What does Widow mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
χήρα a widow. 10
אַלְמָנָֽה widow. 5
אַלְמָנָ֖ה widow. 4
אַלְמָנָ֣ה widow. 4
אַלְמָנָ֔ה widow. 3
אֵ֖שֶׁת woman 3
χήραν a widow. 3
וְלָאַלְמָנָ֖ה widow. 3
אֵֽשֶׁת־ woman 2
וְאַלְמָנָה֙ widow. 2
וְהָאַלְמָנָ֖ה widow. 2
וְאַלְמָנָ֑ה widow. 2
אַלְמָנָ֥ה widow. 2
וְהָֽאַלְמָנָה֙ widow. 2
וְאַלְמָנָ֧ה widow. 1
יְבִמְתּ֣וֹ sister-in-law 1
יְבִמְתּ֨וֹ sister-in-law 1
יְבִמְתּ֑וֹ sister-in-law 1
אֵ֨שֶׁת woman 1
הָאַלְמָנָ֞ה widow. 1
אַלְמָנָ֨ה widow. 1
אַלְמָנָ֤ה widow. 1
אַ֭לְמָנָה widow. 1
וְאַלְמָנָ֣ה widow. 1
! כְּאַלְמָנָ֑ה widow. 1
וְ֝אַלְמָנָ֗ה widow. 1
וְאַלְמָנָ֤ה widow. 1
וְאַלְמָנָ֖ה widow. 1
וְלָאַלְמָנָ֔ה widow. 1
וְלָֽאַלְמָנָ֔ה widow. 1
אַנְחֶֽנָּה to lead 1

Definitions Related to Widow

G5503


   1 a Widow.
   2 metaph.
   a city stripped of its inhabitants and riches is represented under the figure of a Widow.
   

H490


   1 Widow.
   

H802


   1 woman, wife, female.
      1a woman (opposite of man).
      1b wife (woman married to a man).
      1c female (of animals).
      1d each, every (pronoun).
      

H2994


   1 sister-in-law, brother’s wife, brother’s Widow.
   

H5148


   1 to lead, guide.
      1a (Qal) to lead, bring.
      1b (Hiphil) to lead, guide.
      

Frequency of Widow (original languages)

