What does Wilderness mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
בַּמִּדְבָּ֑ר wilderness. 25
ἐρήμῳ solitary 22
בַּמִּדְבָּֽר wilderness. 20
בַּמִּדְבָּ֔ר wilderness. 17
מִדְבַּ֥ר wilderness. 9
בְּמִדְבַּ֥ר wilderness. 9
מִדְבַּר־ wilderness. 8
הַמִּדְבָּֽר wilderness. 8
בַּמִּדְבָּ֖ר wilderness. 8
בַּמִּדְבָּר֙ wilderness. 8
ἔρημον solitary 8
הַמִּדְבָּ֖ר wilderness. 7
מִדְבָּ֑ר wilderness. 7
הַמִּדְבָּ֔ר wilderness. 5
בְּמִדְבַּר־ wilderness. 5
בְּמִדְבַּ֣ר wilderness. 5
בַּמִּדְבָּ֗ר wilderness. 5
הַמִּדְבָּ֑ר wilderness. 4
מִדְבָּר֙ wilderness. 4
הַמִּדְבָּֽרָה wilderness. 4
מִמִּדְבַּר־ wilderness. 4
מִמִּדְבַּ֣ר wilderness. 4
הַמִּדְבָּ֗ר wilderness. 3
מִדְבַּ֣ר wilderness. 3
הַמִּדְבָּ֙רָה֙ wilderness. 3
בְּמִדְבַּ֖ר wilderness. 3
בַמִּדְבָּר֙ wilderness. 3
בַּמִּדְבָּ֥ר wilderness. 3
בַמִּדְבָּ֑ר wilderness. 2
הַמִּדְבָּ֑רָה wilderness. 2
בַּמִּדְבָּר֒ wilderness. 2
מִדְבָּ֖ר wilderness. 2
מִדְבָּ֔ר wilderness. 2
؟ בַּמִּדְבָּ֑ר wilderness. 2
לְמִדְבַּ֥ר wilderness. 2
בַּמִּדְבָּ֛ר wilderness. 2
בְּתֹ֣הוּ formlessness 2
מִדְבָּֽר wilderness. 2
בַּמִּדְבָּ֣ר wilderness. 2
הַמִּדְבָּ֣ר wilderness. 2
כַּמִּדְבָּֽר wilderness. 2
בַמִּדְבָּ֛ר wilderness. 2
בְמִדְבַּר־ wilderness. 2
כַמִּדְבָּ֖ר wilderness. 1
בַמִּדְבָּ֗ר wilderness. 1
לְצִיִּֽים a wild beast 1
בַמִּדְבָּ֖ר wilderness. 1
מִ֝דְבָּ֗ר wilderness. 1
מֵהַמִּדְבָּר֩ wilderness. 1
בַּצִּיָּֽה dryness 1
צִיָּ֑ה dryness 1
וּבַמִּדְבָּ֖ר wilderness. 1
עֲרָבָ֣ה desert plain 1
מִדְבַּ֖רָה wilderness. 1
צִיִּ֑ים a wild beast 1
וַעֲרָבָ֑ה desert plain 1
עֲרָבָ֥ה desert plain 1
וּמִמִּדְבָּ֖ר wilderness. 1
כָּֽעֲרָבָ֔ה desert plain 1
הָֽעֲבָרִ֗ים a station of Israel in the wilderness on the southeast side of Moab. 1
מִמִּדְבַּ֥ר wilderness. 1
؟ בַּמִּדְבָּֽר wilderness. 1
מִ֭דְבָּר wilderness. 1
לְמִדְבָּ֑ר wilderness. 1
בַ֭מִּדְבָּר wilderness. 1
! בַּמִּדְבָּ֥ר wilderness. 1
הֲמִדְבָּ֤ר wilderness. 1
וּבַמִּדְבָּ֑ר wilderness. 1
הַמִּדְבָּ֔רָה wilderness. 1
ἐρημίᾳ a solitude 1
מִדְבָּ֗ר wilderness. 1
וּבַמִּדְבָּר֙ wilderness. 1
ἐρήμοις solitary 1
ἐρήμου solitary 1
וְהָאֲשֵׁד֗וֹת foundation 1
יְשִׁמֹ֑ן waste 1
בִֽישִׁימ֣וֹן waste 1
מִדְבָּ֜רָה wilderness. 1
מִדְבָּ֔רָה wilderness. 1
מִדְבַּ֣רָה wilderness. 1
؟ בַּמִּדְבָּ֔ר wilderness. 1
בְּמִדְבַּ֤ר wilderness. 1
מֵֽהַמִּדְבָּ֛ר wilderness. 1
לְמִדְבַּ֣ר wilderness. 1
לַמִּדְבָּ֑ר wilderness. 1
בַּמִּדְבָּ֡ר wilderness. 1
הַמִּדְבָּ֖רָה wilderness. 1
מִדְבָּ֣ר wilderness. 1
הַמִּדְבָּ֨ר wilderness. 1
הַמִּדְבָּ֥ר wilderness. 1
בַּמִּדְבָּ֣ר ׀ wilderness. 1
הַמִּדְבָּר֙ wilderness. 1
מִדְבַּ֖ר wilderness. 1
הַמִּדְבָּ֗רָה wilderness. 1
מִמִּדְבָּ֣ר wilderness. 1
כַמִּדְבָּ֗ר wilderness. 1
כַּמִּדְבָּ֖ר wilderness. 1
מִדְבָּ֑רָה wilderness. 1
כַּמִּדְבָּ֑ר wilderness. 1
בַּמִּדְבָּ֕ר wilderness. 1
בַמִּדְבָּ֜ר wilderness. 1
מִדְבָּרָהּ֙ wilderness. 1
מִמִּדְבָּ֑ר wilderness. 1

Definitions Related to Wilderness

H4057


   1 Wilderness.
      1a pasture.
      1b uninhabited land, Wilderness.
      1c large tracts of Wilderness (around cities).
      1d Wilderness (fig.
      ).
   2 mouth.
      2a mouth (as organ of speech).
      

G2048


   1 solitary, lonely, desolate, uninhabited.
      1a used of places.
         1a1 a desert, Wilderness.
         1a2 deserted places, lonely regions.
         1a3 an uncultivated region fit for pasturage.
      1b used of persons.
         1b1 deserted by others.
         1b2 deprived of the aid and protection of others, especially of friends, acquaintances, kindred.
         1b3 bereft.
            1b3a of a flock deserted by the shepherd.
            1b3b of a women neglected by her husband, from whom the husband withholds himself.
            

H8414


   1 formlessness, confusion, unreality, emptiness.
      1a formlessness (of primeval earth).
         1a1 nothingness, empty space.
      1b that which is empty or unreal (of idols) (fig).
      1c wasteland, Wilderness (of solitary places).
      1d place of chaos.
      1e vanity.
      

H6723


   1 dryness, drought, desert.
   

H6160


   1 desert plain, steppe, desert, Wilderness.
   

H794


   1 foundation, slope.
   

G2047


   1 a solitude, an uninhabited region, a waste.
   

H6728


   1 a wild beast, desert-dweller, crier, yelper.
      1a a specific wild beast but not certainly identified.
      

H5863


   1 a station of Israel in the Wilderness on the southeast side of Moab.
   2 a town in Judah.
   Additional Information: Ije-abarim = “ruins of Abarim”.
   

H3452


   1 waste, Wilderness, desert, desolate place.
   

Frequency of Wilderness (original languages)

Frequency of Wilderness (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Wilderness
Heb. midhbar, denoting not a barren desert but a district or region suitable for pasturing sheep and cattle (Psalm 65:12 ; Isaiah 42:11 ; Jeremiah 23:10 ; Joel 1:19 ; 2:22 ); an uncultivated place. This word is used of the wilderness of Beersheba (Genesis 21:14 ), on the southern border of Palestine; the wilderness of the Red Sea (Exodus 13:18 ); of Shur (15:22), a portion of the Sinaitic peninsula; of Sin (17:1), Sinai (Leviticus 7:38 ), Moab (Deuteronomy 2:8 ), Judah (Judges 1:16 ), Ziph, Maon, En-gedi (1 Samuel 23:14,24 ; 24:1 ), Jeruel and Tekoa (2 Chronicles 20:16,20 ), Kadesh (Psalm 29:8 ). "The wilderness of the sea" (Isaiah 21:1 ). Principal Douglas, referring to this expression, says: "A mysterious name, which must be meant to describe Babylon (see especially ver. 9), perhaps because it became the place of discipline to God's people, as the wilderness of the Red Sea had been (Compare Ezekiel 20:35 ). Otherwise it is in contrast with the symbolic title in Isaiah 22:1 . Jerusalem is the "valley of vision," rich in spiritual husbandry; whereas Babylon, the rival centre of influence, is spiritually barren and as restless as the sea (comp 57:20)." A Short Analysis of the O.T.
Jeshimon, a desert waste (Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Psalm 68:7 ).
'Arabah, the name given to the valley from the Dead Sea to the eastern branch of the Red Sea. In Deuteronomy 1:1 ; 2:8 , it is rendered "plain" (RSV, "Arabah").
Tziyyah, a "dry place" (Psalm 78:17 ; 105:41 ).
Tohu, a "desolate" place, a place "waste" or "unoccupied" (Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Job 12:24 ; Compare Genesis 1:2 , "without form"). The wilderness region in the Sinaitic peninsula through which for forty years the Hebrews wandered is generally styled "the wilderness of the wanderings." This entire region is in the form of a triangle, having its base toward the north and its apex toward the south. Its extent from north to south is about 250 miles, and at its widest point it is about 150 miles broad. Throughout this vast region of some 1,500 square miles there is not a single river. The northern part of this triangular peninsula is properly the "wilderness of the wanderings" (et-Tih). The western portion of it is called the "wilderness of Shur" (Exodus 15:22 ), and the eastern the "wilderness of Paran." The "wilderness of Judea" (Matthew 3:1 ) is a wild, barren region, lying between the Dead Sea and the Hebron Mountains. It is the "Jeshimon" mentioned in 1 Samuel 23:19 .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Shur, Wilderness of
(sshyoor) Place name meaning, “wall.” Region on Egypt's northeastern border, perhaps named after wall Egyptians built to protect their border, where Moses made first stop after crossing the Red Sea (Exodus 15:22 ). Earlier, Sarah's handmaid, Hagar, had come toward Shur after her expulsion from the clan of Abraham (Genesis 16:7 ). Abraham lived near Shur (Genesis 20:1 ). Saul smote the Amalekites in that area (1 Samuel 15:7 ). David and his men made forays as far as Shur while eluding King Saul (1 Samuel 27:8 ). Shur may be modern tell el-Fara.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Sin, Wilderness of
SIN, WILDERNESS OF (name probably derived from the moon-god Sin). A region on the route of the Hebrews from Egypt to Mt. Sinai. It is usually identified with the plain lying S. of the Ras Abu Zenimeh . Upon the view held in many quarters that Mt. Sinai must be located somewhere in the Negeb, the wilderness of Sin was on the more direct route from Egypt to Kadesh, near to if not identical with the desert of Zin ( Numbers 13:21 ; Numbers 20:1 ; Numbers 27:14 ; Numbers 33:36 ; Numbers 34:3 , Deuteronomy 32:51 , Joshua 15:1-3 ). Cf. Zin.
H. L. Willett.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Wilderness, Desert
WILDERNESS, DESERT . These terms stand for several Heb. and Gr. words, with different shades of meaning.
1. midbâr (from dâbar , ‘to drive’) means properly the land to which the cattle were driven, and is used of dry pasture land where scanty grazing was to be found. It occurs about 280 times in OT and is usually tr. [1] ‘wilderness,’ though we have ‘desert’ about a dozen times. It is the place where wild animals roam: pelicans ( Psalms 102:6 ), wild asses ( Job 24:5 , Jeremiah 2:24 ), ostriches ( Lamentations 4:3 ), jackals ( Malachi 1:3 ); and is without settled inhabitants, though towns or settlements of nomadic tribes may be found ( Joshua 15:61-62 , Isaiah 42:11 ). This term is usually applied to the Wilderness of the Wanderings or the Arabian desert, but may refer to any other waste. Special waste tracts are distinguished: wilderness of Shur, Zin, Paran, Kadesh, Maon, Ziph, Tekoa, Moab, Edom, etc.
2. ‘ârâbâh (probably from a word meaning ‘dry’) signifies a dry, desolate, unfertile tract of land, ‘steppe,’ or ‘desert plain.’ As a proper name, it is applied to the great plain including the Jordan Valley and extending S. to the Gulf of Akabah, ‘ the Arabah .’ but it is applied also to steppes in general, and translated ‘wilderness,’ ‘desert,’ and sometimes in pl. ‘plains,’ e.g . of Moab, of Jericho.
3. chorbâh (from a root ‘to be waste or desolate’) is properly applied to cities or districts once inhabited now lying waste, and is translated ‘wastes,’ ‘deserts,’ ‘desolations,’ though it is once used of the Wilderness of the Wanderings ( Isaiah 48:21 ).
4. tsiyyâh meaning ‘dry ground’ is twice translated ‘wilderness’ in AV [2] : Job 30:3 (RV [3] ‘dry ground’), Psalms 78:17 (RV [3] ‘desert,’ RVm [5] ‘a dry land’).
5. tôhû has the special meaning of a ‘wild desolate expanse.’ In Job 6:18 it is the waste where the caravans perish, it is applied to the primeval chaos ( Genesis 1:2 ), also to the Wilderness of the Wanderings ( Deuteronomy 32:10 ‘ waste howling wilderness’).
6. The NT terms are erçmos and erçmia , the former being used either as noun or as adjective, with ‘place’ or ‘country’ understood. Generally the noun is tr. [1] ‘wilderness,’ the adjective ‘desert’ in the English versions.
On deserts named in NT see artt. on respective names.
W. F. Boyd.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ephraim in the Wilderness
(John 11 :: 54 ), a town to which our Lord retired with his disciples after he had raised Lazarus, and when the priests were conspiring against him. It lay in the wild, uncultivated hill-country to the north-east of Jerusalem, betwen the central towns and the Jordan valley.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Wandering in the Wilderness
[1]
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Sin, Wilderness of,
a tract of the wilderness which the Israelites reached after leaving the encampment by the Red Sea. (Numbers 33:11,23 ) Their next halting-place, (Exodus 16:1 ; 17:1 ) was Rephidim, probably the Wady Feiran [1]; on which supposition it would follow that Sin must lie between that way and the coast of the Gulf of Suez, and of course west of Sinai. In the wilderness of Sin the manna was first gathered, and those who adopt the supposition that this was merely the natural product of the tarfa bush find from the abundance of that shrub in Wady es-Sheikh , southeast of Wady Ghurundel , a proof of local identity.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Wilderness of the Wanderings
(On Israel's route from Rameses to Sinai. (See EXODUS; EGYPT.) Κadesh or Κadesh Βurned ("son of wandering" (Bedouin), or "land of earthquake," as Psalms 29:8, "the Lord shaketh the wilderness of Cades") was the encampment from which the spies were sent and to which they returned (Numbers 13:26; Numbers 32:8), on the W. of the wilderness of Zin, which was N.E. of the wilderness of Paran; S. of the wilderness of Paran was the wilderness of Sinai between the gulfs of Akabah and Suez. Comparing Numbers 12:16 with Numbers 33:18, and Numbers 13:3; Numbers 13:21-26, we see that the Kadesh of Numbers 13 is the Rithmah of Numbers 33. The stages catalogued in this last chapter are those visited during the years of penal wandering.
Rithmah (from retem the "broom" abounding there) designates the encampment during the first march toward Canaan (Numbers 33:18); Kadesh the second encampment, in the same district though not on the same spot, in the 40th year (Numbers 33:36-38); N. of Mount Her where Aaron died, and to which Israel marched as the first stage in their journey when denied a passage through Mount Seir (Numbers 20:21-22). From the low ground of Kadesh the spies "went up" to search the land, which is called the mountain (Numbers 13:17; Numbers 13:21-22). The early encampment at Rithmah (Numbers 33:18-19) took place in midsummer in the second year after the Exodus (for Israel left Sinai the 20th day of the second month, Numbers 10:11, i.e. the middle of May; next the month at Kibroth Hattaavah would bring them to July); the later at Kadesh the first month of the 40th year (Numbers 20:1).
At the first encampment they were at Kadesh for at least the 40 days of the spies' search (Numbers 13:25); here Moses and the tabernacle remained (Numbers 14:44) when the people presumptuously tried to occupy the land in spite of Jehovah's sentence dooming all above 20 to die in the wilderness (the name Kadesh, "holy," may be due to the long continuance of the holy tabernacle there). After their repulse they lingered for long ("many days," Deuteronomy 1:45-46) hoping for a reversal of their punishment. At last they broke up their prolonged encampment at Kadesh and compassed Mount Seir many days (Deuteronomy 2:1), i.e. wandered in the wilderness of Paran until the whole generation of murmurers had died. The wilderness is called Et Tih, i.e. "of wandering," or "Paran," being surrounded W. and S. by the Paran mountains (Numbers 13:26; the limestone of the pyramids is thought to have been brought from Et Tih).
To this period belong the 17 stages of Numbers 33:19-36. Early in the 40th year (Numbers 20:1) Israel reassembled at Kadesh and stayed for three or four months (compare Numbers 20:1 with Numbers 20:22-28; Numbers 33:38). Miriam died here. Soon the people gathered here in full number, exhausted the water supply, and were given water miraculously from the rock. Thence proceeding, they were at Mount Hor refused a passage through Edom; then by the marches of Numbers 33:41-49 they went round Edom's borders to Moab's plains. At Mount Hor Arad attacked them and brought destruction on his cities (Numbers 21:3). In Numbers 20:1 the words "Israel even the whole congregation" mark the reassembling of the people at the close of the 40 years, as the same words in Numbers 13:26; Numbers 14:1, mark the commencement of the penal wandering.
The 38 intervening years are a blank, during which the covenant was in abeyance and the "congregation" broken up. The tabernacle and its attendant Levites, priests, and chiefs, formed the rallying point, moving from time to time to the different stations specified up and down the country as the people's head quarters. Qehelathah and Μakhelot ("assembling," "assemblies") were probably places of extraordinary gatherings. At other times the Israelites were scattered over the wilderness of Paran as nomads feeding their flocks wherever they found pasture. This dispersion for foraging meets the objections raised on the ground of subsistence for such a multitude for so long. The plain er Rahah, W. of Sinai, now bare, is described by a traveler in the 16th century as a "vast green plain." The forests then existing tended to produce a greater rainfall and therefore better pasture than at present, when scarcely any wood is left (the Bedouins burning the acacias for charcoal).
Various events and enactments belonging to the 38 years' wandering (the law of the meat offering, the stoning of the Sabbath breaker, etc., Numbers 15; Korah's rebellion, etc., Numbers 16; Aaron's rod budding, Numbers 17; the Levites' and priests' charge and portion, Numbers 18; the red heifer water of separation, Numbers 19) are recorded in Numbers 15:1-19:22. The last year in the wilderness, the 40th, is referred to in Numbers 20:1-36:13. During the 38 years Israel trafficked in provisions with surrounding tribes (Deuteronomy 2:26-29). The desert of wandering was the highway of caravans between Egypt and the East. Fish was obtainable from the Red Sea. They were encamped close to it at Ezion Geber (Numbers 33:35). Traces of a population and resources are found in parts of the wilderness where now there are neither.
The hardships alluded to (Deuteronomy 1:19; Deuteronomy 2:3; Deuteronomy 8:15) refer to the 4Oth year marches through the Arabah, which seemed the worse by contrast with the fertile plains of Moab which they next reached. Numbers 21:4, "the soul of the people was much discouraged because of the way." Down the Arabah between the limestone cliffs of the Tih on the W. and the granite of Mount Seir on the E. they were for some days in a mountain plain of loose sand, gravel, and granite detritus, with little food or water, and exposed to sandstorms from the shore of the gulf. This continued until a few hours N. of Akaba (Ezion Geber), where the wady Ithm opened to their left a passage in the mountains northward to fertile Moab. The mauna, the quails, and the water, are but samples of God's continuous care (Deuteronomy 8:4 ff, Deuteronomy 29:5).
The non waxing old of their raiment means God so supplied their wants, partly by ordinary and occasionally by miraculous means, that they never lacked new and untattered garments and shoes to prevent the foot swelling. Sheep, oxen, and traffic with tribes of the desert, ordinarily (under God's providence) supplied their need (Isaiah 63:11-14; Nehemiah 9:21; Amos 2:10). God often besides at Rephidim and Kadesh (Exodus 17:1, etc., Numbers 20) interposed to supply water (Judges 5:4; Psalms 68:7, etc.; Isaiah 35:1, etc., Isaiah 41:17; Isaiah 49:9-10; Hosea 2:14), and the Israelites from their stay in Egypt knew how to turn to best account all such supplies.
It was a period of apostasy (compare Ezekiel 20:15 ff; Amos 5:25, etc.; Hosea 9:10). The Israelites probably made somewhat comfortable booths (as the booths erected in commemoration at the feast of tabernacles prove) and dwellings for themselves in their 38 years' stay (compare Psalms 107:4; Psalms 107:35-36). According to some they were the writers of the Sinaitic inscriptions in the wady Mokatteb, deciphered by Forster as recording events in their history at that time. Their stays in the several stations varied according to the guidance of the divine cloud from two days to a month or a year (Numbers 9:22). The date palm (generally dwarf but abounding in sustenance), acacia, and tamarisk are often found in the desert. From the acacia (Mimosa Nilotica) came the shittim wood of the tabernacle and gum arabic.
The retem (KJV "juniper") or broom yields excellent charcoal, which is the staple of the desert. Ras Sufsafeh, the scene of the giving of the law, means willow head, willows abounding there, also hollyhocks and hawthorns, hyssop and thyme. The ghurkud is thought to be the tree cast by Moses into the Marah bitter waters; growing in hot and salt regions, and bearing a red juicy acidulous berry, but the fruit ripens in June, later than Israel's arrival at Marah. Mount Serbal may be named from its abounding in myrrh (ser ). Spiritually, Rameses (dissolution of evil), Israel's starting point, answers to the penitent soul's first conviction of sin, haste to flee from wrath, and renunciation of evil. Israel's course first was straight for Canaan; so the believer's, under first impressions, is direct toward heaven. Succoth next, the place of booths, answers to the believer's pilgrim spirit (Hebrews 11:13-16).
Next Etham, their strength, the believer's confidence of never being moved (Psalms 30:6-7). At Pihahiroth Israel, shut in between the wilderness, the mountains, and the sea, and pursued by Pharaoh's mighty hosts, answers to the believer's suddenly finding himself powerless, in great straits, and so driven to cry unto God. Man's extremity becomes God's opportunity. The month of destruction becomes "the month of deliverance" or else "wells," as Pihahiroth means; a glorious passage is opened to him through the Red Sea, i.e. a new and living way through the blood of Christ (Hebrews 10:19-20; 2 Timothy 4:17) He is baptized unto Christ not Moses, giving him dominion over sin through Christ's resurrection, whereby he too is raised from the death of sin (1 Corinthians 10:2; Romans 6:3-7); consequently, he sings the song of Moses and of the Lamb (Exodus 15; Revelation 15:3; Isaiah 12:1-3; Psalms 40:1-3).
But he does not go far before he reaches Marah with its two bitter wells, afflictions seldom come single. He cries to Jehovah (Exodus 15:25) who in answer shows him the tree of life, whose leaves are for the healing of the nations, the cross of Christ which through faith by the operation of the Holy Spirit sweetens every bitter (Ruth 1:20 margin; John 16:14; Revelation 22:2). The shortest distance between one encampment and another is that from Marah to Elim (a park or paradise of oaks) with its twelve pure springs and 70 palms; so happy communion with God follows close upon sanctified affliction. Next, Israel goes to the Red Sea to the plain of Taiyibeh ("good"); so it is good for the believer to go back to the blood of sprinkling. Next in the wilderness of Sin ("dross") Israel feeds on the heaven sent manna, their own resources failing; so the believer as he advances begins wholly to by faith on Christ the true counting all else but dross.
Next, Dophkah signifies the believer's knocking at the heavenly door. Next, Alush (the lion's den) reminds us of the roaring lion Satan (1 Peter 5:8). Here Amalek ("your vexation"), i.e. the believer's besetting sin, is near, ready to "smite the hindmost" or laggers behind (Deuteronomy 25:18). Rephidim ("places of refreshment") with its water from the smitten rock typifies Christ, by being smitten yielding the living water (John 7:37-39; John 4:14). After so drinking Israel smote Amalek (Exodus 17:8); so faith which appropriates Jesus by the Spirit is what overcometh the world (1 John 5:4). The giving of the law at Sinai, and its being written by the finger of God on stone tables, typify the writing of the gospel law on the heart by the Holy Spirit.
Israel's Sinaitic Pentecost answers to the Christian church's one, 50 days after Passover, our Good Friday and Easter (Acts 2; 2 Corinthians 3:2-7). Israel's material tabernacle of God typifies the spiritual tabernacle of God in the heart (John 14:23). Sinai with its fire marks that stage in the believer's life when, after having believed, he is brought nearer to God than before, being sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise, the earnest of his coming inheritance (Ephesians 1:13-14). Kibroth Hattaavah ("the graves of lust") follows, the burial of remaining lusts with Christ by spiritual baptism. Then Hazeroth, "porch," the vestibule of heaven. Kadesh (holiness) is the last stage to heaven, were it not for backslidings. Then follows a miserable, irregular course, at one time toward Canaan, then back toward the Egypt of the world or to the Sinai of legalism; a spiritual blank, marked only by the Sabbath breaking case and the Korah rebellion against spiritual authority.
Still Jehovah withdraws not His pillar of cloud and fire. If the backslider return to Kadesh, weeping there for his provocations (Deuteronomy 1:45), Jesus, the antitypical Joshua, will still bring him to the heavenly Canaan, though by a more trying way and with sore temptations, even at the hour of death, as Israel suffered from Baal-peor at the verge of Jordan (Numbers 25:1). A line drawn from Gaza to the S. of the Dead Sea bounds Palestine proper. S. of the line is the desert now, which once contained the negeb or "S. country," and the Gerar pastures (Genesis 10:19; Genesis 20:1). S. of this lies the desert proper, a limestone plateau, projecting wedge-like into the Sinai peninsula, just as Sinai itself projects into the Red Sea. The cliff jebel Magrah, 70 miles S. of Hebron, terminates the hill country; et Tih, the southern portion, ends in a long cliff. It is drained on the W. by wady el Arish, "the stream of Egypt" (Isaiah 27:12), the southern bound of Palestine, and on the E. by the wady el Deib going into the Dead Sea.
The desert proper has only a few springs in the wadies, from whence by scraping holes one can bale up a little yellowish muddy water. Flints and fine black detritus form the surface, with parched brown herbage most of the year except for a brief season of verdure in spring. Stone circles and cairns attest the former existence of a primeval population. From this one ascends the plateau jebel el Mugrah, and then is in the hill country, "the South." Here are seen the stone remains of a prehistoric race and the hazerot or fenced enclosures of a pastoral people, probably the Amalekites whom Israel found here at the time of the Exodus. In a steep on the edge of the plateau is Ain Gadis (Kadesh according to Palmer, the starting point of the 40 years' wandering and again after it their starting point to Mount Hor and Canaan). In Numbers 13:17; Numbers 13:22, "they ascended by the S. (i.e. they ascended the plateau and passed through the negeb or south country) to Hebron," which was N.
In the district at the head of wady Gharundel and beyond Ain Howharah are found nawamis, which tradition makes into houses built by Israelites to shield from the mosquitoes (compare the fiery flying serpents): circular, ten feet diameter, of unhewn stone, covered with a dome shaped roof, the top closed by a stone slab, and the sides weighted to prevent their springing out, the entrance door only two feet high, the hearth marked by charred wood and bones. They resemble the Shetland shielings or bothan. A second kind consists of stone circles, some 100 ft. in diameter, a cyst in the center covered with large boulders and having human skeletons; evidently sepulchral. The homes of the living close by were a collection of circles enclosed with rudely heaped walls, the permanent camps of a pastoral people; they sacrificed at the tombs of their dead. Possibly it was here that the hungry Israelites "ate the sacrifices of the dead" (Psalms 106:28); but "the dead" may mean the dead idols as opposed to the living God.
These camps are mostly below jebel el Ejmeh, made of boulders packed together. At Erweis el Ebeirig there is elevated ground covered with stone enclosures not like the former. On a small hill is an erection of rough stones surmounted by a pyramidal white block; enclosures with stone hearths exhibiting the action of fire exist for miles around. Beneath the surface charcoal was found, and outside a number of stone heaps, evidently graves. Arab tradition makes these remains "the relics of a large hajj caravan, who on their way to Ain Hudherah lost their way in the desert Tih and never were heard of again." The Hebrew hag means a "feast" (Exodus 10:9), which was Israel's avowed object in going into the wilderness. No Muslim hajj ever could pass this way; the distance is just a day's journey from Ain Hudherah. All these marks identify this interesting site with the scene of Numbers 11:33-35; "there they buried the people that lusted, and the people journeyed from Kibroth Hattaavah unto Hazeroth and abode at Hazeroth."
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Sin, Wilderness of
Lying between Elim and sinai (Exodus 16:1 ; Compare Numbers 33:11,12 ). This was probably the narrow plain of el-Markha, which stretches along the eastern shore of the Red Sea for several miles toward the promontory of Ras Mohammed, the southern extremity of the Sinitic Peninsula. While the Israelites rested here for some days they began to murmur on account of the want of nourishment, as they had by this time consumed all the corn they had brought with them out of Egypt. God heard their murmurings, and gave them "manna" and then quails in abundance.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Sin, Wilderness of
The district lying between the Red Sea and Sinai, in some part of which the Israelites encamped. Exodus 16:1 ; Exodus 17:1 ; Numbers 33:11,12 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Wilderness of the Wandering,
(The region in which the Israelites spent nearly 38 years of their existence after they had left Egypt, and spent a year before Mount Sinai. They went as far as Kadesh, on the southernmost border of Palestine, from which place spies were sent up into the promised land. These returned with such a report of the inhabitants and their walled cities that the people were discouraged, and began to murmur and rebel. For their sin they were compelled to remain 38 years longer in the wilderness, because it showed that they were not yet prepared and trained to conquer and to hold their promised possessions. The wilderness of the wandering was the great central limestone plateau of the sinaitic peninsula. It was bordered on the east by the valley of the Arabah, which runs from the Dead Sea to the head of the eastern branch of the Red Sea. On the south and south west were the granite mountains of Sinai and on the north the Mediterranean Sea and the mountainous region south of Judea. It is called the Desert of Paran , and Badiet et-Tih , which means "Desert of the Wandering." The children of Israel were not probably marching as a nation from place to place in this wilder new during these 38 years, but they probably had a kind of headquarters at Kadesh, and were "compelled to linger on as do the Bedouin Arabs of the present day, in a half-savage, homeless state, moving about from place to place, and pitching their tents wherever they could find pasture for their flocks and herds." --E.H. Palmer. Toward the close of the forty years from Egypt they again assembled at Kadesh, and, once more under the leadership of the Shechinah, they marched down the Arabah on their way to the promised land. --ED.)
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Wilderness
See Desert.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Wilderness (2)
WILDERNESS.—The word or words (more or less synonymous) which the Authorized and Revised Versions translation by ‘wilderness’ or ‘desert’ afford a striking example of the difficulties which translators, and after them the ordinary readers of Holy Scripture, have to contend with, because that word does not convey to our mind the idea of something we know: in our western European countries there is not, properly speaking, any desert or wilderness, in the Biblical sense of the word. Thus, unable to consult our own experience, we have to fall back upon books we have read, and upon notions obtained in that way. Immediately there rises in our memory the view of a desert of sand, stretching itself out of sight in a complete solitude, and giving to the caravans of travellers scarcely any other choice but death from thirst, or burial under the moving soil blown up by some terrible windstorm. Such is the classical representation of a desert or wilderness, and it is a constant source of errors for the understanding of numerous passages of the Bible where that word occurs. There is no ‘desert of sand’ either in Palestine or in the neighbouring countries. In fact, the Hebrew word which is usually translation ‘desert’ or ‘wilderness’ (midbâr) does not in the least convey the idea of solitude or desolation; on the contrary, it belongs to a root which means ‘to pasture,’ and therefore, etymologically,’ feeding-ground’ or ‘pasture-land’ would seem to be the most exact translation. But if we should adopt it, another ambiguity would be created, and a false notion suggested. Indeed, for a European reader, a pasture is a meadow with abundant grass, which is not at all true of the-Palestinian midbâr.
For a correct understanding of the meaning of the word ‘wilderness’ in the Bible, one has to remember that there were—and are still—nomads in Bible lands. Those people are not addicted to agricultural life, but to the breeding of cattle; they live on the borders of cultivated lands, between these and other regions which are either uninhabitable or practically uninhabited. The territories held by those nomads—called Bedawîn in modern times—are not without water and grass; but these indispensable resources, required for the herds, are both scarce, and the tribes of shepherds, are compelled to remove their camps from one place to another for feeding and watering their cattle. The midbâr is therefore essentially the ground occupied by nomad tribes; it forms around agricultural districts a zone variable in extension or breadth; sometimes culture wins over uncultivated lands, sometimes these regain spaces formerly tilled and sown. At the boundary itself of those two tracts of land live some populations which hold a sort of intermediate position in the progress of civilization: they are half-sedentary, half-shepherds (half-Fellahîn, half-Bedawîn), and, dwelling still under tents, they cultivate the ground, plough, sow, and reap (cf. Max von Oppenheim, Vom Mittelmeer zum Persischen Golf, 1900, ii. pp. 78–84). Even in the interior of cultivated districts, where villages and towns exist, there are frequently patches of land where the soil remains abandoned to itself, without culture, and they offer, therefore, the same character as the exterior zone inhabited by nomads. Those spaces are generally used as pasture-grounds for the cattle, and have also been called midbâr. They are found even near towns; thus the OT mentions the wildernesses of Gibeon, of Tekoa, of Damascus, of Riblah (Massoretic Text Diblah, Ezekiel 6:14). Besides those local denominations, others occur which apply to peripheric regions: wildernesses of Shur, of Sin, of Sinai, of Paran, of Ẓin, of Kadesh, of Ethan (or Yam-Suph), of Maon, of Ziph, of Beersheba, of Engedi, of Jeruel, of Beth-aven, of Edom, of Moab, of Kedemoth. Several of these wildernesses, as their names show, cover vast spaces; others, on the contrary, represent quite limited places.
One of the most important deserts is the Wilderness of Judah, twenty hours in length and five in breadth, which constitutes, with the Mountain (Har), the South (Negeb), and the Low-Country (Shephelah), the four parts of the territory of that tribe. The Wilderness of Judah is the region situated east of the watershed, between this high line and the western shore of the Dead Sea. The wildernesses of Ziph and of Maon are portions of it in the south, as well as those of Engedi and Tekoa in the middle; and finally also, in the north, the rough, barren, and uninhabited district where the road runs from Jerusalem to Jericho (cf. Luke 10:30 ff.) That wilderness is an uneven, undulating table-land, where conical hills and rocky hillocks arise, where deep ravines are cut between steep walls of rocks; it falls down towards the east—here in gradual declivities, there in sudden and abrupt slopes—in the direction of the Dead Sea, situated 1500 or 2000 feet below. No river or rivulet, no trees, no villages; a soil without vegetation, either sandy or stony, here and there with scarce and meagre grass, which is avidly sought for by small flocks of sheep and goats, belonging to a few miserable camps of black or brown tents. That wilderness was the refuge of David when persecuted by Saul (1 Samuel 22-26); he knew it from the time of his youth, having, when a boy, followed there the herds of his father (1 Samuel 16:11; 1 Samuel 17:15; 1 Samuel 17:34). Later on the same region sheltered Judas Maccabaeus and his companions (1 Maccabees 9:33).
The wildernesses mentioned in the Bible are not all as inclement and inhospitable as the Wilderness of Judah. They are sometimes inhabited; they contain wells and cisterns, towns (Joshua 15:61 f., 1 Kings 9:18, 2 Chronicles 8:4) and houses (1 Kings 2:34), herds of sheep (1 Samuel 17:28), and pastures (Psalms 65:13 f).
The Gospel of John alludes twice to the sojourn of Israel in the wilderness (John 3:14 Moses lifting the serpent, and John 6:31; John 6:40 the manna). The Synoptics do not mention it; but it is spoken of in the Book of Acts, specially in Stephen’s discourse (John 7:36-44) and in John 13:18, and in 1 Corinthians 10:5 and Matthew 14:13-21, (quoting Psalms 95:8) and John 3:17.
The Wilderness of Judah is named several times in connexion with John the Baptist. His youth, according to Luke 1:80, was spent ‘in the deserts’; that is, certainly, with the keepers of herds, away from towns or villages, in solitude and contemplation. In that respect, as well as in others, John is like Amos, the shepherd of Tekoa. According to the Gospels, ‘the deserts’ included also the country near Jordan—beyond, that is, east of, the river—where John began his ministry, preaching and baptizing (Matthew 3:1, Mark 1:4, Luke 3:2; cf. Matthew 11:7, Luke 7:24; see artt. Bethabara, John the Baptist, Jordan), and the four Gospels apply to that event the prophecy of Isaiah 40:3 (Matthew 3:3, Mark 1:3, Luke 3:4, John 1:23).
Ecclesiastical tradition has not been content with the indications given in the Gospels which connect John the Baptist’s life and work with the wilderness: it has connected also his birth with it. The place where Zacharias and Elisabeth dwelt being only vaguely named in Luke 1:39, it has been identified by the Christians of the Holy Land and the pilgrims, since the time of the Crusades, with a village situated about 4 miles west from Jerusalem; the Arabs call it ‘Ain-Karim, hut it is known in the language of the Churches as ‘St. John in the Desert’ or ‘St. John in the Mountain.’ That place is not in the Wilderness of Judah; its neighbourhood is cultivated and fertile, at least in the sense in which one can use that word when speaking of Judaea. Even if we should suppose that such was the birthplace of John, it would be unjustified to consider it as being ‘in the wilderness’ (cf. ZDPV [1] xxii. pp. 81–93).
It is also in the wilderness that the Gospel narratives place the scene of the Temptation of our Lord (Matthew 4:1, Mark 1:12, Luke 4:1). Since the time of the Crusades, ecclesiastical tradition has contrived to localize that event in a particular, well-defined spot, and has chosen for it the wild and desolate mountain which arises almost vertically above the Fountain of Elisha, west from the oasis of Jericho. A Greek convent, continuation of a very old laura, which was, if not founded, at least developed by Elpidins (ZDPV [1] iii. p. 13), is suspended on the side of that mountain, which has received the name of Mount of the Quarantania (Jebel Karantul), on account of Jesus fasting 40 days. It is, of course, equally impossible to prove or to disprove that this, place is the one mentioned in the narratives of the Temptation.
Galilee, and particularly the shores of the Lake of Gennesaret, was at the time of our Lord relatively well peopled: this is proved by the Gospels, and still more explicitly by the testimony of Josephus. There were, however, spaces of land without human habitations, and probably left to the shepherds and their cattle. According to the narratives of the Gospels, several scenes of the Galilaean ministry of Jesus, and some of His teachings, were connected with places of that sort, designated now as ‘a desert’ or ‘a wilderness’ (ἔρημος or ἐρημία), now as ‘a desert place’ (ἔρημος τόπος). We have to mention here (a) the multiplication of loaves (Hebrews 3:8 Mark 6:30-44, Luke 9:10-17, Matthew 15:32-38, Mark 8:1-10); (b) Jesus withdrawing for prayer (Mark 1:35, Luke 5:16), or to avoid the crowd (Mark 1:45, Luke 4:42, John 11:54); (c) the demoniac of Gadara (Luke 8:29); (d) the parable of the Lost Sheep (Luke 15:3-7), where the 99 sheep remain ‘in the wilderness,’ whereas the shepherd goes after that which is lost until he finds it.
Literature.—PEFSt [3] , 1871, pp. 3–80; E. H. Palmer, The Desert of the Exodus , 2 vols., 1871; Furrer, art. ‘Wüste’ in Schenkel, Bib. Lex. v. pp. 680–685; G. A. Smith, HGHL [4] , pp. 312–317; Buhl, GAP [5] , pp. 96–99; Lagrange in RB [6] , 1896, pp. 618–643, 1897, pp. 107–130, 605–625, 1900, pp. 63–86; B. Baentsch, Die Wüste, ihre Namen und ihre bildliche Anwendung in den Alttest. Schriften, 1883; Pierre Loti, Le Désert 6, 1895 [7], and other [8] books of travels in the Sinai-Peninsula; Bönhoff,’ Die Wanderung Israels in der Wüste’ in SK [9] , 1907, pp. 159–217.
Lucien Gautier.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Sin, Wilderness of
(ssihn) Barren region somewhere west of the Sinai plateau on the Sinai peninsula. The Hebrew people stopped here on their journey from Egypt to the Promised Land (Exodus 16:1 ). It was here that God first provided manna and quail for them to eat. The place sometimes has been confused with the Wilderness of Zin, which is located on the northwestern side of Sinai. See Zin .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Wilderness
Holy Land areas, particularly in the southern part, with little rainfall and few people. The words for wilderness in the Old Testament come close to our word desert , because they usually mean a rocky, dry wasteland. Desert in the lands of the Bible is usually rocks instead of sand dunes. These have been called “tame” deserts, because they have infrequent rainfall and wells or oases enough to accommodate some nomadic or seminomadic human occupancy. It was the land that neighbored inhabited land to which shepherds could drive their sheep and goats for pasture. David's older brother Eliab taunted him: “With whom have you left those few sheep in the wilderness?” (1 Samuel 17:28 NRSV). The wilderness could also have the forboding sense of uninhabitable land, as Jeremiah described it: “a land of deserts and pits a land of drought and deep darkness a land that no one passes through, where no one dwells” ( Jeremiah 2:6 NRSV). It was a fearful place in which to get lost ( Psalm 107:4-9 ).
Geographically, the wilderness lay south, east, and southwest of the inhabited land of Israel in the Negeb, Transjordan, and the Sinai. A particular wilderness, closer to home, lay on the eastern slopes of the Judean mountains in the rain shadow leading down to the Dead Sea. This particular wilderness, sometimes called Jeshimon, became a refuge for David when he fled from Saul, and was the locale of the temptation of Jesus.
Historically, the wilderness was particularly connected with the wandering of the escaping Hebrews after their miraculous escape from Egypt and just prior to the conquest of Transjordan. This was remembered in their retelling of the story as “that great and terrible wilderness” (Deuteronomy 1:19 ; Deuteronomy 8:15 ). There was good news and bad news about this period of the nation's existence. The good news was that God had provided manna, quail, and water from the rock. He had led them in the wilderness, and revealed Himself and His covenant laws to them at Sinai/Horeb, the mountain of revelation. The bad news was they had rebelled against the Lord and murmured against Moses again and again in the wilderness. The Book of Numbers is called in the Hebrew Bible, bemidbar , “In the desert.” It tells the tragic story of Kadesh-barnea in the wilderness of Paran and the spy committee who persuaded the people not to attack the Promised Land from the south, so that a whole generation died in the desert (Numbers 13-14 ). In the Psalms, the worshiping Israelites confessed these ancient sins (Psalm 78:40 ; Psalm 106:26 ), and New Testament preachers used them as a warning to “wilderness Christians” not to make the same mistakes (1 Corinthians 10:1-13 ; Hebrews 3:16-19 ). There were several specific wilderness areas mentioned, such as those of Sin, Shur, Sinai, Paran, and Zin on the way of wilderness wanderings. Some specific locales were connected with David's outlaw years, such as wilderness of En-Gedi, of Judah, of Maon, of Ziph. Jeremiah once yearned for a desert lodge as a place of escape from his rebellious audience (Hebrews 9:2 ). People in biblical times mostly feared the desert as a place inhabited by beasts of prey, snakes, and scorpions (even demons) to which one might drive out the scapegoat (Leviticus 16:10 ,Leviticus 16:10,16:22 ,Leviticus 16:22,16:26 ; Isaiah 13:21-22 ; Isaiah 34:13-14 ). So it was appropriate as a place for Jesus' temptation (Matthew 4:1-11 ; Mark 1:12-13 ; Luke 4:1-13 ).
The prophets felt that most of Israel's religious troubles began with the settlement of Canaan and apostasy to Canaanite idolatry, but they also looked forward to a renewed pilgrimage in the wilderness (Hosea 2:14-15 ; Hosea 9:10 , compare Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Jeremiah 2:2-3 ; Jeremiah 31:2-3 ). There would be a new Exodus after the Babylonian Exile through the north Syrian desert to make the Lord their king and “prepare his way” (Ezekiel 20:30-38 ; Isaiah 40:3-5 ). John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness of Judea as the promised prophetic forerunner (Matthew 3:1-3 ; Mark 1:2-4 ; Luke 3:2-6 ; John 1:23 ). Not only did Jesus overcome the tempter in the wilderness, but He fed the four thousand in a desolate place east of Lake Galilee (Mark 8:1-9 ). See Desert ; Paran ; Shur, Wilderness of ; Sin, Wilderness of ; Sinai; Wanderings.
M. Pierce Matheny
Holman Bible Dictionary - Wanderings in the Wilderness
Israel's movements from Egypt to the Promised Land under Moses, including the place names along the routes. A reconstruction of the Israelites' wilderness wanderings is more complex than a casual reading of the biblical account at first would seem to indicate. The “wanderings” refer to that difficult period in Israel's history between their departure from the area of Egyptian enslavement in the land of Goshen and arrival in the Jordan Valley to claim their long-standing inheritance of the Promised Land. (Exodus 12:31Numbers 12:31—33:49 ). The sequence of that extended event is complicated by the nature of the biblical data.
The itinerary from the border of Egypt to the oasis of Kadesh-barnea is relatively clear. Only three established trade routes across the northern Sinai were viable options for the movement of such a large contingent of people and livestock. Decisions in Egypt during the early stages of their migration reduced those options to only one. The shortest, most northerly, route along the Mediterranean shoreline was not taken because of a possible encounter with Egyptian military guarding oasis forts or returning from regular incursions and punitive raids in Canaan (Exodus 13:17 ). A second relatively direct route to Kadesh-barnea appears to have been avoided by divine plan when they approached the border at Etham and then were instructed to turn back to the seeming impossible situation “by the Sea” where God miraculously delivered them from the pharaoh's forces (Exodus 13:20-14:2 ). This route is identified with Marah (Exodus 15:23 ), Elim (Exodus 15:27 ), the Wilderness of Sin (Exodus 16:1 ), Rephidim (Exodus 17:1 ), the Wilderness of Sinai (Exodus 18:5 ; Exodus 19:1 ), Sinai (Exodus 19:2 ), the wilderness of Paran (Numbers 10:12 ), Taberah (Numbers 11:3 ) or Kibroth-hattaavah (“the cemetery of the lusters,” Numbers 11:34 ), Hazeroth (“corrals,” Numbers 11:35 ; Numbers 12:16 ) where the mention of enclosures for the livestock and a series of events in the biblical account suggest an extended stay, and, ultimately, Kadesh (Numbers 20:1 ). A later reference to the distance between Mount Sinai (Horeb) and Kadesh-barnea (Deuteronomy 1:2 ) seems to suggest that the early itinerary took them basically along the major trade route used by the Amalekites between modern Suez at the northern end of the Gulf of Suez and the northern end of the Gulf of Aqaba (Elath and Ezion-geber) and then northward into the extensive clustering of oases at Kadesh that would become their tribal center and the location of the tabernacle during the next 38 years.
The negative response to an immediate conquest following the spies' report resulted in the additional 38 years in the Sinai wilderness. When that generation of military died, the camp of Israel again was mobilized for the assault on Canaan. Their request to pass through Edomite territory and to proceed along the King's Highway through Moab and into the Jordan Valley opposite Jericho was blocked by a show of military force by the king of Edom. Their attempt to enter Canaan from the south was stopped by the king of Arad, and so a very difficult detour southward to the head of the Gulf of Aqaba and northeastward around Edomite and Moabite lands (Numbers 20:14 ; Deuteronomy 2:1 ) brought them finally to Mount Nebo overlooking the Jordan Valley north of the Dead Sea.
This itinerary is complicated by a comprehensive list of place names in Numbers 33:1 related to the Exodus and wanderings that includes many more locations seemingly playing a part in this extended event. Obviously, many of these places naturally may be related to the 38 years of the wanderings. More important is the fact that Numbers 33:1 indicates that in fact the Israelite itinerary from Egypt to the Jordan Valley did include passage through Edomite and Moabite territory along the King's Highway. This route cannot be associated with the Moses/Joshua-led Exodus because of the specific statements in Numbers 20-21 . Many scholars therefore conclude that Numbers 33:1 is a combined compilation of place names that are related to pre-Mosaic infiltration from Egypt to Canaan by way of the King's Highway, the place along the second route around Edomite-Moabite territory followed by the Moses/Joshua-led contingent and all those places visited by the Israelites during those 38 punitive years of desert wanderings when like the nomads of every generation they sought water and pasturage for their flocks within that hostile arid environment of the Sinai. See Exodus ; Kadesh ; Moses ; Sinai.
George L. Kelm
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Judaea Wilderness of
Judæa, Wilderness of. A wild and desolate region extending from the hill-country near Jerusalem southeast to the Dead Sea, and averaging about 15 miles in breadth. Matthew 3:1. It is a limestone country, rough and barren, with only patches of grass. It seems never to have had many inhabitants, and no cities. The traditional scene of the temptation of Christ is in this district, on a high mountain behind Jericho, very desolate, and now infested with beasts and reptiles. See Matthew 4:1; Mark 1:13.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Wilderness
Psalm 102:6 (a) This type represents the lonely, desolate condition of the blessed Lord as He walked about among sinful men and wicked enemies on the earth. (See under PELICAN).
Proverbs 21:19 (a) It is better for one to go without many comforts, and to deny himself many pleasures if thereby he can live as he pleases. This is to be preferred to living the life with one who is constantly a source of sorrow and trouble to the heart.
Isaiah 32:15 (b) This is a wonderful type of the barren Christian life, which is filled with sorrow, difficulty, disappointment and grief, but which, by the ministry of the Spirit, becomes a life filled with fruitfulness, beauty and joy.
Isaiah 43:19 (b) This word describes the deliverance which GOD is able to bring into the tangled affairs of human life, straightens out the difficulties, delivers from perplexities, and brings His child safely through to a life of peace.
Revelation 12:6 (b) Probably this refers to the condition of Israel as scattered throughout the world, where they have weary feet, longing eyes, and heavy hearts. GOD will bring them out of this condition, and out of these nations, to inhabit again their own land.
Revelation 17:3 (b) This wilderness no doubt represents the various nations of the world in which the great apostate and religious system operates. This church produces nothing but tragedy and sin in the lives of the people who become members of their group. It really is a wilderness in every sense of the word.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Desert, Wilderness
The ideas suggested to our minds by the words ‘desert’ or ‘wilderness’ differ to a considerable extent from those conveyed to an Oriental by the biblical terms so translated. When we think of a desert we tend to imagine a bare sandy waste, without any vegetation or water, such as the Desert of the Sahara in N. Africa. The ‘desert’ of the Bible is rather a place without human habitations, devoid of cities or towns, but by no means devoid of vegetation, at least for a considerable portion of the year. Properly speaking, the desert was the place to which the cattle were driven (Heb. מִדְבְּר from דָּבַר ‘to drive’), an uncultivated region where pasturage, however scanty, was to be found. Joel, for instance, speaks of the fire having devoured the pastures of the wilderness (Joel 1:20), and of the locusts leaving a desolate wilderness behind them (Joel 2:3). It was in the wilderness that the shepherds tended their flocks, and other forms of life were also to be found there. Thus, e.g., pelicans (Psalms 102:6), wild asses (Jeremiah 2:24), ostriches (Lamentations 4:3), jackals (Malachi 1:3) had their home in the desert. As the pasture to be found in the wilderness was scanty and insufficient to support a flock of sheep for any length of time, the shepherds had to move from place to place in order to obtain the necessary food for their flocks. The desert was thus the special home of nomadic or wandering tribes, although the name ‘desert’ or ‘wilderness’ was applied to the uncultivated tracts of land beyond the bounds of the cultivated area near the towns or villages. Some of the deserts mentioned in Scripture are small, and correspond to the English ‘common’ or uncultivated pasture ground near a village on which any of the inhabitants could graze their cattle. Thus we read of the Wilderness of Gibeon (2 Samuel 2:24), of Tekoa (2 Chronicles 20:20), of Damascus (1 Kings 19:15). On the other hand, many of the wildernesses referred to in the Bible are simply parts of larger deserts. Some of these larger tracts of uncultivated pasture land are, e.g., the Wilderness of Judah (Judges 1:16), of Moab (Deuteronomy 2:8), of Edom (2 Kings 3:8). The Wilderness of Judah included the Wilderness of Ziph, of Tekoa, of Engedi.
The best-known desert of the Bible is the Wilderness of Sinai, where the tribes of Israel wandered before settling in Canaan. God’s care for the people in those days of wandering is repeatedly referred to by prophets and psalmists (e.g. Hosea 13:5, Jeremiah 2:6, Amos 2:10, Psalms 78:52; Psalms 107:4; Psalms 136:16). In the same way the sin and unbelief of the people in the wilderness are mentioned (e.g. Psalms 78:40; Psalms 106:14), while on the other hand several of the prophets seem to look on the time of the sojourn in the wilderness as the ideal period in the story of Israel’s relation to God (e.g. Jeremiah 2:2, Amos 5:25).
In the apostolic writings we have several references to ‘wilderness’ or ‘desert.’ The terms employed are ἐρημία and ἔρημος, the latter used either as a noun or adjective with τόπος or χώρα or some similar word understood. In the life of our Lord the desert holds an important place. It is the scene of the Temptation, of the feeding of the 5000, of midnight prayer and rest from labour. In the life of St. Paul we have a reference to his sojourn in Arabia (Galatians 1:17) after his conversion, and undoubtedly we are to understand that the Apostle had retired to the desert for meditation. The evangelist Philip is instructed by the Spirit to go to meet the Ethiopian eunuch on the road from Jerusalem to Gaza, and the statement follows, ‘which is desert’ (Acts 8:26). If this refers to the road which passed through the desert, there is no difficulty; but the natural application of the words is to Gaza itself, which in the time of Philip was a prosperous town. G. A. Smith (Historical Geography of the Holy Land (G. A. Smith) 4, 1897, p. 186f.) supposes that the reference is to Old Gaza, past which the road ran; but the more likely explanation is that the sentence is a later marginal gloss inserted after Gaza had passed away, and that it at length crept into the text (cf. Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) iv. 918b). In the Epistle to the Hebrews reference is made to the persecuted followers of Christ ‘who wandered in deserts and mountains’ (11:38). Probably this refers to the Jewish Christians of the Holy Land during the great war with Rome and after the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus. The apostolic writings also contain repeated allusions to the wilderness of Israel’s wanderings. In the speeches of St. Stephen and St. Paul, as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles, we find the story of the desert sojourn, in the accounts of the history of God’s revelation of Himself to mankind (Acts 7:36; Acts 7:38; Acts 7:42; Acts 7:44; Acts 13:18). St. Paul in 1 Corinthians 10:5 refers to the temptation, sin, and punishment of the people in the wilderness as a warning to Christian believers against giving way to temptation. A similar use of the temptation in the wilderness is made in Hebrews 3:8; Hebrews 3:17.
In Revelation 12:1; Revelation 12:14 ‘the woman clothed with the sun’ has a place prepared for her in the wilderness, whither she flees from before the dragon, while in 17:3 the seer is carried to the wilderness to see the ‘woman sitting upon a scarlet-coloured beast, full of names of blasphemy.’ The thought behind the former reference, of the wilderness as a place of refuge for the woman, may be taken from the history of the Jews who fled from Pharaoh to the wilderness, but there may be no more than the general idea of the wilderness as a place of refuge and concealment, so amply illustrated in the life of David. The idea in the latter instance may be connected with the Jewish conception of the desert as the home of demons or evil spirits (cf. article Demon).
W. F. Boyd.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Zin, Wilderness of
The N.E. portion of the wilderness of Paran. (See PARAN.) The spring of Kadesh lay in it (Numbers 20:1; Numbers 27:14; Deuteronomy 32:51). (See KADESH.) It probably stretched from the Arabah on the E. to Kadesh on the W. The wilderness of Zin formed the immediate boundary of Canaan (Numbers 13:21; Numbers 34:3), and comprised also the whole rugged mountain region S. of wady el Murrah, and wady el Fikrah as far E. as the Arabah, and as far W. as Ain Kadeis (fountain of Kadesh) and wady el Arish ("the river of Egypt".) The Arabah separated it from the mountains of Edom. On the declivity of a commanding hill within Edom's territory stands the village Dhana which may correspond to Zin.
Though the wilderness of Zin does not strictly belong to Edom, yet it was connected with Edom; hence Judah's cities are said to lie "toward the coast of Edom" (Joshua 15:21). The wilderness of Kadesh is identical with the western part of the wilderness of Zin (Numbers 33:36). Kadesh was "in the uttermost border of Edom," i.e. in the uttermost W. of the wilderness of Zin which borders Edom (Numbers 20:16). The name Zin, i.e. coldness, however may be given from some cold fountain at the head of wady el Murrah. Do not confound it with "the wilderness of Sin."
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Sin, Wilderness of
Which Israel reached after leaving the encampment by the Red Sea (Numbers 33:11). Their next stage was Rephidim. (See EXODUS.) Exodus 16:1; Exodus 17:1. Sin wilderness is the desert sandstone tract, Debbet er Ramleh , extending across the peninsula from wady Nasb in a S.E. direction between the limestone district of et Tih and the granite of the central formation, Sinai. The journey from Elim, or even from the Red Sea, could be performed in a day. The Egyptians working the copper mines at Sarbut el Khadim would keep the route in good order. Israel moved by detachments; and only at the wilderness of Sin "all the congregation" assembled for the first time. (See PARAN.) Distinct from the wilderness of Zin. (See SIN (1).)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Zin, Wilderness of
A district far south of Judah, lying between the Dead Sea and the Gulf of Akaba, in which Kadesh was situated, and in which a great part of the wanderings of the Israelites occurred. Numbers 13:21 ; Numbers 20:1 ; Numbers 27:14 ; Numbers 33:36 ; Numbers 34:3,4 ; Deuteronomy 32:51 ; Joshua 15:1,3 . It must not be confounded with the Wilderness of Sin (which lies along the south-east coast of the Red Sea).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Wilderness
This term and that of DESERTdo not usually refer in scripture to such places as the vast sand-plains of Africa, though there are some such in Palestine, but the words mostly refer to non-arable plains where the vegetation but thinly covers the limestone with patches of verdure. In places where the ground is not worth cultivating it can be used for pasture. Some of such deserts are comparatively small, but others are extensive. The wilderness of JUDAHis a plain extending the whole length of the Dead Sea; but some of it can be used for pasture land. It may be said to include the wilderness of EN-GEDI, that of MAON, and probably that of ZIPH and of JERUEL.
The wilderness of BETH-AVEN and of GIBEON were in the allotment of Benjamin.
The wilderness of DAMASCUS was far north, and that of BEER-SHEBA far south; and that of SHUR, still farther south-west.
Those of KEDEMOTH, of EDOM, and of MOAB were east of the Dead Sea.
The rest were not in Palestine proper, but were the deserts through which the Israelites passed or were located in their wanderings: namely, ETHAM, KADESH, PARAN, SIN, SINAI, and ZIN. See WANDERINGS OF THE ISRAELITES.
Typically the wilderness was outside Canaan, and stands in contrast to it. The wilderness was the place of testing to the Israelites, and it is the same to the Christian, to humble him, and to prove what is in his heart. Deuteronomy 8:2 . He has to learn what he is in himself, and the God of all grace he has to do with. There is need of constant dependence or there is failure, while the experience is gained of knowing One who never fails to succour. Canaan is figuratively a heavenly position and conflict, corresponding with the need of the armour of Ephesians 6:11 , to stand against the wiles of the devil. For this one needs to realise what it is to be dead and risen with Christ. It is association in spirit with Christ in heaven.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jeruel Wilderness
Part of the flat country stretching from the Dead Sea to Tekoa, a waste table land in front of the valley; where Jahaziel told Jehoshaphat he should encounter Ammon, Moab, etc., pouring round the S. of the Dead Sea into Judah (2 Chronicles 20:16; 2 Chronicles 20:24); containing "the watchtower" built there for observing from afar such inroads. "The ascent of Ziz," or Hazziz, has probably given its name to the wady el Hasasah.
Webster's Dictionary - Wilderness
(1):
(v. t.) A tract of land, or a region, uncultivated and uninhabited by human beings, whether a forest or a wide, barren plain; a wild; a waste; a desert; a pathless waste of any kind.
(2):
(v. t.) Quality or state of being wild; wildness.
(3):
(v. t.) A disorderly or neglected place.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Wilderness
Wilderness, The, in which the Israelites spent 40 years, between Egypt and Canaan, is called sometimes the "great and terrible wilderness" by way of eminence. Deuteronomy 1:1; Deuteronomy 8:2; Joshua 5:6; Nehemiah 9:19; Nehemiah 9:21; Psalms 78:40; Psalms 78:52; Psalms 107:4; Jeremiah 2:2. In general it may be identified with the peninsula of Sinai, the triangular region between the Gulf of Akabah, on the east, and the Gulf of Suez and Egypt on the west. See Sinai. In this region there are several smaller wildernesses, as Etham, Paran, Shur, Zin. What is known distinctively as the "wilderness of the Wandering" is the great central limestone plateau between the granite region of Sinai on the south, the sandy desert on the north, and the valley of the Arabah on the east. The explorations of travellers and the British Ordnance Survey have made this region quite well known. The route of the Israelites from Egypt to Kadesh can be traced with reasonable accuracy. Instead of entering the Promised Land immediately from Kadesh, they were driven back into the wilderness for their disobedience, and there wandered for 40 years. They probably lived a nomad life as do the Bedouin Arabs of the present day.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Wilderness
See DESERT .
King James Dictionary - Wilderness
WILDERNESS, n. from wild.
1. A desert a tract of land or region uncultivated and uninhabited by human beings, whether a forest or a wide barren plain. In the United States, it is applied only to a forest. In Scripture, it is applied frequently to the deserts of Arabia. The Israelites wandered int he wilderness forty years. 2. The ocean. The watry wilderness yields no supply.
3. A state of disorder. Not in use. 4. A wood in a garden, resembling a forest.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - be'Zer in the Wilderness,
a city of refuge in the downs on the east of the Jordan. (4:43; Joshua 20:8 ; 21:36 ; 1 Chronicles 6:78 )
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Wilderness
1: ἐρημία (Strong's #2047 — Noun Feminine — eremia — er-ay-mee'-ah ) "an uninhabited place," is translated "wilderness" in the AV of Matthew 15:33 ; Mark 8:4 (RV, "a desert place"); RV and AV, "wilderness" in 2 Corinthians 11:26 . See DESERT , A. (In the Sept., Isaiah 60:20 ; Ezekiel 35:4,9 .
2: ἔρημος (Strong's #2048 — — eremos — er'-ay-mos ) an adjective signifying "desolate, deserted, lonely," is used as a noun, and rendered "wilderness" 32 times in the AV; in Matthew 24:26 ; John 6:31 , RV, "wilderness" (AV, "desert"). For the RV, "deserts" in Luke 5:16 ; 8:29 see DESERT , B.

