judgment (Isaiah 28:22 ; Isaiah 52:2 ; Jeremiah 30:8 ; Nahum 1:13 ), the authority of kings (Job 12:18 ; Psalm 2:3 ), the obligation to keep the covenant (Jeremiah 2:20 ; Jeremiah 5:5 ; see Colossians 2:14 ), the bonds of peace and love (Ephesians 4:3 ; Colossians 3:14 ), and the bonds of an evil Woman (Ecclesiastes 7:26 )
Stachys - A Woman, Persis (q
Domestic - ) Remaining much at home; devoted to home duties or pleasures; as, a domestic man or Woman
Virgin - ) A Woman who has had no carnal knowledge of man; a maid
Build - Moses, speaking of the formation of the first Woman, says, God built her with the rib of Adam, Genesis 2:22
Kindle - So is a contentious Woman to kindle strife
Widow - , "a Woman a widow;" Luke 7:12 ; 18:3,5 ; 20:47 ; 21:2,3 ; Acts 6:1 ; 9:39,41 ; 1 Timothy 5:3 (twice),4,5,11,16 (twice); James 1:27 ; 1 Timothy 5:9 refers to elderly "widows" (not an ecclesiastical "order"), recognized, for relief or maintenance by the church (cp
Adultery - A married Woman cohabiting with a man not her husband. Under the Mosaic law both the guilty parties (including those only betrothed unless the Woman were a slave) were stoned (Deuteronomy 22:22-24; Leviticus 19:20-22). ...
The Pharisees' object in bringing the adulterous Woman (John 8) before Christ was to put Him in a dilemma between declaring for reviving an obsolete penalty, or else sanctioning an infraction of the law. The visitation, if the Woman was guilty, was from God direct; the innocent escaped: whereas many an innocent African perishes by the poison. ...
The Woman in Revelation 12, represented as clothed with the Sun (of righteousness), and crowned with the 12 stars (i
Divorce - Polygamy had violated God's primal law joining in one flesh one man to one Woman, who formed the other half or converse side of the male. ...
But this would make the marriage between one pagan man and one pagan Woman a "sacrament," which in the Christian sense would be absurd; for Ephesians 5:23-32, which Rome quotes, and Mark 10:5-12 where even fornication is not made an exception to the indissolubility of marriage, make no distinction between marriages of parties within and parties outside of the Christian church. The divorced Woman who married again, though the law sanctions her remarriage (Deuteronomy 24:1-4), is treated as "defiled" and not to be taken back by the former husband
Hagar - Sarah therefore complained to Abraham, and said, "Cast out this bond-woman and her son, for the son of this bond-woman shall not be heir with my son Isaac. And the thing was very grievous in Abraham's sight, because of his son Ishmael;" but God approved of Sarah's advice, and again excluded Ishmael from the special covenant of grace: "For in Isaac shall thy seed be called: nevertheless, the son of the bond-woman will I make a nation also, because he is thy seed
Zeruiah - ’ The father’s name is never mentioned, and he may have died early; or the mother may have been so remarkable a Woman that her husband’s name was not preserved; or we have a survival of the ancient custom of tracing kinship through the female line
Lemuel - Her character was perhaps the model of the portrait of the "virtuous Woman" (Proverbs 31:10-31)
Nathanael - " Philip, like Andrew finding his own brother Simon (John 1:41), and the Woman of Samaria (John 4:28-29) inviting her fellow townsmen, having been found himself by Jesus, "findeth" his friend Nathanael, and saith, "we have found (he should have said, we have been found by: Isaiah 65:1; Philippians 3:12 ff, Song of Solomon 1:4) Him of whom the prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth the son of Joseph" (he should have said the Son of God)
Age: no Care For Sin - According to AEsop, an old Woman found an empty jar which had lately been full of prime old wine, and which still retained the fragrant smell of its former contents
Bastards - Yet Jephthah, son of a strange Woman, and therefore driven out by the legitimate children, was called to be a judge to Israel (Judges 11:1-2)
Sarah - Her death, at the age of one hundred and twenty-seven years (the only instance in Scripture where the age of a Woman is recorded), was the occasion of Abraham's purchasing the cave of Machpelah as a family burying-place
Kenizzite - Jephunneh the Kenizzite may have married a Woman of the tribe of Judah
Couple - , a man and Woman who are married or betrothed
Candle - Job said of God, "when his candle shined upon my head," Job 29:3 ; "the candle of the wicked shall be put out," Proverbs 24:20 ; whereas respecting 'the wise Woman' it is said "her candle goeth not out by night
Hag - ) An ugly old Woman
Gerizim - It was the site of the Samaritan temple, and referred to by the Woman at the well
Eve - the first Woman
Pot - The water-pot of the Samaritan Woman may have been a leathern bucket, such as Bedouin women use
Proverbs, Book of - Under symbolic terms, such as 'the evil man' and 'the strange Woman,' the great forms of evil in the world, violent self-will, and corrupting folly, are laid bare in their course and end. ...
Proverbs 5 warns a man against leaving the wife of his youth (the lawful connection) for the strange Woman, which leads to utter demoralisation. The strange Woman is again pointed out to be avoided as fire : there is no ransom for adultery. ...
Proverbs 7 again shows the traps laid by the strange Woman, which alas, are often too successful. Again the world has its counter attractions by the strange Woman; but the dead are there, and her guests in the depths of Sheol. The rest of the chapter is devoted to the description of a virtuous Woman. The king and the virtuous Woman may in some respects be typical of Christ and the church
Rahab - The name Rahab appears in English versions of the Bible as belonging to a Woman who features in the book of Joshua, and to a mythical sea monster that features in the poetical books. ...
A Woman in Jericho...
Before Joshua opened his attack on Canaan, he sent two men to spy out the first city they would meet, Jericho
Mary Magdalene - A Woman is marked out for this peculiar privilege, yea, and such a Woman as one might hare supposed would have been not the first upon the occasion; for we are told, that Jesus had cast out of her seven devils
Gomer - Contracts for marriages, it is said, were never formed without giving with the Woman a certain measure of corn, as well as money, for a marriage portion. " To what a degree of spiritual adultery and fornication was our nature gone, when Christ betrothed that nature to himself! Here surely the prophet typified Christ, when he said, "Go yet, love a Woman (beloved of her friend, yet an adulteress) according to the love of the Lord toward the children of, Israel
Mount Samaria - Hence, in the conversation the Woman at Jacob's well had with Christ, she seemed anxious to know whether they were right. What unnumbered discoveries of grace have distressed sinners found in those encouraging words of Jesus! The constraint upon the Lord Jesus to go there to seek and save this sinner, the unprepared, unconscious state of her mind at the time, the tender waitings of Jesus to the hour of her arrival at the well, for he was first there, the tenderness and compassion in all that he said and manifested towards her, his condescension in abiding with the Samaritans two whole days, and the effects wrought upon the hearts of many of the people, as well as this poor Woman; these, with numberless other incidents which are found in Christ's visit to Samaria, must always make the very name interesting to the heart of a believer, and especially when the same saving grace which wrought upon this Woman's mind hath taken place in ours, so that we can hold out the invitation concerning Christ to others, which she did to her countrymen: "Come, see a man which told me all things that ever I did; is not this the Christ!" (Read the whole relation, John 4:1-42
Abimelech - Three years afterwards the men of Shechem rose against Abimelech; he defeated them and destroyed their city, and sowed it with salt While attacking Thebez, he was mortally wounded by a piece of a millstone thrown upon his head by a Woman from the top of the tower. That it might not be said, "a Woman slew him," he called to his armor-bearer to thrust him through with his sword, and thus he died
Phinehas - ’ An Israelite brought into the camp a Woman from the Midianites who had beguiled the people into foreign worship. Phinehas slew the man and the Woman ( Numbers 25:1-18 )
Harlot - The Woman of Luke 7, ‘who was a sinner in the city’ (Luke 7:37 v. The popular idea of Mary Magdalene as a Woman of evil life is rejected by many of the best exegetes. Luke’s story of the sinful Woman, whose newness of heart was intensified by the love and gratitude consequent upon the pity and pardon experienced at the Saviour’s hands. Nor should it be forgotten that the general effect of the way in which the Master admitted women to His intimate fellowship is to raise the status of Woman in such a manner as to render her degradation through prostitution unthinkable
Harlot - The Woman of Luke 7, ‘who was a sinner in the city’ (Luke 7:37 v. The popular idea of Mary Magdalene as a Woman of evil life is rejected by many of the best exegetes. Luke’s story of the sinful Woman, whose newness of heart was intensified by the love and gratitude consequent upon the pity and pardon experienced at the Saviour’s hands. Nor should it be forgotten that the general effect of the way in which the Master admitted women to His intimate fellowship is to raise the status of Woman in such a manner as to render her degradation through prostitution unthinkable
Appearance: we Must Not Judge by - Judge then no man or Woman after their outward fashion, but with purified eye behold the hidden beauty of the heart and life
Lost Coin, Parable of the - The coin lost was very small as coins go (15 to 25 cents), but it meant much to the poor Woman; hence her care in searching for it and joy at finding it
Fringe - The Woman suffering from chronic hemorrhage touched the tassel of Jesus' cloak (Matthew 9:20 , Luke 8:44 )
Dragon - A fierce, violent person, male or female as, this man or Woman is a dragon
Lilith - It was a nocturnal spectre who assumed the form of a beautiful Woman in order to beguile and destroy young children
Simon - Simon the Pharisee, in whose house the penitent Woman anointed our Lord’s head and feet (Luke 7:36 ff
Prayer: Its Power Against Satan - devil was whisking this enormous stone along very merrily at early dawn of day, when he was met by a devout old Woman, who being somewhat alarmed, uttered a prayer at the sight of the unexpected traveller
Bernice - Acts 25:13, Acts 25:23; Acts 26:30 (c) This Woman is surely a type of some pet sin which is nourished and protected in the life in order to keep a person from accepting JESUS CHRIST as his Lord and Saviour
Eighteen - ...
Luke 13:11 (c) This Woman also had a period of helplessness and had the joy of seeing a new experience come into her life and soul when JESUS spoke
Gerizim, Mount - Though this temple was destroyed by Hyrcanus, the Samaritans clung to the mountain as the right place of worship, as the Woman of Samaria said to the Lord
Adam - He made a Woman, Eve, from the rib of Adam and gave her to him for a wife
Philippi - On his casting out a spirit of divination from the young Woman who followed him, a tumult was raised, and Paul and Silas were scourged and cast into prison; but this happily led to the conversion of the jailer and his household
Abishag - a young Woman, a native of Shunam, in the tribe of Issachar
Affinity - persons of the opposite sex; also, the man or Woman who exerts such psychical or spiritual attraction
Samaria - In the time of Christ there was great hostility between the Jews and the Samaritans, which explains the episode of the Samaritan Woman, and Our Lord's command to His disciples not to enter any of their cities (Matthew 10), and makes all the more noble the deed of the Good Samaritan
Bracelet - ...
The Woman of Syria and Arabia at this day wear rings round their legs, to which are fastened many other lesser rings, with make a tinkling noise, like little bells, when they walk
Betrothing - The engagement of a man and Woman to marry each other at a future time
Abimelech - , either as an atoning gift and a testimony of her innocence in the sight of all, or rather for the purpose of procuring a veil for Sarah to conceal her beauty, and thus as a reproof to her for not having worn a veil which, as a married Woman, she ought to have done. When engaged in reducing the town of Thebez, which had revolted, he was struck mortally on his head by a mill-stone, thrown by the hand of a Woman from the wall above. Perceiving that the wound was mortal, he desired his armour-bearer to thrust him through with his sword, that it might not be said he had perished by the hand of a Woman (Judges 9:50-57 )
Husband - God created man and Woman as equal in status and worth, as joint bearers of the image of God (Genesis 1:27). God also desired that man and Woman live together in harmony, and with this in view he made them as the counterparts of each other. When a man wished to marry a Woman taken captive in war, he had to give her special consideration and care because of the new way of life she was being introduced to
Sidon (2) - Matthew 15:22 And, behold, a Woman of Canaan came out of the same coasts, etc. For a certain Woman, etc. And, behold, a Canaanitish Woman came out from those borders, etc. But straightway a Woman, etc. Thus the primary Gospel of Mark, the more ancient Sinaitic and Vatican Manuscripts , Professor Weiss, and the Revisers do not hesitate to depict Jesus as entering Gentile territory (twice), entering a (probably) heathen house, and dispensing blessings upon a pagan Woman, going then yet farther ‘through Sidon’ and Decapolis. ...
Anything like a direct ‘route’ from the Israelitish borders of Tyre, or of Tyre and Sidon,—for Edersheim emphasizes Matthew’s indication that the Woman came from her territory to that of Jesus,—would take one in a south-easterly direction, and therefore away from Sidon
Fall - Man and Woman are placed on earth with a commandment to obey (Genesis 1:28 ). This prompted the special creation of Woman from man (Genesis 2:19-22 ). Theological reflection has identified him as an instrument of Satan and, thus, legitimately cursed and pictured as the enemy of Woman's seed (Genesis 3:14-15 ). The questioner invited the Woman to enter into a conversation about God and to treat Him and His word as objects to be considered and evaluated. ...
The Woman apparently felt inclined to defend God's instruction. Adam may have passed on this information that he initially received prior to Woman's creation (Genesis 2:17-18 ). It is interesting that the first challenge to God's word did not involve deletion, but addition by both the serpent and the Woman. ...
The Woman's willingness to judge and her addition to God's instruction, though seemingly harmless, permitted the serpent boldly to continue with a direct attack on God's character. ...
The Woman stood before the tree. The man admitted his sin, but only after emphatically reminding God that the Woman was instrumental in his partaking. Woman shared equally in the deed, but she quickly blamed the deceiving serpent (Genesis 3:12-13 ). ...
The Woman's punishment was linked to her distinctive role in the fulfillment of God's command (Genesis 1:28 ). He was guilty of following the Woman's sinful advice and eating of the forbidden tree (Genesis 3:17 ). ...
Results—Epilogue Man's prerogative to name Woman (Genesis 3:20 ) was a sign of the fallen order, but hope persists. Mankind can carry on because the Woman has the capacity to bear children
Dowry - A definite sum of money, or its equivalent, the income of which is to be used to support a religious Woman who, by her profession, has become a member of her community
Birth - Seasons of misfortune are likened to the pains of a Woman in travail, and seasons of prosperity to the joy that succeeds child-birth (Isaiah 13:8 ; Jeremiah 4:31 ; John 16:21,22 )
Mill - It was with the upper stone of a hand-mill that "a certain Woman" at Thebez broke Abimelech's skull (Judges 9:53 , "a piece of a millstone;" literally, "a millstone rider", i
Judah - ...
Soon after the sale of Joseph to the Ishmaelites, Judah went to reside at Adullam, where he married a Woman of Canaan
Sinner - , "a Woman which was in the city, a sinner," Luke 7:37 ; "a man that is a sinner," Luke 19:7
Candle - In beautiful contrast, as the Woman in the parable "lit the candle, swept the house, and sought diligently until she found" the lost piece of silver, so God (Luke 15:8) searches out His elect so that not one is lost, and takes each out of the darkness of this world, and restores the divine image, with a view to their salvation
Tabitha - The Christian Woman at Joppa, "full of good works and alms deeds" (as making coats and garments for poor widows, compare Job 31:19-20), who was raised from the dead by Peter's prayer and words under the Spirit, "Tabitha, arise
Lust - ...
Whosoever looketh on a Woman to lust after her,hath committed adultery with her already in his heart
Barren, Barrenness - Term used to describe a Woman who is unable to give birth to children: Sarai (Genesis 11:30 ), Rebekah (Genesis 25:21 ), Rachel (Genesis 29:31 ), Manoah's wife (Judges 13:2 ), Hannah (1 Samuel 1:5 ), and Elizabeth (Luke 1:7 ,Luke 1:7,1:36 )
Adriel - Still the term "bare" (margin) may mark how completely Michal, evidently a Woman of strong affections (1 Samuel 19:11-12; 2 Samuel 3:16), acted as a true mother to them
Flirt - , a Woman who acts with giddiness, or plays at courtship; a coquette; a pert girl
Betrothment - Certain laws were given as to a betrothed Woman
Beginning - Also the creation of man and Woman
Jacob's Well - In the valley of Shechem, near to a city called Sychar, was the well where the Lord rested, and conversed with the Woman of Samaria
Ointment - the word is μύρον, 'oil mingled with fragrant spices:' with such Mary anointed the Lord, and its perfume filled the house, John 12:3,5 ; it was also used by a Woman 'which was a sinner
Zimri - Leader of tribe of Simeon slain by Phinehas for bringing Midianite Woman into the wilderness camp (Numbers 25:1 )
Gender - a Woman, a wife Sans
Sheba (1) - ) A Woman in it saved the city by cutting off and casting Sheba's head to Joab (see Ecclesiastes 9:14-15)
Hair - as the natural covering of a Woman, as owning her subjection to the man, and is a glory to her; but nature teaches that if a man have long hair, it is a shame to him
Which - ) A interrogative pronoun, used both substantively and adjectively, and in direct and indirect questions, to ask for, or refer to, an individual person or thing among several of a class; as, which man is it? which Woman was it? which is the house? he asked which route he should take; which is best, to live or to die? See the Note under What, pron
Abihail - As the name of a Woman it occurs three times: ( a ) 1 Chronicles 2:29 , the wife of Abishur, of the tribe of Judah; this is its only occurrence in pre-exilic writings. ...
It is a Woman’s name in Minæan (South Arabian) inscriptions, where it occurs in the form Ili-hail
Abigail - I have often admired the sweet and gracious conclusion, which David made, on occasion of the sin-preventing providence, the Lord accomplished on the patriarch's mind, through the instrumentality of this Woman
Will, Be Willing - 24:5, where Abraham’s servant who is about to be sent to find a wife for Isaac says: “Peradventure the Woman will not be willing to follow me unto this land …?”...
It is to be noted that in all but 2 instances of its use in the Old Testament (Job 39:9; Forget - But God does not “forget” His people: “Can a Woman forget her suckling child, that she should not have compassion on the son of her womb? yea, they may forget, yet will I not forget thee” ( Necromancer - " (Leviticus 20:6) The Woman at Endor practised this art, and made Saul in his horrors of mind, a dupe to her delusion
Conceive - , "to take together" (sun, "with," lambano, "to take or receive"), is used (a) of a Woman, to "conceive," Luke 1:24,31,36 ; in the Passive Voice
Concubine - This term, in western authors, commonly signifies, a Woman, who, without being married to a man, yet lives with him as his wife; but, in the sacred writers, the word concubine is understood in another sense; meaning a lawful wife, but one not wedded with all the ceremonies and solemnities of matrimony; a wife of the second rank, inferior to the first wife, or mistress of the house
Simon - ...
Descendant of Juda (1Paralipomenon 4)
Simon, surnamed Thasi, brother of Judas Machabeus (1Machabees 2)
Simon of the tribe of Benjamin; governor of the Temple (2Machabees 3)
Simon who is called Peter, the Apostle (Matthew 4)
Simon the Cananean, the Apostle (Matthew 10)
one of the relatives of Our Lord, identified erroneously with the preceding (Matthew 13)
Simon the leper, a resident of Bethany (Matthew 26)
a Pharisee at whose house the penitent Woman washed the feet of Jesus (Luke 7)
Simon the Cyrenean, who helped Our Lord carry the Cross (Matthew 27)
the father of Judas (John 6)
Simon Magus, a magician in the time of the Apostles (Acts 8)
Simon the tanner, a Christian of Joppe, in whose house Peter had the vision commanding him to receive the Gentiles into the faith (Acts 10)
Simon called Niger, a Christian living at Antioch in the time of the Apostles (Acts 13)
Deborah - Barak, however, refused to go unless she accompanied him, which she did, but told him that the success of the expedition would be imputed to a Woman and not to him
Living - The Woman spins for a living
Linen - , 2 Samuel 6:14 ; SHESH, worn by Joseph when governor of Egypt, Genesis 41:42 , and by the virtuous Woman in Proverbs 31:22 , (see SILK ;) and BUTZ, of which the veil of the temple and David's outer mantle were made, ...
1 Chronicles 15:27 2 Chronicles 2:14 3:14 5:12
Jael - The song of Deborah celebrates the act as one of justice and heroism, and as a divine judgement which, as well as the defeat of Sisera's host, was the more disgraceful to him for being wrought by a Woman, Judges 5:1 ; 21:25,25
Divorce, - , (22:19,29) The ground of divorce is appoint on which the Jewish doctors of the period of the New Testament differed widely; the school of Shammai seeming to limit it to a moral delinquency in the Woman, whilst that the Hillel extended it to trifling causes, e
Adultery - Yet both the adulterous man and Woman were viewed as guilty, and the punishment of death was prescribed for both (Leviticus 20:10 ). Marriage is a lifelong covenant between a man and a Woman
Allegory - Never would it have entered into the breast of any man alive, untaught of the church's almighty Teacher, that such glorious things were intended by the Lord to be shadowed forth in the children of the bond Woman and the children of the free. Well might it be said, as it is said, when Jesus, who had been secretly set up from everlasting the glorious Head of his body the church, was openly to be brought into the world,"Let all the angels of God worship him!" (Hebrews 1:6) It will be a blessed view of this sweet allegory, now so graciously explained to us as it is, by the Holy Ghost himself, if both he that writes and he that reads, when summing up the wonderful account, can say with the apostle, "We are not children of the bond-woman, but of the free
Noah - His name may have been given to him by his parents in the hope that he would be the promised "seed of the Woman" that should "bruise the serpent's head. We may also mention the medals struck at Apamea in Phrygia, in the time of Septimus Severus, and bearing the name NO, an ark, a man and Woman, a raven, and a dove with an olive branch in its mouth
Evidence: Experimental - None of you can tell what the troubles of a poor lone Woman are, but the Lord has made his grace all-sufficient. Now, you are going to tell me something better than that: better for a poor Woman like me! I have been to the Lord sometimes when I've been very low indeed, and there's been scarcely anything for us to eat, and I've always found his providence has been good and kind to me. ' The lecturer was a good hand at an argument, but such a mode of controversy was novel, and therefore he gave up the contest, and merely said, 'Really, the dear old Woman was so happy in her delusion he should not like to undeceive her
Man - In a few places it is used in a stricter sense in contrast to a Woman: as "Is it lawful for a man to put away his wife?" Matthew 19:3 . ἀνήρ, man as distinguished from a Woman. "The head of the Woman is the man. It is thus the common word used for 'husband:' a Woman's man is her husband
Christ, Miracles of - ...
Healing of the nobleman's son (John 4)
Cure of the mother-in-law of Peter (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 4)
Cleansing of the leper (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 5)
Healing of the paralytic (Matthew 9; Mark 2; Luke 5)
Healing of the impotent man at Bethesda (John 5)
Restoring of the man with the withered hand (Matthew 12; Mark 3; Luke 6)
Healing of the centurion's servant (Matthew 8; Luke 7)
Healing of one blind and dumb (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Healing of the Woman with an issue of blood (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Opening of the eyes of two blind men (Matthew 9)
Cure of the dumb man (Matthew 9)
Healing of the deaf and dumb man (Mark 7)
Opening the eyes of one blind at Bethsaida (Mark 8)
Healing the lunatic child (Matthew 17; Mark 9; Luke 9)
Opening of the eyes of one born blind (John 9)
Restoring the Woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Healing of the man with the dropsy (Luke 14)
Cleansing of the ten lepers (Luke 17)
Opening the eyes of the blind man near Jericho (Matthew 20; Mark 11; Luke 18)
Healing of Malchus's ear (Luke 22)
DELIVERANCE OF DEMONIACS ...
General formulas regarding the driving out of devils (Mark 1) indicate that such acts of deliverance were very numerous during Our Lord's public life. Phenician Woman (Matt.
Woman with the spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Miracles of Christ - ...
Healing of the nobleman's son (John 4)
Cure of the mother-in-law of Peter (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 4)
Cleansing of the leper (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 5)
Healing of the paralytic (Matthew 9; Mark 2; Luke 5)
Healing of the impotent man at Bethesda (John 5)
Restoring of the man with the withered hand (Matthew 12; Mark 3; Luke 6)
Healing of the centurion's servant (Matthew 8; Luke 7)
Healing of one blind and dumb (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Healing of the Woman with an issue of blood (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Opening of the eyes of two blind men (Matthew 9)
Cure of the dumb man (Matthew 9)
Healing of the deaf and dumb man (Mark 7)
Opening the eyes of one blind at Bethsaida (Mark 8)
Healing the lunatic child (Matthew 17; Mark 9; Luke 9)
Opening of the eyes of one born blind (John 9)
Restoring the Woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Healing of the man with the dropsy (Luke 14)
Cleansing of the ten lepers (Luke 17)
Opening the eyes of the blind man near Jericho (Matthew 20; Mark 11; Luke 18)
Healing of Malchus's ear (Luke 22)
DELIVERANCE OF DEMONIACS ...
General formulas regarding the driving out of devils (Mark 1) indicate that such acts of deliverance were very numerous during Our Lord's public life. Phenician Woman (Matt.
Woman with the spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Head, Headship - ...
A moral, unmarried Woman even wore a veil in front of her parents. ...
William Ramsey saw the Woman's head covering as her power. This might explain why Paul says "a Woman ought to have a sign of authority on her head" (1 Corinthians 11:10 ). ...
Paul begins by presenting a hierarchy of headship: God, Christ, man, and Woman. A Woman may pray and prophesy in public if her dress shows submission to her husband's authority (1 Corinthians 11:5-6 ). If a Woman's outward appearance reflects gentleness and submission to her husband, it may win him to Christ (1 Peter 3:1-6 ). Use of head coverings enhanced the acceptance of a Woman's contribution to the service. ...
Paul based his view about the Woman's place in the authority continuum on Genesis 2:18-24 . Here the Woman is formed from man's side in response to a need for companionship and help. ...