Frequency of Widow (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Widow-Wail
(n.) A low, narrowleaved evergreen shrub (Cneorum tricoccon) found in Southern Europe.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Widow
WIDOW . Widows from their poverty and unprotectedness, are regarded in OT as under the special guardianship of God ( Psalms 68:6 ; Psalms 146:9 , Proverbs 15:25 , Deuteronomy 10:18 , Jeremiah 49:11 ); and consequently due regard for their wants was looked upon as a mark of true religion, ensuring a blessing on those who showed it ( Job 29:13 ; Job 31:16 , Isaiah 1:17 , Jeremiah 7:6-7 ; Jeremiah 22:3-4 ); while neglect of, cruelty or injustice towards them were considered marks of wickedness meriting punishment from God ( Job 22:9-10 ; Job 24:20-21 , Psalms 94:6 , Isaiah 1:23 ; Isaiah 10:2 , Zechariah 7:10 ; Zechariah 7:14 , Malachi 3:5 ). The Book of Deut. is especially rich in such counsels, insisting that widows be granted full justice ( Deuteronomy 24:17 ; Deuteronomy 27:19 ), that they be received as guests at sacrificial meals ( Deuteronomy 14:29 , Deuteronomy 16:11 ; Deuteronomy 16:14 , Deuteronomy 26:12 f.), and that they be suffered to glean unmolested in field, oliveyard, and vineyard ( Deuteronomy 24:19 f.). See, further, Inheritance, i. 2 ( c ); Marriage, 6.
The earliest mention of widows in the history of the Christian Church is found in Acts 6:1 , where the Grecian Jews murmured ‘against the Hebrews because their widows were neglected’ in the daily distribution of alms or food. In course of time these pensioners became an excessive burden on the finances of the Church. We thus find St. Paul dealing with the matter in 1 Timothy 5:3-16 , where he charges relatives and Christian friends to relieve those widows with whom they are personally connected ( 1 Timothy 5:4 ; 1 Timothy 5:8 ; 1 Timothy 5:15 ), so that the Church might be the more able to relieve those who were ‘widows indeed’ ( i.e. widows in actual poverty and without anyone responsible for their support) ( 1 Timothy 5:3 ; 1 Timothy 5:5 ; 1 Timothy 5:16 ). He further directs that ‘none be enrolled as widows’ except those who were sixty years of age, of unimpeachable character, and full of good works; and he adds that ‘the younger widows’ should be ‘refused’ ( i.e. not enrolled); for experience had shown that they ‘waxed wanton against Christ’ and, re-marrying, ‘rejected their first faith.’ Since it could not have been the Apostle’s wish that only widows over sixty should receive pecuniary help from the Church (for many young widows might be in great poverty), and since he could not describe the re-marriage of such a widow-pensioner as a rejection of her faith, it follows that the list of widows, from which the younger widows were to be excluded, was not the list of those who were in receipt of Church relief, but rather a list of those, from among the pensioner-widows, who were considered suitable by age and character to engage officially in Church work. Therefore we may see in this passage a proof of the existence thus early in the history of the Church of that ecclesiastical order of ‘Widows’ which we find mentioned frequently in post-Apostolic times.
Charles T. P. Grierson.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Widow
Under the Mosaic dispensation no legal provision was made for the maintenance of widows. They were left dependent partly on the affection of relations, more especially of the eldest son, whose birthright, or extra share of the property, imposed such a duty upon him, and partly on the privileges accorded to other distressed classes, such as a participation in the triennial third tithe, (14:29; 26:12) in leasing, (24:19-21) and in religious feasts. (16:11,14) With regard to the remarriage of widows, the only restriction imposed by the Mosaic law had reference to the contingency of one being left childless in which case the brother of the deceased husband had a right to marry the widow. (25:5,6; Matthew 22:23-30 ) In the apostolic Church the widows were sustained at the public expense, the relief being daily administered in kind, under the superintendence of officers appointed for this special purpose, (Acts 6:1-6 ) Particular directions are given by St.Paul as to the class of persons entitled to such public maintenance. (1 Timothy 5:3-16 ) Out of the body of such widows a certain number were to be enrolled, the qualifications for such enrollment being that they were not under sixty years of age; that they had been "the wife of one man," probably meaning but once married ; and that they had led useful and charitable lives. vs. ( 1 Timothy 5:9,10 ) We are not disposed to identify the widows of the Bible either with the deaconesses or with the presbutides Of the early Church. The order of widows existed as a separate institution, contemporaneously with these offices, apparently for the same eleemosynary purpose for which it was originally instituted.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Widow
Cared for specially by the law, in the triennial tithes, etc. Deuteronomy 19:29; Deuteronomy 24:17; Deuteronomy 26:12; Deuteronomy 27:19; Exodus 22:22; Job 24:3; Job 29:13; Isaiah 1:17; Matthew 23:14. God is "judge of the widows" (Psalms 68:5; Psalms 146:9), therefore, the judge or righteous vindicator of His church, and of Israel especially (Isaiah 54), widowed by His physical absence, against her adversary Satan (Luke 18:1-7). For pious widows, see Anna, and the one who gave her all to the Lord's treasury (Luke 2:36-37; Luke 20:47; Luke 21:1-4). (See ANNA.) Three classes of widows are distinguished in 1 Timothy 5
(1) The ordinary widow.
(2) The widow indeed, i.e. destitute, and therefore to be relieved by the church, not having younger relatives, whose duty it is to relieve them (let them, the children or descendants, learn first, before calling the church to support them; to show reverent dutifulness toward their own elder destitute female relatives).
(3) The presbyteral widow (1 Timothy 5:9-11). Let none be enrolled as a presbyteral widow who is less than 60 years old. Not deaconesses, who were chosen at a younger age (40 was fixed as the limit at the council of Chalcedon) and who had virgins (latterly called widows) as well as widows among them, compare Dorcas (Acts 9:41). As expediency required presbyters to be but once married (1 Timothy 3:2; Titus 1:6), so also presbyteresses. (The feeling among Jews and Gentiles being against second marriages, the desire for conciliation in matters indifferent, where no principle was compromised, accounts for this rule in the case of bishops, deacons, and presbyteresses, whose aim was to be all things to all men that by all means they might save some: 1 Corinthians 9:22; 1 Corinthians 10:33.) The reference in 1 Timothy 5:9 cannot, as in 1 Timothy 5:3, be to providing church maintenance, for then the restriction to widows above 60 would be harsh, as many might need help at an earlier age.
So the rules that she should not have been twice married, and that she must have brought up children and lodged strangers, would be strange, if the reference were to eligibility for church alms. Tertullian ("De velandis Virginibus," 9), Hermas (Shepherd 1:2), and Chrysostom (Horn. 31) mention an order of ecclesiastical widows, not less than 60 years old, who ministered to widows and orphans. Their experimental knowledge of the trials of the bereaved adapted them for such an office and for general supervision of their sex. Age was a requisite, as in presbyters, to adapt them for influencing younger women; they were supported by the church, but were not the only widows so supported (1 Timothy 5:3-4).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Widow
In Bible times widows usually found life difficult, partly because they were defenceless against people able to take advantage of them. Without anyone to support and protect them, many widows became lonely and poor. The law of Moses recognized that widows needed special protection against social injustice (Exodus 2:22; Deuteronomy 24:17; Jeremiah 7:5-7; Mark 12:40-44; Luke 18:1-5).
Throughout the Bible God shows a special concern for widows and he expects people in general to have similar concern (Deuteronomy 10:18; Deuteronomy 14:29; Deuteronomy 24:19; Psalms 68:5; Psalms 146:9; Proverbs 15:25; Isaiah 1:17; James 1:27). Christians in the Jerusalem church showed such concern when they organized a daily distribution of food to the widows among them (Acts 6:1-3). Later, other churches followed their example, though some families abused the system by using the church’s welfare program as a way of avoiding their responsibilities. Paul therefore suggested that the church support only those widows who were over sixty years of age and who had no other means of support. Widows in Christian families were to be supported by those families (1 Timothy 5:3-16).
Paul reminded Christians that a widow in the church was free to remarry, provided she married another Christian and provided the circumstances were favourable (Romans 7:2-3; 1 Corinthians 7:26-27; 1 Corinthians 7:39-40). In the case of younger widows, he advised in favour of remarriage (1 Timothy 5:11-15).
A custom in Old Testament times was that when a man died having no children, his brother had the duty of producing a son through the widow. Legally this child was considered to be the son of the dead man and so carried on his family name and inheritance. If the living brother refused to do his duty, he was publicly disgraced for allowing his brother’s family name to die out (Genesis 38:8-10; Deuteronomy 25:5-10; Ruth 1:1-14; Ruth 3; Ruth 4:1-12; Matthew 22:24).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Widow
WIDOW (χήρα).—Four widows are referred to in the Gospels.
1. Anna of the tribe of Asher (Luke 2:36-38), a devout woman described as a prophetess, who had been a widow eighty-four years, and who constantly frequented the Temple, passing her time in fastings and prayers, and who, coming up at the moment of the presentation of the infant Saviour, moved by the spirit of prophecy, spake of Him to those present who were expecting the redemption of Jerusalem. The Lewis MS of the Syriac Gospels says that Anna lived only seven days with her husband, an alteration not improbably made by some scribe with the object of reducing Anna’s age to a less unusual limit. See also art. Anna.
2. The widow of Sarepta or Zarephath, referred to by our Lord in the synagogue at Nazareth (Luke 4:25-26) as an instance of a Gentile who had entertained Elijah, and had received a blessing by his means. It has been suggested by A. Meyer (Jesu Muttersprache, iv. 8) that the word ‘widow’ here may have been ‘Gentile’ in some Aramaic original, ܐܪܡܢܬܐ (armaitha), the feminine of ‘Gentile’ or ‘Syrian ‘having been confused with ܐܪܡܠܬܐ (armalta), ‘a widow.’ If this were so, then our Lord’s reference to Naaman the Syrian would be balanced by a reference to ‘a woman who was a Syrian’ or ‘Gentile.’
3. The widow of Nain (Luke 7:11-17), a little town situated a few miles to the south of Mount Tabor in Galilee, to whom our Lord uttered His compassionate ‘Weep not’ just before restoring her only son to life. The people who witnessed the miracle exclaimed that a great prophet had risen up among them, probably with reference to Elijah or Elisha, the former of whom, like Christ, had raised a widow’s son.
4. The poor widow who cast her two mites into the treasury (Mark 12:41-44, Luke 21:1-4), whom Christ commended. It should not be forgotten in practical applications of this incident and of our Lord’s praise of the widow, that she cast in ‘all her living,’ that is to say, her day’s entire income, or ‘all that she had to live upon until more should be earned’ (Swete), and that consequently the phrase ‘widow’s mite’ is incorrectly applied to small sums deducted, and more or less easily spared, from a daily income.
In addition to these four widows, who were actual persons, a widow is a character in one of our Lord’s parables (Luke 18:1-8), who, having no power to enforce the justice she claims, obtains it at length by her importunity; and from this our Lord draws His a fortiori conclusion that God will hear and answer those who cry day and night unto Him. Further, widows are referred to by Christ (Matthew 23:14 [1], Mark 12:40, Luke 20:47) as being often cruelly oppressed and defrauded by the Pharisees of His day.
It may be regarded as certain that our Lord’s mother was a widow during the time of His ministry, hence His recommendation of her, just before His death, to the beloved disciple (John 19:26 f.).
The honourable and important position which widows occupied in the early Church is entirely in harmony with the respectful and sympathetic tone in which they are referred to in the above places of the Gospels.
In the Lewis MS of the Syriac Gospels the Syrophœnician woman (Mark 7:26) is described as a widow. This may be another instance of the possible confusion of ‘widow’ and ‘Gentile’ alluded to above.
Albert Bonus.
Webster's Dictionary - Chuck-Will's-Widow
(n.) A species of goatsucker (Antrostomus Carolinensis), of the southern United States; - so called from its note.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Widow
Lamentations 1:1 (b) By this we understand the condition of Jerusalem and Israel who had turned their backs on GOD (the husband), and sought other lovers, idolatrous nations, upon whom they lavished their gifts and affections.
Revelation 18:7 (b) This is Babylon. It is a term which is used to describe the great unrighteous religious world, which boasts that she has sufficient prosperity and power to take care of herself. Because of this she denies that she is like a widow, who has no support, no one to love her, nor care for her. She really lives independent of GOD.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - the Widow With the Two Mites
SHE was a widow. And she was surely the poorest widow in all the city that day. But she had this-that she was rich toward God, and that He was rich toward her. For she loved the house of God. She was another Anna. Only, Anna lodged in the precincts of the temple, and departed not from the temple night and day, whereas this poor widow somehow and somewhere had an impoverished house of her own. "O God, thou art my God," she kept saying to herself all the way up from her own impoverished house with the two mites in her hand; "my soul shall be satisfied as with marrow and fatness; and my mouth shall praise Thee with joyful lips, when I remember Thee upon my bed, and meditate on Thee in the night watches." When one after another of her neighbours and her kindred railed on her for going up to the Court of the Women in her deep poverty, she answered them not again. Only, she did not turn back, nor did she lose hold of her two mites. "Two mites," says Mark, "make a farthing." She had no great temptation to let her left hand know what her right hand intended to do. And thus it was that without once lifting her eyes off the temple steps she cast her contribution into the temple-chest, and passed on into the temple to offer her morning prayer, and then went down to her own house. She had seen nobody, she had spoken to nobody, and nobody had seen or spoken to her. And she does not know to this day what we know. Nor will she know till that day when everything shall be known and made manifest. What would she have thought if she had been told Who had watched her that day, and what He had said about her, and that we would be reading about her tonight in this far-off island of the sea? As also that her two mites would multiply, all down the ages, into millions upon millions of gold and silver, the same Eyes still watching the process all the time? And what will she think and what will she say when all that is told from the housetop on that day about her, and about her two mites, by the Judge of all? And still He sits over against the treasury in this temple tonight, and calls unto Him His disciples among us, and says to us, 'Verily I say unto you also.' And as He sits and speaks to us, and points us to this poor widow, we lay to heart from Him many lessons.
In every department of merely secular finance money is just money. The Chancellor of Her Majesty's Exchequer does not care one straw what our feelings toward him and toward his office are when he sends us in our income-tax schedule. He does not interrogate us as to our political principles, or even as to our loyalty to the throne. Only pay your taxes promptly and he will not trouble you again till next year. But it was very different from that in those communities where Paul was the collector of the contributions of the apostolic churches. "Brethren," he wrote, "we do you to wit of the grace of God bestowed on the churches of Macedonia, who first gave themselves to the Lord. For ye know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that, though He was rich, yet for your sakes He became poor. Therefore, see that ye abound in this grace also." And, as our Lord sat over against the thirteen chests in the temple that day, and all thirteen for the temple upkeep in one way or another, it was not the money so much as the mind of the contributors that He watched and weighed. And thus it was that this poor widow's mind weighed out for her this never-to-be-forgotten approval and applause of our Lord, "Verily I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast more in than all they which have cast into the treasury." Because, as Paul has it, she had first cast in herself. That, then, is our first and fundamental lesson in all church finance. It is ourselves first; and then, after ourselves, it is our time, and our money, and our work. Two mites of mind and intention outweigh out of sight a million of mere money in the balances of the sanctuary.
"For if there be first a willing mind, it is accepted according to that a man hath, and not according to that he hath not." And thus it comes about that such a noble and ennobling equality is established in the Church of Christ. Why, our very Lord Himself, though He was rich, yet for our sakes had become so poor that the poor widow was richer than He was that day. He had absolutely nothing; not so much as two mites, to call His own that day. He had literally and absolutely nothing but a willing mind. And thus it was that He sat so near the treasury enjoying the sight of the liberality of those who had both the willing mind and money also. He had no money. He had only Himself. And as they cast in their money, He again cast in Himself. All the time the poor widow was coming up the street singing to her own heart the sixty-third Psalm, our Lord was sitting in the treasury singing to His Father the fortieth Psalm. "Sacrifice and offering Thou didst not desire. Mine ears hast thou opened; burnt offering and sin offering hast Thou not required. Then said I, Lo, I come. In the volume of the book it is written of me, I delight to do Thy will, O my God; yea, Thy law is within my heart." I have an ancient friend in this congregation who, also, has God's law in this respect within her heart. Like Paul's Macedonian saints she has very little more than a willing mind. She puts on her old bonnet once a year and is announced into my study with five shillings in her hand. Where she gets it I cannot imagine, but this is what she does with it. I have another fellow-communicant who calls on me annually with a pound. But the five-shilling one touches me most. For her little room looks to me when I visit it as if she had far more need, not of five shillings, but of five pounds every year either from me or from the poor's box. But she has always a clean chair and a cup of tea for me when I call to see her. "A shilling," she said to me the other day when she came on her annual errand, "for Armenia. A shilling for the Jewish schools in Constantinople. A shilling for the miners, mission. A shilling for the Zenana ladies. And a shilling, over and above Dr. Chalmers's penny a week, for the Sustentation Fund." I would be a brute if I refused to take it. I would have yet to learn the first principles of the grace of God if I were tempted to say to her to take it away and to buy coals with it. For all the coals in the bowels of all the earth would not warm her heart and mine; and, shall I not say it, her Master's heart, as her love for these causes of His warms His heart, and hers, and her minister's heart. A well-to-do worshipper sent me the other day a hundred pounds as a special donation, over and above the hundred he gives in monthly instalments to his deacon. For more reasons than the coming dividend in May I was mightily delighted with his noble and timeous donation. But the five shillings melted my heart far more. He who sits over against His treasury here also, will Himself tell you in your hearing that day what He has to say about these two, and all such like princely minds. "That"-it was said by a great preacher in a land of vineyards and olive yards in illustration and in enforcement of this very same subject of a willing mind-"that which comes from His people at the gentle pressure of their Lord's simple bidding, comes as the fine and sweet and golden-coloured olive oil which runs freely from the fruit, almost before the press has ever touched it. That, again, is as the dark and coarse dregs, which is wrung out by the force of a harsh constraint at the last." "When I was in France," says Bacon, "it was said of the Duke of Guise that he was the greatest usurer in all the land, because he had turned all his estates into obligations; meaning that he had left himself nothing, but only had bound great numbers of persons in life-long indebtedness to him." It is not for the lip of mortal man to say it, but it is true, that Almighty God holds Himself under obligations to us all, corresponding to all the estates, great or small, that we have spent upon Him and upon His house. And if it is only the inward estate of a more and more willing mind, what usurers we are, and what an obligation will He acknowledge and repay!
Mutatis mutandis, as the Latin lawyers said; making all allowance, that is, for the immense change of dispensation and of all other circumstances, the thirteen temple-chests of our Lord's day were just the Endowment Funds, and the Augmentation Funds, and the Sustentation Funds of our own land and day. There were special chests elsewhere in the temple for the poor, and for the education of the children of the poor, but the treasury chests over against which our Saviour sat that day were just the Deacons' Courts of our own Free Church and other churches. It is doing no exegetical or homiletical violence to this exquisite scene to transfer every syllable of it to ourselves as a congregation and a court. Indeed it would take some blindness of mind and some pulpit ineptitude to lead us past the outstanding lessons and applications of this delightful Scripture. For our own Sustentation Fund is just that very same temple treasury over again exactly. By means of those chests the temple worshippers by their daily and weekly and monthly and yearly contributions supported the priests, the doctors, the readers of the law, and all the other office-bearers of the sanctuary. And, like our Sustentation Fund also, all classes contributed to the support of the sacred house; from the rich among the people down to this poor widow. Just as with ourselves where some give to this one fund hundreds of pounds a year and others a penny a week. And then out of our great central fund an equal dividend is made every May to every minister of the Free Church, from John O'Groats to Maidenkirk. So much so, that wherever you see a Free Church door open on a Sabbath morning, in town or country, and the people flocking up to it, you have had a hand in opening that door, and in sustaining that minister, and in preaching the unsearchable riches of Christ to that congregation. And if, under God's hand, you are such a widow that you have nothing to give to your deacon but a willing mind, and a word of God-speed, that is quite enough. You are a rich contributor and a true pillar of the Free Church. It is no irreverence, but only a becoming gratitude and love to say it, that as I sit at the head of the monthly table of our Deacons' Court I have something in my heart not unlike what was in His heart who sat that day in the treasury of the temple. As I see our deacons coming in and laying down on the table, one a few shillings, and another hundreds of pounds, like Him I rejoice at the sight, and a little like Him I hope, I give myself again to the service of God and to the service of His people. If you could all see, as I every first Monday of every month see, our splendidly-equipped and splendidly-managed Deacons' Court, the sight would both move, and inflame, and sanctify your heart also. Tens and twenties of the finest young fellows in the city; arts, law, medical, and divinity students; young merchants, young bankers, young advocates, young tradesmen,-all tabling the income of their districts, and all received with the applause of the elders sitting around. And if you could hear the treasurer's monthly report, and then the censor's so stringent monthly scrutiny, and then the thanks-giving psalms and prayers, you would give far more to this so sustaining and so sanctifying Fund than you have yet given. And you would see, not by any means to perfection, but to a certain honest approximation, what a modern treasury-chest of the Lord's house ought to be, and what it will yet be in every congregation in the coming days of the Church of Christ in Scotland. For it is not by any means the enormous wealth of this congregation that has given to Free St. George's its honourable place at the head of this honourable Fund. It is, I shall say it in your presence, the exceptional intelligence in church matters and in personal religion that has all along, with all its drawbacks, characterised Dr. Andrew Thomson's and Dr. Candlish's congregation. And, taken along with all that, its absolutely unique and unapproached Deacons' Court.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - the Importunate Widow
WITH all his ungodliness and with all his inhumanity, there was a widow in that city who brought the unjust, judge to his senses. His boast within himself was that he neither feared God nor regarded man, but there was a widow in that city who made him both fear her and regard her. There were many widows who had adversaries in our Lord's land and day, and He must have known more than one of them. His own mother Mary may very well have been one of them. Who knows but that she herself was this very widow with an adversary? Nothing is more likely. At any rate, whoever this widow was, by this time she was driven all but beside herself with adversity and oppression and robbery. She had spent all her living on daysmen and mediators, but the unjust judge was a companion of thieves and he would not hear her advocates. And, had it not been for her fatherless and fast-starving children, she would soon have been laid out of sight and out of hearing in her dead husband's forgotten grave. It was her orphaned and starving children that made their mother to be like a she-bear robbed of her whelps. Avenge me of mine adversary! She stood in the way of the unjust judge's chariot all day and cried out, Avenge me of mine adversary! She burst in upon the business of his court and cried, Avenge me of mine adversary! She stood under his window all night and cried out, Avenge me of mine adversary! And he would not for a while. But after that day when this wild woman suddenly sprang in upon him with a knife hidden away among her rags-after that day he said, Because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me. There is a tinge of blood in the original ink that is lost in the tame translation, because there was a gleam of blood in the widow's wild eye on that last day of her warning and appeal to the unjust judge. And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith. And shall not God avenge His own elect which cry day and night to Him, though He bear long with them? I tell you that He will avenge them speedily.