Sentence search

Zin - The Wilderness of Zin, stretching from Kadesh-barnea to the Dead Sea, formed part of the southern border of Canaan and later Judah (Numbers 34:3-4 ; Joshua 15:1 ,Joshua 15:1,15:3 ). “From the Wilderness of Zin to Rehob” in Galilee encompasses almost the whole Promised Land (Numbers 13:21 ). The Wilderness of Zin should be distinguished from the Wilderness of Sin which embraces the western Sinai plateau. See Negeb ; Palestine ; Sin , Wilderness of; Wilderness
Etham - ” The second station in Israel's Wilderness wandering out of Egypt (Exodus 13:20 ; Numbers 33:6-8 ). The nearby Wilderness was called the Wilderness of Etham (Numbers 33:8 )
Mount of the Amorites - The range of hills which rises abruptly in the Wilderness of et-Tih ("the wandering"), mentioned Deuteronomy 1:19,20 , "that great and terrible Wilderness
Wilderness - 1: ἐρημία (Strong's #2047 — Noun Feminine — eremia — er-ay-mee'-ah ) "an uninhabited place," is translated "wilderness" in the AV of Matthew 15:33 ; Mark 8:4 (RV, "a desert place"); RV and AV, "wilderness" in 2 Corinthians 11:26 . ...
2: ἔρημος (Strong's #2048 — — eremos — er'-ay-mos ) an adjective signifying "desolate, deserted, lonely," is used as a noun, and rendered "wilderness" 32 times in the AV; in Matthew 24:26 ; John 6:31 , RV, "wilderness" (AV, "desert")
Desert - A — 1: ἐρημία (Strong's #2047 — Noun Feminine — eremia — er-ay-mee'-ah ) primarily "a solitude, an uninhabited place," in contrast to a town or village, is translated "deserts" in Hebrews 11:38 ; "the Wilderness" in Matthew 15:33 , AV, "a desert place," RV; so in Mark 8:4 ; "wilderness" in 2 Corinthians 11:26 . See Wilderness. ...
B — 1: ἔρημος (Strong's #2048 — — eremos — er'-ay-mos ) used as a noun, has the same meaning as eremia; in Luke 5:16 ; 8:29 , RV, "deserts," for AV, "wilderness;" in Matthew 24:26 ; John 6:31 , RV, "wilderness," for AV, "desert. " See DESOLATE , Wilderness
Zin, Wilderness of - portion of the Wilderness of Paran. The Wilderness of Zin formed the immediate boundary of Canaan (Numbers 13:21; Numbers 34:3), and comprised also the whole rugged mountain region S. ...
Though the Wilderness of Zin does not strictly belong to Edom, yet it was connected with Edom; hence Judah's cities are said to lie "toward the coast of Edom" (Joshua 15:21). The Wilderness of Kadesh is identical with the western part of the Wilderness of Zin (Numbers 33:36). of the Wilderness of Zin which borders Edom (Numbers 20:16). Do not confound it with "the Wilderness of Sin
Dophkah - ” Station in the Wilderness between Wilderness of Sin and Rephidim where Israel camped (Numbers 33:12 )
Desert - See Wilderness
Zin - A low palm-tree, the south-eastern corner of the desert et-Tih, the Wilderness of Paran, between the Gulf of Akabah and the head of the Wady Guraiyeh (Numbers 13:21 ). To be distinguished from the Wilderness of Sin (q
Quarantania - —See Wilderness
Desert - —See Wilderness
Desert - See Wilderness
Wilderness - The words for Wilderness in the Old Testament come close to our word desert , because they usually mean a rocky, dry wasteland. David's older brother Eliab taunted him: “With whom have you left those few sheep in the Wilderness?” (1 Samuel 17:28 NRSV). The Wilderness could also have the forboding sense of uninhabitable land, as Jeremiah described it: “a land of deserts and pits a land of drought and deep darkness a land that no one passes through, where no one dwells” ( Jeremiah 2:6 NRSV). ...
Geographically, the Wilderness lay south, east, and southwest of the inhabited land of Israel in the Negeb, Transjordan, and the Sinai. A particular Wilderness, closer to home, lay on the eastern slopes of the Judean mountains in the rain shadow leading down to the Dead Sea. This particular Wilderness, sometimes called Jeshimon, became a refuge for David when he fled from Saul, and was the locale of the temptation of Jesus. ...
Historically, the Wilderness was particularly connected with the wandering of the escaping Hebrews after their miraculous escape from Egypt and just prior to the conquest of Transjordan. This was remembered in their retelling of the story as “that great and terrible Wilderness” (Deuteronomy 1:19 ; Deuteronomy 8:15 ). He had led them in the Wilderness, and revealed Himself and His covenant laws to them at Sinai/Horeb, the mountain of revelation. The bad news was they had rebelled against the Lord and murmured against Moses again and again in the Wilderness. ” It tells the tragic story of Kadesh-barnea in the Wilderness of Paran and the spy committee who persuaded the people not to attack the Promised Land from the south, so that a whole generation died in the desert (Numbers 13-14 ). In the Psalms, the worshiping Israelites confessed these ancient sins (Psalm 78:40 ; Matthew 4:1-112 ), and New Testament preachers used them as a warning to “wilderness Christians” not to make the same mistakes (1 Corinthians 10:1-13 ; Hebrews 3:16-19 ). There were several specific Wilderness areas mentioned, such as those of Sin, Shur, Sinai, Paran, and Zin on the way of Wilderness wanderings. Some specific locales were connected with David's outlaw years, such as Wilderness of En-Gedi, of Judah, of Maon, of Ziph. ...
The prophets felt that most of Israel's religious troubles began with the settlement of Canaan and apostasy to Canaanite idolatry, but they also looked forward to a renewed pilgrimage in the Wilderness (Hosea 2:14-15 ; Hosea 9:10 , compare Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Jeremiah 2:2-3 ; Jeremiah 31:2-3 ). John the Baptist appeared in the Wilderness of Judea as the promised prophetic forerunner (Matthew 3:1-3 ; Mark 1:2-4 ; Luke 3:2-6 ; John 1:23 ). Not only did Jesus overcome the tempter in the Wilderness, but He fed the four thousand in a desolate place east of Lake Galilee (Mark 8:1-9 ). See Desert ; Paran ; Shur, Wilderness of ; Sin, Wilderness of ; Sinai; Wanderings
Wilderness - Wilderness, n. The Israelites wandered int he Wilderness forty years. The watry Wilderness yields no supply
Jeruel - A Wilderness where Jehoshaphat was to find his enemies, the Ammonites, the Moabites, and the inhabitants of Mount Seir, who destroyed one another. Doubtless in some part of the Wilderness west of the Dead Sea, but it is not definitely identified
Zin - The Wilderness of Zin was a part of the Arabian desert south of Palestine. Kadesh is sometimes spoken of as in the Wilderness of Zin, Numbers 33:36, and again as in the Wilderness of Paran
Abidan - ” Representative of the tribe of Benjamin in helping Moses and Aaron number the people in the Wilderness (Numbers 1:11 ) and captain of the tribe in the Wilderness marches (Numbers 2:22 ; Numbers 7:60 ,Numbers 7:60,7:65 ; Numbers 10:24 )
Middin - City in the Wilderness of Judah
Shur - A Wilderness so called. And how many of God's dear children have found the same Wilderness dispensations laying a foundation for rich enjoyments! I verily believe that the family of Jesus would have lost some of their most precious seasons, had they lost some of their Wilderness exercises. It was not without an eye to this that the Lord said, "Therefore, behold, I will allure her, and bring her into the Wilderness, and speak comfortably to her. Oh, how precious the faith that enables a soul to say, under all Wilderness straits and difficulties, Thou God seest me! Oh, for all the family of Jesus to call such Wildernesses Beer-lahai-roi—namely, the well of him that liveth and seeth me!...
Wilderness - This word is used of the Wilderness of Beersheba (Genesis 21:14 ), on the southern border of Palestine; the Wilderness of the Red Sea (Exodus 13:18 ); of Shur (15:22), a portion of the Sinaitic peninsula; of Sin (17:1), Sinai (Leviticus 7:38 ), Moab (Deuteronomy 2:8 ), Judah (Judges 1:16 ), Ziph, Maon, En-gedi (1 Samuel 23:14,24 ; 24:1 ), Jeruel and Tekoa (2 Chronicles 20:16,20 ), Kadesh (Psalm 29:8 ). "The Wilderness of the sea" (Isaiah 21:1 ). 9), perhaps because it became the place of discipline to God's people, as the Wilderness of the Red Sea had been (Compare Ezekiel 20:35 ). The Wilderness region in the Sinaitic peninsula through which for forty years the Hebrews wandered is generally styled "the Wilderness of the wanderings. The northern part of this triangular peninsula is properly the "wilderness of the wanderings" (et-Tih). The western portion of it is called the "wilderness of Shur" (Exodus 15:22 ), and the eastern the "wilderness of Paran. " The "wilderness of Judea" (Matthew 3:1 ) is a wild, barren region, lying between the Dead Sea and the Hebron Mountains
Wilderness, Desert - Wilderness, DESERT . ]'>[1] ‘wilderness,’ though we have ‘desert’ about a dozen times. This term is usually applied to the Wilderness of the Wanderings or the Arabian desert, but may refer to any other waste. Special waste tracts are distinguished: Wilderness of Shur, Zin, Paran, Kadesh, Maon, Ziph, Tekoa, Moab, Edom, etc. ’ but it is applied also to steppes in general, and translated ‘wilderness,’ ‘desert,’ and sometimes in pl. chorbâh (from a root ‘to be waste or desolate’) is properly applied to cities or districts once inhabited now lying waste, and is translated ‘wastes,’ ‘deserts,’ ‘desolations,’ though it is once used of the Wilderness of the Wanderings ( Isaiah 48:21 ). tsiyyâh meaning ‘dry ground’ is twice translated ‘wilderness’ in AV [1] ‘wilderness,’ the adjective ‘desert’ in the English versions
Nibshan - City in the Wilderness of Judah
Riu'Sah - (a ruin ), a march-station in the Wilderness
Nahshon - Sorcerer, the son of Aminadab, and prince of the children of Judah at the time of the first numbering of the tribes in the Wilderness (Exodus 6:23 ). He died in the Wilderness (Numbers 26:64,65 )
Tarah - Stopping; station, an encampment of the Hebrews in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:27,28 )
Tarah - (tay' ruh) KJV form of Terah, the Wilderness campsite (Numbers 33:27-28 )
Dophkah - A station in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:12) between Rephidim and the sea
Jeshimom - A city in the Wilderness
Ebronah - One of the stations of the Israelites in the Wilderness
Shapher - Brightness, one of the stations where Israel encamped in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:23,24 )
Mithcah - Sweetness, one of the stations of the Israelites in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:28,29 )
Zalmonah - Shady, one of the stations of the Israelites in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:41,42 )
Alush - (ay' luhssh) Wilderness camping place not far from Red Sea (Numbers 33:13-14 )
Kibroth Hataavah - one of the encampments of the Israelites in the Wilderness, Numbers 11:34-35
Rith'Mah - (heath ), a march-station in the Wilderness, ( Numbers 33:18,19 ) Probably northeast of Hazeroth
Paran - A desert or Wilderness south of Palestine, and near the Wilderness of Etham, which separated it from the Gulf of Suez and Egypt. Through this very wide Wilderness, from pasture to pasture, as do modern Arab tribes, the Israelites wandered in irregular lines of march
Desert - The Scriptures, by "desert," generally mean an uncultivated place, a Wilderness, or grazing tract. Other deserts particularly mentioned, are "that great and terrible Wilderness" in Arabia Petraea, south of Canaan, Numbers 21:20 ; also the region between Canaan and the Euphrates, Exodus 23:31 Deuteronomy 11:24 . The pastures of this Wilderness are clothed in winter and spring with rich and tender herbage; but the heat of summer soon burns this up, and the Arabs are driven to seek pasturage elsewhere
Desert, Wilderness - The ideas suggested to our minds by the words ‘desert’ or ‘wilderness’ differ to a considerable extent from those conveyed to an Oriental by the biblical terms so translated. Joel, for instance, speaks of the fire having devoured the pastures of the Wilderness (Joel 1:20), and of the locusts leaving a desolate Wilderness behind them (Joel 2:3). It was in the Wilderness that the shepherds tended their flocks, and other forms of life were also to be found there. As the pasture to be found in the Wilderness was scanty and insufficient to support a flock of sheep for any length of time, the shepherds had to move from place to place in order to obtain the necessary food for their flocks. The desert was thus the special home of nomadic or wandering tribes, although the name ‘desert’ or ‘wilderness’ was applied to the uncultivated tracts of land beyond the bounds of the cultivated area near the towns or villages. Thus we read of the Wilderness of Gibeon (2 Samuel 2:24), of Tekoa (2 Chronicles 20:20), of Damascus (1 Kings 19:15). On the other hand, many of the Wildernesses referred to in the Bible are simply parts of larger deserts. , the Wilderness of Judah (Judges 1:16), of Moab (Deuteronomy 2:8), of Edom (2 Kings 3:8). The Wilderness of Judah included the Wilderness of Ziph, of Tekoa, of Engedi. ...
The best-known desert of the Bible is the Wilderness of Sinai, where the tribes of Israel wandered before settling in Canaan. In the same way the sin and unbelief of the people in the Wilderness are mentioned (e. Psalms 78:40; Psalms 106:14), while on the other hand several of the prophets seem to look on the time of the sojourn in the Wilderness as the ideal period in the story of Israel’s relation to God (e. ...
In the apostolic writings we have several references to ‘wilderness’ or ‘desert. The apostolic writings also contain repeated allusions to the Wilderness of Israel’s wanderings. Paul in 1 Corinthians 10:5 refers to the temptation, sin, and punishment of the people in the Wilderness as a warning to Christian believers against giving way to temptation. A similar use of the temptation in the Wilderness is made in Hebrews 3:8; Hebrews 3:17. ...
In Revelation 12:1; Revelation 12:14 ‘the woman clothed with the sun’ has a place prepared for her in the Wilderness, whither she flees from before the dragon, while in 17:3 the seer is carried to the Wilderness to see the ‘woman sitting upon a scarlet-coloured beast, full of names of blasphemy. ’ The thought behind the former reference, of the Wilderness as a place of refuge for the woman, may be taken from the history of the Jews who fled from Pharaoh to the Wilderness, but there may be no more than the general idea of the Wilderness as a place of refuge and concealment, so amply illustrated in the life of David
Sin - Sin, Wilderness of (sĭn). The Wilderness extends 25 miles along the east shore of the Red Sea, from Wâdy Taiyibeh to Wâdy Feiran; it is now called the plain of el-Markha
Pagiel - God allots, a prince of the tribe of Asher (Numbers 1:13 ), in the Wilderness
Rissah - Heap of ruins; dew, a station of the Israelites in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:21,22 )
Giah - Facing Ammah, "by the way of the Wilderness of Gibeon
Chi'un - (a statue , perhaps of Saturn), an idol made by the Israelites in the Wilderness
Moseroth - Bonds, one of the stations in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:30,31 ), probably the same as Mosera
Sin, Wilderness of - Sin Wilderness is the desert sandstone tract, Debbet er Ramleh , extending across the peninsula from wady Nasb in a S. Israel moved by detachments; and only at the Wilderness of Sin "all the congregation" assembled for the first time. ) Distinct from the Wilderness of Zin
Nibshan - Fertile; light soil, a city somewhere "in the Wilderness" of Judah (Joshua 15:62 ), probably near Engedi
Middin - A town in the Wilderness of Judah ( Joshua 15:61 )
Ammah - A hill near Giah, in the Wilderness of Gibeon
Nibshan - One of the six cities of Judah in the midbar , "wilderness," the low district adjoining the Dead Sea
Horhagidgad - Station of the Israelites in the Wilderness
Secacah - One of Judah's six cities in the midbar or Wilderness bordering on the Dead Sea (Joshua 15:61)
Ishmael - In his boyhood he and his mother were sent into the Wilderness by Abraham at the request of Sara his wife, a request to which he was directed by God to accede. Ismael was saved by Divine intervention from perishing of drought, lived in the Wilderness of Parau, became famous as an archer, and married an Egyptian wife
Nah'Shon, - (enchanter ) son of Amminadab, and prince of the children of Judah (as he is styled in the genealogy of Judah,) ( 1 Chronicles 2:10 ) at the time of the first numbering in the Wilderness. He died in the Wilderness, according to (Numbers 26:64,65 ) (B
Hill of the Foreskins - (Hebrew Gibeath-haaraloth ) Place near Gilgal where Joshua circumcised the Israelites born during the Wilderness wandering (Joshua 5:3 )
Reba - Fourth, one of the Midianite chiefs slain by the Israelites in the Wilderness (Numbers 31:8 ; Joshua 13:21 )
Shepher, Mount - ” Stop on Israel's Wilderness journey whose location is not known (Numbers 33:23 )
Tab'Erah, - the name of a place in the Wilderness of Paran
Medad - ” Israelite layman who prophesied in the Wilderness camp (Numbers 11:26-27 )
Nahaliel - A place where Israel encamped in the Wilderness, and is compounded of Nahal, brook—and El, God
Pelican - The pelican obtained its food from the sea, not in the Wilderness. In the Wilderness it could find no food and no companionship
Rimmon-Parez - A pomegranate breach, or Rimmon of the breach, one of the stations of the Israelites in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:19,20 )
Rimmon-Perez - ” Campsite during Israel's Wilderness wanderings (Numbers 33:1 : 19-20 )
Etham - The place of the second encampment of Israel 'in the edge of the Wilderness
Ije-Abarim - Ruins of Abarim, the forty-seventh station of the Israelites in the Wilderness, "in the border of Moab" (Numbers 33:44 )
Hashmonah - Fatness, the thirtieth halting-place of the Israelites during their wanderings in the Wilderness, not far from Mount Hor (Numbers 33:29,30 )
Jeshimon - (jih sshi' mahn) Place name meaning, “desert” or “wilderness. Wilderness site near where David hid from Saul. Wilderness site east of the Jordan near Pisgah and Peor used to mark the places Israel passed under Moses on the way to conquer the Promised Land (Numbers 21:20 ; Numbers 23:28 )
Makheloth - (mak hee' lahth) Stopping place during the Wilderness wandering
Secacah - City 'in the Wilderness' of Judah
Gudgodah - One of the stations of the Israelites in the Wilderness
Nib'Shan - (soft soil ) one of the six cities of Judah, ( Joshua 15:62 ) which were in the district of the Midbar (Authorized Version "wilderness")
as'Phar, - the pool in the "wilderness of Thecoe
Wilderness - Wilderness, The, in which the Israelites spent 40 years, between Egypt and Canaan, is called sometimes the "great and terrible Wilderness" by way of eminence. In this region there are several smaller Wildernesses, as Etham, Paran, Shur, Zin. What is known distinctively as the "wilderness of the Wandering" is the great central limestone plateau between the granite region of Sinai on the south, the sandy desert on the north, and the valley of the Arabah on the east. Instead of entering the Promised Land immediately from Kadesh, they were driven back into the Wilderness for their disobedience, and there wandered for 40 years
Machbanai - Clad with a mantle, or bond of the Lord, one of the Gadite heroes who joined David in the Wilderness (1 Chronicles 12:13 )
Middin - Measures, one of the six cities "in the Wilderness," on the west of the Dead Sea, mentioned along with En-gedi (Joshua 15:61 )
Champaign - The word is arabah, Deuteronomy 11:30 , and is elsewhere translated 'plain, desert, Wilderness
Elparan - In the margin 'the plain of Paran,' or some boundary mark in the Wilderness of Paran in the south of Palestine
Ammah - Hill to which Joab pursued Abner and Abishai, it was 'before Giah by the way of the Wilderness of Gibeon
Mid'Din - (measures ), a city of Judah, ( Joshua 15:61 ) one of the six specified as situated in the district of "the midbar" (Authorized Version "wilderness")
Oboth - All encampment, so called, in the Wilderness, after leaving Panon
Iim - ...
...
One of the stations of the Israelites in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:45 )
Abiram - , conspired to overthrow the authority of Moses and Aaron in the Wilderness, Numbers 16:1-50
Rithmah - A place of encampment where Israel rested in the Wilderness, (Numbers 33:18) Probably the place abounded with juniper trees, since the name signifies juniper
Oboth - Bottles, an encampment of the Israelites during the wanderings in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:43 ), the first after the setting up of the brazen serpent
Tophel - Lime, a place in the Wilderness of Sinai (Deuteronomy 1:1 ), now identified with Tafyleh or Tufileh, on the west side of the Edomitish mountains
Hazar-Addar - ” Station on Israel's Wilderness journey (Numbers 34:4 ) near Kadesh, possibly ain Qedesh
be-er-Laha'i-Roi - ( Jeremiah 6:7 ) between Kadesh and Bered, in the Wilderness
Paran - The exiled Ishmael settled in the ‘ Wilderness of Paran ,’ evidently S. Israel’s first march from Sinai brought them to this Wilderness ( Numbers 10:12 ). Within it lay Taberah, Kibroth-hattaavah, Mazeroth, Kadesh, and what is called the ‘ Wilderness of Zin. ’ The spies went from the ‘Wilderness of Zin’ ( Numbers 13:21 ), in which lay Kadesh ( Numbers 20:1 , Numbers 27:14 , cf. Numbers 33:36 ), and this again is identified with the ‘Wilderness of Paran’ ( Numbers 13:26 )
Rissah - ” Campsite during Israel's Wilderness wanderings (Numbers 33:21-22 ), modern Sharma, east of Gulf of Aqaba
Rithmah - ” Campsite during Israel's Wilderness wanderings (Numbers 33:18-19 ), possibly valley called er-Retame east of Gulf of Aqaba
Arbathite - ‘A native of Beth-arabah,’ a town in the Wilderness of Judah ( Joshua 15:6 ; Joshua 15:51 ; Joshua 18:22 )
Eliab - ...
...
A son of Helon, and chief of the tribe of Zebulun at the time of the census in the Wilderness (Numbers 1:9 ; 2:7 ). ...
...
One of the Gadite heroes who joined David in his stronghold in the Wilderness (1 Chronicles 12:9 )
Ephraim (2) - a country near to the Wilderness" (John 11:54). "The Wilderness" means the hill country N
Sela-Hammahlekoth - A rock or cliff in the Wilderness of Maon, at which Saul ‘returned from pursuing after David’ ( 1 Samuel 23:28 )
Kehelathah - ” One of the desert camps of the Israelites during the Wilderness wandering (Numbers 33:22-23 )
Kedemoth - A Wilderness near the same
Tadmor - Palm, a city built by Solomon "in the Wilderness" (2 Chronicles 8:4 ). In 1 Kings 9:18 , where the word occurs in the Authorized Version, the Hebrew text and the Revised Version read "Tamar," which is properly a city on the southern border of Palestine and toward the Wilderness (Compare Ezekiel 47:19 ; 48:28 ). It stood in the great Syrian Wilderness, 176 miles from Damascus and 130 from the Mediterranean and was the centre of a vast commercial traffic with Western Asia
pa'Ran, el-pa'Ran - (peace of caverns ), a desert or Wilderness, bounded on the north by Palestine, on the east by the valley of Arabah, on the south by the desert of Sinai, and on the west by the Wilderness of Etham, which separated it from the Gulf of Suez and Egypt. Through this very wide Wilderness, from pasture to pasture as do modern Arab tribes, the Israelites wandered in irregular lines of march. This region through which the Israelites journeyed so long is now called by the name it has borne for ages --Bedu et-Tih , "the Wilderness of wandering
Shapher - ” Stop on Israel's Wilderness journey (Numbers 33:23 ), somewhere on east of the Gulf of Aqaba
Rithmah - Wild broom, a station in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:18,19 ), the "broom valley," or "valley of broombushes," the place apparently of the original encampment of Israel, near Kadesh
Zin - In Numbers 13:21 ‘the Wilderness of Zin’ is named as the southern limit from which the spies began to search the land. Numbers 20:1 records the arrival of the children of Israel ‘in the Wilderness of Zin’ in the first month [1], and the following Numbers 20:2-13 relate the events which took place at Meribah. The remaining two passages, Numbers 27:1-23 and Deuteronomy 32:1-52 , which are duplicates, refer to the punishment of Moses for his offence at ‘the waters of Meribah of Kadesh in the Wilderness of Zin. ’ Hence it may be inferred ( a ) that the Wilderness of Zin formed part of the southern boundary of Judah at its eastern end towards the Dead Sea; ( b ) that Kadesh was included within its limits. Paran, Sin [2]
Wilderness - The Wilderness of JUDAHis a plain extending the whole length of the Dead Sea; but some of it can be used for pasture land. It may be said to include the Wilderness of EN-GEDI, that of MAON, and probably that of ZIPH and of JERUEL. ...
The Wilderness of BETH-AVEN and of GIBEON were in the allotment of Benjamin. ...
The Wilderness of DAMASCUS was far north, and that of BEER-SHEBA far south; and that of SHUR, still farther south-west. ...
Typically the Wilderness was outside Canaan, and stands in contrast to it. The Wilderness was the place of testing to the Israelites, and it is the same to the Christian, to humble him, and to prove what is in his heart
Paran, Mount - Probably the hilly region or upland Wilderness on the north of the desert of Paran forming the southern boundary of the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 33:2 ; Habakkuk 3:3 )
Ammishaddai - (am' mih sshad' dawee) The father of Ahiezer, the leader of the tribe of Dan in the Wilderness
am'Mah - (head ), The hill of, A hill facing Giah by the way of the Wilderness of Gibeon, named as the point to which Joab pursued Abner ( 2 Samuel 2:24 )
Secacah - Enclosure, one of the six cities in the Wilderness of Judah, noted for its "great cistern" (Joshua 15:61 )
Jangling, Vain - Translation alternatives include: foolish (TEV), fruitless (NAS), or vain (RSV) discussion; meaningless talk (NIV, NRSV); and a Wilderness of words (REB)
Hashmonah - A station in Israel's Wilderness journey (Numbers 33:29-30 )
Haradah - ” Station in Israel's Wilderness journey (Numbers 33:24-25 )
Oboth - ” A Wilderness station (Numbers 21:10-11 ; Numbers 33:43-44 ), perhaps identical with Ain el-Weiba near Panon (modern Feinan)
Zurishaddai - ” The father of Shelumiel, a leader of the tribe of Simeon, in the Wilderness wanderings (Numbers 1:6 )
Dizahab - Place in the Wilderness near where Moses rehearsed the law
e'Nan - Ahira ben-Enan was "prince" of the tribe of Naphtali at the time of the numbering of Israel in the Wilderness of Sinai
Hazeroth - ” Wilderness station on Israel's journey from Egypt (Numbers 11:35 ). If they are right, the Hazeroth mentioned there is different from the Wilderness station
Zelo'Phehad - (1 Chronicles 7:15 ) Zelophehad came out of Egypt with Moses, but died in the Wilderness, as did the whole of that generation. (Numbers 14:35 ; 27:3 ) On his death without male heirs, his five daughters, just after the second numbering in the Wilderness, came before Moses and Eleazar to claim the inheritance of their father in the tribe of Manasseh
Taberah - Burning, a place in the Wilderness of Paran, where the "fire of the Lord" consumed the murmuring Israelites (Numbers 11:3 ; Deuteronomy 9:22 )
Hazeroth - Station of the Israelites in the Wilderness
Shur - part of the Wilderness of Paran, now al Jifar. Israel entered "the Wilderness of Shur" when they had crossed the Red Sea (Exodus 15:22-23). The Wilderness of Shur is the whole district between the N. In Numbers 33:8 the special designation occurs, "the Wilderness of Etham" (at the northern extremity of the Bitter Lakes)
Sec'Acah, - (thicket ), one of the six cities of Judah which were situated in the Midbar ("wilderness"), that is, the tract bordering on the Dead Sea
Bamoth - ” A place in Moab where Israel stayed during the Wilderness wanderings (Numbers 21:19-20 )
Zenan - ” Village in the Shephelah (wilderness) district of Judah (Joshua 15:37 ), likely identified with Araq el-Kharba
Tophel - Place in the Wilderness, mentioned only in Deuteronomy 1:1
Desert - The same Hebrew word is rendered "wildernes," and is used of the country lying between Egypt and Palestine (Genesis 21:14,21 ; Exodus 4:27 ; 19:2 ; Joshua 1:4 ), the Wilderness of the wanderings. The same Hebrew word is used also to denote the Wilderness of Arabia, which in winter and early spring supplies good pasturage to the flocks of the nomad tribes than roam over it (1 Kings 9:18 ). ...
The Wilderness of Judah is the mountainous region along the western shore of the Dead Sea, where David fed his father's flocks (1 Samuel 17:28 ; 26:2 ). Such, also, is the meaning of the word "wilderness" in Matthew 3:3 ; 15:33 ; Luke 15:4 . While Midbar Denotes properly a pastoral region, Arabah Denotes a Wilderness. It is also translated "plains;" as "the plains of Jericho" ( Joshua 5:10 ; 2 Kings 25:5 ), "the plains of Moab" (Numbers 22:1 ; Deuteronomy 34:1,8 ), "the plains of the Wilderness" (2 Samuel 17:16 ). It is rendered "desert" only in Psalm 102:6 , Isaiah 48:21 , and Ezekiel 13:4 , where it means the Wilderness of Sinai. Nations destitute of the knowledge of God are called a "wilderness" (32:15, Midbar )
Susi - ” The father of Gaddi, one of the spies Moses sent from the Wilderness of Paran to spy out the land of Canaan (Numbers 13:11 )
Salt, City of - One of the six cities in the Wilderness that fell to the lot of Judah
Evi - ” King of Midian killed in battle by Israelites during Wilderness wanderings (Numbers 31:8 )
Pinon - Eusebius and Jerome (Onomasticon) identify the seat of the tribe with Punon, an Israelite station in the Wilderness, and Phoeno between Petra and Zoar, the site of the Roman copper mines
Sibmah (1) - shall be transported beyond sea to Cyprus and lands subject to Babylon; or else "they wandered through the Wilderness, they are gone over the Dead Sea," in wild luxuriance overrunning the Wilderness round Moab and spreading round the sea so as to reach beyond to the other side
Sin, Wilderness of - SIN, Wilderness OF (name probably derived from the moon-god Sin). Sinai must be located somewhere in the Negeb, the Wilderness of Sin was on the more direct route from Egypt to Kadesh, near to if not identical with the desert of Zin ( Numbers 13:21 ; Numbers 20:1 ; Numbers 27:14 ; Numbers 33:36 ; Numbers 34:3 , Deuteronomy 32:51 , Joshua 15:1-3 )
Sin, Wilderness of, - a tract of the Wilderness which the Israelites reached after leaving the encampment by the Red Sea. In the Wilderness of Sin the manna was first gathered, and those who adopt the supposition that this was merely the natural product of the tarfa bush find from the abundance of that shrub in Wady es-Sheikh , southeast of Wady Ghurundel , a proof of local identity
Paran - Abounding in foliage, or abounding in caverns, (Genesis 21:21 ), a desert tract forming the north-eastern division of the peninsula of Sinai, lying between the 'Arabah on the east and the Wilderness of Shur on the west. From Kadesh, in this Wilderness, spies (q
Wandering - Of the Israelites in the Wilderness in consequence of their rebellious fears to enter the Promised Land (Numbers 14:26-35 ). (See Wilderness
Shur - The Wilderness of Shur was entered in the Israelites after they had crossed the Red Sea. (Exodus 15:22,23 ) It was also called the Wilderness of Etham
Paran - The Wilderness on the south of Canaan and west of Edom. David also at one time took shelter in this Wilderness
Hori - Father of the leader of tribe of Simeon under Moses in the Wilderness (Numbers 13:5 )
Secacah - A town mentioned ( Joshua 15:61 ) among the possessions of Judah ‘in the Wilderness’ ( midbâr )
Ahisamach - ” Father of Oholiab, the artisan who helped Bezaleel create the artwork of the Wilderness tabernacle (Exodus 31:6 ; Exodus 35:34 ; Exodus 38:23 )
Dophkah - Knocking, an encampment of the Israelites in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:12 )
Salt, City of, - the fifth of the six cities of Judah which lay in the "wilderness
Shur - Wilderness towards the north east of Egypt; its situation is clearly shown in the various passages
Middin - ” Village in the Wilderness district of Judah (Joshua 15:61 )
Beth-Arabah - A place in the Jericho plain, apparently north of Beth-hoglah, in the ‘wilderness
Rephidim - An encampment of Israel in the Wilderness, Exodus 17:1 remarkable for the murmurings of the people grace in giving them water
Onions - The Israelites, having enjoyed them in Egypt, lamented their loss in the Wilderness
Punon - A place were Israel pitched in the Wilderness, between Petra and Segor, Some have thought that it was here Moses set up the brazen serpent, Numbers 21:9 and Numbers 33:42
Pagiel - ” Wilderness leader of the tribe of Asher (Numbers 1:13 ; Numbers 2:27 ; Numbers 7:72 ,Numbers 7:72,7:77 ; Numbers 10:26 )
Iim - Contracted from Ije Abarim, a late stage of Israel's Wilderness journey (Numbers 33:45; Numbers 21:11), = "ruinous heaps". border of Moab, in the midbar or "wilderness," unenclosed uncultivated land, verdant in spring, but parched and dreary in summer
Nahshon - Son of Amminadab, prince of Judah; assisted Moses and Aaron at the first numbering in the Wilderness (1 Chronicles 2:10; Exodus 6:23; Numbers 1:7). First in the encampment, the march, as captain of Judah (Numbers 2:3; Numbers 10:14; Numbers 7:12), and in offering for dedicating the altar; but third in order at the census (Numbers 1:1-7); died in the Wilderness (Numbers 26:64-65)
Alarm - A particular quivering sound of the silver trumpets to give warning to the Hebrews on their journey through the Wilderness (Numbers 10:5,6 ), a call to arms, or a war-note (Jeremiah 4:19 ; 49:2 ; Zephaniah 1:16 )
Elizur - ” Leader of tribe of Reuben under Moses in the Wilderness (Numbers 1:5 )
Secacah - ” Town in tribal territory of Judah in the Judean Wilderness (Joshua 15:61 )
Zeboim - The "wilderness" is the wild tract between the central hills and the valley of the Jordan
Jokshan - ” Son of Abraham by Keturah and ancestor of Arabian tribes in Wilderness east of Jordan (Genesis 25:2-3 )
Ammah - A hill facing Giah by way of the Wilderness of Gibeon, where Joab ceased pursuing Abner after Asahel's death (2 Samuel 2:24)
David - Ruth 4:22 (c) He is a type of the Christian and of CHRIST who lives for GOD in his youth, is persecuted and rejected by his brethren, is tempted in the Wilderness, but finally is exalted on the throne
Salt, City of - A city near Engedi and the Dead Sea, in the Wilderness
Abronah - ” Wilderness camp (Numbers 33:34 )
Taberah - Name given to a place in the Wilderness of Paran, where the Israelites murmured and were consumed by the fire of the Lord until Moses prayed for them
i'je-ab'Arim - ( Numbers 21:11 ; 33:44 ) It was on the boundary --the southeast boundary-- of the territory of Moab; in the waste uncultivated "wilderness" on its skirts
Scapegoat - ) A goat upon whose head were symbolically placed the sins of the people, after which he was suffered to escape into the Wilderness
Beer-Lahai-Roi - A fountain in the Wilderness, southwest of Beersheba, Genesis 16:7; Genesis 16:14; Genesis 24:62; Genesis 25:11; perhaps Moilâhhi; not the same as that in Genesis 21:19
Etham - It lay near the head of the west gulf of the Red Sea, and the Wilderness east of it was often called by the same name
Jer'Uel - (founded by God ) , The Wilderness of, the place in which Jehoshaphat was informed by Jahaziel the Levite that he should encounter the hordes of Ammon, Moab and the Mehunims
Eliz'Aphan -
A Levite, son of Uzziel, chief of the house of the Kohathites at the time of the census in the Wilderness of Sinai
Coriander Seed - The manna of the Wilderness period was like coriander seed either in appearance (Exodus 16:31 ) or taste (Numbers 11:7 )
Elparan - Oak of Paran, a place on the edge of the Wilderness bordering the territory of the Horites (Genesis 14:6 )
Murmuring - Of the Hebrews in the Wilderness, called forth the displeasure of God, which was only averted by the earnest prayer of Moses (Numbers 11:33,34 ; 12 ; 14:27,30,31 ; 16:3 ; 21:4-6 ; Psalm 106:25 )
Ether - In the Wilderness country below Hebron, E
Gideoni - ” Father of Abidan, a leader of the tribe of Benjamin during the encampment in the Wilderness (Numbers 1:11 ; Numbers 2:22 ; Numbers 7:60 ; Numbers 10:24 )
se'la-Hammahle'Koth - (the cliff of escapes or of divisions ), a rock or cliff in the Wilderness of Maon, southeast of Hebron, the scene of one of those remarkable escapes which are so frequent in the history of Saul's pursuit of David
Selahammahlekoth - It is a rock in the Wilderness of Maon, where David escaped from Saul
Ahira - ” Leader of tribe of Naphtali under Moses (Numbers 1:15 ), who presented the tribe's offerings at the dedication of the altar (Numbers 7:78-83 ) and led them in the Wilderness marches
Ziz - made their way up from the shores of the Dead Sea to the Wilderness of Jeruel
Eli'Asaph -
Head of the tribe of Dan at the time of the census in the Wilderness of Sinai
Etham - An early stage in Israel's sojourn in the Wilderness, not far from the Red Sea (Numbers 33:6-8). Etham is probably Pithom, the frontier city toward the Wilderness
Sinai - The peninsula is usually called in Scripture ‘the desert (or Wilderness) of Sinai. Stephen (Acts 7:30) recalls how an angel of the Lord appeared to Moses ‘in the Wilderness of mount Sinai, in a flame of fire in a bush
Numbers - a canonical book of the Old Testament, being the fourth of the Pentateuch, or five books of Moses; and receives its denomination from the numbering of the families of Israel by Moses and Aaron, who mustered the tribes, and marshalled the army, of the Hebrews in their passage through the Wilderness. A great part of this book is historical, relating several remarkable events which happened in that journey, and also mentioning various of their journeyings in the Wilderness
False Christs - Jesus also urged disbelief of those claiming the Messiah was waiting in the Wilderness or was in “the inner rooms” (perhaps a reference to the inner chambers of the Temple complex). 44-46) and summoned the people to the Jordan River Wilderness with the promise that he would divide the Jordan like Joshua and begin a new conquest of the land; (2) various “imposters” during the term of Felix (A. 52-59) who led crowds into the Wilderness with promises of signs and wonders; (3) an “imposter” during the term of Festus (A. 60-62) who promised deliverance and freedom from the miseries of Roman rule for those who would follow him into the Wilderness; (4) Manahem ben Judah (alias “the Galilean”) during the term of Florus (A
Gudgodah - A stop on the Israelites' Wilderness journey (Deuteronomy 10:7 )
Hor-Haggidgad - ” Station on Israel's Wilderness journey (Numbers 33:32-33 )
Zelophehad - A Manassite who died during the Wilderness journeyings, leaving no male issue
Bozer - ("in the Wilderness"
Mattanah - ” Stopping place in the Wilderness (Numbers 21:18-19 )
Jeruel - The part of the Wilderness of Judæa that faces the W
Hornet - The Israelites, being in the sandy Wilderness, would escape it
Jesh'Imon - (a Wilderness ), a name which occurs in ( Numbers 21:20 ) and Numb 23:28 In designating the position of Pisgah and Peor; both described as "facing the Jeshimon
Jeruel - It lay beyond the Wilderness of Tekoa, in the direction of Engedi (2 Chronicles 20:16,20 )
Gibeah-Haaraloth - ), hill of the foreskins, a place at Gilgal where those who had been born in the Wilderness were circumcised
Mithan - ” One of the Wilderness stations (Numbers 33:28-29 )
Mosera - A bond, one of the stations of the Israelites in the Wilderness (Deuteronomy 10:6 ), at the foot of Mount Hor
Elzaphan - He helped carry the dead bodies of Nadab and Abihu out of the Wilderness camp after God punished them (Leviticus 10:4-5 )
Taberah - ” Unidentified site in the Wilderness wandering
Leeks - After a steady diet of manna in the Wilderness, they were ready to return to slavery and the foods of servitude (Numbers 11:5 )
Mosera(h), Moseroth - ” A Wilderness station (Numbers 33:30-31 )
Pole - Our Lord JESUS said that it represents the Cross on which He was lifted up at Calvary as the pole was lifted up in the Wilderness, and on which the serpent hung
Garlic, - The Israelites longed for it when in the Wilderness
Remphan - " It is probable, therefore, that they are names for a god worshipped secretly by the Israelites in Egypt and in the Wilderness, answering, probably, to Saturn or Moloch, the star-god
Wanderings of the Israelites - The "great and terrible Wilderness" between mount Sinai and Palestine is still known by the Arabs as Et-Tyh, or the Wanderings
Jeshimon - The waste, probably some high waste land to the south of the Dead Sea (Numbers 21:20 ; 23:28 ; 1 Samuel 23:19,24 ); or rather not a proper name at all, but simply "the waste" or "wilderness," the district on which the plateau of Ziph (q
Judaea - ...
It was in the Wilderness of Judæa that John the Baptist came forward as the forerunner of Christ ( Matthew 3:1 ; cf. Mark 1:4 ; and Luke 3:2 , ‘the Wilderness’). It is probably the same as the ‘wilderness of Judah’ ( Judges 1:16 , Psalms 63:1 [1], the desert tract to the W
Kadesh-Barnea - a station of the Israelites, to which they returned again after thirty-eight years, is said to be in the Wilderness of Zin, Numbers 13:21 ; Numbers 20:1 ; Deuteronomy 32:51 ; but in the Wilderness of Paran, Numbers 12:16 . In the Itinerary it is simply called Rithmah, "the Wilderness
Booth - ), Leviticus 23:42,43 , which commemorated the abode of the Israelites in the Wilderness
Nahaliel - Possession, or valley of God, one of the encampments of the Israelites in the Wilderness (Numbers 21:19 ), on the confines of Moab
Rissah - Roman Rasa, 30 miles from Elath, on the road to Jerusalem, on the plateau of the Wilderness near the hill now named Ras-el-Κaa , i
Rithmah - By comparing this passage with Numbers 11:35 and Numbers 12:16 it appears that Rithmah is in the Wilderness of Paran, and the passages refer to the first visit of the Israelites to that locality
Bezer - A city belonging to Reuben, situated ‘in the Wilderness, on the mîshôr ,’ or fiat table-land, E. From its being described as being in the ‘wilderness’ (cf
Kedemoth - A Wilderness or uncultivated pasture adjoining was named from it; where Israel encamped when Moses asked leave of Sihon to pass through the Amorite country (Deuteronomy 2:26, etc
Zered - It is called the "brook of the willows" (Isaiah 15:7 ) and the "river of the Wilderness" (Amos 6:14 )
Taberah - ) A place in the Wilderness of Paran where a fire from Jehovah consumed many Israelites at the outer edge of the camp, for their murmurings (Numbers 11:3; Deuteronomy 9:22)
Ox - ) The law prohibiting the slaughter of clean beasts in the Wilderness, except before the tabernacle, at once kept Israel from idolatry and tended to preserve their herds
Zelophehad - A descendant of Joseph, whose death in the Wilderness, leaving five daughters and no sons, led to the establishment of a law that in such cases daughters should inherit the patrimony of their father; but they were not to marry out of their tribe, Numbers 26:33 27:1-11 Joshua 17:3,4
Hach'Ilah, the Hill, - a hill apparently situated in a wood in the Wilderness or waste land in the neighborhood of Ziph, in Judah, in the fastnesses or passes of which David and his six hundred followers were lurking when the Ziphites informed Saul of his whereabouts
Camp - ) There were forty-one encampments, from their first in the month of March, at Rameses, in the land of Goshen, in Egypt, and in the Wilderness, until they reached the land of Canaan. Etham, on the edge of the Wilderness...
4. Wilderness of Sin...
9. Wilderness of Sinai...
13 . Perhaps we may consider this spectacle as a type of the order, beauty, and glory of the true "church in the Wilderness," in those happy days when God "shall not behold iniquity in Jacob, nor perverseness in Israel;" when it shall be said, "The Lord his God is with him, and the shout of a king is among them
Beth-Arabah - In Joshua 15:61 it is said to have been "in the Wilderness
Onion - The Israelites in the Wilderness longed for the "onions and garlick of Egypt" (Numbers 11:5 )
Breastplate - of faith and love (for the Wilderness)
Maon - City in the highlands of Judah, to the 'wilderness' of which David and his men resorted when pursued by Saul
Ked'Emoth - (Joshua 21:37 ; 1 Chronicles 6:79 ) It possibly conferred its name on the "wilderness," or uncultivated pasture land, "of Kedemoth
Remphan - Amos 5:26 , upbraids the Hebrews with having carried, during their wanderings in the Wilderness, the tabernacle of their Moloch and Chiun, their images, the star of their god, which they made to themselves, according to our version of the Bible. Grotius thinks it to have been some deity, as Rimmon; and Capellus and Hammond take this Remphan to be a king of Egypt, deified by his subjects; a late writer is of opinion, that God here refers to the idolatries to which in succeeding ages the Jews were gradually given up, after having begun to revolt in the Wilderness by the sin of the golden calf
Deuel - ” In Numbers 1:14 , the father of Eliasaph, the leader in the Wilderness of the tribe of Gad
Hepher - A hero in David's Wilderness army (1 Chronicles 11:36 )
Day of Atonement - The 19th day of the 7th Jewish month, Tishri (September - October), a day of solemn fast, when, in ancient times, two buck goats were brought to the high priest, who sacrificed one of them for sin, while the other, the scapegoat, was thereafter led forth into the Wilderness to carry away all the iniquities of the people
Hazar - All the compounds of HAZER were in the Wilderness or its borders
Nahshon - ” Leader of the tribe of Judah during the Wilderness years (Numbers 1:7 ; Numbers 2:3 ; Numbers 7:12 ,Numbers 7:12,7:17 ; Numbers 10:14 ), brother-in-law of Aaron (Exodus 6:23 ), and an ancestor of King David (Ruth 4:20-22 ) and of Jesus (Matthew 1:4 ; Luke 3:32 )
Zered - Israel crossed the Zered after wandering in the Wilderness for thirty-eight years (Deuteronomy 2:13-14 )
Kedemoth - From the ‘wilderness of Kedemoth’ messengers were sent by Moses to Sihon ( Deuteronomy 2:26 )
Almon-Diblathaim - ” A stopping place near the end of the Wilderness wandering near Mount Nebo (Numbers 33:46-47 )
Howling - ...
Innumerable artifices and stratagems are acted in the howling Wilderness and in the great deep,that can never come to our knowledge
Atonement, Day of - The 19th day of the 7th Jewish month, Tishri (September - October), a day of solemn fast, when, in ancient times, two buck goats were brought to the high priest, who sacrificed one of them for sin, while the other, the scapegoat, was thereafter led forth into the Wilderness to carry away all the iniquities of the people
Leek - A vegetable similar to the onion, after which the Israelites longed in the Wilderness
Manna - (man' naw) Grainlike substance, considered to be food from heaven, which sustained the Israelites in the Wilderness and foreshadowed Christ, the true Bread from heaven. ...
New Testament Jesus assured the Jews that He, and not the Wilderness food, was the true Bread from heaven which conferred eternal life on those who partook of it (John 6:30-58 )
Rephidim - A stage in the Wanderings, between the Wilderness of Sin and the Wilderness of Sinai ( Exodus 17:1 ; Exodus 17:8 ; Exodus 19:2 ; cf
en'-Gedi - (fount of the kid ), a town in the Wilderness of Judah, ( Joshua 15:62 ) on the western shore of the Dead Sea. 2 Chronicles 20:2 Saul was told that David was in the "wilderness of Engedi;" and he took "three thousand men, and went to seek David and his men upon the rocks of the wild goats
Eli'ab -
Son of Helon and leader of the tribe of Zebulun at the time of the census in the Wilderness of Sinai. " (1 Chronicles 15:18,20 ; 16:5 ) ...
One of the warlike Gadite leaders who came over to David when he was in the Wilderness taking refuge from Saul
Kadesh-Barnea - The Old Testament locates it between the Wilderness of Paran and the Wilderness of Zin (Numbers 13:3-21 ,Numbers 13:3-21,13:26 ). The location on the road from Egypt to Edom would fit well the biblical context of Kadesh-Barnea as the oasis home for the Hebrews during the Wilderness wandering period. ), but no remains from the period of the Wilderness wandering have been found to date