Woman reflects the glory of God in man so that both bear the image of God (Genesis 1:26-27 ). , Manhood and Womanhood: A Biblical Perspective ; idem, Trinity J NS (1985): 1438-59; G. Neuer, Man and Woman in Christian Perspective ; W
Betrothal - The OT betrothal ceremony perpetuated in a conventional fashion the recollection of the time when a Woman was purchased from her family. At the same time it is clear that when a Woman was designated (ועד Exodus 21:8-9) by the head of her family as the future wife of another man, there was paid over by the prospective bridegroom a certain sum of money (or service, as in the case of Jacob), and a contract which was inviolable was then entered into (Genesis 34:12, Exodus 22:17). The money payment belonged originally to the family of the Woman, but gradually came to belong in part or wholly to the Woman herself. The Woman might bring wealth to her husband, as in the case of Rachel and Leah, but this was not obligatory in the Hebrew period, and cannot be said to belong to betrothal as such. There is no clear evidence that the young Woman had any right of appeal from the choice of her family. The status of the man and Woman was now, as in Hebrew times, practically the same as that of married persons, although it was now generally customary for the wedding ceremony proper to be celebrated at the expiration of a year in the case of a virgin, and in thirty days in the case of a widow
Tamar - A Canaanite Woman, married to Er and then to his brother Onan (see Marriage, 4)
Ransom - No Woman, no man, no church, no religion, no good works, no money, no prayers can avail for this purpose
Leaven - The Woman is the apostate church, the meal is the Word of GOD, the leaven is wrong and evil teachings concerning the Word of GOD
Scarlet - , in connection with the cleansing of a leper, Leviticus 14:4,6 , "scarlet;" with the offering of the red heifer, Numbers 19:6 ; (b) of the robe put on Christ by the soldiers, Matthew 27:28 ; (c) of the "beast" seen in symbolic vision in Revelation 17:3 , "scarlet-colored;" (d) of the clothing of the "woman" as seen sitting on the "beast," Revelation 17:4 ; (e) of part of the merchandise of Babylon, Revelation 18:12 ; (f) figuratively, of the glory of the city itself, Revelation 18:16 ; the neuter is used in the last three instances
Desert - , of a Woman deserted by a husband, Galatians 4:27 ; (b) so of a city, as Jerusalem, Matthew 23:38 ; or uninhabited places, "desert," e
Uriah - He was the husband of Bathsheba, the Woman with whom David committed adultery
Temptations - Master Greenham, a Puritan dIvine, was once waited upon by a Woman who was greatly tempted
Bethany - Here also He was entertained by Simon the leper, at the feast where the Woman made her offering of ointment ( Matthew 26:6 , Mark 14:3 )
Miriam - A man (or Woman) of the family of Caleb ( 1 Chronicles 4:17 )
Sir - It is also a term frequently employed in addressing Jesus, both by disciples and others (‘Lord, if thou wilt thou canst make me clean,’ Matthew 8:2, John 11:12); so the Woman of Samaria says to Jesus, ‘Sir, thou hast nothing to draw with’ (John 4:11)
Moon - In Revelation 12:1 the Woman who appears as a sign in heaven has the moon under her feet as a footstool (see Sun)
Wormwood - ...
Revelation 17:3 (b) The Lord represents apostate Christendom as the Woman
Bonds - ...
Luke 13:16 (b) The sickness which this Woman suffered is described as a bond because it hindered her from living a normal life
Fringes - The Woman with the issue of blood touched Christ's hem, as the sacred part (Matthew 9:20)
Dragon - a Woman
Weed - ) An article of dress worn in token of grief; a mourning garment or badge; as, he wore a weed on his hat; especially, in the plural, mourning garb, as of a Woman; as, a widow's weeds
Mother - As a Woman who brings forth a child is by virtue of it immediately called a mother, so the church, which brings forth children to God in Christ is called "the Jerusalem which is above, who is the mother of us all
Peradventure - Elsewhere 'ûlay expresses fear or doubt: “Peradventure the Woman will not be willing to follow me unto this land; must I needs bring thy son again unto the land from whence thou camest?” ( Divorce - The ground of divorce is a point on which the Jewish doctors of the New Testament era differed widely; the school of Shammai seeming to limit it to a moral delinquency in the Woman, whilst that of Hillel extended it to trifling causes, e
Rehoboam - the son and successor of Solomon; his mother was Naamah, an Ammonitish Woman, whom Solomon had married, 1 Kings 14:20-21
Alabaster - ...
In Matthew 26:6-7 , we read that Jesus being at table in Bethany, in the house of Simon the leper, a Woman came thither and poured an alabaster box of ointment on his head
Ointment - Of the act of the Woman mentioned in Matthew 26:6-13 , the Lord said, "she did it to prepare Me for burial;" her devotion led her to antedate the customary ritual after death, by showing both her affection and her understanding of what was impending
Adonijah - He did not remain quiet, but, after David's death, persuaded Bath-sheba to ask for him Abishag, a Woman of bis father's harem
Scarlet - So the diligent and virtuous Woman is said to clothe her household in scarlet, Proverbs 31:21
Jealous - We say, a young man is jealous of the Woman he loves, or jealous of his rival
Spagnoletto - Typical works are The Flaying of Saint Bartholomew, in the Prado in Madrid, The Martyrdom of Saint Lawrence, in the Dresden Gallery, the Pieta in the National Gallery, or still more realistic paintings such as The Club Foot; The Bearded Woman, and Prometheus
Ribera, Josef - Typical works are The Flaying of Saint Bartholomew, in the Prado in Madrid, The Martyrdom of Saint Lawrence, in the Dresden Gallery, the Pieta in the National Gallery, or still more realistic paintings such as The Club Foot; The Bearded Woman, and Prometheus
Ribera, Juseppe de - Typical works are The Flaying of Saint Bartholomew, in the Prado in Madrid, The Martyrdom of Saint Lawrence, in the Dresden Gallery, the Pieta in the National Gallery, or still more realistic paintings such as The Club Foot; The Bearded Woman, and Prometheus
Concubine - A term which, in modern authors, commonly signifies a Woman who, without being married to a man, lives with him as his wife; but in the Bible the word concubine is understood in another sense- meaning a lawful wife, but of a secondary rank
John, the Second And Third Epistles of - The second epistle is addressed to an individual Woman
Man - It denotes also man in opposition to Woman (Genesis 3:12 ; Matthew 19:10 ). 'ish, like the Latin vir and Greek aner, denotes properly a man in opposition to a Woman (1 Samuel 17:33 ; Matthew 14:21 ); a husband (Genesis 3:16 ; Hosea 2:16 ); man with reference to excellent mental qualities
Kiss - The location of the kiss carried different meanings as Jesus made clear in the episode of the Woman kissing his feet (Luke 7:36-50 ). The term “kiss” in the New Testament is used of Judas (Mark 14:44-45 ), of the father to the prodigal as a sign of acceptance and reconciliation (Luke 15:20 ), of the Ephesian elders to Paul as a sign of gratitude (Acts 20:37 ), of the Woman who kissed the feet of Jesus (Luke 7:38 ), and of the “holy kiss” (1 Thessalonians 5:26 ; 1 Corinthians 16:20 ; 2 Corinthians 13:12 ; Romans 16:16 )
Sychar - It is objected that Jacob's well at the entrance into the valley is a mile and a half from Shechem, and that it is unlikely the Woman, if belonging to Shechem, would go so far for water when plenty was nearer at hand; but Robinson conjectures the town had extensive suburbs anciently which reached to near Jacob's well. The Woman probably went to this well, irrespectively of distance, just because it was Jacob's; her looking for "Messiah" is in consonance with this, besides the well was deep and the water therefore especially good
Miraculous Conception - If we admit this evidence of the fact, we can discern the emphatical meaning of the appellation given to our Saviour when he is called "the seed of the Woman," Genesis 3:15 ; we can perceive the meaning of a phrase which St. Luke has introduced into the genealogy of Jesus, Luke 3:23 , and of which, otherwise, it is not possible to give a good account, ων , ως ενομιζετο , υιος ‘Ιωσηφ ; [1] and we can discover a peculiar significancy in an expression of the Apostle Paul, Galatians 4:4 , "God sent forth his Son, made of a Woman
Persis - (Περσίς, a Greek name)...
Persis is a Woman saluted by St. The aorist, in contrast to the present used in the same verse of the labours of Tryphaena and Tryphosa, may point to some definite occasion of special importance in the past; or we may suppose that Persis was an aged Woman whose active work was over
Hagar - Abram's bond-woman; an Egyptian received into his household during his sojourn in Egypt,. Ishmael's mocking at the feast which celebrated Isaac's weaning was the occasion of Sarah's saying, "Cast out this bond-woman and her son, for the son of this bond-woman shall not be heir with my son . ...
Paul expounds Hagar to answer to Sinai and the law, which generates a spirit of "bondage," as Hagar was a bond-woman, and that this must give place to the gospel dispensation and the church of grace, the "Jerusalem which is above
Hagar - But taught by divine instruction, from this beautiful allegory we learn the vast importance of being found belonging to a covenant of grace, and not with the bond-woman under the law of works. " The everlasting hatred of nature to grace was then strikingly set forth, by the mocking of the bond-woman's son. " And surely, the bond-woman and her son cannot be heir with the son of the free-woman; for all of the Hagar, the mount Sinai covenant, are in bondage. Well might the apostle comfort the church with that sweet assurance, "so then, brethren, we are not children of the bond-woman, but of the free
Barrenness - This was looked upon as reproachful among the Greeks and Romans, but more particularly so among the Jews; which may be accounted for by the constant expectation of Messiah, and the hope that every Woman had, that she might be the mother of the promised seed. This constant hope of the speedy coming of the great "Seed of the Woman" serves also to account for many circumstances in the Old Testament history. I see that nothing is great or little before Him who can bend to his purposes whatever he willeth, and convert the light-hearted and thoughtless mockery of an aged Woman into an instrument of his glory, effectual as the tongue of the seer which he touched with living coals from the altar. The Seed of the Woman, that was to bruise the serpent's head, Genesis 3:15 , however indistinctly understood, (and probably it was understood very indistinctly,) was the one thing longed for in the families of old; was ‘the desire of all nations,' as the Prophet Haggai expressly calls it, Haggai 2:7 ; and, provided they could accomplish this desire, they (like others, when urged by an overpowering motive) were often reckless of the means, and rushed upon deeds which they could not defend
Immorality, Sexual - This important function is given special prominence in the narrative describing the creation of Woman (Genesis 2:21-24 ). Accordingly a man is prohibited from copulating with his mother or any other wife belonging to his father; a sister or half-sister, a daughter-in-law or a granddaughter, an aunt on either side of the family, a Woman and her daughter or her son's daughter or daughter's daughter, a wife's sister as a rival wife, a neighbor's wife, and a Woman during the menses. ...
Homosexuality is described in the Mosaic legislation in terms of a man lying with a man "as one lies with a Woman" (Leviticus 18:22 ; 20:13 ), that is, for purposes of sexual intercourse. ...
Bestiality, defined in terms of a man or Woman having sexual relations with an animal (Leviticus 18:23 ; 20:15-16 ), is stigmatized in the Mosaic enactments as a defilement for a man and a sexual perversion for a Woman. The marriage of a man, a Woman, and her mother is deemed wicked, and the offenders sentenced to be burned with fire so as to expunge completely the wickedness of the act from the holy community. The same is true of a man and a Woman engaging in sexual activity during the Woman's menstrual period. At all events, adultery was understood as sexual intercourse between a man and another man's wife or betrothed Woman. Similarly, any act of coition between a married Woman and a man who was not her husband was also regarded as adultery. But he extends the definition to include any man who lusts in his mind after another Woman, whether she is married or not. ...
Whereas the female is cast in an inferior, passive role in the Old Testament sexual legislation, Jesus considers the Woman as equal to the man in his teachings about divorce and remarriage. In consequence the Woman has to bear equal responsibility for adultery. The accused Woman was protected under the law to the extent that her husband's accusations had to be proved. Sexual activity is to be confined to the marriage relationship, and if a married man or Woman has sexual intercourse with someone other than the spouse, that person has committed adultery
Rebekah - He prays that God may prosper him and give him a sign by which he may recognize the Woman Providence has set apart for Isaac. Appearing first as a pure, unselfish, loving girl, she becomes a Woman of great strength of mind and depth of character. Although that curse fell and her beloved son had to flee and she saw his face no more, yet we forget the scheming, plotting Woman in the loving wife and self-sacrificing mother
Babylon - If God is sovereign and makes use of Babylon to punish Judah, can Babylon—as a tool in the hand of its Masterbe blamed for its behavior? Isaiah addresses this problem by portraying Babylon as a Woman, the queen of kingdoms (47:5), who should be tender and delicate but is not. Psalm 137 personifies Babylon as a Woman who is doomed to destruction and whose infant children will be savagely killed. ...
The dominant image of Babylon in Revelation is the city's personification of a rich Woman, the "mother of prostitutes" (17:5)
Widow - Anna of the tribe of Asher (Luke 2:36-38), a devout Woman described as a prophetess, who had been a widow eighty-four years, and who constantly frequented the Temple, passing her time in fastings and prayers, and who, coming up at the moment of the presentation of the infant Saviour, moved by the spirit of prophecy, spake of Him to those present who were expecting the redemption of Jerusalem. ’ If this were so, then our Lord’s reference to Naaman the Syrian would be balanced by a reference to ‘a Woman who was a Syrian’ or ‘Gentile. ...
In the Lewis MS of the Syriac Gospels the Syrophœnician Woman (Mark 7:26) is described as a widow
Dorcas - Both the Aramaic and the Greek terms were used as proper names for women, and the writer of the Acts gives the translation for the benefit of his Greek readers, though the Woman was probably known as Tabitha. ’ One feature or her benevolent activity was the making of garments which she distributed among the poor, a circumstance which is regarded as indicating special goodness, as a Woman with means adequate to provide such benefactions might have been content with merely giving her money. Peter put them all out of the room, knelt down and prayed, and turning to the Woman said, ‘Tabitha, arise!’ when she opened her eyes, sat up, and was handed over to the widows
Babylon, Mystical - ...
The "woman arrayed in purple and scarlet color, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls, having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication, and upon her forehead having a name written, MYSTERY, BABYLON THE GREAT, THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS AND ABOMINATIONS OF THE EARTH" (Revelation 17:4-5), is avowedly mystical. ) John had seen the Woman "clothed with the sun, and the moon (the earth's satellite) under her feet, and upon her head a crown of twelve stars "; i. Not that the elect apostatize; but Christendom, as a whole, and as the visible "woman," has apostatized from its first faith and love. The elect invisible church, the true "woman" and "bride," remains hidden in the visible that has become the harlot, and shall only be manifested when Christ our Life is manifested (Colossians 3:1). ...
The harlot retains human shape as Woman, does not become a beast; i
Mary Magdalene - Luke 8:3) identifies her with "the Woman a sinner" (Luke 7:37), and explains "Mary of the braided locks" from gaadal "to braid" (?). cf6 "Woman," said He, cf6 "why weepest thou? whom seekest thou?" "Supposing Him to be the gardener she saith, Sir, if thou have borne Him (she, with the natural absence of mind of one absorbed in one object, forgetting to explain whom she meant, as if all must know Him) hence, tell me where thou hast laid Him, and I will take Him away. " She never stops to think of her own weakness as a Woman; love gives her the nerve to take it for granted that she is able for the blessed task; contrast her and the women's former question, "who shall roll us away the stone from the door of the sepulchre?" (Mark 16:3. The seven demons that had possessed her were her misfortune, not the proof that she had been in the common sense "a Woman which was a sinner. It does not mean that she had already anointed Him and was identical with the Woman a sinner whose anointing of Him is recorded in Luke 7
Tekoa - From here came the ‘wise Woman’ sent by Joab to plead for Absalom ( 2 Samuel 14:2 ; 2 Samuel 14:4 ; 2 Samuel 14:8 ); Rehoboam fortified it ( 2 Chronicles 11:6 ), and apparently it continued to be a fortress ( Jeremiah 6:1 ); Amos ‘was among the herdmen of Tekoa’ ( Amos 1:1 )
Euodias - A Christian Woman, perhaps a deaconess or one of influence at Philippi (Acts 17:12)
Gamaliel - His views were tolerant and large-hearted; he emphasized the humaner side of the Law, relaxing somewhat the rigour of Sabbatical observance, regulating the customs of divorce so as the more to protect helpless Woman, and inculcating kindness on the part of Jews towards surrounding heathen
Narrow (And Forms) - Proverbs 23:27 (b) The man who gets led astray by such a Woman finds himself become a slave to her
Siren - ) An enticing, dangerous Woman
Forehead - ...
Jeremiah 3:3 (a) GOD compares the people of Israel to a wicked Woman who is bold, brazen and unashamed in her sins
Brick - No religion of any kind that has its origin in the mind of a man or a Woman will pass GOD's judgment
Hour - Jesus saith, Woman,my hour is not yet come
New - Except in the Gospels, in reference to the wine as above, the word νέος is used only in 1 Corinthians 5:7 , 'a new lump;' Colossians 3:10 , 'the new [1];' Hebrews 12:24 , 'the new covenant;' and Titus 2:4 , 'young Woman
Adultery - The law of Moses made this crime capital, both to the man and Woman; and upon clear proof, they were both to be put to death
Sell - Similarly, it was said that “the Lord shall sell Sisera into the hand of a Woman” ( Spread Out - “To spread” may mean “to cover over” and thus to hide from vision: “And the Woman took and spread a covering over the well’s mouth, and spread ground corn thereon; and the thing was not known” ( Timothy - His father was a Greek and a heathen; his mother, Eunice, was a Jewess, and a Woman of piety, as was also his grandmother, Lois, 2 Timothy 1:5, and by them he was early taught in the Scriptures of the Old Testament
Anna - We know nothing more either of the life or death of this holy Woman
Virgin - The interpretation that this passage refers to a man and Woman already in some kind of relation by way of a spiritual marriage and living together in a vow of virginity and celibacy, is untenable if only in view of the phraseology of the passage; (e) figuratively, of "a local church" in its relation to Christ, 2 Corinthians 11:2 ; (f) metaphorically of "chaste persons," Revelation 14:4
Loose - ) Dissolute; unchaste; as, a loose man or Woman
Languish - To pine or sink under sorrow or any continued passion as, a Woman languishes for the loss of her lover
Porter - In private houses the doorkeeper might be a Woman ( 2 Samuel 4:6 as restored from LXX Elisha - Many miracles also were wrought at his word; some of these were, healing the waters of Jericho; supplying the widow's cruse with oil, and the allied armies of Judah, Israel, and Edom with water; gaining a son for the Woman of Shunem, and restoring him to life; healing the leprosy of Naaman; detecting and punishing Ghazi
Sad - Lady Catherine, a sad and religious Woman
Seven Words of Christ -
"Woman, behold thy son
Who - Thus we say, the man or Woman who was with us the men or women who were with us the men or women whom we saw
Ointment - " (Nehemiah 3:8 ) The work was sometimes carried on by Woman "confectionaries
Shemaiah - Priest married to a foreign Woman (Ezra 10:21 ). Man married to a foreign Woman (Ezra 10:31 )
Harlot - Ζarah and nokriyah , "the strange Woman," implies that foreign women were those often found among the harlot class. In Proverbs 5:17-20 "strange" seemingly contrasts with one's own rightful wife; another term, qudeeshaah , "consecrated Woman" (in Genesis 38:21-22; Deuteronomy 23:17; Hosea 4:14), refers to the abominable worship of the Syrian Astarte or Venus by prostitution
Harlot - ‘strange Woman’]'>[1], qedçshâh , Gr. From the name ‘strange Woman’ in Proverbs 6:24 ; Proverbs 23:27 etc
Flute-Players - 4 is the often cited rule that a man who had lost his wife must engage, no matter how poor he might be, not fewer than two flute-players and one wailing Woman. The wailing Woman remains, but the funeral flautist has gone (Bauer, Volksleben im Lande der Bibel, 1903, p
Inability - The Woman mentioned in 2d Had that Woman been a very Kings 6: 29, could not kill affectionate mother, she could her neighbour's son, and eat not have killed her own son in him, when he was hid, and a time of plenty, as she did in she could not find him
Man - " And God said, Let us make man in our image, , after our likeness, and let them have dominion--Genesis 1 ...
Man that is born of a Woman, is of few days and full of trouble. ...
When opposed to Woman, man sometimes denotes the male sex in general. ...
Woman has, in general, much stronger propensity than man to the discharge of parental duties
Jacob's Well - or fountain, a well near Shechem, at which our Saviour conversed with the Woman of Samaria, John 4:12 . This is situated at a small distance from the town in the road to Jerusalem, and has been visited by pilgrims of all ages, but particularly since the Christian era, as the place where Christ revealed himself to the Woman of Samaria. The journey of our Lord from Judea into Galilee; the cause of it; his passage through the territory of Samaria; his approach to the metropolis of that country; its name; his arrival at the Amorite field, which terminates the narrow valley of Sichem; the ancient custom of halting at a well; the female employment of drawing water; the disciples sent into the city for food, by which its situation out of the town is so obviously implied; the question of the Woman referring to existing prejudices which separated the Jews from the Samaritans; the depth of the well; the oriental allusion contained in the expression, "living water;" the history of the well, and the customs illustrated by it; the worship upon Mount Gerizim:—all these occur within the space of twenty verses; and if to these be added that remarkable circumstance mentioned in the fifty-first verse of the chapter, where it is stated that as he was now going down, his servants met him," his whole route from Cana being a continual descent toward Capernaum, we may consider it as a record, signally confirmed in its veracity by circumstances, which remain in indelible character, to give them evidence, to this day
Abimelech - Three years afterwards, they rose against Abimelech; he defeated them, and destroyed their city, but as he was attacking Thebez, a Woman threw down a piece of millstone on his head, which so injured him, that he called to his armor bearer to slay him, Judges 9:1 - 57
Deaconess - A Woman performing certain ecclesiastical functions in the early Church
Incest - Leviticus 18:19 prohibited a man's involvement with a Woman and her daughter or granddaughter
Poor - 1, of the same Woman, in ver
Lydia - It has been held that Lydia is the proper name of this Woman; but it seems more likely that it merely means ‘the Lydian,’ and that it was the designation by which she was ordinarily known at Philippi
Blue - ) A pedantic Woman; a bluestocking
Lydia - Her name originally might have been the designation of her home, “a Woman of Lydia,” since Thyatira was in the province of Lydia
Miriam - ...
At Hazeroth, Miriam sided with Aaron in an act of rebellion against Moses when he married an Ethiopian Woman (Numbers 12:1-15 )
Slothful - The virtuous Woman is the opposite of slothful, not having to live with the results of idle sloth (Proverbs 31:27 )
Mill - One Woman fed the grain at the center, and the other guided the products into little piles
Pot - ...
John 2:6 (c) These may be taken as a type of the six people in John who are outstanding in their transformed lives; Nicodemus, the Samaritan Woman, the lame man in chapter5, the blind man, Lazarus, and the nobleman's son in chapter4
Plain - ) Without beauty; not handsome; homely; as, a plain Woman
Dog - ...
Matthew 15:26 (a) This troubled Woman accepted the place CHRIST gave her and compared herself to a dog waiting to be fed with the crumbs
Hiram - His father was a man of Tyre, and he is called "the son of a Woman of the daughters of Dan" in 2 Chronicles 2:14 ; but in 1 Kings 7:14 it reads "a widow's son of the tribe of Naphtali," which may mean that her husband was a man of Naphtali
Single - ) Hence, unmarried; as, a single man or Woman
Person - ) A living, self-conscious being, as distinct from an animal or a thing; a moral agent; a human being; a man, Woman, or child
Miriam - With Aaron she took the lead in murmuring against Moses, on the plea that he had married an Ethiopian Woman
Abimelech - This was fulfilled by many of the men of Shechem being killed, and Abimelech being mortally wounded by a piece of a millstone cast upon him by a Woman at the attack upon Thebez
Shame - ”...
This word represents both “shame and worthlessness”: “Thou son of the perverse rebellious Woman, do not I know that thou hast chosen the son of Jesse … unto the confusion of thy mother’s nakedness” ( Cush - The "Ethiopian Woman," too, whom Moses married during the march of the Israelites through the desert, came probably from this Cush, Exodus 2:16-21 Numbers 12:1 2 Chronicles 21:16
Paint - The notices of it are few; and in each instance it seems to have been used as a meretricious art, unworthy of a Woman of high character
Fall of Man - This account is, that a garden having been planted by the Creator, for the use of man, he was placed in it, "to dress it, and to keep it;"—that in this garden two trees were specially distinguished, one as "the tree of life," the other as: "the tree of the knowledge of good and evil;"—that from eating of the latter Adam was restrained by positive interdict, and by the penalty, "In the day thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die;"—that the serpent, who was more subtle that any beast of the field, tempted the Woman to eat, by denying that death would be the consequence, and by assuring her, that her eyes and her husband's eyes "would be opened," and that they would "be as gods, knowing good and evil;"—that the Woman took of the fruit, gave of it to her husband, who also ate;—that for this act of disobedience they were expelled from the garden, made subject to death, and laid under other maledictions. The creation of the world, of man, of Woman; the planting of the garden of Eden, and the placing of man there; the duties and prohibitions laid upon him; his disobedience; his expulsion from the garden; the subsequent birth of his children, their lives, and actions, and those of their posterity, down to the flood; and, from that event, to the life of Abraham, are given in the same plain and unadorned narrative; brief, but yet simple; and with no intimation at all, either from the elevation of the style or otherwise, that a fable or allegory is in any part introduced. "What is man, that he should be clean? and he which is born of a Woman, that he should be righteous?"...
Job 15:14 . Why not clean? Did God make Woman or man unclean at the beginning? If he did, the expostulation would have been more apposite, and much stronger, had the true cause been assigned, and Job had said, "How canst thou expect cleanness in man, whom thou createdst unclean?" But, as the case now stands, the expostulation has a plain reference to the introduction of vanity and corruption by the sin of the Woman, and is an evidence that this ancient writer was sensible of the evil consequences of the fall upon the whole race of man. ) That the intimacy and indissolubility of the marriage relation rests upon the formation of the Woman from the man; for our Lord quotes the words in Genesis, where the obligation of man to cleave to his wife is immediately connected with that circumstance: "And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of man. And Adam was not deceived," first or immediately, "but the Woman being deceived was in the transgression. " And he offers this as the reason of an injunction, "Let the Woman learn in silence with all subjection
Dove - ...
In art it is the emblem of the following saints, ...