Now it is not by any means every woman who has the making of a "widow indeed" in her. And it is not by any means every soul under sanctification who cries for victory over sin day and night. There are many-even gracious souls among us-to whose case this Scripture does not by any means answer. But there are some other souls who say unto their Lord as soon as He has spoken this about the widow and her adversary to them: Lo, now speakest Thou plainly, and speakest no parable. Now we are sure that Thou knowest all things, and needest not that any man should ask Thee: for by this we believe that Thou camest forth from God. Such souls are sure that He knows all things about them, at any rate; and by His knowledge of them and of their adversary they believe that He has come forth to them from God. And, like one who has come forth from God and who knows the secret things of God, He here announces to us who are God's elect among us, and who are not. Every elect soul, He says, is like that widow in that city. For every elect soul is poor, and downtrodden, and dispossessed, and desolate. Is, or ought to be. As that widow had an adversary who had done all that to her, even so, every soul, elect to a great salvation, has an adversary who has done all that to it, and far more than all that. I do not know, and I cannot tell you, the name of that widow's adversary in that city. But if you do not know I will tell you the name of the universal adversary of all God's elect in this city. It is sin. This widow had only one adversary, and so it is with the elect. You never hear from their lips a demand for vengeance against any adversary of theirs but one. And all elect souls have one and the same adversary. And this is as good to them all as the seal of their election, this, that their only and real adversary is sin. Now you would all like to be assured, would you not, that you are among God's elect? You would all like to get a glimpse, for a moment, into the book of God's decrees, so as to read your name there. But you do not need to climb up to heaven in order to make your election sure. Who is your adversary? Who makes your life a burden to you? Who persecutes and oppresses and impoverishes your soul day and night continually? Against whom is it that you, almost demented, cry without ceasing, Avenge you of your adversary? Sin is the spot of God's children. Sin, and the woe it works in the soul, is the seal of God's elect. Have you that spot? Have you that seal? Has your sin dispossessed you, and beggared you, and driven you beside yourself? Nevertheless, the foundation of God standeth sure, having this seal. Now, are you such? Look well into yourself and see. Among all your adversaries, who is it that drives you day and night to God, like this woman to the judge? Do you think that our Lord counts you up among His Father's elect? I think He does? I am sure He does, if your adversary that you cry to be revenged upon is sin.
Avenge me! the widow cries. Her heart is full of her great wrongs. Her heart is full of a great rage. Her heart is full of fire. And she here puts her hot words into our mouth. She teaches our sin-tortured souls how to pray. She says to us, Remember me. Imitate me. I got vengeance done at last on mine adversary. Take no rest until you have got vengeance done on yours. She being dead, yet speaketh. Let us imitate her. Let us call on God as she called on the judge. Let us dwell day and night before God on our great wrongs. Let us keep ever repeating before Him what we have suffered at our adversary's hands. Tell Him that it is past telling. Tell Him that you are beside yourself. Tell Him that all He can do to your adversary will not satisfy your fierce feelings. O sin! O sin! How thou hast persecuted my soul down to the ground! How thou hast robbed and desolated my soul! How thou hast made my life a burden to me! How thou hast driven me sometimes beside myself with thy cruel and bitter bondage! How my soul sometimes seeks death to escape from thee! O thou foul and cruel tyrant, I will surely be revenged upon thee yet!
And He spake this parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray. Not once; not twice; not seven times; not a thousand times. But always till we are avenged of our adversary. We are not to pray against a besetting sin for a time, and then to despair and let it have its own way with us. We are to pray always. We are to pray on till we need to pray no longer. No sooner is one such prayer offered than we are to begin another. No sooner have we said, Amen! than we must say with our very next breath, O Thou that hearest prayer; to Thee shall all flesh come. No sooner have we risen off our knees than we must return to our knees. No sooner have we opened the door to come out of our closet than we must shut the door again, and return to our Father who seeth in secret. To whom else can we go? To whom else can we tell it all out, how our iniquities still continue to prevail against us?
Always, or as it is rendered in the seventh verse, day and night. All day and all night; the first thing in the morning and the last thing at night. The first thing in the morning and then all the day. When you open your eyes, and before that, always say this, When I awake, I am still with Thee. When you rise off your bed always say, Awake, my soul, and with the sun thy daily stage of duty run. When you wash your hands and your face say, Wash Thou me, and I shall be clean. When you bathe your whole body say, There is a fountain filled with blood, and sinners plunged beneath that flood, lose all their guilty stains. When you dress yourself say, He hath clothed me with the garments of salvation, He hath covered me with the robe of righteousness. And then when you go forth to your day's work say with David when he went forth to his day's work, On Thee do I wait all the day. What is your occupation? Whatever it is say as you again enter on it, The kingdom of heaven is like this, and that, more than on earth is thought. Are you a carpenter? say So was He. Are you a mason? say Other foundation can no man lay than that is laid. Are you a laundress? say His raiment was shining, exceeding white as snow; so as no fuller on earth can white them. Are you a cook? When you burn yourself, then say with Brother Lawrence, Who among us shall dwell with the devouring fire? Who among us shall dwell with everlasting burnings? And say with him also, Even the dogs eat of the crumbs. Are you a preacher? say Lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway. Are you a physician? say Physician, heal thyself. And say Esculapius healed many, but at last he succumbed himself. And say at every patient's door with Sir Thomas Browne, Peace be to this house, and health from the God of their salvation. Are you a banker? say to yourself, Thou wicked and slothful servant, thou oughtest to have put my money to the exchangers, and then at my coming I should have received mine own with usury. And cast ye the unprofitable servant into outer darkness. Are you an aurist? say He that planted the ear, shall He not hear? Are you an oculist? say He that formed the eye, shall He not see? Do you own horses, or ride or drive, horses? say Be ye not as the horse, or as the mule, which have no understanding; whose mouth must be held in with bit and bridle. And are you not good at driving? Then say like the English clown: I have driven into the ditch, O Jesus Christ, take Thou the reins! When on the street you see a prisoner in the hands of his jailor, say There goes John Newton, but for the grace of God. No, it was when John Newton saw a scaffold that he said that. And, speaking of John Newton, if you are a shoe-black, say If only for the credit of Christ, I will be the best shoe-black in the parish. When you meet a funeral, take off your hat and say The sands of time are sinking. When you meet a marriage, say Behold, the bridegroom cometh! When the sun sets in the west, say There shall be no night in heaven. When you lay your head down on your pillow say, if only out of respect to your sainted mother, This night I lay me down to sleep, I pray the Lord my soul to keep. When you cannot sleep, say At midnight will I rise and praise Thee. And when you awake in the morning, say Nevertheless, I am still with Thee. And shall not God avenge His own elect, which cry day and night unto Him, though He bear long with them? I tell you that He will avenge them speedily.
There is a well-known system of medicine that, most paradoxically as one would think, for a cure prescribes a little more of that which caused the sickness. I do not know whether that is sound science, or whether it is what its enemies call it. That is not my field. But this is. And I am safe and certain to say that whether homœopathy is sound medicine or no, it holds in divinity, and especially in this department of divinity, unfainting prayer for sanctification. If you are fainting in prayer for sanctification I recommend and prescribe to you Samuel Hahnemann's dictum similia similibus curantur. Only not in small doses. The opposite of that. Small doses in prayer will be your death. The very thing that has caused your whole head to be sick, and your whole heart to be faint,-hitherto unanswered prayer, answered or unanswered, pray you on. The answer is not your business. It is importunate and unfainting prayer that is your only business. And, always, more and more importunate and unfainting prayer. Similia similibus. Mix up your medicine with every meal. Make your whole meal upon your medicine. Have it standing ready at your bedside all night. Take it the last thing at night and the first thing in the morning. And if you hear the hours striking all night, betake yourself to your sure febrifuge and sleeping draught. In plain words, when you faint in prayer for a holy heart continue all the more instant in that prayer. Pray always for a holy heart, with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watch thereunto with all perseverance. The next time you feel your heart ready to faint in that kind of prayer, call to mind Who says this to you, and where He says it. This, that men ought always to pray against this adversary, and not to faint.
Nevertheless, when the Son of Man cometh, shall He find such prayer on the earth? I do not know. I cannot tell. The earth is too large for me to speak for it, and too far away from me. My matter is, shall He find such prayer in me? Shall He find me in my bed, or on my knees? Shall I be reading this parable of His for the ten thousandth time to keep my heart from fainting? Shall, Avenge me of mine adversary, be on my lips at the moment when the judgment-angel puts the last trump to his lips? And shall I be found of him on my knees, and with my finger on this scripture, when the trumpet shall sound, and I shall be changed?
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Widow
Married woman whose husband has died and who remains unmarried. The Hebrew word translated "widow" is almana [ Isaiah 13:22 ; Ezekiel 19:7 ; cf. LXX ). The Septaugint virtually always translates almana [ Luke 18:1-8 ). The same Greek word occurs twenty-six times in the New Testament.
Words that occur in the general semantic field of the term "widow" in the Bible shed light on both her personal experience and social plight. Weeping (Job 27:15 ; Psalm 78:64 ), mourning (2 Samuel 14:2 ), and desolation (Luke 2:36-38 ) describe her personal experience after the loss of her spouse. Poverty (Ruth 1:21 ; 1 Kings 17:7-12 ; Job 22:9 ) and indebtedness (2 Kings 4:1 ) were all too often descriptive of her financial situation, when the main source of her economic support, her husband, had perished. Indeed, she was frequently placed alongside the orphan and the landless immigrant (Exodus 22:21-22 ; Deuteronomy 24:17,19 , 20-21 ) as representative of the poorest of the poor (Job 24:4 ; 29:12 ; 31:16 ; Isaiah 10:2 ) in the social structure of ancient Israel, as well as in the ancient Near East. With minimal, if any, inheritance rights, she was often in a "no-man's land." She had left her family, and with her husband's death the bond between her and his family was tenuous.
The Old Testament . A recent body of influential research has argued that the Hebrew almana [ 2 Samuel 14:2,5 , where the death of the husband is simply in view, and Leviticus 21:14 , which classes an almana [ 2 Samuel 14 ; Job 24:3 ; Proverbs 15:25 ) and in later extrabiblical literature, it can be assumed that the term was used even of the wealthy Judith (Judith 9:4,10 ).
Nonetheless, the loss of a husband in ancient Israel was normally a social and economic tragedy. In a generally patriarchal culture, the death of a husband usually meant a type of cultural death as well. Although the denotation of widow referred to a woman whose husband had died, because of the social context the word quickly acquired the connotation of a person living a marginal existence in extreme poverty. The widow reacted with grief to her plight, and probably wore a distinct garb as a sign of her status (Genesis 38:14,19 ; 1 Kings 2:13-181 ; cf. Judith 8:5-6 ; 10:3 ; 16:8 ). Disillusionment and bitterness could easily result (Ruth 1:20-21 ). Her crisis was aggravated if she had no able-bodied children to help her work the land of her dead spouse. To provide for her children, to maintain the estate, and to continue payments on debts accrued by her husband imposed severe burdens. Since she was in an extremely vulnerable economic position, she became the prime target of exploitation. The fact that she was classed with the landless stranger and Levite indicates that she was often unable to keep her husband's land.
In general, the widow's inheritance rights were minimal. Some scholars believe that Israelite widows could inherit land as was the case with their Mesopotamian counterparts. But the evidence is sparse. The general rule was that the land was inalienably connected to the family of the male to whom it was apportioned. The fact that an individual desired to marry the widow of a king did not assume that the woman had inherited her husband's estate; it was simply an attempt to legitimize a claim to royalty (cf. 1618094655_36 ). The fact that widows had land within their possession probably indicated that they held it in trust for their children (1 Kings 17:7-9 ; 2 Kings 4:1-2 ; cf. Proverbs 15:25 ). If a widow had male children, the land would pass to her sons when they reached maturity if she was able to maintain the land and the sons survived. If she had only female children, the land would be transferred to them provided they married within the tribe (Numbers 27:8-11 ). If she was childless and of marriageable age (i.e., still able to reproduce), it was the duty of the closest male relative on her husband's side (normally the brother-in-law [1]) to marry her and provide an heir for the land of her dead husband, and to continue his name in Israel (Deuteronomy 25:5 ). The story of Judah and Tamar (Genesis 38 ) is an example of this custom of "levirate" marriage. Later, Deuteronomy 25:5-10 codifies legislation for such unions. The Book of Ruth provides a historical example of the application of the law. If no relative would marry a childless widow, it seemed that she could return to her father's house ( Genesis 38:11 ; cf. Leviticus 22:13 ) and dispose of the land to the husband's family (Ruth 4:1-3 ).
The distribution of the term "widow" is found approximately one-third of the time in legal texts, one-third in prophetic texts, and one-third in wisdom and historical literature. But the vast majority of the contexts are legal in nature, either dealing with justice (the legal protection of the widow) or injustice (the exploitation of her status). In the former case the Old Testament is replete with legislation that attempted to provide a social security net for the widow: she was not to be exploited (Exodus 22:21-22 ; Deuteronomy 27:19 ); she was specifically permitted to glean the fields and vineyards during harvest time (Deuteronomy 24:19-21 , ; cf. Ruth 2 ); tithes were to be shared with her ( Deuteronomy 14:29 ; 26:12-13 ); provision was to be made for her at the main religious feasts (Deuteronomy 16:9-15 ); her garment could not be taken as collateral for a loan (Deuteronomy 24:17 ); and the levirate institution would not only provide an heir for the land for childless widows, it would help them be integrated back into society. Moreover, the supreme measure by which a ruler in Israel was to be judged was whether such powerless ones were cared for (Psalm 72:4,12-14 ; Jeremiah 22:16 ).
At the same time, the legislation acknowledged the fact of the vulnerability of the widow and many Old Testament texts indicate that she was victimized repeatedly (Exodus 22:22-23 ; Isaiah 1:23 ; 10:2 ; Ezekiel 22:7 ; Malachi 3:5 ). The prophets were the champions of exploited widows. As far as they were concerned, repentance began with redressing wrongs done to such unfortunate women (Isaiah 1:17 ; Jeremiah 7:6 ; 22:3 ; Zechariah 7:10 ). Wisdom texts encouraged a benevolent attitude toward widows. Job's comforters accused him of heinous crimes, particularly of oppressing the widow (Acts 6:1-6 ), but he countered with the argument that he never sent away a begging widow without food and he often made her broken heart sing (29:13; 31:16).
Although there are similar concerns for the widow in ancient Near Eastern texts, there does not seem to be the same pervasive and comprehensive attitude toward the powerless. This difference is rooted in theological reasons. When Israel was once in a powerless condition, God had mercy on her and delivered her from the harsh oppression of Egypt. She was thus called to remember her liberation and to imitate her God who was not only the father of the orphan, but the legal defender of the widow (Psalm 68:6 ) and the guardian of her property (Proverbs 15:25 ). The transcendent "high and holy One, " the Lord of Lords, sees the last first in the human social order and describes himself as the judge of the widow (Deuteronomy 10:18 ; Psalm 146:9 ; cf. Psalm 113 ; Isaiah 57:15 ). Yahweh instituted the death penalty for those who committed capital crimes in the earliest legal code (Exodus 21-23 ); but when people oppressed the widow, he himself directly intervened to execute the exploiters (Exodus 22:24 ). His prophets were sent as messengers with the directive to his people: "Don't hurt my little ones." Even non-Hebrew widows could trust in Him (Jeremiah 49:11 ).
The widow—who was absolutely dependent, whose value was found in "being" and not "doing" and "achieving, " who had known both the joy of love and the anguish of lossperhaps reflected more than others the image of God. After all, proud Babylon symbolized the satanic image in her quest for power. She incarnated pure autonomy with her statement: "I am, and there is none besides me. I will never be a widow or suffer the loss of children" (Isaiah 47:8 ).
The concept of widowhood was also used as a metaphor to describe God's relationship to Israel. When the nation was judged in 586 b.c., a devastated Jerusalem could be described as a widow; her husband, the Lord, having departed, was as good as dead to her (Lamentations 1:1 ; cf. Ezekiel 11:22-23 ). Yet Jeremiah stated that this perspective was distorted: Israel was not a widow, nor Judah deprived of her God, even though the land was contaminated with sin (Jeremiah 51:5 ). Isaiah accepted the description of Israel's widowhood, but promised future salvation: "You will forget the shame of your youth and remember no more the reproach of your widowhood. For your Maker is your husbandthe Lord Almighty is his name" (54:4-5).
The New Testament . Widows were prominent in the New Testament. It was no accident that one of the poorest of the poor, Anna, was privileged to greet the infant Messiah (Lamentations 1:1 ). The adult Jesus followed in the footsteps of his prophetic predecessors with his concern for the plight of the widow. He healed a widow's son because of compassion for his mother (Luke 7:11-17 ); he protested the exploitation of widows (Mark 12:40 ). He reversed the standards by which people were judged with the parable of the widow's tithe: the widow gave from her poverty while the wealthy merely offered from their abundance (Mark 12:41-42 ). In another parable, the church was compared with an importunate widow who kept demanding that her case be heard. Similarly, the church must persistently pray for eschatological justice, the redressing of all wrongs against her (Job 24:21 ).
The early church, the messianic community, defined the essence of true religion as demonstrating compassion to the poor and needy, in particular the widow and the orphan (James 1:27 ). A special fund was instituted for widows (Job 22:9 ) and as the church matured, younger widows were urged to remarry while a special class of widows was maintained economically (1 Timothy 5:3-16 ). By the end of the first century a.d., as Christians were being persecuted by Rome, John wrote to a church whose husband seemed dead and impotent to her grief and need. The church was a widow, while proud Rome boasted: "I sit as a queen; I am not a widow, and I will never mourn" (Revelation 18:7 ). At the end of history the roles will be reversed, as Rome will become destitute and the church will be united to her resurrected and reigning husband who will wipe every tear from her eyes (Revelation 21:4 ). In that great day the reproach of the new Israel's widowhood will no longer be remembered, for her husband will appear, whose name is the Lord God of hosts (Isaiah 54:5 ).
Stephen G. Dempster
See also Family Life and Relations ; Woman
Bibliography . G. W. Coats, CBQ 34 (1972): 461-66; C. Cohen, Encyclopedia Judaica, 16:487-91; E. W. Davies, VT 31 (1981): 138-44; 31 (1981): 257-68; G. R. Driver and J. C. Miles, The Assyrian Laws ; P. S. Hiebert, Gender and Difference in Ancient Israel ; D. E. Gowan, Int 41 (1987): 341-53; H. Hoffner, TDOT, 1:287-91; J. Khlewein, THAT, 1:169-73; J. Limburg, The Prophets and the Powerless ; S. Niditch, HTR 72 (1979): 143-49; J. H. Otwell, And Sarah Laughed: The Status of Women in the Old Testament ; R. D. Patterson, BSac 130 (1973): 223-34; N. W. Porteous, Service in Christ ; S. Solle, DNTT 3:1073-75; G. Stä lin, TDNT, 9: 440-65; T. and D. Thompson, VT 18 (1968): 79-99; W. C. Trenchard, Ben Sira's View of Women ; H. E. von Waldow, CBQ 32 (1970): 182-204; C. H. J. Wright, ABD 2:761-69.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Widow
Almânâh (אַלְמָנָה, Strong's #490), “widow.” Cognates of this word appear in Aramaic, Arabic, Akkadian, Phoenician, and Ugaritic. Biblical Hebrew attests it 55 times and in all periods.
The word represents a woman who, because of the death of her husband, has lost her social and economic position. The gravity of her situation was increased if she had no children. In such a circumstance she returned to her father’s home and was subjected to the Levirate rule whereby a close male relative surviving her husband was to produce a child through her in her husband’s behalf: “Then said Judah to Tamar his daughter-inlaw, Remain a widow at thy father’s house, till Shelah my son be grown …” (Gen. 38:11 the first occurrence of the word). These words constitute a promise to Tamar that the disgrace of being without both husband and child would be removed when Shelah was old enough to marry. Even if children had been born before her husband’s death, a widow’s lot was not a happy one (2 Sam. 14:5). Israel was admonished to treat “widows” and other socially disadvantaged people with justice, God Himself standing as their protector (Exod. 22:21-24).
Wives whose husbands shut them away from themselves are sometimes called “widows”: “And David came to his house at Jerusalem; and the king took the ten women his concubines, whom he had left to keep the house, and put them in ward, and fed them, but went not in unto them. So they were shut up unto the day of their death, living in widowhood” (2 Sam. 20:3).
Destroyed, plundered Jerusalem is called a “widow” (Lam. 1:1).
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Widow
Among the Hebrews, even before the law, a widow who had no children by her husband was to marry the brother of her deceased spouse, in order to raise up children who might inherit, his goods and perpetuate his name and family. We find the practice of this custom before the law in the person of Tamar, who married successively Er and Onan, the sons of Judah, and who was likewise to have married Selah, the third son of this patriarch, after the two former were dead without issue, Genesis 38:6-11 . The law that appoints these marriages is Deuteronomy 25:5 , &c. Two motives prevailed to the enacting of this law. The first was, the continuation of estates in the same family: and the other was to perpetuate a man's name in Israel. It was looked upon as a great misfortune for a man to die without an heir, or to see his inheritance pass into another family. This law was not confined to brothers-in-law only, but was extended to more distant relations of the same kind; as we see in the example of Ruth, who married Boaz after she had been refused by a nearer kinsman. See SANDALS .
Webster's Dictionary - Widow Bird
See Whidan bird.
Webster's Dictionary - Widow-Hunter
(n.) One who courts widows, seeking to marry one with a fortune.
Webster's Dictionary - Widow-Maker
(n.) One who makes widows by destroying husbands.
Webster's Dictionary - Widow
(1):
(v. t.) To deprive of one who is loved; to strip of anything beloved or highly esteemed; to make desolate or bare; to bereave.
(2):
(n.) A woman who has lost her husband by death, and has not married again; one living bereaved of a husband.
(3):
(a.) Widowed.
(4):
(v. t.) To become, or survive as, the widow of.
(5):
(v. t.) To reduce to the condition of a widow; to bereave of a husband; - rarely used except in the past participle.
(6):
(n.) In various games, any extra hand or part of a hand, as one dealt to the table.
(7):
(v. t.) To endow with a widow's right.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Widow
A custom was prevalent in patriarchal times, Genesis 38:1-30 , and was afterwards confirmed by the Mosaic law, Deuteronomy 25:5-10 , that a widow without children, in order to preserve the family name and inheritance, should marry the brother of her deceased husband; or he failing his nearest kinsman, Ruth 3:12,13 4:1-11 Matthew 22:23-30 . The high-priest was forbidden to marry a widow, Leviticus 21:14 . The humanity and justice of true religion are shown in the Bible, as might be expected, by numerous indications that God and the friends of God sympathize with the sorrows, supply the wants, and defend the rights of the widow, Exodus 22:22-24 Deuteronomy 16:11 24:17,19 Psalm 68:5 Isaiah 1:17 10:2 Jeremiah 22:3 Matthew 23:14 .
The apostolic church was not negligent in providing for widows, Acts 6:1-3 1 Timothy 5:16 ; and James makes this duty an essential part of true piety, James 1:27 . Heathenism, on the contrary, makes those who have been slaves to a husband's caprices during his life, either victims upon the funeral pile at his death, or forlorn and hopeless sufferers under destitution and contempt. The duties of Christian widows are specified in 1 Timothy 5:3-16 .
King James Dictionary - Widow
WIDOW, n. L. See Wide. A woman who has lost her husband by death. Luke 2 .
Widows chamber, in London, the apparel and furniture of the bed-chamber of the widow of a freeman, to which she is entitled.
WIDOW,
1. To bereave of a husband but rarely used except in the participle. 2. To endow with a widows right. Unusual. 3. To strip of any thing good. The widowd isle in mourning--
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Widow
: (Strong's # — — — ) Matthew 28:13 (in some texts); Mark 12:40,42,43 ; Luke 2:37 ; 4:25,26 , lit., "a woman a widow;" Luke 7:12 ; 18:3,5 ; 20:47 ; 21:2,3 ; Acts 6:1 ; 9:39,41 ; 1 Timothy 5:3 (twice),4,5,11,16 (twice); James 1:27 ; 1 Timothy 5:9 refers to elderly "widows" (not an ecclesiastical "order"), recognized, for relief or maintenance by the church (cp. 1 Timothy 5:3,16 ), as those who had fulfilled the conditions mentioned; where relief could be ministered by those who had relatives that were "widows" (a likely circumstance in large families), the church was not to be responsible; there is an intimation of the tendency to shelve individual responsibility at the expense of church funds. In Revelation 18:7 , it is used figuratively of a city forsaken.