Mount Paran - ) So that Paran hath proved an asylum to the distressed on many occasions, as recorded in the Scriptures; and in how many more that are not recorded in public memorials , who shall say! It is blessed when souls under exercise find the Lord in the Wilderness dispensations, who have missed such discoveries in the peopled city. Hagar and David, and thousands besides, have experienced a Paran when and where they least expected it; and Wilderness straits have sometimes brought forth such freedoms, as to make the Wilderness blossom as the rose. " So may my soul find many a Paran in the present Wilderness, and Jesus will sweeten and soften all straits by the gracious enlargements of his love
Iye-Abarim - ” Station in the Wilderness wanderings (Numbers 21:11 ) near Moab
Gershon - In the Wilderness the sons of Gershon had charge of the fabrics of the tabernacle when it was moved from place to place, the curtains, veils, tent-hangings (Numbers 3 :: 2126-26 )
Beer -
A place where a well was dug by the direction of Moses, at the forty-fourth station of the Hebrews in their wanderings (Numbers 21:16-18 ) in the Wilderness of Moab
Husks - Tradition makes it the Baptist's food in the Wilderness; from whence it is called also John's bread
Zin - Within this region lay the barren Wilderness of Zin
Etham - It lay ‘in the edge of the Wilderness,’ evidently at the E
Pioneer - ) One who goes before, as into the Wilderness, preparing the way for others to follow; as, pioneers of civilization; pioneers of reform
Sela-Hammahlekoth - of Judah, in the Wilderness of Maon, where David was on one side of the mountain, Saul on the other
Rehoboth - A place in the Wilderness south of Gerar and Beersheba, so named by Isaac on the occasion of his digging a well there, Genesis 26:22
e'Tham - (bounded by the sea ), one of the early resting-places of the Israelites when they quitted Egypt; described as "in the edge of the Wilderness
Jotbathah - one stage of Israel in the Wilderness, "a land of torrents of waters" (Numbers 33:33; Deuteronomy 10:7)
Wilderness (2) - WILDERNESS. —The word or words (more or less synonymous) which the Authorized and Revised Versions translation by ‘wilderness’ or ‘desert’ afford a striking example of the difficulties which translators, and after them the ordinary readers of Holy Scripture, have to contend with, because that word does not convey to our mind the idea of something we know: in our western European countries there is not, properly speaking, any desert or Wilderness, in the Biblical sense of the word. Such is the classical representation of a desert or Wilderness, and it is a constant source of errors for the understanding of numerous passages of the Bible where that word occurs. In fact, the Hebrew word which is usually translation ‘desert’ or ‘wilderness’ (midbâr) does not in the least convey the idea of solitude or desolation; on the contrary, it belongs to a root which means ‘to pasture,’ and therefore, etymologically,’ feeding-ground’ or ‘pasture-land’ would seem to be the most exact translation. ...
For a correct understanding of the meaning of the word ‘wilderness’ in the Bible, one has to remember that there were—and are still—nomads in Bible lands. They are found even near towns; thus the OT mentions the Wildernesses of Gibeon, of Tekoa, of Damascus, of Riblah (Massoretic Text Diblah, Ezekiel 6:14). Besides those local denominations, others occur which apply to peripheric regions: Wildernesses of Shur, of Sin, of Sinai, of Paran, of Ẓin, of Kadesh, of Ethan (or Yam-Suph), of Maon, of Ziph, of Beersheba, of Engedi, of Jeruel, of Beth-aven, of Edom, of Moab, of Kedemoth. Several of these Wildernesses, as their names show, cover vast spaces; others, on the contrary, represent quite limited places. ...
One of the most important deserts is the Wilderness of Judah, twenty hours in length and five in breadth, which constitutes, with the Mountain (Har), the South (Negeb), and the Low-Country (Shephelah), the four parts of the territory of that tribe. The Wilderness of Judah is the region situated east of the watershed, between this high line and the western shore of the Dead Sea. The Wildernesses of Ziph and of Maon are portions of it in the south, as well as those of Engedi and Tekoa in the middle; and finally also, in the north, the rough, barren, and uninhabited district where the road runs from Jerusalem to Jericho (cf. ) That Wilderness is an uneven, undulating table-land, where conical hills and rocky hillocks arise, where deep ravines are cut between steep walls of rocks; it falls down towards the east—here in gradual declivities, there in sudden and abrupt slopes—in the direction of the Dead Sea, situated 1500 or 2000 feet below. That Wilderness was the refuge of David when persecuted by Saul (1 Samuel 22-26); he knew it from the time of his youth, having, when a boy, followed there the herds of his father (1 Samuel 16:11; 1 Samuel 17:15; 1 Samuel 17:34). ...
The Wildernesses mentioned in the Bible are not all as inclement and inhospitable as the Wilderness of Judah. ...
The Gospel of John alludes twice to the sojourn of Israel in the Wilderness (John 3:14 Moses lifting the serpent, and John 6:31; John 6:40 the manna). ...
The Wilderness of Judah is named several times in connexion with John the Baptist. ...
Ecclesiastical tradition has not been content with the indications given in the Gospels which connect John the Baptist’s life and work with the Wilderness: it has connected also his birth with it. ’ That place is not in the Wilderness of Judah; its neighbourhood is cultivated and fertile, at least in the sense in which one can use that word when speaking of Judaea. Even if we should suppose that such was the birthplace of John, it would be unjustified to consider it as being ‘in the Wilderness’ (cf. ...
It is also in the Wilderness that the Gospel narratives place the scene of the Temptation of our Lord (Matthew 4:1, Mark 1:12, Luke 4:1). According to the narratives of the Gospels, several scenes of the Galilaean ministry of Jesus, and some of His teachings, were connected with places of that sort, designated now as ‘a desert’ or ‘a Wilderness’ (ἔρημος or ἐρημία), now as ‘a desert place’ (ἔρημος τόπος). We have to mention here (a) the multiplication of loaves (Mark 1:4, Mark 6:30-44, Luke 9:10-17, Matthew 15:32-38, Mark 8:1-10); (b) Jesus withdrawing for prayer (Mark 1:35, Luke 5:16), or to avoid the crowd (Mark 1:45, Luke 4:42, John 11:54); (c) the demoniac of Gadara (Luke 8:29); (d) the parable of the Lost Sheep (Luke 15:3-7), where the 99 sheep remain ‘in the Wilderness,’ whereas the shepherd goes after that which is lost until he finds it
Beth-Jeshimoth - of Jordan in the "deserts" of Moab; last but one of the stations in Israel's journeys in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:49)
Nabal - ) A sheepmaster on the border of Judah which took its name from the great "Caleb" (3) (1 Samuel 30:14), next the Wilderness
Elizaphan - A clan leader among the sons of Kohath among the Levites in the Wilderness with Moses (Numbers 3:30 )
Sin, Wilderness of - The place sometimes has been confused with the Wilderness of Zin, which is located on the northwestern side of Sinai
Attai - Warrior of tribe of Gad who served David in the Wilderness as he fled from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:11 )
Agar - The unfortunate woman determined to abandon the boy to death in the Wilderness but hearkened to the angel who foretold his people as the progenitor of a great people, the Ismaelites
Bezer - A city in Reuben, described as 'in the Wilderness, in the plain country
Zeboim - A valley in Benjamin between Michmash and the Wilderness overlooking the Jordan River (1 Samuel 13:17-18 )
Hazeroth - The place where Israel, in their journey through the Wilderness, encamped
Tekoa - ...
The Wilderness of Tekoa, mentioned in 2 Chronicles 20:20 , inclines toward the Dead Sea
e'Zion-ga'Ber, - (giant's backbone ), ( Numbers 33:35 ; 2:8; 1 Kings 9:26 ; 22:48 ; 2 Chronicles 8:17 ) the last station named for the encampment of the Israelites before they came to the Wilderness of Zin
Kib'Roth-Hatta-Avah, - as in the margin, the graves of lust , a station of the Israelites in the Wilderness, where, growing tired of manna and desiring flesh, they murmured, and God sent them quails in great abundance, but smote great numbers of them with a plague and they died
Judah, Tribe of - Its number increased in the Wilderness (26:22). ...
The "wilderness," the sunken district next the Dead Sea (Joshua 15:61 ), "averaging 10 miles in breadth, a wild, barren, uninhabitable region, fit only to afford scanty pasturage for sheep and goats, and a secure home for leopards, bears, wild goats, and outlaws" (1 Samuel 17:34 ; 22:1 ; Mark 1:13 ). It was divided into the "wilderness of En-gedi" (1 Samuel 24:1 ), the "wilderness of Judah" (Judges 1:16 ; Matthew 3:1 ), between the Hebron mountain range and the Dead Sea, the "wilderness of Maon" (1 Samuel 23:24 )
Leviathan - So again the Psalmist, speaking figuratively, saith, (Psalms 74:14) "Thou brakest the head of leviathan in pieces, and gavest him to be meat to thy people inhabiting the Wilderness:" meaning, that as in the Red Sea the Lord overthrew and destroyed that type of the devil, Pharaoh, so in the after-journies of the people during their Wilderness state, whenever they were put to Wilderness straits, the recollection of the Lord's deliverance of them in that memorable instance, became meat for their faith to feed upon. Surely it may be said of the church now, as well as of the church of old, "the Lord thy God led thee through that great and terrible Wilderness, wherein were fiery serpents, and scorpions and drought, where there was no water. " And what was the result? "The Lord thy God brought thee forth water out of the rock of flint; he fed thee in the Wilderness with manna, which thy fathers knew not, that he might humble thee, and that he might prove thee, to do thee good at thy latter end
Fiery Serpent - To punish the Israelites for complaining about their lot in the Wilderness, God sent fiery serpents among them. The serpents were natural residents of the Wilderness ( Deuteronomy 8:15 )
Egyptian, the - In Acts 21:38 the tribune commanding the Antonia fortress mistook Paul for this revolutionary who led 4,000 “Assassins” into the Wilderness. Later the Egyptian gathered 30,000 in the Wilderness, leading the multitude to the Mount of Olives from which, so he promised, they would see the walls of Jerusalem fall at his command
Pillar of Cloud And Fire - Visible evidence of God's presence with Israel during the Exodus and Wilderness wanderings (Exodus 14:24 ; Exodus 33:9-10 ; Numbers 12:5 ; Exodus 33:9-100 ). Jesus' self-presentation as the incarnate Light of the world ( John 8:12 ) recalls the guiding light of the Wilderness wanderings
Miriam - In the course of the Wilderness wanderings she combined with Aaron against Moses, and was punished by leprosy, which was healed in answer to the prayer of Moses ( Numbers 12:1-15 ). She died in Kadesh towards the end of the Wilderness journey ( Numbers 20:1 )
Tadmor - City built in the Wilderness by Solomon. Though this was also built by Solomon in the Wilderness, it is added 'in the land,' whereas Tadmor was outside
Zebo'im - ...
The valley of Zeboim, a ravine or gorge, apparently east of Michmash, mentioned only in (1 Samuel 13:18 ) The road running from Michmash to the east is specified as "the road of the border that looketh to the ravine of Zeboim toward the Wilderness. " The Wilderness is no doubt the district of uncultivated mountain tops and sides which lies between the central district of Benjamin and the Jordan valley
Bethaven - Near it was the "wilderness," i
Scorpion - In the Wilderness God protected Israel from scorpions (Deuteronomy 8:15 ) and could protect His prophet from them (Ezekiel 2:6 )
Kibroth-Hattaavah - The march from Taberah ( Numbers 11:3 ) is not mentioned in Numbers 23:1-30 , but Kibroth-hattaavah was one day’s journey from the Wilderness of Sinai
Hachilah - A hill in which David hid, and on which, during his pursuit, Saul pitched his camp, near the Wilderness of Ziph
Ziz - (the projection ), The cliff of, the pass by which the horde of Moabites, Ammonites and Mehunim made their way up from the shores of the Dead Sea to the Wilderness of Judah near Tekoa
Provoke - It is used in Psalms 95:8 of the conduct of the children of Israel towards God in the Wilderness
Rephidim - An encampment of the Israelites between the Wilderness of Sin and mount Sinai, where the people murmured, and God gave them water from the rock
Coriander - The manna which fell in the Wilderness was like coriander-seed, Exodus 16:31 Numbers 11:7
Gershon - The Gershonites encamped west of the tabernacle in the Wilderness, and carried its curtains and other parts form station to station, Numbers 3:17,25 ; 4:24-28,38 - 41 ; 10:17
Azazel - Some Jewish interpreters regard it as the name of a place some 12 miles east of Jerusalem, in the Wilderness. But the sins must also be visibly banished, and therefore they were symbolically laid by confession on the other goat, which was then "sent away for Azazel" into the Wilderness. " It was of no consequence what became of it, as the whole import of the transaction lay in its being sent into the Wilderness bearing away sin
Arad - of the Wilderness of Judah (Judges 1:16)
Middin - One of the six cities of Judah in the "wilderness" (midbar ; Joshua 15:61, including the waste on the upper level, the cliffs, and shore of the lake)
Marah - A place in the Wilderness of Shur or Etham, three days' journey, Numbers 33:8-9, from the place at which the Israelites crossed the Red Sea
Beer - One of the camps of the Israelites during the Wilderness wandering (Numbers 21:16 )
Marah - ” Place in the Wilderness of Shur, so named because of the bitter water found there by the wandering Israelites (Exodus 15:23 )
Iye-Abarim - The station mentioned in Numbers 21:11 ; Numbers 33:44 (in Numbers 33:45 Iyim alone) and described ( Numbers 21:11 ) as ‘in the Wilderness which is before Moab toward the sun-rising,’ and more briefly ( Numbers 33:44 ) as ‘in the border of Moab
Bethaven - A place or 'wilderness' of Benjamin near Bethel
Caves - David and his followers were in a cave in the Wilderness of En-gedi, so extensive that they could hide themselves, though Saul came into the same cave
Laura - In church history, a name given to a collection of little cells at some distance from each other, in which the hermits of ancient times lived together in a Wilderness
Joshua - The son of Nun, whose name and history we have very fully related in the church of the Wilderness, and afterward in his victories, as set forth in the book which bears his name
Peor - Mountain in Moab opposite the Wilderness of Judah
Cinnamon - Such oil was used to anoint the Wilderness tent of meeting (Exodus 30:23 )
Desert - The Hebrew language distinguishes with several words what English describes as desert or Wilderness. This southern Wilderness can be divided into various parts: Shur (Exodus 15:22 ); Sin (Exodus 16:1 ); Paran (Numbers 12:16 ); Zin (Numbers 13:21 ). This entire southern desert region can be called the Wilderness of Sinai (Exodus 19:1 ) above which rises Mount Sinai. North of this is the Wilderness of Judah (Judges 1:16 ), lying east of the road connecting Jerusalem and Hebron. The only expectation for a person in the Wilderness was death by starvation ( Exodus 16:3 ). ...
God's judgment could turn a city into desert (Jeremiah 4:26 ), but His grace could turn the Wilderness into a garden (Isaiah 41:17-20 ). See Wilderness
Jahaz - After the crossing of the Arnon, messengers were sent to Sihon from the ‘wilderness of Kedemoth’ ( Deuteronomy 2:26 ), and he ‘went out against Israel into the Wilderness and came to Jahaz’ ( Numbers 21:23 )
Shittah - Isaiah foretells (Isaiah 41:19) God's planting it in the Wilderness. If the ark had been made in Palestine, oak or cedar would have been its material; its being said to be made of shittah, the wood of the Wilderness, is an undesigned propriety and mark of truth (Exodus 25:10)
Hundreds - The seating of the crowd in groups of hundreds in Mark 6:40 is perhaps meant to recall Israel's Wilderness division
Tabernacle - Exodus 26:27 : Feast of Tabernacles, a solemn festival of the Hebrews, observed after harvest, on the 15th day of the month Tisri, instituted to commemorate the goodness of God, who protected the Israelites in the Wilderness, and made them dwell in booths when they came out of Egypt
Shur - An enclosure; a wall, a part, probably, of the Arabian desert, on the north-eastern border of Egypt, giving its name to a Wilderness extending from Egypt toward Philistia (Genesis 16:7 ; 20:1 ; 25:18 ; Nettle - chârûl ( Job 30:7 , Proverbs 24:31 , Zephaniah 2:9 ), more probably a generic name for thorn bushes growing in the Wilderness, such as the Zizyphus and varieties of acacia
Zin, Wilderness of - It must not be confounded with the Wilderness of Sin (which lies along the south-east coast of the Red Sea)
Kehushtan - The serpent of brass—or copper—which Moses made by God's command in the Wilderness, Numbers 21:8-9, was preserved for many ages
Leek - The Hebrews complained in the Wilderness, that manna grew insipid to them; they longed for the leeks and onions of Egypt, Numbers 11:5
Zin - It formed part of the great Wilderness of Paran, Numbers 13:26 ; and in its north-east corner was Kadesh-barnea, memorable for the death of Miriam, the mission of the twelve spies into Canaan, the murmuring of the Israelites, the rock flowing with water, and the unholy passion of Moses, Numbers 13:21 20:1-13 27:14
Merari - In the journey through the Wilderness they were charged with the framework of the tabernacle, to carry from one place of encampment to another, and there set it up, Numbers 4:29-33 ; 7:8
Scapegoat - The one of the two buck goats presented before the Lord on the Day of Atonement, chosen by lot to be the emissary goat, not sacrificed for sin, as his companion, but let go into the Wilderness, symbolic of carrying the iniquities of the Chosen People into an uninhabited land; or, as some interpret the emissary goat to mean the evil spirit, symbolic of turning back on the evil spirit the sins which he instigated (Leviticus 8)
e'Phra-in - ( 2 Chronicles 13:19 ) It has been conjectured that this Ephrain or Ephron is identical with the Ephraim by which Absalom's sheep-farm of Baal-hazor was situated; with the city called Ephraim near the Wilderness in which our Lord lived for some time; and with Ophrah, a city of Benjamin, apparently not far from Bethel
Heath, - Moab also, under the judgement of God, is compared to 'the heath in the Wilderness
Appeal - Moses established in the Wilderness a series of judicatories such that appeals could be made from a lower to a higher (Exodus 18:13-26
Beth-Aven - Close to Ai ( Joshua 7:2 ), by the Wilderness ( Joshua 18:12 ), north-west of Michmash ( 1 Samuel 13:5 ), and on the way to Aijalon ( 1 Samuel 14:23 ), still inhabited in the 8th cent
Zelophehad - Died in the Wilderness without male issue
Zalmonah - The stage in Israel's Wilderness journey next after Mount Hor (Numbers 33:41) on the march from Kadesh round Edom
Ahiezer - An aide to Moses in the Wilderness from the tribe of Dan (Numbers 1:12 ; Numbers 2:25 )
Melons, - The melon was one of the fruits the Israelites had eaten in Egypt, and for which they longed in the Wilderness
Scorpion - When we consider the Wilderness-state through which the Lord brought the church after coming out of Egypt, and hear what the Lord saith to his people concerning his care over them there, it is very blessed to trace a subject so abundantly interesting. "Who led thee (saith the Lord) through that great and terrible Wilderness, wherein were fiery serpents, and scorpions, and drought, where there was no water. And as the scorpion had two eyes at each extremity, and one species of scorpions possessed wings like the locusts, what could be more formidable to the traveller through the hot, sultry, unwatered Wilderness!...
What a sweet thought is it to the church of Christ, that as this as a figure of the present life, it is Jesus that now speaks to his people in the same gracious language, while they are going home through their eventful pilgrimage! What scorpions, what fiery flying serpents, do they meet with in every part of their warfare! "Behold, (saith the Lord Jesus) I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy, and nothing shall by any means hurt you
Maon - Habitation, a town in the tribe of Judah, about 7 miles south of Hebron, which gave its name to the Wilderness, the district round the conical hill on which the town stood
Jobab - (joh' bab) Personal name perhaps meaning, “wilderness” or “arm oneself for battle
Silver - It was largely employed for making vessels for the sanctuary in the Wilderness (Exodus 26:19 ; 27:17 ; Numbers 7:13,19 ; 10:2 )
Gershon - He was the progenitor of the Gershonites, who had specifically assigned responsibilities regarding the transporting of the tabernacle during the years of Israel's nomadic existence in the Wilderness
Tamarisk - ” Some believe the resin which the tamarisk produces may have been the manna eaten by the Hebrews during the Wilderness wanderings
Desolate - Destitute or deprived of inhabitants desert uninhabited denoting either stripped of inhabitants, or never having been inhabitated as a desolate isle a desolate Wilderness
Brook of the Arabah - Literally, “brook of the Wilderness
Shapher, Mount - corner of the Wilderness of Ziu
Kibroth-Hattaavah - The graves of lust, one of the encampments of Israel in the Wilderness, where they desired of God flesh for their sustenance, declaring they were tired of manna, Numbers 11:34,35 33:16
Mortar - Mortars were used in the Wilderness for pounding the manna (Numbers 11:8 )
Bezaleel - , "under his protection", the artificer who executed the work of art in connection with the tabernacle in the Wilderness (Exodus 31:2 ; 35:30 )
Miriam - She died at Kadesh during the second encampment at that place, toward the close of the wanderings in the Wilderness, and was buried there (Numbers 20:1 )
Libnah -
One of the stations of the Israelites in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:20,21 )
Beer-la-Hai-Roi - ) Named by Hagar, because God looked after her with loving providence even in the Wilderness (Genesis 16:14; Genesis 22:14; compare 2 Chronicles 16:9; Psalm 139)
Diblath - "I will make the land desolate from the Wilderness (midbar ) to Diblah," i
Rephidim - (rehf' ih dihm) Site in the Wilderness where the Hebrews stopped on their way to Canaan just prior to reaching Sinai (Exodus 17:1 ; Exodus 19:2 )
Hazezon Tamar - ) Perhaps this was "the city of palm trees" (Judges 1:16) (though Jericho is generally called so: Deuteronomy 34:3), from which the Kenites, the tribe of Moses' father-in-law, went into the Wilderness of Judah with the children of Judah
Melons - No fruit is more appreciated in the arid Wilderness
Judaea Wilderness of - Judæa, Wilderness of
Baali - In the last days a remnant will be brought into the Wilderness, and be spoken comfortably to
Desolate - ) Destitute or deprived of inhabitants; deserted; uninhabited; hence, gloomy; as, a desolate isle; a desolate Wilderness; a desolate house
Ziph - City in the highlands of Judah: with its 'wilderness' it was connected with some of the stirring events in the life of David
Manna - ) The food supplied to the Israelites in their journey through the Wilderness of Arabia; hence, divinely supplied food
Tadmor - A city in the Wilderness, built by Solomon
Exodus - It comprehends the history of about a hundred and forty-five years; and the principal events contained in it are, the bondage of the Israelites in Egypt, and their miraculous deliverance by the hand of Moses; their entrance into the Wilderness of Sinai; the promulgation of the law, and the building of the tabernacle
Chiun - He called them back to the simple worship of the Wilderness
Rephidim - (rehf' ih dihm) Site in the Wilderness where the Hebrews stopped on their way to Canaan just prior to reaching Sinai (Exodus 17:1 ; Exodus 19:2 )
Engedi - It stood near the middle of the western shore of the Dead sea, twenty-five or thirty miles south- east of Jerusalem, in the edge of the loftiest part of the Wilderness of Judea, a region full of rocks and caverns, 1 Samuel 23:29 Ezekiel 47:10
ma'Rah - (bitterness ), a place which lay in the Wilderness of Shur or Etham, three days journey distant, ( Exodus 15:23 ; Numbers 33:8 ) from the place at which the Israelites crossed the Red Sea, and where was a spring of bitter water, sweetened subsequently by the casting in of a tree which "the Lord showed" to Moses
at'ta-i - (1 Chronicles 11:41 ) ...
One of the lion-faced warriors of Gad, captains of the host, who forded the Jordan at the time of its overflow and joined David in the Wilderness
Cloud, Pillar of - The pillar of cloud by day and of fire by night that God caused to pass before the camp of the children of Israel when in the Wilderness
Engedi - Fountain of the kid, place in the Wilderness of Judah (Joshua 15:62 ), on the western shore of the Dead Sea (Ezekiel 47:10 ), and nearly equidistant from both extremities. To the Wilderness near this town David fled for fear of Saul (Joshua 15:62 ; 1 Samuel 23:29 )
Eliab - Eliab betrayed anger without a cause toward David, when seeking his brethren's welfare ("Why camest thou down hither, and with whom hast thou left those few sheep in the Wilderness?"); also "pride and naughtiness of heart," the very sins he charged David with ("I know thy pride," etc. A Gadite leader who joined David in the Wilderness in his flight from Saul (1 Chronicles 12:9)
Eliab - The representative, or ‘prince,’ of the tribe of Zebulun, who assisted Moses and Aaron in numbering the children of Israel in the Wilderness of Sinai ( Numbers 1:1 ff. One of the Gadites who joined David, during his outlaw life, in the hold in the Wilderness ( 1 Chronicles 12:9 )
Sinai - Within it are the semi-desert regions known as the Wilderness of Shur in the north and the Wilderness of Paran in the north-east. They spent much of this time in the Wilderness regions of the Sinai Peninsular, where the older generation passed away and a new generation grew up
Frankincense - Song of Solomon 3:6, "Who is this that cometh out of the Wilderness, like pillars of smoke, perfumed with myrrh and frankincense?" Israel, with Jehovah's pillar of smoke by day and fire by night, and smoke from the altars of incense and atonement, was the type. The bride too comes up with Him from the Wilderness, exhaling frankincense-like graces, faith, love, joy, peace, prayer, praise; of her too it is asked, "Who is this that cometh up from the Wilderness, leaning upon her Beloved?" (Song of Solomon 8:5; Revelation 7:13-17
Ishmael - When Hagar was banished to the Wilderness, God directed her to a fountain, and renewed his promise to make him a great nation. Ishmael married an Egyptian woman, and dwelt in the Wilderness, Genesis 16:12; he was distinguished for lawless predatory habits, as his descendants have always been. He was the father of twelve sons, who gave their names to as many tribes, who dwelt in the Wilderness, from Havilah unto Shur
Abiel - One of David’s heroes ( 1 Chronicles 11:32 ), from Beth-arabah in the Wilderness of Judah ( Joshua 15:6 ; Joshua 15:61 ; Joshua 18:22 )
Dead Sea - In the Old Testament it is called "sea of the Wilderness" (Joshua 1:3); "east sea" (Joel 2; Zachariah 14); "salt sea" (Genesis 14); and "sea of the desert" (Deuteronomy 3)
Ithamar - During the Wilderness years Ithamar apparently was in charge of all the Levites (Exodus 38:21 )
Nehushtan - Of copper; a brazen thing a name of contempt given to the serpent Moses had made in the Wilderness (Numbers 21:8 ), and which Hezekiah destroyed because the children of Israel began to regard it as an idol and "burn incense to it
Massah - ” Stopping place during the Wilderness wandering near the base of Mount Horeb (Sinai)
Juniper - As they are bitter and nauseous and contain very little nourishment, this vividly pictures the severity of the famine in the Wilderness
Camp - During their journeys across the Wilderness, the twelve tribes formed encampments at the different places where they halted (Exodus 16:13 ; Numbers 2:3 )
Tekoa, Tekoah - The Wilderness OF TEKOA was probably on its east
Savage - ) Of or pertaining to the forest; remote from human abodes and cultivation; in a state of nature; wild; as, a savage Wilderness
Exodus - (Greek: ex, out; odos, way) ...
The second book of the Bible, thus named because it relates the departure of the Jews from Egypt and a part of their wanderings through the Wilderness, as far as Mount Sinai
Amminadab - Father of Nahshon, who led tribe of Judah in the Wilderness (Numbers 1:7 )
Hor - It is an irregularly truncated cone, with three rugged peaks, overlooking a Wilderness of heights, cliffs, ravines, and alone with his brother and son, Numbers 20:22-29 ; 33:38
Nehushtan - Brazen, a name given by Hezekiah king of Judah to the brazen serpent that Moses had set upon the Wilderness, Numbers 21:8 , and which had been preserved by the Israelites to that time
Ezion-Geber - Ezion-Geber was the last stopping place before Kadesh during the Wilderness wandering (Numbers 33:35-36 ). This site seems an unlikely stopping place during the Wilderness wandering
Ezion-Geber - Ezion-Geber was the last stopping place before Kadesh during the Wilderness wandering (Numbers 33:35-36 ). This site seems an unlikely stopping place during the Wilderness wandering
Tabernacles Feast of - During the seven days of its celebration the people dwelt in booths made of the branches and leaves of trees, in commemoration of the 40 years' wandering in the Wilderness. This ceremony is said to have been founded on Isaiah 12:3; and was probably a memorial of the abundant supply of water which God afforded to the Hebrews during their wanderings in the Wilderness
Bronze Serpent - The people were in the Wilderness after their refusal to obey God by entering the land of Canaan. The serpent, lifted up in the Wilderness, had been God's chosen way to provide physical healing. As the serpent gave life in the Wilderness, Jesus gives spiritual life. See Moses ; Wilderness ; Atonement ; Hezekiah
Desert - ) The Wilderness of Israel's 40 years wanderings (Paran, now the Tih) afforded ample sustenance then for their numerous cattle; so that the skeptic's objection to the history on this ground is futile. ...
Μidbar , the regular term for this "desert" or "wilderness" (Exodus 3:1; Exodus 5:3; Exodus 19:2), means a pasture ground (from daabar , "to drive flocks") (Exodus 10:26; Exodus 12:38; Numbers 11:22; Numbers 32:1). The transition from "pasture land" to "desert" appears Psalms 65:12, "the pastures of the Wilderness" (Joel 2:22
Snail - This was probably the sand-lizard, of which there are many species in the Wilderness of Judea and the Sinai peninsula
Hupham - (hyoo' fam) Original ancestor of clan of Benjamin in the Wilderness (Numbers 26:39 )
Raven - Its glossy plumage is referred to in Song of Solomon 5:11 ; it often dwells in the Wilderness ( Isaiah 34:11 ), and yet God cares for and watches over it ( Job 38:41 , Psalms 147:8 , Luke 12:24 )
Flint - Abounds in all the plains and valleys of the Wilderness of the forty years' wanderings
Elim - The form of expression in Exodus 16:1 seems to imply that the people proceeded in detachments or companies from Elim, and only for the first time were assembled as a complete host when they reached the Wilderness of Sin (q
Shittah-Tree - Shittah wood was employed in making the various parts of the tabernacle in the Wilderness, and must therefore have been indigenous in the desert in which the Israelites wandered
Cucumber - A variety of the melon; hence the Israelites pined for this Egyptian dainty in the Wilderness (Numbers 11:5)
Gold: Places of Its Abundance Undesirable - Did the eye ever rest upon a more utter desolation than that which surrounds the gold mines near Goldau in the Hartz mountains? It is worse than a howling Wilderness, it is a desert with its bowels torn out, and scattered in horrid confusion
Arabah - "wilderness")
Diblah - ” Ezekiel used the term to describe the northern border of Israel as joined with the southern Wilderness to describe all the territory of Israel which faced judgment—“from the desert to Diblah” (NIV)
Ziph - The Wilderness of Ziph was one of the refuges of David when fleeing from Saul ( 1 Samuel 23:14-15 ; 1 Samuel 23:24 ; 1 Samuel 26:2 bis )
Heber (2) - The Kenites migrated with the children of Judah into the Wilderness of Judah at the time of the conquest of Canaan (Judges 1:16)
Machaerus - The Gospels, however, associate John's ministry with the Judean Wilderness (Mark 1:5 ; Matthew 3:1 ; John 3:22-23 )
Aaron - He caused the casting of the golden calf which the Israelites worshiped in the Wilderness (Exodus 32), but at the prayer of Moses he was spared the fate of the three thousand worshipers (Deuteronomy 9)
Corn - The manna is rather heavenly grace for Wilderness circumstances
Zeboim, Valley of - Zeboim lay "toward the Wilderness" (the uncultivated mountain sides between the central district of Benjamin and the Jordan valley)
Jeshimon - root meaning ‘to be waste or desolate,’ is used either as a common noun (= ‘desert,’ ‘wilderness’) or (with the art
Gamaliel - Son of Pedahzur; prince or captain of the tribe of Manasseh at the census at Sinai, Numbers 1:10; Numbers 2:20; Numbers 7:54; Numbers 7:59, and at starting on the inarch through the Wilderness
Aram-Naharaim - Balaam, the prophet Balak hired to curse Israel as they entered Moab from the Wilderness, came from Aram-Naharaim
Giants - And in the days of the church going though the Wilderness, the king of Bashan, which opposed Israel, is described as having a bedstead of iron of nine cubits long, and four wide; so that the length was fifteen feet and four inches
Nehush'Tan - (a thing of brass ), the name by which the brazen serpent made by Moses in the Wilderness, ( Numbers 21:9 ) was worshipped in the time of Hezekiah
Rem'Phan, - (Acts 7:43 ) and Chi'un, ( Amos 5:26 ) have been supposed to be names of an idol worshipped secretly by the Israelites in the Wilderness, difficulty has been occasioned by this corresponding occurrence of two names so wholly different in sound
Refreshment Sunday - The Fourth Sunday in Lent is so called from theGospel for the day, which relates the feeding of the five thousandby our Lord in the Wilderness
Wilderness - ...
Revelation 17:3 (b) This Wilderness no doubt represents the various nations of the world in which the great apostate and religious system operates. It really is a Wilderness in every sense of the word
Paradise - Compare the Holy Land turned from a garden of Eden into a Wilderness, with Israel's Wilderness made like Eden the garden of Jehovah (Numbers 24:6; Joel 2:3; Isaiah 51:3; Ezekiel 36:35; contrast Ezekiel 28:13)
Hobab - Moses' entreaty, "Leave us not, I pray thee, forasmuch as thou knowest how we are to encamp in the Wilderness, and thou mayest be to us instead of eyes," implies that Hobab was younger than Moses' father-in-law could now have been. Reuel had seven grown daughters when Moses first went into the Wilderness at 40, and now Moses was 80. As Jethro helped Moses in counsel as a judicious administrator, so Hobab helped him as the experienced Arab sheikh familiar with the tracks, passes, and suitable places of the Wilderness for an encampment, quick eyed in descrying the far off shrubs which betoken the presence of water, and knowing well where there was danger of hostile attacks. If we suffer with Israel in the Wilderness, we shall reign with Israel in Canaan (2 Timothy 2:12; Luke 22:28-29)
Paran - of the Wilderness of Sinai. by the brook or river of Egypt, parting it from Shur Wilderness, the other half of the plateau; on the S. The Zin (not Sin) Wilderness, Canaan's (1 Samuel 25:1-25) immediate boundary, was its N. extremity, from whence Kadesh is spoken of as in Zin Wilderness or in Paran (Numbers 13:26; Numbers 20:1
Beer-la-Hai-Roi - (Genesis 16:1-14) It was Hagar, the handmaid of Sarai, which gave this name to the well, when she fled from her mistress, and was found by the angel of the Lord near a fountain of water in the Wilderness of Shur. ...
That Hagar should have her steps directed into the Wilderness-that there she should find a well of water, already prepared to her hands, when we know how rare and precious wells were considered in the Eastern world; what pains men took to dig them; and what strife for possessing them they occasioned;—that there the Lord should manifest himself to her, and give her such gracious promises:—these are so many distinct tokens of divine love. "...
I cannot dismiss the subject before that I have first requested the reader to ask himself, whether, when at any time in the Wilderness frames of his own heart, or under the Wilderness dispensations the Lord hath brought him into, he hath not often found a well of seasonable and unexpected supplies, like that of Hagar, so that he could call it Beer-la-hai-roi? How very often hath it been found, yea, it may always be found, in the believer's exercises, that where we least expected, there most of Jesus hath been discovered
Arabia Petraea - " In this "great and terrible Wilderness," from Mount Sinai to the promised land, the Hebrews spent their forty years of wanderings
Mehunims - They are again mentioned in 1 Chronicles 4:41 (RSV), in the reign of King Hezekiah, as a Hamite people, settled in the eastern end of the valley of Gedor, in the Wilderness south of Palestine
Zelophehad - First-born, of the tribe of Manasseh, and of the family of Gilead; died in the Wilderness
Gibeath-Haaraloth - A whole generation had neglected God's commandment and lived as strangers or sojourners in the Wilderness
Hebron (1) - The Hebronites are mentioned at the census taken in the Wilderness of Sinai ( Numbers 3:27 ), and appear again at the later census in the plains of Moab (26:53); cf
Maon - David took refuge from Saul in the Wilderness to the east of Maon (1 Samuel 23:24-25 )
Brook of Zered - ” The Israelites crossed this book marking an end to their Wilderness wandering and entrance into the Promised Land (Numbers 21:12 ; Deuteronomy 2:13-14 )
Spies - In the historical book, Numbers, God's command alone is mentioned; but in Deuteronomy, which treats of the people's conduct toward God, Moses reminds them that the request which eventuated in their fathers' rebellion and death in the Wilderness, emanated from themselves
Anah - In Genesis 36:24 Anah is noted for having found “mules in the Wilderness” (KJV) or “hot springs in the desert” (NIV; compare NAS; RSV)
Gama'Liel -
Son of Pedahzur; prince or captain of the tribe of Manasseh at the census at Sinai, (Numbers 1:10 ; 20:20 ; 7:54,59 ) and at starting on the march through the Wilderness
Hagar - They wandered out into the Wilderness, where Ishmael, exhausted with his journey and faint from thirst, seemed about to die. Ishmael afterwards established himself in the Wilderness of Paran, where he married an Egyptian (Genesis 21:20,21 )
Engedi - of the Dead Sea (Ezekiel 47:10), in the Wilderness of Judah (Joshua 15:62). "The Wilderness of Engedi" is explained as" the rocks of the wild goats" (1 Samuel 24:4)
Manna - ’ ‘Your fathers did eat the manna in the Wilderness, and they died. ’ God has a far better gift than the manna that was gathered day by day in the Wilderness
Judah Territory of - The south country, or Negeb, where the fertile land shaded off into the Wilderness. The Wilderness, sloping from the central hills to the Dead Sea, at which it terminates in precipitous cliffs
Manna - ’ ‘Your fathers did eat the manna in the Wilderness, and they died. ’ God has a far better gift than the manna that was gathered day by day in the Wilderness
Wanderings in the Wilderness - A reconstruction of the Israelites' Wilderness wanderings is more complex than a casual reading of the biblical account at first would seem to indicate. This route is identified with Marah (Exodus 15:23 ), Elim (Exodus 15:27 ), the Wilderness of Sin (Exodus 16:1 ), Rephidim (Exodus 17:1 ), the Wilderness of Sinai (Exodus 18:5 ; Exodus 19:1 ), Sinai (Exodus 19:2 ), the Wilderness of Paran (Numbers 10:12 ), Taberah (Numbers 11:3 ) or Kibroth-hattaavah (“the cemetery of the lusters,” Numbers 11:34 ), Hazeroth (“corrals,” Numbers 11:35 ; Numbers 12:16 ) where the mention of enclosures for the livestock and a series of events in the biblical account suggest an extended stay, and, ultimately, Kadesh (Numbers 20:1 ). ...
The negative response to an immediate conquest following the spies' report resulted in the additional 38 years in the Sinai Wilderness
Field - It denotes sometimes a cultivated region as opposed to the Wilderness (Genesis 33:19 ; 36:35 )
Kibroth-Hattaavah - It is to find death in the pot, when we seek that from the creature which the Creator only can supply, Oh, how many Kebroth-hattaavahs doth the present world afford, as well as the Wilderness to Israel!...
Sin, - Its antiquity may perhaps be inferred from the mention of "the Wilderness of Sin" in the journeys of the Israelites
Brier - Judges 8:7,16: "Gideon said, I will tear your flesh with the thorns of the Wilderness and with briers
Amram - Moses' father, Amram, was the father of the Levitical family, the Amramites (Numbers 3:27 ; 1 Chronicles 26:23 ), who served in the Wilderness sanctuary and may have served in the Temple treasuries in later years
Ar - Ar provided provisions for the Israelites as they passed through on the last legs of the Wilderness wandering (Deuteronomy 2:29 )
Paran - DESERT OF, a "great and terrible Wilderness" which the children of Israel entered after leaving Mount Sinai, Numbers 10:12 ; Deuteronomy 1:19 ; and in which thirty-eight of their forty years of wandering were spent
Bezer - When Scripture mentions Bezer, it adds, "in the Wilderness," because it lay in Arabia Deserta, and the eastern part of Edom, encompassed with deserts
Amminadab - His daughter, Elisheba, was the wife of Aaron; and his son Naashon, or Nahshon, prince of Judah in the Wilderness
Elish'Ama -
The "prince" or "captain" of the tribe of Ephraim in the Wilderness of Sinai
Tabernacles, Feast of - This feast was designed (1) to be a memorial of the Wilderness wanderings, when the people dwelt in booths (Leviticus 23:43 ), and (2) to be a harvest thanksgiving (Nehemiah 8:9-18 ). The booths recalled the pilgrimage through the Wilderness
Wilderness of the Wandering, - For their sin they were compelled to remain 38 years longer in the Wilderness, because it showed that they were not yet prepared and trained to conquer and to hold their promised possessions. The Wilderness of the wandering was the great central limestone plateau of the sinaitic peninsula
Sina, Sinai - This name is applied to both a mountain and to a Wilderness. The Israelites were located in the Wilderness of Sinai, which must have been a large place capable of holding two million people
Ark - (Genesis 6:14) And Moses in the Wilderness was commanded to make an ark. And the ark in the Wilderness is called the ark of the covenant, intimating Christ given of JEHOVAH to the people
Ishmaelites - " The heavenly messenger who appeared to Hagar in the Wilderness, and instructed her by what name to call her future son, predicted also that he and his posterity would prove fierce and warlike, engaged in repeated hostilities, and yet able to maintain their independence. Having wandered for some time in the Wilderness of Beersheba, they proceeded farther to the Wilderness of Paran, which bordered on Arabia; and here Ishmael arrived at maturity, and became an expert archer, or a hunter and warrior
Quail - The Hebrew term translated “quail” in the OT is found only in connection with God's provision of food for Israel in the Wilderness (Exodus 16:13 ; Numbers 11:31-32 ; Psalm 105:40 )
Sabbath-Day's Journey - The permitted distance seems to have been grounded on the space to he kept between the ark and the people, (Joshua 3:4 ) in the Wilderness, which tradition said was that between the ark and the tents
Keilah - "And David was in the Wilderness of Ziph, in a wood" (1 Samuel 23:15 )
Providence - An old authority assures us that 'the Jews fancy, concerning the cloud that conducted Israel through the Wilderness, that it did not only show them the way, but also plane it; that it did not only lead them in the way which they must go, but also fit the way for them to go upon it; that it cleared all the mountains and smoothed all the rocks; that it cleared all the bushes and removed all the rubs
Beer - Perhaps the words translated ‘and from the Wilderness,’ which immediately follow this extract ( Numbers 21:18 ), should be translated (following the LXX Ziph - David hid from Saul in the surrounding Wilderness (1 Samuel 23:14-15 ); 1 Samuel 26:2 )
Engedi - Town in the Wilderness of Judah
Ammihud - Father of Elishama, who represented the tribe of Ephraim to help Moses during the Wilderness wandering (Numbers 1:10 )
Ziph - (1 Samuel 23:14,15,24 ; 26:2 ) These passages show that at that time it had near it a Wilderness (i,e, a waste pasture-ground) and a wood
Leeks - The Israelites in the Wilderness longed for the leeks and onions of Egypt
Paran - Wilderness area south of Judah, west of Edom, and north of Sinai
Simeon, the Tribe of - They decreased in the Wilderness by about two-thirds (Compare Numbers 1:23 ; 26:14 )
Zephath - or Wilderness of Judah
Agag - The Amalekites had attacked the Israelites in the Wilderness and were therefore cursed (Exodus 17:14 )
Ahimelech - A Hittite warrior in David's Wilderness army (1 Samuel 26:6 )
Mer'Ari, Mer'Arites - ( Genesis 46:8,11 ) At the time of the exodus and the numbering in the Wilderness, the Merarites consisted of two families, the Mahlites and the Mushites, Mahli and Mushi being either the two sons of the son and grandson of Merari
Sea - The Dead Sea, the sea of the Wilderness, the sea or the East, the sea of Sodom, the sea of Salt, or the Salt Sea, the sea of Asphaltites, or of bitumen, is no other than the lake of Sodom
Samuel - He was the son of Elkanah a Levite, descended from that Korah who perished in the Wilderness
Cloud, Pillar of - The means by which God led Israel through the Wilderness with His presence and still hid Himself so they could not see His face
am'Alekites, - a nomadic tribe of uncertain origin, which occupied the peninsula of Sinai and the Wilderness intervening between the southern hill-ranges of Palestine and the border of Egypt
Kadesh - It lay in the "wilderness" or "desert of Zin" (Genesis 14:7 ; Numbers 13:3-26 ; 14:29-33 ; 20:1 ; 27:14 ), on the border of Edom (20:16). ) Because of their unbelief, they were condemned by God to wander for thirty-eight years in the Wilderness
Kadesh - It lay in the "wilderness" or "desert of Zin" (Genesis 14:7 ; Numbers 13:3-26 ; 14:29-33 ; 20:1 ; 27:14 ), on the border of Edom (20:16). ) Because of their unbelief, they were condemned by God to wander for thirty-eight years in the Wilderness
Cloud - Jehovah came down upon Sinai in a cloud (Exodus 19:9 ); and the cloud filled the court around the tabernacle in the Wilderness so that Moses could not enter it (Exodus 40:34,35 ). Cloud, the pillar of, was the glory-cloud which indicated God's presence leading the ransomed people through the Wilderness (Exodus 13:22 ; 33:9,10 )
Asher - The tribe of Asher numbered 53,400 in the Wilderness (Numbers 26:46 ), having grown from 41,500 (Numbers 1:41 ). They formed part of the rear guard in the Wilderness marches (Numbers 10:25-28 )
Netophah - Noticed as "in the Wilderness" of Judah in the Acta Sanctorum