Saint Agnes of Rome - Woman with a dove holding a ring in its beak
Saint Ambrose of Milan
Blessed Ambrose Sansedoni of Siena - Dominican with a dove (the Holy Spirit) whispering in his ear as he preaches
Saint Augustine of Hippo
Saint Basil the Great - the dove is near the supernational fire that indicates descent of the Holy Spirit on Basil
Saint Colman of Lindisfarne - the name Colman means dove
Saint Colomba of Rieti - Dominican tertiary with a dove indicating the Holy Spirit
Saint Dathus - chosen as bishop when a dove descended on him and those present took it as a sign
Saint David of Wales - as proof of the truth of his preaching, a dove settled on his shoulder as he spoke
Saint Devota - as her martyred body was being taken home, a storm threatened to wreck the boat; a dove emerged from her mouth, and the storm stopped
Saint Dunstan of Canterbury - man writing with a dove (the Holy Spirit) nearby
Saint Eulalia of Merida
Pope Saint Fabian - chosen pope when a dove settled on his head and the people took it as a sign
Pope Saint Gregory the Great
Saint Ida of Herzfield - Woman with a dove hovering over her head
Saint Ivo of Kermartin - lawyer surrounded by doves (the Holy Spirit)
Saint Joachim - elderly man carrying a basket of doves
Saint John Chrysostom
Saint Oliva
Saint Oswald
Saint Remigius
Saint Scholastica - at her death, her brother, Saint Benedict of Nursia, saw her soul ascend to heaven as a dove
Saint Teresa of Avila - Carmelite nun with a dove (the Holy Spirit) nearby while she writes
Saint Thomas Aquinas - Dominican with a dove (the Holy Spirit) speaking in his ear as he writes
Pope Saint Zachary - with a dove and olive branch to indicate his work as a peace maker
Thyatira - Yet Thyatira "suffered that Woman Jezebel, which calleth herself a prophetess, to teach and to seduce My servants to commit fornication, and to eat things sacrificed unto idols. ) Some self-styled prophetess, or collection of prophets (the feminine in Hebrew idiom expressing a multitude), closely attached to and influencing the Thyatira church and its presiding bishop or "angel" (the Alexandrinus and Vaticanus manuscripts read "thy wife" for "that Woman") as Jezebel did her weak husband Ahab
Rending of Garments - ’ For father or mother all the garments were rent till the breast was exposed, but a Woman was enjoined to rend her under garment in private, and to wear it reversed. A Woman, however, might in all cases repair after seven days
Gehazi - Gehazi is first introduced to us in connexion with the episode of the Shunammite Woman. Gebazi bears Elisha’s message to her: ‘Behold, thou hast been careful for us with all this care; what is to be done for thee? Wouldst thou be spoken for to the king, or to the captain of the host?’ On her refusal to be a candidate for such honours, Gehazi reminds his master that the Woman is childless
Salt - The memory of the deed of this Woman and her act of rebellion were to be preserved for future generations. The punishment of this Woman was to be permanent
Authority - In 1 Corinthians 11:10 ἐξουσία is used in a peculiar sense (‘for this cause ought the Woman to have ἐξουσίαν on her head, because of the angels’), where a veil appears to be meant. Acts 8:27 Authorized Version , Revised Version , ‘a eunuch of great authority’ (δυνάστης); 1 Timothy 2:2 Authorized Version ‘for kings and for all that are in authority’ (ἐν ὑπεροχῇ), Revised Version ‘in high place’; 1 Timothy 2:12 Authorized Version ‘I suffer not a Woman … to usurp authority over the man’ (αὐθεντεῖν ἀνδρός), Revised Version ‘to have dominion over’; Titus 2:15 ‘rebuke (Authorized Version reprove) with all authority’ (ἐπιταγῆς)
Virgin - Solomon wrote that the process of wooing a Woman was mysterious to him ( Woman who had not borne a child
ma'ry the Virgin, - With almost his last words Christ commended his mother to the care of him who had borne the name of the disciple whom Jesus loved: "Woman, behold thy son. So far as Mary is portrayed to us in Scripture, she is, as we should have expected the most tender, the most faithful humble, patient and loving of women, but a Woman still
Mary - If “kinswoman” in Luke 1:36 is a reference for family line and not a relationship established by marriage, then Mary's family heritage may have been priestly. 500 onward, identified Mary Magdalene with the sinful Woman of Luke 7:36-50 . To confuse the interpretative tradition further, the sinful Woman in the anointing scene of Luke 7:36-50 is often identified incorrectly with another Mary, the sister of Martha and Lazrus. On all accounts, no evidence exists that the sinful Woman of Luke 7:1 should be identified as Mary. This Woman was the owner of the house in Jerusalem where the first followers of Jesus met (Acts 12:12 )
Brood - ) The young from the same dam, whether produced at the same time or not; young children of the same mother, especially if nearly of the same age; offspring; progeny; as, a Woman with a brood of children
Coal - ...
Coal, or rather charcoal, supplies several Scripture metaphors, the most interesting of which is illustrated by the expression of the wise Woman of Tekoa, ‘thus shall they quench my coal that is left’ (2 Samuel 14:7 )
Moliere - Outside of the many "Farces" which contribute little to his glory, Moliere wrote a group of comedies in which he is little concerned with plot and denouement, but in which he depicts in immortal "types" the foibles and ridiculousness of humanity at large: the Miser, the Misanthrope, the Hypocrite, the Pedantic Woman, the Parvenu, the Quaek
Discalced Carmelite Order - Among the many Saints of the Order, the most renowned are Saint Teresa of Jesus, considered as tbe world's greatest Woman writer, Saint John of the Cross, mystical Doctor of the Churcb, and tbe most exquisite of all the great Spanish poets, and the world-renowned Saint Teresa of the Cbild Jesus, commonly known as the "Little Flower
Order of Discalced Carmelites - Among the many Saints of the Order, the most renowned are Saint Teresa of Jesus, considered as tbe world's greatest Woman writer, Saint John of the Cross, mystical Doctor of the Churcb, and tbe most exquisite of all the great Spanish poets, and the world-renowned Saint Teresa of the Cbild Jesus, commonly known as the "Little Flower
Jean Poquelin - Outside of the many "Farces" which contribute little to his glory, Moliere wrote a group of comedies in which he is little concerned with plot and denouement, but in which he depicts in immortal "types" the foibles and ridiculousness of humanity at large: the Miser, the Misanthrope, the Hypocrite, the Pedantic Woman, the Parvenu, the Quaek
Admiration - They are men wondered at, (Zechariah 3:8) In this sense, the Lord Jesus admired and praised, it may be said, by the notice he took of it, the faith of the centurion, and the faith of the Woman of Canaan
Persecution - The first great persecution for religious opinion of which we have any record was that which broke out against the worshippers of God among the Jews in the days of Ahab, when that king, at the instigation of his wife Jezebel, "a Woman in whom, with the reckless and licentious habits of an Oriental queen, were united the fiercest and sternest qualities inherent in the old Semitic race", sought in the most relentless manner to extirpate the worship of Jehovah and substitute in its place the worship of Ashtoreth and Baal
Deaconess - According to these, a Woman to be admitted to theoffice of Deaconess must be at least twenty-five years of age, acommunicant of the Church, and fit and capable to discharge theduties of the office
Mark - John whose surname was Mark, Acts 12:12, was the son of Mary, a Woman of piety who lived at Jerusalem
Belial (Beliar) - ‘a wicked Woman’ (cf
Julia - The name Julia is very frequently found as a name of female slaves belonging to the Imperial household)...
A Woman saluted by St
Shechem - A well, said to have been dug by his orders, was in existence in Christ’s day, and here at Jacob’s well our Lord had His famous interview with the Samaritan Woman (John 4)
Athaliah - She managed to rule Judah for six years (2 Kings 11:1-4 ), being the only Woman to do so
Tamar - There are some circumstances in the history of this Woman which strike the mind with astonishment
Bethany - (Example the Woman who brought the alabaster box of ointment in Mark 14:3) He wanted them to remember that they must endure the neglect of His children
Truth - In the three Epistles of John 'the truth' is constantly referred to, and a Christian Woman is warned not to receive any one into her house, nor wish him God-speed unless he holds the doctrines taught by the apostles — in other words, 'the truth
Man - ) Especially: An adult male person; a grown-up male person, as distinguished from a Woman or a child
ra'Hab, - (wide ), a celebrated Woman of Jericho who received the spies sent by Joshua to spy out the land, hid them in her house from the pursuit of her countrymen, was saved with all her family when the Israelites sacked the city, and became the wife of Salmon and the ancestress of the Messiah
Dog - The only apparent exception to the above is when the Lord compared the Syrophenician Woman to a dog, and she said, "Yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which fall from their masters' table
Abominable, Abomination - " It is also used of the contents of the golden cup in the hand of the evil Woman described in Revelation 17:4 , and of the name ascribed to her in the following verse
ra'Hab, - (wide ), a celebrated Woman of Jericho who received the spies sent by Joshua to spy out the land, hid them in her house from the pursuit of her countrymen, was saved with all her family when the Israelites sacked the city, and became the wife of Salmon and the ancestress of the Messiah
Concubine - A concubine would generally be either (1) a Hebrew girl bought of her father; (2) a Gentile captive taken in war; (3) a foreign slave bought; or (4) a Canaanitish Woman, bond or free
Lydia - The Woman who bears this name in Acts 16:14 ff. As a seller of purple garments-among the most expensive articles of ancient commerce-Lydia was no doubt a Woman of considerable wealth
Fair - Thou art a fair Woman to look upon. Elliptically, a fair Woman a handsome female
Adam - God said also that it was not good for man to be alone, so He caused him to sleep, took from him a rib, and of this 'builded' a Woman. When questioned by God, Adam laid the blame on Eve, ungratefully saying, "the Woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat
Adam - God said also that it was not good for man to be alone, so He caused him to sleep, took from him a rib, and of this 'builded' a Woman. When questioned by God, Adam laid the blame on Eve, ungratefully saying, "the Woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat
Loose - Woman, thou art loosed from thine infirmity. Wanton unrestrained in behavior dissolute unchaste as a loose man or Woman
Mother (2) - His sympathy with motherhood may be inferred from these incidents, as also from the healing of the daughter of the Canaanitish Woman (Matthew 15:22, Mark 7:26). In nothing is the uniqueness of Jesus more clearly seen than in this kind of reverence for Womanhood, so unexpected in a religious teacher of His time (John 4:27). See Woman
Lydia - The Woman who bears this name in Acts 16:14 ff. As a seller of purple garments-among the most expensive articles of ancient commerce-Lydia was no doubt a Woman of considerable wealth
Hair (2) - The Jews in Poland permit no married Woman to wear her own hair; it must be cropped close before the wedding, and replaced by a high head-dress of wool or silk. It was a shame for a Woman to appear with locks unbound and hair dishevelled. ‘The priest unloosed the hair’ of the suspected Woman, about to be tried by the bitter water, ‘for greater disgrace’ (Sota, fol
Man - In some later passages of Scripture 'âdâm is difficult to distinguish from ‘ish—man as the counterpart of Woman and/or as distinguished in his maleness. A geber denotes a “male,” as an antonym of a “woman”; cf. “The Woman [9] shall not wear that which pertaineth unto a man, neither shall a man [8] put on a Woman’s [9] garment: for all that do so are abomination unto the Lord thy God” ( Woman; a “man” is a person who is distinguished by maleness. …” Sometimes the phrase “man and Woman” signifies anyone whatsoever, including children: “If an ox gore a man or a Woman, that they die: then the ox shall be surely stoned …” ( Woman, young and old, and ox, and sheep, and ass, with the edge of the sword” ( Woman and revered by her: "[12] gave also unto her husband with her: and he did eat. Even if one strikes a Woman or child and he or she dies, the attacker should be put to death
Divorce - Marriage was ordained by God as an intimate and complementing union between a man and a Woman in which the two become one physically, in the whole of life, in its purpose to reflect the relationship of the Godhead, and to serve God. It was not permitted (1) when false accusations were made about a bride's virginity; and (2) when marriage occurred because a man had forcibly violated a Woman sexually. Deuteronomy 24:1-4 prohibited remarriage of a Woman to her first husband after the death or divorce of her second husband. In that culture remarriage would be expected since it was difficult for a Woman to survive in life unless she was married or remained single in her father's house. The text prohibits remarriage to the first husband since the Woman has already been defiled. Adultery would have been punishable by death of the Woman and the second husband, if such had been the case. It does not approve of or encourage divorce or remarriage, although it allows for both, except for remarriage of a Woman to her first husband
Indissolubility of Marriage - When the sacrament of matrimony has been received by a man and a Woman and ratified by their cohabitation as husband and wife, their union cannot be dissolved except by death
Flatter - We flatter a Woman when we praise her children
Eve - Thus she welcomed Cain, as some think, as if he had been the Promised One the "See d of the Woman
Feel, Feeling, Felt - 1: γινώσκω (Strong's #1097 — Verb — ginosko — ghin-oce'-ko ) "to know, perceive," is translated "she felt (in her body)," of the Woman with the issue of blood, Mark 5:29 , i
Marriage, Indissolubility of - When the sacrament of matrimony has been received by a man and a Woman and ratified by their cohabitation as husband and wife, their union cannot be dissolved except by death
Gomer - Still others have believed she was an ordinary Woman who became unfaithful after her marriage to Hosea
Tamar - She is called “a beautiful Woman” (2 Samuel 14:27 )
Transformations of Grace - Grace transforms a villain into an honest man, a harlot into a holy Woman, a thief into a saint
Hem of Garment - The supposed sanctity of the "hem" explains why the Woman with the issue of blood and other sick persons touched Jesus' hem in particular (Matthew 9:20; Matthew 14:36)
Tutor - Then ‘when the fulness of the time came, God sent forth his Son, born of a Woman, born under the law, that he might redeem them which were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons’ (Galatians 4:4)
Well - While surprised that a Jew, even when urged by thirst, should thus accost a Samaritan, the Woman did not deny the Saviour’s request
Endor - That, in this case, the real Samuel appeared is plain both from the affright of the Woman herself, and from the fulfilment of his prophecy
Indignation - ...
B — 1: ἀγανακτέω (Strong's #23 — Verb — aganakteo — ag-an-ak-teh'-o ) "to be indignant, to be moved with indignation" (from agan, "much," achomai, "to grieve"), is translated "were moved with indignation" of the ten disciples against James and John, Matthew 20:24 ; in Mark 10:41 , RV (AV, "they began to be much displeased"); in Matthew 21:15 , of the chief priests and scribes, against Christ and the children, RV, "they were moved with indignation" (AV, "they were sore displeased"); in Matthew 26:8 , of the disciples against the Woman who anointed Christ's feet, "they had indignation;" so Mark 14:4 ; in Mark 10:14 , of Christ, against the disciples, for rebuking the children, "He was moved with indignation," RV (AV, "he was much displeased"); in Luke 13:14 , of the ruler of the synagogue against Christ for healing on the Sabbath, "being moved with indignation," RV, AV, "(answered) with indignation
Millstone - Small stones could be turned by one Woman (mill-grinding was a work deemed fit only for women and slaves; cp
Sarah - She appears to have been a Woman of uncommon beauty, and a most exemplary and devoted wife
Jealousy - A Woman's jealousy is roused by her husband's attentions to another Woman
Deb'Orah - " She was probably a Woman of Ephraim
Polygamy - The circumstances of the patriarchs living in polygamy, and their not being reproved for it, has given occasion for some modern writers to suppose that it is not unlawful: but it is answered that the equality in the number of males and females born into the world intimates the intention of God that one Woman should be assigned to one man; "for (says Dr. It seems also a significant indication of the divine will, that he at first created only one Woman to one man. Paul's writings which speak of marriage, always suppose it to signify the union of one man with one Woman, Romans 7:2-3 . ...
And whatever may be said in behalf of polygamy, when it is authorized by the law of the land, the marriage of a second wife, during the life- time of the first, in countries where such a second marriage is void, must be ranked with the most dangerous and cruel of those frauds by which a Woman is cheated out of her fortune, her person, and her happiness. "When we reflect, " says he, "that the primitive institution of marriage limited it to one man and one Woman; that this institution was adhered to by Noah and his sons, amidst the degeneracy of the age in which they lived, and in spite of the examples of polygamy which the accursed race of Cain had introduced; when we consider how very few (comparatively speaking) the examples of this practice were among the faithful; how much it brought its own punishment with it; and how dubious and equivocal those passages are in which it appears to have the sanction of the divine approbation; when to these reflections we add another, respecting the limited views and temporary nature of the more ancient dispensations and institutions of religion how often the imperfections and even vices of the patriarchs and people of God in old times are recorded, without any express notification of their criminality how much is said to be commanded, which our reverence for the holiness of God and his law will only suffer us to suppose were for wise ends permitted; how frequently the messengers of god adapted themselves to the genius of the people to whom they were sent, and the circumstances of the times in which they lived; above all, when we consider the purity, equity, and benevolence of the Christian law, the explicit declaration of our Lord and his apostle Paul respecting the institution of marriage, its design and limitation; when we reflect, too, on the testimony of the most ancient fathers, who could not possibly be ignorant of the general and common practice of the apostolic church; and, finally, when to these considerations we add those which are founded on justice to the female sex, and all the regulations of domestic aeconomy and national policy, we must wholly condemn the revival of polygamy
ad'am - After this the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon him, and took one of his ribs from him, which he fashioned into a Woman and brought her to the man. By the subtlety of the serpent the Woman who was given to be with Adam was beguiled into a violation of the one command which had been imposed upon them
Adam - Thereafter the Lord caused a deep sleep to fall upon him, and while in an unconscious state took one of his ribs, and closed up his flesh again; and of this rib he made a Woman, whom he presented to him when he awoke. Adam received her as his wife, and said, "This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man
Samaritans - The Woman of Samaria in John 4 alluded to the differences between Jews and Samaritans, and in Luke 9:52,53 it is said of a village of the Samaritans that the inhabitants would not receive the Lord because His face was turned towards Jerusalem. The Woman of Samaria said to the Lord, "Art thou greater than our father Jacob, who gave us the well?" As to their religion, she spoke of 'this mountain' as the proper place to worship; but the Lordsaid, "Ye worship ye know not what: we know what we worship: for salvation is of the Jews
Genealogy of the Lord Jesus - ...
There is more difficulty as to the genealogy in Luke: is it the lineal line of Joseph or Mary? Women are never quoted as forming a line of succession, yet Christ is spoken of as the 'seed' of the Woman, Genesis 3:15 ; 'come of Woman,' Galatians 4:4 ; 'the seed of Abraham,' Hebrews 2:16 ; 'the seed of David according to flesh,' Romans 1:3 ; 2 Timothy 2:8 ; 'the offspring of David
Amen - The first timewe read of its use was when a Woman was supposed to have been unfaithful to her husband and was made to drink the bitter water. The priest pronounced a curse upon her if she had been guilty, and the Woman had to answer Amen, Amen
Gracious, To Be; Show Favor - When a Woman is said to have chên, she is a “gracious” Woman ( ad'am - After this the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon him, and took one of his ribs from him, which he fashioned into a Woman and brought her to the man. By the subtlety of the serpent the Woman who was given to be with Adam was beguiled into a violation of the one command which had been imposed upon them
ad'am - After this the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon him, and took one of his ribs from him, which he fashioned into a Woman and brought her to the man. By the subtlety of the serpent the Woman who was given to be with Adam was beguiled into a violation of the one command which had been imposed upon them
Adam - The name appropriated to the first man, the father of the inhabitants of the world; used, however, sometimes more generally, as in Genesis 5:1-2, where the Woman is included. Paul calls the man "the image and glory of God," on the ground of his being "the head of the Woman
Fall of Man - This positive law he broke by eating the forbidden fruit; first the Woman, then the man: and thus the condition or law of the covenant being broken, the covenant itself was broken. The Woman was enticed by an evil genius, under the semblance of a serpent, as appears from its reasoning the Woman into the transgression of the law, of which a brute beast is incapable
Love - First, the word refers to the love a man has for a Woman and a Woman for a man. Hosea appears to use this nuance when he writes that God told him to “go yet, love a Woman beloved of her friend, yet an adulteress …” (3:1)
Veil - To lift up the veil of a virgin is reckoned a gross insult; but to take away the veil of a married Woman is one of the greatest indignities that she can receive, because it deprives her of the badge which distinguishes and dignifies her in that character, and betokens her alliance to her husband, and her interest in his affections. Their ideas of decency, on the other hand, forbid a virtuous Woman to lay aside or even to lift up her veil in the presence of the other sex. From that moment she is noted as a Woman of easy virtue, and her act is regarded as a signal for intrigue
the Woman With the Issue of Blood - Now, this Woman who overtook Him on the way was not actually dead like the ruler's little daughter, but she often wished she was, for she was worse than dead. "And a certain Woman, which had an issue of blood twelve years, and had suffered many things of many physicians, and had spent all that she had, and was nothing bettered but rather worse-when she heard of Jesus, came in the press behind, and touched the hem of His garment. Sin tries Christ Himself to His utmost, as this Woman's bloody issue tried and found wanting all the best physicians in all the cities round about. Christ could cure a twelve year old issue of blood incidentally, and just by the way, as we say; ere ever He was aware He had healed that Woman of her blood, but not for all her remaining life of her sin. Let us be like this bleeding Woman. This Woman had suffered enough to drive her beside herself for twelve years before she ever thought of the hem of His garment, and she went home that night healed of her plague. Even when you feel completely disenchanted of this scripture and this night and this house; even when you feel shame as you look back at your intensity tonight; even when you feel that this Woman, and Christ, and this church, and the present preacher are all a piece of the same entire dream-still grope after His garment. Now, why was it, did you ever think, that when our Lord healed so thoroughly this Woman's sick body, He did not in an equally immediate, and in an equally thorough way, heal her far more sick soul? Why did He stop short at her blood? Why did He not work a far better cure on her sin? Was it because she was not sick of sin? Was it because she had not come, with all those twelve years, to know the plague of her own heart? Or was it because He did not come the first time to this world with a full salvation? Or was it, and is it, because sin is such a mystery of iniquity that it takes not only both His first and His second comings to heal our souls of sin; but long time, and great labour, and great pain, and great faith, and great prayer on our part also, before even His Divine power can perform and pronounce a perfect cure? Yes, that is it. Even if this Woman had come on a very much better errand than she did come; and with a far better kind of faith and love; even had she come as David and Paul and Luther came all their days; she would only have gone home to a more horrible pit in her own heart than ever, and to a more corrupt and abominable and burdensome body of death than ever, and to a loneliness that the happiest home in Canaan could not have comforted; to a lifelong death indeed, of which her twelve years' issue of blood was but a far off and feeble emblem
Contract - ) The act of formally betrothing a man and Woman
Shunem - She is ‘a great Woman,’ perhaps an heiress, and takes the lead in both stories; by the time of the latter she may have been a widow
Teko'a, - The "wise Woman" whom Joab employed to effect a reconciliation between David and Absalom was obtained from this place
Deborah - ...
...
A prophetess, "wife" (woman?) of Lapidoth
Forehead - The apocalyptic Woman dressed in purple and scarlet had her name written on her forehead (Revelation 17:5 )
Rape - The forcible rape of an engaged Woman was a capital offense (Deuteronomy 22:25-27 )
Tryphaena - (Τρύφαινα, a Greek name)...
Tryphaena is a Woman saluted by St
Help - ) Specifically, a domestic servant, man or Woman
Concubines - Deuteronomy 21:11 gives the root of it: a man saw a beautiful Woman and lusted after her
Compact - Thou pernicious Woman, ...
Compact with her thats gone
Espoused - Upon these occasions there was generally a pledge given from the man to the Woman, as a token of this inviolable contract
Ordinary - Plain not handsome as an ordinary Woman a person of an ordinary form an ordinary face
Wanton - A lewd person a lascivious man or Woman
Ruth - (a female friend ) a Moabitish Woman, the wife, first of Mahlon, second of Boaz, the ancestress of David and Christ,and one of the four women who are named by St
Canticles - This basis is either the marriage of Solomon with Pharoah's daughter or his marriage with an Israelitish Woman, the Shulamite
Past - The loving gift of a forgiven Woman who had been a sinner is still told for a memorial of her (Mark 14:9)
Serapion, Surnamed Sindonites - 685, 686) there is an account of his visit to a lewd Woman, whom he brought to repentance
Dance - The Woman nearest of kin to the champion in some national triumph or thanksgiving, and who had a kind of public character with her own sex, led a choir of women; as Miriam (Exodus 15:1-20) (while Moses led the men), Jephthah's daughter (Judges 11:34), Deborah (Judges 5) (while Barak led the men). ...
The Woman leader usually in the East leads off the dance, and the other women exactly follow her graceful movements
Linen - (See Exodus 22:26-27) And perhaps of that precept, that the "woman should not wear the dress pertaining to a man, neither the man put on the Woman's garment;"‘ (see Deuteronomy 22:5) the reason doth not seem difficult to discover, For in this change of garments, in the first face of it, there is implied somewhat of deception; and when we consider the retirement of Woman in those eastern nations, no man ever. Presuming to appear in the apartments of the women, there seems an evident propriety in this prohibition, lest men, under the garb of a Woman's dress, might get in unperceived among them
Considerateness - ), while by going with Jairus He supports his weak faith, and is beside him when the stunning message reaches him, ‘Thy daughter is dead: why troublest thou the Master any further?’ (Mark 5:35); His whole action in the case of the Woman taken in adultery (John 8:1-11); and His attention to the still deeper need of the Woman with the issue of blood, whose faith, great as it was, required to be adorned with gratitude to, and confession of, her healer (1618388223_32)
Reproach - The unmarried Woman ( Woman without children ( Hate - ” The word, used as a passive participle, represents a spurned Woman: “… An odious [7] Woman when she is married …” ( Elder; Aged - Zâqên (זָקֵן, Strong's #2204, זָקֵן, Strong's #2205), “old man; old Woman; elder; old. A feminine form of zâqên refers to an “old Woman” (zâqênah)
Virgin, Virgin Birth - Some believe the prophet wrote of a son to be born to his wife or to some other Woman of the day and only then with a further reference to the birth of the Messiah. The word itself referred to a young Woman, usually of marriageable age. Mary was a young Woman betrothed (engaged) to Joseph
Issue of Blood - ...
That our Lord’s healing of the sufferer was regarded as memorable and attained to a considerable vogue apart from the NT record, is evidenced by the legend that the votive figure at Bâniâs, supposed to be that of Christ, was erected by this Woman out of gratitude to her Deliverer, and other kindred legends. Our Lord was pressing through the crowd on His way to the house of Jairus, when the Woman, moved by a great expectation of healing, drew near to touch at least the fringe of His garment (in which special sanctity resided), assured that even this slight contact would remove her trouble. The whole nature of the Woman had been roused to activity and hopefulness
Marriage - Adam said, "This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman (isha ), because she was taken out of Man (ish ). ...
All this shows that God's institution of marriage was the union of one man and one Woman, the two and only two, becoming one. ...
It is not now known how the negotiations were conducted that led to a man and Woman being betrothed, or espoused, or what were the ceremonies usually attending it
Beth-Horon - The chronicler preserved an even earlier tradition of a descendant of Ephraim, a Woman named Sherah, building the two cities (1 Chronicles 7:22-24 )
Mill - With the movable upper millstone of the hand-mill the Woman of Thebez broke Abimelech's skull
Maid, Maiden - Unmarried Woman, especially of the servant class. Alternate translations for these terms include: bondmaid; bondwoman; female slave; handmaid; and maid servant
Gomer - Hosea in vision (not in external act, which would be revolting to purity)takes by God's command Gomer to wife, though a Woman "of whoredoms"; symbolically teaching that out of this world, which whorishly has departed from the Lord, God takes a church to be sanctified by communion with Himself in Christ, as Gomer was sanctified by communion with the prophet, (1 Corinthians 7:14)
Babylon - This Babylon is represented as a Woman
Barak - Deborah consented to go, but told Barak that it would not be to his honour; Sisera would fall by the hand of a Woman
Bitterness - Moses says that the man or Woman, family or tribe, that turns from Jahweh will be ‘a root that beareth gall and wormwood’ (ῥίζα ἄνω φύουσα ἐν χολῇ καὶ πικρίᾳ, Deuteronomy 29:18)
Widow - ...