Sentence search

Widowhood - ) Estate settled on a Widow. ) The state of being a Widow; the time during which a woman is Widow; also, rarely, the state of being a Widower
Widowhood - WidowHOOD, n. The state of being a Widow. Estate settled on a Widow
Dowager - ) A title given in England to a Widow, to distinguish her from the wife of her husband's heir bearing the same name; - chiefly applied to Widows of personages of rank. ) A Widow endowed, or having a jointure; a Widow who either enjoys a dower from her deceased husband, or has property of her own brought by her to her husband on marriage, and settled on her after his decease
Widow - Widow, n. ...
Widows chamber, in London, the apparel and furniture of the bed-chamber of the Widow of a freeman, to which she is entitled. ...
Widow, ...
1. To endow with a Widows right. The Widowd isle in mourning--...
Widwe - ) A Widow
Poverty - See Poor, Orphan, Widow
Whidah Bird - Called also vida finch, whidah finch, whydah bird, whydah finch, Widow bird, and Widow finch
Widowed - ) of Widow...
Widowly - ) Becoming or like a Widow
Widowing - ) of Widow...
Widual - ) Of or pertaining to a Widow; vidual
Palsgravine - ) The consort or Widow of a palsgrave
Relict - ) A woman whose husband is dead; a Widow
Vidual - ) Of or pertaining to the state of a Widow; Widowed
Electress - ) The wife or Widow of an elector in the old German empire
Widow - WIDOW (χήρα). —Four Widows are referred to in the Gospels. Anna of the tribe of Asher (Luke 2:36-38), a devout woman described as a prophetess, who had been a Widow eighty-four years, and who constantly frequented the Temple, passing her time in fastings and prayers, and who, coming up at the moment of the presentation of the infant Saviour, moved by the spirit of prophecy, spake of Him to those present who were expecting the redemption of Jerusalem. The Widow of Sarepta or Zarephath, referred to by our Lord in the synagogue at Nazareth (Luke 4:25-26) as an instance of a Gentile who had entertained Elijah, and had received a blessing by his means. 8) that the word ‘widow’ here may have been ‘Gentile’ in some Aramaic original, ܐܪܡܢܬܐ (armaitha), the feminine of ‘Gentile’ or ‘Syrian ‘having been confused with ܐܪܡܠܬܐ (armalta), ‘a Widow. The Widow of Nain (Luke 7:11-17), a little town situated a few miles to the south of Mount Tabor in Galilee, to whom our Lord uttered His compassionate ‘Weep not’ just before restoring her only son to life. The people who witnessed the miracle exclaimed that a great prophet had risen up among them, probably with reference to Elijah or Elisha, the former of whom, like Christ, had raised a Widow’s son. The poor Widow who cast her two mites into the treasury (Mark 12:41-44, Luke 21:1-4), whom Christ commended. It should not be forgotten in practical applications of this incident and of our Lord’s praise of the Widow, that she cast in ‘all her living,’ that is to say, her day’s entire income, or ‘all that she had to live upon until more should be earned’ (Swete), and that consequently the phrase ‘widow’s mite’ is incorrectly applied to small sums deducted, and more or less easily spared, from a daily income. ...
In addition to these four Widows, who were actual persons, a Widow is a character in one of our Lord’s parables (Luke 18:1-8), who, having no power to enforce the justice she claims, obtains it at length by her importunity; and from this our Lord draws His a fortiori conclusion that God will hear and answer those who cry day and night unto Him. Further, Widows are referred to by Christ (Matthew 23:14 [1], Mark 12:40, Luke 20:47) as being often cruelly oppressed and defrauded by the Pharisees of His day. ...
It may be regarded as certain that our Lord’s mother was a Widow during the time of His ministry, hence His recommendation of her, just before His death, to the beloved disciple (John 19:26 f. ...
The honourable and important position which Widows occupied in the early Church is entirely in harmony with the respectful and sympathetic tone in which they are referred to in the above places of the Gospels. ...
In the Lewis MS of the Syriac Gospels the Syrophœnician woman (Mark 7:26) is described as a Widow. This may be another instance of the possible confusion of ‘widow’ and ‘Gentile’ alluded to above
Marchioness - ) The wife or the Widow of a marquis; a woman who has the rank and dignity of a marquis
Duchess - ) The wife or Widow of a duke; also, a lady who has the sovereignty of a duchy in her own right
Chileab - The second son of David by Abigail, the Widow of Nabal the Carmelite ( 2 Samuel 3:3 )
Chalitzah - "taking off"); a ceremony whereby the Widow of a childless husband is released by the brother of the deceased, thus permitting her to remarry somebody else
Discovert - ) Not covert; not within the bonds of matrimony; unmarried; - applied either to a woman who has never married or to a Widow
Dorcas - A female antelope, or gazelle, a pious Christian Widow at Joppa whom Peter restored to life (Acts 9:36-41 )
Widow - The Hebrew word translated "widow" is almana [ Isaiah 13:22 ; Ezekiel 19:7 ; cf. ...
Words that occur in the general semantic field of the term "widow" in the Bible shed light on both her personal experience and social plight. Although the denotation of Widow referred to a woman whose husband had died, because of the social context the word quickly acquired the connotation of a person living a marginal existence in extreme poverty. The Widow reacted with grief to her plight, and probably wore a distinct garb as a sign of her status (Genesis 38:14,19 ; 2 Samuel 14:2 ; cf. ...
In general, the Widow's inheritance rights were minimal. Some scholars believe that Israelite Widows could inherit land as was the case with their Mesopotamian counterparts. The fact that an individual desired to marry the Widow of a king did not assume that the woman had inherited her husband's estate; it was simply an attempt to legitimize a claim to royalty (cf. The fact that Widows had land within their possession probably indicated that they held it in trust for their children (1 Kings 17:7-9 ; 2 Kings 4:1-2 ; cf. If a Widow had male children, the land would pass to her sons when they reached maturity if she was able to maintain the land and the sons survived. If no relative would marry a childless Widow, it seemed that she could return to her father's house ( Genesis 38:11 ; cf. ...
The distribution of the term "widow" is found approximately one-third of the time in legal texts, one-third in prophetic texts, and one-third in wisdom and historical literature. But the vast majority of the contexts are legal in nature, either dealing with justice (the legal protection of the Widow) or injustice (the exploitation of her status). In the former case the Old Testament is replete with legislation that attempted to provide a social security net for the Widow: she was not to be exploited (1618094655_97 ; Deuteronomy 27:19 ); she was specifically permitted to glean the fields and vineyards during harvest time (Deuteronomy 24:19-21 , ; cf. Ruth 2 ); tithes were to be shared with her ( Deuteronomy 14:29 ; 26:12-13 ); provision was to be made for her at the main religious feasts (Deuteronomy 16:9-15 ); her garment could not be taken as collateral for a loan (Deuteronomy 24:17 ); and the levirate institution would not only provide an heir for the land for childless Widows, it would help them be integrated back into society. ...
At the same time, the legislation acknowledged the fact of the vulnerability of the Widow and many Old Testament texts indicate that she was victimized repeatedly (Exodus 22:22-23 ; Isaiah 1:23 ; 10:2 ; Ezekiel 22:7 ; Malachi 3:5 ). The prophets were the champions of exploited Widows. Wisdom texts encouraged a benevolent attitude toward Widows. Job's comforters accused him of heinous crimes, particularly of oppressing the Widow (Job 22:9 ), but he countered with the argument that he never sent away a begging Widow without food and he often made her broken heart sing (29:13; 31:16). ...
Although there are similar concerns for the Widow in ancient Near Eastern texts, there does not seem to be the same pervasive and comprehensive attitude toward the powerless. She was thus called to remember her liberation and to imitate her God who was not only the father of the orphan, but the legal defender of the Widow (Psalm 68:6 ) and the guardian of her property (Proverbs 15:25 ). The transcendent "high and holy One, " the Lord of Lords, sees the last first in the human social order and describes himself as the judge of the Widow (Deuteronomy 10:18 ; Psalm 146:9 ; cf. Yahweh instituted the death penalty for those who committed capital crimes in the earliest legal code (Exodus 21-23 ); but when people oppressed the Widow, he himself directly intervened to execute the exploiters (Exodus 22:24 ). " Even non-Hebrew Widows could trust in Him (Jeremiah 49:11 ). ...
The Widow—who was absolutely dependent, whose value was found in "being" and not "doing" and "achieving, " who had known both the joy of love and the anguish of lossperhaps reflected more than others the image of God. I will never be a Widow or suffer the loss of children" (Isaiah 47:8 ). ...
The concept of Widowhood was also used as a metaphor to describe God's relationship to Israel. , a devastated Jerusalem could be described as a Widow; her husband, the Lord, having departed, was as good as dead to her (Acts 6:1-6 ; cf. Yet Jeremiah stated that this perspective was distorted: Israel was not a Widow, nor Judah deprived of her God, even though the land was contaminated with sin (Jeremiah 51:5 ). Isaiah accepted the description of Israel's Widowhood, but promised future salvation: "You will forget the shame of your youth and remember no more the reproach of your Widowhood. Widows were prominent in the New Testament. The adult Jesus followed in the footsteps of his prophetic predecessors with his concern for the plight of the Widow. He healed a Widow's son because of compassion for his mother (1618094655_7 ); he protested the exploitation of Widows (Mark 12:40 ). He reversed the standards by which people were judged with the parable of the Widow's tithe: the Widow gave from her poverty while the wealthy merely offered from their abundance (Mark 12:41-42 ). In another parable, the church was compared with an importunate Widow who kept demanding that her case be heard. ...
The early church, the messianic community, defined the essence of true religion as demonstrating compassion to the poor and needy, in particular the Widow and the orphan (James 1:27 ). A special fund was instituted for Widows (Lamentations 1:1 ) and as the church matured, younger Widows were urged to remarry while a special class of Widows was maintained economically (1 Timothy 5:3-16 ). The church was a Widow, while proud Rome boasted: "I sit as a queen; I am not a Widow, and I will never mourn" (Revelation 18:7 ). In that great day the reproach of the new Israel's Widowhood will no longer be remembered, for her husband will appear, whose name is the Lord God of hosts (Isaiah 54:5 )
Widow - ) Widowed. ) To become, or survive as, the Widow of. ) To reduce to the condition of a Widow; to bereave of a husband; - rarely used except in the past participle. ) To endow with a Widow's right
Sarepta - The village to which Elias was sent to succour a poor Widow
Skat - ) A three-handed card game played with 32 cards, of which two constitute the skat (sense 2), or Widow. ) A Widow of two cards
Onan - Slain by Jehovah for the unnatural means which he took to have no issue by his brother Er's Widow, whom he had married according to the custom, to perpetuate the race (Genesis 38:4-9)
Widow - A custom was prevalent in patriarchal times, Genesis 38:1-30 , and was afterwards confirmed by the Mosaic law, Deuteronomy 25:5-10 , that a Widow without children, in order to preserve the family name and inheritance, should marry the brother of her deceased husband; or he failing his nearest kinsman, Ruth 3:12,13 4:1-11 Matthew 22:23-30 . The high-priest was forbidden to marry a Widow, Leviticus 21:14 . The humanity and justice of true religion are shown in the Bible, as might be expected, by numerous indications that God and the friends of God sympathize with the sorrows, supply the wants, and defend the rights of the Widow, Exodus 22:22-24 Deuteronomy 16:11 24:17,19 Psalm 68:5 Isaiah 1:17 10:2 Jeremiah 22:3 Matthew 23:14 . ...
The apostolic church was not negligent in providing for Widows, Acts 6:1-3 1 Timothy 5:16 ; and James makes this duty an essential part of true piety, James 1:27 . The duties of Christian Widows are specified in 1 Timothy 5:3-16
Matron - ) A wife or a Widow, especially, one who has borne children; a woman of staid or motherly manners
Zarephath - City belonging to Zidon, where Elijah stayed with a Widow during part of a time of drought and famine, being sustained by the miraculous increase of the Widow's meal and oil
Fitzherbert, Maria Anne - The daughter of Walter Smythe of Brambridge, Hampshire, and the Widow of Edward Weld, and of Thomas Fitzherbert, she married George, Prince of Wales, 1785
Maria Anne Fitzherbert - The daughter of Walter Smythe of Brambridge, Hampshire, and the Widow of Edward Weld, and of Thomas Fitzherbert, she married George, Prince of Wales, 1785
Marie de l'Incarnation, Blessed - Married at seventeen, she was left a Widow two years later, with a son Claude, afterwards a Benedictine
Marie Guyard - Married at seventeen, she was left a Widow two years later, with a son Claude, afterwards a Benedictine
Marie Martin - Married at seventeen, she was left a Widow two years later, with a son Claude, afterwards a Benedictine
Elimelech - In a famine he and his wife Naomi, with their two sons, went to Moab, where he and his sons died, and from whence Naomi returned a childless Widow with Ruth
Mary Guise - The Widow of Louis II d'Orleans, she married James V of Scotland, and on his death was made regent for her daughter, Mary, Queen of Scots
Judith - Daughter of Merari, of the tribe of Simeon ( Genesis 8:1 161809465536 hen 9:2); Widow of Manassea of the same tribe
Guise, Mary - The Widow of Louis II d'Orleans, she married James V of Scotland, and on his death was made regent for her daughter, Mary, Queen of Scots
Gleaning - For the humanitarian provisions of the Pentateuchal codes, by which the gleanings of the cornfield, vineyard, and oliveyard were the perquisites of the poor, the fatherless, the Widow, and the gçr outlander, see Leviticus 19:9 f
Judith - A pious Widow, she beguiled Holfernes, Nebuchadnezzar's general and delivered her people from him by cutting off his head
Tabitha - We find an honourable Widow called by it in the Acts of the apostles, whose death gave occasion for the Holy Ghost by the ministry of the apostle Peter, to manifest his almighty power in raising her again
Judith - A pious Widow, she beguiled Holfernes, Nebuchadnezzar's general and delivered her people from him by cutting off his head
Mite - The Widow sowed her all; she might have kept back one of the two mites for herself (2 Corinthians 9:6). God accepted the Widow's mites, but rejects the miser's "mite
Dower - ) That portion of the real estate of a man which his Widow enjoys during her life, or to which a woman is entitled after the death of her husband
Onan - Following the death of his older brother, Er, Onan was to have married the Widow and produced a son who would carry on Er's name
Cherith - When Cherith finally went dry, he found refuge with the Widow of Zarephath
Widow - Almânâh (אַלְמָנָה, Strong's #490), “widow. In such a circumstance she returned to her father’s home and was subjected to the Levirate rule whereby a close male relative surviving her husband was to produce a child through her in her husband’s behalf: “Then said Judah to Tamar his daughter-inlaw, Remain a Widow at thy father’s house, till Shelah my son be grown …” ( Widow’s lot was not a happy one (
Wives whose husbands shut them away from themselves are sometimes called “widows”: “And David came to his house at Jerusalem; and the king took the ten women his concubines, whom he had left to keep the house, and put them in ward, and fed them, but went not in unto them. So they were shut up unto the day of their death, living in Widowhood” (
Anna - Daughter of Phanuel, of Asher; a Widow of 84; a prophetess, i. After seven years of married life she had given up all other concerns to join the women who devoted themselves to a continual attendance at the temple services "night and day"; "a Widow indeed" (1 Timothy 5:5)
Mahlon - Boaz, a distant relative to Mahlon, married the dead man's Widow, Ruth
Levirate Law - From Latin levir, "a husband's brother," the name of an ancient custom ordained by Moses, by which, when an Israelite died without issue, his surviving brother was required to marry the Widow, so as to continue his brother's family through the son that might be born of that marriage (Genesis 38:8 ; Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ; Compare Ruth 3 ; 4:10 )
Zarephath - Here Elijah sojourned with a poor Widow during the "great famine," when the "heaven was shut up three years and six months" (Luke 4:26 ; 1 Kings 17:10 )
Zarephath - At Zarephath, Elijah found shelter with a Widow during the great famine in Israel
Anna - A daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher, early married, but left a Widow after seven years, and thenceforth devoted to the service of God
Levirate Law - According to Deuteronomy 25:5-10 , the deceased's brother was to marry the Widow
Sabina, Saint - She was a wealthy Widow of Umbria in Italy, converted to Christianity by her servant Serapia, who was martyred for her faith
Felicitas, Saint 23 Nov - She was a holy Roman Widow martyred during the reign of Emperor Antoninus, with seven sons (Januarius, Felix, Philip Pius, Silvanus, Alexander, Vitalis, and Martialis), because of their defense of Christianity
Hatchment - It is used in England as a means of giving public notification of the death of the deceased, his or her rank, whether married, Widower, Widow, etc
Dower - That portion of the lands or tenements of a man which his Widow enjoys during her life, after the death of her husband
Levirate Law, Levirate Marriage - The legal provision requiring a dead man's brother (levirate) to marry his childless Widow and father a son who would assume the dead man's name and inherit his portion of the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 25:5-10 )
Poor - , Matthew 11:5 ; 26:9,11 ; Luke 21:3 (with stress on the word, "a conspicuously poor Widow"); John 12:5,6,8 ; 13:29 ; James 2:2,3,6 ; the "poor" are constantly the subjects of injunctions to assist them, Matthew 19:21 ; Mark 10:21 ; Luke 14:13,21 ; 18:22 ; Romans 15:26 ; Galatians 2:10 ; (b) metaphorically, Matthew 5:3 ; Luke 6:20 ; Revelation 3:17 . ...
A — 2: πενιχρός (Strong's #3998 — Adjective — penichros — pen-tikh-ros' ) akin to B, "needy, poor," is used of the Widow in Luke 21:2 (cp
Anna - Grace, an aged Widow, the daughter of Phanuel. After seven years of married life her husband died, and during her long Widowhood she daily attended the temple services
Zarephath - While in Zarepath, he was hosted by a Widow and her son. Although the drought affected the Widow's income, too, her supply of meal and oil were miraculously sustained (1 Kings 17:12-16 )
Younger - 1, above, occurs in Luke 15:12,13 ; 22:26 ; 1 Timothy 5:1 ("younger men"); 5:2, feminine; 1 Timothy 5:11 , "younger (widows);" 1 Timothy 5:14 , "younger (widows)," RV, marg. and AV, "younger (women)" (see Widow); 1 Peter 5:5
Naomi - Elimelech died, and also his two sons, each leaving a Widow; Naomi, thus bereaved, started back to her native country
Rufus - ’ It has been conjectured that these two are the same person, that Simon’s Widow (?) had emigrated to Rome with her two sons, where they became people of eminence in the Church, and that this is the reason why the brothers are mentioned by St
Mite - A small Roman coin, so small, and of so little value, that we are told two of them made a farthing: (Luke 21:2) —and yet the Lord Jesus declared, that this was a costly offering when thrown in by the poor Widow into the treasury
Zarephath - ...
During a famine in Israel, the prophet Elijah resided here, with a Widow whose cruse of oil and barrel of flour were supplied and whose child was restored to life by miracle
Widow - God is "judge of the Widows" (Psalms 68:5; Psalms 146:9), therefore, the judge or righteous vindicator of His church, and of Israel especially (Isaiah 54), Widowed by His physical absence, against her adversary Satan (Luke 18:1-7). For pious Widows, see Anna, and the one who gave her all to the Lord's treasury (Luke 2:36-37; Luke 20:47; Luke 21:1-4). ) Three classes of Widows are distinguished in 1 Timothy 5...
(1) The ordinary Widow. ...
(2) The Widow indeed, i. ...
(3) The presbyteral Widow (1 Timothy 5:9-11). Let none be enrolled as a presbyteral Widow who is less than 60 years old. Not deaconesses, who were chosen at a younger age (40 was fixed as the limit at the council of Chalcedon) and who had virgins (latterly called Widows) as well as Widows among them, compare Dorcas (Acts 9:41). ) The reference in 1 Timothy 5:9 cannot, as in 1 Timothy 5:3, be to providing church maintenance, for then the restriction to Widows above 60 would be harsh, as many might need help at an earlier age. 31) mention an order of ecclesiastical Widows, not less than 60 years old, who ministered to Widows and orphans. Age was a requisite, as in presbyters, to adapt them for influencing younger women; they were supported by the church, but were not the only Widows so supported (1 Timothy 5:3-4)
Isabel, Saint - Queen of Portugal, Widow, born 1271; died 1336
Cascia, Rita of, Saint - Holy Widow
Aiguillon, Marie de Vignerot de Pontcourlay, Duche - Left a Widow, 1622, she wished to be a nun, but was obliged to do the honors of Richelieu's palace, and was created Duchess of Aiguillon, 1638
Widow - Because of this she denies that she is like a Widow, who has no support, no one to love her, nor care for her
Elizabeth of Portugal, Saint - Queen of Portugal, Widow, born 1271; died 1336
Helena, Saint - (Greek: light) ...
Widow, wife of Emperor Constantius Chlorus and mother of Constantine, born probably Drepanum (Relenopolis), Bithynia, c
Rita of Cascia, Saint - Holy Widow
Frances of Rome, Saint - Mystic, Widow, foundress of the Benedictine Oblate congregation of Tor di Specchi, born Rome, Italy, 1384; died there, 1440
Friend at Midnight - This parable (Luke 11), the lesson of which recalls somewhat that of the parable of the Widow and the unjust judge (Luke 18), teaches the efficacy of perseverance in prayer
Attendant - ) Depending on, or owing duty or service to; as, the Widow attendant to the heir
Third - ) The third part of the estate of a deceased husband, which, by some local laws, the Widow is entitled to enjoy during her life
Seton, Elizabeth Ann, Saint - Daughter of Dr Richard Bayley, she was married to William Magee Seton, 1794, and was left a Widow with five children in 1803
Rome, Frances of, Saint - Mystic, Widow, foundress of the Benedictine Oblate congregation of Tor di Specchi, born Rome, Italy, 1384; died there, 1440
Quarantine - ) The period of forty days during which the Widow had the privilege of remaining in the mansion house of which her husband died seized
Endow - To furnish with a portion of goods or estate, called dower to settle a dower on, as on a married woman or Widow
Salvina - The young Widow and her children then formed one household with her mother, Gildo's Widow (he had died a