Arnon - Rising in the Arabian mountains (the branch Sell es Saideh in the mountains of Gilead near Kalaat el Katrane), it flows through the Wilderness and falls into the Dead Sea
Flint - God's miraculous provision for the Israelites in the Wilderness is pictured as water ( Deuteronomy 8:15 ; Psalm 114:8 ) or oil (Deuteronomy 32:13 ) flowing from flinty rock
Eliel - A warrior from the tribe of Gad who served under David in the Wilderness (1 Chronicles 12:11 )
Suspicion - Whereas the suspicious man, having his imagination filled with all the shocking forms of human falsehood, deceit, and treachery, resembles the traveller in the Wilderness, who discerns no objects around him but what are either dreary or terrible; caverns that open, serpents that hiss, and beasts of prey that howl
Giles, Saint - Of a noble Athenian family, he went to Gaul, where he established himself first in a Wilderness near the mouth of the Rhone and then by the River Gard
Nabal - His shepherds and his flocks had been protected in the Wilderness by David and his followers
Serpent, Brazen - John 3:14 , declares, that "as Moses lifted up the serpent in the Wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up," alluding to his own death, which, through faith, was to give life to the world
Eli'el - (1 Chronicles 11:47 ) ...
One of the Gadite heroes who came across Jordan to David when he was in the Wilderness of Judah hiding from Saul
Field - The Hebrew sadeh is applied to any cultivated ground, and in some instances in marked opposition to the neighboring Wilderness
Eliab - A Gadite leader who was with David in the Wilderness
Exodus, the - God by His providential preparations having wonderfully led the Hebrew to sojourn in Egypt, and there to unlearn their nomadic habits and to learn agriculture and the arts of a settled life, now by equally wonderful interpositions leads them out of Egypt into the Wilderness. Moses' first proposal to Pharaoh had been for a journey into the Wilderness adjoining Goshen, not beyond the frontier, three days in all going and, returning, in order to sacrifice. , God led Israel through the Wilderness of the Red Sea, lest encountering the warlike Philistines they should repent when they saw war (Exodus 13:17-18). As Moses' 40 years sojourn in the Wilderness trained him for being their leader there, so their 40 years in it trained them for the conflicts in Canaan. end of lake Timsah, on the edge of the Wilderness, and the route to Palestine. Thence to Ras Selima or Zenimeh, a headland on the Red Sea (Numbers 33:10): Next the Wilderness of Sin (Debbet er Ramleh) between Elim and Sinai. Next the Wilderness of Sinai. Fifteen days elapsed between the encampment in the Wilderness of Sin and their arrival at Sinai mount (Exodus 16:1; compare Exodus 19:1). ...
The Debbet er Ramleh probably is the Wilderness of Sin, bore and desolate; debbet and sin alike meaning "sand level, raised, and extended through the surface of the district. " Wady Nasb, the first station on this route, affords water abundant, answering to the "wilderness of Sin" encampment, where they made no complaint of want of water; the water supply accounts for their halting some days here. ...
The wady er Rahah is the "wilderness of Sinai," where the assembled people heard the law proclaimed from Ras Sufsafeh, a bold granite cliff 2,000 ft. The surveyors of the Wilderness of Sinai, Captain Wilson and Captain Palmer, accompanied by F. They make the battle with Amalek at the ancient city of Feiran, but this would make" the mount of God" to be mount Serbal, which is rather one of the Sinai range; and the palmgroves of Feiran could hardly be called a "wilderness
Pelican - Having gorged itself with fish, this bird flies miles into the Wilderness, where it sits in some lonely place "for hours, or even days, with
Hobab - ” Moses urged Hobab to accompany the Israelites through the Wilderness as a guide
Aaron's Rod - In a very complicated section of the Hexateuch ( Numbers 16:1-50 ; Numbers 17:1-13 ; Numbers 18:1-32 ), dealing with various revolts against the constituted authorities in the Wilderness period, the exclusive right of the tribe of Levi to the duties and privileges of the priesthood is miraculously attested by the blossoming and fruit-bearing of Aaron’s rod
Anah - ]'>[5] wrongly ‘the mules’) in the Wilderness, as he fed the asses of Zibeon his father’ ( Genesis 36:24 )
Day's Journey - Laban in hot pursuit of Jacob, and the Hebrew host in the Wilderness, may be taken to represent the extremes in this matter of a ‘day’s journey’ (reff
Exodus, Book of - The time comprised in this book, from the death of Joseph to the erection of the tabernacle in the Wilderness, is about one hundred and forty-five years, on the supposition that the four hundred and thirty years (12:40) are to be computed from the time of the promises made to Abraham (Galatians 3:17 )
Levites - In the journey through the Wilderness the number of the Levites from 30 years up to 50 years, the year of superannuation, was 8580 (Numbers 4)
Evangelists, Symbols of the - The lion, the dweller in the desert, is emblematic of Saint Mark, who opens his narrative with the mission of Saint John the Baptist, "the voice of one crying in the Wilderness
Hazeroth - Such like enclosures abound in the Wilderness of Paran, which the Israelites entered after leaving Sinai (Numbers 11:35 ; 12:16 ; 33:17,18 )
Quails - The Israelites were twice relieved in their privation by a miraculous supply of quails, (1) in the Wilderness of Sin (Exodus 16:13 ), and (2) again at Kibroth-hattaavah (q
Trumpet - We read much of the use of trumpets in the old church in the Wilderness
Kite - Hence, when a beast dies in a Wilderness, in a very short time kites and vultures, invisible before to man, swoop in spiral circles from all quarters toward it
Weaving, Weavers - In the Wilderness, the Hebrews practised it (Exodus 26:1,8 ; 28:4,39 ; Leviticus 13:47 )
Tekoa - Approximately fifty years later, Jehoshaphat defeated a force of Ammonite, Meunite, and Moabite invaders in the Wilderness between Tekoa and En-gedi (2 Chronicles 20:20-22 )
Roe - Israel ate the gazelle in the Wilderness, and the flesh of flocks and herds only when offered in sacrifice; but in Canaan they might eat the flesh, "even as the gazelle" (Deuteronomy 12:15; Deuteronomy 12:22); Isaac's venison was front it (Genesis 27)
Beeroth - The wells of the sons of Jaakan, where Israel camped in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:31 ; Deuteronomy 10:6 )
Caleb - Because of his steadfast loyalty to the Lord, God rewarded him by letting him survive the years of Wilderness wandering and giving him the region of Hebron as his portion in the Promised Land
Elishama - A prince of the tribe of Ephraim at the census in the Wilderness, son of Ammihud and grandfather of Joshua ( Numbers 1:10 ; Numbers 2:18 , 1 Chronicles 7:26 )
en-Gedi - A place ‘in the Wilderness’ in the tribe of Judah ( Joshua 15:62 ), where David for a time was in hiding ( 1 Samuel 23:29 ; 1 Samuel 24:1 )
Scorpion - Common in the Sinai Wilderness, typifying Satan and his malicious agents against the Lord's people (Deuteronomy 8:15; Ezekiel 2:6; Luke 10:19)
Zimri - Leader of tribe of Simeon slain by Phinehas for bringing Midianite woman into the Wilderness camp (Numbers 25:1 )
Gershon, Gershonites - At the numbering of the Israelites in the Wilderness there were 7,500 Gershonites as a branch of the Levites
Gad (2) - This tribe, in the Wilderness, was placed with Simeon and Reuben on the south of the tabernacle; with Reuben and the half of Manasseh, it occupied the pasture grounds on the east of the Jordan
Amalekite - Israel won the initial battle (Exodus 17:8-16 ), but later was driven back into the Sinai Wilderness by a coalition of Amalekites and Canaanites (Numbers 14:39-45 )
Abana - Naaman, the leper, on being directed to wash in the river Jordan, says, 2 Kings 5:12 , "Are not Abana and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel?" Probably the Abana is a branch of the Barrady, or Chrysorrhoas, which derives its source from the foot of Mount Libanus, eastward; runs round and through Damascus, and continues its course till lost in the Wilderness, four or five leagues south of the city
Ziph - When pursued by Saul, David hid himself "in the Wilderness of Ziph
Symbols of the Evangelists - The lion, the dweller in the desert, is emblematic of Saint Mark, who opens his narrative with the mission of Saint John the Baptist, "the voice of one crying in the Wilderness
ed'Rei - The ruins are nearly three miles in circumference, and have a strange, wild, look, rising up in dark, shattered masses from the midst of a Wilderness of black rocks
Wilderness of the Wanderings - ) Κadesh or Κadesh Βurned ("son of wandering" (Bedouin), or "land of earthquake," as Deuteronomy 2:26-296 "the Lord shaketh the Wilderness of Cades") was the encampment from which the spies were sent and to which they returned (Numbers 13:26; Numbers 32:8), on the W. of the Wilderness of Zin, which was N. of the Wilderness of Paran; S. of the Wilderness of Paran was the Wilderness of Sinai between the gulfs of Akabah and Suez. ...
At the first encampment they were at Kadesh for at least the 40 days of the spies' search (Numbers 13:25); here Moses and the tabernacle remained (Numbers 14:44) when the people presumptuously tried to occupy the land in spite of Jehovah's sentence dooming all above 20 to die in the Wilderness (the name Kadesh, "holy," may be due to the long continuance of the holy tabernacle there). wandered in the Wilderness of Paran until the whole generation of murmurers had died. The Wilderness is called Et Tih, i. At other times the Israelites were scattered over the Wilderness of Paran as nomads feeding their flocks wherever they found pasture. The last year in the Wilderness, the 40th, is referred to in Numbers 33:38:13. Traces of a population and resources are found in parts of the Wilderness where now there are neither. At Pihahiroth Israel, shut in between the Wilderness, the mountains, and the sea, and pursued by Pharaoh's mighty hosts, answers to the believer's suddenly finding himself powerless, in great straits, and so driven to cry unto God. Next in the Wilderness of Sin ("dross") Israel feeds on the heaven sent manna, their own resources failing; so the believer as he advances begins wholly to by faith on Christ the true counting all else but dross. " The Hebrew hag means a "feast" (Exodus 10:9), which was Israel's avowed object in going into the Wilderness
Numbers, Book of - This book is of special historical interest as furnishing us with details as to the route of the Israelites in the Wilderness and their principal encampments. ...
The period comprehended in the history extends from the second month of the second year after the Exodus to the beginning of the eleventh month of the fortieth year, in all about thirty-eight years and ten months; a dreary period of wanderings, during which that disobedient generation all died in the Wilderness
Leviathan - Psalms 104:26; Psalms 74:13-14; "Thou breakest the heads of leviathan in pieces, and gavest him to be meat to the people inhabiting the Wilderness. " The king of Egypt is symbolized by the "dragons" and "leviathan" (compare Ezekiel 32:2; Ezekiel 29:3); he and his host at their overthrow in the Red Sea became a spoil to Israel (compare "bread for us," Numbers 14:9) "in the Wilderness
Quail - I have met with it in the Wilderness of Palestine, near the shores of the Dead Sea and the Jordan, between Jordan and Jericho, and in the deserts of Arabia Petrea. " It is said that God gave quails to his people in the Wilderness upon two occasions: first, within a few days after they had passed the Red Sea, Exodus 16:3-13
Lent, the Season of - Forty years the children ofIsrael were under discipline in their pilgrimage in the Wilderness. Elijah was forty days inthe Wilderness. And forty days did our Lord fast in the Wilderness when about toenter upon His public ministry
Negeb, - and the Wilderness, and formed a most efficient barrier to the land of Israel towards the South. Though now little better than a Wilderness, the numerous ruins of towns and broken terraces witness to days of large population and good cultivation; the OT, too, in the stories of Saul’s and David’s captures from the Amalekites ( 1 Samuel 15:9 ; 1 Samuel 27:9 ), witnesses to a great wealth of cattle. Under neglect it has become again little better than a desert: the Bedouin of these parts are known in Palestine for their skill in making rough cisterns on the hillsides to catch the surface water, and have in recent years been employed to construct many such in the ‘wilderness of Judæa
Mount Sinai - ...
The Bible uses the term Sinai for both the mountain and the entire Wilderness area ( Leviticus 7:38 ). Since Horeb means “waste” or “wilderness area,” it seems best to think of Horeb as the general term for the area and Sinai as the specific peak where God manifested Himself to Moses. See Palestine ; Exodus, Wilderness Journey...
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Hor - It was one of the stations of the Israelites in the Wilderness (33:37), which they reached in the circuitous route they were obliged to take because the Edomites refused them a passage through their territory
Elim - Israel stayed here a long time; for they did not reach the Wilderness until two and a half months after leaving Suez, finding water and pasture abundant in the intermediate district
Fourth Sunday in Lent - It is also called Refreshment Sunday from the Gospel forthe Day which gives the account of our Lord feeding the multitudein the Wilderness, and thereby indicating a more joyous note in theservice for this day than belongs to the other Sundays in Lent
Badger - Though the badger is common in Palestine, and might occur in the Wilderness, its small hide would have been useless as a tent covering
Gamaliel - The son of Pedahzur; a leader of the tribe of Manasseh, who helped Moses take the census in the Wilderness (Numbers 1:10 )
Maon, Maonites - It was in the ‘wilderness’ of Maon that Nabal dwelt ( 1 Samuel 25:2 ), and in this district David sojourned on two occasions during the period of his outlaw life ( 1Sa 23:24 ff
Ezion Geber - The last stage in Israel's march before the Wilderness of Zin or Kadesh
Miriam - ...
Miriam died in the Wilderness between Egypt and Canaan
River (2) - ...
To one reared in Palestine, where only water is required to turn the Wilderness into a garden, a river, with its beautifying and fertilizing power, might well seem an apt symbol of life (Revelation 22:1-2)
Levi - After the people of Israel sinned in the Wilderness by making the molten calf, Moses commanded the people of Levi to slaughter those who had participated in the debacle (Exodus 32:28 )
Libnah - Wilderness station east of the Jordan (Numbers 33:20 )
Pelican - ...
The Psalmist said, "I am like a pelican of the Wilderness," which refers to the bird sitting solitary for hours as it digests its stock of fish
Kadesh-Barnea - Perhaps Barnea might have been given to Kadesh, from the frequent movings about of Israel while in the Wilderness state
Rim'Mon - ...
Rimmon-parez (pomegranate of the breach ), the name of a march-station in the Wilderness
Deuteronomy - As its name imports, it contains a repetition of the civil and moral law, which was a second time delivered by Moses, with some additions and explanations, as well to impress it more forcibly upon the Israelites in general, as in particular for the benefit of those who, being born in the Wilderness, were not present at the first promulgation of the law
Abiathar - When Saul sent to Nob to murder all the priests, Abiathar escaped the massacre, and fled to David in the Wilderness
Sanctuary - The same name was also given to the most sacred part of the tabernacle set up in the Wilderness, Leviticus 4:6
Tabernacle - Among the Jews, a movable building, so contrived as to be taken to pieces with ease and reconstructed, for the convenience of being carried during the wanderings of the Israelites in the Wilderness
Pelican - ‘A pelican in the Wilderness’ is referred to in Psalms 102:3
Rim'Mon - ...
Rimmon-parez (pomegranate of the breach ), the name of a march-station in the Wilderness
Naph'Tali - (Numbers 26:48-50 ) During the march through the Wilderness Naphtali occupied a position on the north of the sacred tent with Dan and Asher
Hyaena - The hyaena is among the mammals what the vulture is among birds, --the scavenger of the Wilderness, the woods and the shore
Issachar - Issachar, Tribe of, during the journey through the Wilderness, along with Judah and Zebulun (Numbers 2:5 ), marched on the east of the tabernacle
Pottery - It is abundantly evident, both that the Hebrews used earthenware vessels in the Wilderness and that the potter's trade was afterward carried on in Palestine
Offerings - The old church formed in the Wilderness abounded in offerings of various kinds, both and religious
Chaldeans, Chaldees - We read "Behold the land of the Chaldeans; this people was not, till the Assyrian founded it for them that dwell in the Wilderness. They had formerly dwelt in the Wilderness (as when they fell upon Job's camels, Job 1:17 )
Arabah - where it should read 'the Arabah,' Joshua 18:18 ; but it occurs in many other passages where it is translated 'a plain' or 'the plain,' and is also translated 'desert,' 'wilderness,' etc. The southern end is also called the Wilderness of Zin, and it was in this part of the Arabah that a good deal of the wanderings of the people of Israel took place, before they turned to the east and left the plain on their left
Quails - First, soon after they left Egypt in the Wilderness of Zin, (Exodus 16:1-36) and the second time when they were encamped at Ribroth-hattaavah, which the margin of the Bible renders the graves of lusts. The Psalmist hath made a beautiful observation upon this self-will of Israel, and the lawful consequence of it, when saying, "they lusted exceedingly, or as the words are, they lusted a lust in the Wilderness, and tempted God in the desert
Hagar - Abraham gave up Hagar, in violation of eastern custom, to Sarai's ill usage; so Hagar fled toward her native land Egypt, by the way through the Wilderness toward Shur, probably Suez. ...
The Wilderness is identified with the N. wandered with her child (15 years was childhood when human life was so long, he was old enough to "mock") in the Wilderness of Beersheba; the water was spent in the bottle, and she cast him, soon worn out as a growing lad, under a shrub, having previously led him by the hand (for Genesis 21:14 means that Abraham put the bread and bottle, but not also the child, "on her shoulder"; so Genesis 21:18, "hold him in thine hand". God opened her eyes to see water where she had supposed there was only a dry Wilderness
Temptation of Jesus - ...
Mark (Luke 1:13-14 ) recorded that the Spirit drove Jesus into the Wilderness where He remained 40 days, was tempted by Satan, was with the wild beasts, and was ministered to by angels. This reinforces the Old Testament ideas that the Wilderness, the place of wild beasts, was the appropriate place for sin (Leviticus 16:1 ) and that when one was in distress in the desert, the angels of God ministered to the afflicted. ...
Matthew (Leviticus 4:1-11 ) spoke of the Spirit leading Jesus into the Wilderness to be tempted by the devil. There is no account of the Wilderness temptation in John
Numbers, Book of - As a whole the book may be said to give the service and walk of the people, their trials and testings under responsibility: typical of the spiritual service and walk of Christians now in the Wilderness. In the Hebrew the title of the book is "In the Wilderness. When journeying the sacred things of the tabernacle in general were to be covered with skins, to preserve from defilement, over a covering of blue: typical of the heavenly character of the assembly as the vessel of the testimony of Christ in the Wilderness, in separation from evil. The whole congregation exclaimed, "Would God that we had died in this Wilderness," and proposed to return into Egypt. Their failure under responsibility was now completely manifested, and God decreed that all of twenty years old and upwards should die in the Wilderness, save Caleb and Joshua, and that their little ones should be brought into the land. This is the beginning of their wandering in the Wilderness. Then is given the law of the Red Heifer, a provision for defilement in the Wilderness. It literally considers the children of Israel in two aspects: first, in view of the Wilderness; and secondly, in view of possessing the promised land. The book is the obverse of Exodus, in which we have the actings of God — His redemption of the people; His resources for them in the Wilderness; the declaration of His will; and the setting up among them of the tabernacle — all this was God's side. These lead, in their spiritual significance, to the conclusion that the means necessary to conduct a people through the Wilderness are the water of purification ( Numbers 19 ), and priestly ministration (Numbers 20 ): Christ in death and Christ risen; the red heifer, and the budding rod. ...
In spiritual experiences the second part of the book runs concurrently with the first, for while in the type Israel did not come to the brazen serpent until they had been thirty-eight years in the Wilderness, Christians begin their spiritual course with the cross, which is the antitype of the brazen serpent
Edom - Moreover, the Edomite area was largely “wilderness”—semi-desert, not very conducive to agriculture—and many of the inhabitants were semi-nomads. Yet not all of Edom was Wilderness; the vicinity of present-day Tafileh and Buseireh, east of the Arabah, is fairly well watered, cultivable land, and would have boasted numerous villages during Old Testament times. See especially the description of Judah's boundary in Numbers 34:3-4 and Joshua 15:1-3 , where Judah's south side is described as extending “even to the border of Edom the Wilderness of Zin. ” Certain of the tribal groups which ranged this Wilderness area south of Judah are listed in the Edomite genealogy of Genesis 36:1 . ...
Both Saul and David conducted warfare with the Edomites—probably frontier wars fought in the “wilderness” area southwest of the Dead Sea (1 Samuel 14:47-48 ; 2 Samuel 8:13-14 )
Elishama - Leader of the tribe of Ephraim under Moses in the Wilderness (Numbers 1:10 )
Tekoa - A fortress city on the edge of the Wilderness to which it gave its name ( 2 Chronicles 20:20 )
Shechinah - For references made to it during the Wilderness wanderings, see Exodus 14:20 ; 40:34-38 ; Leviticus 9:23,24 ; Numbers 14:10 ; 16:19,42
Bithiah - The marriage probably took place in the Wilderness shortly after the Exodus
Jahaz - ” As they journeyed from the Wilderness to the Promised Land, Israel defeated King Sihon there (Numbers 21:23-24 ; Deuteronomy 2:32-33 ; Judges 11:20-21 )
Succoth - "He took the elders of the city, and thorns of the Wilderness and briers, and with them he taught the men of Succoth" (Judges 8:13-16 )
Gedor - A Benjaminite from Gedor had two sons in David's Wilderness army (1 Chronicles 12:7 )
Scorpion - The Wilderness of Sinai is especially alluded to as being inhabited by scorpions at the time of the exodus, and to this day these animals are common in the same district, as well as in some parts of Palestine
Desert - ) A tract, which may be capable of sustaining a population, but has been left unoccupied and uncultivated; a Wilderness; a solitary place
Joab - After the death of David, Joab was slain at the altar, whither he had fled for protection; and was buried in his own domain in the Wilderness
Pelican - ...
"Pelican of the Wilderness" alludes to its seeking uninhabited places as breeding places
Tempt, to; Temptation - They questioned whether God could furnish them a table in the Wilderness
Unbelief - " (Revelation 21:8) How solemnly the apostle to the Hebrews sums up the history of those whose carcases fell in the Wilderness, when he saith, "So we see that they could not enter in because of unbelief
Wild - ) An uninhabited and uncultivated tract or region; a forest or desert; a Wilderness; a waste; as, the wilds of America; the wilds of Africa
ko'Rah - He was leader of the famous rebellion against his cousins Moses and Aaron in the Wilderness, for which he paid the penalty of perishing with his followers by an earthquake and flames of fire
Manna - man-hu, "What is that?" the name given by the Israelites to the food miraculously supplied to them during their wanderings in the Wilderness (Exodus 16:15-35 ). They now no longer needed the "bread of the Wilderness
Serpent - When God punished the murmurs of the Israelites in the Wilderness by sending among them serpents whose fiery bite was fetal, Moses, upon their repentance, was commanded to make a serpent of brass, whose polished surface shone like fire, and to set it up on the banner-pole in the midst of the people; and whoever was bitten by a serpent had but to look up at it and live. This brazen serpent was a type of Christ: "As Moses lifted up the serpent in the Wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life
Encamp - The manner in which the Israelites encamped during their march through the Wilderness is described in Numbers 2,3
Juniper - One of the encampments in the Wilderness of Paran is called Rithmah, i
Miriam - Miriam played a key role in the rescue of Moses (Exodus 2:4-8 ) and in the subsequent experience of the Exodus and the Wilderness community
Mill - The manna which fell in the Wilderness was tough enough so that people ground it in mills before cooking it (Numbers 11:7-8 )
Lent - Over the next few centuries, perhaps in remembrance of Jesus' fasting for forty days in the Wilderness (Matthew 4:1-2 ), forty days became the accepted length of the Lenten season
John - He grew up a Nazirite, and when about 30 years old began to preach in the Wilderness of Judæa
Mule - Mules were found in the Wilderness because the asses had been mingling with the horses and producing these fine work animals while it was all unknown to the owners
Creation, the New - Still, while in the body he is not entirely free from contact with the old creation: the Wilderness life is a part of christian life, as well as Canaan and its conflicts
Zared - " The limit of Israel's wandering; marking the time of the Wilderness sojourn on one side as Kadesh did on the other
Alarm - The alarm called the Wilderness community to march (Numbers 10:5-6 )
Glad - The Wilderness and the solitary place shall be glad for them
Thirst - He must seek GOD as he fled from the enemy and hid here and there in the Wilderness and in caves
Tabernacle - ) A portable structure of wooden framework covered with curtains, which was carried through the Wilderness in the Israelitish exodus, as a place of sacrifice and worship
Kadesh, Kadeshbarnea - It was in the Wilderness of Paran, and is known to be situated in the extreme south of the land, from whence Joshua smote the inhabitants, and it became the border of Judah's possession
Abiram - ABIRAM, the son of Eliab, of the tribe of Reuben, was one of those who conspired with Korah and Dathan against Moses in the Wilderness, and was swallowed up alive, with his companions, by the earth, which opened to receive them, Numbers 16
John - He grew up a Nazirite, and when about 30 years old began to preach in the Wilderness of Judæa
Ken'Ite, the, - 2 Chronicles 28:15 But, the wanderings of Israel over, they forsook the neighborhood of the towns and betook themselves to freer air, --to "the Wilderness of Judah, which is to the south of Arad
Manna - The chief food of the Israelites in the Wilderness. It has no characteristics in common with the manna miraculously supplied to the Israelites while journeying through the Wilderness
Succoth - As then they classed themselves with the wicked, of whom thorns are the symbol, their retributive punishment was to be chastised with thorns of the Wilderness (the strongest thorns: Isaiah 5:6; Isaiah 27:4; Amos 1:3; 2 Samuel 23:6-7). Israel's first camping place after leaving Egypt, half way between Rameses and Etham, Succoth of the Βirket Τimseh ("the lake of crocodiles") on the road which led by the shortest way to the edge of the Wilderness
Brazen Serpent - An image of polished brass, in the form of one of those fiery serpents which were sent to chastise the murmuring Israelites in the Wilderness, and whose bite caused violent heat, thirst, and inflammation. To the circumstance of looking at the brazen serpent in order to be healed, our Lord refers, John 3:14-15 : "As Moses lifted up the (brazen) serpent in the Wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life
Murmuring - γογγυσμός and γογγύζειν are used seven times in the Septuagint in reference to Israel in the Wilderness. The quotation from the Song of Moses (Deuteronomy 32:5 Septuagint ) in the following verses hints that the history in the Wilderness is again in the author’s mind
Type - THE MANNA given by God from heaven to the Israelites — type of heavenly grace for Wilderness circumstances set forth in Christ who was the true Bread come down from heaven. ...
THE WELL OF WATER as a resource from God, digged in the Wilderness, Israel singing, "Spring up, O well" — type of the Holy Spirit compared to "a well of living water springing up into everlasting life. Leviticus 16:5 ), the one sacrificed and the other driven into the Wilderness — type of the double effect of the death of Christ, which meets all the demands of a holy God, so that He remembers no more the sins of His people, and removes from them all imputation of sin. ...
(Consider the various events which happened to Israel in the Wilderness, 1 Corinthians 10:11 , the passage of the Jordan, the return of a remnant from Babylon, etc
Partridge - The partridge of the Wilderness (Ammo-perdix heyi) is a smaller species
Hormah - After the manifestation of God's anger against the Israelites, on account of their rebellion and their murmurings when the spies returned to the camp at Kadesh, in the Wilderness of Paran, with an evil report of the land, they quickly repented of their conduct, and presumed to go up "to the head of the mountain," seeking to enter the Promised Land, but without the presence of the Lord, without the ark of the convenant, and without Moses
Scapegoat - ), the name given to the goat which was taken away into the Wilderness on the day of Atonement (16:20-22)
Prison - In the Wilderness two persons were "put in ward" (Leviticus 24:12 ; Numbers 15:34 ), but it was only till the mind of God concerning them should be ascertained
Jahaziel - dismayed by reason of this great multitude, for the battle is not yours but God's; tomorrow go ye down against them; behold they come up by the cliff of Ziz, and ye shall find them at the end of the brook (valley) before the Wilderness of Jeruel, ye shall not need to fight
Sabbath Day's Journey - Earlier, while in the Wilderness, they had been told not to leave home on the Sabbath (Exodus 16:29 )
Table - ...
Psalm 78:19 (b) By this picture we understand that GOD made provision for food and sustenance in the Wilderness where there were no natural supplies
Heath - He shall not see when good cometh; but shall inhabit the parched places in the Wilderness, a salt land
Deuteronomy - This book contains the history of what passed in the Wilderness from the beginning of the eleventh month, to the seventh day of the twelfth month, in the fortieth year after the Israelites' departure from Egypt, that is, about six weeks, B
ex'Odus - It was written probably during the forty-years wanderings int he Wilderness, between B
Honey - All travellers agree in describing Palestine as a land "flowing with milk and honey," ( Exodus 3:8 ) bees being abundant even in the remote parts of the Wilderness, where they deposit their honey in the crevices of rocks or in hollow trees
Pomegranate - The pomegranate was early cultivated in Egypt; hence the complaint of the Israelites in the Wilderness of Zin, (Numbers 20:5 ) this "is no place of figs, or of vines, or of pomegranates
Manna - 1: μάννα (Strong's #3131 — Noun Neuter — manna — man'-nah ) the supernaturally provided food for Israel during their Wilderness journey (for details see Exodus 16 and Numbers 11 )
Idol - The first rebellion of the Hebrews centered around the golden calf made under Aaron's leadership in the Wilderness (Exodus 32:1 ). Moses set it up in the Wilderness to allay a plague of serpents (Numbers 21:1 ), but Israel retained it and made it an object of worship (2 Kings 18:4 )
Rahab - Thus the Psalmist elsewhere saith, "Thou brakest the heads of Leviathan in pieces, and gavest him to be meat to the people inhabiting the Wilderness. " (Psalms 74:13-14) Here is an evident allusion to the destruction of Pharaoh; and his host in the Red Sea; and afterwords causing the people, when at any time in their Wilderness-state, to meet with difficulties, that the recollection of this mighty deliverance might become food to their faith, to help them through any present trouble
Hagar - " God renewed this promise also to Hagar, during her wanderings in the Wilderness of Beersheba, when she despaired of support: "Arise, lift up the lad, and hold him in thine hands, for I will make him a great nation. And God was with the lad, and he grew, and dwelt in the Wilderness of Paran, and became an archer
Exodus - ), 13:20, "in the edge of the Wilderness," and was probably a little to the west of the modern town of Ismailia, on the Suez Canal. , it took fully a month to travel from Rameses to the Wilderness of Sin ( Exodus 16:1 ), yet reference is made to only six camping-places during all that time. ...
From 'Ayun Musa they went on for three days through a part of the barren "wilderness of Shur" (22), called also the "wilderness of Etham" (Numbers 33:8 ; Compare Exodus 13:20 ), without finding water. ...
After a time the children of Israel "took their journey from Elim," and encamped by the Red Sea (Numbers 33:10 ), and thence removed to the "wilderness of Sin" (to be distinguished from the Wilderness of Zin, 20:1), where they again encamped
Wanderings of the Israelites - The Wilderness of Sin, Mount Sinai, and Horeb are in the main identified. |...
In the Wilderness of Sinai the Israelites remained until the second month of the second year, during which period the law was given. ...
Kadesh in the Wilderness of Paran | Rithmah, Numbers 33:18 . ...
There was a prolonged stay at Kadesh or Rithmah in the Wilderness of Paran. The rebellion broke out on the report of the faithless spies, and God sware they should not enter the land, but should wander in the Wilderness that all the men who came out of Egypt might die except Caleb and Joshua. For the typical signification of the journey of the Israelites see under Wilderness
Temptation - Our Lord was in this way tempted in the Wilderness
Dedan - Isaiah warned the traders from Dedan to avoid the regular caravan stations and spend the night in the Wilderness
Badger - Badger skins were the outer covering of the tabernacle, in the Wilderness; and of the ark, the table, the candlestick, the golden altar, and altar of burnt offering (Numbers 4:6-14)
Corruptions: Seen Even in Solitude - The devil can tempt in the Wilderness as well as in the crowd
Numbers Book of - 33 a list is given of the various stations in the Wilderness
Tamar - City built by Solomon “in the Wilderness” (1 Kings 9:18 )
Tadmor - Built by Solomon in the Wilderness
Well - This included fields (Genesis 29:2 ), towns (2 Samuel 23:15 ), and the Wilderness (Genesis 16:7 ,Genesis 16:7,16:14 )
Fight - So they were made to wander in the Wilderness thirty-eight years
Depart - 11:31, the word refers to the “springing up” (NEB) of the wind that brought the quail to feed the Israelites in the Wilderness
Camp And Encamp - The order in which the Israelites camped in the Wilderness was specially prescribed by divine command
Army - In the NT it denotes the distribution of troops in army formation, "armies," Hebrews 11:34 ; a camp, as of the Israelites, Exodus 19:17 ; 29:14 ; 32:17 ; hence, in Hebrews 13:11,13 , of Jerusalem, since the city was to the Jews what the camp in the Wilderness had been to the Israelites; in Revelation 20:9 , the "armies" or camp of the saints, at the close of the Millennium
Kadesh - The people rebelled, and were condemned to 40 years sojourn in the Wilderness, Numbers 13:14, during which time Kadesh seems to have been their chief centre
Kidron or Cedron - It sinks still deeper as it passes Siloam, the valley of Hinnom, and the well of Nehemiah, and then winds southeast, in a narrow and precipitous gorge, through the horrid Wilderness of St
am'Orite, the am'Orites - This rich tract, bounded by the Jabbok on the north, the Arnon on the south, the Jordan on the west and "the Wilderness" on the east, (Judges 11:21,22 ) was, perhaps in the most special sense the "land of the Amorites," (Numbers 21:31 ; Joshua 12:2,3 ; 13:10 ; Judges 11:21,22 ) but their possessions are distinctly stated to have extended to the very foot of Hermon, (3:8; 4:48) embracing "Gilead and all Bashan," (3:10) with the Jordan valley on the east of the river
Jerahmeel - The Kenites occupied the Wilderness of Judah S
Lent, Sundays in - It is also called Refreshment Sunday, from the Gospel for the Daywhich gives the account of our Lord miraculously feeding thefive thousand in the Wilderness; another name is Mothering Sunday(which see)
Murder - Paul speaks Greek, asks: ‘Art thou not then that Egyptian, which before these days stirred up to sedition and led out into the Wilderness the four thousand men of the Assassins (τετρακισχιλίους ἄνδρας τῶν σικαρίων)?’ The Sicarii must have been the easy instrument at hand to every clever impostor, and the incident referred to here was the most notable example. An Egyptian Jew gave himself out as a prophet and held out to a crowd in the Wilderness the alluring promise that the walls of Jerusalem would fall down at his word and so make the city theirs once more
Manna - ...
(1) It was found not under the tamarisk, but on the surface of the Wilderness, after the morning dew had disappeared. ...
(1) A necessity, for Israel could not otherwise have been sustained in the Wilderness. ...
(9) The manna continued with Israel throughout their Wilderness journey; so Christ with His people here (Matthew 28:19). ...
(10) It ceases when they gain the promised rest, for faith then gives place to sight and the Wilderness manna to the fruit of the tree of life in the midst of the paradise of God (Revelation 2:7; Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14)
the Angel of the Lord - ...
When the Angel of the Lord found Hagar in the Wilderness, "she called the name of JEHOVAH that spake to her, Thou God seest me. Stephen, in alluding to this part of the history of Moses, in his speech before the council, says, "There appeared to Moses in the Wilderness of Mount Sinai, an Angel of the Lord in a flame of fire," showing that that phraseology was in use among the Jews in his day, and that this Angel and Jehovah were regarded as the same being; for he adds, "Moses was in the church in the Wilderness with the Angel which spoke unto him in Mount Sinai. " There is one part of the history of the Jews in the Wilderness, which so fully shows that they distinguished this Angel of Jehovah from all created angels, as to deserve particular attention
Numbers, Book of - The Hebrew bible uses the first word in the book, Bemidhbar (“in the Wilderness”), as the title. This outline is simply stated:...
Numbers 1:1-10:10 What happened at Sinai;...
Numbers 10:11-20:13 What happened in the Wilderness; and...
Numbers 20:14-36:13 What happened from Kadesh to Moab. ...
In this way, the reader is able to see that every aspect of life during the Wilderness wandering was permeated with the centrality of God
Arabah - The great limestone plateau, et-Tîh , the Wilderness of Paran, forms the western boundary, and the naked crags of Edom the eastern
Shepherd - In those lands sheep require to be supplied regularly with water, and the shepherd for this purpose has to guide them either to some running stream or to wells dug in the Wilderness and furnished with troughs
Baptism of Fire - As John the Baptist preached in the Judean Wilderness, he declared, "I baptize you with water for repentance
Refuge - ...
2 Samuel 22:3 (a) David did not trust in his army, nor in the caves, nor the Wilderness, nor men
Satan - He tempted our Lord in the Wilderness (Matthew 4:1-11 )
Remphan - Israel secretly carried on idolatry in the Wilderness, with a small shrine escaping Moses' observation (Ezekiel 20:7-8; Ezekiel 20:39; Ezekiel 23:3; Joshua 24:14)
Banner, Ensign, Standard - Song of Solomon 6:10 ) of the four great divisions of the Hebrew tribes in the Wilderness, according to the artificial theory of the priestly writer
Desert - An uninhabited tract of land a region in its natural state a Wilderness a solitude particularly, a vast sandy plain, as the deserts of Arabia and Africa
Manna - A substance miraculously furnished as food for the Israelites in their journey through the Wilderness of Arabia
South - In a more limited and special sense the Hebrews gave the name ‘South Country’ to the Wilderness of Judaea and the region lying beyond it (Joshua 12:8, Acts 8:26)
Molech - The Israelites had not worshipped Jehovah for forty years in the Wilderness; but they had carried symbols of Molech and Chiun (or Remphan) and worshipped them
Desert - "wilderness," is accurately "the pasture ground
Tabernacles - It was one of the three great solemnities, wherein all the males of the Israelites were obliged to present themselves before the Lord; and it was instituted to commemorate the goodness of God, who protected them in the Wilderness, and made them dwell in tents or booths after they came out of Egypt
Bear - Shaw gives us to understand that these rugged animals are not peculiar to the bleak regions of the north, being found in Barbary; and Thevenot informs us that they inhabit the Wilderness adjoining the Holy Land, and that he saw one near the northern extremities of the Red Sea
Punishments - It was reenacted, with reasons, after the deluge, Genesis 9:5-6 , and in the Wilderness, Numbers 35:9-34 ; and was early and widely recognized among mankind
ha'Gar - Hagar fled, turning her steps toward her native land through the great Wilderness traversed by the Egyptian road
Ark of the Covenant - " During their journeys in the Wilderness, it was borne by the priests under a purple canopy and with great reverence before the host of Israel, Numbers 4:5,6 . ...
Besides the tables of the covenant, placed by Moses in this sacred coffer, God appointed the blossoming rod of Aaron to be lodged there, Numbers 17:10 Hebrews 9:4 ; a golden vase of manna gathered in the Wilderness, Exodus 16:33,34 , and a copy of the book of the law, Deuteronomy 31:26
Manna - The miraculous "bread of heaven" (Psalm 78:24 ) that God provided for the Israelites while he led them through the Red Sea on dry ground and into the Wilderness of Sin (Exodus 16 ). Like the Israelites in the desert, Jesus was totally dependent on the provisions of his heavenly Father while in the Wilderness of temptation (Matthew 4:11 )
Brook - It is joined by the Valley of Hinnom, and thence, as Wady en-Nâr, ‘Valley of Fire,’ it winds down an ever deepening gorge, through the Wilderness of Judaea, to the edge of the Dead Sea. The name Wady er-Râhib, ‘Valley of the Monks,’ attaching to part of it, comes from the convent of Mar Saba, built on the right-hand face of the gorge, a sort of reformatory for refractory monks, in the midst of the Wilderness
Exodus, Book of - After the song at the Red Sea the Israelites were led into the Wilderness of Shur, and their faith was put to the test by the bitter waters of Marah; but they were afterwards refreshed by the living waters and shelter at Elim: both are types of Wilderness experience. God gave them bread from heaven, typical of the heavenly grace in Christ, the bread of life, to sustain the believer in life to God, during the Wilderness
Manna - מן , Exodus 16:15 ; Exodus 16:33 ; Exodus 16:35 ; Numbers 11:6-7 ; Numbers 11:9 ; Joshua 5:12 ; Nehemiah 9:20 ; Psalms 78:24 ; μαννα , John 6:31 ; John 6:49 ; John 6:58 ; Hebrews 9:4 ; Revelation 2:17 ; the food which God gave the children of Israel during their continuance in the deserts of Arabia, from the eighth encampment in the Wilderness of Sin. It was nothing that was common in the Wilderness. It is evident that the Israelites never saw it before; for Moses says, "He fed thee with manna which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know," Deuteronomy 8:3 ; Deuteronomy 8:16 ; and it is very likely that nothing of the kind had ever been seen before; and by a pot of it being laid up in the ark, it is as likely that nothing of the kind ever appeared after the miraculous supply in the Wilderness had ceased
Tent - The patriarchs were "dwellers in tents" (Genesis 9:21,27 ; 12:8 ; 13:12 ; 26:17 ); and during their Wilderness wanderings all Israel dwelt in tents (Exodus 16:16 ; Deuteronomy 33:18 ; Joshua 7:24 )
Arad - Its king attacked the Israelites as they were moving on to Canaan after the Wilderness wandering
Kenites - The children of the Kenite, Moses' father-in-law, left Jericho, the city of palm trees, and went into the Wilderness of Judah, which was to the south of Arad, and dwelt there
Ezer - Member of tribe of Gad who joined David's Wilderness army before he became king (1 Chronicles 12:9 )
Eliezer - ' He, with his mother and his brother were left in the care of Jethro until after the Exodus, when they joined Moses in the Wilderness
Kenites - They showed kindness to Israel in their journey through the Wilderness
Engedi - In the tribal allotments, it was given to Judah and was in the district of Judah known as the Wilderness district (Joshua 15:62 )
Gad - At the conclusion of the period of Wilderness wandering, when the Israelites were preparing to occupy Canaan, the tribe of Gad requested permission, along with the tribe of Reuben and half the tribe of Manasseh, to settle east of the Jordan
Turtle, Turtle-Dove - It is not improbable that the palm-dove may in some measure have supplied the sacrifice in the Wilderness, for it is found in amazing numbers wherever the palm tree occurs, whether wild or cultivated
Scapegoat - Animal that carried away the sins of the people into the Wilderness on the Day of Atonement (Leviticus 16:8 ,Leviticus 16:8,16:10 ,Leviticus 16:10,16:26 )
Nest - They had to leave their dwelling place and take the long journey through the Wilderness
Assembly - They accused Moses of having brought them into the Wilderness to kill the 'whole assembly with hunger,' Exodus 16:3 ; so in many places
Abomination - So when Pharaoh told Israel to offer sacrifice to Jehovah in Egypt without going to the Wilderness, Moses objected: "we shall sacrifice the abomination of the Egyptians before their eyes" (the cow, the only animal which all the Egyptians held sacred), "and will they not stone us?" (Exodus 8:26) compare the Jews' own practice in later times (Acts 10:28)
Field - In contrast to the adjoining Wilderness (Genesis 33:19; Genesis 36:35)
Idumaeans - They opposed their passage through their country when Israel came from the Wilderness
Trail - ) A footpath or road track through a Wilderness or wild region; as, an Indian trail over the plains
Baptist - And they said, Who art thou? And he said, I am the voice of one crying in the Wilderness, Make straight the way of the Lord?" (John 1:19-23
Set, Place - 5:6); “… I will make thee a Wilderness …” ( Pomegranate - The high estimation in which it was held by the people of Israel, may be inferred from its being one of the three kinds of fruit brought by the spies from Eshcol to Moses and the congregation in the Wilderness, Numbers 13:23 ; Numbers 20:5 ; and from its being specified by that rebellious people as one of the greatest luxuries which they enjoyed in Egypt, the want of which they felt so severely in the sandy desert