The word represents a Woman who, because of the death of her husband, has lost her social and economic position
Set, Place - 3:15: “And I will put enmity between thee and the Woman
Citizen, Citizenship - ...
Becoming a Citizen Roman citizenship could be gained in several ways: birth to Roman parents, including birth to a Roman Woman without regards to identity of the father; retirement from the army; being freed from slavery by a Roman master; buying freedom from slavery; being given citizenship by a Roman general or emperor as an individual or as part of a political unit; purchase of citizenship
Petrus, a Solitary - Theodoret relates that his mother, when a beautiful young Woman of 23, failing to obtain relief from a malady in her eye from any oculist, was induced by one of her female servants to apply to Peter
Abimelech - When he tried to repeat his tactics against Thebez, a Woman threw a stone down on his head and killed him (Judges 9:23-57 )
Judith, Book of - An Old Testament chronicle which takes its name from the valiant Woman who by her courage, resourcefulness, and confidence in God saved the city of Bethulia from destruction at the hand of Holofernes, general of Nabuchodonosor, king of Ninive
New Testament, Divorce in the - God's will in regard to the important matter of indissolubility of marriage was first revealed to man in Paradise, when God created man and Woman and united them in marriage so that "they shall be two in one flesh" (Genesis 2)
Divorce in the New Testament - God's will in regard to the important matter of indissolubility of marriage was first revealed to man in Paradise, when God created man and Woman and united them in marriage so that "they shall be two in one flesh" (Genesis 2)
Messiah - The expectations of the Jews were thus kept alive from generation to generation, till the "fulness of the times," when Messiah came, "made of a Woman, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law
Mark - He was the son of Mary, a Woman apparently of some means and influence, and was probably born in Jerusalem, where his mother resided (Acts 12:12 )
John, Gospel of Saint - Chapters specially commendable for reading: 1, Prologue, First Disciples; 2, Cana, Cleansing of the Temple; 4, Samaritan Woman; 6, Promise of the Holy Eucharist; 10, Good Shepherd; 11, Raising of Lazarus; 12-18, Discourses after the Last Supper; 20,21, the Risen Lord
Gerizim - To this mountain the Woman of Sychar referred in John 4:20
Shimei - Levite married to a foreign Woman under Ezra (Ezra 10:23 )
Veil - Isaiah 47:2, "take off thy veil," or "thy locks," nature's covering for a Woman (1 Corinthians 11:15), a badge of female degradation
Tekoa - The wise Woman whom Joab suborned to persuade David to restore Absalom belonged to Tekoa (2 Samuel 14)
Penitence - It was necessary before a Woman could be admitted, that she had first committed the sin of the flesh
Settlement - ) That which is bestowed formally and permanently; the sum secured to a person; especially, a jointure made to a Woman at her marriage; also, in the United States, a sum of money or other property formerly granted to a pastor in additional to his salary
Fair - ) A fair Woman; a sweetheart
Husband - ' 'The man of a Woman' signified her husband
Hour - "The Woman was made whole from that hour
Above - ...
The price of a virtuous Woman is above rubies, Proverbs 31
Jealousy, - The Woman was required to drink bitter water, composed of 'holy water,' in which was placed dust from the floor of the tabernacle (type of the Holy Spirit applying what death is, as God's judgement of sin, by the word to the conscience)
Crown - The common ensign of royalty and of victory, 2 Chronicles 23:11 ; it is also used symbolically for honour or reward; as "a virtuous Woman is a crown to her husband
Jael - ...
Great indignation has been expressed at this act of Jael, and even Christians have blamed her severely; but it was foretold that Jehovah would "sell Sisera into the hand of a Woman;" and immediately after the deed, it is added, "So God subdued on that day Jabin the king of Canaan before the children of Israel
Five - ...
...
John 4:18 (c) The five husbands were not enough to satisfy this Woman and to fill her heart with the peace and the joy that she craved
Gospel of Saint John - Chapters specially commendable for reading: 1, Prologue, First Disciples; 2, Cana, Cleansing of the Temple; 4, Samaritan Woman; 6, Promise of the Holy Eucharist; 10, Good Shepherd; 11, Raising of Lazarus; 12-18, Discourses after the Last Supper; 20,21, the Risen Lord
Patriarchs - The distinction between the seed of the Woman and that of the serpent appears in God's revealing Himself to the chosen as He did not to the world; hence their history is typical (Galatians 4:21-31; Hebrews 7:1-7; Matthew 24:37-39; Luke 17:28-32; 1618388223_96)
Loose Conduct - This noun signifies “loose or infamous conduct” and is used most often with regard to illicit sexual conduct: “Thou shalt not uncover the nakedness of a Woman and her daughter, … or her daughter’s daughter, to uncover her nakedness; for they are her near kinswomen: it is wickedness” ( Shut - Sâgar is used for the first time in the Old Testament in the story of the creation of the Woman from the rib of the man: “And the Lord God … closed up the flesh instead thereof” ( Curse, the - Man was not cursed; but the curse fell on the serpent and on the ground: in sorrow man was to eat of the fruit of the ground all the days of his life, and in sorrow was the Woman to bring forth children
Bow, Bowed - ...
3: συγκύπτω (Strong's #4794 — Verb — sunkupto — soong-koop'-to ) "to bow together" (sun, "together with," kupto, "to bow"), is said, in Luke 13:11 , of the Woman crippled with a physical infirmity
Abner - Perhaps he now had some idea of seizing the Israelitish throne for himself; for he appropriated a Woman of Saul's harem, which Ish-bosheth interpreted as an overt act of rebellion
Micah - He proclaims the coming of the Messiah, "whose going forth have been from of old, from everlasting," as the foundation of all hope for the glorious and blessed future he describes; and specifies Bethlehem in Judah as the place where He should be born of Woman, Micah 5:2,3
Philippi - The first convert was Lydia; and the church which at one sprang up here was characterized by the distinguished traits of this generous and true-hearted Christian Woman
Concubine - A barren Woman might offer her maid to her husband hoping she would conceive (Genesis 16:1
Jezebel - When Jehu told them to bury the 'cursed Woman,' it was found that, as foretold by the prophet, the dogs had eaten her, except her skull, her hands and her feet
Pionius, Martyr at Smyrna - ...
When taken to prison, Pionius and his companions, Asclepiades and Sabina, found there already another Catholic presbyter, named Lemnus, and a Montanist Woman named Macedonia
Theophylactus Simocatta - 15), and of a Woman of noble birth among the Magi of Babylon, named Golinducha, her escape, pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and life at Nisibis (v
Water - In John 4:10-15 , part of Jesus' discourse with the Samaritan Woman at the well, he speaks metaphorically of his salvation as "living water" and as "a spring of water welling up to eternal life. "...
In other passages of Scripture, the following are said metaphorically to be "water": God's help (Isaiah 8:6 : "the gently flowing waters of Shiloah" ); God's judgment (Isaiah 28:17 : "water will overflow your hiding place" ); man's words (Proverbs 18:4 : "The words of man's mouth are deep waters" ); man's purposes (Proverbs 20:5 : "The purposes of a man's heart are deep waters" ); an adulterous Woman (Proverbs 9:17 : "Stolen water is sweet" ); and a person's posterity (Isaiah 48:1 : "Listen to this, O house of Jacob, who are called by the name of Israel and have come forth out of the line [1] of Judah" )
Gospel, the, - It was good news to Adam and Eve that the Seed of the Woman should bruise the head of the serpent. There will also be proclaimed THE EVERLASTING GOSPEL to the Gentiles, that which has been from the beginning, that the Seed of the Woman should bruise the serpent's head
Divorce - This state of things, as Moses himself very clearly saw, was not equitable as respected the Woman, and was very often injurious to both parties. It is true, as far as the Mosaic statute or the civil law was concerned, the husband had a right thus to do; but it is equally clear, that the ground of just separation must have been, not a trivial, but a prominent and important one, when it is considered, that he was bound to consult the rights of the Woman, and was amenable to his conscience and his God
Belief, Believe, Believers - " It is translated "believer" in 2 Corinthians 6:15 ; "them that believe" in 1 Timothy 4:12 , RV (AV, "believers"); in 1 Timothy 5:16 , "if any Woman that believeth," lit. , "if any believing Woman
Fornication - The union of a man and a Woman to become ‘one’ means, by definition, that it excludes all others (Genesis 2:24; Matthew 19:5-6). It is part of a total commitment of a man and a Woman to each other in a lifelong relationship (Romans 7:2)
Exclusiveness - When the Syrophœnician Woman, seizing the opportunity presented by His presence in the neighbourhood, appealed to Him to heal her demoniac daughter, He justified Himself at first for refusing by the statement, ‘I am not sent but unto the lost sheep of the house of Israel’ (Matthew 15:24). The apparent coldness of His demeanour toward the Syrophœnician Woman was due to the embarrassing nature of her petition, which required Him to violate the principle by which His conduct had been governed hitherto. The Woman herself did not view it in this light, and her quick wit turned it into an argument in her own favour. The scruples which led Christ to withhold for a moment the help sought, were in the end overcome by the Woman’s faith, which won His cordial approval
Incest - Illicit marital relations between a man and Woman who belong to the same kinship group. Marital relations with the following persons are forbidden: one's mother, father's wife, sister and half-sister, son's daughter, daughter's daughter, step-sister (a possible meaning of Leviticus 18:11 ), father's sister, mother's sister, father's brother's wife, daughter-in-law, brother's wife, wife's mother, and the joint marriage of a Woman and her daughter, a Woman and her son's or daughter's daughter, a Woman and her sister (while the former is still alive, Leviticus 18:18 ), a Woman and her mother
Elisha - ...
A great Woman at Shunem bestowed hospitality on Elisha, and provided a chamber for his use whenever he passed that way. The Woman laid him on Elisha's bed, and hastened to inform him of what had happened, but piously added 'It is well. ' Elisha returned with the Woman, and the child was raised to life and restored to his mother. The famine became so severe that a Woman's child was boiled and eaten. ...
Elisha prophesied that there wouldbe a seven years' famine, and he told the Shunammite Woman to sojourn where she could during the time. He recognised the Woman as the one whose son Elisha had raised, and the king ordered the restoration of her property
Image - 18, ) who says, that in his time there were to be seen two brass statues in the city of Paneas, or Caesarea Philippi; the one of a Woman on her knees, with her arm stretched out; the other of a man over against her, with his hand extended to receive her; these statues were said to be the images of our Saviour, and the Woman whom he cured of an issue of blood. Eusebius, however, vouches none of these things; nay, he supposes that the Woman who erected this statue of our Saviour was a pagan, and ascribes it to a pagan custom
Mary - Jesus seeing his mother, and his beloved disciple near, he said to his mother, "Woman, behold thy son; and to the disciple, Behold thy mother. " No farther particulars of this favoured Woman are mentioned, except that she was a witness of Christ's resurrection. He informs us, also, in the same place, that Jesus, in company with his Apostles, preached the Gospel from city to city; and that there were several women with them, whom he had delivered from evil spirits, and healed of their infirmities; among whom was this Mary, whom some, without a shadow of proof, have supposed to be the sinful Woman spoken of, Luke 7:37-39 ; as others have as erroneously imagined her to be Mary, the sister of Lazarus. Townley's Essays, there is one of considerable research on Mary Magdalene; and his conclusion is, that it is probable that the Woman mentioned by St. There is no doubt but that Mary Magdalene, both in character and circumstances, was a Woman of good reputation
Immanuel - Recent study has pointed to Ahaz's wife as the Woman expected to bear the child and show that God was still with the Davidic royal dynasty even in the midst of severe threat from Assyria
Covering the Head - This led Paul to state that a Woman should cover her head during the worship service
Simon - The Pharisee who was our Lord’s host when the sinful Woman anointed Him ( Luke 7:40 )
Esther - Esther appears in the Bible as a "woman of deep piety, faith, courage, patriotism, and caution, combined with resolution; a dutiful daughter to her adopted father, docile and obedient to his counsels, and anxious to share the king's favour with him for the good of the Jewish people
Quietists - One of the principal patrons and propagators of Quietism in France was Marie Bouveres de la Motte Guyon, a Woman of fashion, and remarkable for her piety
Samson - The first recorded event of his life was his marriage with a Philistine Woman of Timnath (Judges 14:1-5 )
Diadem - ...
Tsaniph or tseniphah is the turban worn by a man ( Job 29:14 ) or Woman (Isaiah 3:23 ) or by the king (Isaiah 62:3 ) or high priest (Zechariah 3:5 )
Mitylene - Mitylene was the home of Alcaeus and of Sappho, ‘an extraordinary person (θαυμαστόν τι χρῆμα), for at no period within memory has any Woman been known at all to be compared to her in poetry’ (Strabo, xiii
Elisabeth - It is interesting to know that she was a kinswoman (συγγενίς, Luke 1:36) of Mary, though it is unfortunately impossible to verify the exact relationship that existed between them. The joy of such a twofold honour was, however, diminished by the fact that she was barren (Luke 1:7), to an Oriental Woman little less than a calamity. On Mary’s appearance she received a special inspiration of the Holy Spirit, which even enabled her to recognize in her kinswoman the mother of her ‘Lord’ (Luke 1:41 ff
Maid - Talîtha seems to have been frequently employed in the sense of ‘young Woman
Spikenard - (Song of Song of Solomon 1:12) —And the Woman who anointed the head of Jesus before his sufferings, is said to have done it with the ointment of spikenard
Carmel - ...
The mountain was afterwards the residence of Elisha, where he was visited by the Shunammite Woman on the death of her child
Physician - A Woman who had spent her all on physicians without relief obtained from Him an immediate cure
Sarah, Sarai, Sara - This is taken up in Galatians 4 as a figure of Christians being children of the free Woman, that is, of Jerusalem which is above, which, says the apostle, is our mother
Crown - ...
A virtuous Woman is a crown to her husband
Term - ) A quadrangular pillar, adorned on the top with the figure of a head, as of a man, Woman, or satyr; - called also terminal figure
Abimelech - Thebez, the next town attacked by him, fell into his hands, but he was mortally wounded by a Woman whilst assaulting the citadel ( Judges 9:50-54 , 2 Samuel 11:21 )
Jezebel - The horrid character of this Woman is strongly marked in the Scriptures, from (1 Kings 15:1 - 1 Kings 22:53; 2 Kings 1:1 - 2 Kings 9:37)
Touch - 3:3 in the Garden of Eden story, where the Woman reminds the serpent that God had said: “Ye shall not eat of [1], neither shall ye touch it
Shechem - Jesus visited the region, preached to a Woman at Jacob's well, and many from Sychar believed on him
Jeiel - He may have married a foreign Woman (1 Chronicles 9:35 ; compare 1 Chronicles 8:29 )
Nazarite - Under the ancient Hebrew law, a man or Woman engaged by a vow to abstain from wine and all intoxicating liquors, and from the fruit of the vine in any form; to let the hair grow; not to enter any house polluted by having a dead body in it, nor to be present at any funeral
Voice - We say, the voice of a man is loud or clear the voice of a Woman is soft or musical the voice of a dog is loud or harsh the voice of a bird is sweet or melodious
Mill - Allusion to one of these is made in ( Matthew 18:6 ) With the movable upper millstone of the hand-mill the Woman of Thebez broke Abimelech's skull
Marvel, Marvellous - have the adjective thaumastos: see C, below), "(no) marvel;" in Revelation 17:6 , RV , "wonder" (AV, "admiration"), said of John's astonishment at the vision of the Woman described as Babylon the Great
Aquila - In due course he married a Woman named Priscilla
Ointment (2) - Luke mentions it in connexion with the anointing of Christ by the unnamed Woman in the house of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:38; Luke 7:46), and again (Luke 23:56) as one of the things prepared by the women for the intended completion of the burial of the Master
Sinners - The Samaritan Woman is a clear case in point, John 4. Thus Peter in Luke 5:8; ‘sinners’ and ‘righteous’ people are placed in antithesis in Matthew 9:13, Mark 2:17, Luke 5:32; in Mark 8:38 the word is associated with μοιχαλίς; so also in the story of the sinful Woman, Luke 7:37 : so in the great parables of Luke 15, and esp
Abimelech - Thence he marched to Thebez, nine miles eastward, and took the town; but when trying to burn the tower was struck on the head by a piece of a millstone cast down by a Woman. Feeling his wound mortal, he was slain by his armorbearer, at his own request, lest it should be said a Woman slew him
Baal, Master - ...
A secondary meaning, “husband,” is clearly indicated by the phrase ba‛al ha-ishshah (literally, “owner of the Woman”). For example: “If men strive, and hurt a Woman with child, so that her fruit depart from her, and yet no mischief follow: he shall be surely punished, according as the Woman’s husband [5] will lay upon him; and he shall pay as the judges determine” ( Adam - The serpent, the Woman, and the man receive their sentences, one of which is the unequal relationship of the man and the Woman as the result of sin
Divination - An evil spirit connected with that oracle possessed this young Woman. The Woman at Endor is usually called a witch. As an example of the meaning of this word we have the Woman at Endor whom Saul consulted: she is said to have had a familiar spirit. Saul at once said to the Woman, "Bring me him up whom I shall name unto thee. " The Woman, as soon as her life was secured by an oath, replied, "Whom shall I bring up unto thee?" Apparently it was her profession to call up departed spirits, but on this occasion she recognised the work of a superior power, for when she saw Samuel she cried with a loud voice. The Woman had reckoned that her familiar demon would personate as usual: hence her fear when God allowed Samuel's spirit in this special instance to appear
Bride - The Jews did not allow marriageable persons to enter into that honourable state without restriction; the high priest was forbidden by law to marry a widow; and the priests of every rank, to take a harlot to wife, a profane Woman, or one put away from her husband. The suitor himself, or his father, sent a messenger to the father of the Woman, to ask her in marriage. An Arabian suitor will offer fifty sheep, six camels, or a dozen of cows: if he be not rich enough to make such offers, he proposes to give a mare or a colt, considering in the offer the merit of the young Woman, the rank of her family, and his own circumstances. " The contract of marriage was made in the house of the Woman's father, before the elders and governors of the city or district. The espousals by money, or a written instrument, were performed by the man and Woman under a tent or canopy erected for that purpose. "He went down," says the historian, "and talked with the Woman," (whom he had seen at Timnath,) "and she pleased him well," Judges 14:7 , &c. These circumstances are distinctly marked in the account which the sacred historian has given us of Samson's marriage: "So his father went down unto the Woman, and made there a feast; for so used the young men to do. The marriage ceremony was commonly performed in a garden, or in the open air; the bride was placed under a canopy, supported by four youths, and adorned with jewels according to the rank of the married persons; all the company crying out with joyful acclamations, "Blessed be he that cometh!" It was anciently the custom, at the conclusion of the ceremony, for the father and mother and kindred of the Woman, to pray for a blessing upon the parties. And in times long posterior to the age of Isaac, when Ruth, the Moabitess, was espoused to Boaz, "all the people that were in the gate, and the elders, said, We are witnesses: the Lord make the Woman that is come into thine house like Rachel, and like Leah, which two did build the house of Israel; and do thou worthily in Ephratah, and be famous in Bethlehem," Ruth 4:11-12
Song of Solomon, Theology of - Thus, when the Woman pleads with the king to take her into his chamber (1:4), this has nothing to do with human lovemaking but rather describes the exodus from Egypt, God's bedroom being the land of Palestine. Thus, the Woman delights in the physical beauty of the man (5:10-16) and vice versa (4:1-15), and this physical attraction culminates in passionate lovemaking (5:1-2). Since Adam had no suitable partner, God created Eve, and the man and the Woman stood naked in the garden and felt no shame (Genesis 2:25 ), exulting in one another's "flesh" (Genesis 2:23-24 )
Gerizim - Gerizim lies in its being the mountain to which the Woman of Samaria referred on the occasion when Jesus uttered His memorable words, ‘Woman, believe me, the hour cometh, when ye shall neither in this mountain, nor yet at Jerusalem, worship the Father’ (John 4:21). ...
In order to understand the significance of the question which the Woman put to Jesus at the well (John 4:20), it is necessary to remember that she must have been well instructed in the notable history of Mt
Desert, Wilderness - ...
In Revelation 12:1; Revelation 12:14 ‘the Woman clothed with the sun’ has a place prepared for her in the wilderness, whither she flees from before the dragon, while in 17:3 the seer is carried to the wilderness to see the ‘woman sitting upon a scarlet-coloured beast, full of names of blasphemy. ’ The thought behind the former reference, of the wilderness as a place of refuge for the Woman, may be taken from the history of the Jews who fled from Pharaoh to the wilderness, but there may be no more than the general idea of the wilderness as a place of refuge and concealment, so amply illustrated in the life of David
Wells And Springs - Close at hand is mount Gerizim, which the Woman of Sychar no doubt glanced at as she said, "Our fathers worshipped in this mountain. " The Woman intimated that the well was "deep," and had no steps. As the traveler stands by this venerated well and thinks of the long series of men of a hundred nations and generations who have drunk of its waters, thirsted again, and died, he is most forcibly affected by the truth of Christ's words to the Samaritan Woman, and made to feel his own perishing need of the water "springing up into everlasting life," John 4:1-54
Annunciation, the - Luke did not get his information direct from Mary herself, the person who passed on the mysterious story from her to the Evangelist was almost certainly a Woman. Mary would be much more likely to tell it to a Woman than to a man; and, in spite of her habitual reticence, she would, after Joseph’s death, be likely to confide it to some one. Luke derived the information respecting Mary either from herself, or from a Woman to whom she had confided it, is confirmed by the characteristics of these first two chapters of his Gospel. 258) says: ‘The colouring of a Woman’s memory and a Woman’s view is unmistakable in the separate features of this history. 88) says: ‘There is a Womanly spirit in the whole narrative which seems inconsistent with the transition from man to man. 297) agrees that the narrative came not only from a Woman, but through a Woman, and he thinks that Joanna, the wife of Chuza, steward to Herod Antipas (Luke 8:2-3; Luke 24:10; cf. Finally, she committed the sacred mystery to another Woman, or to a small group of women; and from them it passed to St. Luke should be the Evangelist to receive this Womanly story of women is not surprising. Besides those in the first two chapters, we have the widow at Nain, the sinner in Simon’s house, Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Susanna, the Woman with the issue, Martha and Mary, the Woman bowed down for eighteen years, the widow with her two mites, the daughters of Jerusalem, and the women at the tomb. And he alone gives us the parable of the Woman and the Lost Coin. We may believe that he was one in whom a Woman might naturally confide. Luke everything is grouped round Mary and her kinswoman Elisabeth, in St. He intimates that there is to be close relationship between Elisabeth’s son and her own, and directs her to her kinswoman for confirmation and sympathy. Just as the prophet (John the Baptist) who was to renovate Israel was taken from the old priesthood, so the Christ who was to redeem the whole of mankind was not created out of nothing, but ‘born of a Woman
Quakers - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Quakers, Fighting - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Quakers, Free - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Friends - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Friends, Hicksite Society of - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Friends of Truth - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Children of Light - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Friends, Orthodox Society of - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Friends, Wilburite Orthodox Conservative - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Children of Truth - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Fighting Quakers - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Free Quakers - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Orthodox Society of Friends - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Light, Children of - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Mormons - The Reorganized Church repudiates the revelation of plural marriage and maintains that the law of God provides for but one companion in wedlock for either man or Woman
Latter Day Saints - The Reorganized Church repudiates the revelation of plural marriage and maintains that the law of God provides for but one companion in wedlock for either man or Woman
Jael - The writer of the Song of Deborah records an act which, though base, resulted in putting the seal to the Israelite victory, and thus contributed to the recovery of Israel from a ‘mighty oppression’ ( Judges 4:3 ); in the exultation over this result the Woman who helped to bring it about by her act is extolled
French Revolution - An altar was raised to the Goddess of Reason in Notre Dame, the goddess a Woman of low character
Sheba - While Joab was engaged in laying siege to this city, Sheba's head was, at the instigation of a "wise Woman" who had held a parley with him from the city walls, thrown over the wall to the besiegers, and thus the revolt came to an end
Deacon - "It occurs in the NT of domestic servants, John 2:5,9 ; the civil ruler, Romans 13:4 ; Christ, Romans 15:8 ; Galatians 2:17 ; the followers of Christ in relation to their Lord, John 12:26 ; Ephesians 6:21 ; Colossians 1:7 ; 4:7 ; the followers of Christ in relation to one another, Matthew 20:26 ; 23:11 ; Mark 9:35 ; 10:43 ; the servants of Christ in the work of preaching and teaching, 1 Corinthians 3:5 ; 2 Corinthians 3:6 ; 6:4 ; 11:23 ; Ephesians 3:7 ; Colossians 1:23,25 ; 1 Thessalonians 3:2 ; 1 Timothy 4:6 ; those who serve in the churches, Romans 16:1 (used of a Woman here only in NT); Philippians 1:1 ; 1 Timothy 3:8,12 ; false apostles, servants of Satan, 2 Corinthians 11:15
Simon - The third was the owner of a house where a Woman anointed Jesus just before his death (Matthew 26:6)
Miss - The title of a young Woman or girl as little masters and misses
Preadamite - " It is also clear from Genesis 3:20 , where it is said, that "Adam called his wife's name Eve, because she was the mother of all living, " that is, she was the source and root of all men and women in the world; which plainly intimates that there was no other Woman that was such a mother
Mistakes: Our Aptness to Make - Alas, for our friend's happiness during the whole of the next twenty-four hours! The motion of the carriage made him miss his aim, and the bottle fell on the head of the Woman instead of into her basket
Artemis - In Ephesus and western Asia Minor she was portrayed as a more mature Woman
Ruth, Book of - ...