Jane Frances de Chantal, Saint - She married Baron de Chantal, 1592, and was left a Widow with four children, 1601
Lysanias - An inscription found near Baalbek on a memorial tablet to "Zenodorus, son of the tetrarch Lysanias, and to Lysanias her children" by the Widow of the first and mother of the second Lysanias proves Luke's accuracy, which had been doubted because no proof was found of the existence of a second Lysanias
Self-Dissatisfaction: a Spur - During the nine years that I was his wife,' says the Widow of the great artist Opie, 'I never saw him satisfied with one of his productions, and often, very often, have I seen him enter my sitting-room, and throwing himself in an agony of despondence on the sofa, exclaim, 'I never, never shall be a painter as long as I live!' It was a noble despair, such as is never felt by the self-complacent daubers of signboards, and it bore the panting aspirant up to one of the highest niches in the artistic annals of his country
Martha - Some have imagined that she was the wife or Widow of Simon the leper; which would account for the place where Mary anointed Christ being termed his house
Hedwig, Saint - Widow, Duchess of Silesia, born Andechs castle, Bavaria, 1174; died Trebnitz, 1243
Zarephath - Luke’s report of Christ’s sermon at Nazareth distinctly connects Zarephath with Sidon, as do the LXX Septuagint and Massoretic Text in the account of Elijah’s sustenance by the Widow there. The choice, among all others, of the Widow of pagan Phœnician Zarephath, and of Naaman the leper of heathen Syrian Damascus, to receive the favours of the prophets Elijah and Elisha, filled the crabbed synagogue hearers of Nazareth with wrath and murder (Luke 4:25 ff
Gehazi - Gehazi did testify to the king of Elisha's good deeds and helped the Widow get her lands restored (2 Kings 8:1-6 )
Holofernes - God raised up a pious Widow, named Judith, of extraordinary virtue and courage (8), who reanimated the confidence of her compatriots
Widow - , "a woman a Widow;" Luke 7:12 ; 18:3,5 ; 20:47 ; 21:2,3 ; Acts 6:1 ; 9:39,41 ; 1 Timothy 5:3 (twice),4,5,11,16 (twice); James 1:27 ; 1 Timothy 5:9 refers to elderly "widows" (not an ecclesiastical "order"), recognized, for relief or maintenance by the church (cp. 1 Timothy 5:3,16 ), as those who had fulfilled the conditions mentioned; where relief could be ministered by those who had relatives that were "widows" (a likely circumstance in large families), the church was not to be responsible; there is an intimation of the tendency to shelve individual responsibility at the expense of church funds
Lemuel - Abstemious; a pleader for and patron of those who cannot defend themselves, the Widow and orphan
Carmel - There Nabal treated David and his men with disrespect and disregard, an action eventually resulting in Nabal's death and David's marriage to his Widow Abigail (1 Samuel 25:2-40 )
Buffet - in Luke 18:5 , of the persistent Widow, text, "wear out" (AV, "weary")
Onanism - When Juda requested Onan to marry his (Onan's) brother's Widow, in order to raise up progeny to his brother, Onan frustrated conception
Anna - ...
(3) A prophetess, daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Aser; the Widow in the Temple who recognized Jesus, when presented to the Lord, as the Redeemer (Luke 2)
Marie de Rabutin Chantal, Marquise de Sevigne - Married at 18, she was a Widow at 25, devoting all her time and energy to the education of her two children, Charles and Frances-Margaret who became Marquise de Grignan and whom she idolized
Widow - In Bible times Widows usually found life difficult, partly because they were defenceless against people able to take advantage of them. Without anyone to support and protect them, many Widows became lonely and poor. The law of Moses recognized that Widows needed special protection against social injustice (Exodus 2:22; Deuteronomy 24:17; Jeremiah 7:5-7; Mark 12:40-44; Luke 18:1-5). ...
Throughout the Bible God shows a special concern for Widows and he expects people in general to have similar concern (Deuteronomy 10:18; Deuteronomy 14:29; Deuteronomy 24:19; Psalms 68:5; Psalms 146:9; Proverbs 15:25; Isaiah 1:17; James 1:27). Christians in the Jerusalem church showed such concern when they organized a daily distribution of food to the Widows among them (Acts 6:1-3). Paul therefore suggested that the church support only those Widows who were over sixty years of age and who had no other means of support. Widows in Christian families were to be supported by those families (1 Timothy 5:3-16). ...
Paul reminded Christians that a Widow in the church was free to remarry, provided she married another Christian and provided the circumstances were favourable (Romans 7:2-3; 1 Corinthians 7:26-27; 1 Corinthians 7:39-40). In the case of younger Widows, he advised in favour of remarriage (1 Timothy 5:11-15). ...
A custom in Old Testament times was that when a man died having no children, his brother had the duty of producing a son through the Widow
Ruth, Book of - On the death of Elimelech and his sons, Naomi the Widow returned to Bethlehem, accompanied by Ruth, who clave to her, declaring that Naomi's God should be her God, and Naomi's people should be her people. ...
The Book of Ruth may be taken as having a prophetic force: Naomi may represent Israel separated by death from 'God my king' (Elimelech), a Widow and desolate among the Gentiles: Ruth, the remnant in which, on the ground of mercy, the nation will bear a son
Avoid - side, void, Widow L
Martha - Martha was probably the Widow of Simon a leper (comp
Baking Bread - Elijah requests the same of the Widow of Zarephath, 1 Kings 17:13 , Amnon the son of David requests Tamar his sister to come and make cakes in his sight, that he might eat at her hand, 2 Samuel 13:6
Certain - There came a certain poor Widow
the Importunate Widow - WITH all his ungodliness and with all his inhumanity, there was a Widow in that city who brought the unjust, judge to his senses. His boast within himself was that he neither feared God nor regarded man, but there was a Widow in that city who made him both fear her and regard her. There were many Widows who had adversaries in our Lord's land and day, and He must have known more than one of them. Who knows but that she herself was this very Widow with an adversary? Nothing is more likely. At any rate, whoever this Widow was, by this time she was driven all but beside herself with adversity and oppression and robbery. But after that day when this wild woman suddenly sprang in upon him with a knife hidden away among her rags-after that day he said, Because this Widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me. There is a tinge of blood in the original ink that is lost in the tame translation, because there was a gleam of blood in the Widow's wild eye on that last day of her warning and appeal to the unjust judge. ...
Now it is not by any means every woman who has the making of a "widow indeed" in her. But there are some other souls who say unto their Lord as soon as He has spoken this about the Widow and her adversary to them: Lo, now speakest Thou plainly, and speakest no parable. Every elect soul, He says, is like that Widow in that city. As that Widow had an adversary who had done all that to her, even so, every soul, elect to a great salvation, has an adversary who has done all that to it, and far more than all that. I do not know, and I cannot tell you, the name of that Widow's adversary in that city. This Widow had only one adversary, and so it is with the elect. ...
Avenge me! the Widow cries
Sequester - ) To renounce (as a Widow may) any concern with the estate of her husband
Shealtiel - Shealtiel dying without male issue, Pedaiah by the Levirate law married his brother's Widow (Deuteronomy 25:5-10; Matthew 22:24-28)
Anna - the daughter of Phanuel, a prophetess and Widow, of the tribe of Asher, Luke 2:36-37
Alms - Every third year the tithe of the produce of the fanners was to be shared with the Levite, the fatherless, the stranger, and the Widow
Alms - Every third year also, (14:28) each proprietor was directed to share the tithe of his produce with "the Levite, the stranger, the fatherless and the Widow
the Widow With the Two Mites - SHE was a Widow. And she was surely the poorest Widow in all the city that day. Only, Anna lodged in the precincts of the temple, and departed not from the temple night and day, whereas this poor Widow somehow and somewhere had an impoverished house of her own. ' And as He sits and speaks to us, and points us to this poor Widow, we lay to heart from Him many lessons. And thus it was that this poor Widow's mind weighed out for her this never-to-be-forgotten approval and applause of our Lord, "Verily I say unto you, that this poor Widow hath cast more in than all they which have cast into the treasury. Why, our very Lord Himself, though He was rich, yet for our sakes had become so poor that the poor Widow was richer than He was that day. All the time the poor Widow was coming up the street singing to her own heart the sixty-third Psalm, our Lord was sitting in the treasury singing to His Father the fortieth Psalm. And, like our Sustentation Fund also, all classes contributed to the support of the sacred house; from the rich among the people down to this poor Widow. And if, under God's hand, you are such a Widow that you have nothing to give to your deacon but a willing mind, and a word of God-speed, that is quite enough
Levirate Marriage - (Latin: levir, a husband's brother) ...
A Hebrew ordinance, by which the brother of a man who died without male issue was obliged to marry the Widow
Birgitta, Saint - Widow; foundress of the Brigittines
Hiram - He was the son of a Widow of Dan, and of a Tyrian father
Marriage, Levirate - (Latin: levir, a husband's brother) ...
A Hebrew ordinance, by which the brother of a man who died without male issue was obliged to marry the Widow
Lydia - A seller of purple-dyed garments at Philippi, probably a Widow and a ‘proselyte of the gate’ (see art
Anna - She had attained a great age, upwards of a hundred years, since she had been a wife for seven years and a Widow for eighty-four (see RV Widow - Among the Hebrews, even before the law, a Widow who had no children by her husband was to marry the brother of her deceased spouse, in order to raise up children who might inherit, his goods and perpetuate his name and family
Sweden, Bridget of, Saint - Widow; foundress of the Brigittines
Maximus Petronius, Emperor of the West - Maximus then seized the vacant throne, and compelled Eudoxia, the Widow of Valentinian, to marry him a few days after her husband's death, his own wife having died shortly before
Mohammed - Of the powerful tribe of Fihr or Quraish, Mohammed spent his early life as a shepherd and an attendant of caravans, and at 25 married Khadeejah, a rich Widow
Martha - From the residence being called "her house," some have supposed that she was a Widow, and that her brother and sister lodged with her
Jeanne Marie Bouvier de la Motte Guyon - Married at 16, she was a Widow at 28
Nail - Among the ancient Arabs it was the custom for a Widow to allow her nails to grow during her term of mourning
Hungary, Elizabeth of, Saint - Queen, Widow, born Pressburg, Hungary, 1271; died Marburg, Hesse, 1336
Tadmor - On Odenathus' assassination his Widow Zenobia assumed the title Queen of the East, but was conquered and made captive (A
Elizabeth of Hungary, Saint - Queen, Widow, born Pressburg, Hungary, 1271; died Marburg, Hesse, 1336
Boaz - He features in the book of Ruth as the man who helped the young Moabite Widow Ruth and later married her (see RUTH). ...
Boaz was a godly man who was eager to reward Ruth when he learnt of her kindness to her Widowed mother-in-law (Ruth 2:11-12)
Widow - Widow . Widows from their poverty and unprotectedness, are regarded in OT as under the special guardianship of God ( Psalms 68:6 ; Psalms 146:9 , Proverbs 15:25 , Deuteronomy 10:18 , Jeremiah 49:11 ); and consequently due regard for their wants was looked upon as a mark of true religion, ensuring a blessing on those who showed it ( Job 29:13 ; Job 31:16 , Isaiah 1:17 , Jeremiah 7:6-7 ; Jeremiah 22:3-4 ); while neglect of, cruelty or injustice towards them were considered marks of wickedness meriting punishment from God ( Job 22:9-10 ; Job 24:20-21 , Psalms 94:6 , Isaiah 1:23 ; Isaiah 10:2 , Zechariah 7:10 ; Zechariah 7:14 , Malachi 3:5 ). is especially rich in such counsels, insisting that Widows be granted full justice ( Deuteronomy 24:17 ; Deuteronomy 27:19 ), that they be received as guests at sacrificial meals ( Deuteronomy 14:29 , Deuteronomy 16:11 ; Deuteronomy 16:14 , Deuteronomy 26:12 f. ...
The earliest mention of Widows in the history of the Christian Church is found in Acts 6:1 , where the Grecian Jews murmured ‘against the Hebrews because their Widows were neglected’ in the daily distribution of alms or food. Paul dealing with the matter in 1 Timothy 5:3-16 , where he charges relatives and Christian friends to relieve those Widows with whom they are personally connected ( 1 Timothy 5:4 ; 1 Timothy 5:8 ; 1 Timothy 5:15 ), so that the Church might be the more able to relieve those who were ‘widows indeed’ ( i. Widows in actual poverty and without anyone responsible for their support) ( 1 Timothy 5:3 ; 1 Timothy 5:5 ; 1 Timothy 5:16 ). He further directs that ‘none be enrolled as Widows’ except those who were sixty years of age, of unimpeachable character, and full of good works; and he adds that ‘the younger Widows’ should be ‘refused’ ( i. ’ Since it could not have been the Apostle’s wish that only Widows over sixty should receive pecuniary help from the Church (for many young Widows might be in great poverty), and since he could not describe the re-marriage of such a Widow-pensioner as a rejection of her faith, it follows that the list of Widows, from which the younger Widows were to be excluded, was not the list of those who were in receipt of Church relief, but rather a list of those, from among the pensioner-widows, who were considered suitable by age and character to engage officially in Church work. Therefore we may see in this passage a proof of the existence thus early in the history of the Church of that ecclesiastical order of ‘Widows’ which we find mentioned frequently in post-Apostolic times
Hiram - "Son of a Widow of Naphtali," but in 2 Chronicles 2:13-14, of one "of the daughters of Dan," i. When her husband died she married again, as Widow of a Naphtalite, a Tyrian to whom she bore Hiram Blunt (Undesigned Coincidences) makes her of the colony Dan or Laish in Naphtali, bordering on Sidoninn or Tyrian territory
Shunem - She is ‘a great woman,’ perhaps an heiress, and takes the lead in both stories; by the time of the latter she may have been a Widow
Beneficence - It includes all the kind exertions on the behalf of the poor, the sick, the fatherless, the Widow, the distressed, &c
Martha - Some interpreters identify Martha as the wife (widow) or daughter of Simon the leper on the basis of harmonization with Matthew 26:6-13 and Mark 14:3-9
Elias - After the brook had dried up he crossed over to Sarepta, where he was hospitably received by a poor Widow, whose charity he rewarded by increasing her store of meal and oil and by raising her child to life
Elijah - After the brook had dried up he crossed over to Sarepta, where he was hospitably received by a poor Widow, whose charity he rewarded by increasing her store of meal and oil and by raising her child to life
Ruth - At the end of ten years Naomi now left a Widow and childless, having heard that there was plenty again in Judah, resolved to return to Bethlehem, and her daughter-in-law Ruth returned with her
Inheritance - A childless Widow could, however, ask the brother of her dead husband to act as a sort of temporary husband to her, so that she might produce a son who would inherit the dead husband’s property and carry on his name (Deuteronomy 25:5-10; see Widow)
Widows - Widows and orphans are alluded to by St. James (James 1:27) as a class specially needing sympathy and support, and those who visit this class and extend to it sympathetic help thereby truly serve God, who is ‘a father of the fatherless, and a judge of the Widows’ (Psalms 68:5). of charity to Widows as true worship, occurs in Polycarp (ad Philipp. 4), who speaks of Widows as a θυσιαστήριον, ‘altar of sacrifice,’ on which Christians should lavish their offerings as of old worshippers of Jahweh placed their gifts on the altar in the Temple. The same attitude towards Widows is found in almost all the literature of the sub-Apostolic Age. In Hermas we find repeatedly such sentiments as the following: ‘Instead of fields then buy ye oppressed souls as each one can, and Widows and orphans mercifully visit (ἐπισκέπτεσθε) and do not overlook them’ (Sim. Fasting is recommended so that by the saving thus effected the Widow and the orphan might be filled (v. Deacons who exercise their office wickedly, robbing Widows and orphans of their livelihood, are spots on the Church (ix. Heretics are censured by Ignatius because ‘they do not care for the love-feast or for brotherly love (περὶ ἀγάπης), nor yet for the Widow nor the orphan’ (ad Smyrn. Aristides in his Apology can say of Christians as a whole: ‘From the Widows they do not turn away their countenance; they rescue the orphan from him who does him violence’ (see Hermas, Vis. That there was need of such injunctions is clear, because church-officers might selfishly appropriate funds for their own use, and also because Widows themselves might in a mercenary spirit take too much and ‘make their Widowhood a profitable trade’ (E. ‘Widows,’ in Smith and Cheetham’s DCA ii. , where the faults of Widows are enumerated). Oesterley, EGT , London, 1910, on James 1:27) all lay stress on the duty of ‘practising kindness’ towards Widows. There were deposits for Widows and orphans in the treasury of the Temple (2 Maccabees 3:10), and from the gospel we learn that even well-to-do Widows were robbed by the Pharisees and that others were subject to spoliation without legal redress (Mark 12:40; see Swete, in loc. ; Luke 18:1-8; see also, for Widows in the early Church, J. Paul cared so much (τοὺς πτωχοὺς τῶν ἁγίων, Romans 15:26), and whom he helped by means of the offerings of the Gentile churches (1 Corinthians 16), would include Widows. Of course there were Widows who were not poor, such as the mother of John Mark, and there were others for whom their relatives could provide; but as a class Widows were poor, and the Church could not let them starve. , we learn that in the Church of Jerusalem there were many Widows, not only Aramaic-speaking Widows, but also those of Jewish blood who spoke Greek. These men saw to it that the Hellenist Widows as well as the others were fed at the daily ministration-probably meals were procured daily wherever the church met for worship. Before this the duty of helping the poor, and among them Widows, was left to the dictates of spontaneous individual charity in the daily ministration; now it was partially organized. Nothing is said, however, of a roll of Widows or of specific qualifications such as age being necessary before relief could be given. In Joppa Tabitha (Dorcas) had instituted a species of clothing society for the help of Widows (Acts 9:36 ff. In both of these passages Widows are brought before us as a needy class who were tended by the charity of their fellow-believers. ...
When 1 Timothy 5:3-16 was written the question of the Church’s relation to Widows-in Ephesus at any rate-had become a serious problem. The Apostle makes it clear that no Widows were to be relieved who had children or grandchildren able to support them. There is every reason to believe that there were families who tried to evade what was a cardinal obligation of piety by attempting to get their Widowed mothers or grandmothers to be supported by the Church. Possibly some Widows were themselves eager to do so, so as to gain thus greater personal liberty. Paul is emphatic in declaring that descendants ought to support their Widowed relatives. The principle is stated generally in 1 Timothy 5:3-4, ‘Respect Widows who are really Widows. But if any Widow has children or grandchildren, let such descendants learn first of all to act piously towards their own households and to requite their parents’; and a specific application of the same principle is thus expressed: ‘If any believing woman has Widows, let her provide for them, and let the church not be burdened, lest really deserving Widows have not sufficient support’ (1 Timothy 5:16). The Apostle here lays down a basal principle of Christian charity in general, making it apply specifically to the case of Widows. The Apostle also states that those Widows who lived a fast life-a living death-were not to be supported out of Church funds. Those Widows only are to be cared for who are really destitute and who have their hope fixed on God and keep to their prayers night and day-in other words, thoroughly God-fearing Widows who have no relatives to whom they can look for help. If the Apostle had stopped here, there would be no difficulty in understanding the teaching of the passage, but he goes on to speak of a roll (κατάλογος) of Church Widows, and the question is whether this roll is a poor roll simply or whether it is a sort of inner circle selected from all those Widows whom the Church relieved. If the latter view be correct, then we have an indefinite band of destitute Widows, of all ages, supported by the Church, and of this band a select few who are on a roll of honour because they occupy some status in the Church. Only destitute Widows of sixty and upwards can be included, who have hitherto had a blameless career and a record of good works. Such an enrolled Widow must have been ‘a woman of one man,’* must have brought up her family well, must have washed the disciples’ feet, shown hospitality to strangers, done service to the oppressed. If the Apostle intended the help of the Church to be restricted to such, then what was to become of destitute Widows under sixty or even of those who did not come up to the moral requirements demanded? It is because this ruling appears so harsh that many scholars see in this catalogue not a poor catalogue at all, but a roll of Widows with ecclesiastical functions and status. The Apostle excludes from this roll all younger Widows. The Widows on the roll were expected to remain unmarried, but the Apostle advises the younger Widows to marry and become good housewives. ...
It is clear that this catalogue, even if it is regarded as more than a poor roll, cannot refer to the Widows found in the Western Church in the 5th cent. and onwards, for in this order were included all Widows of whatever age who took the vow of abstinence and donned a special ecclesiastical dress. But it is contended that there was an earlier order of Widows in some churches (cf. 13), ‘I salute the virgins who are called Widows’ (see Lightfoot in loc. ), is claimed to support the contention, but against it is the fact that the Apostle says nothing as to the duties of the catalogued Widows; and indeed the age limit imposed would render many of them unable to do any strenuous work for the Church. Besides, the whole passage is on the face of it concerned mainly with Church support, and again in the East, even in Chrysostom’s time, Widows were regarded mainly if not exclusively as Church pensioners. deaconesses would in many cases be taken from the ranks of the Widows (Tert. In Titus 2:3 the aged women referred to are not female presbyters, and so on the whole it is better to regard the roll here spoken of as a catalogue of those Widows who ought to be supported by the Church, and perhaps of these it was expected that they would give their time and skill to the service of the Christian community. Paul speaks so strongly about the remarriage of young Widows is no proof-on our view of the meaning of ‘a woman of one man’-that younger Widows if they remarried and again became Widows would be excluded from the roll, for they would still be faithful to one husband. On the other hand, the case of a destitute Widow under sixty is not directly discussed. The Church’s earlier relations to Widows were distinctly eleemosynary, whatever the later may have been, and there is no reason to believe that anything else is intended by St. ...