Altar - In the old church in the Wilderness, there were three altars erected
Food - In the Wilderness their ordinary food was miraculously supplied in the manna
Merari - The Mahlites and Mushites were the two families of Merarites at the Exodus and in the Wilderness (1 Chronicles 6:19; 1 Chronicles 6:47; Numbers 3:20; Numbers 3:33-37; Numbers 4:29-33; Numbers 4:42-45; Numbers 7:8; Numbers 10:17-21)
Kidron - It runs in a winding course through the Wilderness of Judea to the north-western shore of the Dead Sea
Temptation of Christ - Is it not best always to adhere as close as possible to the language of inspiration, without glossing it with fancies of our own? And, after all, what is there so inconsistent with reason in this account? That, when our Lord retired to the interior part of the Wilderness, the enemy of mankind should assume a disguise (whether human or angelic is not important, ) and present the most plausible temptation to our Redeemer, under these trying circumstances, is perfectly consisted with the malevolence of his character; but how far he was permitted to exert his power in forming them, is not necessary to be inquired
Whole - ...
John 5:6 (c) Probably this is a type of the condition of Israel for the thirty-eight years during which they wandered in the Wilderness
Spies - Moses announced that as a punishment for their rebellion they must now wander in the Wilderness till a new generation should arise which would go up and posses the land
Eden - “Eden” is probably derived from the Sumerian-Akkadian edinu, meaning “flatland” or “wilderness
Midian, Midianites - During the wandering in the Wilderness, Reuel's father-in-law Hobab served as a guide for the Israelites (Numbers 10:29-32 )
Golden Calf - An image of a young bull, probably constructed of wood and overlaid with gold, which the Hebrews worshiped in the Wilderness and in the Northern Kingdom of Israel
Pillar - God led Israel through the Wilderness with a pillar of cloud by day and a pillar of fire by night (Exodus 13:21 ; compare Exodus 14:19-20 )
Rock - Paul identified Christ as the spiritual Rock which nourished Israel in the Wilderness ( 1 Corinthians 10:4 )
Tekoa - " The derivation taaqa' "to strike" alludes to the stakes struck into the ground to secure the tents of the shepherds who roamed in "the Wilderness of Tekoa," which was E
Jaazer - ...
The plants of the Sibmah vine are said in Isaiah 16:8 to have come even unto Jaazer, 15 miles from Heshbon, near Sibmah, "they wandered through the Wilderness in wild luxuriance," namely, that encompassing Moab, "they are gone over the sea," namely, the sea of Jaazer, but others the Dead Sea (Psalms 80:8-11)
Patience of God - v; in the people of Israel in the Wilderness, Acts 13:18 ; in the Amorites and Cannaanites, Genesis 15:15
Lamb of God - John's identification might also entail a reference to Jesus as the scapegoat sent into the Wilderness on the Day or Atonement to bear the iniquities of the Israelites (Leviticus 16:1 ) or to the Passover lamb (Exodus 12:1 )
Levelling - When a sovereign rode forth, a company always went before him to clear the way: hence, ‘Prepare ye the way of the people: cast up, cast up the highway: gather out the stones’ (Isaiah 62:10), and, ‘A voice crying in the Wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight’ (Matthew 3:3, adapted from Isaiah 40:3)
Azazel - the goat that is allowed to escape, which goes back to the caper emissarius of the Vulgate) obscures the fact that the word Azazel is a proper name in the original, and in particular the name of a powerful spirit or demon supposed to inhabit the Wilderness or ‘solitary land’ ( Leviticus 16:22 RV Cloud - The PILLAR OF CLOUDguided the children of Israel through the Wilderness
Pelican - (Leviticus 11:18) Notwithstanding the Psalmist seems to have had much respect to the solitary pursuit of this bird, when describing his loneliness of soul under this figure—"I am like a pelican of the Wilderness
Circumcision - During the 40 years in the Wilderness this rite was not performed, but on entering God's land all were circumcised at Gilgal, when the reproach of Egypt was rolled away
Sela - celah , "the rock," Greek petra (2 Kings 14:7); Isaiah 16:1, translated "send ye the lamb ("tribute") from Sela through the Wilderness to the" king of Judah; Amaziah had subjected it (2 Kings 14:7)
Abigail - Nabal held a feast for his sheep shearers while David was hiding from Saul in the Wilderness of Paran
Horeb - The mountain of Sinai and its Wilderness are distinguished as the theatre of events that took place in the district of Horeb and the whole of Horeb is called "the mountain of God
Honey - And the manna from heaven, that the Lord fed the church with in the Wilderness forty years, is said in taste, to have been "like wafers made with honey
Rest, Remain - God threatened to abandon the Israelites in the Wilderness ( Locusts - They are remarkable for the immense numbers that suddenly swarm upon a district, and for the vast devastation they accomplish in vegetation in a little while, as the prophet says, before them the land may be as the garden of Eden, and behind them a desolate Wilderness: nothing escapes them
Miriam - Her death happened in the first month of the fortieth year after the exodus, at the encampment of Kadesh in the Wilderness of Zin, Numbers 20:1
Bull - The Egyptians had a particular veneration for it, and paid divine honours to it; and the Jews imitated them in the worship of the golden calves or bulls, in the Wilderness, and in the kingdom of Israel
Iron - We do not, however, find that Moses made use of iron in the fabric of the tabernacle in the Wilderness, or Solomon in any part of the temple at Jerusalem
Myrtle - Thus Isaiah 41:19 , intending to describe a scene of varied excellence: "I will plant in the Wilderness the cedar, and the shittah tree, and the myrtle, and the oil tree;" that is, I will adorn the dreary and barren waste with trees famed for their stature and the grandeur of their appearance, the beauty of their form, and also the fragrance of their odour
Badger - This word in a plural form occurs, Exodus 25:5 ; Exodus 26:14 ; Exodus 35:7 ; Exodus 35:23 ; Exodus 36:19 ; Exodus 39:34 ; Numbers 4:6 ; Numbers 4:8 ; Numbers 4:10-12 ; Numbers 4:14 ; Numbers 4:25 ; Ezekiel 16:10 ; and is joined with ערת , skins used for the covering of the tabernacle in the Wilderness
Ishmael - Overcome with heat and thirst, and then miraculously relieved, he remained in the Wilderness of Paran, took a wife from Egypt, and was the father of twelve sons, heads of Arab tribes
Burial - Two burials are mentioned as having taken place in the Wilderness. Joab (1 Kings 2:34 ) "was buried in his own house in the Wilderness
Arabah - Arabah was the scene of Israel's wanderings in the Wilderness, N. crowned with the table land of "the Wilderness of the wanderings" (et Tih), and rise 1500 feet above the Arabah
Ark - The ark also had a military role, leading the march of the people of Israel in the Wilderness (Numbers 10:33 ), circling the walls of Jericho (Joshua 4:6 ), and going forth to battle against the Philistines (1 Samuel 4:5 ). Moses addressed the ark as "the Lord" in the Wilderness (Numbers 10:35 )
Chaos - In Jeremiah 4:23-26 , the land is described as desolate, formless, void, and without light, a Wilderness unfit for habitation. En route to Canaan, God cared for Israel in a howling Wilderness waste (Deuteronomy 32:10 )
Serpent - Very different is the passage John 3:14 ‘and as Moses lifted up the serpent (τὸν ὄφιν) in the Wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up,’ where the reference is to the plague of serpents among the Israelites in the Wilderness and the miraculous cure, as recorded in Numbers 21:6-9
Wing - Exodus 19:4 (a) How wonderfully our Lord took care of Israel through those rough days in the Wilderness. The Wilderness probably refers to desolate places where the Jews are driven during that period
Manna - Israel in the Wilderness. It was altogether miraculous: for this food began to fall from heaven from the time the Israelites arrived in the Wilderness of Zin, which was the sixteenth day of the second month after their departure from Egypt, until that they came to Canaan, during the pilgrimage of forty years
Hagar - Her exultation so irritated Sarah that the maid had to flee from the encampment, and took refuge in the Wilderness of Shur ( Genesis 16:7 , Genesis 25:18 ), between Philistia and Egypt. Again ‘the angel of God’ cheered her; and she found her way southwards to the Wilderness of Paran ( Genesis 21:21 ), where her son settled
Cloud - " (Isaiah 4:5) When we consider the peculiarity of this cloud, when we read expressly who was in it, when we consider the wonderful progress of it in its ministry, then going before, and then shifting its station, as occasion required, and going behind, when we behold the striking account of its ministry, in the difference of its aspect of light to Israel, and darkness to the Egyptians, when we trace the history of it through all the Wilderness dispensation of the church, and discover its blessed and beneficial influences to Israel, from Succoth even to Jordan, who but must exclaim, What hath God wrought! Surely, it is impossible for any reader, and every reader, to attend to the wonderful account without joining Moses, the man of God and saying, "Happy art thou, O Israel! who is like unto thee, O people saved of the Lord?" (Deuteronomy 33:29) Let the reader turn to those Scriptures, (Exodus 13:21-22; Exo 14:19-20; Exo 16:10; Numbers 12:5; Deuteronomy 31:15; Nehemiah 9:19; 1 Corinthians 10:1; 1Co 10:4) But when the reader hath paused over these Scriptures, and duly pondered the wonderous subject, I entreat him to carry on the blessed consideration (for it is, indeed, most blessed), as it concerns the Exodus, or going forth of the church of Jesus now. For is not the church the same? Is not Jesus's love to it the same? And doth he not go before it now in the pillar of cloud by day, and follow it in the pillar of fire by night, to guide, to bless, to protect, yea, himself to be the very supply to it, through all the eventful journies of its Wilderness state, from the Succoth of the beginning of the spiritual life, even to Jordan, the river of natural death opening to glory? What though the cloud, in the miraculous movements of it as to Israel, is not seen, yet the Lord of the cloud, in his presence, grace, and love, is sensibly known and enjoyed
Calf - The "golden calf" was an idol set up and worshipped by the Israelites at the foot of mount Sinai in their passage through the Wilderness to the land of Canaan. Having been conducted through the Wilderness by a pillar of cloud and fire, which preceded them in their marches, while Moses was receiving the divine commands that cloud covered the mountain, and they probably imagined that it would no longer be their guide; and, therefore, applied to Aaron to make for them a sacred sign or symbol, as other nations had, which might visibly represent God
Manna - It fell every morning, with the dew, about the camp of the Israelites, and in so great quantities during the whole forty years of their journey in the Wilderness, that it was sufficient to serve the entire multitude instead of bread, Exodus 16:35 Deuteronomy 29:5,6 Joshua 5:12 . It was found, not on trees and shrubs, but on "the face of the Wilderness" wherever they went; and was different in its qualities from any now known by that name, being dry enough to grind and bake like grain, but breeding worms on the second day
Serpent - Very different is the passage John 3:14 ‘and as Moses lifted up the serpent (τὸν ὄφιν) in the Wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up,’ where the reference is to the plague of serpents among the Israelites in the Wilderness and the miraculous cure, as recorded in Numbers 21:6-9
Gilgal - The Israelites born in the Wilderness were here circumcised with stone knives (Joshua 5:2 margin; Exodus 4:25), which "rolling" away of the reproach of uncircumcision gave the name. The sons under 20 years, when at Kadesh in the second year of the Wilderness journey the murmuring nation was rejected (Numbers 14), had been already circumcised; those born subsequently needed circumcision. ...
The "reproach of Egypt rolled off" is (like "the reproach of Moab" Zephaniah 2:8, and "Syria" Ezekiel 16:57) that heaped on Israel by Egypt, namely, that Jehovah had brought them into the Wilderness to slay them (Exodus 32:12; Numbers 14:13-16; Deuteronomy 9:28)
Ass - Arad and arod refers to the wild ass ( asinus hemippus ) that God created for freedom in the Wilderness rather than to do slave labor for humans (Job 39:5 ). It lives in the Wilderness searching for food and helpless before the cold and rain (Job 24:5-8 ; compare Job 39:5 ). God had created them to be accustomed to life in the Judean Wilderness (Jeremiah 2:24 ), where they freely pursued natural instincts and lusts
Goat - " (Isaiah 1:18) The scape goat was then sent away, by the hand of some fit man, or as the margin of the Bible hath it, by a man of opportunity, into the Wilderness. Some of the Jews say, that the edge of the Wilderness had a precipice where the Azazel fell over, and was dashed to pieces. But the "wilderness which no man went through, and none inhabited," carried with it the same idea, that "the iniquity of Israel when, sought for, there should be none; and the sins of Judah, and they should not be found
Serpent - (See Job 26:13; Isaiah 27:1)...
The whole tenor of Scripture, therefore being directed to set forth the devil under this image and figure of the serpent, there appears a beautiful analogy between the brazen serpent lifted, up in the Wilderness at the command of God, and the Lord Jesus lifted up on the cross for the salvation of his people by the same authority—and for this plain reason, because none but the serpent of all the creatures in the creation of God was cursed; and therefore none but the serpent among the creatures of God could be the suitable type or figure to represent Christ when redeeming, his people from the curse of the law, "being made a curse for them. " And as the simple act of faith in the Israelite in the Wilderness, when beholding the brazen serpent as typical of Christ, became the sole means of recovery when dying under the effects of the serpent's poison in the old dispensation, so the simple act of faith in the Lord Jesus Christ becomes the sole cause of salvation when dying under the consequences of sin and Satan under the New. Parkhurst in his Lexicon, page 390, that the reason for which Moses in the Wilderness when commanded to make the figure of a fiery serpent, made it of brass or copper, was not only because it was the nearest in resemblance to the colour of the serpent, but also from the noxious qualities of poison in it
Cedar - Probably erez here is a species of juniper, Juniperus Sabina , which grows in the Wilderness
Abiathar - When Saul sent his emissaries to Nob, to destroy all the priests there, Abiathar, who was young, fled to David in the Wilderness, 1 Samuel 22:11-23 , with whom he continued in the character of priest, 1 Samuel 23:9 30:7
Michigan - , who was murdered soon after by a band of Sioux in the Wilderness
Tad'Mor - (city of palms ), called "Tadmor in the Wilderness," is the same as the city known to the Greeks and Romans under the name of Palmyra
Numbering of the People - Besides the numbering of the tribes mentioned in the history of the wanderings in the Wilderness, we have an account of a general census of the whole nation from Dan to Beersheba, which David gave directions to Joab to make (1 Chronicles 21:1 )
Arabia - ...
Arabia Deserta, the el-Badieh or "Great Wilderness" of the Arabs
Joab - He was buried in his own property in the "wilderness," probably in the north-east of Jerusalem (1 Kings 2:5,28-34 )
Reuben, Tribe of - At the Exodus numbered 46,500 male adults, from twenty years old and upwards (Numbers 1:20,21 ), and at the close of the Wilderness wanderings they numbered only 43,730 (26:7)
Winds - The east wind crosses the sandy wastes of Arabia Deserts before reaching Palestine and was hence termed "the wind of the Wilderness
Pools of Solomon - , in the Wilderness of Tekoa, Jehoshaphat assembled his army in the valley of Berachah ("blessing"), and there blessed the Lord
Mesopotamia - Mesopotamia again occurs at the close of the wanderings in the Wilderness
Savior - God reveals His role as savior primarily through the Exodus from Egypt and provision for Israel during the Wilderness years (Hosea 13:4-6 )
Signs - ' He was Himself God's sign, according to Isaiah 7:14 , as the manna was the sign of God to Israel in the Wilderness
Token - The people had been delivered from Egypt, had safely crossed the sea, had been preserved as they traveled through the Wilderness
Commandment - And thou shalt remember all the way which the Lord thy God led thee these forty years in the Wilderness, to humble thee, and to prove thee, to know what was in thine heart, whether thou wouldest keep his commandments, or no” ( Beasts - In Isaiah 13:21 , several wild animals are mentioned as dwelling among the ruins of Babylon: "Wild beasts of the desert," ציים , those of the dry Wilderness, as the root of the word implies, "shall dwell there
Ishmael - God was with the lad, for he was the seed of Abraham; he dwelt in the Wilderness and became an archer. At first he was located in the Wilderness of Beer-sheba and afterwards at Paran, a region between Canaan and mount Sinai
Tadmor - a city built by Solomon, 1 Kings 9:18 , afterward called Palmyra; situated in a Wilderness of Syria, upon the borders of Arabia Deserta, inclining toward the Euphrates. He says there is no water any where else in the Wilderness, but in this place
Waste - Till your carcasses be wasted in the Wilderness. Desolate uncultivated as a waste country a waste howling Wilderness
Ishmael - "Jehovah," in covenant with Abraham her husband, "heard her affliction" in the Wilderness whither she had fled from Sarah. Job 11:12; Job 24:5; "behold, as wild donkeys in the desert, go they forth to their work, rising betimes for a prey (for traveling in the East is at an early hour, to be before the heat): the Wilderness yieldeth food for them and for their children"; i. Robbery is "their work"; the Wilderness which yields no food to other men "yieldeth food for them" by the plunder of caravans. " Many conquerors have marched into the Arabian Wilderness, but they have never been able to catch this wild donkey and to tame him" (Baumgarten). ")...
After God's saving them they "dwelt in the Wilderness of Paran," the El Tih, the desert of Israel's wanderings; stretching from the wady Arabah on the E. Ishmael first went into the Wilderness of Beersheba, then into that of Paran
Moses - ...
At length, when the oppression of the Israelites was come to the full, and they cried to God for succour, and the king was dead, and all the men in Egypt that sought his life, "the God of glory" appeared to Moses in a flame of fire, from the midst of a bush, and announced himself as "the God of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob," under the titles of Jahoh and AEhjeh, expressive of his unity and sameness; and commissioned him first to make known to the Israelites the divine will for their deliverance; and next to go with the elders of Israel to Pharaoh, requiring him, in the name of "the Lord, the God of the Hebrews, to suffer the people to go three, days' journey into the Wilderness, to sacrifice unto the Lord their God," after such sacrifices had been long intermitted during their bondage; for the Egyptians had sunk into bestial polytheism, and would have stoned them, had they attempted to sacrifice to their principal divinities, the apis, or bull, &c, in the land itself: foretelling, also, the opposition they would meet with from the king, the mighty signs and wonders that would finally compel his assent, and their spoiling of the Egyptians, by asking or demanding of them (not borrowing) jewels of silver, and jewels of gold, and raiment, (by way of wages or compensation for their services,) as originally declared to Abraham, that "they should go out from thence with great substance,"...
Genesis 15:14 ; Exodus 2:23-25 ; Exodus 3:2-22 ; Exodus 8:25-26 . To assist him, also, in his arduous mission, when Moses had represented that he was "not eloquent, but slow of speech," and of a slow or stammering tongue, God inspired Aaron, his elder brother, to go and meet Moses in the Wilderness, to be his spokesman to the people, Exodus 4:1-31 , and his prophet to Pharaoh; while Moses was to be a god to both, as speaking to them in the name, or by the authority, of God himself, Exodus 7:1-2 . At their first interview with Pharaoh, they declared, "Thus saith the Lord, the God of Israel, Let my people go, that they may hold a feast unto me in the Wilderness. All these, except Caleb and Joshua, having brought "an evil report," so discouraged the people, that they murmured against Moses and against Aaron, and said unto them, "Would God that we had died in the land of Egypt; or would God that we had died in the Wilderness! And wherefore hath the Lord brought us unto this land to fall by the sword, that our wives and our children shall be a prey? Were it not better for us to return into Egypt? And they said one to another, let us make a captain, and return into Egypt. " He powerfully appealed to the long-tried mercies and forgivenesses they had experienced ever since their departure from Egypt; and his energetic supplication prevailed; for the Lord graciously said, "I have pardoned, according to thy word: but verily, as I live, all the earth shall be filled with the glory of the Lord;" or shall adore him for his righteous judgments; "for all these men which, have seen my glory and my miracles which I did in Egypt, and in the Wilderness, and have tempted me these ten times, and have not hearkened to my voice, surely shall not see the land which I sware unto their fathers: neither shall any of them that provoked me see it. As ye have spoken in my ears, so will I do unto you," by a righteous retaliation: "your carcasses shall fall in this Wilderness. But your little ones, which ye said should be a prey, them will I bring in; and they shall wander in the Wilderness forty years, and bear your whoredoms, after the number of the days in which ye searched the land, each day for a year, until your carcasses be wasted in the Wilderness. On the morrow they were ordered to turn away from the promised land, and to take their journey south-westward, toward the way of the Red Sea: and they abode in the Wilderness of Kadesh many days, or years, Numbers 14:25 ; Deuteronomy 1:40-46 . At Meribah Kadesh the congregation murmured against Moses, for bringing them into a barren Wilderness without water; when the Lord commanded Moses to take his rod, which had been laid up before the Lord, and with Aaron to assemble the congregation together, and to speak to the rock before their eyes; which should supply water for the congregation and their cattle. As to himself personally: He is destined to die in the Wilderness; he is never to taste the tranquillity, the plenty, and the delight, the possession of which he promises to his countrymen; he shares with them only their fatigues and privations; he has more anxieties than they, on their account, in their acts of disobedience, and in their perpetual murmurings. Samuel and Eli assign a part of their paternal authority to their sons, and permit them even to abuse it; but the sons of Moses, in the Wilderness, are only the simple servants of the tabernacle; like all the other sons of Kohath, if they even dare to raise the veil which covers the sacred furniture, the burden, of which they carry, death is denounced against them. There is a minuteness in the details of the Mosaic writings, which bespeaks their truth; for it often bespeaks the eye-witness, as in the adventures of the Wilderness; and often seems intended to supply directions to the artificer, as in the construction of the tabernacle
Circumcision - ...
The reason of the omission of circumcision in the Wilderness (Joshua 5:5-6) was, while suffering the penalty of their unbelief the Israelites were practically discovenanted by God, and so were excluded from the sign of the covenant. "The reproach of Egypt" was the taunt of the Egyptians that God brought them into the Wilderness to slay them (Numbers 14:13-16; Deuteronomy 9:23-28); which reproach lay on them so long as they were in danger of being "cut off" in the Wilderness as uncircumcised, but was rolled off the younger generation by their circumcision at Gilgal
Balaam - His fame had spread across the Wilderness, and, when Balak found himself in straits through the advance of Israel, he sent for Balaam to come and curse Israel. It is a story belonging not to the Wilderness, but to a land of vineyards. It ignores the embassy that has been sent to bring Balaam back across the Wilderness ( Numbers 22:15 ; Numbers 22:21 ), for it represents Balaam as travelling alone
Kadesh-Barnea - It was an oasis town between the Wilderness of Zin to the north, the Wilderness of Paran to the south, the Wilderness of Shur to the west, and the Arabah to the east (Genesis 16:7; Genesis 16:14; Genesis 20:1; Numbers 13:26; Numbers 20:1; see PALESTINE)
Moabite - On their journey the Israelites did not pass through Moab, but through the "wilderness" to the east (Deuteronomy 2:8 ; Judges 11:18 ), at length reaching the country to the north of the Arnon
Sanctuary - 1: ἅγιον (Strong's #39 — Adjective — hagion — hag'-ee-on ) the neuter of the adjective hagios, "holy," is used of those structures which are set apart to God, (a) of "the tabernacle" in the Wilderness, Hebrews 9:1 , RV, "its sanctuary, a sanctuary of this world" (AV, "a worldly sanctuary"); in Hebrews 9:2 the outer part is called "the Holy place," RV (AV, "the sanctuary"); here the neuter plural hagia is used, as in Hebrews 9:3
Vine, Vineyard - This is attested by the presence of rock-hewn wine-presses and traces of ancient vine terraces where all is Wilderness to-day
Korah - A leader of rebellion against Moses and Aaron while Israel was camped in the Wilderness of Paran (Numbers 16:1 )
Camp, Encampment - During Israel's years in the Wilderness, sin offerings were burned outside the camp
Census - Another census was taken in Moab at the end of the Wilderness wanderings, again excluding the Levites
Allotment - Judah claimed all land west of the Dead Sea from Kadesh-barnea and the Wilderness of Zin to the Sorek valley, including the cities of Beth-shemesh, Ekron, and Timnah
Capernaum - It was in this building that our Lord gave the well-known discourse in John 6 ; and it was not without a certain strange feeling that on turning over a large block we found the pot of manna engraved on its face, and remembered the words, 'I am that bread of life: your fathers did eat manna in the Wilderness, and are dead
Waste - ) That which is wasted or desolate; a devastated, uncultivated, or wild country; a deserted region; an unoccupied or unemployed space; a dreary void; a desert; a Wilderness
Arabah - The Wilderness of Judah encompassing the eastern slopes of the mountains of Judah with little rain, deep canyons, and steep cliffs where David hid from Saul (1 Samuel 23:24-25 )
Likeness - 102:6: “I am like a pelican of the Wilderness: I am like an owl of the desert
Burn - 21:6, 8, the term śârâph describes the serpents that attacked the Israelites in the Wilderness
Publican - Theocritus being asked which was the cruelest of all beasts, answered, "Among the beasts of the Wilderness, the bear and the lion; among the beasts of the city, the publican and the parasite
Deuteronomy - (1:1; 4:40) After a brief historical introduction the speaker recapitulates the chief events of the last forty years in the Wilderness
Kadesh Barnea - "The Wilderness of Kadesh," i. the desert adjoining Kadesh; the northern part of the Paran Wilderness was called Zin (Numbers 10:12; Numbers 13:21)
Temptation - ...
Israel failed temptation in the Wilderness, but Jesus, the true fulfilment of Israel, triumphed over temptation in the Wilderness (Matthew 4:4; Matthew 4:7; Matthew 4:10; cf
Month - The children of Israel came into the Wilderness of Sin, which is between Elim and Sinai, on the fifteenth day of the second month, after their departing out of the land of Egypt. So again, Exodus 19:1) In the third month, when the children of Israel were gone forth out of the land of Egypt, the same day came they unto the Wilderness of Sinai
Levites - The Gershonites, whose number was seven thousand five hundred, were employed in the marches through the Wilderness in carrying the veils and curtains of the tabernacle; the Kohathites, whose number was eight thousand six hundred, in carrying the ark and sacred vessels of the tabernacle; the Merarites, whose number was six thousand two hundred, in carrying the several pieces of the tabernacle which could not be placed upon the chariots; and the Aaronites were the priests who served the sanctuary. When the Hebrews encamped in the Wilderness, the Levites were placed around the tabernacle; Moses and Aaron at the east, Gershon at the west, Kohath at the south, and Merari at the north
Moses - ” The Old Testament depicts Moses as the leader of the Israelites in their Exodus from Egyptian slavery and oppression, their journey through the Wilderness with its threats in the form of hunger, thirst, and unpredictable enemies, and finally in their audience with God at Mount Sinai/Horeb where the distinctive covenant bonding Israel and God in a special treaty became a reality. ...
Moses led the people into the Wilderness, where the pursuing Egyptians trapped the Israelites at the Red Sea. He met their needs for food and water in the hostile Wilderness. Even the fiery serpents and the Amalekites failed to thwart the Wilderness journey of the Israelites under Moses' leadership
Shadow - In the desert Wilderness the traveler found little hope for shade but looked for shade or shadow from hills (Judges 9:36 ), large rocks (Isaiah 32:2 ), a cave (Exodus 33:1 : 22 ; 1 Kings 19:9 ), or a cloud (Isaiah 25:5 )
Burden - In Numbers 4:15 it is used of the items the sons of Kohath carried as they moved the tabernacle from place to place in the Wilderness
Fast - Our Lord fasted forty days in the Wilderness (Matthew 4:2 )
Bow - The cloud was the token of God's presence in Israel's Wilderness journey and in the holiest place of the temple; and on Mount Sinai at the giving of the law; and at the Lord's ascension (Acts 1:9), and at His coming again (Revelation 1:7)
Gad - The tribe of Gad during the march through the Wilderness had their place with Simeon and Reuben on the south side of the tabernacle (Numbers 2:14 )
Forest - It is also rendered "wood", the "wood" in the "wilderness of Ziph," in which david concealed himself (1 Samuel 23:15 ), which lay south-east of Hebron
Hachilah, the Hill - ...
From the rock of Ziph David came down to "the Wilderness of Maon
Apostasy - The increase in apostasy in these last days of the church's Wilderness experience is associated with the appearance of the "man of lawlessness" (2 Thessalonians 2:1-3 )
Ur - The other is an abundant spring, issuing in a pool of transparent clearness, and embosomed in a mass of luxuriant verdure, which, amidst the dull brown desert all around, makes and must always have made, this spot an oasis, a paradise, in the Chaldaean Wilderness
Weather - The central hill country is cooler than the foothills and coastal areas, but the Judaean Wilderness and Negev become fiercely hot
Memorial - No biblical book utilizes this motif more fully than Deuteronomy, where God exhorted the people to remember him, the exodus, and the Wilderness experience in order to prepare themselves for the conquest of Canaan
Army - In the Wilderness Joshua led men he had chosen to defend against the Amalekites (Exodus 17:9-10 )
Altar - If the Jews were to hew stone for altars in the Wilderness, they would have been compelled to use war weapons to do the work
Convert - To change from one state to another as, to convert a barren waste into a fruitful field to convert a Wilderness into a garden to convert rude savages into civilized men
Far - Lo then would I wander far off, and remain in the Wilderness
Caleb - All the people that had been numbered, from twenty years old and upward, perished in the Wilderness except these two
Food - ...
John the Baptist, like some others of his day, lived nearer to nature, as a rebuke of prevalent luxury, and chose the native food of the Wilderness, ‘locusts and wild-honey’ (Matthew 3:4, Mark 1:6)
Hands, Laying on of - On the day of atonement Aaron laid his hands upon the head of the scapegoat, and confessed over it all the iniquities of the children of Israel, and it was sent away into the Wilderness to signify the putting away of the sins confessed over the goat
Num'Bers, - (Numbers 10:11 ; Numbers 14:45 ) ...
A brief notice of laws and events which transpired during the thirty-seven years wandering in the Wilderness
Reuben - They made inroads upon the Bedouin tribes: being on the border of the Wilderness doubtless this was unavoidable if they were to live in peace and safety
Fulfill - In His being lifted up on the cross (John 3:14 ), Christ corresponded to the serpent Moses raised in the Wilderness (Numbers 21:9 ). Christ was foreshadowed by Adam ( Romans 5:12-21 ; 1Corinthians 15:22,1 Corinthians 15:45-49 ), by the rock in the Wilderness (1 Corinthians 10:4 ), and by the Passover lamb (1 Corinthians 5:7 )
Pillar - The pillar of cloud, and the pillar of fire in the Wilderness, which went before and followed Israel, were among the symbols of the divine presence. And hence; the sacred writers, through the several parts of sacred Scriptures, keep up the remembrance of those manifestations in the Wilderness, as so many proofs of the Lord's presence with his people
Palmtree - "...
The palm was carried with willows and thick trees (rabbinically called lulab ) in the hand at the feast of tabernacles, the thanksgiving for the ingathered fruits, and the commemoration of Israel's 40 years' sojourn in tabernacles in the Wilderness. The earthly feast shall be renewed in commemoration of Israel's Wilderness-like dispersion and sojourn among the nations (Zechariah 14:16)
John the Baptist - " He preached in the Wilderness, calling on the people to repent, for the kingdom of heaven was at hand. He was "the voice of one crying in the Wilderness, Make straight the way of the Lord," as Isaiah had prophesied
Deuteronomy - After receiving the law at Mt Sinai, Israel spent almost forty years in the Wilderness region between Sinai and Canaan. In the case of the Israelites, they would no longer be together as a vast crowd moving through the Wilderness, but would split up, spread out and settle down in an agriculturally fertile country
Exodus, Book of - Thus Moses had to flee to the Wilderness of Midian, where he helped seven endangered shepherd girls. ...
After celebrating the deliverance in song and dance (Exodus 15:1-21 ), Israel followed God's leadership into the Wilderness, but soon the difficult Wilderness life proved too hard. Moses' father-in-law Jethro brought Moses' wife and children back to him in the Wilderness and praised God for all that He had done for Moses and the people. To avoid sin, God's people had to follow God's chosen leader, even when the path led through the Wilderness and demanded a life-style lacking in some of the food and luxuries they had learned to take for granted
Land (of Israel) - The general line of the southern border is from the Dead Sea, through the Wilderness of Zin to Kadesh Barnea. The territory south of the Wilderness of Zin (called the Central Negev Highlands today) belonged to Edom. ...
Monson observes that the purpose of the land was to serve as God's testing ground of faith! The Lord wanted to see if his people, redeemed by his matchless grace and mighty power out of slavery in Egypt, and brought through the Wilderness and into the promised land, would worship him and him alone. The southern border of Israel went only as far as the Wilderness of Zin, not down to Eilat
Forest - ...
That "of Ziph-wilderness," where David hid, S
Meribah - " Thirty-eight years afterward at Kadesh, bordering on the promised laud, again, untaught by the severe discipline of the Wilderness (Isaiah 9:13), Israel in want of water cried, "would God we had died when our brethren died before the Lord!"...
God's glory appeared, and the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, "take the rod, and speak unto the rock before their eyes, and it shall give forth his water
Moses - By a succession of miracles, which God wrought by his hand, Moses brought the Hebrews out of Egypt, and through the Wilderness, unto the borders of Canaan
Hormah - After Israel's unbelief, consequent on the spies' report, and subsequent presumptuous advance toward Canaan, in defiance of the Lord who no longer would go with them since they had refused to go when He invited them, the Amalekites from the hill "smote them and discomfited them even unto Hormah" Then followed the wandering in the Wilderness for 38 years
Gibeon - The "wilderness (midbar ), pasture ground) of Gibeon" lay to the E
South - In Judges 1:16 it is called "the Wilderness of Judah South of Arad"; a strip of hilly country, running from the Dead Sea westward across Palestine, obliquely to the S
Amalek, Amalekites - ...
When the Israelites, who, alas, disbelievingly agreed with the spies who had brought up the evil report of the land, were told they should all fall in the Wilderness, they then said they would go up and possess it; but they were smitten by the Amalekites and the Canaanites
Scorpion - The Jews encountered them in the Wilderness, Deuteronomy 8:15 , and a range of cliffs across the hot valley south of the Dead Sea, called Acrabbim, or scorpions, appears to have been much infest be them
Simeon - ...
The tribe was reduced in numbers while in the Wilderness, from 59,300 to 24,000, Numbers 1:23 26:14 ; very probably on account of sharing in the licentious idolatry of Moab, with Zimri their prince, Numbers 25:1-18 , or for other sins
Tabernacle - Nehemiah 8:14-18 ), it is called "the feast of tabernacles" (or "booths," sukkoth), and was appointed for seven days at Jerusalem from the 15th to the 22nd Tishri (approximately October), to remind the people that their fathers dwelt in these in the Wilderness journeys
Judah - Kenites, commonly supposed to be of Midianite origin, we are told in Judges 1:16 , also went up from Jericho with Judah into the Wilderness. ]'>[2] ’s Sinai census (Numbers 1:27 ) gives 74,600, and that of the Wilderness 76,500 ( Numbers 26:22 )
Cloud, Cloud of the Lord - In a positive sense, clouds represent unlimited extent (of God's faithfulness and truth, Psalm 36:5 ; 57:10 ; 108:4 ; of Babylon's judgment, Jeremiah 51:9 ); life-giving refreshment (of the king's favor, Proverbs 16:15 ); a normal occurrence (cycle of nature, Ecclesiastes 11:3 ); shade or shelter (from the "heat" of the ruthless, Isaiah 25:5 ); calm (of the Lord in his heavenly sanctuary, Isaiah 18:4 ); covering or concealment (of Israel's sins in forgiveness, Isaiah 44:22 ); speed and mobility (of the Gentiles "flying" to Mount Zion, Isaiah 60:8 ); and an abundant outpouring (of the "rain" of righteousness, Isaiah 45:8 , and of manna in the Wilderness, Psalm 78:23 ). By far the largest group (about fifty occurrences) of these refer to the visible manifestation of the divine presence during Israel's exodus from Egypt and Wilderness wandering. ...
The pillar of cloud motif-set forth in the exodus account and expanded in the prophetic announcements of a new exodus after the Babylonian exile-encompasses a rich complex of theological meanings and functions: guidance/leading (of Israel out of Egypt and through the Wilderness to Canaan, Exodus 13:21 ; Numbers 14:14 ; Nehemiah 9:12 ; Psalm 78:14 ); a signal for movement (breaking and setting up camp, Exodus 40:36-37 ; Numbers 9:17-23 ); protection from danger (as a barrier of darkness between Israel and the Egyptians, Exodus 14:19-20 ); the sustained, immediate, personal presence of Yahweh/the angel of the Lord (Exodus 13:22 ; 14:19,24 ; 40:38 ; Numbers 9:15-16 ); an agency of summons (to battle, Numbers 10:34-35 ; and to worship, Exodus 33:10 ); both a concealment and manifestation of divine glory (Exodus 16:10 ; 19:9,16 ; 20:21 ; 24:15-18 ; 34:5 ; Deuteronomy 4:11 ; 5:22 ); the place of propositional revelation (as an oracular cloud, Exodus 33:9 ; Psalm 99:7 ); the dwelling place/throne of divinity (over the tabernacle, Numbers 9:18,22 ; 10:11 ; and in particular, over the mercy seat, Leviticus 16:2 ); the locus of cultic theophany (for the investiture of the seventy elders and Joshua, Numbers 11:25 ; Deuteronomy 31:15 ; for the inauguration of the tabernacle, Exodus 40:34-35 ); shade/protection from the sun or storm (Numbers 10:34 ; Psalm 105:39 ; Isaiah 4:5 ); illumination (as a pillar of fire by night, Exodus 14:20 ; Numbers 9:15 ); and an agency of legal investigation and/or executive judgment (against Israel's enemies, Exodus 14:24 ; and against rebels within Israel, Numbers 12:5,10 ; 16:42 )
John the Baptist - alone furnishes any information about him previous to the moment when he suddenly issued from his retirement in the Wilderness and began to preach the baptism of repentance in the Jordan Valley, and true also that in the case of the Fourth Gospel it is difficult often to distinguish between the Evangelist’s statements as a historian and his own subjective exposition. Of the precise nature of the impulse which first led him to withdraw himself from his fellows, the duration of his stay in the Wilderness, and the fashion of his life while there, no Evangelist has anything to tell us. John’s withdrawal into the Wilderness indicated his disapproval of society as he found it, it signified more especially an absolute break with the prevalent Pharisaic type of piety. ] ...
How long John remained in ‘the deserts,’ by which is doubtless meant the awful solitudes of the Wilderness of Judaea, and how he grew into the full sense of the precise nature of his prophetic vocation as the forerunner and herald of the Messiah, we cannot tell. —It was in the 15th year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar that the word of God came to John in the Wilderness summoning him to enter upon his work as a prophet (Luke 3:1-2). , was ‘the Wilderness’ (Mark 1:4), according to Mt. ‘the Wilderness of Judaea’ (Matthew 3:1), according to Lk. Probably, as hitherto, the Wilderness of Judaea continued to be his home—that wild region which stretches westwards from the Dead Sea and the Jordan to the edge of the central plateau of Palestine; but when he preached he must have done so in some place not too far removed from the haunts of men, while, owing to his practice of baptism (almost certainly by immersion), the Jordan necessarily marked the central line of his activity (Matthew 3:6; Matthew 13:16, Mark 1:5; Mark 1:9). By his trumpet-voiced proclamation of this fact he thrilled the nation to its heart and drew forth the multitude into the Wilderness to hear him (Matthew 3:5, Luke 3:7; cf
Numbers, the Book of - Then they "compassed Mount Seir (the Wilderness of Paran) many days," until that whole generation died (Deuteronomy 2:1). Leviticus completed the Sinai legislation, but the stay in tents in the Wilderness required supplementary directions not originally provided, as Numbers 19:14, also Numbers 5; Numbers 9:6-14; Numbers 19 (Numbers 10:35-36 the plague after Korah's rebellion necessitating ordinances concerning defilement by contact with the dead), Numbers 30; Numbers 36, the law of heiresses marrying in their tribe, being at the suit of the Machirite chiefs, as the law of their inheriting was issued on the suit of Zelophehad's daughters (Numbers 27), and that was due to Jehovah's command to divide the land according to the number of names, by lot (Numbers 26:52-56). The very inconsistency seeming between Numbers 4:3; Numbers 4:23; Numbers 4:30, fixing the Levites' limit of age to 30, and Numbers 8:24 appointing the age 25 (the reason being, the 30 was temporary, the number of able-bodied Levites between 30 and 50 sufficing for the conveyance of the tabernacle in the Wilderness; but, when Israel was in Canaan, the larger number afforded by the earlier limit 25 to 50 was required: David enlarged the number, as the needs of the sanctuary service required, by reducing the age for entrance to 20 (1 Chronicles 23:24-28), younger men being able then for the work, carrying the tabernacle being no longer needed). The tabernacle is presupposed near, which is true only while Israel was in the Wilderness; "Arnon is the border of Moab, between Moab and the Amorites" (Numbers 21:13), could only be written in Moses' time; the Amorites were not yet supplanted by the two and a half tribes: Numbers 32. were in the Wilderness" (Numbers 15:32) do not prove they were no longer there, but that the sabbath ordinance (Exodus 31:14) now violated was in force already, whereas other ordinances were to come in force only "when Israel should come into the land" (Numbers 15:2, etc
Day of Atonement - The high priest confessed all of the people's sins over the head of the live goat which was lead away and then released in the Wilderness (Leviticus 16:21-22 )
Ephraim, the Tribe of - At the time of the first census in the Wilderness this tribe numbered 40,500 (Numbers 1:32,33 ); forty years later, when about to take possession of the Promised Land, it numbered only 32,500
Tabernacle - Sometimes it is intended to mean the place of worship the Israelites had in the Wilderness
Bela - He too "in Aroer, even unto Nebo and Baal Meon, eastward unto the entering in of the Wilderness from the river Euphrates" (1 Chronicles 5:8-9)
Maon - In the waste pasture ("wilderness") of Maon in the plain S
Sinai - After three days they reach the "wilderness of Paran," the "et-Tih", i
Winds - wind, "the wind of the Wilderness" (Job 1:19; Job 27:21; Jeremiah 13:24)
Temptation - The Lord therefore may, and the Lord will, bring his people as he himself was led up before them into the Wilderness of temptation to try their spirits, and to prove his faithfulness: but the issue is not doubtful
Assembly - The whole congregation of the sons of Israel complained that Moses had brought them forth into the Wilderness to kill the whole assembly with hunger ( Forgive - The Israelites experienced God’s “forgiveness” in the Wilderness and in the Promised Land
Devil - He tempted Eve, Genesis 3:1; he tried Job, Job 1:7; provoked David to number Israel, 1 Chronicles 21:1; he tempted our Lord in the Wilderness
Judea - ...
The "wilderness of Judea," in which John began to preach, and where Christ was tempted, seems to have been in the eastern part of Judah, adjacent to the Dead sea, and stretching towards Jericho, 2 Samuel 15:28
Lebanon - Its vast Wilderness of mountains forms almost a world by itself
Judges - Sigonius supposes that these elders and judges of cities were the original constitution settled in the Wilderness by Moses, upon the advice given him by Jethro, Exodus 18:21-22 , and continued by divine appointment after the settlement in the land of Canaan; whereas others imagine that the Jethronian prefectures were a peculiar constitution, suited to their condition while encamped in the Wilderness, but laid aside after they came into Canaan
Jesus, the Lord - Subsequently, and before entering upon His public ministry, He was led of the Spirit into the Wilderness to be tempted of the devil. The gospels of Matthew and Luke here record His being led of the Spirit into the Wilderness to be tempted of the devil. During that period He visited Bethany to raise Lazarus, but again retired into the Wilderness till six days before the Passover