Ruth is mentioned in Matthew 1:5 , and in her and in Rahab we have a Moabitess and a Woman of Canaan in the genealogy of Christ
Ishmael - Ishmael married an Egyptian Woman, and dwelt in the wilderness, Genesis 16:12; he was distinguished for lawless predatory habits, as his descendants have always been
Hicksite Society of Friends - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Eve - (1 Timothy 2:13-14) uses the story of the Fall for the purpose of proving Woman’s natural inferiority to man. He remarks that man was not beguiled, but that ‘the Woman’-a word spoken with the same accent of contempt as in Genesis 3:12 -being beguiled, fell into transgression
Hypatia, Lady in Alexandria - This then was the Woman upon whom malicious envy now made its attack
Gall - " (Acts 8:23) Moses, describing the apostacy of any man or Woman, or family, or tribe in Israel, calls it, "the root that beareth gall and wormwood
Ampliatus - A Woman is saluted-perhaps with intentional delicacy-as ‘Persia the beloved’ (Romans 16:12)
Elagabalus, Emperor - 21), speaks of her as a Woman of exceptional piety ( γυνὴ θεοσεβεστάτη εἰ καὶ τις ἄλλη γεγονυία ), and we may trace her influence in the character of her son Alexander Severus
Cain - He was the first man who had been a child, and the first man born of Woman
Bond - " So in Luke 13:16 , of the infirmity of the Woman who was bowed together
Society of Friends (Orthodox) - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Truth, Children of - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Truth, Friends of - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Religious Society of Friends of Philadelphia - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Wilburite Orthodox Conservative Friends - Monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings, purely business organizations, are held, and Woman is absolutely equal with man in Friends' polity
Children - The apostle Paul speaks of them as fruits and evidences of the fall; but assures those who abide in faith, that, amid all the suffering that reminds them that Woman was first in the transgression, Genesis 3:16 , they may yet look trustfully to God for acceptance and salvation, 1 Timothy 2:15
Revolution, French - An altar was raised to the Goddess of Reason in Notre Dame, the goddess a Woman of low character
Wise - Skilled in hidden arts a sense somewhat ironical as the wise Woman of Brainford
Ethiopia - During Israel’s journey from Egypt to Canaan, Moses married an Ethiopian Woman, probably after his first wife had died (Numbers 12:1)
Border - When Jesus was on His way to heal Jairus’ little daughter, a certain Woman who had an issue of blood twelve years came behind Him and touched the ‘border’ (‘hem’) of His garment (τοῦ κρασπέδου τοῦ ἱματίου) and was healed (Matthew 9:20-22, Luke 8:44, Mark 6:56). The ‘tassel’ attached to this corner, then, could be reached with ease from behind, as in the case of the Woman with the issue of blood (Matthew 9:20)
Southcotters - It is said they looked upon Joanna to be the bride, the Lamb's wife; and that as man fell by a Woman, he will be restored by a Woman
Elisha - Who has not been moved by the story of the Shunammite Woman and her son? This barren Woman and her husband who had graciously opened their home to the prophet had in turn been given a son by the Lord
Sam'Son - " He married a Philistine Woman whom he had seen at Timnath. Next he formed his fatal connection with Delilah, a Woman who lived in the valley of Sorek
Boasting - Jesus told the Woman at the well that the Father seeks our worship (John 4:23 ). ...
The Scriptures encourage us to engage in proper boasting or praise of other human beings: "Let another praise you, and not your own mouth" (Proverbs 27:2 ); "a Woman who fears the Lord is to be praised" (Proverbs 31:30 )
Gift - John 3:16), others that He meant the unique opportunity the Woman now had of gaining religious enlightenment from Him; and the two ideas blend in His words. If the Woman but knew ‘the gift of God,’ that fount of the living Spirit which, springing up within, and independent of Samaritan books of the Law, is the assurance of eternal life (Jeremiah 17:14), and if she could but recognize the supremacy of love and spiritual power in Him who was speaking, then she would not hesitate to ask an infinitely greater gift than He had asked of her
Levirate Law - In stating their problem they brought forward a case of seven brothers who one after the other married the same Woman. ...
The problem propounded by the Sadducees may be thus stated:—The Levirate law was enacted by Moses, and there was a case of seven brothers who in obedience to it married, one after the other, the same Woman, who herself died after the death of the last of the seven
Courtesy - ...
There are two instances where Jesus seems to fail in the matter of courtesy—in His reply to His mother, ‘Woman, what have I to do with thee?’ (John 2:4), and in His reply to the Syro-Phœnician Woman, ‘Let the children first be filled: for it is not meet to take the children’s bread, and to cast it unto the dogs’ (Matthew 15:26 || Mark 7:27)
Hannah - Those of you who are living in the same house with a Woman like Peninnah, you could best picture to us poor Hannah's life. The sacred writer does not keep us long in Peninnah's company: he hastens past Peninnah to tell us about Hannah, that sorely-fretted and sequestered Woman, who waters her couch with her tears. And little do we think-only one here and there has the power and the will, the mind and the heart so to think-how we plunge this man and that Woman into a lifetime of deadly sin just by the way we provoke them to anger at us. If you could see into this man's and that Woman's heart, it would frighten you for once. Exercise, I implore you, all your powers of imagination to put yourself in the place of that man or Woman you so fret and provoke. Let God hide us all in the secret of His presence from the pride of men! Let Him keep us secretly in His pavilion from the strife of tongues!...
Well, it was all that: it was Hannah's diabolical ill-usage at her adversary's hands, and it was still more, her own wicked and revengeful heart at her ill-usage: it was all that that made that saintly Woman absolutely drunk sometimes with her sorrow. Hannah was a saint; but she was a Woman-saint; and hence her reeling heart. But something would happen in the household that would soon show that even Shiloh had made Hannah nothing better but rather worse; for her chastised and well-bridled tongue would all of a sudden break out again till, had it been in Greece or in Rome, she would have been called a fury rather than a Woman and a saint. The milk of human kindness, not to say of Womanhood, would suddenly turn to burning brimstone in Hannah's bosom. You will charge me with mocking you, and with an abuse of sacred words, when I call such a Woman a saint
Fall - It tells how the first man and Woman, living in childlike innocence and happiness in the Garden of Eden, were tempted by the subtle serpent to doubt the goodness of their Creator, and aim at the possession of forbidden knowledge by tasting the fruit of the one tree of which they had been expressly charged not to eat. Their transgression was speedily followed by detection and punishment; on the serpent was laid the curse of perpetual enmity between it and mankind; the Woman was doomed to the pains of child-bearing: and the man to unremitting toil in the cultivation of the ground, which was cursed on account of his sin. ...
(1) The story offers, on the face of it, an explanation of the outstanding ills that flesh is heir to: the hard, toilsome lot of the husbandman, the travail of the Woman and her subjection to man, the universal fate of death. The process by which these evil thoughts are insinuated into the mind of the Woman is described with a masterly insight into the psychology of temptation which is unsurpassed in literature
Child, Children - a punishment inflicted by God, and involving, for the Woman, disgrace in the eyes of the world. ‘He maketh the barren Woman to keep house and to be a joyful mother of children’ ( Psalms 113:9 ), cries the Psalmist as the climax of his praise. Our Lord refers to the joy of a Woman at the birth of a man into the world ( John 16:21 )
Good - Why trouble ye the Woman, for she hath ...
wrought a good work on me. In the phrases, the good man, applied to the master of the house,and good Woman, applied to the mistress, good sometimes expresses a moderate degree of respect, and sometimes slight contempt. The good Woman never died after this, till she came to die for good and all
Clean, To Be - Though conception and birth were not branded immoral (just as dying itself was not sinful), a Woman who had borne a child remained unclean until she submitted to the proper purification rites (Lev. Chapter 15 of Leviticus prescribes ceremonial cleansing for a Woman having her menstrual flow, for a man having seminal emissions, and for “the Woman also with whom man shall lie with seed of copulation” ( Shechem - In its vicinity was Jacob's well or fountain, at which Christ discoursed with the Woman of Samaria, John 4:5 . This is situated at a small distance from the town, in the road to Jerusalem, and has been visited by pilgrims of all ages, but particularly since the Christian era, as the place where our Savior revealed himself to the Woman of Samaria. The journey of our Lord from Judea into Galilee; the cause of it; his passage through the territory of Samaria; his approach to the metropolis of this country; its name; his arrival at the Amorite field which terminates the narrow valley of Sychem; the ancient custom of halting at a well; the female employment of drawing water; the disciples sent into the city for food, by which its situation out of the town is obviously implied; the question of the Woman referring to existing prejudices which separated the Jews from the Samaritans; the depth of the well; the oriental allusion contained in the expression, living water;' the history of the well, and the customs thereby illustrated; the worship upon Mount Gerizim; all these occur within the space of twenty verses
Miriam - Only perform thy part well, and wherever this gospel shall be preached in the whole world, there shall this also that thou art doing be told for a memorial of thee!...
What a witty little Woman did Moses sister prove herself to be that day! If it was all out of her own head, what a quick-witted little prophetess she was already! 'Shall I go and call to thee a nurse of the Hebrew women, that she may nurse the child for thee?' And then, ye mothers among us, what amazing self-control that was in God-my-glory, the mother of Miriam and Moses. ...
But for her brother's marriage, Miriam would have been the sovereign Woman in all Israel for all her days. Miriam was the first famous Woman in Israel who had borne the honourable and universal name of a mother in Israel. But Moses' marriage made Miriam as weak and as evil and as wicked as any weak and evil and wicked Woman in all the camp. Set me as a seal upon thine heart! Miriam cried to Moses, in a storm of tears, when she saw the Ethiopian Woman coming to take her place. I would know then whether the Lord God had made that Ethiopian Woman an help meet for Moses. Only, I know that the thoughts of no Woman's heart in all Israel were more revealed all that week than the thoughts of that Ethiopian Woman, Moses much-injured wife
Apocalypse - ...
It is an expanded illustration of the first great promise, "The seed of the Woman shall bruise the head of the serpent
Shame And Honor - ...
The reference to the man and Woman in Genesis 2:25 being naked and unashamed likely does not highlight that they were not bashful
Sychar - The main objection to this is the presence of a copious spring, more than sufficient to supply the village; while from John 4:15 we learn that the Woman of Sychar was accustomed to go ‘all the way’ (RV Etam - Into a cleft of it Samson retired after slaying the Philistines for burning the Timnite Woman who was to have been his wife (Judges 15:8; Judges 15:11-19)
Head - Christ is the head of the Church ( Ephesians 4:15 , Colossians 1:18 ; Colossians 2:19 ), as man is of the Woman ( Ephesians 5:23 )
Divorce - In these cases the Woman receives again only what she brought
Ahimaaz - They narrowly escaped Absalom's servants at Bahurim, the Woman of the house hiding them in a well's mouth, over which she spread a covering with ground grain on it, and telling the servants what was true in word, though misleading them: "they be gone over the brook of water
Far - Who can find a virtuous Woman? for her price is far above rubies
Help - A hired man or Woman a servant
Archelaus - He was the elder of the two sons of Herod the Great by Malthace, a Samaritan Woman (Josephus BJ i
Family (Jewish) - Betrothal (Matthew 1:18), as a covenant, was equivalent to marriage; it prevented the Woman from being married to any other man until she had received a writing of divorce
Adoption - (Ephesians 1:5) And the purpose for which Christ is said to be made of a Woman, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law was, that they might receive the adoption of sons
Emmanuel - Jerome makes a nice distinction on this ground, between the ordinary word, Bethula, a young Woman, and Almah, a virgin
Sechem - Here Joseph's bones were brought out of Egypt to be interred; and on the same piece of ground was the well called Jacob's well, at which our Saviour sat down when he had the memorable conversation with the Woman of Samaria, John 4, which caused her, and many other inhabitants of Sechem, or Sychar, as it is there called, to receive him as the Messiah
Dreams - Saul, before the battle of Gilboa, consulted a Woman who had a familiar spirit, "because the Lord would not answer him by dreams, nor by prophets," 1 Samuel 28:6-7
Read - Who is't can read a Woman? ...
6
Tail - Estates tail are general or special general, where lands and tenements are given to one, and to the heirs of his body begotten special, where the gift is restrained to certain heirs of the donee s body, as to his heirs by a particular Woman names
Concubine - The practice was contrary to God’s plan for marriage (namely, one man and one Woman united for life, to the exclusion of all others; see MARRIAGE), but human society had moved far away from God’s plan (Romans 1:20-32)
Possession (2) - (John 4:28) tells us of the Samaritan Woman, in the excitement of her new-found joy, ‘leaving her water-pot,’ he uses the words τὴν ὑδρίαν, pointing doubtless to just such a portable earthen water-pot as women in Palestine are everywhere to-day seen carrying on their heads
Healing, Divine - Speaking to the Woman who was hemorrhaging Jesus said, “thy faith hath made three whole” (Mark 5:34 ; compare Matthew 9:29 ). Healing also seems to have occurred as people touched either Jesus or His garments: the Woman with the hemorrhage (Mark 5:27 ,Mark 5:27,5:29 ), and at other times in His ministry (Mark 6:56 )
Shekinah - with Matthew 18:20 and 1 Corinthians 11:11 , sayings such as ‘when two sit together and are occupied with the words of the Law, the Shekinah is with them,’ or ‘the man is not without the Woman, nor the Woman without the man, nor both of them without the Shekinah
Immanuel - "Behold (arresting attention to the extraordinary prophecy) a (Hebrew: the) virgin (primarily the Woman (the foreappointed mother of the Messiah is ultimately meant by the Spirit); then a virgin, soon to become the prophet's second wife) shall conceive and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel . the Lord hath created a new thing in the earth, a Woman shall compass a man
Uncleanness - ...
Ceremonial cleansing, including the offering of sacrifices, was necessary for a Woman after childbirth. Where a Woman suffered lengthy or otherwise abnormal discharge, sacrifices also were required (Leviticus 15:16-33)
Women - He gave the ultimate responsibility for leadership to the man, but when sin entered the human race, the man misused his position to dominate the Woman (Genesis 3:16). Paul saw in it a reflection of the Woman’s role in God’s order for church and society (1 Corinthians 11:3; 1 Corinthians 11:7-9), though he did not see it as meaning that she was inferior to the man (1 Corinthians 11:11-12). He himself acknowledged that at times a Woman may have a more prominent teaching role than her husband (Acts 18:2; Acts 18:26; Romans 16:3-4; 2 Timothy 4:19)
Jezebel - Jezebel is referred to in the NT in Revelation 2:20 : ‘I have somewhat against thee, because thou dost tolerate the Woman Jezebel who calleth herself a prophetess, and teacheth my servants to commit fornication and to eat of things offered to idols and leadeth them astray. ]'>[1] The passage goes on to say that her misdoing was of some standing, that the Woman gave no sign of amending her ways, and that therefore she and her companions in sin would be cast into a bed, or triclinium, defined as great affliction, while her children would be smitten with death
Strength - ” This word can also represent the domestic skills of a Woman—Ruth is described as a Woman of ability and, therefore, either potentially or actually a good wife (Ruth 3:11; Touch - By a touch, recorded in its stronger form of grasp or imposition of hands, He healed one deaf and dumb (Mark 7:33), the blind man at Bethsaida (Mark 8:22-26), a Woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13:13), the epileptic lad (Mark 9:27), many divers diseases (Mark 6:5), and the dead daughter of Jairus (Matthew 9:25). ‘A Woman … came in the crowd behind and touched his garment. With these may be associated the act of the Woman in Simon’s house, who washed Christ’s feet with tears, and anointed them with ointment, and of whom the Pharisee said later, ‘This man, if he were a prophet, would have perceived who and what manner of Woman this is which toucheth him’ (Luke 7:39). —The most vivid instance of this is in the story above referred to of the Woman with an issue of blood, where, in the different Gospels, no less than four Greek words are used to depict the thronging of the multitude, so finely distinguished from the significant touch of faith which brought healing to the sufferer
Silence - When the Syrophœnician Woman pleads with Jesus to cure her daughter, He answers her not a word. Those of the Woman reflect the universality of the gospel. See Syrophœnician Woman. When confronted with the Woman, Jesus is silent, stoops down, and writes upon the ground. He is filled with pity and sorrow for the Woman who has lost the virgin glory of her Womanhood, and with indignation against the men whose shameless indelicacy in exposing her fault shows that they utterly fail to realize in what the true gravamen of her offence consists. ’ The rebuke strikes home, the sense of shame flushes their cheeks, and the Woman’s accusers silently steal away
Heracleon, a Gnostic - 40) that our Lord tarried with the Samaritans, not in them; notice is taken of the point in our Lord's discourse with the Woman of Samaria, where He first emphasizes His assertion with "Woman, believe Me"; and though Origen occasionally accuses Heracleon of deficient accuracy, for instance in taking the prophet (i. He finds mysteries in the numbers in the narrative—in the 46 years which the temple was in building, the 6 husbands of the Woman of Samaria (for such was his reading), the 2 days our Lord abode with the people of the city, the 7th hour at which the nobleman's son was healed. As he finds the ψυχικοί represented in the nobleman's son, so again he finds the πνευματικοί in the Woman of Samaria. In fact he does not use the word aeon in the sense employed by other Valentinian writers but rather where according to their use we should expect the word Pleroma; and this last word he uses in a special sense describing the spiritual husband of the Samaritan Woman as her Pleroma—that is the complement which supplies what was lacking to perfection
Fall, the - The relationship of harmony and trust between God and them, between man and Woman, between them and the cosmos, as represented by the serpent, was ruptured. ...
First, God declared that enmity was to exist between Satan and the seed of the Woman. A mortal blow would be struck by the seed of the Woman, who would suffer in delivering it. He would undo the fall by providing full redemption and restoration through the mediatorial work of the seed of the Woman, his incarnate Son, Jesus Christ, who would serve as the second Adam
Mary, the Virgin - ), which makes Mary a Woman of the tribe of Levi, is clearly an erroneous inference from the relationship between her and Elisabeth (cf. ’ Soon after (‘in these days,’ Luke 1:39) the departure of the angel, Mary set out to pay the visit to her kinswoman, which his words would naturally suggest to her. Rather, as it has been said, ‘the first but the ever-deepening desire in the heart of Mary, when the angel left her, must have been to be away from Nazareth, and for the relief of opening her heart to a Woman, in all things like-minded, who perhaps might speak blessed words to her’ (Edersheim, Life and Times, i. She arose with haste and set out to seek that relief in the house of her kinswoman in the far-off hills of Judah. ...
When Mary reached her kinswoman’s house, a fresh surprise awaited her in the greeting of Elisabeth: ‘Blessed art thou among women. ’ No longer is Mary to Elisabeth simply ‘kinswoman,’ she is ‘the mother of my Lord. Mary remained with her kinswoman in Judah ‘about three months,’ probably waiting (cf. She is mentioned by the unknown Woman out of the multitude (Luke 11:27), ‘Blessed is the womb that bare thee, and the breasts that thou didst suck. It is not a little remarkable, in view of later developments, that no fewer than three of these allusions seem to guard against an undue feeling of veneration for the mother of our Lord, In the story of the feast at Cana, His words, though not wanting in respect, ‘show that the actions of the Son of God, now that He has entered on His Divine work, are no longer dependent in any way on the suggestion of a Woman, even though that Woman be His mother. ’ These two scenes at Cana and Capernaum belong to the beginning of the Ministry, and similarly, almost at its close, we have Christ’s words, during the last journey from Galilee to Jerusalem, in answer to the saying of the Woman above mentioned, ‘Yea, rather (μενοῦν), blessed are they that hear the word of God and keep it (Luke 11:28). ’ This adds to and corrects the Woman’s words
Hannah - " After the child was weaned (probably in his third year) she brought him to Shiloh into the house of the Lord, and said to Eli the aged priest, "Oh my lord, I am the Woman that stood by thee here, praying unto the Lord
Simon - ...
...
A Pharisee in whose house "a Woman of the city which was a sinner" anointed our Lord's feet with ointment (Luke 7:36-38 )
Bethany - Late on the Tuesday night of Jesus' last week, a Woman (recognized as Mary in John 12:3 ) gave Jesus His “burial anointment
Gerizim And Ebal - The small Samaritan community continues to worship on Gerizim today, just as they did in Jesus' lifetime when He met the Samaritan Woman drawing water from Jacob's well
Ruler - In Asia Minor there is evidence that the title was one of honour, and therefore could be held by more than one person simultaneously; there is a case known of even a Woman bearing this title at Smyrna
Deuterocanonical - 22: and the history of the adulterous Woman in St
Gehazi - His messenger to the Shunammite Woman (2 Kings 4); suggested the obtaining of a son from the Lord for her, as a meet reward for her kindness to the prophet
Handmaid - Still it must always have been easy for an Oriental Woman to call herself ‘the handmaid’ of Deity
Impossibility - The command over nature displayed in the stilling of the storm (Mark 4:39) and in the healing of the Woman with the issue of blood (Matthew 9:21, Mark 5:28) is at the service of faith and prayer
Bands - ...
Ecclesiastes 7:26 (b) This is a figure of the tremendous, attractive power of the evil Woman who holds in the chains of sin those who yield to her evil attractions
Abner - Saul had had a concubine named Rizpah, and this Woman Abner took; for which he was reproached by Ish-bosheth (who probably thought it was a prelude to his seizing the kingdom)
Glory - , distinction]'>[5]; for the Lord shall sell Sisera into the hand of a Woman
Commodus - The epithet by which he describes her as a "God-loving Woman" may be, as Dr
Sun - To “see the sun” is “to live”: “… Like the untimely birth of a Woman, that they may not see the sun” ( Gerizim - It is certain, that, in our Saviour's time, this temple was in being; and that the true God was worshipped there, since the Woman of Samaria, pointing to Gerizim, said to him, "Our fathers worshipped in this mountain, and ye say, that in Jerusalem is the place where men ought to worship," John 4:20
Dan - One naturally associates 'the adder that biteth the heels' with the serpent that would bruise the heel of the seed of the Woman
Indeed - g, Matthew 15:27 , RV, "for even," instead of the AV "yet;" the Woman confirms that her own position as a Gentile "dog" brings privilege, "for indeed the dogs, etc
Serpents - Besides, it cannot be doubted but that by the serpent we are to understand the devil, who employed the serpent as a vehicle to seduce the first Woman, Genesis 3:13 2 Corinthians 11:3 Revelation 12:9
Justinus - The third, or female principle, identified with the earth, is called Eden and Israel, destitute of knowledge and subject to anger, of a double form, a Woman above the middle, a snake below
Majorianus, Julius Valerius - 33) states that Leo the Great forbad a Woman taking the veil before 60 years of age, or according to a various reading 40, and that the 19th canon of the council of Agde (Mansi, viii
Jehoash - This Woman, Athaliah, the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, then established her parents’ Baalism in Judah
Omniscience - On the other hand, in His discourse with Nathanael and with the Woman of Samaria, He showed supernatural knowledge
Stranger - ...
The ‘strange Woman’ of Proverbs 2:16 etc. has the same technical sense as ‘foreign Woman’ with which it stands in parallelism, viz
Thirst - Early in His public ministry, as He was journeying back from Judaea to Galilee, leaving the former country as a result of Pharisaic hostility, the writer of the Fourth Gospel notices that Jesus suffered the pangs of thirst, and records His request for a drink of water from the Samaritan Woman as she came to draw water from ‘Jacob’s spring’ (πηγὴ τοῦ Ἰακώβ, John 4:6). In His conversation with the Woman of Samaria He characteristically emphasizes His teaching by the details in her drawing of the water from the fountain
Feet (2) - It is employed in phrases which express worthlessness (‘to be trodden under foot,’ Matthew 5:13), supplication (‘fell at his feet,’ Mark 5:22; Mark 7:25), great honour or reverence (Luke 7:38-46 the Woman who kissed Jesus’ feet; John 11:2 Mary; Matthew 28:9 ‘held him by the feet’), ignorant or blasphemous contempt (Matthew Mat_7:6 ‘trample under foot’), righteous condemnation or rejection (Matthew 10:14 ‘shake dust off feet’), salvation through sacrifice (Matthew 18:8 || Mark 9:45 cutting off hand or foot), discipleship (Luke 8:35 cured demoniac sitting at Jesus’ feet; Luke 10:39 Mary), helplessness (Matthew 22:13 ‘bind hand and foot’), complete triumph (Matthew 22:44, Mark 12:36 || Luke 20:43 enemies of Messianic King put under His feet), absolute safety (Matthew 4:6 || Luke 4:11 ‘lest thou dash thy foot against a stone’), subjection (Matthew 5:35 earth the footstool of God’s feet). Neglectful of the courtesies of a host, Simon the Pharisee gave Him no water to refresh His feet (Luke 7:44); but a sinful Woman on the same occasion wet His feet with her tears, wiped them with the hair of her head, kissed them, and anointed them with ointment (Luke 7:38; Luke 7:44 ff
Garments - The costume of the men and women was very similar; there was sufficient difference, however, to mark the sex, and it was strictly forbidden to a Woman to wear the staff, signet-ring, and other ornaments of a man; as well as to a man to wear the outer robe of a Woman
Salutations - The Woman who was afflicted with an issue of blood touched the hem of his garment, and the Syro-Phenician Woman fell down at his feet
Beauty - Among these may be mentioned the conversation with the Samaritan Woman at Jacob’s well (John 4), the blessing of the little children that were almost sent away (Matthew 19:13 ff. ); the humble insistency of the Syro-Phœnician Woman (Mark 7:26 ff. ); the act of the sinful Woman who bathed His feet with her tears (Luke 7:44), and of her also who unsealed, as for His burial, the alabaster vase of precious ointment (John 12:7)
Dropsy - In Numbers 5:21-22 part of the punishment inflicted on the guilty Woman was a dropsical swelling (cf. ...
Like the story of the healing of the Woman with the crooked spine, told in the preceding section, it furnishes a vivid illustration of the way in which the protracted controversy about the Sabbath rest was conducted by Jesus against the Pharisaic sabbatarians of His time (cf. A very similar instance is observed when He compared the Woman with the diseased spine to the animal which, tied to his stall, required to be loosed therefrom even on the Sabbath day for his daily watering (Luke 13:15; ‘congrnenter hydropicum animali quod cecidit in puteum comparavit; humore enim laborabat,’ Augustine, Quaest
Marriage - The union for life of one man and one Woman, is an ordinance of the Creator for the perpetuity and happiness of the human race; instituted in Paradise, Genesis 1:27-28 2:18-24 , and the foundation of no small part of all that is valuable to human society. God made originally but one man and one Woman. These seven days of rejoicing were commonly spent in the house of the Woman's father, after which they conducted the bride to her husband's home. Nowhere in the world is Woman so honored, happy, and useful as in a Christian land and a Christian home
Phoebe - (Φοίβη, a Greek name)...