The right of Widows to remarry is tacitly taken for granted by the Apostle in Romans 7:3 and 1 Corinthians 7:8; 1 Corinthians 7:39; and, although in the latter passage he advises them to remain as they are, it is because of special reasons of temporal distress. , is separated by a wide chasm from the opinion which became prevalent later when the remarriage of Widows was regarded with horror. ...
Once, in Revelation 18:7, the term ‘widow’ is used of a city in affliction-a usage borrowed from the OT prophets (cf. The idea of Grotius that Euodia and Syntyche mentioned in Philippians 4:2 were ‘widows’ can be neither proved nor disproved. ‘Widow. ’ For Widows of a later age, see E. ‘Widows,’ in Smith and Cheetham’s DCA ii. All these discuss the relation between the Widow and the deaconess
Sons of the Prophets - In that capacity, Elisha cared for the needs of a prophet's Widow (2 Kings 4:1-7 ), agreed to the building of a common dwelling (2 Kings 6:1-7 ), and presided at a common meal (2 Kings 4:38-44 )
Eunice - One of the cursives 25 adds the word χήρας in Acts 16:1; and although this is undoubtedly a marginal gloss that crept into the text, it may refer to an early tradition that Eunice was a Widow at the date of the Apostle’s visit to Lystra, and would give added emphasis to the injunction of 1 Timothy 5:4 regarding the treatment of Widows by their children or grandchildren,...
W
Famine - The famine in Ruth 1:1 was probably owing to the Midianite devastation of the land (Judges 6), so severe in the Holy Land that Elimelech had to emigrate to Moab, and Naomi his Widow returned not until ten years had elapsed
Virgin - In Joel 1:8 it is used of a young Widow
Barley - Barley harvest was a note of time; as when it is said Rizpah, the afflicted Widow of Saul, watched over her seven sons' bodies "from the beginning of barley harvest until water dropped upon them out of heaven" (2 Samuel 21:9-10), i
Queen - Wife or Widow of a monarch and the female monarch reigning in her own right
Widow - Under the Mosaic dispensation no legal provision was made for the maintenance of Widows. (16:11,14) With regard to the remarriage of Widows, the only restriction imposed by the Mosaic law had reference to the contingency of one being left childless in which case the brother of the deceased husband had a right to marry the Widow. (25:5,6; Matthew 22:23-30 ) In the apostolic Church the Widows were sustained at the public expense, the relief being daily administered in kind, under the superintendence of officers appointed for this special purpose, (Acts 6:1-6 ) Particular directions are given by St. (1 Timothy 5:3-16 ) Out of the body of such Widows a certain number were to be enrolled, the qualifications for such enrollment being that they were not under sixty years of age; that they had been "the wife of one man," probably meaning but once married ; and that they had led useful and charitable lives. ( 1 Timothy 5:9,10 ) We are not disposed to identify the Widows of the Bible either with the deaconesses or with the presbutides Of the early Church. The order of Widows existed as a separate institution, contemporaneously with these offices, apparently for the same eleemosynary purpose for which it was originally instituted
Abigail - Abigail was the daughter of Nahash who, because of textual uncertainties has been described as (1) another name for Jesse; (2) the wife of Jesse; and (3) the father of Abigail and Zeruiah, who died and whose Widow became a wife of Jesse
Genealogy - , a marriage of a man to the childless Widow of his elder brother, the children of the second marriage being reckoned as the legal descendants of the first husband
Anna - Anna was a Widow 84 years of age (Authorized Version), or more probably ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885) about 105, as 7 years of married life followed by 84 years of Widowhood would make her to be. Anna would seem to later times an ideal saint of the cloister, as such stress is laid on her virginity, her long life of Widowhood, and her ceaseless devotions
Kinsman - Boaz demonstrated one of the duties of the kinsman—that of marrying the Widow of a deceased kinsman
Visit - ...
To visit the fatherless and Widow, or the sick and imprisoned, to show them regard and pity, and relieve their wants
Tithes - and the stranger, and the fatherless, and the Widow. The poor Widow who cast in the two mites cast in more than the rich, for it was her whole living
Vows - (Numbers 30:2 ; 23:21; Ecclesiastes 5:4 ) (2) If persons In a dependent condition made vows as (a) an unmarried daughter living in her father's house, or (b) a wife, even if she afterward became a Widow the vow, if (a) in the first case her father, or (b) in the second her husband, heard and disallowed it, was void; but,if they heard without disallowance, it was to remain good
Alien - Thus Elijah was an alien in the home of the Widow of Zarephath (1 Kings 17:20 ; “to sojourn” is to be an alien)
Famine (2) - ) In order to illustrate the truth that no prophet is best received in his own country, He reminds His hearers that Elijah was at that time sent not to one of the many Widows in Israel, but to the Widow of Sarepta in the territory of Sidon
Affinity - If he left no children, the surviving brother was to raise up children to his deceased brother by marrying his Widow
Alien - Thus Elijah was an alien in the home of the Widow of Zarephath (1 Kings 17:20 ; “to sojourn” is to be an alien)
Heir - If a brother died childless the surviving brother should wed his Widow and raise seed to his brother. ...
Moses allowed the obligation to be evaded, if the brother-in-law preferred the indignity of the Widow loosing his shoe off his foot, in token of forfeiting all right over the wife and property of the deceased, as casting the shoe over a place implies taking possession of it (Leviticus 25:23-27; Psalms 108:9); also the indignity of her spitting in his face, so that his name becomes a byword as the barefooted one, implying abject meanness
Treasury - (1) In the two Synoptic passages it is used, in connexion with the incident of the poor Widow who gave her two mites, to denote a treasure-chest, or receptacle into which offerings were cast by worshippers coming into the Temple—a sense in which the word is found also in Josephus (Ant. It was into one of these shôphârôth that the Widow would cast her all
Martha - ) Theophylact made her daughter of Simon the leper, others his wife or Widow
Name - In Isaiah 65:15, "ye shall leave your name for a curse unto My chosen, for the Lord shall call His servants by another name": instead of a "curse," as the name of Jew had been, the elect Jews shall have a new name, God's delight, "Hephzibah," and married to Him, "Beulah," instead of "forsaken" and "widow" (Isaiah 62:2-4)
Violence - 22:3 with the meaning of “to do no violence”: “… And do no wrong, do no violence to the stranger, the fatherless, nor the Widow, neither shed innocent blood in this place
Avenge, Avenger - " With the meaning (a), it is used in the parable of the unjust judge, Luke 18:3,5 , of the "vindication" of the rights of the Widow; with the meaning (b) it is used in Revelation 6:10 ; 19:2 , of the act of God in "avenging" the blood of the saints; in 2 Corinthians 10:6 , of the Apostle's readiness to use his apostolic authority in punishing disobedience on the part of his readers; here the RV substitutes "avenge" for the AV, "revenge;" in Romans 12:19 of "avenging" oneself, against which the believer is warned
Nain - Luke mentions it (Luke 7:11) as the ‘city’ to which the Widow, whose dead son Jesus raised to life, belonged
Banquet - To these the "widow, and the fatherless, and the stranger" were welcome (Deuteronomy 16:11 )
Henry Viii, King - The second son of Henry VII, he was intended in his youth for the Church; he married Catherine of Aragon, his brother Arthur's Widow, 1509, after obtaining the requisite dispensation
Ownership - The impoverished Widow would not be forced to sell her land to outsiders, thus diminishing the tribal area of the clan
Pen'Tecost, - The Pentecost was the Jewish harvest-home, and the people were especially exhorted to rejoice before Jehovah with their families their servants, the Levite within their gates, the stranger, the fatherless and the Widow in the place chosen by God for his name, as they brought a free-will offering of their hand to Jehovah their God
Woman - , Matthew 11:11 ; 14:21 ; Luke 4:26 , of a "widow;" Romans 7:2 ; in the vocative case, used in addressing a "woman," it is a term not of reproof or severity, but of endearment or respect, Matthew 15:28 ; John 2:4 , where the Lord's words to His mother at the wedding in Cana, are neither rebuff nor rebuke
Naaman - Then, to justify and to illustrate His action in Working miracles outside the limits of His own city, He referred to the cases of the Widow of Sarepta and of Naaman, which were instances of blessings bestowed through the instrumentality of two of Israel’s greatest prophets on persons who were not of the house of Israel at all
Lamentations, Book of - In chapter 1 the prophet dwells on the manifold miseries oppressed by which the city sits as a solitary Widow weeping sorely
ma'ry the Virgin, - She had probably become a Widow before this time
Hospitality - The word is not used in the Old Testament, but its elements are recognizable: Abraham and the three visitors (Genesis 18:1-8 ), Lot and the two angels (Genesis 19:1-8 ), Abraham's servant at Nahor (Genesis 24:17-33 ), Reuel and Moses (Exodus 2:20 ), Manoah and the angel (Judges 13:15 ), Elijah and the Widow of Zarephath (1 Kings 17:10-11 ), and Elisha and the Shunammite woman (2 Kings 4:8-11 ). It was to be a characteristic of bishops and Widows (1 Timothy 3:2 ; 1 Timothy 5:10 ; Titus 1:8 ) and a duty of Christians (Romans 12:13 ; 1 Peter 4:9 )
Hiram - There is a discrepancy regarding his parentage: in 1 Kings 7:14 he is said to have been the son of a Widow of the tribe of Naphtali, and his father a man of Tyre: according to 2 Chronicles 2:14 his mother belonged to the tribe of Dan, though here, too, his father was a Tyrian
Ordinance - Isaiah and James give the same solution to the faithless observance of outward forms: cease to do evil, learn to do good, seek justice, correct oppression, defend the fatherless, plead for the Widow (Isaiah 1:16-17 ; James 1:27 )
Lydia - Probably she was a Widow carrying on the business of her dead husband, and her position at the head of a wealthy establishment shows the comparative freedom enjoyed by women bosh in Asia Minor and in Macedonia
Testament - The Widow of the deceased, like his daughters, had no legal right to a share in the estate. The prophets very frequently, and undoubtedly not without cause, exclaim against the neglect and injustice shown to Widows, Isaiah 1:17 ; Isaiah 10:2 ; Jeremiah 7:6 ; Jeremiah 22:3 ; Ezekiel 22:7 ; Exodus 22:22-24 ; Deuteronomy 10:18 ; Deuteronomy 24:17
Sandals - The loosing of a shoe of one who refused to marry the Widow of his deceased brother, and spitting upon the owner's face, was a ceremony prescribed in the Jewish law, Deuteronomy 25:7-10
Coins - The smallest coin in use was the Jewish lepton (referred to in the story of the poor Widow; Mark 12:41-44), and more than a hundred of these were needed to equal one denarius
Mammaea or Mamaea, Julia - By her marriage with the Syrian Gessius Marcianus she became the mother of Alexander Severus, and soon afterwards was a Widow
Lydia - Probably she was a Widow carrying on the business of her dead husband, and her position at the head of a wealthy establishment shows the comparative freedom enjoyed by women bosh in Asia Minor and in Macedonia
Foreigner - Yet, although ancient Near Eastern law codes stressed protection for the Widow and orphan, only Israel's contained legislation for the resident alien. Rahab, Ruth, Naaman, the Widow of Zarepath)
Stewardship - He did not rejoice in the tithe or a big offering as much as He did in the sacrificial, complete giving of a Widow
Avenger - The avenger or go'el is responsible to take the life of one who killed a family member ( Numbers 35:12 ), to receive restitution for crimes against a deceased relative (Numbers 5:7-8 ), buy back property lost to the family (Leviticus 25:25 ), redeem a relative who sold himself into slavery (Leviticus 25:48-49 ), or marry the Widow of a relative without sons and perpetuate the family (Deuteronomy 25:5-10 )
Genealogy of the Lord Jesus - ' Again, it should be noted that by a Jewish law if a man died childless, his brother was to raise up seed to the deceased by his Widow, so that a son born thus might be called the legal son of the deceased, whereas he would be the actual or lineal son of his father, the brother of the deceased
Father - God declares himself to be the "Father of the fatherless, and Judge of the Widow," Psalms 68:5
Foot - Paul would have a Widow assisted by the church, to be one who had hospitably washed the feet of saints, 1 Timothy 5:10
Justina, Empress - 19 and 43), the Widow of Magnentius, killed in 353
Footwashing - ...
Washing the feet of other Christians was a qualification for service as a “widow” in the early church (1 Timothy 5:10 )
Evidence: Experimental - Now,' she said, 'I have been a Widow thirty years, and I was left with ten children, and I trusted in the Lord Jesus Christ in the depth of poverty, and he appeared for me and comforted me, and helped me to bring up my children so that they have grown up and turned out respectable
Tithe - (14:22-27) ...
Then follows the direction that at the end of three years all the tithe of that year is to be gathered and laid up "within the gates" and that a festival is to be held of which the stranger, the fatherless and the Widow together with the Levite, are to partake
Orphan - The meaning is clearly demonstrated in Lamentations 5:3 : "We have become orphans and fatherless, our mothers like Widows. Consequently in the Bible, and in the ancient Near East, orphans and Widows are usually mentioned together as the epitome of the poor and deprived of society, the personae miserabiles. In this text, given to a group of recently liberated slaves, the Lord passionately desired the protection of the orphan: "Do not take advantage of a Widow or an orphan. My anger will be aroused, and I will kill you with the sword; your wives will become Widows and your children fatherless" (22:22). The essence of true religion is "to look after orphans and Widows in their distress
Adonijah - " But on David's death he, through the queen mother Bathsheba, now exalted to Special dignity, sought Abishag, David's virgin Widow, to be given him, a contemplated incest only second to that perpetrated by Absalom, whom he so much resembled, and also a connection which was regarded in the East as tantamount to a covert claim to the deceased monarch's throne
Alms - " The poor were entitled to leavings from the produce of the field, the vineyard, and the olive yard (Leviticus 19:9-10; Leviticus 23:22; Deuteronomy 15:11; Deuteronomy 24:19; Deuteronomy 26:2-13), the third year's tithing for the Levite, the stranger, the fatherless, the Widow. An ecclesiastical order of Widowhood attended to charitable ministrations in the early church (1 Timothy 5:10)
Feet - ) and the habit of rendering such service to the ‘saints’ is mentioned amongst the qualifications of ‘widows’ (1 Timothy 5:10; see article Widow)
Elijah - When the brook had dried up he was sent to a Widow woman of Zarephath, and again the hand of the Lord supplied his wants and those of his friends. He raised the Widow's son to life
Jeroboam - He was the son of a Widow of Zereda, and while still young was promoted by Solomon to be chief superintendent of the "burnden", i
Family - Regardless of the help that may come from the government, the church, or other sources, Christians have a responsibility for the well-being of their aged parents (Mark 7:9-13; 1 Timothy 5:4; 1 Timothy 5:8; see also Widow)
Marcella, Friend of Jerome - Her mother Albina was a Widow when Athanasius came as an exile to Rome in 340
Olympias, the Younger - Olympias (2) , the younger, Widow; a celebrated deaconess of the church of Constantinople, the most eminent of the band of holy and high-born women whom Chrysostom gathered round him. In less than two years she was left a Widow without children
Elijah - Chrysostom said that Elijah learned compassion in the house of the Widow so he could be sent to his own people. The theophany in 1 Kings 19 is similar to Exodus 33:19 , and like the story of the Widow, may show that God is to be found in the daily affairs of humans, rather than in supernatural phenomena. ...
Jesus used the story of God sending Elijah to the Widow of Zarephath to show that the Gentiles were not to be excluded from salvation (Luke 4:25-26 )
Napoleon i - At the coronation ceremonies in Notre Dame, 1804, Napoleon crowned himself and the empress, although Pope Pius VII had been induced to officiate, on condition that Napoleon should previously go through a religious ceremony with Josephine de Beauharnais, the Widow he had civilly married, 1798
Arise - ...
Another special use of qûm is "rise up again," as when a childless Widow complains to the elders, "My husband's brother refuseth to raise up unto his brother a name in Israel …" ( Deuteronomy 25:7)
Pentecost - The Levite, stranger, fatherless, and Widow were invited
Poor - The considerate provisions of the law for the poor (based on principles already recognized by the patriarchs: Job 20:19; Job 24:3-4; Job 24:9-10; especially Job 29:11-16; Job 31:17) were:...
(1) The right of gleaning; the corners of the field were not to be reaped, nor all the grapes to be gathered, nor the olive trees to be beaten a second time; the stranger, fatherless, and Widow might gather the leavings; the forgotten sheaf was to be left for them (Leviticus 19:9-10; Deuteronomy 24:19; Deuteronomy 24:21; Ruth 2:2)
Complete - After providing the Widow with the amount needed, Elisha directed her: “Go sell the oil, and pay [3] thy debt …” (2 Kings 4:7)
First-Born - In case a man married with a Widow, who by a previous marriage had become the mother of children, the first-born as respected the second husband was the eldest child by the second marriage
Betrothal - In later times, in the case of a virgin it was after the lapse of a year, and at least thirty days in the case of a Widow; but it is impossible to establish more than a possibility of these periods in OT times. The status of the man and woman was now, as in Hebrew times, practically the same as that of married persons, although it was now generally customary for the wedding ceremony proper to be celebrated at the expiration of a year in the case of a virgin, and in thirty days in the case of a Widow
Marriage - By the Levirate law, as it is termed, if a Jew died without children, his nearest brother or kinsman was bound to marry the Widow, that her firstborn son after this marriage might be reckoned the son and heir of the first husband, Genesis 38:1-30 Deuteronomy 25:5-10 Matthew 22:23-26 . ...
The wedding festivities commonly lasted seven days for a maid, and three days for a Widow
Woman - see), and possibly ( 1 Timothy 5:3 ) that of the ‘ Widow ’ (wh
Banquets - At the three great religious feasts, when all the males appeared before Jehovah, the family had its feast, of which the stranger, the fatherless, and the Widow had their share (Deuteronomy 16:11)
Tabernacles, Feast of - It describes it as a day of joy for all, including servant, stranger, and Widow (Deuteronomy 16:13 ff
Break - ) To impart, as news or information; to broach; - with to, and often with a modified word implying some reserve; as, to break the news gently to the Widow; to break a purpose cautiously to a friend
University of Oxford - 1263 by Devorgilla, Widow of John de Baliol; Cardinal Manning was one of its scholars
Elijah - The brook at length becoming dry, he went to Zarephath belonging to Zidon at the commandment of the Lord, where he lodged with a poor Widow, whose faith was tested at the outset by the prophet's request that she should provide for his need first from her slender store of meal and oil, on the assurance of the Lord God of Israel that her barrel of meal and cruse of oil should not waste till He sent rain on the earth. This Widow is referred to in Luke's Gospel along with the case of Naaman the Syrian, as illustrating the abounding of the grace of God beyond the limits of Israel
Proselytes - In Psalms 94:6, as the pagan do not make Widow and strangers their chief object of attack, "the stranger" is probably the saint in relation to this world (Psalms 39:12), and "the Widow" is the Widowed church awaiting Christ's glorious epiphany to avenge her on antichrist (Luke 18:3-8)
Elijah - The brook at length becoming dry, he went to Zarephath belonging to Zidon at the commandment of the Lord, where he lodged with a poor Widow, whose faith was tested at the outset by the prophet's request that she should provide for his need first from her slender store of meal and oil, on the assurance of the Lord God of Israel that her barrel of meal and cruse of oil should not waste till He sent rain on the earth. This Widow is referred to in Luke's Gospel along with the case of Naaman the Syrian, as illustrating the abounding of the grace of God beyond the limits of Israel
Christ, Miracles of - ...
Raising of the daughter of Jairus (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Raising of the son of the Widow of Naim (Luke 7)
Raising of Lazarus (John 11)
The subject of the miracles of Christ has been well dealt with, both from an apologetic and an exegetic point of view, by L
Miracles of Christ - ...
Raising of the daughter of Jairus (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Raising of the son of the Widow of Naim (Luke 7)
Raising of Lazarus (John 11)
The subject of the miracles of Christ has been well dealt with, both from an apologetic and an exegetic point of view, by L
Elisha - ...
The prophet used his power to provide a Widow with an abundance of valuable oil to save her children from slavery (2 Kings 4:1-7 )
Mark (John) - Probably Mary was a Widow
Levirate Law - levir, ‘a husband’s brother’) regulated the marriage of a man with his dead brother’s Widow
Galba - His friendship with Liuia, the Widow of Augustus, gave him great influence from the start
Parable - ...
Importunate Widow, Luke 18:1-8
Mourning - the Widows gather round the body of Dorcas, weep and recount her good deeds. Babylon in her strength boasts, ‘No Widow am I, and shall in no wise see mourning’ (Revelation 18:7). In a day she knows the Widowhood of retributive disaster (Revelation 18:8). The representation changes-widowed Babylon is herself mourned for by others (Revelation 18:8-19); see 1
Family - (the bishop), 1 Timothy 5:4 (the Widow), 2 Timothy 1:16; 2 Timothy 4:19 (Onesiphorus, who apparently was dead, and whose household is nevertheless named after him: see below, 2 (d)), Hebrews 11:7 (Noah), and, in plural, 1 Timothy 3:12 (deacons), Titus 1:11 (Christians generally); (2) for descendants, Luke 1:27; Luke 2:4; (3) for God’s family, the house of God (see below, 3). ...
(c) οἰκία is similarly used for a ‘household’ in Philippians 4:22 (Caesar), Matthew 10:13; Matthew 12:25, John 4:53 (the Capernaum royal officer), 1 Corinthians 16:15 (Stephanas); and therefore for ‘possessions’ in the phrase ‘widows’ houses,’ Mark 12:40, Luke 20:47, and inferior Manuscripts of Matthew 23:14. Further, if the mother was a Widow, she, rather than one of the sons, seems, at least in some cases, to have been the head of the household. (Acts 16:15), who was probably a Widow, trading between Philippi and Thyatira, a city famous for dyeing, with a gild of dyers evidenced by inscriptions (the supposition that Lydia was the ‘true yokefellow’ of Philippians 4:3 rests on no solid basis). A similar case is perhaps that of Chloe; she seems to have been a Widow whose household (‘they of Chloe,’ 1 Corinthians 1:11) traded between Ephesus and Corinth
Family - A childless Widow could demand, though not enforce, re-marriage with her brother-in-law ( Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ). Its purpose was perhaps rather for the preservation of the particular branch of the family than for the advantage of the Widow herself: in any case it illustrates the strong sense of duty towards the family as a whole
Inheritance - ( c ) For the Widow no immediate place was found in the succession. According to the levirate law, however, when a man died leaving no son, his brother or other next-of-kin ( go’çl ) must marry the Widow, and her firstborn son by this marriage became the heir of her previous husband ( Deuteronomy 25:6 )
Healing, Divine - ...
On four occasions Jesus' compassion is specially noted in connection with healing the sick: the Widow of Nain with her dead son (Luke 7:13-14 )
Meals - Great feasts were held at the end of each third year (Deuteronomy 14:28) when the Levite, stranger, fatherless, and Widow were invited (compare Luke 14:12-13; Nehemiah 8:10-12)
Tithes - In Deuteronomy 10:9; 1618094655_6; Deuteronomy 14:22; Deuteronomy 14:29; Deuteronomy 18:1-2; Deuteronomy 26:12-14, the general first tithe of all animal and vegetable increase for maintaining the priests and Levites is taken, for granted; what is added in this later time is the second additional tithe of the field produce alone, and for celebrating the sacred feasts each first and second year in the Shiloh or Jerusalem sanctuary, and every third year at home with a feast to the Levites, the stranger, fatherless, and Widow
Sojourn, Dwell - Every third year the tithe of the harvest was to be deposited at the city gate with the elders and distributed among “the Levite, (became he hath no part nor inheritance with thee,) and the stranger, and the fatherless, and the Widow, which are within thy gates …” ( Poverty (2) - In accordance with this distinction, the contact of Jesus with the poor as described in the Gospels is almost confined to Judaea and Jerusalem (Matthew 19:16, Mark 10:21 the rich young ruler; Mark 12:42, Luke 21:1 the poor Widow; Matthew 26:6, Mark 14:5 ‘this ointment might have been sold for much and given to the poor’; Matthew 20:30, Mark 10:46, Luke 18:35 the blind beggars outside Jericho; cf. Isaiah 61:1-2, Luke 4:18), and specially contrasts the Widow with the rich donors to the Temple treasury (Mark 12:42, Luke 21:3)
Apocrypha - An angel leads him to Ecbatana, where he romantically marries a Widow who was still a virgin though she had had seven husbands. On the inspiration of the angel, Tobias marries the Widow, and, by burning the inner parts of a fish, puts the spirit to flight by the offensive smoke. Judith is a thrilling tale of how Judith, a Jewish Widow, secured the confidence of Holofernes, an Assyrian commander who was besieging Bethulia
Stranger - That he occupies a status inferior to that of the born Israelite is indicated by the fact that he is classed with the Widow and orphan as needing special consideration ( Deuteronomy 10:18 , Deuteronomy 14:29 , Deuteronomy 29:14 ; Deuteronomy 29:19 ), and that the right of intermarrying is denied him ( Deuteronomy 7:1 ff
Intercession - Elijah accused God of bringing “evil upon the Widow with whom I sojourn, by slaying her son” (1 Kings 17:20 ) and prayed successfully that the child would live again
Naphtali - , whom Solomon brought from Tyre to work on the house of Jahweh, was the son of a Widow of the tribe of Naphtali Firstborn - If a man died without children, the heir was the firstborn of his Widow by his brother or next-of-kin ( Deuteronomy 25:5-10 )
Judah - Er’s Widow, Tamar, a Canaanitess also, it seems, posing by the wayside as a hierodule, enticed Judah to intercourse with her, and of her the twin sons Perez and Zerah were born to Judah
Justice - The victims are disproportionately from the poor, among whom are the fatherless, the Widow, and the resident alien (Deuteronomy 27:19 ; Psalm 82 )
Domitianus, the Emperor - One of the most prominent conspirators concerned was Stephanus, an agent and freedman of the banished Widow of Clemens
Tithes - And the Levite, (because he hath no part nor inheritance with thee,) and the stranger, and the fatherless, and the Widow, which are within thy gates, shall come, and shall eat and be satisfied; that the Lord thy God may bless thee in all the work of thine hand which thou doest,"...
Deuteronomy 14:28 ; Deuteronomy 26:12
Poor And Poverty, Theology of - The words "poor" and "poverty" cover a wide range of meaning, overlapping with terms like "widow" or "orphan, " which underscores the expansive nature of the topic. Gleaning laws focused on the Widow, fatherless, stranger, and poor (Leviticus 19:9-10 ; 23:22 ; Deuteronomy 24:19-22 )
Ruth - At the end of ten years, there being plenty in Judah, Naomi, now a Widow and childless, returned; and Ruth in spite of her mother-in-law's suggestion that she should go back with Orpah (compare Luke 24:28), at the sacrifice of home and Moabite kindred (compare Luke 14:27-28), did cling to Naomi (Proverbs 17:17; Proverbs 18:24)
Vine - Vineyards could not be stripped totally of their grapes; the owner was to allow gleanings for the poor and the sojourner (Leviticus 19:10 ), and the fatherless and the Widow (Deuteronomy 24:21 )
Elijah (2) - Here Jesus justifies His performance of miracles in Capernaum, while refraining from working them in Nazareth, by citing the well-known story of Elijah’s going away from Israel in time of famine to relieve the distress of a Sidonian Widow (1 Kings 17:8-9)
Kill - The psalmist, too, metaphorically expresses the deprivation of the rights of helpless murder victims: “They slay the Widow and the stranger, and murder the fatherless” ( Apocrypha - Set in the time of Nebuchadnezzar, Judith is a vivid and dramatic narrative of a beautiful Jewish Widow, who, through a combination of extraordinary courage and trust in God, delivers her people in a time of crisis. Tobit, purportedly from the time of the Assyrian exile, combines the themes of quest, romance, and overcoming the demonic in a story of God's healing of his faithful servant Tobit and deliverance of the unfortunate Widow Sarah. The Protevangelium of James, for example, tells the story of Mary's birth, childhood, and eventual marriage to Joseph (a Widower with children), culminating in a detailed account of the birth of Jesus (in a cave) and a strong affirmation of Mary's virginity
Golden Rule - God loves the alien, the fatherless, and the Widow (Deuteronomy 9:5-6 ; 10:18 ), and the Israelites are to love the alien as well (Deuteronomy 10:19 )
Tithe, Tithing - Every third year tithes remained in the hometown and were given to the Levite, alien, orphan, and Widow (vv
Home - In 1 Timothy 5:4 Widows’ children are bidden εὐσεβεῖν τὸν ἴδιον οἶκον, ‘show piety at home’ (Authorized Version ), or ‘towards their own family’ (Revised Version ). Among Widows’ qualifications is that of having brought up children, who in turn are bidden to requite their parents by supporting the Widowed mother and grandmother (1 Timothy 5:10; cf. ...
The duty of showing hospitality is insisted on in the case of a ‘bishop’ in 1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:8 (he is to be φιλόξενος), and in the case of a Widow in 1 Timothy 5:10 (ἐξενοδόχησεν); and Christians in general are bidden to ‘pursue’ (Romans 12:13) and ‘not to forget’ (Hebrews 13:2) love unto strangers (φιλοξενία), to be ‘lovers of strangers’ (φιλόξενοι, 1 Peter 4:9), i
Martha - ...
The idea that the scene of this entertainment was Martha’s house has given rise to the unfortunate surmise that Martha was a Widow, Simon the Leper being her deceased husband
Come - So came I a Widow
Matthew - His business would not let Matthew stop to think who was a Widow, and who was an orphan, and who was being cruelly treated. Even if not for Himself and for his Widowed mother, the carpenter would often leave His bench to go to Matthew's toll-booth to expostulate with him, and to negotiate with him, and to become surety to him for this and that poor neighbour of His who had fallen into sickness, and into a debt that he was not able to pay. But by this time Jesus, first of Nazareth and now of Capernaum, who had been every poor Widow's cautioner for her rent and for her taxes, had left His father's inherited workshop, and had been baptized by John into a still larger Suretyship. And till one day, just as He was passing Matthew's well-worn doorstep, a Widow woman of the city, with her child in her arms, rushed up against our Lord, and exclaimed to Him: "Avenge me of mine adversary!" till she could not tell Him her heart-breaking tale for sobs and tears
Marriage - There is a particular law called the Levirate, which obliged a man, whose brother died without issue, to marry his Widow, and raise up seed to his brother, Deuteronomy 25:5 , &c. But Moses in some measure left it to a man's choice, whether he would comply with this law or not; for in case of a refusal the Widow could only summon him before the judges of the place, when, if he persisted, she untied his shoe, and spit in his face, and said, "Thus shall it be done unto the man who refuses to build up his brother's house
Aaron - The priest and high priest differed also in their marriage restrictions; for the high priest might not marry a Widow, nor a divorced woman, nor a harlot, but a virgin only; whereas the other priests might lawfully marry a Widow, Leviticus 21:7
Burial - ...
Fine ranges of tombs, said to be of the kings, judges, and prophets, still remain near Jerusalem; but these, many think, are the tomb of Helena, the Widow of the king of Adiabene, who settled at Jerusalem and relieved poor Jews in the famine foretold by Agabus under Claudius Caesar
Zerubbabel - "Son" probably means next heir, the direct line failing; by the Levirate law Shealtiel's Widow would marry her brother-in-law Pedaiah, who would raise seed to his brother Shealtiel (Deuteronomy 25:5-10; Matthew 22:24-28)
Comfort (2) - One of the occasions when comfort is most needed is bereavement: and perhaps the tears of Jesus at the tomb of Lazarus (John 11:35) have been as potent to solace the stricken as His word to the Widow of Nain, ‘Weep not’ (Luke 7:13)
Coins - ...
A third coin mentioned in the New Testament was the one the poor Widow put into the Temple treasury as Jesus watched (Mark 12:42 )
Elisha - He helped the poor Widow of one of the godly prophets by giving her a miraculous supply of oil that saved her entire family (2 Kings 4:1-7)
Macrina, the Younger - 349) she devoted herself to the care of her Widowed mother, the bringing up of her infant brother Peter, and the supervision of the interests of her family. Among its members were a Widow of high rank and wealth, named Vestiana, and a virgin named Lampadia, who is described as the chief of the band ( ib
Luke, Gospel of - Luke included the story of Christ's kind dealings with the Widow of Nain (Luke 7:11-18 ) and the sinful woman who anointed Him (Luke 22:7,22 ). He also related Jesus' parable of the Widow who persevered (Luke 18:1-8 )
Wages - Consequently, hired laborers could be classed with the personae miserabiles, the Widow, orphan, and stranger. One of the few bright moments during the dark days of the judges is reflected in the story of Ruth, a Moabite Widow, who faithfully determines to help her Widowed Israelite mother-in-law
Hilarius Arelatensis, Saint, Bishop of Arles - named Chelidonius, the validity of whose position was assailed on the two grounds that he had married a Widow while yet a layman, and that he had previously, as a lay magistrate, pronounced sentences of capital punishment. Leo found the charge of marriage with a Widow not proven against Chelidonius; and formally (as he had already done informally) pronounced him restored to his rank of bishop and to his see
Elijah - At the city gate he met with a Widow woman gathering sticks, from whom he desired a little water, adding, "Bring me, I pray thee, also a morsel of bread. " His prediction was fully accomplished, and he dwelt at the house of this Widow
Jordanis, Historian of the Goths - He carries the genealogy of the Amali down to Mathasuentha, the granddaughter of Theodoric and Widow of Vitigis, who had just married, as he tells us, Germanus brother of Justinian. Three times he alludes to the marriage of Mathasuentha, Widow of Vitigis (with whom she had been brought captive to Constantinople), to Germanus, brother of the emperor Justinian (cc
Elijah - When the brook dried up God sent him to the Widow of Zarephath, a city of Zidon, from whose scanty store he was supported for the space of two years. During this period the Widow's son died, and was restored to life by Elijah ( 1 Kings 17 :: 224-24 )
Alaric - Proba, Widow of the prefect Petronius, retired to Africa with her daughter Laeta and her granddaughter Demetrias (Hieron
Cassiodorus (or Rather, Cassiodorius) Magnus Aurelius - After the death of Theodoric, 525, Cassiodorus again became conspicuous as the trusted adviser of his daughter Amalasuntha, Widow of Eutaric, who acted as regent for her son Athalaric ( Var
Luke - This Gospel contains many things which are not found in the other Gospels; among which are the following: the birth of John the Baptist; the Roman census in Judea; the circumstances attending Christ's birth at Bethlehem; the vision granted to the shepherds; the early testimony of Simeon and Anna; Christ's conversation with the doctors in the temple when he was twelve years old; the parables of the good Samaritan, of the prodigal son, of Dives and Lazarus, of the wicked judge, and of the publican and Pharisee; the miraculous cure of the woman who had been bowed down by illness eighteen years; the cleansing of the ten lepers; and the restoring to life the son of a Widow at Nain; the account of Zaccheus, and of the penitent thief; and the particulars of the journey to Emmaus
Marriage - We note the omission of prohibition of marriage with a niece, and with Widow of maternal uncle. ]'>[3] , Josephus, Matthew 22:24 ), his brother, if he lives on the same estate, is to take his Widow, and the eldest child is to succeed to the name and inheritance of the deceased (cf. If the survivor refuses, a formal declaration is to be made before the elders of the city, and the Widow is to express her contempt by loosing his sandal and spitting in his face
James - Clopas (Alexandrinus and Vaticanus manuscripts, John 19:25) or Cleophas (Sinaiticus manuscript) is the Hebrew, Alphaeus the Greek, of the same name: he married Mary, sister of the Virgin Mary, and had by her James, Joses, Jude, and Simon, and three daughters (Mary is sometimes designated "mother of James and Joses," Matthew 27:56, as these were the two oldest); he died before our Lord's ministry began, and his Widow went to live with her sister the Virgin Mary, a Widow also herself (for Joseph's name never occurs after Luke 2), at Nazareth (Matthew 13:55), Capernaum (John 2:12), and Jerusalem (Acts 1:14)
Justice - God “executes justice for the orphan and the Widow, and loves the strangers, providing them food and clothing” (Deuteronomy 10:18 , NRSV; compare Hosea 10:12 ; Isaiah 30:18 ). These groups include Widows, orphans, resident aliens (also called “sojourners” or “strangers”), wage earners, the poor, and prisoners, slaves, and the sick (Job 29:12-17 ; Psalm 146:7-9 ; Malachi 3:5 )
Womanliness - To the instances given above of the relation of Jesus to women we may add His compassion for the Widow of Nain (Luke 7:13), and His commendation of the Widow’s mites (Mark 12:43-44)
Elisha - ); he multiplies the oil for the prophet’s Widow, who finds herself in dire extremity ( 2 Kings 4:1 ff)
Repentance - Defend the cause of the fatherless, plead the case of the Widow
Beauty - ); the courage and consecration of the Widow who gave her mites to the Lord (Mark 12:42 ff
Elisha - " The Widow of one of the prophets having told Elisha, that her husband's creditor was determined to take her two sons and sell them for slaves, Elisha multiplied the oil in the Widow's house, in such quantity that she was enabled to sell it and to discharge the debt
Phoebe - ...
That Phoebe was evidently preparing to travel alone suggests that she was a Widow (Conybeare-Howson, The Life and Epistles of St
Leovigild, Arian King of the Visigoths - In the first year of his reign Leovigild married Goisvintha, the Widow of his predecessor Athanagild and a strong Arian (Greg
Economic Life - In these cases the nearest male relative married the dead man's Widow to provide an heir for the deceased (Genesis 38:1 ). ...
Since life was uncertain and disease and war often took many of the village's inhabitants, laws were provided to insure that the Widow, the orphan, and the stranger would not go hungry. ) where the hero's father Daniel is said to be judging the cases of Widows and orphans at the threshing floor
Violence - Elsewhere, Jeremiah portrays taking advantage of the disadvantaged (orphan, Widow, and stranger) as violence (Jeremiah 22:3 )
Tears - To the Widow of Nain who was following the bier of her only son He said, ‘Weep not’ (Luke 7:13), as He had said to those who lamented the daughter of Jairus, ‘Why make ye this ado, and weep?’ (Mark 5:38-39)
Marriage - (Concerning the case where a married man died without leaving children see Widow
Lamentations, Theology of - The once proud city is now like a Widow, a queen become a slave (1:1)
Egypt - He and His parents found hospitality in the house of a Widow, where they remained for a year, at the close of which they were expelled because of a miracle wrought by Jesus in bringing a dry and salted fish to life
Burial - 2 Samuel 3:31, 2 Kings 13:21)—hence at Jesus’ command the Widow of Nain’s son was able to sit up at once (Luke 7:15)
Egypt - He and His parents found hospitality in the house of a Widow, where they remained for a year, at the close of which they were expelled because of a miracle wrought by Jesus in bringing a dry and salted fish to life
Purification (2) - By a similar ceremony, an Arab Widow who is about to remarry makes a bird fly away with the uncleanness of her Widowhood (W
Miracle - In addition to those already noted, Elisha provides unfailing oil for a needy Widow (2 Kings 4:1-7 ), purifies a pot of food, feeds a hundred men with twenty small loaves, and again demonstrates God's concern for foreigners in healing Naaman's leprosy (4:38- 5:27). Raising the son of the Nain Widow closely resembles the reanimations by Elijah and Elisha (Luke 7:11-17 ) and occurs on virtually the identical site as one of them (Old Testament Shunem)
Jephthah And His Daughter - 'Caius Martius,' says Plutarch, 'being left an orphan of his father, was brought up under his mother, a Widow, and he has taught us by his experience that orphanage brings many disadvantages to a child, but does not hinder him from becoming an honest man, or from excelling in virtues above the common sort. He doth execute the judgment of the fatherless and the Widow; He loveth the stranger, and giveth him food and raiment
Court Systems - The Shunammite Widow successfully appealed to the king of Israel for the restoration of her house and land, which she had abandoned during a time of famine (2 Kings 8:1-6 )
Incest - Also, in contrast to Leviticus 20:21 stands the legislation and practice of levirate marriage, a special case in which a brother or close kin is expected to marry the childless Widow of a brother and father a child who would carry on the family lineage in the dead brother's name
Priest, Christ as - Observing the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury, he praised the poor Widow who put in two small coins (Luke 21:1-4 )
Marriage (i.) - On the one hand, it was undesirable to make gifts or pay an instalment in a compact that might never be implemented by marriage, and, on the other hand, it was equally undesirable to dedicate a daughter to one who might not live to undertake her support, and thus cause her to be regarded as a Widow
Elisha - ...
A Widow ofone of the prophets appealed to Elishato save her two sonsfrom the grasp of a creditor
Maximus Magnus, Christian Emperor in the West - After Martin's departure, however, other bishops persuaded Maximus to remit the case to a secular judge, Evodius, and finally the emperor condemned Priscillian and his companions, including a rich Widow Euchrocia, to be beheaded
Hospitality - Widows, orphans, the poor, or sojourners from other lands lacked the familial or community status that provided a landed inheritance, the means of making a living, and protection. In its literature, Israel alone seems to have included the foreign sojourner along with those other alienated persons who were to receive care: the Widow, the orphan, and the poor
Circumstantiality in the Parables - The injustice of the Judge serves to bring out more forcibly that it was the importunity of the Widow that overcame him; the fraud of the Steward emphasizes the fact that it was for his wisdom alone that he was commended
Claim - This fact gives emphasis to the exceptional instances of Naaman and the Widow of Sarepta (Luke 4:25-29)
Hunneric, King of the Vandals. - His subjects were oppressed with taxes and exactions, but he relaxed the strictness of his father's laws against the orthodox, and, at the intercession of his sister-in-law Placidia, the Widow of the emperor Olybrius, and the emperor Zeno, allowed (a
Judah - Er died childless; and oriental or Chaldee custom (afterward permitted and regulated under the Mosaic code: Genesis 38:25-269; Deuteronomy 25:5) required Onan to marry his Widow Tamar. She resumed her Widow's garments
Law of Moses - ( Numbers 30:6-15 ) A Widow or a divorced wife became independent, and did not against fall under her father's power. (22:13-21) the raising up of seed (Levirate law) a formal right to be claimed by the Widow, under pain of infamy, with a view to preservation of families
Thecla - Paul a Virgin of Iconium daughter of a woman of rank (apparently a Widow) named Theocleia and affianced to Thamyris a youth who was first among the nobles of that city. Baffled and enraged the Syriarch brought her before the Roman governor who condemned her to be cast to wild beasts; committing her meanwhile to the care of Tryphaena a Widow lady (afterwards described as a queen and kinswoman of the emperor) who having lately lost her daughter Falconilla found comfort in the charge of the condemned maiden who converted her to Christ