Moses - He had acted with zeal, but without divine direction, and had thereforeto become a fugitive for forty years (being the second period of forty years of his life, as the forty years in the Wilderness was the third ). ...
No trace of timidity is apparent in his dealings with Pharaoh, he boldly requests him to let the people go into the Wilderness to sacrifice to Jehovah; but Pharaoh refused and made the burdens of the Israelites greater. ...
Moses needed such faith, for the murmurings and rebellion of the people were great, and they charged him with causing their trials: why had he brought them out to perish in the Wilderness? When God's anger was kindled against them, he pleaded for them
Prudence - When He came from the temptation in the Wilderness to take up His mission, hearing that Herod had put John in prison, He departed from Jordan to Galilee (Matthew 4:12). Should He not then have committed Himself to the Father: could Herod defeat the mission of the Messiah, the Son who alone could reveal the Father? In the Wilderness Jesus recognized that thought to be a temptation of Satan (Matthew 4:5-7). It lies at the back of the victory over temptation in the Wilderness when He put aside the suggestion to use methods of popularity
Deuteronomy, the Book of - Their wanderings in the Wilderness were at an end. The time is “the fortieth year” ( Deuteronomy 1:3 ) of Wilderness wandering, “in the eleventh month, on the first day of the month. ” The place is “on this side Jordan in the Wilderness” (Deuteronomy 1:1 ) and, more particularly, “in the land of Moab” (Deuteronomy 1:5 ). Moses had led Israel to the borders of Canaan nearly forty years before, but in rebellion and unbelief the people turned back into the Wilderness
Fulfillment - Similarly the Hebrew holy places of human construction, such as the Wilderness tabernacle, were the types and shadows of that true abode of spirituality into which Christ, our High Priest, entered with his own blood (Hebrews 8:5-6 ; 9:11-12 ). ...
Jesus himself gave sanction to this form of interpreting Old Testament events by describing the elevation of the serpent in the Wilderness (Numbers 21:8-9 ) as a type of symbol of his own saving work on Calvary (John 3:14-15 ). In his teachings, Jesus employed the typological approach to contrast the temporality of the Wilderness manna with the permanent quality of the sustenance that he, as the living bread, could offer (John 6:32-35 ). ...
Again, the manna (Exodus 16:14-16 ) and the water that gushed from the rock in the Wilderness (Exodus 17:6 ; Numbers 20:11 ) were interpreted by Paul as depicting the sustaining Christ who was with the Lord's ancient people in their journey (1 Corinthians 10:3-4 )
Locust - It may be 'like the garden of Eden before them, but behind them is a desolate Wilderness
Kibroth Hattaavah - (See Wilderness OF WANDERINGS
Last - When applied elsewhere, the word means “western”: “Every place whereon the soles of your feet shall tread shall be yours: from the Wilderness and Lebanon, from the river, the river Euphrates, even unto the uttermost [1] sea shall your coast be” ( Asher - At the Exodus they numbered 41,500; at the close of the forty years in the Wilderness 53,400
Scorpion - They are common in all warm climates, and are especially ubiquitous in the Wilderness of Sinai (cf
Manna - ...
In accordance with God’s instructions, Moses put part of the manna in a jar, to keep as a memorial of how God fed his people in the Wilderness
Balaam - When Moses led his people across the Wilderness, God commanded him not to attack Edom or Moab (Deuteronomy 2:4-9 )
Caves - ...
Later Occupation The hills of the Judean Wilderness end abruptly at the western shore of the Dead Sea in a series of cliffs rent at intervals by wadies, or stream beds
Ordinance - This included ordinances given at Mount Sinai and those given during the forty years that Israel wandered in the Wilderness
Goshen - Israel setting out from Rameses in Goshen in two days reached the edge of the Wilderness, and in one day more the Red Sea, i
Eagle - Exodus 19:4 (a) GOD compares Himself to an eagle in His work of taking Israel safely through the sorrows, dangers, and distresses of the Wilderness journey
Levites - The Levites numbered 22,000 in the Wilderness, and took the place of the first-born, part of whom were redeemed at five shekels each, Numbers 3:45-51, the fixed ransom for a victim vowed in sacrifice
Tadmor or Tamar - It was remote from human habitations, on an oasis in the midst of a dreary Wilderness; and it is probable that Solomon built it to facilitate his commerce with the East, as it afforded a supply of water, a thing of the utmost importance in an Arabian desert
Tabernacle - ...
The tabernacle was so constructed that it could easily be taken down and conveyed from place to place during the wanderings in the Wilderness. The old tabernacle erected by Moses in the Wilderness was transferred to Nob (1 Samuel 21:1 ), and after the destruction of that city by Saul (22:9; 1 Chronicles 16:39,40 ), to Gibeon
Tabernacles, Feast of - ...
The people in the Wilderness dwelt in tents, not "booths" (sukot ). Coming next day at daybreak to the temple court as they were extinguishing the artificial lights, two colossal golden candlesticks in the center of the temple court, recalling the pillar of fire in the Wilderness, Jesus said, cf6 "I am the Light of the world" (John 8:1-2; John 8:12)
Ephraim - A city ‘near the Wilderness,’ to which Jesus retired after the raising of Lazarus ( John 11:54 ). ‘The Wilderness’ is in Arab
Aaron - ...
When Israel had reached Hazeroth, in "the Wilderness of Paran," Aaron joined with his sister Miriam in murmuring against Moses, "because of the Ethiopian woman whom he had married," probably after the death of Zipporah. ...
Twenty years after this, when the children of Israel were encamped in the Wilderness of Paran, Korah, Dathan, and Abiram conspired against Aaron and his sons; but a fearful judgment from God fell upon them, and they were destroyed, and the next day thousands of the people also perished by a fierce pestilence, the ravages of which were only stayed by the interposition of Aaron (Numbers 16 )
Sarah - Hundreds of miles, weeks of Wilderness, and of tears, and of bleeding feet, and of a bleeding heart from her mother's door. Thou God seest me! Behold, that well still springs up in the Wilderness of Shur; it is to be found on the road between Kadesh and Bered. And, what impurity Hagar had contracted of Sarah and Abraham she had washed away, her head waters and her eyes a fountain of tears, all the way from Abraham's tent door to that well in the Wilderness. And she saw God at that Wilderness-well with a clearness, and with an assurance, and with a rapture, and with a submission, and with an immediate obedience that all combine to lift up Ilagat and to set Hagar beside, and even before, both her master and her mistress in the favour and in the fellowship of God. He made thy life a Wilderness around thee. He made thy heart a Wilderness within thee
Exodus - Israel offers thanks in a hymn of praise ( Exodus 15:1 ); but soon in the Wilderness tempts Jahweh by murmuring for water ( Exodus 15:22-25 a, Exodus 15:27 , Exodus 17:3 ; Exodus 17:2 b, Exodus 17:7 ). ); and in the Wilderness Jahweh tests Israel, whether they can live on a daily provision from Him ( Exodus 16:4 ; Exodus 16:15 a, Exodus 16:19 a, Exodus 16:16 a, Exodus 16:19-21 , Exodus 16:35 a). ]'>[4] had very little on this stage, the account of which was amplified with material from the Wilderness journey after Sinai
Offering - Sin-offerings were presented by the high priest for personal offences, for national sins, and on the great day of atonement, when he confessed the sins of the whole nation with his hand on the scapegoat's head, and the goat was driven off into the Wilderness
Debir (1) - of Jordan, and possibly akin to dabar, Hebrew for a Wilderness pasture, Reland identifies it with Lodebar
Dan - The tribe of Dan had their place in the march through the Wilderness on the north side of the tabernacle (Numbers 2:25,31 ; 10:25 )
Kenites - The connection with Moses explains their continued alliance with Israel, accompanying them to Jericho "the city of palm trees" (Judges 1:16; compare 2 Chronicles 28:15), thence to the Wilderness of Judah, where "they dwelt among the people" (Israel), realizing Moses' promise to Hobab, whose name appears slightly altered as that of a wady opposite Jericho (Numbers 10:32)
Uzzia(h) - His construction of numerous cisterns and military outposts in the Wilderness (the Arad Negeb) made widespread settlement possible
Kenites - ]'>[1] ), who had been invited by Moses and had doubtless accepted the invitation to he a guide to Israel in the Wilderness ( Numbers 10:29-32 ), was a Kenite; and his descendants came up from Jericho with the tribe of Judah into the S
Amorite (the) - , Wilderness E
Ephraim - After the raising of Lazarus, Jesus departed, in consequence of the plots of the chief priests against Him, ‘unto a country ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘into the country’) near to the Wilderness, into a city called Ephraim, and there continued with his disciples
Shepherd - He will feed them, protect them, help them, heal them, refresh them, restore them, and carry them through, the whole of this Wilderness state, until he brings them all home to his fold in heaven
Sin Offering - ) The later Jews, instead of setting the scape-goat free in the Wilderness, led it to a high precipice called Sook ("narrow") and dashed it down
Shiloh (1) - But the town Shiloh did not exist in Jacob's time, and Judah did not lose the preeminence there; nor indeed did Judah, but Moses and Aaron, lead Israel in the Wilderness
Baal - The Lord sets himself therefore to bring them back, and in opening to them the prospects of salvation, shews how he will bring them under afflictions, in Wilderness dispensations, and then having hedged their way up with thorns, compels them, by his grace, to return to him their first lover
Canaan (2) - The boundaries of Canaan were Mount Lebanon on the north, the Wilderness of Arabia on the south, and the Arabian desert on the east
Gibeon - We neither know when, nor by whom, nor on what occasion, the tabernacle and altar of burnt sacrifices, made by Moses in the Wilderness, were removed to Gibeon; but this we certainly know, that, toward the end of David's reign, and in the beginning of Solomon's, they were there, ...
1 Chronicles 21:29-30
Elijah - He fled into the Wilderness, and was brought to Horeb, the mount of God, where he was comforted by a vision of God's power and grace
Caleb - During the next forty years all who were at that time twenty years of age or over (except Caleb and Joshua) would die in the Wilderness (Numbers 14:28-35)
Temptation, Test - The classic example in the Old Testament is the Israelites in the Wilderness, who tested God by doubting his presence with them and care for them (Exodus 17:2,7 ). Matthew 4:1-11 and Luke 4:1-11 depict Jesus as tempted to deviate from his appointed task by seeking provision, protection, and fake power as Israel had done in the Wilderness
Judea - ...
JUDEA, Wilderness OF, a wild and desert country along the southern course of the river Jordan, east of Jerusalem; that which by St. Matthew is called the Wilderness of Judea, being described by St. Luke as "all the country about Jordan;" from whence this Wilderness extended southward along the western side of the Dead Sea. This was the Wilderness in which John first preached and baptized, and into which our Lord, after his own baptism, was led by the Spirit to be tempted, Matthew 4; Luke 4. This peak is considered to be that to which Jesus was transported by the devil during his fast of forty days in the Wilderness; ‘after which he was an hungered. They form, indeed, a most appropriate scene for that Wilderness in which the Son of God is said to have dwelt with the wild beasts, ‘while the angels ministered unto him
John - When John the Baptist began his ministry in the Wilderness of Judea, John, with many others, gathered round him, and was deeply influenced by his teaching
Water - ...
Many of the great acts of God in history have involved water, such as the parting of the sea (Exodus 14:21 ), the provision of water for the Israelites in the Wilderness (Exodus 15:25 ; Exodus 17:6 ), and the crossing of the Jordan River (Joshua 3:14-17 )
Kedron - The valley Kedron passes through the Wilderness of Judah to the N
Temptation - ” In Deuteronomy 8:2 Moses said: “God led thee these forty years in the Wilderness, to humble thee, and to prove ( nsh ) thee, to know what was in thine heart, whether thou wouldest keep his commandments, or no
Rephidim - into the "wilderness of Sinai", Ras Sufsafeh before the open er Rahah or "desert of Sinai" being the true Mount Sinai, not Serbal
Fill - Whence should we have so much bread in the Wilderness, as to fill so great a multitude? Matthew 15
Esau - The first part of the oracle runs, ‘Two nations are in thy womb, and two peoples shall be separated from thy bowels’ (Genesis 25:23); and the Prophet’s words are, ‘Was (or ‘is,’ Revised Version margin) not Esau Jacob’s brother? saith the Lord: yet I (have) loved Jacob; but Esau (have) I hated, and made his mountains a desolation, and gave (given) his heritage to the jackals of the Wilderness
Fast, Fasting - He Himself when led up of the Spirit into the Wilderness to be tempted of the devil, fasted forty days and forty nights
Temple - " (Colossians 2:9) Hence, therefore, as in the tabernacle in the Wilderness, and in the temple at Jerusalem, the glory of the Lord was graciously manifested to the people to intimate the divine presence, so in the person of Christ Jesus, all that is visible it JEHOVAH did appear
Sinai - Ras Sufsafeh, the northern end of (2), with the vast plain er Rahab ("the Wilderness of Sinai") for Israel below, is the Mount Sinai of the law
Abraham - Ishmael's presence caused trouble in the family, and he was expelled with his mother Hagar to the Wilderness of Paran
Manna - He is this heavenly grace now for His own, so that grace is ministered to them for the Wilderness journey
Elijah - The reaction from such a mental strain left the prophet in a weak, nervous condition, and in a fit of despondency he fled from Jezebel into the "wilderness" and desired death
Shushan - The site of the city of Shus is now a gloomy Wilderness, infested by lions, hyaenas, and other beasts of prey
Caleb - Moses, having fervently interceded for them, the Lord graciously heard his prayer; but though he was pleased not to destroy them immediately, he protested with an oath, that none of those who had murmured against him should see the land of Canaan, but that they should all die in the Wilderness
Moloch - Stephen, reproach them with having carried in the Wilderness the tabernacle of their god Moloch, Acts 7:43
Solomon's Song - This I know not how to express otherwise than by a calm, delightful abstraction of the soul from all concerns of the world; and sometimes a kind of vision of fixed ideas and imaginations of being alone in the mountains or some solitary Wilderness, far from mankind, sweetly conversing with Christ, and rapt and swallowed up in God
Plain - ]'>[1] by ‘plain’ (‘plains’) and ‘desert’ (or ‘wilderness’), but in Joshua 18:18 it is transliterated ‘Arabah
ka'Desh, ka'Desh-Bar'ne-a - that there were two places of the name of Kadesh, one in the Wilderness of Paran and the other in that of Zin; but it is more probable that only one place is meant, and that Zin is but a part of the great desert of Paran
Jeremiah -
A Gadite who joined David in the Wilderness (1 Chronicles 12:10 )
Ark of the Covenant - It is a propriety characteristic of the truth of the Scripture narrative that it represents the ark as not made of oak or cedar, the best woods of the Holy Land, but of acacia, the wood of the Wilderness. In the Wilderness "the ark of the covenant of the Lord went before them in the three days' journey to search out a resting place for them; and when the ark set forward, Moses said, Rise up, Lord, and let Thine enemies be scattered, and let them that hate Thee flee before Thee. The antitype, Messiah, goes before His redeemed, exploring their way through the Wilderness, making clear passage through death's waters into the heavenly Canaan
Hospitality - God graciously received the alienated Israelites and met their needs, redeeming them from Egypt and feeding and clothing them in the Wilderness (Exodus 16 ; 1618538448_80 ), bringing them as sojourners into God's own land (Leviticus 25:23 ), where God offered them health, long life, peace, and fertility (Deuteronomy 11 ). Taking the role of host to the multitude, Jesus is portrayed as one like Yahweh, who fed the people in the Wilderness (Exodus 16 ); as one like the prophets of Yahweh, who fed his disciples and had food left over (2 Kings 4:42-44 ); as one like the coming Davidic shepherd, who would care for his flock in the Wilderness (Ezekiel 34:11-31 )
Miriam - Look at her hiding her shame all day behind the sandhills of the Wilderness, and coming out at night to look at the lights in Moses' tent and in Aaron's tabernacle. Was she glad in her heart when she heard of Miriam's leprosy? Did she laugh behind the door like Sarah? Did she say, Let her rot in the Wilderness, for she deserves it? Was she sad all the eighth day and night after Miriam had been healed? Or, did she go up to the court of the Ethiopians, and there importune her brother Aaron to importune his God on behalf of his sister? Did she look out at the gate many times every day all that week, but could never see or hear Miriam for weeping? Did she buy the two birds for the cleansing of a leper with her own money, and did she have them all ready with her own hands for days before Aaron could as yet take Miriam back? I do not know. I can believe that that week's halt did more to secure and to hasten their subsequent march through the Wilderness than a year of their best roads and their best weather. It was that week!-they would often say after they were home in the promised land-it was that week in the Wilderness!...
...
Miriam did not live long after that week. And Miriam sleeps at Kadesh in the Wilderness of Zin till they shall awaken her with the song of Moses and the Lamb, saying, and she answering them with a timbrel, Just and true are Thy ways, Thou King of saints
Pentateuch - Genesis is called bereshith , “in beginning”; Exodus, we'elleh shehymoth , “These are the names”; Leviticus, wayyikra , “and he called”; Numbers, bemidbar , “in the Wilderness”; and Deuteronomy, elleh haddebarim , “These are the words. A division of the Pentateuch based on the contents may be outlined as: Genesis 1-11 , Primeval history, from Creation to Abraham; Genesis 12-36 , Patriarchal history; Genesis 37-50 , Joseph stories; Exodus 1-18 , The Exodus; Exodus 19:1Numbers 19:1—10:10 , Israel at Sinai; Numbers 10:11-21:35 , Israel in the Wilderness; Numbers 22:1Deuteronomy 22:1—34:1 , Israel in the Plains of Moab. Guidance of a rebellious people through the great and terrible Wilderness marks Numbers 10-21 ; and preparations for going over Jordan and conquering Canaan are the major topics of Numbers 22:1Deuteronomy 22:1—34:1 . Narratives describe creation, judgment (flood), travel (wilderness wanderings), buildings (Ark, tabernacle), marriages (Isaac and Rebekah), and births (Moses). ...
The Pentateuch contains many lists: genealogical (Genesis 5:1 ; Genesis 11:1 ; Exodus 5:1 ), geographical and ethnographical (Genesis 10:1 ; Genesis 26:1 ), tribal (Genesis 49:1 ; Deuteronomy 33:1 ); offerings (Exodus 35:1 ); census (Numbers 1-4 ; Numbers 26:1 ), and campsites in the Wilderness (Numbers 33:1 )
Numbers, Book of - The move to the Wilderness of Paran in marching order. The move to the Wilderness of Paran. The move to the Wilderness of Zin (P [11] consented, but condemned all except Caleb to die in the Wilderness
Elijah - He therefore fled in alarm to Beersheba, and thence went alone a day's journey into the Wilderness, and sat down in despondency under a juniper tree. In him we see "the same connection with a wild and Wilderness country; the same long retirement in the desert; the same sudden, startling entrance on his work (1 Kings 17:1 ; Luke 3:2 ); even the same dress, a hairy garment, and a leathern girdle about the loins (2 Kings 1:8 ; Matthew 3:4 )
Judaea - It was during Pilate’s rule that the word of God came to John the Baptist in the Wilderness, and some years later this Roman procurator made his name for ever infamous by giving sentence that the Christ, whom he had openly declared to be innocent of crime, should be led away to be crucified. the ‘Plain of the Coast,’ the ‘Shephelah’ or region of the low hills, the ‘Hill country,’ the ‘Negeb’ or dry country, and the ‘Wilderness. ...
The ‘Wilderness’ includes the whole of the eastern slope or declivity of the Judaean mountains
Judaea - It was during Pilate’s rule that the word of God came to John the Baptist in the Wilderness, and some years later this Roman procurator made his name for ever infamous by giving sentence that the Christ, whom he had openly declared to be innocent of crime, should be led away to be crucified. the ‘Plain of the Coast,’ the ‘Shephelah’ or region of the low hills, the ‘Hill country,’ the ‘Negeb’ or dry country, and the ‘Wilderness. ...
The ‘Wilderness’ includes the whole of the eastern slope or declivity of the Judaean mountains
Palestine - The hill tops are rounded and monotonous—the eastern part of the tract being but an arid Wilderness
Tabernacles, Feast of - ) It was also regarded as commemorating the Israelites’ wanderings in the Wilderness
Encampment - , represents Judah taking the lead in the march out of the Wilderness of Sinai, Reuben was next, Ephraim was next, and Dan was rearward
Murmur, Murmuring - The noun γογγυσμός occurs only once in the Gospels (John 7:12); it as well as γογγύζω and διαγογγύζω are frequently used in LXX Septuagint of Israel in the Wilderness
Toleration, Tolerance - The ascetic Baptist (Matthew 11:18), who drew men into the Wilderness (Matthew 11:7-9), received the highest commendation (Luke 7:26-28) from Him whose scene of ministry was the street and the synagogue, and who honoured with His presence bridal and other feasts (Matthew 9:10-12, John 2:1-11; John 12:2)
Babylon - Like the Mesopotamian city, the "great city" (Rome) will be judged and will become a desolate Wilderness
Endurance - But failure did not automatically mean their rejection in the manner of Israel's failure in the Wilderness
Circumcision - During the journey through the Wilderness, the practice of circumcision fell into disuse, but was resumed by the command of Joshua before they entered the Promised Land (Joshua 5:2-9 )
Greatness - God's care of the children of Israel in the Wilderness demonstrated his greatness (Deuteronomy 3:24 ; 11:2 )
Ark - The ark served as an instrument through which God guided and defended Israel during the Wilderness wandering (Numbers 10:11)
Arsenius - "...
Arsenius, arriving at the monastic Wilderness of Scetis, begged the clergy there to put him in the way of salvation by making him a monk
Festus - ’ More particularly it is added that he ‘sent forces, both horsemen and footmen, to fall upon those that had been seduced by a certain impostor, who promised them deliverance and freedom from the miseries they were under, if they would but follow him as far as the Wilderness
Stone - Of the cult objects in Israel’s Wilderness shrine, only the tablets of the Decalogue were made of “stone” ( Tabernacle - in Hebrew, אהל , in Greek, σκηνη , a word which properly signifies a tent, but is particularly applied by the Hebrews to a kind of building in the form of a tent, set up by the express command of God, for the performance of religious worship, sacrifices, &c, during the journeyings of the Israelites in the Wilderness; and after their settlement in the land of Canaan made use of for the same purpose, till the temple was built in Jerusalem
Scorpion - Thus Moses, in his farewell address to Israel, Deuteronomy 8:15 , reminds them, that God "led them through the great and terrible Wilderness, wherein were fiery serpents and scorpions
Damascus - The plain around the city is well watered and of exuberant fertility; and the eye of the traveller from any direction is fascinated by the view-a Wilderness of verdure, interspersed with innumerable villas and hamlets, with gardens, fountains, and groves
Exodus - They must also heed the lessons that the Israelites failed to learn in the Wilderness years that followed their deliverance (Hosea 11:1; Hebrews 3:7-19)
Mark, the Gospel According to - ...
He notices Jesus being "with the wild beasts" when tempted by Satan in the Wilderness; contrast Adam tempted amidst the tame animals in Eden (Genesis 2; 3). Adam changed paradise into a Wilderness, Jesus changes the Wilderness into paradise
Leviticus - Exodus 26-27 give the Lord's instruction for the building of the tabernacle, the place of worship during ancient Israel's sojourn in the Wilderness. Then the goat was taken into the Wilderness, a significant symbol of the removal of the sin of the people. Also here was the Feast of Tabernacles, a harvest festival remembering the time in the Wilderness
Feasts - The feast of tabernacles commemorates the establishment of God's people in the land of promise, their pleasant and peaceful home, after the 40 years of wandering in the Wilderness, living in shifting tents. ...
Solomon (appropriately to his name, which means king of peace) also did so, for his reign was preeminently the period of peaceful possession when every man dwelt under his own vine and figtree (1 Kings 4:25); immediately after that the last relic of Wilderness life was abolished by the ark being taken from under curtains and deposited in the magnificent temple of stone in the seventh month (2 Chronicles 5:3), the feast of tabernacles was celebrated on the 15th day, and on the 23rd Solomon sent the great congregation away glad in heart for the goodness that the Lord had showed unto David, Solomon, and Israel His people. ...
The zest of the heavenly joy of the palmbearing multitude (antitypical to the palmbearers at the feast of tabernacles), redeemed out of all nations, shall be the remembrance of their tribulations in this Wilderness world forever past; for repose is sweetest after toil, and difficulties surmounted add to the delight of triumph
Jude, Theology of - 7), and among God's people in the Wilderness (vv. In contrast, the unfaithful—like Israel in the Wilderness—place themselves under the judgment of God by presuming on his grace, neglecting spiritual discipline, and repudiating Jesus Christ in word and deed (v
Cry - ...
The voice of him that crieth in the Wilderness
New France - The expansion of French influence was powerfully promoted by these intrepid missionaries who penetrated far into the Wilderness, often alone, sometimes side by side with the great explorers and discoverers, winning the admiration, confidence, and friendship of the savage tribes by their courage and self-denial, converting many, and attaching them indissolubly to New France
Hezekiah - Hezekiah even destroyed the bronze serpent Moses had erected in the Wilderness (Numbers 21:4-9 ) so the people would not view the bronze serpent as an object of worship
Zebulun - ...
In the Wilderness Zebulun was one of the foremost, marching with Issachar and Judah under the standard of Judah
Fire - For this crime he was punished by being chained to a rock in the Wilderness of Scythia
Theophany - Not in human form In some instances the theophany came as at the burning bush (Exodus 3:2-4:17 ) and in the guidance through the Wilderness (Exodus 13:21 ; compare Acts 7:30 )
Directions (Geographical) - East could be referred to as the Wilderness, and south could be called the Negeb, the dry south country (Genesis 24:62 )
Uncleanness - Somewhat similarly the scapegoat, who bore away the sins of the people, defiled him who led him into the Wilderness, and the bringing forth aid burning the sacrifice on the Great Day of Atonement had a similar power
Levites - During the Wilderness journey they were in charge of taking the tabernacle down, transporting it, setting it up and conducting worship at the tent where God dwelt (Numbers 1:47-54 ; Numbers 3:14-39 )
Face - FACE is used freely of animals, as well as of men; also of the surface of the Wilderness ( Exodus 16:4 ), of the earth, of the waters or deep, of the sky
Manasseh - In Psalm 80:2 we read, "Before Ephraim and Benjamin and Manasseh stir up thy strength, and come and save us," in allusion to these three being the tribes that immediately followed the ark of God in the Wilderness
Walk - Thus, the rather concrete idea of following God through the Wilderness moves to “walking behind” Him spiritually
Publican - But as for the common publicans, the collectors or receivers, as many of the socii were, they are spoken of with great contempt, by Heathens as well as Jews; and particularly by Theocritus, who said, that "among the beasts of the Wilderness, bears and lions are the most cruel; among the beasts of the city, the publican and parasite
Sinai - The Wilderness of Sinai, where the Israelites continued encamped almost a year, and where Moses erected the tabernacle of the covenant, is considerably elevated above the rest of the country; the ascent to it is very craggy, the greater part cut out of the rock; then one comes to a large space of ground, which is a plain surrounded on all sides by rocks and eminences, whose length is nearly twelve miles
Fasting - Our Saviour fasted forty days and forty nights in the Wilderness, Matthew 4:2
Stone - Joshua 5:2 , did the same, when he caused such of the Israelites to be circumcised at Gilgal, as had not received circumcision during their journey in the Wilderness
Ostrich - This want of affection is also recorded in Lamentations 4:3 , The daughter of my people is become cruel, like the ostriches in the Wilderness;' that is, apparently by deserting her own children, and receiving others in return
Gen'Esis - The date of writing was probably during the forty-years wanderings in the Wilderness, B
Atonement, the Day of - The goat was then led, by a man chosen for the purpose, into the Wilderness, into "a land not inhabited," and was there let loose
Day of Atonement - The high priest laid his hands on the animal’s head, confessed over it the sins of the people, and sent it far away into the Wilderness so that it could never return
Canticles; the Song of Solomon - ...
Driven from the vineyard of paradise which was once her own into the Wilderness (Song of Solomon 3:6), and to keep very different vineyards (Satan's and the world's), she became black with affliction, though still beautiful (Song of Solomon 1:5-6; compare Lamentations 4:7-8; Revelation 19:7): in contrast to His countenance, "white and ruddy" (Song of Solomon 5:10). But He at the close brings her up from the Wilderness of affliction (Song of Solomon 3:6; Song of Solomon 8:5; Revelation 12:6), and restores her her own vineyard (Song of Solomon 8:12), where He desires to hear her voice. Her Wilderness state then gave place to peaceful and prosperous settlement in manifested union with her God; "the day of Solomon's espousals" (Song of Solomon 3:11)
Exodus, the Book of - The miracles severally suit the place, the time, and the circumstances under which they are stated to have been wrought; the plagues are essentially Egyptian; the supply of Israel's wants in the Wilderness is in harmony with the national characteristics of the country. Israel's "scattering" tended to uproot them from their long settlement in Goshen and to train them for their approaching Wilderness life. ...
None but one in Moses' circumstances could have described the wanderings in the Wilderness of Sinai with such a peculiarly local coloring. Finally, the form, structure, and materials of the tabernacle belong to the Wilderness
Type - ), and of the serpent uplifted by Moses in the Wilderness to stand as a prophetic symbol of the truth that the Son of Man must be lifted up (John 3:14). Genesis 2:24), Christian baptism by the passage of the Red Sea (1 Corinthians 10:1-2), the bread and wine of the Lord’s Supper by the manna and water of the Wilderness (1 Corinthians 10:3-4), and Christ Himself by the rock from which the water flowed (1 Corinthians 10:4). ), in the course of which a further contrast is drawn between the good tidings preached to the Israelites in the Wilderness and the word of the Christian gospel (Hebrews 4:2)-the promised rest of Canaan being used as symbolic of the rest that remains for the people of God (Hebrews 4:9). The triumph song of Moses and the children of Israel (Exodus 15:1, Deuteronomy 31:30; Deuteronomy 32:4) becomes ‘the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb’ (Revelation 15:3); the manna by which Israel was fed in the Wilderness tells of a hidden manna given to him that over-cometh (Revelation 2:17); the twelve tribes reappear in the twelve companies of the sealed servants of God (Revelation 7:4-8); Jerusalem itself is transfigured into the new Jerusalem, the city of God (Revelation 3:12, Revelation 21:2; Revelation 21:10); Mount Zion, to which the tribes went up, becomes the gathering place of the hosts of the redeemed (Revelation 14:1-3). The tabernacle in the Wilderness anticipated that ‘tabernacle of God’ in which He shall dwell for ever with His people and they with Him (Revelation 21:3 f
Solomon - ) in the Wilderness as a commercial depot, as well as a military outpost. "Deep, indeed, must have been her yearning, and great his fame, which induced a secluded Arabian queen to break through the immemorial custom of her dreamy land, and to put forth the energy required for braving the burdens and perils of so long a journey across a Wilderness
John the Baptist - John was that voice crying in the Wilderness preparing the way for the coming Messiah (Isaiah 40:3 ; Matthew 3:3 ; Mark 1:2-3 ; Luke 3:3-6 ). He was an ascetic living in the Wilderness, clothed in camel hair and subsisting on locusts and wild honey (Matthew 3:4 ; Mark 1:6 )
Atonement, Day of - In NT times the goat was led to a lofty precipice in the Wilderness about 12 miles east of Jerusalem, over which it was thrown backwards, to be dashed in pieces on the rocks below ( Yômâ , vi. The most striking illustration of this transmissibility, however, is seen in the central rite by which the nation’s sins are transferred to the head of ‘the goat for Azazel,’ the demonic spirit of the Wilderness (cf
John the Baptist - )...
When the ecclesiastical authorities sent priests and Levites from Jerusalem to ask, Who art thou? John replied, "I am the voice of one crying in the Wilderness, Make straight the way of the Lord" (John 1:19-23). The natural Wilderness symbolized the moral (Isaiah 32:15), wherein was no highway for the Lord and for righteousness
Nineveh - will make Nineveh a desolation, and dry like the Wilderness
Tabernacle - ...
The center of attention in the Wilderness narratives is the tabernacle with rich decorations, curtains, bread of the presence, ark, lights, and altar
Lord of Hosts - But this explanation of the origin of the title, as Delitzsch pointed out, is greatly invalidated by the fact that we do not find it in the period in which we should expect it to be most common, that is, in the wars of the Wandering in the Wilderness
Transfiguration, the - (The event in the earthly life of Christ which marks the culminating point in his public ministry, and stands midway between the temptation in the Wilderness and the agony in Gethsemane, (Matthew 17:1-13 ; Mark 9:2-13 ; Luke 9:28-36 ) Place
Caesarea - To-day it is a Wilderness of dreary ruins, tenanted only by a few wandering shepherds
Rest (And Forms) - ...
1 Chronicles 6:31 (a) The traveling days of Israel through the Wilderness were finished
Saints - His presence (the Shekinah) dwelled in the Holy of Holies or the Most Holy Place, the most remote and inaccessible place in the Wilderness tabernacle and later in the Jerusalem temple
Camp - 'The Camp' was a common expression used of Israel in the Wilderness: the tabernacle in the centre and the twelve tribes, each in its appointed place, arranged around it, composed the camp
Atonement, Day of - The other, after being presented before the Lord, was brought forth: on him Aaron laid both his hands and confessed over him "all the iniquities of the children of Israel and all their transgressions in all their sins, putting them upon the head of the goat," Leviticus 16:21 , which was then sent away into the Wilderness, a land of forgetfulness
Lion - What a sweet consoling thought to the believer travelling through this waste and howling Wilderness, that our Jesus is the sovereign of all, and the ruler over all
Abiathar - Abiathar had the first place, with the ephod, Urim and Thummim, and the ark, in the tent pitched by David at Jerusalem Zadok officiated before the tabernacle and brazen altar made by Moses and Bezaleel in the Wilderness, which were now in Gibeon (1 Chronicles 16:1-7; 1 Chronicles 16:37; 1 Chronicles 16:39-40; 1 Chronicles 27:38; 1 Chronicles 27:34; 2 Chronicles 1:3-5)
Atone - After lots were cast upon the two goats, one was sent away into the Wilderness as an atonement (v
Cloud - He, our Redeemer and Advocate, the Lord who is our Brother, is now within the cloud that covers Sinai, that leads through the Wilderness, that shines above the Mercy-seat; that is to say—in all that by which God draws near to man (in His law as in Sinai, in His providences as in the shepherding of Israel, in religious life and worship as in the Holiest of all), Christ is present, and the love which He has made known, bestowed and sealed
Smoke - ...
Isaiah 4:5 (b) The reference is made to the pillar of fire and the cloud that led Israel through the Wilderness
Shepherd - As agriculture increased pasturage decreased, and was limited to particular spots, the border of the Wilderness of Judah, Carmel (1 Samuel 25:2), Bethlehem (1 Samuel 16:11; Luke 2:8), Tekoa (Amos 1:1), and Gedor (1 Chronicles 4:39)
Flock - For separated by distinguishing grace and gathered out of the world's wide Wilderness, Jesus hath pent it up, and hedged it in; so that it is for ever separated from the wolves and beasts of prey
Tabernacle - ” God dwelt amidst His people in the Wilderness, and His presence was symbolically manifest in the tent of meeting
Sea - The Great Sea is the Mediterranean: “From the Wilderness and this Lebanon even unto the great river, the river Euphrates, all the land of the Hittites, and unto the Great Sea toward the going down of the sun, shall be your coast” ( Salt - " So a salt land, Jeremiah 17:6 , is the same as the "parched places of the Wilderness," and is descriptive of barrenness, as saltness also is, Job 39:6 ; Psalms 107:34 ; Ezekiel 47:11 ; Zechariah 2:9
Jehoshaphat - " Abenezra is of opinion, that this valley is the place where King Jehoshaphat obtained a signal victory over the Moabites, Ammonites, and Meonians of Arabia Petraea, 2 Chronicles 20:1 , &c, toward the Dead Sea, beyond the Wilderness of Tekoah, which after that event was called the valley of blessing, 2 Chronicles 20:26
Lead, Led - ...
2: ἀνάγω (Strong's #321 — Verb — anago — an-ag'-o ) "to lead up" (ana, "up"), is used of Christ in being "led" up by the Spirit into the Wilderness, Matthew 4:1 Luke 4:5 (AV, "taking up"); by the elders of the people into their council, Luke 22:66 , "led away
Justice - In the Wilderness, Moses organized for the Jews a regular system of judges, some having jurisdiction over ten families, others over fifty, one hundred, or one thousand
Shepherd - But the heat of summer withered these "pastures of the Wilderness," and drove the shepherds and their flocks to seek for highlands and streams
Levites - In the Wilderness, the Levites took charge of the tabernacle and its contents; and conveyed it from place to place, each of the three families having a separate portion, Numbers 1:51 4:1-49 1 Chronicles 15:2,27
Clouds - In the tent of revelation during the Wilderness period (Exodus 40:34-38 ), in the Jerusalem Temple (1 Kings 8:10-11 ), on Mount Sinai (Exodus 34:5 ), and in His direction and protection by means of the clouds and the pillar of fire, Israel experienced that God came to them (Exodus 33:7-11 ) but still remained wholly other (Leviticus 16:2 ,Leviticus 16:2,16:13 ) even when he came as the Son of Man (Daniel 7:13 )
Cloud - He, our Redeemer and Advocate, the Lord who is our Brother, is now within the cloud that covers Sinai, that leads through the Wilderness, that shines above the Mercy-seat; that is to say—in all that by which God draws near to man (in His law as in Sinai, in His providences as in the shepherding of Israel, in religious life and worship as in the Holiest of all), Christ is present, and the love which He has made known, bestowed and sealed
Jonah - beyond that enemy from which Jeroboam II had just delivered them, according to the prophecy of Jonah, and that they should be "afflicted from the entering in of Hamath unto the river of the Wilderness" (the southern bound of Moab, then forming Israel's boundary), i. the very bounds restored by Jeroboam II, for "the river of the araba h" or "wilderness" flowed into the S. Forty is the number indicative of judgment for sin, as Israel's 40 years in the Wilderness
Moses - ...
During the Wilderness period Moses receives from God other laws dealing with sacrifices and offerings, rules governing social behavior, prohibitions against idolatry and immorality, and positive promises of God's blessings upon the Israelites, provided always that they keep the covenant obligations that they had assumed under oath. In the Wilderness he bears the brunt of complaints (Numbers 11:1-25 ) and feels the crushing weight of his responsibilities (Numbers 11:14 )
Jordan - It is evident, also, from the history of Josephus, that a Wilderness or desert of considerable extent stretched along the river Jordan in the times of the New Testament; which was undoubtedly the Wilderness mentioned by the evangelists, where John the Baptist came preaching and baptizing
Serpent - ...
Serpents are very common in the Holy Land and in the Wilderness to the south
Shekinah - It was so in nature ( Psalms 18:10 ), on Sinai ( Exodus 24:16 ), in the Wilderness and in the Tabernacle ( Exodus 16:7 ; Exodus 29:43 ; Exodus 40:34 , Numbers 14:10 ), in the Temple ( 1 Kings 8:11 ); cf
Bread, Bread of Presence - ...
The manna in the Wilderness is the quintessential example of bread as a provision of God
Anger - ...
God may choose to display his wrath within historical events, as in Israel's Wilderness wanderings (Psalm 95:10-11 ) or the Babylonian exile (Lamentations 2:21-22 )
Serpent - (See also ADDER ; ASP ] When God punished the murmurs of the Israelites in the Wilderness by sending among them serpents whose fiery bite was fatal, Moses, upon their repentance, was commanded to make a serpent of brass, whose polished surface shone like fire, and to set it up on the banner-pole in the midst of the people; and whoever was bitten by a serpent had but to look up at it and live
Roads - (c) To the west, another road ran from Jerusalem to Jaffa, passing Gibeah, Bethhoron, and Lydda; while (d) to the south the road went through Bethlehem to Hebron, where it split in two: one going through the Wilderness by way of Beersheba, and the other going west to the coast and passing through Gaza
Calf, Golden - He, and He alone, was worshipped both in the Wilderness (see Exodus 32:5 ‘a feast to J″ Wrath, Wrath of God - When the Israelites complained to God at Taberah, “the anger of the Lord blazed hotly” (Psalm 78:56-666 RSV) Later, God reminded the people of various such experiences and warned, “Remember and do not forget how you provoked the Lord your God to wrath in the Wilderness
Jericho - But the uncertainty of the scene of the Baptism and the vagueness of the phrase ‘the Wilderness’ (Matthew 4:1 ||) make this a matter of tradition only
Amalekites - " A nomadic tribe, occupying the peninsula of Sinai and the Wilderness between Palestine and Egypt (Numbers 13:29; 1 Samuel 15:7; 1 Samuel 27:8)
Solitude - Their thought would explain our Lord’s ‘being led up of the Spirit into the Wilderness, to be tempted of the devil’ (Matthew 4:1)
Dan - With his characteristic love of large numbers he gives the fighting strength of Dan in the Wilderness census as 62,700, more than that of any other except Judah (Numbers 1:33 ; cf
Locusts - The locusts of Egypt, it is more than probable, differed widely from the locusts which John the Baptist ate for food in the Wilderness
Gregorius, Saint., the Illuminator - Gregory died in the Wilderness a
Fathers - The ‘fathers,’ then, in the language of our Lord and His contemporaries, could mean ancestors in general, or the ancestors of some particular period, as, for example, the wandering in the Wilderness (John 6:31; John 6:49; John 6:58), or ancestors of notable piety or renown, more especially the three patriarchs who were regarded as the founders of the people
Ostrich - In Lamentations 4:3, yeenim , "cruel like the ostriches in the Wilderness
Father - This noun may be used of any one of the entire line of men from whom a given individual is descended: “But he [2] himself went a day’s journey into the Wilderness, and came and sat down under a juniper tree: and he requested for himself that he might die; and said, It is enough; now, O Lord, take away my life; for I am not better than my fathers” (1 Kings 19:4)
Eating - John the Baptist is said to have come "neither eating nor drinking," Matthew 11:18 ; that is, as other men did; for he lived in the Wilderness, on locusts, wild honey, and water, Matthew 3:4 ; Luke 1:15
Jericho - But the uncertainty of the scene of the Baptism and the vagueness of the phrase ‘the Wilderness’ (Matthew 4:1 ||) make this a matter of tradition only
Joshua the Son of Nun - God announced that Israel would therefore remain in the Wilderness for the next forty years, till all those currently over twenty years of age (except Joshua and Caleb) had died, and a new generation had grown up (Numbers 13:1-16; Numbers 14:6-10; Numbers 14:26-30)
Red Sea - After they set out from Rameses, in the land of Goshen, in the neighbourhood of Cairo, their first encampment was at Succoth, signifying "booths," or an "enclosure for cattle," after a stage of about thirty miles; their second, at Etham, or Adsjerud, on the edge of the Wilderness, about sixty miles farther; "for the Lord led them not by the way of the land of the Philistines, although that was near; for God said, Lest peradventure the people repent when they see war, and they return to Egypt: but God led the people about by the way of the Wilderness of the Red Sea," or by a circuitous route to the land of promise, in order to train them and instruct them, in the solitudes of Arabia Petraea, Exodus 13:17-20 ; Deuteronomy 32:10 . Instead of proceeding from Etham, round the head of the Red Sea, and coasting along its eastern shore, the Lord made them turn southward along its western shore, and, after a stage of about twenty or thirty miles, to encamp in the valley of Bedea, where there was an opening in the great chain of mountains that line the western coast, called Pi-hahiroth, the mouth of the ridge between Migdol westward, and the sea eastward, "over against Baal-zephon," on the eastern coast; to tempt Pharaoh, whose heart he finally hardened, to pursue them when they were "entangled in the land," and shut in by the Wilderness on their rear and flanks, and by the sea in their front. And it was this unexpected change in the direction of their march, and the apparently disadvantageous situation in which they were then placed, entangled in the land, and shut in by the Wilderness, with a deep sea in front, the mountains of Attaka on the sides, and the enemy in their rear, that tempted the Egyptians to pursue them through the valley of Bedea, by the direct route from Cairo, who overtook them encamping by the sea, beside Pi-hahiroth, opposite to Baal-zephon, Exodus 14:2-9