Phoebe is a Woman introduced by St. It is interesting to notice that a Christian Woman in the Apostolic Age did not think it necessary to discard the name of a heathen deity. The term προστάτις indicates that she was a Woman of means
Immanuel - It may now be taken for granted that the word עַלִמָה translated ‘virgin’ in the Authorized and Revised Versions should be more correctly rendered ‘young Woman. ’ All that can with certainty be said of the word used by Isaiah is that it indicates a young Woman of marriageable age, but says nothing as to whether she is married or not. The natural interpretation to put on the prophecy is that a young Woman, either married at the time or soon to be married, would give birth to a son and call him by this name. Accordingly it is better to translate ‘a young Woman’ instead of ‘the young Woman. ’ Isaiah, however, does not mean precisely that any young Woman, who is shortly about to conceive and give birth to a son, may call his name Immanuel. While he has no definite young Woman in his mind, he predicts that some young Woman will, in the future, conceive and bear a son, to whom she will give the name Immanuel. A young Woman will bear a son and call his name Immanuel
Head - ): (1) there is an upward gradation of rank to be observed-woman, man, Christ, God; (2) Woman was created from and for man, and so she must show by her covered head that she is in the presence of her superior-man (cf. ’]'>[2] (3) the long hair of Woman shows that the covering of the veil is natural to her. ’]'>[2] on her head’ [4] seems yet to have been given, but the context seems to imply that the veil expresses the authority of man over Woman, in accordance with which the Revised Version inserts the words ‘a sign of’ before ‘authority
Head - ): (1) there is an upward gradation of rank to be observed-woman, man, Christ, God; (2) Woman was created from and for man, and so she must show by her covered head that she is in the presence of her superior-man (cf. ’]'>[2] (3) the long hair of Woman shows that the covering of the veil is natural to her. (No satisfactory explanation of the phrase ‘authority [3] on her head’ [4] seems yet to have been given, but the context seems to imply that the veil expresses the authority of man over Woman, in accordance with which the Revised Version inserts the words ‘a sign of’ before ‘authority
Joseph And Mary - For Mary had been the Woman of all women to him. And thus it was that she fled to the mountains of Judah, hoping to find there an aged kinswoman of hers who would receive her word and would somewhat understand her case. Was the Virgin an orphan, or was Mary's mother such a Woman that Mary could have opened her heart to any stranger rather than to her? Be that as it may, Mary found a true mother in Elizabeth of Hebron. ...
For my own part, I do not know the gift or the grace or the virtue any Woman ever had that I could safely deny to Mary. The divine congruity compels me to believe that all that could be received or attained or exercised by any Woman would be granted beforehand, and all but without measure, to her who was so miraculously to bear, and so intimately and influentially to nurture and instruct, the Holy Child. "Blessed is the womb that bare Thee," cried on another occasion a nameless but a true Woman, as her speech bewrayeth her, "and Blessed be the paps that Thou hast sucked
Bela - As Husham is like Bela a king of Edom, so with Bela son of Benjamin is connected a Benjamite family of Hushim, sprung from a foreign Woman of Moab (1 Chronicles 7:12; 1 Chronicles 8:8-11)
Barak - Barak is made an example of faith (Hebrews 11:32), though it was weak; he was therefore deprived of the glory of stronger faith by a Woman, Jael (compare Judges 4:8)
Boar - ...
"As a jewel of gold (worn often by women as 'nose jewels,' Isaiah 3:21) in a swine's snout, so is a fair Woman which is without discretion" (Hebrew: taste, i
Uri'ah - He married Bath-sheba a Woman of extraordinary beauty, the daughter of Eliam--possibly the same as the son of Ahithophel, and one of his brother officers, (2 Samuel 23:34 ) and hence, perhaps, Uriah's first acquaintance with Bath-sheba
Murder - Striking a pregnant Woman so as to cause death brought capital punishment
Oil - ...
2 Kings 4:2 (c) Probably this represents the blessings of GOD which He pours out upon the man or the Woman of faith in order that the needs of the life may be met
Star - ...
Lastly, the Woman in the vision (Revelation 12:1) ‘has a crown of twelve stars’ (see article Sun)
Play - ) To act or perform (a play); to represent in music action; as, to play a comedy; also, to act in the character of; to represent by acting; to simulate; to behave like; as, to play King Lear; to play the Woman
Shiloh - The first was all gospel, and all of Christ: (Genesis 3:15) "The seed of the Woman shall bruise the serpent's head
Star - ...
Revelation 12:1 (b) This Woman is a type of Israel and the twelve stars represent the twelve patriarchs for whom the twelve tribes are named
Impurity - The Woman who had been delivered, offered a turtle and a lamb for her expiation; or if she was poor, two turtles, or two young pigeons
Andronicus - The latter, although a remarkable expression (and all the more so if the second name is that of a Woman), is probably to be preferred
There is - Used with the infinitive and the preposition le, yêsh signifies possibility—Elisha told the Shunammite Woman: “… Behold, thou hast been careful for us with all this care; what is to be done for thee? Wouldest thou be spoken for to the king, or to the captain of the host [3]?” (2 Kings 4:13)
Devil - The word devil is sometimes applied to a very wicked man or Woman
Long - To have a preternatural craving appetite as a longing Woman
Lose - The Woman that deliberates is lost
Temper - ...
Woman! nature made thee ...
To temper man we had been brutes without you
Travail - ...
In Revelation 12:2 the Woman is figurative of Israel; the circumstances of her birth pangs are mentioned in Isaiah 66:7 (see also Micah 5:2,3 )
Esther - ...
Summary of the story...
When the Persian king decided to replace his queen, the Woman chosen was Esther, an orphan Jew who had been brought up by her cousin Mordecai
Deacon, Deaconess - "not double-tongued"), not indulging excessively in wine, not pursuing dishonest gain, holding the mystery (proved and approved), being found blameless, husband of one wife (a one-woman kind of man publicly and privately), and a good manager of children and household. Akin...
See also Church, the ; Servant, Service ; Woman ...
Bibliography
Messiah - There should be no shyness, but his people should come near unto him; for this was not a new thing, a new doctrine, it was from the beginning, yea, before all worlds Jesus was spoken of, in his mediatorial character, as set up from everlasting; neither was it whispered in secret, but openly, in the first revelations, the man-nature of the seed of the Woman, the anointed of the Father and the Holy Ghost, was all along declared, that it was, and that I am, saith Christ. " (Psalms 110:4) Hence, therefore, the Lord Jesus, in effect, speaks to every poor sinner as he did to the Woman of Samaria—"If thou knewest the gift of God, and who it is, and by what authority he saith to thee, Give me to drink, thou wouldest have asked of him, and he would have given thee living water
Concubine - The man and Woman once united in wedlock, were no longer separable but by death. (Matthew 19:3-9) And his servant, the apostle, finished the matter from his Master's authority, when he saith, "Let every man have his own wife, and let every Woman have her own husband
Philip: Deacon And Evangelist - And thus it was that Philip would certainly seek out the Woman of Samaria that all the world knows about now, and in whose heart, and in whose house, there was now a well of water springing up unto everlasting life. And the Woman would welcome Philip, and would say to him, Come in, thou blessed of the Lord, for when I was thirsty He gave me drink. And when Philip said to her, Sit down, Woman, sit down and eat, she only served his table all the more hospitably, and said, I have meat to eat that thou knowest not of. And, taking his text from the Woman's words, Philip preached the risen Christ in Sychar till there was great joy in that city. His wife is a good Woman. She is a grave Woman, as Paul exhorted her to be. But, far deeper than that, Agabus had a finishing work of the Holy Ghost to perform on Philip, and on his four daughters, and on their mother, that grave Woman
Marriage - From the beginning God’s ideal for marriage has been that one man and one Woman live together, independent of parents, in lifelong union (Genesis 2:18-24; Matthew 19:4-6). God intends people to have and to enjoy sexual relations, but only as part of a total relationship where a man and a Woman commit themselves to each other for life (Matthew 19:5-6; Hebrews 13:4). ...
In marriage as God intended it, there is an equality between the man and the Woman (Genesis 2:23-24)
Proselytes - ...
Tyre's alliance with David was a prophetic earnest of its future union with the kingdom of God, of which the Syrophoenician Woman was a firstfruit (Mark 7:26), as Candace's eunuch the proselyte (Acts 8) was a pledge of Ethiopia's conversion. ...
(2) Man for Woman or Woman for man, where one embraced the married partner's Judaism
Widow - Married Woman whose husband has died and who remains unmarried. Although the denotation of widow referred to a Woman whose husband had died, because of the social context the word quickly acquired the connotation of a person living a marginal existence in extreme poverty. The fact that an individual desired to marry the widow of a king did not assume that the Woman had inherited her husband's estate; it was simply an attempt to legitimize a claim to royalty (cf. Dempster...
See also Family Life and Relations ; Woman ...
Bibliography
Anointing (2) - In the course of the meal a Woman appeared in the room, wearing her hair loose, which in Jewish society was the token of a harlot. They simply say that the ‘beautiful work’ was wrought by ‘a Woman. (3) They represent the nameless Woman as pouring the ointment not on the Lord’s feet but on His head, and say nothing of her wiping His feet with her hair. His account is historical, and it would stand so in the Apostolic tradition; but the Synoptic editors or, more probably, the catechisers in their oral repetition of the tradition, wondering, since they did not know who the Woman was, at the strangeness of her action, substituted ‘head’ for ‘feet,’ and then omitted the unintelligible circumstance of her wiping His feet with her hair
Cush - Moses' wife came from Cush (Numbers 12:1 ), probably a Woman distinct from Zipporah (Exodus 2:21 )
Rahab - The story of this Woman, called a harlot, of Jericho is given in Joshua 2:1-24
Hospitality - The word is not used in the Old Testament, but its elements are recognizable: Abraham and the three visitors (Genesis 18:1-8 ), Lot and the two angels (Genesis 19:1-8 ), Abraham's servant at Nahor (Genesis 24:17-33 ), Reuel and Moses (Exodus 2:20 ), Manoah and the angel (Judges 13:15 ), Elijah and the widow of Zarephath (1 Kings 17:10-11 ), and Elisha and the Shunammite Woman (2 Kings 4:8-11 )
Carnutum - The substructure of the building encloses a well and vault, which, according to tradition, the early Christians found surmounted by an altar and statue of a Woman seated with her child upon her knees, erected by the Druids
Chartres, France - The substructure of the building encloses a well and vault, which, according to tradition, the early Christians found surmounted by an altar and statue of a Woman seated with her child upon her knees, erected by the Druids
Filthiness, Filthy - 1), is used of "base gain," "filthy (lucre)," Titus 1:11 , and translated "shame" in 1 Corinthians 11:6 , with reference to a Woman with shorn hair; in 1 Corinthians 14:35 , of oral utterances of women in a church gathering (RV, "shameful"); in Ephesians 5:12 , of mentioning the base and bestial practices of those who live lascivious lives
Sarah - ...
Sarah found it difficult to believe that a Woman as old as she could bear a son, and therefore God sent special heavenly messengers to convince her
Dan (2) - In 1 Kings 7:13-14, Hiram the worker in brass is said to be of Naphtali; but in 2 Chronicles 2:13-14, he is called "son of a Woman of Dan
Macedonia - How Christianity, starting from that beginning, has since elevated Woman socially throughout Europe!...
Sheba, Queen of - ), without naming Sheba, gives an account of the visit to Solomon of a Woman who was queen of Egypt and Ethiopia. ’ He is mistaken as to the locality, but it is interesting to observe the tradition which he reports, ‘that we possess the root of that balsam which our country still bears by this Woman’s gift
Caves - ...
In addition to artifacts from earlier periods, important finds include the personal and legal documents of a Jewish Woman, Babata, which shed light on the culture of that day
Gerizim - To Gerazim our Lord alludes: "Woman, believe Me, the hour cometh when ye shall neither in this mountain nor yet at Jerusalem (exclusively) worship the Father" (John 4:21)
Personal Effort: Needed For Success - We must not exempt a single soldier of the cross, neither man nor Woman, rich nor poor; but each must fight for the Lord Jesus according to his ability, that his kingdom may come, and that his will may be done in earth even as it is in heaven
Image - On speaking of man as the head of the Woman, it says he ought not to coverhis head, forasmuch as "he is the image and glory of God
Jephthah, Jephthae - Son of Gilead by a 'strange Woman
Autricum - The substructure of the building encloses a well and vault, which, according to tradition, the early Christians found surmounted by an altar and statue of a Woman seated with her child upon her knees, erected by the Druids
Maiden, Virgin - What was true of her and figuratively of these nations (including Israel) was that she was a vigorous young Woman at the height of her powers and not married
Judge - Judge in yourselves is it comely that a Woman pray unto God uncovered? 1 Corinthians 11 ...
JUDGE, To hear and determine a case to examine and decide
Baal (1) - ’ Thus, a married man is called ‘possessor of a Woman’ ( 2 Samuel 11:26 ), a ram, ‘possessor of horns,’ and even the citizens of a locality are denoted by this word ( Judges 9:2 ; Judges 20:5 , 1 Samuel 23:11 f
Hide, Hid, Hidden - ...
A — 7: λανθάνω (Strong's #2990 — Verb — lanthano — lan-than'-o ) "to escape notice, to be hidden from," is rendered "(could not) be hid" in Mark 7:24 , of Christ; "was (not) hid," Luke 8:47 , of the Woman with the issue of blood; "is hidden," Acts 26:26 , of the facts concerning Christ; the sentence might be rendered "none of these things has escaped the king's notice
Rahab (1) - Again, Rahab's act cannot prove justification by works as such, for she was a Woman of bad character. A Woman of loose life, and a Gentile, is justified even as Abraham, the father of the Jews, the friend of God, was; showing that justifying, working faith manifests itself in every class
Mary, the Virgin - 30), upon a Woman of the company exclaiming, "blessed is the womb that bore Thee, and the paps which Thou hast sucked," He said, "yea, rather (menounge ) blessed are they that hear the word of God and keep it"; the blessedness even of Mary is not her motherhood towards Him, but her hearing and obeying Him. " cf6 "Woman, what have I to do with thee?" (what is there (in common) to Me and thee?) a rebuke though a gentle one, as in Matthew 8:29; Mark 1:24; 1 Kings 17:18. Commending her to John He said to her, cf6 "woman, behold thy son", and to John cf6 "behold thy mother". Meek (John 2:5), and humble, making her model the holy women of old (Luke 1:46), yielding herself in implicit faith up to the divine will though ignorant how it was to be accomplished (Luke 1:38), energetic (Luke 1:39), thankful (Luke 1:48), and piously reflective (Luke 2:19; Luke 2:51), though not faultless, she was the most tender and lovable of women, yet a Woman still
Family - ...
The role and status of a Woman were not linked intrinsically to her function as a wife and mother. There was to be marriage between one man and one Woman (Mark 10:6-8 ; Ephesians 5:31 ). ...
The nature of the Christian marriage relationship, guided by Christlike love, called for both man and Woman to give themselves voluntarily and sacrificially to each other (Ephesians 5:21 ). See Father ; Mother ; Marriage ; Sex; Woman ; Children; Divorce
Impotence - ...
Another case which must probably be included here is that of the Woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13:11-27). The Woman was bowed and crouched together (ἧ συγκύπτουσα), and was in no wise able to lift herself up. ...
The reference of our Lord to Satan as binding the Woman is not to be understood as pointing to possession, although it may have been a reflexion of the current idea that all bodily deformity was due to demonic agency—in which case the description is due to the Evangelist lather than to Jesus. ...
The features of the healing are: (1) The Divine compassion expressed in our Lord’s laying His hand upon the Woman as He spoke the word of hope and deliverance; (2) His profound sense that this suffering and weakness, this crouching spirit, were completely foreign to the will of God (Hebrews 7:16); and (3) His stedfast refusal to allow any pedantic Sabbath rules to stand in the way of His relief of suffering humanity
Family (Jesus) - There Woman is often found in a prominent and honourable place (e. Miriam, Numbers 12:2; Deborah, Judges 4:4; Bathsheba, 1 Kings 1), but the days were now approaching when it could be said that he who talked with a Woman was qualifying for Gehenna (Pirke Aboth, ed. John 2:4) obscured in the Authorized and Revised Versions by the employment of ‘woman’ as a rendering of γύναι, a translation which is far from reproducing the respectful tone of the Greek. This story, whether Apostolic or not, certainly reflects the teaching of Jesus by inferring that in such moral downfalls the crime is not always to be imputed to the Woman alone
Banquet - To these customary marks of respect, to which a traveller, or one who had no house of his own, was entitled, our Lord alludes in his defence of Mary: "And he turned to the Woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this Woman? I entered into thine house; thou gavest me no water for my feet, but she hath washed my feet with her tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head. Thou gavest me no kiss; but this Woman, since the time I came in, hath not ceased to kiss my feet. My head with oil thou didst not anoint; but this Woman hath anointed my feet with ointment," Luke 7:44
Mission(s) - He healed the daughter of “a Woman of Canaan” and praised the Woman for her faith (Matthew 15:21-29 ). On another occasion, He initiated a conversation with a Samaritan Woman which led both to her conversion and to that of the entire community (John 4:1 )
Old - Golden - ...
Proverbs 11:22 (a) By this type we learn the lesson that ungodly actions in the life of a beautiful Woman are as inconsistent as to see a jeweled ornament placed in the snout of a pig. ...
Revelation 17:4 (b) The false Woman represents and is a type of the great world-wide religious system, that denies the truths of the Gospel, and substitutes for GOD's Word the traditions of men, the teachings of religious leaders, and gaudy presentations that appeal to the eye and the ear. "...
Revelation 18:16 (b) The great false religious group called Babylon in the previous chapter and under the type of a "woman" is represented in this chapter as a city because of her tremendous commercial activities
Divorce (2) - A Woman who puts away her husband and marries another commits adultery. No Woman could divorce her husband by Jewish law. ...
With this earliest record of Christ’s teaching the fragment in the Third Gospel (Luke 16:18) is in agreement: ‘Every one who puts away his wife and marries another commits adultery, and he who marries a divorced Woman commits adultery
Proverbs, the Book of - ...
(5) Proverbs 31 consists of king Lemuel's words (Proverbs 31:1-6), and an alphabetical acrostic in praise of a virtuous Woman. The first division, with the closing part of the middle (Proverbs 10:1-22:16 being the germ of the book), Proverbs 1-9; Proverbs 22:17 - Proverbs 25:1, is characterized by favorite words and constructions: as chokmot , "wisdoms"; zarah , "the strange Woman"; nokriah , "the foreigner," the adulteress who seduces youth, the opposite of true wisdom, found once in the middle division (Proverbs 22:14). ) Lemuel's mother suggested the model of the closing acrostic in praise of a virtuous Woman, "a looking glass for ladies" (M
Figure - A good figure, or person, in man or Woman, gives credit at first sight to the choice of either
Devotion to the Holy Family - It is no longer limited to working-men; any Catholic, man or Woman, child or adult, may join this association
Family, Holy - It is no longer limited to working-men; any Catholic, man or Woman, child or adult, may join this association
Lot - It is "a tall, isolated needle of rock, which really does bear a curious resemblance to an Arab Woman with a child upon her shoulder
Shechem - This city is mentioned in connection with our Lord's conversation with the Woman of Samaria (John 4:5 ); and thus, remaining as it does to the present day, it is one of the oldest cities of the world
Apollos - His humility and teachableness in submitting, with all his learning, to the teaching of Aquila and even of Priscilla (a Woman), his fervency and his power in Scripture, and his determinably staying away from where his well deserved popularity might be made a handle for party zeal, are all lovely traits in his Christian character
Oath - A special ritual was available when a Woman was suspected of adultery and she wanted to swear her innocence (Numbers 5:11-31)
Blasphemy - Stoning was the penalty, as upon the son of Shelomith, a Woman of Dan, and of an Egyptian father (Leviticus 24:11); Stephen was so treated by a sudden outbreak of Jewish zeal (Acts 7:57-60)
Allegory - The allegory told by the wise Woman of Tekoa in 2 Samuel 14:4-7 similarly opened David's eyes to a new perspective and caused him to spare the life of Absalom
Vessel - The objection which has been raised, that the injunction would thus be made to apply to men only, is not serious, for, as is often the case, the corresponding obligation on the part of the Woman is implied. Lightfoot considers it a more serious objection that by using such an expression as σκεῦος κτᾶσθαι the Apostle would seem to be lowering himself to the sensual view of the marriage relation, and adopting the depreciatory estimate of the Woman’s position which prevailed among both Jews and heathen at the time, whereas it is his constant effort to exalt both the one and the other
Holy Family, Devotion to the - It is no longer limited to working-men; any Catholic, man or Woman, child or adult, may join this association
Epaenetus - Persis, a Woman, is saluted perhaps with intentional delicacy as ‘the beloved’ (Romans 16:12)
Pledge - "Take his garment (saith the wise man) that is surety for a stranger: and take a pledge of him for a strange Woman
Hair - ...
John 11:2 (b) Since the hair is given to a Woman for her glory, this was a picture of Mary laying her glory at JESUS' feet
Bear - ” God cursed Woman by multiplying her pain in “bringing forth” children (cf
Travail - ...
Isaiah 53:11 (a) CHRIST's terrible sufferings and sorrows are compared to the pains of a Woman in childbirth
Head - (Isaiah 48:16-17) And hence, in conformity to this order of things, the apostle tells the church, when speaking of this subject, "I would have you know, that the head of every man is Christ, and the head of the Woman is the man, and the head of Christ is God
Aaron - Their excuse was that he had married an Ethiopian Woman (sign of the same sovereign grace that goes out to Gentiles who have no claim to it)
Nazarite - This term implies 'separation'; it was applied to either man or Woman that vowed to separate themselves unto the Lord
Bind, Binding - A Woman who was bent together, had been "bound" by Satan through the work of a demon, Luke 13:16
Lift - , 2 Samuel 7:13,16 ; 1 Chronicles 17:12 ; Jeremiah 10:12 ; often so used in the papyri); of the healing of the Woman with a spirit of infirmity, Luke 13:13 , "was made straight" (for ver
Nazarite - The rule of the Nazarite is given Numbers 6:2; "when either man or Woman shall separate themselves to . Man or Woman might ordinarily of their own free will take the vow
Sychar - According to Sanday (Sacred Sites of the Gospels, 32), ‘it is possible that the special sacredness and real excellence of the water (on a hot day it is beautifully soft and refreshing) had something to do with’ the presence of the Woman from Sychar, though it has been suggested that she was fetching water for workmen employed on the adjacent cornlands and not for her own household. Συχάρ) writes to the effect that Sychar lay ‘before Neapolis, near the piece of ground which Jacob gave to his son Joseph, where Christ, according to John, held discourse with the Samaritan Woman, by the fountain: it is shown to this day
Jews in the New Testament - The word Jew is derived ultimately from the tribe of Judah through Middle English Iewe , Old French Ieu , Latin Iudaeus , and Greek Ioudaios (compare the Woman's name Judith , which originally meant “Jewess”). Some of these references are quite positive, especially in the dialogue between Jesus and the Woman of Samaria ( John 4:1 ). In John 4:9 the Woman says to Jesus, “thou, being a Jew,” and in John 4:22 Jesus says, “salvation is of the Jews
She'Chem - It is the SYCHAR of (John 4:5 ) near which the Saviour conversed with the Samaritan Woman at Jacob's well. The Christians sometimes call it Bir es-Samariyeh -- "the well of the Samaritan Woman
Sex, Biblical Teaching on - A double standard in relationships may be described throughout the Scriptures; yet before the Fall and after the coming of Christ, man and Woman are set forth as equals before God. These are all declared to be outside of the will of God for man and Woman who are called to live together in monogamous fidelity within the covenant of marriage
Shame - ...
It is possible that in the passage last quoted (the episode of the Woman taken in adultery) we have an instance of shame in another aspect, the sympathetic shame evoked by sin in others. He could not meet the eye of the crowd, or of the accusers, and perhaps at that moment least of all of the Woman
Sow - ” Only rarely is this nuance applied to animals: “And I will put enmity between thee [9] and the Woman [10], and between thy seed and her seed …” ( Woman and ultimately to a particular descendant (Christ)
Chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible - ...
Woman of Tekoah. ...
Infirm Woman healed
Dress - The costume of the men and women was very similar; there was sufficient difference, however, to mark the sex, and it was strictly forbidden to a Woman to wear the appendages, such as the staff, signet-ring, and other ornaments, of a man; as well as to a man to wear the outer robe of a Woman
Shame - ...
It is possible that in the passage last quoted (the episode of the Woman taken in adultery) we have an instance of shame in another aspect, the sympathetic shame evoked by sin in others. He could not meet the eye of the crowd, or of the accusers, and perhaps at that moment least of all of the Woman
Imagery - ...
In His parables, Jesus continued the Old Testament practice of using vivid images for God: a shepherd seeking one lost sheep (Luke 15:4-7 ); a Woman seeking one lost coin (Luke 15:8-10 ); a father waiting patiently for the return of one son and taking the initiative to reconcile the other (Luke 15:11-32 )
Homosexuality - Only heterosexual preference and behavior patterns are approved in Scripture as conforming to God's plan in the creation of man and Woman
Prov'Erbs, Book of - 1-6, and an alphabetical acrostic in praise of a virtuous Woman, which occupies the rest of the chapter
Cup - Isaiah 51:17 personifies Jerusalem as a Woman who drained the cup of wrath to its dregs
Midian - So, by Jehovah's command, 1,000 warriors of every tribe, 12,000 in all, of Israel "vexed and smote" their five kings (Zur included, father of Cozbi the Midianite Woman slain with Zimri by Phinehas in the act of sin) and Balaam the giver of the wicked counsel which brought Jehovah's wrath on Israel for the sin (Numbers 31:2-17)
Footwashing - The initiative of the Woman who was a “sinner” in washing Jesus' feet (Luke 7:37-50 ) was more than expected hospitality
Miriam - "Miriam and Aaron spake against Moses because of the Ethiopian Woman whom he had married (Numbers 12)
Flesh And Spirit - The first mention of flesh occurs in Genesis 2:21 , the account of the creation of Woman from the side of man
Body of Christ - A husband cannot be one flesh with both his wife and another Woman
Shechem - Here he is said to have dug the well coosecrated by Christ’s conversation with the Samaritan Woman, and still shown to travellers, with a claim to authenticity which is lacking in the vast majority of the so-called ‘holy places
Absalom - As the result of a stratagem carried out by a Woman of Tekoah, Joab received David's sanction to invite Absalom back to Jerusalem
Build up - It is interestingly used to describe God's fashioning of Adam's rib into a Woman (Genesis 2:22 )
Hair - ...
The greater abundance of hair possessed by Woman as compared with man is mentioned by St
Deborah - an inspired Woman one of the four mentioned in the OT of the tribe of Issachar ( Judges 5:15 ), wife of Lappidoth ( Judges 4:4 )
Claudia - 34), and thus makes her a Woman of British race
Fabiola, a Noble Roman Lady - She was descended from Julius Maximus and extremely wealthy; a Woman of a lively and passionate nature, married to a man whose vices compelled her to divorce him
Samson - "...