Genseric, King of the Vandals - In 455 Genseric, at the invitation of Eudoxia, Valentinian's Widow, sailed to Italy, and took Rome without a blow
Paul's Visit to Jerusalem to See Peter - To face the Widows and the orphans of the men he had put to death in the days of his ignorance and unbelief. Now, if any of you have ever made any woman a Widow, or any child an orphan, or done anything of that remorseful kind, do not flee the country
Arrest - ); and it may well have been, as Ewald suggests, the house of Mary, that Widow lady who resided in Jerusalem with her son John Mark, and showed hospitality to the Apostles in after days (Acts 12:12)
Discourse - Of these there are a great number and variety, spoken sometimes to great multitudes, sometimes to groups, but publicly: on Blasphemy (Matthew 12:22-37, Mark 3:19-30); on Signs (Matthew 12:38-45); latter part of discourse on Eating with Unwashen Hands, and Traditions (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-23); on Signs again (Matthew 16:1-4, Mark 8:11-12); on Demons and Signs again (Luke 11:14-36); on Confession, Worldliness, Watchfulness (Luke 12); on Repentance, with parable of the Barren Fig-tree (Luke 13:1-9); on the Good Shepherd (John 10:1-18); on His Messiahship and Relations with the Father (John 10:22-38); Sabbath Healing, parables of Mustard Seed and Leaven (Luke 13:10-21); on the Salvation of the Elect (Luke 13:23-30); Lament over Jerusalem (Luke 13:34-35); on Counting the Cost of Following Him (Luke 14:25-35); reproof of the Pharisees, with parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (1618094655_3); on the Coming of the Kingdom (Luke 17:20-37); on Prayer, with parables of the Importunate Widow, and of the Pharisee and Publican (Luke 18:1-14); the colloquies with His critics in the Temple, on His Authority, on the Tribute to Caesar, on the Resurrection, on the Great Commandment, on the Son of David (Matthew 21:23 to Matthew 22:46, Mark 11:27 to Mark 12:37, Luke 20); remarks on Belief and Unbelief (John 12:44-50)
Pride (2) - He tried to make them realize from their own Scriptures the futility of their reliance on descent, by referring to the favour shown Naaman the Syrian and the Widow of Zarephath (Luke 4:25 ff
Lazarus - Their unbelief, "could not this man which opened the eyes of the blind (John 9, they allude not to the raising of Jairus' daughter and the Widow of Nain's son, which took place in Galilee, but to the miracle which made such a stir in Jerusalem; they never thought of His raising the dead) have caused that even this man should not have died?" made Him "groan again
Elijah - As the guest of a poor Widow, he brings blessings to the household (cf
Pharisees - (Matthew 15:7-8; Matthew 23:5; Matthew 23:13-33), their ostentatious phylacteries and hems, their real love of preeminence; their pretended long prayers, while covetously defrauding the Widow
Elisha - A Widow (Obadiah's Widow, according to Josephus), when the creditor threatened to take her sons as bondmen, cried to Elisha for help on the ground of her deceased husband's piety. The mother, inferring from God's extraordinary and unsought gift of the child to her, that it could not be God's design to snatch him from her for ever, and remembering that Elijah had restored the Widow's son at Zarephath, mounted her she-ass (hathon , esteemed swifter than the he-ass), and having left her son on the bed of the man of God, without telling her husband of the death, rode 15 miles, four hours ride, to Carmel
Regeneration - (3) Remarriage of a Widow. -Just as a Widow assumes a new loyalty when she marries a new husband, so are we free from the old sense of moral obligations and under the highest necessity of being true to the new (Romans 7:1-6)
Annunciation, the - Besides those in the first two chapters, we have the Widow at Nain, the sinner in Simon’s house, Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Susanna, the woman with the issue, Martha and Mary, the woman bowed down for eighteen years, the Widow with her two mites, the daughters of Jerusalem, and the women at the tomb
Death, Mortality - But the Widow who lives for pleasure, says Paul, "is dead even while she lives" (1 Timothy 5:6 )
Family Life And Relations - Williams...
See also Divorce ; Marriage ; Woman ; Widow ...
Bibliography
Exodus, Book of - Care for the stranger, Widow, orphan, and poor (Exodus 22:21-27 )...
H
Tiberius - The Senate was servile to both: Agrippina († 33), the Widow of Germanicus, and her son Nero were exiled; another son, Drusus, was imprisoned (and executed in 33)
Touch - —Here four instances are to be noted: the arresting touch laid upon the bier of the Widow of Nain’s son (Luke 7:14 ἥψατο τῆς σοροῦ); the upholding touch or grasp offered to Simon Peter upon the sea (Matthew 14:31 ἐκτείνας τὴν χεῖρα ἐπελάβετο αὐτοῦ); the encouraging touch laid upon the disciples after the Transfiguration, when ‘he touched them, and said, Arise, and be not afraid’ (Matthew 17:7 ἥψατο αὐτῶν; cf
Gospel - He helps the materially poor, like the Widow in Elijah's day (4:25-26; Manichees - A rich Widow, whose servant he had been, dying without issue, left him stores of wealth; after which he assumed the title of the apostle or envoy of Jesus Christ
Prayer - ...
While all Christians are exhorted to pray without ceasing (1 Thessalonians 5:17) it was regarded as a special privilege of those who had leisure, such as ‘widows indeed’ (1 Timothy 5:5), to continue in supplications and prayers night and day. 217), in de Monogamia, 10, Tertullian describes a Christian Widow as one ‘who prays for his Monnica - " With him Monnica lived patiently and faithfully, till at the age of 40 she was left a Widow, tenderly attached to his memory, and longing to be laid at death in his grave (ib. ...
Monnica joined cordially with Patricius in securing the highest education for Augustine and in stimulating his studies; and even during her Widowhood made every effort to maintain him in them
Elijah - Here he was the first "apostle" to the Gentiles (Luke 4:26); a poor Widow, the most unlikely to give relief, at his bidding making a cake for him with her last handful of meal and a little oil, her all, and a few gathered sticks for fuel; like the Widow in the New Testament giving her two mites, not reserving even one,: nor thinking, what shall I have for my next meal? (Luke 21:2
Jonah - The identification of Jonah with the son of the Widow of Zarephath, which is mentioned by Jerome, and other assertions of Jewish origin, have no historical value
Luke, the Gospel According to - Light to lighten the Gentiles"; Luke 4:25, Christ's reference to Elijah's mission to the Gentile Widow of Sarepta; Luke 9:52; Luke 10:30, the good Samaritan; Luke 17:18, the only grateful one of the ten cleansed lepers, a Samaritan; the mission of the seventy, a number typical of the nations, as the twelve represent the twelve tribes of Israel
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - He would outdo all the charitable men that have gone before him; he would retire from the world; he would have no equipage; he would allow himself only necessaries, in order that Widows and orphans, the sick and the distressed, might find relief out of his estate. Remember the poor Widow's mite, Clemens. Come and give two mites, like the poor Widow
Prayer - Doing His will, and asking according to His will, are the conditions of acceptable prayer (1 John 3:22; 1 John 5:14-15; James 5:16); also persevering importunity in prayer for ourselves, taught in the parable of the importunate Widow; as importunity in intercession for others, that the Lord would give us the right spiritual food to set before them, is taught in that of the borrowed loaves (Luke 18:1, etc
Apocrypha - Judith had been a Widow for three years and had been careful to obey all the law
Parables - The parable of the mustard seed speaks pastorally about ending despair, and the parable of the persistent Widow (Luke 18:1-8 ) encourages to hang in there
Take - Let not a Widow be taken into the number under threescore
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - 3) Anthusa, while John was an infant, was left a Widow at the age of twenty, refused all offers of marriage, and devoted herself to the education of her boy and the care of his property ( de Sacerdot. ad Viduam Juniorem, addressed to the young Widow of Therasius ( c. The cabal against Chrysostom was headed by the empress and her favourite ladies, of whose extravagance of attire and attempts to enhance their personal charms, the bishop had spoken with contemptuous ridicule, and among whom the wealthy and licentious Widows Marsa, Castricia, and Eugraphia, "who used for the ruin of their souls the property their husbands had gained by extortion" (Pallad
Perfection (of Jesus) - His help in sickness was for rich and poor, in all circumstances and conditions—the solitary leper, and the mourning Widow in the streets of Nain; the paralytic of thirty-eight years, friendless and helpless, and the bond-servant of the household of the Roman centurion, whose name was held in honour throughout all Capernaum; the daughter of Jairus, a ruler of the synagogue, and the daughter of a nameless Gentile woman of Syro-Phœnicia. He made the Samaritan the hero of His story of neighbourliness; He praised the faith of the Roman centurion; He pointed to God’s care of Naaman the Syrian captain, and the Widow of Zarephath
Deuteronomy, the Book of - ...
The later in Deuteronomy refer to the second and additional tithe on the increase of the field only, and for celebrating the sacred feasts each first and second year in the sanctuary, every third year at home with a feast to the Levites, the stranger, fatherless, and Widow; like the love-feasts of New Testament (Deuteronomy 11:5
Law - The sabbath, marriage, sacrifices (Genesis 2; Genesis 4; Exodus 16:23-29), distinction of clean and unclean (Genesis 7:2), the shedding of blood for blood (Genesis 9:6), circumcision (Genesis 17), the penalty for fornication, and the Levirate usage (a brother being bound to marry and raise up seed by a deceased brother's Widow, Genesis 38:8; 2 Kings 2:11-12) were some of the patriarchal customs which were adopted with modifications by the Mosaic code
Meals - The poor Widow of Zarephath’s ‘little oil’ was not intended for her lamps, but to bake her ‘handful of meal’ withal ( 1 Kings 17:12 )
Virgin Virginity - To Him His earthly sojourn with His disciples was like a marriage feast and His removal was regarded as the time of their Widowhood (Matthew 9:15). In 1 Timothy, where the outlook is different, he advises young Widows to marry, while the older ones should be loyal to their first faith, evidently to their resolution not to marry. Mary’s husband]'>[1] In later times unmarried women and Widows resided with the clergy in their homes-a monk in the desert might have his ‘uxor spiritualis. Even the deaconesses are not required to be unmarried (1 Timothy 3:11); and, as we saw above, the younger Widows are to marry again so that they may not be a burden on the Church funds, and so as to save them from sexual temptation. Paul advises older Widows who are on the Church rolls for relief to adhere to their decision to remain unmarried, and these seem to have been called virgines* Reality - —Though disdaining to flatter, Jesus was ever ready to recognize good, even when found in unexpected quarters, as we see in His praise of the faith of the centurion at Capernaum (Matthew 8:10), and of the offering of the poor Widow at the Temple (Mark 12:42-44)
Insight - The two mites thrown by the Widow into the Temple treasury are a more munificent offering than the costly gifts of the Pharisees, because they represent a greater degree of sacrifice (Mark 12:43-44)
Acts - Luke is also the only Gospel which mentions the prophetess Anna (Luke 2:36-38 ), the Widow at Nain (Luke 7:11-17 ), and the Galilean women who supported Jesus' ministry (Acts 2:5-473 )
Wealth - Defend the cause of the fatherless, plead the case of the Widow" (Isaiah 1:17 ; cf
Jeroboam - His mother is called a "widow woman
Mahometanism - His father Abd'allah was a younger son of Abd'almotalleb, and dying very young, and in his father's life-time, left his Widow and an infant son in very mean circumstances, his whole subsistence consisting but of five camels and one Ethiopian she slave. He afterwards recommended him to Khadijah, a noble and rich Widow, for her factor; in whose service he behaved himself so well, that by making him her husband, she soon raised him to an equality with the richest in Mecca
Isaiah - The character of true religion was absent; they needed to desist from evil, to learn to do good, to seek justice, correct oppression, defend the fatherless, plead for the Widow (Isaiah 1:17 )
Ethics - The admonition to honor parents was to be no excuse to claim no responsibility to help the poor, the orphan, and the Widow ( Leviticus 25:35 ; Deuteronomy 15:7-11 ; Job 29:12-16 ; Job 31:16-22 ; Isaiah 58:1 ; Amos 4:1-2 ; Amos 5:12 )
Exodus, the Book of - Inscriptions both in Egypt and in the peninsula, as early as Snefru of the third dynasty and of the three following dynasties, and of Hatasu, Widow of Thothmes II (drowned in the Red Sea), describe victories over the Mentu, the mountaineers of the peninsula, and other native tribes
Gregorius (32) Turonensis, Bishop of Tours - He was known to and favoured by Radegund the Widow of Clotaire I
Bride - The Jews did not allow marriageable persons to enter into that honourable state without restriction; the high priest was forbidden by law to marry a Widow; and the priests of every rank, to take a harlot to wife, a profane woman, or one put away from her husband
Hannah - But, unless God was mocked on Mount Ephraim as He has never been mocked anywhere else, it does not need a prophet to tell us, if not Peninnah's past as a maiden and a young wife, then her future as an old mother and a Widow
Maccabees - According to the will of John Hyrcanus, the government was placed in his Widow’s hands, while the high priesthood was given to the oldest of his five sons, Aristobulus. After the death of Aristobulus, his Widow Alexandra (Salome) released his three brothers from prison, and married the oldest of them, Alexander Jannæus (or Jonathan), making him king and high priest
Ethics - So is the prevalent theft, murder, violence, adultery, and constant neglect of Widows, orphans, strangers. Oppression of Widows, orphans, and foreigners and perversion of justice are strictly forbidden. God is ever impartial, just, caring for the fatherless, the Widow, and the alien: so must his people be
Gentiles - The native chiefs of Canaan treat Abraham with respect; the Pharaoh who makes Joseph lord of his house calls him ‘a man in whom the spirit of God is’; the daughter of the Pharaoh of the oppression is moved with compassion at the sight of the child Moses, and brings him up as her son; Jethro receives Moses when an exile into his family, guides him in the desert, and instructs him in the art of governing; Rahab and Ruth ‘take refuge under the wings of the God of Israel,’ and their names are in the regal genealogy; Ittai the Gittite cleaves to David, when almost all have forsaken him; the Queen of Sheba comes to hear the wisdom of Solomon; the Tyrian Hiram supplies him with materials when building the Temple, having been ‘ever a lover of David’; the Widow of Zarephath, nearly destitute herself, feeds the famishing Elijah; and Naaman, the Syrian general, confesses his faith in the God of Elisha as the one true God; Ebed-melech, an Ethiopian slave, rescues Jeremiah from death, and is rewarded with a promise of personal immunity from danger; Job, an Arabian shaikh, is the lofty teacher of how ‘to suffer and be strong’; Cyrus the Persian Is the Lord’s anointed, and the deliverer of His people
Begetting - So μονογενής, used in the Fourth Gospel only of the relation of Christ to God the Father, occurs in Luke 7:12 of the son of the Widow of Nain, meaning simply ‘only son’ (cf
Priest - ...
The priest was not to marry a woman divorced or the Widow of any but a priest
David - in His Services - It would have gone hard with the poor Widow if she had only had a farthing meted out to her in her Lord's judgment on her. Both from David's intended temple; from the poor Widow's actual collection at the door of David's temple; and from Bengel's spiritual annotation let us learn this spiritual lesson, that our hearts are the measure both of our work and of our wages in the sight of God. You cannot visit and relieve all the fatherless and Widows in their affliction as you would like. May all David's good intentions, and generous preparations be found in all our rich people; and may all the Widow's love and goodwill be found in all our poor people
Kings, the Books of - Our Lord thrice refers to the book, speaking of Solomon, the queen of Sheba, and the Widow of Sarepta and Naaman (Matthew 6:29; Matthew 12:42; Luke 4:25-27)
Sibylline Oracles - [2] 240) suggests that he was the son of the Widow of Nain; but this is pure conjecture, and Nestle’s companion idea that ‘Tabitha’ represents the daughter of Jairus (Mark 5:41, ταλειθά κούμ) is a precarious support
Children - The only son of the Widow of Nain (Luke 12:45), the desolate state of whose bereft mother roused so deeply the pity of our Lord | (Luke 7:13), is addressed indeed as a ‘young man’ (νεανίσκε, Luke 7:14), a term so broad that it need imply no more than that he was in his prime; but the suggestion of the narrative certainly seems to be that he was in his youthful prime (Luke 7:15)
Prayer (2) - ‘If an unrighteous judge would yield to the importunity of an unknown Widow, who came and spoke to him at intervals, much more will a righteous God be ready to reward the perseverance of His own elect, who cry to Him day and night
Woman - ...
Widows are consistently presented as a paradigm of the dispossessed. Blomberg...
See also Eve ; Family Life and Relations ; Head, Headship ; Marriage ; Person, Personhood ; Sexuality, Human ; Widow ...
Bibliography
High Priest - The high priest could only marry a virgin or a priest's Widow, typifying Christ's wedding to His Godhead our manhood in purity, and also wedding to Him the church and its members individually as "a chaste virgin" (Revelation 14:4; 2 Corinthians 11:2)
Righteous, Righteousness - The Widow who cast a farthing into the treasury was doing a greater thing than those who brought rich offerings (1618094656_9 ||)
Vespasian - His patron Narcissus, the powerful freedman of Claudius, died in 54, and Agrippina, Widow of Claudius and mother of Nero, pursued his former friends with hatred
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - On Matthan’s death, Melchi, a descendant of Nathan, married his Widow, who bore him a son Heli
Religious Experience - Jesus Himself expressly affirms this, and refers to Naaman the Syrian, the Widow of Zidon, the Roman centurion, and the Syrophœnician woman as possessing better religious experience than their Jewish neighbours, and definitely announces that ‘many’ shall come from the heathen nations and enter the future Kingdom in peace (John 12:20; John 12:23, Luke 4:25-28, Mark 7:24, Matthew 8:10; Matthew 15:28)
Individualism - Than this, both are a great deal nearer the position of Him who said, ‘Sell that ye have, and give alms’ (Luke 12:33), ‘woe unto you who are rich’ (Luke 6:24), who denounced the robbery of the Widow and the orphan, and no doubt included every form of ruthless competition whereby the strong get advantage of the weak
Abstinence - 7: ‘Reckon up on this day what thy meal would otherwise have cost thee, and give the amount to some poor Widow or orphan, or to the poor
Esther - Remember what the poor Widow did with her two mites, and go and do likewise. Your maid, and her sister, and her Widowed mother, and her ill-doing brother, and her lover, all are your circle at present, and your opportunity is fast flitting by; and, because it is so near you every day, you do not discover it
Religion (2) - He denounced the advocates of ‘Corban,’ and those who ‘devoured Widows’ houses and for a pretence made long prayers’; demanded ‘mercy instead of sacrifice, and reconciliation rather than ritual’ (Matthew 9:13; Matthew 5:23 f. Their first economic problem was how to distribute alms most wisely to the Widows (Acts 6:1). ||), the sacrificial giving of the poor Widow (Mark 12:42 ff
Immanuel - term for ‘virgin’ is בִּתוּלָה, though even this is used in Joel 1:8 for ‘young Widow
Terah - Maid, wife, mother, mistress, Widow indeed, and so on
Work - Moreover, it is also a recognition that the fruits of work must be shared with the less fortunate, particularly the foreigner, the Widow, and the orphan (Deuteronomy 14:22-29 ; 26:12-15 )
Innocentius, Bishop of Rome - (2) Whether persons who had married Widows might be ordained and made bishops, for which allowance they pleaded the custom of their church. Those who had married Widows he debars from ordination, citing the prohibition of such marriages to the high-priest under the Mosaic law. " (6, 7) No layman who has married a Widow, or been twice married, may be ordained. He insists, as so often in his letters, on the incapacity for ordination of such as had married Widows or had married twice, and again protests that baptism cannot annul the obligation of a previous marriage
Offering - They, like the Widow, the orphan, and the resident alien, were to be given the tithe of all farm produce every third year ( Psalms (2) - Most welcome of all would be those fine interpretations of the character of God scattered throughout the Psalter—as of one who is not only Lord of all space and time (90, 139), but who is also ‘good and ready to forgive and rich in love to all that call upon him’ (Psalms 86:5, Psalms 103:8), who opens His hand and satisfies the desire of every living thing (Psalms 145:16), who is father of the fatherless and judge of the Widow (Psalms 68:6 (5)), who rises up at the oppression of the poor and the sighing of the needy (Psalms 12:6 (5))
Egypt - , and it is remarkable that his Widow imported many trees from Arabia Felix
Jews - After the death of the Widow of Jameus, who governed nine years, the nation was almost ruined with civil broils
Koran - ...
The Alcoran, while Mahomet lived, was only kept in loose sheets: his successor, Abubeker, first collected them into a volume, and committed the keeping of it to Haphsa, the Widow of Mahomet, in order to be consulted as an original; and there being a good deal of diversity between the several copies already dispersed throughout the provinces, Ottoman, successor of Abubeker, procured a great number of copies to be taken from that of Haphsa, at the same time suppressing all the others not conformable to the original
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - Another reference to the history of the same prophet is-that to his visit to the Widow of Sidon in the time of the great famine (Luke 4:25 f
Christ in Jewish Literature - Johanan, a pious youth in Jerusalem, is betrothed to Miriam, the daughter of a Widow
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - To 599 is assigned the extensive conversion of the Lombards to Catholicism, brought about after the death of king Antharis through the marriage of this Theodelinda, his Widow, with Agilulph duke of Turin, who consequently succeeded to the throne
Pelagianism And Pelagius - It was alleged that he had said that man can if he will be without sin and that in writing a letter of commendation to a Widow who had assumed the ascetic life he used fulsome and adulatory language which glorified her unexampled piety as superlatively meritorious