Lord's Prayer, the - ...
The key here is "not too much, not too little, but just enough, " as with God's supply of manna in the morning and quail in the evening for Israel during the Wilderness missionjust enough for the day, no more (Exodus 16:4,12-21 ). There was no ordinariness for Israel in the Wilderness, nor is there for God's people in the new mission
Stephen - His speech is not the unconnected narrative that many suppose, but a covert argument which carries his hearers unconsciously along with him until at the close he unveils the drift of the whole, namely, to show:...
(1) That in Israel's past history God's revelation of Himself was not confined to the holy land and the temple, that Abraham had enjoyed God's revelations in Mesopotamia, Haran, and Canaan before he possessed a foot of the promised land; so also Israel and Moses in the strange land of Egypt, and in Midian and Sinai, which was therefore "holy ground" (Acts 7:33), and in the Wilderness 40 years. He under the Holy Spirit supplements the statements in Exodus 7:7, Moses "fourscore years old" at his call, 40 years in the Wilderness, 120 at his death (Deuteronomy 29:5; Deuteronomy 31:2; Deuteronomy 34:7), by adding that he was 40 at his visiting his Israelite brethren and leaving Egypt for Midian, and stayed there 40 (Acts 7:23-30)
John the Baptist - In the Judæan Wilderness the wild waste which lies to the west of the Dead Sea this Elijah-like prophet ( Luke 1:17 ) ‘on rough food throve’; but, notwithstanding his ascetic affinities with the Essenes, he was not a vegetarian, his diet consisting of edible locusts ( Leviticus 11:22 ) as well as the vegetable honey which exudes from fig-trees and palms ( Mark 1:1-82 ). ...
In the Wilderness ‘the word of God came unto John’ (Luke 3:2 )
Exodus - Their exodus in many particulars well illustrates the state of Christ's church in the Wilderness of this world, until her arrival in the heavenly Canaan. The people murmured, and were directed by Jehovah to turn back and wander in the desert, until the carcasses of that generation should all fall in the Wilderness, Numbers 14:25
Judah - Judah led the van in the Wilderness march on the E. The Wilderness of Zin was its extreme southern limit
Perfection (of Jesus) - And even after the baptism, when the call had come, He went first to the Wilderness, there in prayer and meditation to understand His work and His own heart. —In the Wilderness Jesus met the trials of the future. In the Wilderness Jesus had to face them: He had to come to a clear understanding of the nature of the Messianic Kingdom and of the means He had to use to establish it. Jesus, as in the Wilderness, triumphed by simple obedience. This was the inevitable end of the method He had chosen in the Wilderness, when He renounced all powers of persuasion but that of an appeal to the heart. And in the Wilderness He recognized that He was to tread life’s common way
Deuteronomy, the Book of - Parts of it had been unavoidably in abeyance in the Wilderness. His additional enactment are just of that supplementary and explanatory kind which would come from the legislator himself, after a practical experience of the working of the law during the years of the Wilderness wanderings. Our Lord attests Deuteronomy by quoting from it alone the three passages wherewith He foiled the tempter in the Wilderness (Matthew 4; Deuteronomy 8:3; Deuteronomy 6:13; Deuteronomy 6:16)
Dan (1) - Hushim (the plural implying a family) or Shuham alone is mentioned as Dan's son (Genesis 46:23); but at the Exodus the tribe stood second of Israel in numbers (Numbers 1:39), Numbers 1:62,700; 64,400 at the close of the Wilderness sojourn (Numbers 26:43)
Tabernacle - (σκηνή, tabernaculum)...
Tabernacle is the name given in the English Bible, since the time of Wyclif, to the moving sanctuary which, according to the OT priestly writers, was prepared by Moses as the place of worship of the Israelites during their wanderings in the Wilderness
Mephibosheth - Bearing a name of reproach like Mephibosheth, instead of his name of innocence; banished to the outskirts of the moral Wilderness, like Mephibosheth in Lodebar; liable to perish by the sword of justice, as Saul's other sons (2 Samuel 21); paralyzed by original sin, as Mephibosheth lamed from infancy in both feet; invited by the Lord and Savior, after having spoiled principalities, to sit down at the royal table (Matthew 8:11; Revelation 19:7; Revelation 19:9), as Mephibosheth was by David after conquering all his foes, on the ground of the everlasting covenant (Jeremiah 31:3); as David regarded Mephibosheth because of his covenant with Jonathan (1 Samuel 20:15; 1 Samuel 20:42)
Shur - The main inland route from Egypt to Jerusalem passed through the Wilderness of Shur and the Judean towns of Beersheba and Hebron (Genesis 13:1; Genesis 13:18; Genesis 16:7; Genesis 21:14; Genesis 46:5)
Responsibility - Likewise, in the Wilderness, Moses affirmed that although the Lord is slow to anger, "he does not leave the guilty unpunished; he punishes the children for the sin of the fathers to the third and fourth generation" (Numbers 14:18 )
Puritans - Thither as into a Wilderness they fled from the face of their persecutors, and, being protected in the free exercise of their religion, continued to increase, till in about a century and a half they became an independent nation
Lily - " There is one thought more the subject suggests concerning the church, and that is, that as a lily the church is said to be among thorns; meaning, that in this world Jesus's church is in a Wilderness
Israel - The ten tribes will, by a mighty hand and with fury poured out, be brought into the Wilderness, and there God will plead with them, cause them to pass under the rod, and bring them into the bond of the covenant; but the rebels will be purged out
Ark of God - The Wilderness circumstances, in which the manna and the priesthood of Christ were so necessary, were now passed
Aaron - In the Wilderness Aaron and Hur helped Moses hold up the staff, the symbol of God's power, so that Israel would prevail over Amalek (Exodus 17:12 )
False Christs - ...
The locale of the false Messiahs (Matthew 24:26) is either the Wilderness (cf
House - The steppe is termed the “house of beasts”: “… whose house I have made the Wilderness, and the barren land his dwellings [7]” (Job 39:6)
Eucherius, Saint, Bishop of Lyons - the law was given in the Wilderness and the chosen race fed with bread from heaven) and to the sanction given to retirement by the examples of Moses, Elijah, St
Ways - This custom is easily recognized in that beautiful prediction: "The voice of him that crieth in the Wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight in the desert, a highway for our God
True, Truly, Truth - 1; (d) His ways, Revelation 15:3 ; (e) His judgments, Revelation 16:7 ; 19:2 ; (f) His riches, Luke 16:11 ; (g) His worshipers, John 4:23 ; (h) their hearts, Hebrews 10:22 ; (i) the witness of the Apostle John, John 19:35 ; (j) the spiritual, antitypical tabernacle, Hebrews 8:2 ; 9:24 , not that the Wilderness tabernacle was false, but that it was a weak and earthly copy of the heavenly
Anger, Angry - It is used of the wrath of man, Ephesians 4:31 ; Colossians 3:8 ; 1 Timothy 2:8 ; James 1:19,20 ; the displeasure of human governments, Romans 13:4,5 ; the sufferings of the Jews at the hands of the Gentiles, Luke 21:23 ; the terrors of the Law, Romans 4:15 ; "the anger" of the Lord Jesus, Mark 3:5 ; God's "anger" with Israel in the Wilderness, in a quotation from the OT, Hebrews 3:11 ; 4:3 ; God's present "anger" with the Jews nationally, Romans 9:22 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:16 ; His present "anger" with those who disobey the Lord Jesus in His Gospel, John 3:36 ; God's purposes in judgment, Matthew 3:7 ; Luke 3:7 ; Romans 1:18 ; 2:5,8 ; 3:5 ; 5:9 ; 12:19 ; Ephesians 2:3 ; 5:6 ; Colossians 3:6 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:10 ; 5:9
Ostrich - This want of affection is also recorded, Lamentations 4:3 , ‘the daughter of my people is become cruel, like ostriches in the Wilderness;' that is, by apparently deserting their own, and receiving others in return
Assyr'ia, as'Shur, - Above and below this barrier is an immense level tract, now for the most part a Wilderness, which bears marks of having been in early times well cultivated and thickly peopled throughout
Circumcision - But during Israel’s years in the Wilderness between Egypt and Canaan, the people failed to circumcise their new-born children
Atonement, Day of - Next a man chosen for the purpose led it into the Wilderness, "a land not inhabited," and there let it loose. Many think Azazel to be the devil, to whom, as the source of sin, "the entirely separate one," the scape-goat, with its lead of sin taken of from the congregation, was sent to the Wilderness (the abode of evil spirits) to be given up to, as sin and the wicked shall be hereafter (Acts 2:23; Matthew 25:41; Luke 16:20): entirely separated from God
End - 13:20: “And they took their journey from Succoth, and encamped in the Etham, in the edge of the Wilderness. the hindermost of the nations shall be a Wilderness, a dry land, and a desert” ( Tabernacle - The remarkable and costly structure thus described was erected in the Wilderness of Sinai, on the first day of the first month of the second year, after the Israelites left Egypt, Exodus 40. This was indispensable; it being designed to accompany the Israelites during their travels in the Wilderness
Holy Spirit - The Holy Spirit was then responsible for thrusting Jesus out into the Wilderness to undergo temptation (Luke 4:1-13 )
Sabbath - It is next referred to in connection with the gift of manna to the children of Israel in the Wilderness (Exodus 16:23 ); and afterwards, when the law was given from Sinai (20:11), the people were solemnly charged to "remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy
Repentance - Appearing in the Wilderness, he, like they, issued the call to his own generation for this radical kind of turning
Egypt - Like the people lost in the Wilderness, some of the survivors of the destruction of Judah would rather live in relative peace in Egypt than be available for God in Palestine
Vine - Israel was “like grapes in the Wilderness” when God found them (Hosea 9:10 ), and the remnant surviving the Exile is compared to a cluster of grapes (Isaiah 65:8 )
Ishmael - For the story of his life up to his settlement in the Wilderness of Paran, the northern part of the Sinaitic peninsula, see Hagar
Ark - ]'>[1] ,’ was Israel’s supreme guide in the Wilderness wanderings ( Exodus 32:34 ; Exodus 33:2 compared with Exodus 33:14 f
Garden - As first a garden is an enclosure, separated and fenced round; so the church stands in the midst of the world's wide Wilderness, gathered from it by sovereign grace
Nineveh - "a desolation, and dry like a Wilderness
Joseph - But the grace imparted to Joseph, to repel the temptation, and the punishment he suffered by a false imputation, very beautifully set forth the innocency of Christ triumphing over the Devil's temptation in the Wilderness, and the imputation of our sin to Jesus, who himself bore our sins in his own body on the tree, though himself without sin, neither was guile found in his mouth
Host - 1, 2, and 10, where tsâbâ' occurs with regard to a census of Israel, it is suggested that this was a military census by which God organized His “army” to march through the Wilderness
Nimrod - Thus nahash, the brazen "serpent" in the Wilderness, was called by Hezekiah, in contempt, nehushtan, "a piece of brass," when he broke it in pieces, because it was perverted into an object of idolatrous worship by the Jews, 2 Kings 18:4
Ostrich - What a beautiful light this throws upon that passage in the prophet, "The daughter of my people is become cruel, like the ostriches in the Wilderness?" (Lamentations 4:3)...
And so senseless is this bird in respect to caution in food, that she swallows indiscriminately every thing that comes in her way, whether it be rags, leather, wood, stone, or iron
Jesus Christ - ...
Under the power of the Spirit received at His baptism He encountered Satan in the Wilderness. Adam changed paradise into a Wilderness, Jesus changed the Wilderness into paradise (Isaiah 11:6-9). As 40 is the number in Scripture implying affliction, sin, and punishment (Genesis 7:4; Genesis 7:12; Numbers 14:33; Numbers 32:13-14 Psalms 95:10; Deuteronomy 25:3; Ezekiel 29:11; Ezekiel 4:6; Jonah 3:4), Christ the true Israel (Deuteronomy 8:3; Deuteronomy 8:16; Deuteronomy 9:9; Deuteronomy 9:11-25) denied Himself 40 days, answering to Israel's 40 years' provocation of God and punishment by death in the Wilderness
Disciple, Discipleship - That calling was reiterated and confirmed in the exodus from Egypt and in the Wilderness (Exodus 13:21-22 ). ...
When giving the Law to Israel in the Wilderness God stressed his covenant intent: "I will walk among you and be your God, and you will be my people" (Leviticus 26:12 )
Miracles - times — by Moses in the Wilderness; by the prophets in the land; and some through the direct agency of God from heaven, as the deliverance of the three from the fiery furnace, Daniel from the lions, etc. ...
Water made blood Exodus 7:20-25 ...
Frogs Exodus 8:5-14 ...
Lice Exodus 8:16-18 ...
Flies Exodus 8:20-24 ...
Murrain Exodus 9:3 - 6 ...
Boils and blains Exodus 9:8-11 ...
Thunder and hail Exodus 9:22-26 ...
Locusts Exodus 10:12-19 ...
Darkness Exodus 10:21-23 ...
Death of the Firstborn Exodus 12:29-30 ...
Parting of the Red Sea Exodus 14:21-31 ...
In the Wilderness
Black People And Biblical Perspectives - They took courage in God's provisions during the Wilderness wanderings
Devote, Devoted - ...
Amalekites fell under the ban because of atrocities committed during the Wilderness wanderings (Deuteronomy 25:17-19 )
Manasseh - The tribe of Manasseh was associated with that of Ephraim and Benjamin during the wanderings in the Wilderness
Bread - ), or because unleavened bread reminded Jews of the hasty departure from Egypt and the rigors of the Wilderness march
Eternal Life - ...
Eternal Life as Experienced in the Present and Future John compared the lifting up of the serpent in the Wilderness to the lifting up of the Son of Man on the cross and His exaltation to heaven
Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic - Matthew 4:1 tells of Jesus being tempted by the devil in the Wilderness
Foreigner - ...
After Sinai and the Wilderness wanderings, Israel received the gift of the promised land
Loneliness - The outstanding instances are—the Temptation in the Wilderness (Matthew 4:1, Mark 1:12, Luke 4:2), the retirement after the excitement consequent on the feeding of the five thousand (Matthew 14:22, Mark 6:45; cf
Gad (1) - Companionship in arms and hardships in the Wilderness naturally led them to desire neighborhood in their possessions; also similarity of pursuits in tending flocks and herds led Gad to alliance with Reuben
Cherubim - (Genesis 3:24) And during the church's continuance in the Wilderness, several relations are made of the cherubim
Borrow - ...
I only beg to add, under this view of the subject, that as the tabernacle in the Wilderness was afterwards adorned with the gold and silver the Israelites brought with them from Egypt, it is plain that the Lord approved of the conduct of his servants in asking from their neighbours such things as they needed, and as the Lord himself had commanded
Judges, Book of - ...
Age of Isaac, when Jacob was born, Genesis 25:26 60...
" Jacob when lie stood before Pharaoh 130...
" Israel in Egypt 215...
" Israel in the Wilderness 40...
" To the division of the land 7...
(about 450 years)
Moses - However, his marriage to the Ethiopian must have been at a later period than Josephus states, namely, after Zipporah's death in the Wilderness wanderings. ...
Nothing short of divine interposition could have enabled Moses to lead an unwarlike people of serfs out of a powerful nation like Egypt, to give them the law with their acceptance of it though so contrary to their corrupt inclinations, to keep them together for 40 years in the Wilderness, and finally to lead them to their conquest of the eastern part of Canaan. Moses, instead of animating them to enter Canaan, now will neither suffer them to proceed, nor yet to return to Egypt; they must march and counter-march in the Wilderness for 40 years until every adult but two shall have perished; but their little ones, who they said should be a prey, God will bring in. The limitation of life to 70 or 80 years harmonizes with the dying of all that generation at about that age; 20 to 40 at the Exodus, to which the 40 in the Wilderness being added make 60 to 80
Canaan - In Deuteronomy 1:7 the natural divisions are given, THE PLAIN, THE HILLS, THE VALE, THE SOUTH, THE SEASIDE; THE Wilderness also is mentioned (Joshua 12:8), and the SPRINGS OF PISGAH (Deuteronomy 3:17). ...
The Wilderness (midbar ) of Judah, N. The Hills (har ), from the Wilderness to the S
Nehemiah, Theology of - He is their lawgiver from Mount Sinai and their preserver and sustainer in the Wilderness. He had great compassion on Israel in the Wilderness, providing for all their needs (9:27-31)
John - ...
Mark 1:3-4 records that John was in the Wilderness until the time of his public ministry. Because of his life in the Wilderness, his priestly background, his preaching of repentance to Israel, and his practice of baptism, it is often suggested that John grew up among the Essenes at Qumran
Hospitality - The pleasing picture of the magnanimous sheik, bidding strangers welcome to his tent and to the best he owns ( Genesis 18:1-33 ), is often repeated to this hour in the Arabian Wilderness. A building of some kind may be intended by the ‘lodge of wayfaring men’ in the Wilderness ( Jeremiah 9:2 )
Mark, the Gospel of - God announced His action through the herald in the Wilderness (Mark 1:4-8 ). God sustained His Son in the experience of testing in the Wilderness (Mark 1:12-13 )
Silence - And it was in the Wilderness that Jesus lived His life, fought His tremendous battle with evil, faced every possible contingency of temptation, and came out victorious. After the ordeal in the Wilderness, Jesus began His active career, which was merely the symbol and seal of the victory already gained
Plagues of Egypt - It is more than probable also, that some among the cattle that were destroyed were included in the idols of Egypt; for certain it is, that from the Egyptians the Israelites learnt the worship of the calf, which afterwards they set up in the Wilderness. When Moses afterwards in the Wilderness was admonishing Israel to be cautious of offending the Lord, and threatening punishment to their rebellion, he adverts to those boils as among the most dreadful of divine visitations
Sea - Compare Ezekiel 47:8-10 , where the healing of this deadly sea, and its abounding in fish, as well as the new fertility and beauty of the dreary Wilderness between it and Jerusalemby means of the healing power of the Kidron flowing from beside that altar of Godforcibly illustrate the healing and renovating power of gospel grace. John in the Wilderness, carved in bas-relief, and polished to as great a lustre as black marble is capable of
Conquest of Canaan - At the close of the Wilderness wanderings the Israelites arrived on the plains of Moab in the Transjordan (“beyond the Jordan”)
Tabernacles, the Feast of - The main purposes of the Feast of Tabernacles are plainly set forth in ( Exodus 23:16 ) and Levi 23:43 It was to be at once a thanksgiving for the harvest and a commemoration of the time when the Israelites dwelt in tents during their passage through the Wilderness
Manasseh (1) - Before Ephraim and Benjamin and Manasseh (advancing at their head, as formerly in the pillar of cloud in the Wilderness)
Babylon, Mystical - ...
Then she was "persecuted" by" the dragon, Satan," but nourished by divine Providence for "three and a half times" "in the Wilderness" of the Gentile world
Chaldaea - In Isaiah 23:13 the prophet reminds Tyre of the fact so humbling to her pride, that the upstart Chaldees should destroy her: "Behold the land of the Chaldaeans; this people was not, until the Assyrian founded it for them that dwell in the Wilderness:" i
River - Rivers, in the East especially, have the power to turn a Wilderness into a garden of beauty and fertility; hence the river is here an apt symbol of life
Gad - By the time they had reached the Wilderness they had decreased to 40,500
Haggai, Theology of - ...
The reference to the Holy Spirit and the Sinai covenant in 2:5 serve as a reminder that Moses and the seventy elders were empowered by the Spirit as they led Israel out of Egypt and through the Wilderness (Numbers 11:16-17,25 )
Enthusiasm - His first enthusiasm to use the new energy afforded the occasion for the temptation in the Wilderness (Mark 1:12 ‘straightway the Spirit driveth him forth’)
Ark of the Covenant - ...
A very ancient poem, the “Song of the Ark” in Numbers 10:35-36 , sheds some light on the function of the ark in the wanderings in the Wilderness
Plagues of Egypt - The fish too was abundant: the Israelites in the Wilderness could not forget the fish of which they had eaten freely, or 'for nothing
Bethabara - According to Chrysostom, for instance, the more accurate copies read ‘Bethabara,’ a result that might readily be conceived to follow from Origen’s criticism; and he adds that Bethany was neither across the Jordan nor in the Wilderness, but near Jerusalem
Sow - 20:5 should be rendered: “It [3] is not a place of sowing [4] or figs or vines or pomegranates, nor is there water to drink. ” Only rarely is this nuance applied to animals: “And I will put enmity between thee [2]6 and the woman [3]00, and between thy seed and her seed …” ( Separate - 9:10, the various versions differ in their rendering of nâzar: “I found Israel like grapes in the Wilderness; I saw your fathers as the firstripe in the fig tree at her first time: but they went to Baal-peor, and separated [2] themselves unto that shame; and their abominations were according as they loved
Andrew - By trade he was a fisherman (Matthew 4:18), but, attracted by all that he had heard or seen of John the Baptist, for a time at least he left his old work, and, following the Baptist into the Wilderness, came to be recognized as one of his disciples (John 1:35; John 1:40)
Thorn - The thorns are expressly said to be from the Wilderness, or common hard by; probably the barkanim were from the same place
Ark of the Covenant - ...
On the two sides of the ark there were four rings of gold, two on each side, through which staves, overlaid with gold, were put, by means whereof they carried it as they marched through the Wilderness, &c, on the shoulders of the Levites, Exodus 25:13-14 ; Exodus 27:5
Idolatry, - (Joshua 24:14 ; Ezekiel 20:7 ) In the Wilderness they clamored for some visible shape in which they might worship the God who had brought them out of Egypt
Urim And Thummim - This mode of consultation subsisted under the tabernacle erected by Moses in the Wilderness, and until the building of Solomon's temple; after which we find no instances of it
David - The jealousy of Saul, however, at length drove him to seek refuge in the Wilderness of Judea; where he soon gathered a band of six hundred men, whom he kept in perfect control and employed only against the enemies of the land
Idol, Idolatry - When they were in Egypt, many of them worshipped Egyptians deities, Ezekiel 20:8 ; in the Wilderness, they worshipped those of the Canaaites, Egyptians, Ammonites, and Moabites; in Judea, those of the Phoenicians, Syrians, and other people around them, Numbers 25:1-18 Judges 10:6 Amos 5:25 Acts 7:42
Feasts - During the festival people lived in these shelters in remembrance of Israel’s years in the Wilderness (Leviticus 23:34; Leviticus 23:39-43)
Gilgal - He also arranged for the circumcision of all those who had been born during the years in the Wilderness but had not yet been circumcised
Israel, History of - Chronological Outline...
The Preexilic Period...
The Patriarchal Period...
2000-1720*...
The Egyptian Period...
1720-1290...
The Exodus and the Wilderness Sojourn...
1290-1250...
The Settlement...
1250-1020...
The United Monarchy...
1020-922...
The Divided Monarchy...
922-587...
The Kingdom of Israel...
922-721...
The Kingdom of Judah...
922-587...
The Babylonian Exile...
597/587-539/538...
The Postexilic Period...
The Persian Period...
539-331...
The Hellenistic Period...
331-168...
The Maccabean Period...
168-63...
The Roman Period...
63-400 A. The Exodus and the Wilderness Sojourn (Exodus 1–24 ; 32–34 ; Numbers 10–14 ) Israel is a product of the Sinaitic experience, begun when God called the “renegade” Moses to return to Egypt and deliver His people. ...
The Wilderness experience is set at forty years, the designation often used to indicate a generation
Tabernacle - ]'>[1] more correctly ‘ tent of meeting ,’ see below), is usually understood the elaborate portable sanctuary which Moses erected at Sinai, in accordance with Divine instructions, as the place of worship for the Hebrew tribes during and after the Wilderness wanderings. ]'>[2] ) devoted to the details of the fabric and furniture of the Tabernacle, and to the arrangements for its transport from station to station in the Wilderness, fall into two groups, viz. ...
In these and other OT passages the Wilderness sanctuary is denoted by at least a dozen different designations (see the list in Hastings’ DB Elijah - Elijah fled for his life to Beersheba of Judah, with one attendant, and leaving him there went a day's journey into the Wilderness. It was the same Wilderness which received Moses fleeing from Pharaoh, and Elijah now fleeing from Ahab, and lastly Paul escaping from the Judaic bondage of ritualism. The lonely Wilderness and awful rocks of Sinai were best fitted to draw the spirit off from the depressing influences of man's world and to raise it up to near communion with God. to the Wilderness of Damascus, and anoint Hazael king over Syria, Jehu
Olives, Mount of - In Psalm 42 he was beyond Jordan; in Psalm 63 he is in the Wilderness on the near side of Jordan (2 Samuel 15:28; 2 Samuel 17:21-22). , separating the city which lies on its western side from the Wilderness reaching from the eastern side of Olivet to the Dead Sea
Tabernacle - ...
The same tabernacle was in the Wilderness and in Shiloh; the external surroundings alone were changed (Psalms 78:60; Joshua 18:1; 1 Samuel 3:15). Moses' authorship of the Pentateuch is marked by the fact that all his directions concerning impurity through a dead body relate to a tent such as was in the Wilderness, nothing is said of a house; but in the case of leprosy a house is referred to (Numbers 19:11; Numbers 19:14; Numbers 19:21; Leviticus 13:47-59)
Mount of Olives - This fertility, though no doubt most constantly observed by the city dwellers, to whom the beautiful slopes, then as they do to-day, would appeal most refreshingly as viewed from the dirty, squalid streets, must also have held out to the tired and thirsty travellers, ascending the dry and dusty Wilderness from the Jordan to the city, an enchanting prospect of coolness and refreshment. ]'>[2] over the Wilderness of Judaea, it is caught by the still beauty of the Dead Sea lying nearly 4000 feet below, but in the clear atmosphere looking very near, while behind lies the long level line of the beautiful hills of Moab
Heaven - The miraculous manna came from God's heavenly storehouses for Israel in the Wilderness (Exodus 16:11-15 )
Sabbath - Some have maintained that the sanctification of the seventh day mentioned in Genesis 2:1-25 : is only there spoken by anticipation; and is to be understood of the sabbath afterwards enjoined in the Wilderness; and that the historian, writing after it was instituted, there gives the reason of its institution; and this is supposed to be the case, as it is never mentioned during the patriarchal age
Leviticus - The laws "which the Lord commanded Moses in Mount Sinai, in the day that he commanded the children of Israel to offer their oblations unto the Lord in the Wilderness of Sinai" (Leviticus 7:38)
Hosea - " But first must come her spiritual probation in the Wilderness of trial (Hosea 2:14) and her return to the Egypt of affliction (Hosea 8:13; Hosea 9:3), not literal "Egypt" (Hosea 11:5)
Travel (2) - Moses asked that the children of Israel should be permitted to go into the Wilderness a three days’ journey (Exodus 5:3), and in Genesis 31:23 it is said that Laban pursued after Jacob a seven days’ journey
Spirit - The Spirit was the agent of Jesus' miraculous conception (Matthew 1:18 ,Matthew 1:18,1:20 ), came down on Jesus at His baptism (Matthew 3:16 ), led Him into the Wilderness where He was tempted by the devil (Matthew 4:1 ), and enabled Him to heal diseases and cast out demons (Matthew 12:28 )
Selfishness - the parable of the Rich Fool, Luke 12:16-21, and the profound statement of the same truth in Christ’s Temptation in the Wilderness, Matthew 4:1-11, Luke 4:2-13)
Refuge - And on the other side, by Jericho eastward, there was Bezer in the Wilderness of Ramoth in Gilead, and Golan in Bashan
Arabia - It was the dim border region, not so wholly unproductive as to be incapable of supporting life, interposed between cultivation and the sheer Wilderness
Aaron - He was sent to meet Moses in the Wilderness, and together they performed signs before the people ( 1618538449_4 )
Feasts - And when the church was formed in the Wilderness, they had the several feasts as appointed in regular order
Church - ...
And it is blessed to see in the word of God how plainly and evidently this church, made up of Christ's members, and gathered out of the world's wide Wilderness, is distinguished so as to prove whose she is, and to whom she belongs
Good - Ṭôb often characterizes a statement as an important assertion for salvation and prosperity (real or imagined): “Is not this the word that we did tell thee in Egypt, saying, Let us alone, that we may serve the Egyptians? For it had been better for us to serve the Egyptians, than that we should die in the Wilderness” ( Way - 16:7, the word represents a pathway, road, or route: “And the angel of the Lord found her by a fountain of water in the Wilderness, by the fountain in the way to Shur
Feasts - The feast of tents, or tabernacle, on which all Israel were obliged to attend the temple, and to dwell eight days under tents of branches, in memory of their fathers dwelling forty years in tents, as travellers in the Wilderness
Lebanon - The conversion of the Gentile nations from the worship of idols and the bondage of corruption, to the service and enjoyment of the true God, is foretold in these beautiful and striking terms: "The Wilderness and the solitary place shall be glad for them: and the desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose
Type - During their wanderings in the Wilderness, God left not himself without witness, which should bear reference to the great scheme of the Gospel
Mount Mountain - Of the two passages in Hebrews, the first (Hebrews 8:5) affirms that the tabernacle constructed in the Wilderness was a mere copy and shadow of the heavenly things, made by Moses according to the pattern that was showed him in the Mount (cf
Locust - So justly have they been compared by the prophet to a great army; who further observes, that the land is as the Garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate Wilderness
Priest - (Leviticus 10:11 ; 33:10; 2 Chronicles 15:3 ; Ezekiel 44:23,24 ) During the journeys in the Wilderness it belonged to them to cover the ark and all the vessels of the sanctuary with a purple or scarlet cloth before the Levites might approach them
Mount Mountain - Of the two passages in Hebrews, the first (Hebrews 8:5) affirms that the tabernacle constructed in the Wilderness was a mere copy and shadow of the heavenly things, made by Moses according to the pattern that was showed him in the Mount (cf
Luke, Gospel of - It includes the preparatory preaching of John the Baptist (3:1-20), the baptism of Jesus (3:21-22), Jesus’ genealogy (3:23-38) and the devil’s temptation of Jesus in the Wilderness (4:1-13)
Asceticism (2) - (2) Secondly, there was a class of hermit ascetics who fled away from the allurements and temptations of society, and gave themselves up to a life of rigid self-discipline in the solitude of the Wilderness. This fast is not mentioned in the oldest authority (Mark 1:13); and at any rate it can scarcely have been a ceremonial observance of fasting, but was rather a necessity imposed on Jesus by His situation in the Wilderness. The phrase as applied to Jesus may, as in the case of John, mean merely that He ate no ordinary food, but supported life on such means of subsistence as the Wilderness afforded
Birds - ...
Quail The Hebrew term translated “quail” in the Old Testament is found only in connection with God's provision of food for Israel in the Wilderness (Exodus 16:13 ; Numbers 11:31-32 ; Psalm 105:40 ). Besides providing basic food needs (for example, the quails in the Wilderness), birds function as messengers
Reality - —Dazzling as the outbursts of such enthusiasm were, Jesus would never permit Himself to indulge in the luxury of self-gratulation, but, anxious to preserve the purity of His high spiritual aims, He deliberately seized the earliest opportunity of escaping to the mountains or the Wilderness for solitary communion with the Father (Matthew 14:23, Mark 3:13; Mark 6:31). The policy of concession was urged upon Him at various stages, from the Temptation in the Wilderness to the Agony in Gethsemane, but was always energetically repelled
Tombs - ...
Joshua was buried in his inheritance in Timnath Serah (Joshua 24:30); Samuel in his own house at Ramah (1 Samuel 25:1); Joab in his house in the Wilderness (1 Kings 2:34), i. ...
This explains the difficulty, "they buried Samuel in his house" (his tomb, not his dwelling: Isaiah 22:16, where "habitation" is explained by "sepulchre"): 1 Samuel 25:1; 1 Kings 2:34, "Joab was buried in his own house in the Wilderness"; 2 Chronicles 33:20, "they buried Manasseh in his own house," which is explained 2 Kings 21:18, "in the garden of his own house, in the garden of Uzza
Old Testament in the New Testament, the - ...
Matthew suggestively applies Hosea 11:1 to Jesus' return from Egypt (2:15), highlighting the parallel between Israel, who failed the temptations in the Wilderness, and Jesus, who came through them victoriously to form the heart of a renewed people of God. , Romans 3:24 ; 8:23 ; Ephesians 1:7,14 ), and finds in the Wilderness wanderings several typological foreshadowings of Christ and the church (1 Corinthians 10:1-13 )
Jews, Judaism - The tribal contingent led by Judah was first in the line of march through the Wilderness (Numbers 2:3-9 ), and Caleb of Judah joined Joshua, of the tribe of Ephraim, in bringing back a good report about the trip of the twelve spies into Canaan. The Negeb in the south and the Wilderness to the east, however, were marginal areas, not capable of sustaining agriculture
Aaron - ...
The Lord directed him to "go into the Wilderness to meet Moses" (Exodus 4:27). ), in the Wilderness of Paran, the rebellion took place of Korah and the Levites against Aaron's monopoly of the priesthood, and of Dathan, Abiram, and the Reubenites against Moses' authority as civil leader
Nabal - Had David been in the Wilderness of Paran at that sunny sheep-shearing immediately before Nabal's marriage, and had he asked for the crumbs that fell from the bridegroom's table, David would have been set in the place of honour at the smiling sheep-master's right hand. David and his six hundred men were lying in exile in the adjoining Wilderness
Arabia - "...
Tadmor or Palmyra "in the Wilderness" was on its N
Expiation, Propitiation - The high point of the sacrificial cult was the annual day of atonement when the sins of the people were laid on a scapegoat by the high priest and the sin-laden animal was then driven into the Wilderness to perish (Leviticus 16:1-34 )
Exodus - Others see it as an escape across a sprawling Wilderness and sweltering desert of a small mixed band of border slaves
Furniture - Some Israelites preferred to live in tents (Jeremiah 35:1 ), preserving the traditions of nomadic and Wilderness days
Reserve - His Wilderness temptation argues that (Matthew 4:8-9); it is implicit in His Beatitudes upon the meek and the persecuted, and in His teaching of the earthly rewards of hypocrisy (Matthew 6:2; Matthew 6:5; Matthew 6:16); and the deeper spirit of the OT, with its history of religious growth through the sufferings of the saints and the long-suffering patience of Jehovah’s love, could not be veiled from the insight of His meditation thereon in the years of His preparation
Cattle - The golden calves of the Wilderness were formed like an egel ( Exodus 32:4 ) as were the calves King Jeroboam placed in Bethel and Dan (1 Kings 12:28 )
Caesar - Luke wrote (Luke 3:1): ‘Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea,’ with the tetrarchs for Galilee, Ituraea, and Abilene, desiring to mark the period in the reign of Tiberius Caesar when ‘the word of God came to John in the Wilderness
Numbers as Symbols - The tribes were tested forty years in the Wilderness
Tabernacle, the - ...
The tabernacle was carried about during the forty years in the Wilderness (see CAMP), and when the Israelites entered the land it was apparently placed first at Gilgal
Fire - " (Genesis 15:17-18) In the church in the Wilderness, the going of the Lord before his people was under the form of a "pillar of fire
Stumbling - "...
In the grand description which Isaiah gives, Isaiah 63:13 , of God "with his glorious arm" leading his people through the Red Sea, it is said, "That led them through the deep, as a horse in the Wilderness, that they should not stumble;" that is, who preserved them from falling amidst the numerous inequalities in the bed of the sea, caused in some instances by deep cavities, and in others by abrupt intervening rocks
Chronology of the Biblical Period - Following the Wilderness-wandering period of forty years, the conquest of Canaan began about 1250 B
Joshua, the Book of - The promise, Joshua 1:2-5, is fulfilled (Joshua 2-12), the conquest of the land by Jehovah's mighty help, "from the Wilderness and this Lebanon unto
Joannes (520), Monk And Author - >From the Wilderness of Jordan and the New Laura, says Photius, John went to Antioch and its neighbourhood, the Elogium adding that this occurred when the Persians attacked the Romans because of the murder (Nov
Philip - For at the feeding of the Five Thousand in the Wilderness it was to Philip that Jesus addressed the question, ‘Whence are we to buy bread, that these may eat?’ (John 6:5)
Jesus Christ - John the Baptist appeared in the Wilderness near the Dead Sea preaching a message of baptism and repentance for the forgiveness of sins. ...
A time of severe testing in the Wilderness followed Jesus' baptism, in which Jesus' commitment to his task and understanding of his mission were resolved. Third, at the miraculous feeding of the five thousand and the subsequent sermon in Capernaum reflecting on that event, Jesus offers himself as the essence of the kingdom, as the bread come down from heaven and a new manna in a new Wilderness (Matthew 14:13-21 ; John 6:1-69 )
Economic Life - A desolate Wilderness region lies near the Dead Sea, while well-watered farm lands are found in the Shephelah plateau (between the coastal plain and the hill country) and in the Galilee area of northern Palestine. Under the influence of the desert winds and the barrier of the hill country, these amounts decrease to the south and east, with less than eight inches a year in the desert regions of the Judean Wilderness and the Negev
Leviticus, Theology of - A second and somewhat expanded description of the cloud and its function in leading Israel through the Wilderness appears in Numbers 9:15-23 . But in this case the atonement facilitated the removal of all the iniquities of all the people of the nation by sending them away from the tabernacle and the nation on the head of the goat into the Wilderness (vv
God, Names of - This overtone of presence is reiterated in the naming of the Wilderness structure as "tabernacle" (lit. From the Wilderness experience of bitter waters at Marah emerges another such "name": Yahweh Rophe ("The Lord who heals, " Exodus 15:26 ; cf
Edom - " "I laid the mountains of Esau and his heritage waste for the dragons of the Wilderness. Edom shall be a desolate Wilderness
Palestine - The eastern slopes form the barren and rugged “wilderness of Judea,” then fall abruptly to the floor of the Jordan Valley. The Wilderness is treeless and waterless
Moses - ]'>[4] ’s message, and demand permission from Pharaoh to sacrifice in the Wilderness
Palestine - This vast empire was the Promised Land; but Palestine was only a part of it, terminating in the north at the southern extremity of the Lebanon range, and in the south in the Wilderness of Paran, thus extending in all to about 144 miles in length
Ephraim (1) - " Ephraim's numbers in the Wilderness of Sinai census were 40,500, Manasseh's 32,200
Leper - Apion 1:26,32-34) that the king of Egypt drove out a multitude of impure people and lepers, Jews and Egyptians, the lepers among whom the king's soldiers wrapped in sheets of lead and drowned in the sea (compare Exodus 15:10), and that Moses a sacred scribe was the leader of the rest through the Wilderness into Judaea (compare the "mixed multitude," Exodus 12:38)
Holy Spirit, the - Israel "vexed God's Holy Spirit," though He had "put His Holy Spirit within" Moses, Israel's leader, and "the Spirit of Jehovah" had "caused Israel to rest" in the promised land after his Wilderness wanderings (Isaiah 63:11-12; Isaiah 63:14)
Nile - on both sides; this gives point to Israel's sneer, "because there were no graves in Egypt hast thou taken us away to die in the Wilderness?" (Exodus 14:11)
Salvation - The retelling of the Exodus event and of God's provision during the Wilderness years (Nehemiah 9:12-21 ; Psalm 78:14-29 ; Psalm 105:39-41 ; Psalm 114:8 ) provided a precedent for sharing other stories of national and even personal deliverance (Psalm 40:10 ; Romans 5:9-105 )
Punishment - ...
Sometimes punishment was meted out by God directly, as when fire and brimstone destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah (Genesis 19:24-25 ) or when the ground opened up to swallow those who rebelled in the Wilderness (Numbers 16:31-33 )
Manifestation - Not in the court as a king’s son, not in the Temple as the member of a priestly family, not in the Wilderness as the son of some aged solitary who had given up the world, but in the familiar commonplace surroundings of a peasant family, as the Son of Mary, the wife of a village carpenter
Self-Denial - 15) to 40 days, in imitation of our Lord’s fast in the Wilderness
Satan - Disbelief of God is what first Satan tempts men to (Genesis 3); "IF Thou be the Son of God" was the dart he aimed at Christ in the Wilderness temptation, and through human emissaries on the cross
Elijah - We now see Elijah in the Wilderness, a weak and timid man, weary of the conflict, occupied with himself rather than the Lord, and asking to be allowed to die
Firstborn - 112b), according to which the firstborn acted as officiating priests in the Wilderness until the erection of the tabernacle, when the office was given to the tribe of Levi (Jewish Encyc
Unitarians - Belsham goes on to state the Unitarian opinion to be, that Jesus was not conscious of his high character till after his baptism; that he afterward spent some time in the Wilderness, where he was invested with miraculous powers, and favoured with heavenly visions, like St
Commerce - The pillar of fire answered this purpose for the Israelites, when wandering in the Wilderness
Judah, Kingdom of - In spite of his pious efforts for the instruction of his people through the princes, Levites, and priests, in God's law (2 Chronicles 17), and for the administration of justice in the fear of Jehovah (2 Chronicles 19), his affinity with Ahab and Ahaziah nearly cost him his life at Ramoth Gilead (2 Chronicles 18), and again in the Wilderness of Edom (2 Kings 3:8-11), and caused the loss of his ships in Ezion Geber (2 Chronicles 20:36-37)
Elijah - We now see Elijah in the Wilderness, a weak and timid man, weary of the conflict, occupied with himself rather than the Lord, and asking to be allowed to die
Purification (2) - ...
The ceremony is akin to that of the laying of the sins of the people upon the head of the scapegoat, which was then sent away into the Wilderness (Leviticus 16:21)
Poet - The stories of John the Baptist’s preaching are full of the poetry of the desert, with its intense visual images of the vipers, the axe, the stones, the fires, and the fan of the Wilderness (Matthew 3:9 etc. The simple pathos of such a word as ‘When he thought thereon he wept’ (Mark 14:72), or the sudden reminder that Jesus in the Wilderness of His temptation had for His companions the wild beasts and the angels (Mark 1:13), are inimitable. His Good Shepherd is seen in such detail as only the pitiful heart could have suggested, ‘leaving the ninety and nine in the Wilderness’ (Luke 15:4, Matthew 18:12), and ‘going into the mountains’ in search of the wanderer
Number - There is no evidence of proficiency in arithmetic beyond the simplest operations, but we have examples of addition in connexion with the census in the Wilderness, the numbers of the separate tribes being given first and then the total ( Numbers 1:22 ff; Numbers 26:7 ff. , Isaac and Esau marry at the age of 40; there are 40 years of the wandering; Ezekiel’s 40 years’ captivity ( Ezekiel 29:11 ); 40 days was the period Moses spent in the Mount, Elijah and Christ fasted in the Wilderness, etc
Canaan, History And Religion of - Apparently, the Israelites had to offer in exchange a non-agrarian Wilderness God who had no record of success in agriculture!...
Old Testament Relationships The Israelites settling into Canaan were not impervious to their surroundings. During the period of Joshua and the Judges, a cultural struggle was waged which had to do more with the conflict between Wilderness (Israelite) and agrarian (Canaanite) cultural motifs than between Yahweh and Baal
Miracle - The Israelites' wandering in the Wilderness is punctuated by various miracles of preservation and judgmentrescue when it seems they will perish (by the ongoing provision of manna and quail chap. Feeding the five thousand recalls the manna in the Wilderness and sets up Jesus' bread of life discourse (John 6:1-15,25-59 )
Hebrews, Epistle to the - The saints are viewed as in the Wilderness on their way to the rest of God. " This 'if' introduces a reference to the forty years' wandering in the Wilderness, the argument being that the Hebrews at that time were not able to enter the rest of God because of not hearkening to the word — because of unbelief
Jacob - How dreadful did all Jacob's life of sin look at Luz! He had had his own thoughts about himself, and about his mother, and about his father, and about his brother all these last three days across the Wilderness. And Jacob's heart often trembled and often stood still all the way of the Wilderness from Haran to the Jabbok
Jonath - And thus it was that every report that came across the Wilderness of the increasing wickedness of Nineveh, Jonah rejoiced in that, and took comfort out of that both for himself and for his people. ' Week after week, Sabbath day after Sabbath day, alone with God and his own thoughts in that sacred Wilderness made Jonah another man