His marriage with a Woman of Timnath was so far "of the Lord" that it became in the ways of God an occasion against the Philistines to whom he had allied himself
Adam And Eve - (ad' uhm uhnd eeve) The first man and Woman created by God from whom all other people are descended
Abraham - A Woman named Rebekah was obtained from Abraham's relatives in Mesopotamia, and Isaac married her gladly (Genesis 24:67 )
Garments - It is the 'garment' the edge of which the Woman touched, Matthew 14:36 ; and the 'garments' of which the scribes and Pharisees enlarged the borders
Assassins - After a considerable siege the Romans were on the point of taking the fortress when the Sicarii massacred themselves, one old Woman alone escaping
Hannah - Her name signifies gracious; and she was, indeed, a very gracious Woman
Mary, the Mother of Jesus - She was with Him and His disciples at the marriage feast at Cana, when He uttered another mysterious sentence: "Woman, what have I to do with thee? mine hour is not yet come
Elijah - When the brook had dried up he was sent to a widow Woman of Zarephath, and again the hand of the Lord supplied his wants and those of his friends
Ear-Rings - These rings are of gold, and have commonly two pearls and one ruby between them, placed in the ring; I never saw a girl, or young Woman in Arabia, or in all Persia, who did not wear a ring after this manner in her nostril
Phylacteries - These were worn by our Saviour, as appears from the following passage: "Behold, a Woman, which was diseased with an issue of blood twelve years, came behind him, and touched the hem of his garment," κρασπεδον του ιματιου , Matthew 9:20
Weaving - In the beautiful description which is given, in the last chapter of Solomon's Proverbs, of the domestic economy of the virtuous Woman, it is said, "She seeketh wool and flax, and worketh willingly with her hands: she layeth her hands to the spindle, and her hands hold the distaff
Hair - The Apostle's remark on this subject corresponds entirely with the custom of the east; as well as with the original design of the Creator: "Does not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man have long hair, it is a shame unto him? But if a Woman have long hair, it is a glory to her; for her hair is given her for a covering," 1 Corinthians 11:14
Palm-Tree - Judea particularly is typified in several coins of Vespasian by a desconsolate Woman sitting under a palm-tree, with the inscription, JUDEA CAPTA
Authority - " ...
In 1 Corinthians 11:10 it is used of the veil with which a Woman is required to cover herself in an assembly or church, as a sign of the Lord's "authority" over the church
Nard - The word is found in the OT (Song of Solomon 1:12; Song of Solomon 4:13-14) and twice in the Gospels (Mark 14:3-5, John 12:3-5), occurring in both cases in the account of the anointing of our Lord, in a house at Bethany, by a Woman whom St
Adultery - The one exception was the case of a Woman who had been raped (Deuteronomy 22:22-27)
Hearing - hear of mediately)—the object again being either personal, as Mark 7:25 ‘A Woman … having heard of him,’ or impersonal, as Mark 6:55 ‘where they heard he was. For example, some of the Samaritans are reported as having said to the Woman who conversed with Jesus at the well, ‘Now we believe, not because of thy speaking: for we have heard for ourselves’ (John 4:42). When a certain Woman out of the multitude said to Jesus, ‘Blessed is the womb that bare thee, and the breasts which thou didst suck,’ He answered, ‘Yea rather, blessed are they that hear the word of God and keep it: (Luke 11:28, cf
Claim - The prodigal son declares that he has forfeited the right to which he had been born (Luke 15:19); Zacchaeus (Luke 19:9) and the Woman bowed down with infirmity (Luke 13:16) have, as children of Abraham, a family claim that should shut out more distant considerations. The Syro-Phœnician Woman quite understands that local opinion as to race privilege does not allow her to share on equal terms with Israel (Matthew 15:27-28). The action of the Woman who anointed Christ and bathed His feet with tears is shown to be right, inasmuch as the claim of a passing guest was greater than that of those who were always present (John 12:7-8 Luke 7:37-38, Mark 14:3,)
Appreciation (of Christ) - He acknowledges the longing of the heart though a weak will robs it of fruition; He reads the zealous affection of Peter between the lines of a moment’s Satanic pride (Matthew 16:22), or a terror-stricken denial (Matthew 26:70); He penetrates to the secret yearnings behind the materialistic questions of the Woman at the well, and imparts to her His highest thought of God (John 4:24). The Woman with the issue of blood would but touch the hem of His garment to be cured (Mark 5:28). The Syro-Phœnician Woman persisted in her prayer for her sick daughter, eagerly claiming the rights, while bearing the reproach of being a Gentile ‘dog’ (Mark 7:28)
Marriage - An intimate and complementing union between a man and a Woman in which the two become one physically, in the whole of life. God brings a man and a Woman together in marriage (Ephesians 5:21-240 ; cf. The Woman was created as "a helper suitable" for the man (ezer kenegdo ) (Genesis 2:18 ). Headship is a benevolent responsibility without disdaining condescension and patronizing of the Woman (cf. Whenever God directly brought a man and Woman together in marriage, both were believers. , Recovering Biblical Manhood and Womanhood: A Response to Evangelical Feminism ; E
Widows - But if any widow has children or grandchildren, let such descendants learn first of all to act piously towards their own households and to requite their parents’; and a specific application of the same principle is thus expressed: ‘If any believing Woman has widows, let her provide for them, and let the church not be burdened, lest really deserving widows have not sufficient support’ (1 Timothy 5:16). Such an enrolled widow must have been ‘a Woman of one man,’* must have brought up her family well, must have washed the disciples’ feet, shown hospitality to strangers, done service to the oppressed. Paul speaks so strongly about the remarriage of young widows is no proof-on our view of the meaning of ‘a Woman of one man’-that younger widows if they remarried and again became widows would be excluded from the roll, for they would still be faithful to one husband. Such a Woman would not be left to starve, but she might well he helped to look after herself and to abstain from going definitely on the roll of the Church
Adam (1) - ...
Adam is the generic term for man, including Woman (Genesis 1:26-27). Christ came to reveal not only God, but MAN to us; He alone is therefore called "THE Son of man"; the common property of mankind; who alone realizes the original ideal of man: body, soul, and spirit, in the image and likeness of God, the body subordinate to the animal and intellectual soul, and the soul to the spirit (1 Thessalonians 5:23), combining at once the man and Woman (Galatians 3:28); and in whom believers shall realize it by vital union with Him: having the masculine graces, majesty, power, wisdom, strength, courage, with all Woman's purity, intuitive tact, meekness, gentleness, sympathetic tenderness and love, such as Roman Catholics have pictured in the Virgin Mary. The creation of Woman from man (marked by the very names isha, ish) subsequently implies the same truth. ...
The Second Adam combined in Himself, as Representative Head of redeemed men and women, both man's and Woman's characteristic excellencies, as the first Adam contained both before that Eve was taken out of his side. Satan's antitrinity, the lust of the flesh ("the Woman saw that the tree was good for food"), the lust of the eye ("and that it was pleasant to the eyes"), and the pride of life (and a "tree to be desired to make one wise") seduced man: 1 John 2:16; compare ACHAN; Joshua 7:21
Hour - ...
The reader of the Gospel first encounters the term in Jesus' reply to His mother's implicit appeal for help at the wedding in Cana: “Woman, what have I to do with thee? mine hour is not yet come” (John 2:4 ). ”...
In His conversation with the Woman at Sychar (John 4:1-42 ) Jesus referred again to a coming “hour” (John 7:37-39 ,John 6:39-40,6:23 ), a time when Jerusalem and Gerizim, the holy sites of Jews and Samaritans, respectively, would lose their significance, for worship—would be “in Spirit and truth
Touch - Although God created all things by his spoken word (Genesis 1 ), Genesis 2:7,21-22 pictures him as personally shaping man and Woman from the dust of the earth. Luke 7:14 ), blind men (Matthew 9:29 ; Mark 9:22-25 ; John 9:6 ), a deaf/mute man (Mark 7:33 ), a boy with an evil spirit (Mark 9:27 ), a crippled Woman (Luke 13:13 ), and a servant with a severed ear (Luke 22:51 )
Mary - the Woman of Magdala (Mejdel), a town on the Lake of Galilee, some 3 miles from Capernaum, at the southern end of the Plain of Gennesaret. Luke (Luke 10:38-42), who tells how Jesus, probably on His way to the Feast of Tabernacles (John 7:2; John 7:10) in the third year of His ministry, reached ‘a certain village,’ and was hospitably received by ‘a certain Woman by name Martha,’ who had a sister called Mary
Veil - Female children were no vails, we are told by the historians of those countries, until they had arrived at seven or eight years of age; after that, if a Woman was seen uncovered, it became the mark of a Woman of Hence Rebekah put on the vail on her approach to Isaac
Cosmopolitanism - ...
Jewish exclusiveness was apparently endorsed by Christ Himself (Matthew 5:47 ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885) 6:7, 32); the Twelve are forbidden to go into any way of the Gentiles (Matthew 10:5); and the Syrophœnician Woman is at first addressed in thoroughly Jewish language (Matthew 15:21, Mark 7:24). ); commends the faith of a Roman centurion as greater than any faith He had found in Israel (Matthew 8:10, Luke 7:9); and, notwithstanding His first words to the Syrophœnician Woman, recognizes and rewards the greatness of her faith (Matthew 15:21 ff
Man - " ...
(j) as equivalent simply to "a person," or "one," whether "man" or Woman, e. " ...
2: ἀνήρ (Strong's #435 — Noun Masculine — aner — an'-ayr ) is never used of the female sex; it stands (a) in distinction from a Woman, Acts 8:12 ; 1 Timothy 2:12 ; as a husband, Matthew 1:16 ; John 4:16 ; Romans 7:2 ; Titus 1:6 ; (b) as distinct from a boy or infant, 1 Corinthians 13:11 ; metaphorically in Ephesians 4:13 ; (c) in conjunction with an adjective or noun, e
Mary - the Woman of Magdala (Mejdel), a town on the Lake of Galilee, some 3 miles from Capernaum, at the southern end of the Plain of Gennesaret. Luke (Luke 10:38-42), who tells how Jesus, probably on His way to the Feast of Tabernacles (John 7:2; John 7:10) in the third year of His ministry, reached ‘a certain village,’ and was hospitably received by ‘a certain Woman by name Martha,’ who had a sister called Mary
Sarah - Sarah sacrificed herself on the cruellest altar on which any Woman ever laid herself down; but the cords of the sacrifice were all the time the cords of a suicidal pride; till the sacrifice was both a great sin in the sight of God, a fatal injury to herself, to her husband, and to innocent generations yet unborn. Sarah sacrificed herself to the last drop of a Woman's blood; but all the time her heart was as high as heaven and as hot as hell both against God and against her husband also. ' Cast out the bondwoman and her son! No, Sarah, you cannot do it. Shall she kill her child? Shall she kill herself? Oh, why was I born? Oh, why did I ever come to this cursed land? Why did I ever take the wages of that wicked Woman? Let the night perish on which she took me and led me up into her bed! Let darkness and the shadow of death stain it; let a cloud dwell upon it; let the gross darkness terrify it! Till she awakened and found herself with a well of water close beside her. ...
Now, in God's mercy, is there any Hagar here? Is there any outcast here? Is there any soul of man or Woman ready to perish here? Who can tell who is here? Where would such be found if not here? Is not this the house of God? Does this house not stand on the wayside to Shur? Has this house not been Beer-lahai-roi to many who were in far greater straits, and under far greater guilt, than ever Hagar was? Many have said of this house, Thou God seest me! Many have come up to this house with a secret burden. Is there a motherless Woman-child here? Is there a deceived, injured, cast-out sinner here? My sister, thy God is here. For the Lord hath called thee as a Woman forsaken and grieved in spirit
Cross - ) Characterized by, or in a state of, peevishness, fretfulness, or ill humor; as, a cross man or Woman
Elisha - We next read of his predicting a fall of rain when the army of Jehoram was faint from thirst (2 Kings 3:9-20 ); of the multiplying of the poor widow's cruse of oil (4:1-7); the miracle of restoring to life the son of the Woman of Shunem (4:18-37); the multiplication of the twenty loaves of new barley into a sufficient supply for an hundred men (4:42-44); of the cure of Naaman the Syrian of his leprosy (5:1-27); of the punishment of Gehazi for his falsehood and his covetousness; of the recovery of the axe lost in the waters of the Jordan (6:1-7); of the miracle at Dothan, half-way on the road between Samaria and Jezreel; of the siege of Samaria by the king of Syria, and of the terrible sufferings of the people in connection with it, and Elisha's prophecy as to the relief that would come (2 Kings 6:24-7:2 )
Joppa - ...
The New Testament records that Joppa was the home of Dorcas, a Christian Woman known for her gracious and generous deeds
Mary, Sister of Lazarus - ...
When Judas and the disciples, led by him, objected to the waste of ointment worth 300 pence (about 9 British pounds and 16 shillings) which might have been given to the poor, Jesus vindicated and richly rewarded her: cf6 "why trouble ye the Woman? let alone, she hath wrought a good work on Me, she hath done what she could, ye have the poor always with you but Me ye have not always (See Matthew 25:35-36); she hath come aforehand to anoint My body to the burying; wheresoever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, this also that she hath done shall be spoken of for a memorial of her
Song of Songs - Always, however, the love is in the context of a relationship where a man and a Woman commit themselves to each other in marriage, to the exclusion of all others (Song of Song of Solomon 2:16; Song of Solomon 6:3; Song of Solomon 7:10)
Queen (2) - Some have supposed that our Lord refers to a Woman as the correlative to the men of Nineveh previously spoken of
Necromancy - As a result, he turned to a Woman known to Saul's court as a "medium
Picards - His women were common, but none were allowed to enjoy them without his permission; so that when any man desired a particular Woman, he carried her to Picard, who gave him leave in these words: Go, increase, multiply, and fill the earth
John the Apostle - " The elect lady is supposed to have been some honorable Woman distinguished for piety, and well known in the churches as a disciple of Christ
Ashtaroth - She was represented as a Woman with two horns on her head
Wing - The Woman undoubtedly is Israel
Abomination - People with habits loathsome to God are themselves detestable to Him: “The Woman shall not wear that which pertaineth unto a man, neither shall a man put on a Woman’s garment: for all that do so are abomination unto the Lord thy God” ( Cross - Peevish fretful : applied to persons or things as a cross Woman or husband a cross answer
Thirteen - ...
lu13 - Here we read the story of the Woman with an infirmity of eighteen years; also the story of the master closing the door against professors who were hypocrites; also the record of Herod, the fox who was to be destroyed by the Lord
Witness - In the case of a newly married Woman charged by her own husband, his testimony is sufficient to prove her guilty of adultery unless her parents have clear evidence proving her virginity before her marriage ( Flesh - At some points, the body is viewed as consisting of two components, “flesh” and bones: “This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man” ( Friends - In New- England they were treated with peculiar severity, imprisoned, scourged, (women as well as men,) and at Boston four of them were even hanged, among whom was one Woman; and this was the more extraordinary and inexcusable, as the settlers themselves had but lately fled from persecution in the parent country! During these sufferings, they applied to King Charles II, for relief; who, in 1661, granted a mandamus, to put a stop to them
Labor - , "to cause toil or trouble," to embarass a person by giving occasion for anxiety, as some disciples did to the Woman with the ointment, perturbing her spirit by their criticisms, Matthew 26:10 ; Mark 14:6 ; or by distracting attention or disturbing a person's rest, as the importunate friend did, Luke 11:7 ; 18:5 ; in Galatians 6:17 , "let no man trouble me," the Apostle refuses, in the form of a peremptory prohibition, to allow himself to be distracted further by the Judaizers, through their proclamation of a false gospel and by their malicious attacks upon himself
Eden, Garden of - When the first man and Woman yielded to the tempter and ate of the tree of knowledge, they were expelled, and precluded from re-entering the garden
Isaac - The Woman the servant found was Rebekah
Adam - " And the Lord caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and while he slept, he took one of his ribs, "and closed up the flesh instead thereof;" and of that substance which he took from man made he a Woman, whom he presented to him. Then said Adam, "This is now bone of my bone, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of man," Genesis 2:21 , &c. ...
The Woman was seduced by the tempter; and she seduced her husband to eat of the forbidden fruit. When called to judgment for this transgression before God, Adam attempted to cast the blame upon his wife, and the Woman upon the serpent tempter. But God declared them all guilty, and punished the serpent by degradation; the Woman by painful childbearing and subjection; and the man by agricultural labour and toil; of which punishments every day witnesses the fulfilment. The term for Woman is Aisha
Gestures - mention no touching), the bier on which the widow’s son at Nain lay (Luke 7:14), the Woman with the spirit of infirmity (Luke 13:13), perhaps the dropsical man (Luke 14:4, see Plummer, in loc. Similarly we read of the sick touching Jesus,—the Woman with the issue oMar_5:27(Mark 5:27 and || Mt. ), the Syrophœnician Woman (Mark 7:25 and || Mt. Lastly, we notice the kiss as the sign of love, real or feigned, as in the case of the sinful Woman (Luke 7:45), of Judas (Mark 14:45 and || Mt
the Queen of Sheba - For, so far as I have seen, that wonderful Woman has never had adequate justice done to her. If I once find the Name of the Lord in the life of any Old Testament man or Woman, I can never again forget that man or that Woman. The Queen of Sheba was like one of those children in Israel who asked their fathers at every passover supper, What mean ye by this service? Only, she was not a child, but a Woman of a strong understanding and a deep heart, and both Solomon and the high priest and the prophet, all three together, were at their wits' end; it took them all their might to open up all the parts of the temple and its sacrifices to her satisfaction: the reason of this, and the reason of that; the use of this, and the use of that; the antitype of this, and the antitype of that-she both hearing them and asking them questions
Nabal - 'The Lord make the Woman that is come into his house like Rachel, and like Leah, which two did build the house of Israel. Abigail is still a Woman of a good understanding. Abigail to all appearances is the same Woman she was at the first sheep-shearing, but her husband has sadly gone down. I am that Woman that was so hard-hearted
Hosea - After marriage she proved unfaithful, and Hosea heard that the Woman whom he had been led by Jahweh to marry had had within her all along the tendency to unfaithfulness. She was not at the time of marriage an actual harlot, but, had Hosea only fully understood, he would have known when he married her, as these years afterwards he has come to know, that when Jahweh said, ‘Go, marry Gomer,’ He was really saying ‘Go, marry a Woman who will bestow her love on others
Sibylline Oracles - Tabitha is certainly the Woman of Joppa (Acts 9:36-41) whom St. [6] 333-334), unable to accept (a), since σιός is Laconian, not aeolic, and since the loss of an accented syllable is unlikely, prefers the roots σιβ-υλο-γα (the feminine suffix) = ‘the wise (little) Woman,’ the suffix -υλο being used in a diminutive sense, and σιβ- being connected with sap, ‘to be wise. Σίβιλλα occurs as a Woman’s name in an Attic inscription from the 4th cent. Eventually the name was applied la any Woman or prophetic gifts, according to Servius (on aen. Like the Pythia, she was a Woman, considered to be inspired by Apollo. Pausanias vouches for four Sibyls, the Erythraean Herophile, the Cumaean Demo, a Libyan prophetess, and ‘subsequent to Demo, an oracular Woman among the Hebrews, named Sabbe; Berosus is said to have been the father, Erymanthes the mother, of Sabbe, Some call her the Babylonian, others the Egyptian Sibyl’ (x
Philanthropy - He limits the ministry of His disciples to the villages of Judaea, bidding them avoid the villages of the Samaritans (Matthew 10:5); and in His interview with the Syrophœnician Woman (Mark 7:26) He not only repeats the limitation given to His disciples as binding also upon Himself, declaring that He was not sent save to the lost sheep of the house of Israel, but speaks of the Woman as a dog, and claims for the Jews that they are the children of the household. A far greater difficulty is seen in the story of the Syrophœnician Woman. The words can scarcely be justified even on the supposition that it was a harsh discipline intended to bring out the triumphant faith of the Woman. He throws into contrast with that doctrine the quick intuition of the Woman, as well as the humility of her trust as she declares that even the Gentiles have a place in the family of God
Revelation, the - The evil allowed in this church was systematic and controlling, as indicated by the name of the Woman, Jezebel, who called herself 'prophetess. A Woman (Israel) is seen as a sign in heaven, and brings forth a man child (Christ), whom Satan seeks at once to devour, but the child is caught up to God and to His throne. The Woman flees into the wilderness, and is nourished by God 1,260 days — last half-week of Daniel. The devil casts a flood (people) after the Woman, but it is swallowed up by the earthly organisations of men. He is angry with the Woman and sets himself to make war with the pious remnant of her seed. The Woman is seen riding the beast (the revived Empire), but she is drunk with the blood of saints and martyrs of Jesus
Biblical Commission - , universal creation by God, the special creation of man, the formation of the first Woman from man, the unity of the human race, the original happiness and subsequent fall of Adam and Eve, and the promise of a Redeemer
Crown - So the locusts wear crowns (Revelation 9:7 ), as does the Woman of Revelation 12:1 and the beast and the dragon (12:3; 13:1)
Banquets - Thus, the sinful Woman could come behind the conch where Jesus lay, and anoint His feet (Luke 7:37-38); and Mary, sister of Lazarus (John 12:2-3); and "John leaned on the Lord's bosom" at the last supper (John 13:23; John 13:25)
Vision - The ‘Shepherd’ is the divine teacher, who imparts his lessons by means of precept and allegory, and the Church appears as an aged Woman, whose features become increasingly youthful the oftener she is gazed upon
Torment - ’ The Woman arrayed as the sun was ‘travailing in birth, and in pain to be delivered’ (βασανιζομένη τεκεῖν, Revelation 12:2)
Ishmael - His mother chose a Woman of Egypt for his wife
Couch - where the Woman is spoken of (Luke 7:36-38) as washing and anointing the feet of Jesus while He was ‘sitting (reclining) at meat in the Pharisee’s house’; where our Lord washed the feet of His disciples while they were at supper (John 13:5); and where it is said of the beloved disciple at the supper that he, ‘leaning back, as lie was, on Jesus’ breast,’ spoke to Him of His betrayer (John 13:25)
Dancing - —The Oriental dance was performed either by an individual man or Woman, or by crescent lines of men dancing together and holding each other’s hands, or of women by themselves performing similar movements
Slip - ) A loose garment worn by a Woman
Nakedness - 1:8 plundered, devastated Jerusalem is pictured as a Woman whose nakedness is exposed
Companion - Re’ut refers to a “fellow Woman
Mother - The Woman through whom a nation originated is called its “mother”; she is the first or tribal “mother,” an ancestress: “Thus saith the Lord God unto Jerusalem; Thy birth and thy nativity is of the land of Canaan; thy father was an Amorite, and thy mother a Hittite” ( Oven - The work of baking is done by a Woman who sits beside the oven, and from time to time adds a few handfuls of fuel
Simeon Stylites - The pillar was then enclosed in a church, which no Woman was ever allowed to enter, and where supernatural manifestations were often seen
Family Life And Relations - Strife is to be avoided as destructive to the family's inner cohesiveness; any two males striving for the same Woman would yield an incendiary situation (e. The Woman convicted of adultery became a curse on the community to which she belonged (Numbers 5:27 ). Williams...
See also Divorce ; Marriage ; Woman ; Widow ...
Bibliography
Clean, Unclean - The most serious to least serious cases in descending order were: skin disease (Leviticus 13-14 ), childbirth (Leviticus 12 ), genital discharges (Leviticus 15:3-15,28-30 ), the corpse-contaminated priest (Ezekiel 44:26-27 ), the corpse-contaminated Nazirite (Numbers 6:9-12 ), one whose impurity is prolonged (Leviticus 5:1-13 ), the corpse-contaminated layperson (Numbers 5:2-4 ; 19:1-20 ), the menstruating Woman (Leviticus 15:19-24 ), the handling of the ashes of the red cow or the Day of Atonement offerings (Levv 16:26,28; Numbers 19:7-10 ), emission of semen (Leviticus 15:16-18 ), contamination by a carcass (Levv 11:24-40; 22:5), and secondary contamination (Leviticus 15 ; 22:4-7 ; Numbers 19:21-22 ). Jesus did not hesitate to touch the dead (Matthew 9:25 ; Mark 5:41 ; Luke 8:54 ), and allowed a sinful Woman (e. In such cases, and that of a Woman with a flow of blood (Matthew 9:20-22 ; Mark 5:27 ), Jesus is not defiled (he went through no ceremonial purification), but those are cleansed and healed
Seven Words, the - The first three words, ‘Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do’ (John 19:26-279), ‘Verily I say unto thee, To-day shalt thou be with me in paradise’ (Luke 23:43), and ‘Woman, behold thy son … behold thy mother’ (1618388224_64), were spoken between the third and the sixth hour, and they reveal to us the great High Priest, in His life of ministry, interceding for the transgressors, proclaiming pardon to the penitent, and blessing His own. ‘Woman, behold thy son … behold thy mother. He will not depart before He has provided a home for her; with His parting breath He commits her to the care of the disciple whom He loved: ‘Woman, behold thy son … behold thy mother
Messiah - He promised that the covenantal relationship would be restored through the victory that the seed of the Woman would have over Satan. The seed of the Woman would restore, continue, and bring to full fruition God's kingdom plans and goals. Jesus proclaimed himself as the Messiah in Nazareth (Luke 4:16-22 ) and at Jacob's well to the Samaritan Woman (John 4:24-25 )
the Man Who Went Out to Borrow Three Loaves at Midnight - Think shame, Woman! the devil said to Santa Teresa. A Woman at your time of life having to make such a confession. "The devil never so nearly had my soul for ever, as just after another fall of mine, and when he cried, For shame, O Woman, for shame
Marriage - a civil and religious contract, by which a man is joined and united to a Woman, for the ends of procreation. It is connected with the peace of society by assigning one Woman to one man, and the state protects him, therefore, in her exclusive possession. Though the Mosaic law no where obliges men to marry, the Jews have always looked upon it as an indispensable duty implied in the words, "Increase and multiply," Genesis 1:28 ; so that a man who did not marry his daughter before she was twenty years of age, was looked upon as accessary to any irregularities the young Woman might be guilty of for want of being timely married
Presentation - Paul had mentioned (Galatians 4:4) the sending forth of the Son of God into our world, he spoke of it in two stages, ‘born of a Woman,’ ‘born under the law’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ); and in both those acts or stages the Pauline Evangelist St. Mary’s availing herself of the permission, as a poor Woman, to offer the two doves instead of the costlier lamb is not consistent with the idea that the gold offered by the Wise Men was at her disposal: while St. ...
The legal ordinance (Leviticus 12) appointed that a Woman who had borne a man child should be (ceremonially) unclean for seven days; for three and thirty days more she might touch no hallowed thing, nor come into the sanctuary
Man (2) - Matthew 4:4; Matthew 5:16); ἀνήρ, a man as distinguished from a Woman (Matthew 7:24; Matthew 7:26, Luke 14:24). He received ‘sinners,’ and ate with them; He dined with tax-gatherers, and spoke kindly and compassionately to a Woman of ill fame (Luke 5:27-39; Luke 19:1-10, John 8:1-11). It was while sitting and talking with a Samaritan—a Samaritan Woman—that He said: ‘God is Spirit’ (John 4:24); it was in the house of Zacchaeus that men first heard that ‘the Son of man came to seek and to save that which was lost’ (Luke 19:10); while it was in answer to ‘a certain lawyer’ that Jesus related the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37). He was of value, as a lost coin is of value, for which a Woman sweeps the house and searches diligently until she finds it (Luke 15:8-10); or as a son is of value, who, even if he has left home for a far country and there wasted his substance in riotous living, is still dear to his father’s heart (Matthew 23:37,)
Michal, Saul's Daughter - ...