Philippians - Neither the grumbling so characteristic of Israel in the Wilderness nor the perversity of a world that does not know God should characterize the church
Chronology of the Old Testament - The 40 years of the Wilderness wandering, 40 years of peace in the time of several of the Judges, 40 years each for David and Solomon, are sufficiently marked
Cherub (1) - The four standards under which Israel encamped in the Wilderness were a lion for Judah on the E
Issachar - The tribe's number at Sinai was 54,400 (Numbers 1:29); at the close of the Wilderness march it reached 64,300, inferior to Judah and Dan alone
Voice (2) - Plutarch) between φωνή and λόγος, and this was afterwards transferred by the Fathers (Origen, Augustine) to John the Baptist and Christ, ‘the first claiming for himself no more than to be “the voice of one crying in the Wilderness” (John 1:23), the other emphatically declared to be the Word which was with God and was God (John 1:1)
Number Systems And Number Symbolism - Thus all the adults who had rebelled against God at Sinai died during the forty years of the Wilderness Wandering period
Genealogy - Israel's census was taken early in the Wilderness 40 years sojourn, the second month of the second year, "by their generations, after their families, by the house of their fathers" (Numbers 1:2; Numbers 1:20, etc
Poetry of the Hebrews - Thus: "The Wilderness and the solitary place shall be glad, and the desert shall rejoice and blossom as the rose. For in the Wilderness shall waters break out, and streams in the desert; and the parched ground shall become a pool, and the thirsty land, springs of water; in the habitation of dragons there shall be grass, with rushes and reeds," Isaiah 35:1 ; Isaiah 35:6-7
Deuteronomy, Theology of - The nation with whom the Sinai covenant had been made had died in the Wilderness and so was no longer on the scene (Numbers 14:26-35 ). Moreover, Deuteronomy is a greatly expanded and more detailed rendition of the covenant text, for the complexities of life and expectation in the land of promise raise issues that were of little or no consequence in the Wilderness of Sinai
Forgiveness - Unfortunately, rebellion in the Wilderness made the fulfillment of the promises given to the fathers impossible for the generation of the exodus ( Matthew 9:3-67 ; 32:11 ; Deuteronomy 1:35 ); not surprisingly, in Deuteronomy the next generation is advised as to the conditionality of its standing (6:18; 11:8-9; 30:19-20; cf. 16), while over the other he is to confess all the wickedness of the sons of Israel and all their rebelliontheir sinand release this second goat into the Wilderness
Eli - If John did not sometimes find himself hating Jesus in his heart till, in his agony, he threw himself over the bleeding rocks of the Wilderness, then all I can say is, that Elizabeth's sanctified son was not made of the same rotten stuff with you and me. And all the way up and all the way down again those fathers took their inquiring children by the hand and told them all about Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and Joseph, and Moses, and Aaron, and the exodus, and the Wilderness, and the conquest, and the yearly passover
Hosea - God lures His people into the Wilderness to open a door of hope (Hosea 2:14-15 )
Egypt - They must at the time have been still in the Wilderness
Temptation, Trial - In the day of temptation in the Wilderness the Israelites ‘tempted’ God (Hebrews 3:8 f
Elder - ...
With respect to the task of judging, elders were appointed in the Wilderness wanderings by Moses, with the cooperation of Israel, in order to help him judge the people (Exodus 18:13-26 ; Deuteronomy 1:13 )
Covenant - The act of making the New Covenant is compared with the transactions in the Wilderness ( Ezekiel 20:36 ff
God, Name of - The pillar of fire and cloud—the theophany of the divine presence, the Shekinah gloryappears physically and materially with Israel in the Wilderness and at her sanctuaries
Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ - It was he who made a covenant with the patriarchs, who appeared to Moses in the burning bush, who redeemed the Israelites from Egypt, who conducted them through the Wilderness, who gave the law at Sinai, and transacted the affairs of the ancient church
Bethesda - Now the sheep-gate is known to have been north of the Temple, and, as Bovet says, ‘the small cattle which entered Jerusalem came there certainly by the east; for it is on this side that the immense pastures of the Wilderness of Judaea lie
Dead - This proof of humiliation and submission Jehovah required of his offending people in the Wilderness: "Therefore, now put off thy ornaments from thee, that I may know what to do unto thee
Assyria - There are immense level tracts of the country, now almost a Wilderness, which bear marks of having been cultivated and thickly populated in early times
Psalms, Book of, - --The psalm of Moses Psal 90, which is in point of actual date the earliest, faithfully reflects the long, weary wanderings, the multiplied provocations and the consequent punishments of the Wilderness
Joab - Besides his usual residence at Jerusalem Joab had a house and barley fields in the country not far from the capital (2 Samuel 14:30; 1 Kings 2:34); and "he was buried in his own house in the Wilderness," probably that of Judah, as Joab's mother, David's step sister, would naturally dwell near Bethlehem
Miracles (2) - The Temptation of the Wilderness witnesses to what was characteristic of all His life, His constant refusal to use His power for personal ease, gratification, or convenience. The bare mention of a temptation in the Wilderness (with angels excluded
Moses - ) After an eventful journey to and fro in the Wilderness, we see them at length encamped in the plains of Moab, ready to cross over the Jordan into the Promised Land
Temptation - Luke’s statement that the tempter ‘departed from him for a season’ (Luke 4:13), and Jesus’ own reference to the temptations (Luke 22:28) which His disciples had endured with Him, show that the experience in the Wilderness was not solitary
Jehoshaphat - This want betrayed him into the alliance with Israel which on three occasions brought its penalty:...
(1) at Ramoth Gilead,...
(2) in the joint invasion of Moab (2 Kings 3) through the Edomite Wilderness, and...
(3) in respect to his naval enterprise for Ophir
Angels - ...
In the natural world angels minister, as in directing wind and flame (according to one translation of Psalms 104:4; Hebrews 1:7): "the angel of Jehovah" wrought in the plague on the Egyptian firstborn (Exodus 12:23; Hebrews 11:28), and on the rebels in the Wilderness (1 Corinthians 10:10), on Israel under David (2 Samuel 24:16; 1 Chronicles 21:16), on Sennacherib's army (2 Kings 19:35), on Herod (Acts 12:23)
Inn - Other Rabbinic terms, אשפיוא and אכסניא, are equivalents of hospitium and ξενία; and as these replace the OT terms מָלוֹן and נִּרוּת, they seem to indicate that something is intended quite different from the khan of the lonely road or the ‘lodging-place of wayfaring men in the Wilderness’ (Jeremiah 9:2)
Stone - It is a curious fact that they play a part in two out of the three acts that make up the drama of the Temptation in the Wilderness
Polytheism - A single family, or a small tribe, banished into a desert Wilderness (such as the whole earth must then have been) would find employment for all their time in providing the means of subsistence, and in defending themselves from beasts of prey
Paul's Visit to Jerusalem to See Peter - And-then imagine yourself apprehended of Christ Jesus, driven of the Spirit into the Wilderness of Arabia, and coming back with all your bones burning within you to preach Jesus Christ and Him crucified
Song of Solomon - The virgins ask who it is that comes up from the Wilderness leaning upon her beloved
Ave Maria - Finally, the reverent submission thus instilled into the minds of the disciples was exemplified in Christ Himself towards the will of God, as in the temptation in the Wilderness and in the Garden of Gethsemane
Gospel - ...
They relate the first appearance of Christ upon earth, his extraordinary and miraculous birth, the testimony borne to him by his forerunner, John the Baptist, the temptation in the Wilderness, the opening of his divine commission, the pure, the perfect, and sublime morality which he taught, especially in his inimitable sermon on the mount, the infinite superiority which he showed to every other moral teacher, both in the matter and manner of his discourses, more particularly by crushing vice in its very cradle, in the first risings of wicked desires and propensities in the heart, by giving a decided preference to the mild, gentle, passive, conciliating virtues, before that violent, vindictive, high-spirited, unforgiving temper, which has been always too much the favourite character of the world; by requiring us to forgive our very enemies, and to do good to them that hate us; by excluding from our devotions, our alms, and all our virtues, all regard to fame, reputation, and applause; by laying down two great general principles of morality, love to God, and love to mankind, and deducing from thence every other human duty; by conveying his instructions under the easy, familiar, and impressive form of parables; by expressing himself in a tone of dignity and authority unknown before; by exemplifying every virtue that he taught in his own unblemished and perfect life and conversation; and, above all, by adding those awful sanctions, which he alone, of all moral instructers, had the power to hold out, eternal rewards to the virtuous, and eternal punishments to the wicked
Nineveh - "The Lord will stretch out his hand against the north, and destroy Assyria, and will make Nineveh a desolation, and dry like a Wilderness
Temptation - Luke’s statement that the tempter ‘departed from him for a season’ (Luke 4:13), and Jesus’ own reference to the temptations (Luke 22:28) which His disciples had endured with Him, show that the experience in the Wilderness was not solitary
Moab - are the uncultivated pastures called midbar, "wilderness," facing Moab (Numbers 21:11)
Sea - There are three references to it in apostolic history: (a) Stephen in his memorable apology speaks of Moses thus: ‘This man led them forth, having wrought wonders and signs in Egypt, and in the Red sea, and in the Wilderness forty years’ (Acts 7:36)
Mercy, Merciful - God's mercy is never just a feeling but is expressed by His action: providing for Israel in the Wilderness (Nehemiah 9:19 ; Isaiah 49:10 ) and delivering her from enemies (Psalm 69:16-21 ; Psalm 79:8-11 ; Isaiah 30:18 ; Jeremiah 42:11-12 )
Holy Spirit - Genesis 1:2 ) which was to find its home in the Messiah ( John 1:33 ‘abiding’); in the power of which He was to ‘fulfil all righteousness’ ( Matthew 3:15 ); to be driven into the Wilderness for His fight with temptation ( House - After their Wilderness sojourn in tents they entered into possession of the Canaanite goodly cities
Elijah - As far as we know, only the last of these three commissions was executed by the prophet himself, who, after this sublime incident, made his headquarters in the Wilderness of Damascus ( Ki 19: 15); the other two were carried out either by Elisha or by members of the prophetic guilds ( 2 Kings 8:7 ff; 2 Kings 9:2 )
Atonement - ” After making these offerings, the nation's sins were symbolically laid on the scapegoat “Azazel” that was released into the Wilderness to die
Simeon - Simeon in the Wilderness marched south of the tabernacle, with Reuben and Gad, sons of Zilpah, maid of Leah, Simeon's mother
Red Sea - At the end of the second day's journey the camping place was at Etham, "in the edge of the Wilderness
David - Returning into Judah, he gathered a band of men, and maintained himself sometimes in the Wilderness, sometimes hiding in caves, sometimes occupying a town, as Keilah
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - An appointed man then took the scapegoat out into the Wilderness and released it; he had to wash his clothes and bathe before he could return to the camp. Either interpretation is possible, but if the goat was simply to be killed in the Wilderness one might have expected the text to use more conventional language
History - The Exodus Redemption The covenant with Israel that Moses mediated was founded on God's act in history in which He miraculously saved a slave people from the tyranny of the world's most powerful nation by leading them in the Exodus across the sea and into the Wilderness out of Egypt (Exodus 1:1-15:21 )
Daniel, the Book of - National miracles in Egypt, the Wilderness, and Canaan marked the beginning of the theocracy or outwardly manifested kingdom of God
Medicine - Thus at least four outbreaks took place among the Israelites during their wanderings in the Wilderness, viz
God - Moses experienced that presence on a Wilderness mountain (Exodus 3:1 ); Isaiah, in the Jerusalem Temple (Isaiah 6:1 ); and Paul, on an international highway (Acts 9:1 )
Angel - When the Wilderness tabernacle was being fashioned, God ordered two gold cherubim to be placed on top of the "mercy seat" or lid of the covenant ark to screen it
Census - The number then was 601,730, of 20 years and upward, of whom Joshua and Caleb alone were in the former census, the whole generation having died in the Wilderness
Kings, 1 And 2 - God had shown grace and mercy when they disobeyed in the Wilderness and during the lapses of the time of the judges
Providence of God - It included the call of Abraham (Genesis 12:1-3 ), the lives of the patriarchs (Genesis 17:3-8 ; 28:20-21 ; 49:22-25 ), bondage in Egypt (Genesis 15:13 ), redemption from Egypt (Deuteronomy 5:15 ), guidance and sustenance in the Wilderness (Exodus 13:21-22 ; Nehemiah 9:19 ; Psalm 105:39-41 ; 136:16 ), entrance into the land (Exodus 15:13-18 ; Deuteronomy 4:37-38 ; Amos 2:10 ), and the whole of their history (1 Chronicles 29:10-13 ; 2 Chronicles 32:22 ; Isaiah 43:1,15 ), including the judgments that fell upon them (Deuteronomy 32:15-26 ; Jeremiah 52:3 ; Malachi 3:5 )
Hardening - Pharaoh’s successive promises and refusals to let the Israelites go into the Wilderness are the outward signs of an inward vacillation under the alternate influences of insensate pride and abject fear
Atonement - All that was settled, but man had defiled himself in his journey through the Wilderness, and must be cleansed
Dwelling - After leaving Egypt, the Israelites inhabited tents in the Wilderness; so that it was not till they occupied Canaan that they were domiciled in houses properly so called
Ammonites - However, neither the one nor the other were to be admitted into the congregation to the tenth generation, because they did not come out to relieve them in the Wilderness, and were implicated in hiring Balaam to curse them
David - David must wander hither and thither, sometimes in the Wilderness, sometimes in the mountains, and sometimes in the caves: cf
Aaron - During the march of the children of Israel through the Wilderness, Aaron and his sons were appointed by God to exercise for ever the office of priests in the tabernacle
History - The Exodus Redemption The covenant with Israel that Moses mediated was founded on God's act in history in which He miraculously saved a slave people from the tyranny of the world's most powerful nation by leading them in the Exodus across the sea and into the Wilderness out of Egypt (Exodus 1:1-15:21 )
Egypt - and gavest him to be meat to the people inhabiting the Wilderness"; alluding to Pharaoh and his host overthrown in the Red Sea and their bodies cast on shore and affording rich spoil to Israel in the Wilderness
Israel - The Wilderness wandering . In the traditions this period is called the Wandering in the Wilderness, and it is said to have continued forty years
Holy Spirit (2) - It is the Spirit which sends Him out to the Wilderness, there to engage in conflict with the power of evil. the fast in the Wilderness, and John 4:31 ff
Dates (2) - The Baptism of Jesus might be settled, but not very approximately, by (1) the statement (Luke 3:23) that He was ὡσεὶ ἐτῶν τριάκοντα ἀρχόμενος (at the beginning of His ministry); (2) the date of the Baptist’s preaching, Luke 3:1 ‘Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar … the word of God came unto John the son of Zacharias in the Wilderness’; and (3) by the retort of the Jews in John 2:20 ‘Forty and six years was this temple in building. John 11:55 ‘And the Jews’ passover was at hand, and many went out of the country up to Jerusalem before the passover to purify themselves’), while His sojourn and fast in the Wilderness, of which St
Law - The same providence was displayed in the destruction of the Egyptians in the Red Sea; the travels of the thousands of Israel through the Wilderness, sustained by food from heaven; and in their subsequent settlement in the promised land by means entirely distinct from their own strength. ...
Thus, on a review of the topics we have discussed, it appears that the Jewish law promulgated the great principles of moral duty in the decalogue, with a solemnity suited to their high preeminence; that it enjoined love to God with the most unceasing solicitude, and love to our neighbour, as extensively and forcibly, as the peculiar design of the Jewish economy, and the peculiar character of the Jewish people, would permit; that it impressed the deepest conviction of God's requiring, not mere external observances, but heart-felt piety, well regulated desires, and active benevolence; that it taught sacrifice could not obtain pardon without repentance, or repentance without reformation and restitution; that it described circumcision itself, and, by consequence, every other legal rite, as designed to typify and inculcate internal holiness, which alone could render men acceptable to God; that it represented the love of God as designed to act as a practical principle, stimulating to the constant and sincere cultivation of purity, mercy, and truth; and that it enforced all these principles and precepts by sanctions the most likely to operate powerfully on minds unaccustomed to abstract speculations and remote views, even by temporal rewards and punishments; the assurance of which was confirmed from the immediate experience of similar rewards and punishments, dispensed to their enemies and to themselves by that supernatural Power which had delivered the Hebrew nation out of Egypt, conducted them through the Wilderness, planted them in the land of Canaan, regulated their government, distributed their possessions, and to which alone they could look to obtain new blessings, or secure those already enjoyed
Arabia - It consists almost entirely of one vast and lonesome Wilderness, a boundless level of sand, whose dry and burning surface denies existence to all but the Arab and his camel. The kingdom of Yemen has been successively subdued by the Abyssinians, the Persians, the Sultans of Egypt, and the Turks; the holy cities of Mecca and Medina have repeatedly bowed under a Scythian tyrant; and the Roman province of Arabia embraced the peculiar Wilderness in which Ishmael and his sons must have pitched their tents in the face of their brethren
Chronology of the New Testament - also we see traces of three periods in the ministry: (1) Mark 3:21 to Mark 4:30 , preaching in the Wilderness of Judæa and in Nazareth and Galilee, briefly recorded; (2) Mark 4:31 to Mark 9:50 , preaching in Galilee and the North, related at length; (3) 9:51-end, preaching in Central Palestine as far as Jerusalem
Transportation And Travel - After the completion of the Wilderness tabernacle, six covered wagons, each pulled by two oxen, were donated by the tribal leaders to the Levites to transport holy items along the line of march (Numbers 7:1-8 )
Luke, the Gospel According to - There are eight such instances: Luke 9:51-180 "Jesus praying, the heaven was opened" at His baptism; Luke 5:16, "in the Wilderness"; Luke 6:12, "continued all night in prayer to God before ordaining the twelve; Luke 9:18, as He was alone praying, His disciples were with Him, and He asked whom say the people that I am?" Luke 9:28 Luke 9:29, at the transfiguration, "He went up into a mountain to pray, and as He prayed the fashion of His countenance was altered;" Luke 11:1, "as He was praying in a certain place, when He ceased one of His disciples said (struck with the holy earnestness of His tone, words, and gestures), Lord teach us to pray" (Luke 22:32; Luke 22:41-42; Luke 22:44-46; Luke 23:46)
Egypt - ...
Geography Egypt lies at the northeastern corner of Africa, separated from Palestine by the Sinai Wilderness
Children (Sons) of God - God is the ‘Father’ of Israel, whom He begat by delivering them from Egypt, nourished in the Wilderness and established ( Deuteronomy 32:6 ; Deuteronomy 32:10-15 ; Deuteronomy 32:18 ); the people are His ‘sons and daughters,’ His ‘children’ ( Deuteronomy 32:19-20 )
Atonement - The sending of the second goat into the Wilderness with the sins laid on the top of its head emphasizes that sin will be removed from the person and the community "as far as the east is from the west" (Psalm 103:12 )
Rufus - His people are ‘the sheep of his pasture’ (Psalms 95:7; Psalms 100:3); He led them and fed them in the Wilderness as a shepherd (Psalms 77:20; Psalms 78:52; Psalms 80:1, Hosea 13:5 [10] ἐποίμαινόν σε ἐν τῇ ἐρήμῳ, Isaiah 63:11, Jeremiah 2:2 ‘thou wentest after me’—the shepherd leading); He will bring them back from the Dispersion (Ezekiel 34:12, cf
Bible, Texts And Versions - Others were found further south in the Wilderness of Judea and at Masada
Mission - And an angel, which could well be a Christophany, is sent by God to protect the people in their Wilderness wanderings and powerfully fight on their behalf in the conquest of Canaan (Exodus 23:20-33 ; 33:2 )
Tabernacle - Kiene, The Tabernacle of God in the Wilderness of Sinai ; M
Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times - Or in similar expression may look to the future of the recipients of the message, as when we read, "in later days you will return to the Lord your God and obey him" (Deuteronomy 4:30 ), or in the reminder to the hearers that God gave them manna in the Wilderness "to humble and to test you so that in the end it might go well with you" (Deuteronomy 8:16 )
Kenosis - In the Wilderness the temptation was possible, because He had to learn by experience the uses to which His miraculous powers might legitimately be put, and the proper means for the fulfilment of His vocation
Manliness - It is displayed in a different relation in the temptation in the Wilderness (Matthew 4:1-11, Luke 4:1-13), when neither the pangs of hunger nor the splendid prospect of worldwide dominion could overcome His resolution
Day of Atonement - The sins of the people were confessed over it, and it was led into the Wilderness
Paul in Arabia - "And thus it is that Holy Scripture is everywhere so full of apartness and aloneness and solitude: of lodges in the Wilderness, and of shut doors in the city: of early mornings, and late nights, and lonely night-watches: of Sabbath-days and holidays, and all such asylums of spiritual retreat
John the Baptist - "What went ye out into the Wilderness to see? A reed shaken with the wind!" He who said that never smiled, say some
Barzillai - For Barzillai said, The people is hungry, and weary, and thirsty in the Wilderness
Job - But what Satan could not do with all his Sabeans, and all his Chaldeans, and all his winds from the Wilderness to help him, that he soon did with the help of the debating approaches and the controversial assaults of Eliphaz, and Zophar, and Bildad, and Elihu
Elijah - Here he had visions of the glory and majesty of God, and conversed with him; and was commanded to return to the Wilderness of Damascus, to anoint Hazael king over Syria, and Jehu king over Israel, and to appoint Elisha his successor in the prophetic office
Rufus - His people are ‘the sheep of his pasture’ (Psalms 95:7; Psalms 100:3); He led them and fed them in the Wilderness as a shepherd (Psalms 77:20; Psalms 78:52; Psalms 80:1, Hosea 13:5 [10] ἐποίμαινόν σε ἐν τῇ ἐρήμῳ, Isaiah 63:11, Jeremiah 2:2 ‘thou wentest after me’—the shepherd leading); He will bring them back from the Dispersion (Ezekiel 34:12, cf
Expiation - On the day appointed for this general expiation, the priest is commanded to offer a bullock and a goat, as sin offerings, the one for himself, and the other for the people; and, having sprinkled the blood of these in due form before the mercy seat, to lead forth a second goat, denominated "the scape-goat;" and, after laying both his hands upon the head of the scapegoat, and confessing over him all the iniquities of the people, to put them upon the head of the goat, and to send the animal, thus bearing the sins of the people, away into the Wilderness; in this manner expressing, by an action which cannot be misunderstood, that the atonement, which, it is affirmed, was to be effected by the sacrifice of the sin offering, consisted in removing from the people their iniquities by this translation of them to the animal. For it is to be remarked, that the ceremony of the scape-goat is not a distinct one: it is a continuation of the process, and is evidently the concluding part and symbolical consummation of the sin offering: so that the transfer of the iniquities of the people upon the head of the scape-goat, and the bearing them away into the Wilderness, manifestly imply, that the atonement effected by the sacrifice of the sin offering consisted in the transfer and consequent removal of those iniquities
Palestine - South of that, through the pasture-lands about Bethlehem and the Wilderness of Judaea to the east of them, the land slopes down the rolling ‘South Country’ to the Arabian desert. Driven thence by the Spirit into the Wilderness, He fought His long fight with rival schemes of greatness, in the tract which Judaea thrusts high into the air from the depth of the Jordan Valley, and holds balanced upon the edge of cliffs
Baptism - ...
Their sin delayed the kingdom's manifestation, just as their unbelief in the Wilderness caused the 40 years of delay in entering into their inheritance in Canaan
Law - ) Scripture (Hebrews 4:2; Galatians 3:8) affirms the gospel was preached unto Abraham and to Israel in the Wilderness, as well as unto us
Baptize, Baptism - Jesus never returned to the secluded life of Nazareth, but was "driven" by the Spirit into the Wilderness, where his sonship was tested (Matthew 4:3,6 ) and his messianic work was prepared for
Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies - God provided the Israelites with "bread from heaven" during their Wilderness trek (Exodus 16:4 )
Gennesaret, Land of - But to-day, though its grapes, figs, olives, and walnuts have vanished, there are to be seen wild figs, oleanders, nubk trees, dwarf palms, papyrus plants, tall prickly centaureas: in summer, magnificent lilac-coloured convolvuli hanging in long festoons of blossom from the prickly shrubs; wild flowers of countless variety—tulips, anemones, irises; rice, wheat, the best and earliest melons and cucumbers in Palestine, sedges and rushes by the Lake; also thorns and thistles, especially in the central portion; in short, a tangle of luxuriant vegetation—a lovely floral carpet in February, a Wilderness of thorns in summer
the Ethiopian Eunuch - " If that accusation was laid against the readers of 1792, how much more have we laid ourselves open to it in 1899?...
But, all this time Philip is wandering up and down the Wilderness, thinking that he must have mistaken his own imagination for the voice of the Lord
Pentateuch - Moses, Israel's wise leader, would therefore be sure to commit to writing their laws, their wonderful antecedents and ancestry, and the Divine promises from the beginning connected with them, and their fulfillment in Egypt, in the Exodus, and in the Wilderness, in order to evoke their national spirit
Nicodemus - John had assailed the Temple representatives as a generation of vipers; and, while Jesus did not withdraw or apologise for one single syllable of His so-outspoken forerunner, He veiled His forerunner's strong language somewhat under the sacramental and evangelical typology of the serpent in the Wilderness
Job - Grotius thinks the events of the history are such as cannot be placed later than the sojourning of the Israelites in the Wilderness
Devil - Their home was the open field or Wilderness, where Azazel was supposed to dwell ( Leviticus 16:8 f
Joshua - Joshua and Caleb alone of all that generation above 20 years of age survived the 40 years' Wilderness wanderings that ensued, because "they wholly followed the Lord" (Numbers 32:11-12)
Unbelief - The meaning is, We Christians are favoured with the good news of the heavenly rest, as well as Israel in the Wilderness were with the good news of the earthly rest in Canaan; but the word which they heard concerning that rest did not profit them, because they did not believe it
Epiphanius, Bishop of Salamis - Theophilus of Alexandria having in 398 directed a paschal epistle against the Anthropomorphists, a wild army of monks from the Wilderness of Scete rushed into Alexandria, and so frightened the bishop that he thought his life depended on immediate concession
Exodus, Theology of - Geographically, the first part takes place in Egypt, while the second part begins and ends at Mount Sinai in the Wilderness
Humiliation of Christ - This was the meaning of His temptation in the Wilderness
Locust - John the Baptist, however, was of that class … he also dwelt in “the Wilderness” or desert, where such food was and is still used
Friendship - On the Mount of Transfiguration He admitted three of them to the vision of His glory (Matthew 17:1-13 ||): in Gethsemane He opened to the same three the door of His grief (Matthew 26:36-46): He told His disciples of the stern struggle with temptation in the Wilderness of Judaea
Angels - They ministered to our Lord on earth, in His human nature, after the Temptation in the Wilderness (Matthew 4:11, Mark 1:13, not in || Lk
Mephibosheth - And the king said to Ziba, What meanest thou by these? And Ziba said, The asses be for the king's household to ride on, and the bread and the summer fruits for the young men to eat, and the wine that such as be faint in the Wilderness may drink
Joseph - For that handful of silver the captain of Pharaoh's guard came into possession of all the splendid talents that lay hid in Joseph's greatly gifted mind, and all the magnificent moral character the first foundations of which had been laid in the pit in Dothan, and had been built up in God every step of the long Wilderness journey
Demoniac - And," they continue, "we think ourselves entitled to hold our religion as true, and to regard it as in the highest degree beneficial, though we must allow, at the same time, that the magicians of Egypt performed many wonderful works by the agency of wicked, spirits; that the sorceress of Endor was in league with the powers of darkness, and that Christ was literally tempted ‘of the devil,' in the Wilderness of Judea
Locust - John the Baptist, however, was of that class … he also dwelt in “the Wilderness” or desert, where such food was and is still used
Song of Songs - And there is no proof that the writer was specially connected with the North; if he mentions Lebanon, Amana, Shenir, Hermon, Tirzah, he also knows En-gedi, Heshbon, the Wilderness (of Judah), the ‘daughters of Jerusalem
Church - The sacrifices covered the whole ‘church in the Wilderness’ ( Acts 7:38 ), and each worshipper approached God in virtue of his inclusion in the holy people
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - ...
At the Jordan's end, the Dead Sea extends another 45 miles between high, rugged cliffs of Nubian sandstone and limestone between the arid Wilderness bordering the Judean watershed on the west and the Transjordanian plateau on the east
Tribes of Israel, the - During the journey through the Wilderness, the tribes of Reuben, Simeon, and Gad formed the second unit of the procession with the tribe of Reuben in the lead position (Numbers 10:17-20 )
Ministry - Wilderness
Demon, Demoniacal Possession, Demoniacs - Deuteronomy 32:10 ‘howling Wilderness’); also in unclean places, where their power is great, e
Paul as a Man of Prayer - And just because, with all that, we will not learn to pray, what a Wilderness we all make this life to be to ourselves, till we lie down weary of it, and die and are buried in it
Jeremiah - ...
'Oh that I had in the Wilderness a lodging-place of wayfaring men; that I might leave my people, and go from them!' The loneliness of a man's heart among his own people is one of the heaviest crosses that any man has to take up
Achan - And the swift and heavy fall of Joshua's hand on that one man must have still more consolidated Joshua's authority, and transformed his Wilderness hosts into true soldiers, where other soldiers would have been thieves and robbers
Jonathan - And David was in the Wilderness of Ziph in a wood
David - in His Services - And when I think also of the multitudes that no man can number to whom David's Psalms have been their constant song in the house of their pilgrimage; in the tabernacle as they fell for the first time hot from David's heart and harp; in the temple of Solomon his son with all the companies of singers and all their instruments of music; in the synagogues of the captivity; in the Wilderness as the captives returned to the New Jerusalem; in the New Jerusalem every Sabbath-day and every feast-day; in the upper room, both before and after supper; in Paul's prison at Philippi; in the catacombs; in Christian churches past number; in religious houses all over Christendom at all hours of the day and the night; in deserts, in mountains, in dens and caves of the earth; in our churches; in our Sabbath-schools; in our families morning and evening; in our sickrooms; on our death-beds; and in the night-watches when the disciples of Christ watch and pray lest they enter into temptation
Circumcision - But Moses, while in Midian with Jethro his father-in-law, did not circumcise his two sons born in that country; and during the journey of the Israelites in the Wilderness, their children were not circumcised
Necessity - Almost at the beginning of it He declares to Nicodemus that His purpose to give eternal life to believers can be achieved only by His death: ‘As Moses lifted up the serpent in the Wilderness, even so must (δεῖ) the Son of Man be lifted up’ (John 3:14)
Pre-Existence of Christ - In speaking of the sacraments of the Wilderness (1 Corinthians 10:1-4) St
Dead Sea Scrolls - Acts 9:2 ), the use of Isaiah 40:3 to justify a movement in the Wilderness (cf
David - ...
Saul again went forth (1 Samuel 26 ) in pursuit of David, who had hid himself "in the hill Hachilah, which is before Jeshimon," in the Wilderness of Ziph, and was a second time spared through his forbearance
Temple of Jerusalem - Solomon's Temple may not have actually been the first temple which housed the ark of the covenant, since there was a house of Yahweh, also called a temple, at Shiloh (1Samuel 1:7,1Samuel 1:9,1 Samuel 1:24 ; 1 Samuel 3:3 ) but in 1 Samuel 2:22 (NIV) it is called “tent of meeting,” whether the Wilderness tabernacle or not
Leprosy - (1) The incident of the man whom Jesus touched, with the words, ‘I will, be thou clean,’ and whose grateful excess of zeal prevented Jesus from entering that ‘certain city,’ and drove Him to seek seclusion in the Wilderness (Matthew 8:2 || Mark 1:42 || Luke 5:12)
David - In the meantime Saul’s spies discover the whereabouts of the fugitive, and David, fearing that the men of Keilah will deliver him up to his enemy, escapes with his followers to the hill-country in the Wilderness of Ziph
Solomon - )...
Among his buildings were the famous Tadmor or Palmyra in the Wilderness, to carry on commerce with inland Asia, and store cities in Hamath; Bethhoron, the Upper and the Nether, on the border toward Philistia and Egypt; Hazor and Megiddo, guarding the plain of Esdraelon; Baalath or Baalbek, etc
Balaam - And for his so late but so successful counsel Balaam got his house filled with Balak's silver and gold when Israel sinned and fell in the Wilderness
John the Baptist - That by Isaiah is: "The voice of him that crieth in the Wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight in the desert a highway for our God," Isaiah 40:3
Sabbath - The first Sabbath kept in the Wilderness was calculated from the first day in which the manna fell; and with no apparent reference to the creation of the world
Antiochus - It was on this occasion that Judas Maccabaeus retired into the Wilderness with his father and his brethren, Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - Two goats were brought, and lots were cast; one goat was offered as a sin-offering, and the other was sent away into the Wilderness
Sacraments - Paul, when he conjoins the type of Baptism ‘in the cloud and in the sea’ with the type of the Eucharist in the ‘spiritual meat’ and ‘spiritual drink’ of the Wilderness (1 Corinthians 10:1-4), scarcely admits of question
Food - ...
Next to its fish, the Hebrews in the Wilderness looked back wistfully on the ‘cucumbers, melons, leeks, onions, and garlick’ of Egypt (Numbers 11:5 ), all of them subsequently cultivated by them in Palestine
Holy Spirit - Isaiah 63:10-11 contains the only other Old Testament use of "Holy Spirit, " harking back to God's guidance of Moses and the Wilderness wanderers
Character - The journey of Israel to the Promised Land became the framework of the Christian conception of life—a pilgrimage through a Wilderness
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - Like Moses, he took counsel of God, and retired into the Wilderness, but, unlike Moses, he married no wife, and had virtue only for his spouse
Passover - This was needed as the Passover had only once been kept in the Wilderness (Numbers 9), and for 38 years had been intermitted
Assumption of Moses - -These are confined to five passages: (a) Stephen’s speech in Acts 7:36, where the words ‘in Egypt and in the Red Sea and in the Wilderness forty years’ are the same as in Ass
Adam - And then, by the time he takes his pen in hand to tell us all this, Moses himself has been banished out of Canaan for his sin, and is waiting for death in the Wilderness
Priests And Levites - This included especially the work of fetching and carrying, as they were believed to have carried the Tabernacle and its furniture in the Wilderness
Law of Moses - (a) Local judges (generally Levites as more skilled in the law) appointed, for ordinary matters, probably by the people with approbation of the supreme authority (as of Moses in the Wilderness), ( Exodus 18:25 ; 1:15-18) through all the land
Create, Creation - He will lead the erstwhile captives carefully through the Wilderness between Babylon and Judah and provide for their every need along the way and in their restored land
Amos, Theology of - It is he who elected or chose the people of Israel for a special covenant relationship with himself, who rescued them from slavery in Egypt, and who led them through the blistering Wilderness to their territorial inheritance, which he wrested from the Amorites (2:9-10; 3:1-2; cf
Hell - ...
‘Their names,’ says the seer, ‘shall be blotted out of the book of life, and out of the holy books, and their seed shall be destroyed for ever, and their spirits shall be slain, and they shall cry and make lamentation in a place that is a chaotic Wilderness, and in the fire shall they burn; for there is no earth there
Prophecy - We see the posterity of Ishmael, 'multiplied exceedingly, ' and become 'a great nation, ' in the Arabians; yet living like 'wild men, ' and shifting from place to place in the Wilderness; 'their hand against every man, and every man's hand against them;' and still dwelling an independent and free people, 'in the presence of all their brethren, ' and in the presence of all their enemies
Animals - ...
On this Sir Thomas Browne notes: ‘a coarse garment, a cilicious or sackcloth garment, suitable to the austerity of his life—the severity of his doctrine, repentance—and the place thereof, the Wilderness—his food and diet, locusts and wild honey
Abstinence - As Jesus fasted in the Wilderness (Matthew 4:1-11), or at the well forgot His hunger (John 4:31 f
Hell - ...
‘Their names,’ says the seer, ‘shall be blotted out of the book of life, and out of the holy books, and their seed shall be destroyed for ever, and their spirits shall be slain, and they shall cry and make lamentation in a place that is a chaotic Wilderness, and in the fire shall they burn; for there is no earth there
Proverbs - Galilee was celebrated for its linen manufacture, and the flocks which pastured on the Wilderness of Judaea furnished material for a thriving trade in woollen goods
Noah - The "40 days and 40 nights of rain" were part of the 150; forty is the number significant of judgment and affliction; as Israel's 40 years in the Wilderness; Moses', Elijah's, and our Lord's 40 days of foodlessness
Judges (1) - Thereupon the Israelites assemble, and resolve to punish the Benjamites; as a result, the entire tribe, with the exception of six hundred men who manage to escape to the Wilderness, is annihilated
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - He had led and preserved them through the Wilderness period, and then renewed the covenant on the plains of Moab, at the point of transition between the leadership of Moses and that of Joshua, just prior to Israel's entrance into the land of Canaan
God - ...
Wilderness Wanderings and Conquest
Hebrews Epistle to the - The story of those who fell of old in the Wilderness is a solemn warning of the fatal consequences of apostasy
Terah - Till Lot only put words upon the terrible darkness that fell on Abram's overwhelmed heart when he upbraided Abram, and said, Would God we also had died in Haran! Would God we had listened to our kinsmen in Chaldea when they dissuaded us from this folly and from this Wilderness! The hands of the pitiful women have sodden their own children; they that did feed delicately are desolate in the streets; they that were brought up in scarlet embrace the dung-hill
Work - If the nation does not cooperate with God in taking the land, death in the Wilderness is the result (Numbers 13-14 )
Psalms - the church's pilgrim ascents below, "coming up from the Wilderness, leaning upon her Beloved," and her everlasting hallelujahs, in Book V
Apocalyptic Literature - He commands Raphael to bind Azazel and throw him into a pit in the Wilderness, where he shall remain until the day of the great judgment, and then be cast into the fire
Offering - ...
In order to provide for the materials necessary for the construction of the Wilderness tabernacle, Moses was instructed to receive an “offering” or terûmâh
Canaan - "Tadmore in the Wilderness," (Palmyra,) which the Jewish monarch is stated to have built, (that is, either founded or fortified,) is considerably to the north-east of Damascus, being only a day's journey from the Euphrates; and Hamath, the Epiphania of the Greeks, (still called Hamah,) in the territory belonging, to which city Solomon had several "store cities," is seated on the Orontes, in latitude 34...
45' N
Revelation, the - The woman flees into the Wilderness, and is nourished by God 1,260 days — last half-week of Daniel
Sinlessness - The scenes in the Wilderness, in Gethsemane, and on the Cross, when He is represented as in conflict with the powers of evil, were not less severe than the similar experiences of ordinary mortals, but far more so
Gospels - , we do faintly trace three stages in the Wilderness of Galilee (a brief record), in Galilee (full description), and in Central Palestine as far as Jerusalem and on the other side of Jordan
Psalms, Theology of - Traditions associated with the patriarchs, the exodus, the Wilderness wanderings, the conquest, the period of the judges, the career of David, and the construction of the temple are recalled
Eucharist - He holds up before them the example of the Israelites, who, though they were ‘baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea,’ and ate the same spiritual food and drank the same spiritual drink, yet died in the Wilderness because of their sins (1 Corinthians 10:1-6)
Joram - Josephus also uses the expressions ‘wide Wilderness’ and ‘the great plain’ (BJ iii
Mental Characteristics - The narrative of the Temptation in the Wilderness, which must have been derived from the Lord Himself, can hardly be paralleled in its dauntless determination, except indeed by the narrative of how He followed out in His work the ideal here resolutely formed, and never faltered in following it still when it led Him through the valley of the shadow of death
John, Theology of - The Son of Man is to be ‘lifted up’ like the serpent in the Wilderness ( John 3:14 ), and will draw all men unto Himself ( John 12:32 )
Jews - In the Wilderness God delivered them the law, and confirmed the authority of Moses
Messiah - This day was a solemn day of fasting among the Jews, formerly in memory of the burning of the temple by the Chaldees: several other sad things happened in this month, as the Jews observe; that then, and upon the same day, the second temple was destroyed; and that in this month it was decreed in the Wilderness that the Israelites should not enter into Canaan, &c
Millenarians - Thus Isaiah, after having described Christ's kingdom which was set up at his first coming, and then the succeeding desolate state of the Jews, represents this as continuing "until the Spirit be poured upon us from on high, and the Wilderness be a fruitful field, and the fruitful field be counted for a forest,"...
Isaiah 32:15-19
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - In John’s Gospel there is a reference (2 Chronicles 3:14) to the brazen serpent raised by Moses in the Wilderness, and in His controversy with the Sadducees our Lord shows His acquaintance with the passage in the life of Moses that relates the revelation at the burning bush (Mark 12:26)
Prophet - But John, realizing himself to be only a forerunner, and wishing to turn the thoughts of the people from himself to Jesus, refused to be anything save an impersonal voice crying in the Wilderness
Enoch Book of - 1-6, 25); Leviathan a female monster, and Behemoth a male, parted, one in the abysses of the ocean, the other in the Wilderness to the east of the garden (Eden) where Enoch was taken up; they shall feed … (presumably till given as food to the elect as in 2 Bar
Babylon - " "It is impossible," adds Major Keppel, "to behold this scene and not to be reminded how exactly the predictions of Isaiah and Jeremiah have been fulfilled, even in the appearance Babylon was doomed to present, that ‘she should never be inhabited;' that ‘the Arabian should not pitch his tent there;' that she should ‘become heaps;' that her cities should be ‘a desolation, a dry land, and a Wilderness
Jesus Christ - Not only did the paschal lamb, which was to be killed every year in all the families of Israel, which was to be taken out of the flock, to be without blemish, to be eaten with bitter herbs, to have its blood sprinkled, and to be kept whole that not a bone of it should be broken; not only did the offering up of Isaac, and the lifting up of the brazen serpent in the Wilderness, by looking upon which the people were healed, and many ritual observances of the Jews, prefigure the manner of Christ's death, and the sacrifice which was to be made for sin; but many express declarations abound in the prophecies, that Christ was indeed to suffer
Originality - ...
(2) Seydel finds the 40 days’ fast of Jesus in the Wilderness inexplicable in view of the contrast He Himself drew between His own conduct and the asceticism practised by John the Baptist, and suggests that this incident is borrowed from the example of Buddha