Not to speak of the past, had Michal done that day what any Woman with any sense of decency left in her would have done-had she put on her royal garments and set out with David to the house of Obed-Edom, how differently for her and for David that day would have ended! For, once on the ground; once surrounded with the assembled people, the magnificent scene would have carried Michal away. No ambitious Woman, and least of all Saul's royal-hearted daughter, could have seen assembled Israel that day without being swept into sympathy with the scene. Dante describes Michal as a Woman who stood scornful and afflicted at her royal window. ...
Being the Woman she was, and having the husband she had, Michal could not but feel both scorn and affliction that day
Conversion - They then experienced a radical change in their lives: Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1 ), the Woman at the well at Sychar (John 4:1 ), the sinful Woman in the house of Simon (Luke 7:1 ), and Nicodemus (John 3:1 )
Cain (1) - " She recognized this gift of Jehovah, though accompanied with the foretold "sorrow" of conception, as a first step toward fulfilling the promise of the Redeemer, "the seed of the Woman" (Genesis 3:15). Adam's sin now bears fratricide among its first and terrible fruits; and the seed of the serpent stands forth thenceforward throughout man's history, as distinguished from the seed of the Woman (Genesis 3:15)
Punishment - However, if two men were fighting and one of them accidentally hit a pregnant Woman so that she both miscarried and died, he would suffer death also (Exodus 21:22-25 ). In the case of a man raping a single Woman, he could be forced to marry her (relinquishing the right to divorce) and pay her father the marriage present, but no punishment was required (Deuteronomy 22:28-29 )
Gentiles (2) - With this, too, coincides the teaching of His many parables about the Kingdom of heaven and that recorded in the Fourth Gospel—in this Gospel particularly all His utterances are in accord with His declaration to the Samaritan Woman concerning the true worshippers (John 4:23), and with the impression produced on the Samaritans that He was the Saviour of the world (John 4:42); for in this Gospel especially His words of warning, of encouragement, and of hope embrace all mankind: ‘God so loved the world … that whosoever believeth … shall have eternal life’ (John 3:16). One is His saying to the Syrophœnician Woman, ‘I am not sent but unto the lost sheep of the house of Israel’ (Matthew 15:24); and the other is His injunction to the Twelve, ‘Go not into the way of the Gentiles, and into any city of the Samaritans enter ye not; but go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel’ (Matthew 10:5; Matthew 10:8). In the first case there is little doubt that our Lord’s words were intended to test or to call forth the Woman’s faith, and are not to be understood as implying any unwillingness on His part to assist her (see Syrophœnician Womam)
Home (2) - The place of the Woman, on the other hand, was preeminently in the home. In this respect the Jews shared the sentiment of other Oriental peoples; but the lot of the Jewish Woman was much superior to that of non-Jewish women in the East, and her position in the home was better than that of the Roman matron of that period
Samaria - The Woman of Samaria and several of her townsmen (John 4) were the firstfruits gathered into Christ; the fuller harvest followed under Philip the evangelist deacon (Acts 8, compare John 4:35). The Pentateuch was their sole code; for their copy they claimed an antiquity and authority above any Jewish manuscript Jewish renegades joined them; hence they began to claim Jewish descent, as the Samaritan Woman (John 4:12) says "Jacob our father
Firstborn - Hence the husband of several wives would have to redeem the firstborn of each one of them, while the husband of a Woman who had had children by a previous marriage need not redeem her child although it was his firstborn’ (Jewish Encyc. Moreover, the first male child of a Woman need not be redeemed if a female child has been born before him
Almsgiving - Again, by His own example, in the case of the Woman of Canaan (Matthew 15:21-28), He cuts off another unworthy motive, too often active in our so-called almsgiving, the wish to get rid of a beggar’s importunity; while, both in the case of this Woman and of her with the issue of blood (Matthew 9:20, Mark 5:25, Luke 8:43), He shows by His own example that true kindness is not indiscriminate, but takes the most careful account, not so much of the immediate and material, as of the ultimate and spiritual benefit which may be done, by its assistance, to the afflicted or the needy
Cloth, Clothing - The Book of Proverbs depicts a Woman who spends much time spinning and weaving fabric (Proverbs 31:13-24 ). The Woman also wore a headcloth of brightly colored or patterned material which could be used as a wrapped support for carrying loads (Isaiah 3:22 ), a veil (Genesis 24:65 ; Song of Song of Solomon 5:7 ) or a hanging protective garment against the hot sun
Purification (2) - —That childbirth renders a Woman unclean is an almost universal belief among primitive peoples. Among some Arab tribes it was customary to build a hut outside the camp, where the Woman had to stay for a time (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iv
Feast of the Immaculate Conception - It is in accord with the texts of Scripture (Genesis 3), "I will put enmities between thee [1] and the Woman, and thy seed and her seed"; (Luke 1), "Hail, full of grace
Evangelism - He exorcised a demon, healed a poor Woman that had hemorrhaged for twelve years, and raised Jairus' daughter from the dead
Immaculate Conception - It is in accord with the texts of Scripture (Genesis 3), "I will put enmities between thee [1] and the Woman, and thy seed and her seed"; (Luke 1), "Hail, full of grace
Immaculate Conception, Feast of the - It is in accord with the texts of Scripture (Genesis 3), "I will put enmities between thee [1] and the Woman, and thy seed and her seed"; (Luke 1), "Hail, full of grace
Mark (John) - ...
(1) John Mark was a Jew and son of Mary, who was a leading Christian Woman at Jerusalem
si'Mon - [3] ...
Simon, a Pharisee, in whose house a penitent Woman anointed the head and feet of Jesus
Wife - In marriage two equal human beings, a man and a Woman, have two different functions, those of husband and wife (Genesis 2:24-25)
Ruth - (ryooth) The Woman, an ancestor of David and Jesus, and the biblical book which tells the story of the reversal of fortunes for Ruth and her mother-in-law, Naomi
Mill, Millstone - In manipulating the rubber, the Woman grasped it by both ends and ground the grains of wheat or barley with the convex side
Curse - It is well to notice, in connexion with this kind of anathema, the strong expression used by Christ in addressing the Canaanitish Woman, as one descended from a ‘devoted’ race (Matthew 15:26)
Marriage - A convenant between a man and a Woman, in which they mutually promise cohabitation, and a continual care to promote the comfort and happiness of each other
Beelzebub or Beelzebul - 8); Elisha was recognized as a prophet by the Woman of Shunem, because no fly crept over his place at the table (Berakh
Foot - Christ drew attention to the fact that in the house of one who prided himself upon his precise fulfilment of the Law this service had been more than rendered to Him by a Woman whom the Pharisee despised as a sinner (Luke 7:44; Luke 7:46)
Moon - Hence in a day of brightness, and light, and glory, the church is represented in the Revelations as "a Woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet
Law - The natural father might also instruct his son in wise living, even as a Godfearing Woman was an example of kind “instruction”: “She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness” ( Foot - " "The feet of the debauched Woman go down to death
Mystery - " So Revelation 17:5 , "And upon her forehead a name written, Mystery, Babylon the Great," that is, Babylon in a spiritual sense, "the mother of idolatry and abominations;" and, Revelation 17:7 , "I will tell thee the mystery" or spiritual signification "of the Woman
Afflict, Affliction - Philippians 1:16 ); James 1:27 ; of the distress of Woman in child-birth, John 16:21 ; of persecution, Acts 11:19 ; 14:22 ; 20:23 ; 1 Thessalonians 3:3,7 ; Hebrews 10:33 ; Revelation 2:10 ; 7:14 ; of the "afflictions" of Christ, from which (His vicarious sufferings apart) his followers must not shrink, whether sufferings of body or mind, Colossians 1:24 ; of sufferings in general, 1 Corinthians 7:28 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:6 , etc
That - The Woman was made whole from that hour
Marriage, Marry - Judges 15:1 ) ...
B — 1: γαμέω (Strong's #1060 — Verb — gameo — gam-eh'-o ) "to marry" (akin to A), is used (a) of "the man," Matthew 5:32 ; 19:9,10 ; 22:25 (RV; AV, "married a wife"); Matthew 22:30 ; 24:38 ; Mark 6:17 ; 10:11 ; 12:25 ; Luke 14:20 ; 16:18 ; 17:27 , RV, "married" (AV, "married wives"); Luke 20:34,35 ; 1 Corinthians 7:28 (1st part); 1 Corinthians 7:33 ; (b) of "the Woman," in the Active Voice, Mark 10:12 ; 1 Corinthians 7:28 (last part); 1 Corinthians 7:34 ; 1 Timothy 5:11,14 ; in the Passive Voice, 1 Corinthians 7:39 ; (c) of "both sexes," 1 Corinthians 7:9,10,36 ; 1 Timothy 4:3
Cry, Crying - 1, "to cry out," an onomatopoeic word, used especially of the "cry" of the raven; then, of any inarticulate cries, from fear, pain etc; of the "cry" of a Canaanitish Woman, Matthew 15:22 (so the best mss
Occupation (2) - He rebuked Simon, haughtily hospitable, and commended the kindly Woman, whose love exceeded her pride (Luke 7:44 ff
Flesh - A man and a Woman united in marriage become one flesh, and people related to each other share the same flesh (Genesis 2:24; Genesis 29:14; Romans 1:3; Romans 4:1; Romans 9:3; see also BODY)
Valerianus, Emperor - A Woman who was a follower of Marcion shared their fate
Proverbs - ...
(1) December is the rainy season, and with every wayside brook running full, Jesus would not have needed to crave a drink from the Woman’s pitcher to slake His thirst (cf. He spied the Woman returning in haste from the town accompanied by an eager throng (John 4:28-30), and He broke out, ‘Ye have a saying (λέγετε, cf. One misses the spirit of the conversation between Jesus and the Syrophœnician Woman (Matthew 15:21-28 = Mark 7:24-30) unless one observes that it is a bandying of proverbs. The Woman had followed them indoors [6], and she pressed her suit as they reclined at table. ...
It was some such proverb that shaped our Lord’s speech to the Woman. And the Woman replied in like terms: ‘Yea, Lord, for even the whelps cat of the crumbs that fall from the table of their masters
Bible, Authority of the - It is supremely challenged by a creature of his own making in Genesis 3 : "Yea, hath God said ?" asks the serpent of the Woman (3:1 KJV), and the question reverberates down through the centuries that follow, all the way to the Book of Revelation, where the Almighty God "hath on his vesture and on his thigh a name written, king of kings and lord of lords, " and "death and hell were cast into the lake of fire. "When the Woman saw that the fruit of the tree was good for food and pleasing to the eye, and also desirable for gaining wisdom, she took some and ate it. She also gave some to her husband, and he ate it Then the Lord God said to the Woman, What is this you have done?'" (3:6,13)
Kenosis - In four pregnant statements, in which the Christian salvation is brought into most intimate relation with the humiliation of the Son of God, this Kenosis is more fully defined: ‘God, sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh [1], condemned sin in the flesh’ (Romans 8:3); ‘God sent forth his Son, born of a Woman, born under the law’ (Mark 5:30-32,7); ‘Him who knew no sin he made to be sin on our behalf’ [2]; ‘Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law, having become a curse for us’ [3]. The statement to the Woman of Samaria about the number of her husbands (John 4:17-18) is very perplexing; and possibly, as the conversation was probably reported by the Woman, may have been made more definite by her guilty conscience than it actually was, even as she exaggerates in her account of what Christ had told her (John 4:29)
the Mother of Zebedee's Children - The splendid humility of the Syrophænician Woman completely overcame Him, and now He is equally overcome with the splendid shamelessness of Salome's request. And what would I think of them if they took advantage of their friendship with Christ, as I am taking advantage of my friendship with Him, in order to get Him to favour them and their sons at our expense? And what would I think of Him if He was imposed upon, and prevailed upon, to overlook, and neglect, and injure my sons, at the shameful plot of some of their mothers?' Had Salome talked in that way to her own heart; and, especially, had she brought up her sons to look at themselves and at all their fellows in that light; she would then have been as wise a Woman as she now was a fool, and as good a mother as she now was a bad. But instead of that, this cruel Woman to her own flesh and blood was for exposing her two sons to every possible shaft and spear of envy, and anger, and ill-will, and injury
the Importunate Widow - But after that day when this wild Woman suddenly sprang in upon him with a knife hidden away among her rags-after that day he said, Because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me. ...
Now it is not by any means every Woman who has the making of a "widow indeed" in her. Among all your adversaries, who is it that drives you day and night to God, like this Woman to the judge? Do you think that our Lord counts you up among His Father's elect? I think He does? I am sure He does, if your adversary that you cry to be revenged upon is sin
Mary Magdalene - When He bowed His head she saw Him do it, and she heard Him say, It is finished! It was not a place for a Woman. But Mary Magdalene was not a Woman; she was an angel. And now that He has ascended to His Father's house, He is saying to His saints and to His angels to this very day the very same words that He said in Simon's house-"This Woman since I came in hath not ceased to kiss my feet
Court Systems - When a Judahite Woman who was the concubine of a Levite living in the territory of Ephraim was raped and murdered in Gibeah of Benjamin, several tribes were involved (Judges 19-21 ). The wise Woman from Tekoah appealed to David, a decision which had been made within her extended family (2 Samuel 14:1 )
Family - A Woman of character, however, could improve her situation and attain to a considerable degree of importance and influence as well as of personal freedom. ), and to the misery which it is in the power of a selfish Woman to inflict ( Proverbs 19:13 etc
Error - Take the case of the Woman suffering from an issue of blood (Matthew 9:20-22, Mark 5:25-34, Luke 8:43-48). It would be hard to exaggerate the poor Woman’s ignorance. ’ Jesus adopted essentially the same method in dealing with persons like Zacchaeus, Mary Magdalene, the Woman of Samaria, and the ‘publicans and sinners’ generally
Jesus Christ - On his way through Samaria he conversed with a Woman at Jacob's well. Early in the third year of his ministry, Jesus disputed with the Pharisees about eating with unwashed hands, and went toward the northwest, healed the daughter of the Syrophœnician Woman, and then passed around to Decapolis, where he wrought many miracles and fed 4000
Clean, Cleanness - Thus contact with a dead person (Leviticus 5:2 ; Leviticus 21:1 ), a creeping insect or animal (Leviticus 22:4-5 ), the carcass of an animal (Leviticus 11:28 ; Deuteronomy 14:8 ), or a Woman in labor (Leviticus 12:4-5 ) brought about uncleanness, which required ritual purification to remove it. He taught that adultery had been committed just as fully by a man's lusting after a Woman (Matthew 5:27-28 ) as if the physical act had occurred
Premeditation - The immediacy of an intuition is seen in His use of the opportunity given Him by the Woman at the well (John 4:7), or in the call of Nathanael (John 1:28), or in the treatment of the Woman taken in sin (John 8:1-7), or in the scene at Simon the Pharisee’s (Matthew 26:6-13 || Mark 14:3-9, Luke 7:36-50, John 12:1-8), or the freeing of the Sabbath from Rabbinic tyranny (Matthew 12:3 || Mark 2:25, Luke 6:3)
Head - The divine influences on the world result in a series: God is the “head” of Christ; Christ is the “head” of man; man is the “head” of the Woman, and as such he is to love and care for his wife as Christ does His bride (1 Corinthians 11:3 )
Delight - ...
A man might delight in another man (1 Samuel 18:22 ; Esther 6:6-11 ), or a man might delight in a Woman (Genesis 34:19 )
Palm (of Hand) - The Woman of Zarephath told Elijah: “… I have not a cake, but a handful of meal in a barrel, and a little oil in a cruse …” (1 Kings 17:12)
Beast - ...
The Woman sitting on them is the church conformed to the world; therefore the instrument of her sin is retributively made the instrument of her punishment (Ezekiel 23; Jeremiah 2:19; Revelation 17:16)
Anger - Even the disciples are self-righteously angry with James and John (Matthew 20:24 ) and with the Woman who anointed Jesus with costly ointment (Mark 14:4-5 )
Pharisees - Hence the Sadducees, who believed in no resurrection, and supposed our Saviour to teach it as a Pharisee, very shrewdly urged the difficulty of disposing of the Woman who had in this world been the wife of seven husbands
Roads - It was by this road that Jesus journeyed when He spoke to the Woman of Samaria (John 4:4)
Laying on of Hands - Jesus healed a blind man (Mark 8:23-25 ), the sick (Mark 6:5 ; Luke 4:40 ), and a Woman with “a spirit of infirmity” (Luke 13:11-13 ) by laying hands on them
Joy - The Woman rejoices upon finding the lost coin (15:8-10)
Fruit - When God created man and Woman (Genesis 1:26 ), endowing them with moral, intellectual, and spiritual power (cf. The offspring of the human pair is called, from the Woman's viewpoint, "the fruit of the womb" (Deuteronomy 7:13 ; 28:4,11 , 18,53 ; 30:9 ; Luke 1:42 ), and from the husband's standpoint, "fruit of his loins" (Psalm 131:11 , ; LXX Acts 2:30 , ; Greek text cf
Prostitution - In one case there is a penalty: If a Woman has been betrothed to a man and he discovers that she is not a virgin, she may be stoned to death for prostituting herself (Deuteronomy 22:13-21 )
Jacob's Well - ...
In John 4:6 the well is called πηγὴ (‘fountain’) τοῦ Ἰακώβ: in John 4:11 the Woman refers to it as τὸ φρέαρ (‘the cistern or pit’) which Jacob gave. The Woman’s presence at the well at noon may have been due to the fact that she was seeking water for workmen on the adjacent cornlands, rather than for domestic use (PEFSt Pillar - The manifestation made on both occasions as the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, plainly shows that the covenant of redemption, in the seed of the Woman, was the great and leading cause of all
Marriage - From the whole of which taken together, I think it is very plain, not only of the original design from the beginning, that every Woman should have her own husband, and, every husband his own wife, but also that the married state was intended, in the most dear and tender manner, to set forth and display Christ's union with his church
Gregorius, Saint., the Illuminator - After two years Tiridates ordered the saint to be thrown into a muddy pit infested with creeping creatures, into which malefactors were wont to be hurled, in the city of Ardashat, and there he lived for 14 years, being fed by a Christian Woman named Anna
Genesis, Book of - Genesis contains all the great principles of God's relationship with man, even to the bruising of Satan's head, and in type the union of Christ and the church by a Woman being 'builded' out of a rib of Adam, and brought to the man. ...
Respecting Isaac and Ishmael, the bondwoman and her son, type of the flesh under law, must be cast out, that Isaac the son of promise may inherit all: cf
Palmtree - " Vespasian's coin bore the palm and Zion as a Woman sitting sadly beneath, and the legend "Judaea captive" (see p
Cassianus, Julius, a Heretical Teacher - that he who is united to a Woman soweth to the flesh and therefore shall of the flesh reap corruption
Vessel - ...
Kelı̂y can mean “clothing”: “The Woman shall not wear that which pertaineth unto a man, neither shall a man put on a Woman’s garment: for all that do so are abomination unto the Lord thy God” ( Light - ) Wanton; unchaste; as, a Woman of light character
Archangel - That combat who was to maintain? in that combat who was to be victorious, but the seed of the Woman?...
From all this it is evident, that Michael is a name for our Lord himself, in his particular character of the champion of his faithful people, against the violence of the apostate faction and the wiles of the devil
Child - They spent their time in learning those domestic and other arts, which are befitting a Woman's situation and character, till they arrived at that period in life when they were to be sold, or, by a better fortune, given away in marriage, Proverbs 31:13 ; 2 Samuel 13:7 . The poor Woman, whose oil Elisha increased so much as enabled her to pay her husband's debts, complained to the prophet, that, her husband being dead, the creditor was come to take away her two sons to be bondmen, 2 Kings 4:1
Giant - Job says that the ancient Rephaim groan under the waters; and Solomon, that the ways of a loose Woman lead to the Rephaim; that he who deviates from the ways of wisdom, shall dwell in the assembly of Rephaim, that is, in hell, Proverbs 2:18 ; Proverbs 4:18 ; Proverbs 21:16 , &c; Genesis 14:5 ; Deuteronomy 2:11 ; Deuteronomy 2:20 ; Deuteronomy 3:11 ; Deuteronomy 3:13 ; Joshua 12:4 ; Joshua 13:12 ; Job 26:5
Poetry, Hebrew - 10-31, of the book of Proverbs is an alphabetical acrostic in praise of "the virtuous Woman
Light - ) Wanton; unchaste; as, a Woman of light character
Timothy, First And Second, Theology of - He points out that "Adam was not the one deceived; it was the Woman who was deceived and became a sinner" (1 Timothy 2:14 ). It is probably that the definite article with "childbearing" is the important item here, and that the intent of the verse is that the Woman will be saved, even though she fell into transgression in the beginning, through THE Childbearing, the incarnation of Christ as promised to Eve in Genesis 3:15 . The Woman's continuance in faith, love, and sanctity with self-restraint are then assumed, by these interpreters, to be evidences of a living faith within the saved Woman. Paul goes on to say, using the Greek present tense to clarify his injunctions, that he does not allow a Woman to continue teaching or to continue exercising authority over a man (1 Timothy 2:12 ). ...
Furthermore, to these instructions regarding a Woman's service in the church, Paul adds some instructions regarding her dress for worship (1 Timothy 2:9-10 ). " In keeping with the manner of speaking of the time, he does not forbid all outward adornment, but desires that a Woman's primary attractiveness come from the good words of a godly character
Joseph (2) - Divorce could be effected publicly, so that the shame of the Woman might be seen by all; or it could be done privately, by the method of handing the bill of separation to the Woman in presence of two witnesses
Proverbs, Book of - Such sayings also occur elsewhere, “Like a gold ring in a swine's snout is a beautiful Woman without discretion” ( Proverbs 11:22 ). The epilogue of the book (Proverbs 31:10-31 ) presents an alphabetic poem on wisdom embodied in the “valiant Woman
Mill - A Woman of Thebez, driven to desperation by his furious attack on the tower, started up from the mill at which she was grinding, seized the upper mill stone, פלה דכב , and, rushing to the top of the gate, cast it on his head, and fractured his skull. This was the feat of a Woman, for the mill is worked only by females; it was not a piece of a mill stone, but the rider, the distinguishing name of the upper mill stone, which literally rides upon the other, and is a piece or division of the mill: it was a stone of two feet broad, and therefore fully sufficient, when thrown from such a height, to produce the effect mentioned in the narrative
Joab - ...
Joab next, by the wise Woman of Tekoa and her parable, induced the king to restore Absalom, which Joab saw was David's own wish, though justice constrained him to severity. David discerned Joab's hand in the Tekoan Woman's application. Joab so effectively besieged Abel of Beth Maachah that the townsmen were glad to save their town by sacrificing Sheba, throwing his head, at the suggestion of a wise Woman in the town, over the wall to Joab
Lois And Eunice - ...
THIS Lois was a God-fearing Woman herself, and a Woman of a strong and an unfeigned faith. How such a good Woman, how two such good women, could have fallen into this tremendous trap, we can only guess
Sympathy - This idea is suggested by His remark with regard to the healing of certain demoniacs (Luke 19:1-10), that the performance of the miracle must be preceded by prayer, and is illustrated in the healing of the Woman with the issue of blood (Mark 5:30), when Christ perceived ‘that virtue had gone out of him. The contrast is pointed between the self-righteous host and the sinful Woman who loved much because she had been forgiven much. His heart went out particularly to those who were in any spiritual need, and the conversation with the Woman of Samaria shows how the ‘doctrine of mankind’ rose superior to the superficial cleavages of race, descent, occupation, or even character, and pronounced them all of small account in comparison with that which is common to all humanity—a soul
Individuality - He brings the modesty of the Woman with the issue of blood into prominence, to give her the assurance she needed for her comfort (Matthew 9:20 ff. He rejects roughly the prayer of the Canaanitish Woman, to show more clearly her right to be heard (Matthew 15:21-28). The Woman of Samaria, no longer able to command the protection of even the poorest marriage tie, and too disreputable to appear at the well except when the midday sun kept the other women at home, is offered living water to refresh her soul parched for sympathy, and is so interpreted to herself that she said, ‘He told me all that ever I did’ (John 4:1-26)
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - "It is in some respects like leaven which a Woman took and hid in three measures of meal till the whole was leavened. Well, a little lump of leaven that a Woman can hold in her hand does not look to be much, nor to have much power in it. A foul thought, a foul hint, a foul innuendo, a foul word, a foul image; a foul-mouthed boy in the playground; a foul-mouthed man in the workshop, in the office, in the bothy; a foul-mouthed Woman in the workroom, in the kitchen, in the field; a foul book, a foul picture, a foul photograph in a shop-window in passing,-think it out, with a thousand illustrations taken from your own experience, and you will be wiser in this universal leaven of sensuality than all your teachers
Individuality - He brings the modesty of the Woman with the issue of blood into prominence, to give her the assurance she needed for her comfort (Matthew 9:20 ff. He rejects roughly the prayer of the Canaanitish Woman, to show more clearly her right to be heard (Matthew 15:21-28). The Woman of Samaria, no longer able to command the protection of even the poorest marriage tie, and too disreputable to appear at the well except when the midday sun kept the other women at home, is offered living water to refresh her soul parched for sympathy, and is so interpreted to herself that she said, ‘He told me all that ever I did’ (John 4:1-26)
Image of God - ...
Reflections of Personhood A man or Woman is a person, as God is a Person
Evil - The serpent of the Fall narrative cannot be pressed to mean more than a symbol of temptation, though the form which the temptation takes suggests hostility to the will of God external to the spirit of the Woman ( 2 Corinthians 11:3 , cf
Symbol - Hence Christ’s message to the Samaritan Woman concerning true worship, and His frequent protests against the ceremonial insincerities of the Pharisees
Joy - ...
As Jesus' death approached, He told His followers that soon they would be like a Woman in labor, whose sorrow would be turned into joy (John 16:20-22 )
Reverence - In these passages we have reference to the adoration of Jesus by the Magi, Herod’s desire to do homage to the child at Bethlehem, the request of the devil that Jesus should worship him, the disciples doing homage to their Lord by the sea, the Canaanite Woman humbling herself before Jesus, the mother of James and John as she made her bold request for her two sons, the disciples after the resurrection of Christ, the demoniac of Gadara before Jesus, the mock homage paid to Jesus on the Cross
Mary - The lesser known of these were the mother of John Mark (Acts 12:12; for details see MARK), a member of the church in Rome (Romans 16: