What does Water mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
מַ֖יִם water 28
מָֽיִם water 26
מָ֑יִם water 24
ὕδωρ water. 24
ὕδατος water. 23
מַ֥יִם water 13
מַ֙יִם֙ water 13
בַּמַּ֖יִם water 13
מַ֔יִם water 12
בַּמָּ֑יִם water 12
הַמַּ֔יִם water 12
ὕδατι water. 12
מַ֣יִם water 11
הַמָּ֑יִם water 9
הַמַּ֖יִם water 8
בַּמָּֽיִם water 7
מֵ֣י water 7
מֵ֥י water 6
הַמָּֽיִם water 5
בַּמַּ֔יִם water 4
הַמַּ֙יִם֙ water 4
וּמַ֣יִם water 4
וּמַ֖יִם water 4
מַ֜יִם water 3
וּמַ֛יִם water 3
כַּמָּֽיִם water 3
הַמַּ֥יִם water 3
וּבַמַּ֖יִם water 3
בַּמַּ֛יִם water 3
מַ֭יִם water 3
מֵי־ water 3
מַ֛יִם water 3
הַמַּ֗יִם water 3
מַּ֔יִם water 3
בַּמַּ֖֣יִם ׀ water 2
לְמֵ֥י water 2
מָ֔יִם water 2
כַמַּ֣יִם water 2
מֵ֤י water 2
לַמַּ֔יִם water 2
מָּֽיִם water 2
וּמַ֥יִם water 2
מַ֗יִם water 2
ἄνυδροι without water. 2
כַּמַּ֖יִם water 2
לְהַשְׁק֖וֹת to give to drink 2
לְהַשְׁק֣וֹת to give to drink 2
בַמָּֽיִם water 1
בְּמֵ֥י water 1
שֶׁ֣לֶג snow. 1
מֵימֶ֤יךָ water 1
מֵימָ֑יו water 1
בְּמֵ֣י water 1
מֵֽי־ water 1
בַּמַּיִם֮ water 1
מֵ֨י water 1
וְהִשְׁקֵיתִ֨י to give to drink 1
וַתְּשֹׁ֪קְקֶ֡הָ to be abundant (meaning probable). 1
אַשְׁקֶ֑ה to give to drink 1
וּמַ֗יִם water 1
וְהִשְׁק֖וּ to give to drink 1
הַשְׁק֥וּ to give to drink 1
וּבַמָּ֑יִם water 1
בַמַּ֙יִם֙ water 1
בַמַּ֔יִם water 1
וְהִשְׁקִ֖ינוּ to give to drink 1
אַשְׁקֶ֑נָּה to give to drink 1
בְּמַ֥יִם water 1
לַשֶּׁ֣טֶף flood 1
מִמֵּ֛י water 1
בַּצִּנּ֔וֹר pipe 1
לִשְׁאֹ֔ב to draw (water). 1
הִרְוָ֣ה to be satiated or saturated 1
רַ֭וֵּה to be satiated or saturated 1
בַּמַּ֧יִם water 1
וְרָחֲצ֛וּ to wash 1
וְ֝נֹזְלִ֗ים to flow 1
וְרָחֲצ֣וּ to wash 1
כַ֭מַּיִם water 1
הַשֹּׁאֲבֹֽת to draw (water). 1
אֶשְׁאָ֔ב to draw (water). 1
לִשְׁאֹ֑ב to draw (water). 1
כַּמַּ֗יִם water 1
הַמַּ֨יִם water 1
וַתִּשְׁאָ֑ב to draw (water). 1
מַ֨יִם ׀ water 1
וּבַמַּ֑יִם water 1
כַּמַּ֥יִם water 1
מַ֑יִם water 1
מַ֝֗יִם water 1
מָ֥יִם water 1
מַֽיִם־ water 1
מַּ֑יִם water 1
כַּ֭מַּיִם water 1
הַמַּ֤יִם water 1
בַּמַּ֙יִם֙ water 1
! הַמָּ֑יִם water 1
בַּמַּ֗יִם water 1
؟ וָמָֽיִם water 1
מֵימֶ֑יךָ water 1
מֵימֶֽיךָ water 1
וּבַמַּ֔יִם water 1
וְכַמַּ֙יִם֙ water 1
וָמַ֜יִם water 1
מַ֤יִם water 1
מַ֧יִם water 1
וְהַמַּ֥יִם water 1
מֵימֵ֤י water 1
מֵימֵ֣י water 1
מֵימַ֔י water 1
וָמָֽיִם water 1
הַמַּ֔יְמָה water 1
בַּמַּיִם֒ water 1
מָּ֑יִם water 1
וַֽיַּישְּׁרֵ֥ם to be right 1
הַיֵּמִם֙ meaning uncertain 1
זַרְזִ֥יף drip. / drop 1
דָלָה֙ to draw 1
וַתִּדְלֶ֗נָה to draw 1
ψυχροῦ cold 1
ὕδατα water. 1
ὑδροπότει to drink water 1
ὑδρίαν a vessel for holding water. / a water jar 1
מִמֵּימֵ֣י water 1
מֵימֵיהֶ֖ם water 1
מֵימֵ֙ינוּ֙ water 1
לְמֵ֖י water 1
כַמַּ֙יִם֙ water 1
הַמַּ֜יִם water 1
לְמָֽיִם water 1
؟ מָֽיִם water 1
؟ כַּמָּֽיִם water 1
כַ֝מַּ֗יִם water 1
מֵימֶ֔יהָ water 1
לַמָּ֑יִם water 1
מַ֚יִם water 1
מֵימָ֖יו water 1
(בְּמ֥וֹ) water 1
וּמֵימַ֔י water 1
מִמֵּימֵ֖י water 1
ὑδρίαι a vessel for holding water. / a water jar 1
וּמַ֙יִם֙ water 1
מֵימָ֔יו water 1
וְהַמַּ֣יִם water 1
וָמָ֑יִם water 1
וּמַ֕יִם water 1
מִמַּ֥יִם water 1
וּבְמַ֥יִם water 1
וּמֵֽימֵיהֶ֖ם water 1
וּמֵימֶ֕יךָ water 1
הַמָּ֑יְמָה water 1
וְהִשְׁקָ֖ה to give to drink 1

Definitions Related to Water

G5204


   1 Water.
      1a of Water in rivers, in fountains, in pools.
      1b of the Water of the deluge.
      1c of Water in any of the earth’s repositories.
      1d of Water as the primary element, out of and through which the world that was before the deluge, arose and was compacted.
      1e of the waves of the sea.
      1f fig.
      used of many peoples.
      

H4325


   1 Water, waters.
      1a Water.
      1b Water of the feet, urine.
      1c of danger, violence, transitory things, refreshment (fig.
      ).
      

H7579


   1 to draw (Water).
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to draw (Water).
         1a2 Water-drawing women (participle).
         

H1802


   1 to draw, dangle.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to draw.
         1a2 drawing advice (fig.
         ).
      1b (Piel) to draw up.
      

H8248


   1 to give to drink, irrigate, drink, Water, cause to drink Water.
      1a (Hiphil).
         1a1 to Water, irrigate.
         1a2 to Water, give drink to.
      1b (Pual) to be watered.
      1c (Niphal) variant.
      

G5202


   1 to drink Water, be a drinker of Water.
   

G5201


   1 a vessel for holding Water.
   2 a Water jar, a Water pot.
   

G5593


   1 cold, cool.
      1a of cool Water.
   2 metaph.
      2a cold i.e. sluggish, inert.
      2b in mind: of one destitute of warm Christian faith and the desire for holiness.
      

H2222


   1 drip.
      1a (Hiph) to cause to drip.
   2 drop, dripping, a soaking, a saturation.
   

H7301


   1 to be satiated or saturated, have or drink one’s fill.
      1a (Qal) to take one’s fill.
      1b (Piel).
         1b1 to be drunk, be intoxicated.
         1b2 to drench, Water abundantly, saturate.
      1c (Hiphil) to saturate, Water, cause to drink.
      

H7783


   1 to be abundant (meaning probable).
      1a (Polel) to give abundance to.
      1b (Hiphil) to overflow.
      

H5140


   1 to flow, distil, flow forth or down, trickle, drop.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to flow.
            1a1a streams, floods (participle).
         1a2 to distil.
      1b (Hiphil) to cause to flow.
      

H7364


   1 to wash, wash off, wash away, bathe.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to wash, wash off, wash away.
         1a2 to wash, bathe (oneself).
      1b (Pual) to be washed.
      1c (Hithpael) to wash oneself.
      

H6794


   1 pipe, spout, conduit, Water conduit.
   

H3474


   1 to be right, be straight, be level, be upright, be just, be lawful, be smooth.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to go straight.
         1a2 to be pleasing, be agreeable, be right (fig.
         ).
         1a3 to be straightforward, be upright.
      1b (Piel).
         1b1 to make right, make smooth, make straight.
         1b2 to lead, direct, lead straight along.
         1b3 to esteem right, approve.
      1c (Pual) to be made level, be laid smoothly out.
      1d (Hiphil) to make straight, look straight.
      

H7858


   1 flood, downpour.
   

H7950


   1 snow.
   

H3222


   1 meaning uncertain, meaning perhaps mules or hot springs.
   

G504


   1 without Water.
   

Frequency of Water (original languages)

Frequency of Water (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Water Cart
A cart carrying water; esp., one carrying water for sale, or for sprinkling streets, gardens, etc.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Gate
A gate, or valve, by which a flow of water is permitted, prevented, or regulated.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Gavel
A gavel or rent paid for a privilege, as of fishing, in some river or water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Germander
A labiate plant (Teucrium Scordium) found in marshy places in Europe.
Webster's Dictionary - Vichy Water
A mineral water found at Vichy, France. It is essentially an effervescent solution of sodium, calcium, and magnetism carbonates, with sodium and potassium chlorides; also, by extension, any artificial or natural water resembling in composition the Vichy water proper. Called also, colloquially, Vichy.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Thief
A pirate.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Celery
A very acrid herb (Ranunculus sceleratus) growing in ditches and wet places; - called also cursed crowfoot.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Soldier
An aquatic European plant (Stratiotes aloides) with bayonet-shaped leaves.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Vine
Any plant of the genus Phytocrene, climbing shrubs of Asia and Africa, the stems of which are singularly porous, and when cut stream with a limpid potable juice.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Canker
See Canker, n., 1.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Violet
See under Violet.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Gilding
The act, or the process, of gilding metallic surfaces by covering them with a thin coating of amalgam of gold, and then volatilizing the mercury by heat; - called also wash gilding.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Cavy
The capybara.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Soak
(v. t.) To soak water; to fill the interstices of with water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Carriage
(1):
A vessel or boat.
(2):
Transportation or conveyance by water; means of transporting by water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Gauge
(1):
A wall or bank to hold water back.
(2):
An instrument for measuring or ascertaining the depth or quantity of water, or for indicating the height of its surface, as in the boiler of a steam engine. See Gauge.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Font, Holy Water
(Latin: fons, fountain)
Vessels for holding holy water. They are sometimes imbedded in the walls, and sometimes rest on a pedestal. The shell-shaped font which has persisted was introduced in the 17th century. The most ancient portable fonts for use in aspersions were pails of lead or bronze covered with silver. The present form of the aspersorium was introduced in the 13th century. Private fonts are usually in the shape of a very small basin attached to the wall by means of a plate.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Separation, Water of
SEPARATION, WATER OF . See Red Heifer.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Water
The Bible speaks of water in three different ways: as a material resource, as a symbol, and as a metaphor.
A Material Necessity which God Provides Water as a material resource is necessary for life. The Bible states that God made water a part of His good creation and that He exercises sovereignty over it (Genesis 1-2 ; Isaiah 40:12 ). He controls the natural processes of precipitation and evaporation, as well as the courses of bodies of water (Job 5:10 ; Job 36:27 ; Job 37:10 ; Psalm 33:7 ; Psalm 107:33 ; Proverbs 8:29 ). God normally assures the provision of water for human needs (Deuteronomy 11:14 ). However, water is sometimes used in punishment for sin, as with the flood of Noah's day (Genesis 6:17 ) or the drought proclaimed by Elijah (1 Kings 17:1 ). The divine control of water teaches people obedience to and dependency upon God.
Many of the great acts of God in history have involved water, such as the parting of the sea (Exodus 14:21 ), the provision of water for the Israelites in the wilderness (Exodus 15:25 ; Exodus 17:6 ), and the crossing of the Jordan River (Joshua 3:14-17 ). Water was also involved in several of Jesus' miracles (Matthew 14:25 ; Luke 8:24-25 ; John 2:1-11 ).
Water was a crucial element in God's gift of the Promised Land to Israel (Deuteronomy 8:7 ). Palestine contains several natural sources of water: rain, springs, wells, and a few short, perennial streams. The average annual rainfall in Palestine is about 25 inches, all of which normally falls between November and April. The dry months of May to October made necessary the use of cisterns and pools for water storage. Several famous biblical cities had pools, such as Gibeon (2 Samuel 2:13 ), Hebron (2 Samuel 4:12 ), Samaria (1 Kings 22:38 ), and Jerusalem (2 Kings 20:20 ).
A Theological Symbol and Metaphor The Old Testament contains laws for the use of water in rituals as a symbol of purification. Priests, sacrificial meat, and ritual utensils were washed before involvement in rituals (Leviticus 1:9 ; Leviticus 6:28 ; Leviticus 8:6 ). Unclean people and things were also washed as a symbol of ritual cleansing (Leviticus 11:32-38 ; Leviticus 14:1-9 ; Leviticus 15:1-30 ; Numbers 31:23 ). The Book of Genesis uses water as a symbol of instability before the completion of creation (Genesis 1:2 ), and Ezekiel spoke of water as a symbol of renewal in the age to come (Ezekiel 47:1-12 ).
The Bible contains dozens of metaphorical usages of water. For example, in the Old Testament water is a metaphor or simile for fear (Joshua 7:5 ), death (2 Samuel 14:14 ), sin (Job 15:16 ), God's presence (Psalm 72:6 ), marital fidelity (Proverbs 5:15-16 ), the knowledge of God (Isaiah 11:9 ), salvation (Isaiah 12:3 ), the Spirit (Isaiah 44:3-4 ), God's blessings (Isaiah 58:11 ), God's voice (Ezekiel 43:2 ), God's wrath (Hosea 5:10 ), and justice (Amos 5:24 ). Among the metaphorical uses of water in the New Testament are references to birth (John 3:5 ), the Spirit (John 4:10 ), spiritual training (1 Corinthians 3:6 ), and life (Revelation 7:17 ). See Creation ; Famine and Drought ; Flood ; Rain .
Bob R. Ellis
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Water
WATER . The scarcity of water in the East lends it a special value. Its presence in some form is essential to life. The fruitfulness of the land depends on the quantity available for watering. The Jordan, with its great springs, is too low for the irrigation of anything but the valley. There are many fountains in Palestine, but most fail in summer. The average annual rainfall approaches 30 inches. But this is confined to the months from April till October; and the water would rush down the slopes to the sea, were it not caught and stored for future use. The limestone formation, with its many caves, made easy the construction of cisterns and reservoirs to collect the rain water: thence supplies were drawn as required during the dry months. Wherever water is found, there is greenery and beauty all through the year.
In the Maritime Plain plentiful supplies of water are found on digging (Genesis 26:13 ff.). To fill up the wells would make the district uninhabitable. Invading armies were at times reduced to sore straits by the stopping of wells ( 2 Kings 3:19 ; 2 Kings 3:25 ), or diversion and concealment of the stream from a fountain ( 2 Chronicles 32:3 f.).
The earliest use of water was doubtless to allay the thirst of man and beast. Refusal of drink to a thirsty man would be universally condemned (Genesis 24:17 f., John 4:7 ). It is held a meritorious act to set a vessel of water by the wayside for the refreshment of the wayfarer. The same right does not extend to flocks ( Genesis 24:19 f.), for which water must often be purchased. Use and wont have established certain regulations for the watering of animals, infringement of which frequently causes strife ( Genesis 29:2 ff., Exodus 2:16 ff.; cf. Genesis 26:20 etc.). The art of irrigation (wh. see) was employed in ancient days ( Psalms 1:3 ; Psalms 65:10 , Ezekiel 17:7 etc.), and reached its fullest development in the Roman period. To this time also belong many ruins of massive aqueducts, leading water to the cities from distant sources.
Cisterns and springs are not common property. Every considerable house has a cistern for rain water from roof and adjoining areas. Importance is attached to plunging in the buckets by which the water is drawn up, this preventing stagnation. The springs, and cisterns made in the open country, are the property of the local family or tribe, from whom water, if required in any quantity, must be bought. The mouth of the well is usually covered with a great stone. Drawing of water for domestic purposes is almost exclusively the work of women ( Genesis 24:11 , John 4:7 etc.). In crossing the desert, water is carried in ‘bottles’ of skin ( Genesis 21:14 ).
The ‘living,’ i.e. ‘flowing’ water of the spring is greatly preferred to the ‘dead’ water of the cistern, and it stands frequently for the vitalizing Influences of God’s grace ( Jeremiah 2:13 , Zechariah 14:3 , John 4:10 etc.). Many Scripture references show how the cool, refreshing, fertilizing qualities of water are prized in a thirsty land ( Proverbs 25:26 , Isaiah 44:14 , Jeremiah 17:8 , Luke 16:24 etc.). Water is furnished to wash the feet and hands of a guest ( Luke 7:44 ). To pour water on the hands is the office of a servant ( 2 Kings 3:11 ). The sudden spates of the rainy season are the symbol of danger ( Psalms 18:16 ; Psalms 32:6 , Isaiah 28:17 etc.), and their swift passing symbolizes life’s transiency ( Job 11:18 , Psalms 58:7 ). Water is also the symbol of weakness and Instability ( Genesis 49:4 , Ezekiel 21:7 etc.). Cf. City; Jerusalem, I. 4. For ‘Water-gate’ see Nethinim, p. 654 a .
W. Ewing.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Water of Bitterness
WATER OF BITTERNESS . See Jealousy.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Water of Separation
WATER OF SEPARATION . See Red Heifer.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Drawer of Water
(Deuteronomy 29:11 ; Joshua 9:21,23 ), a servile employment to which the Gibeonites were condemned.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Water of Jealousy
A phrase employed (not, however, in Scripture) to denote the water used in the solemn ordeal prescribed by the law of Moses (Numbers 5:11-31 ) in cases of "jealousy."
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Holy Water
Holy water, indeed! a vile mixture, neither fit for man nor beast. You see this liquid virtue at the doors of all the churches ready for the brows of the faithful, but what is far more curious, you observe it in little pots placed for use in the cemeteries; and that the passer-by may give the dead a showery benediction, there are little sprinkling brushes in the pots with which to scatter the precious mixture. A mother's tears over her dead babe are far more in place than such foolery. Holy water! bah! See how the rain pours down from yonder black cloud which has passed over the rugged crags of Pilatus; that sort of holy water is infinitely more likely to moisten the clay of the defunct, and bring plenteous blessing to the living, than all the hogsheads of aqueous fluid that priests ever mumbled over. Holy water, indeed! If there be such a thing, it trickles from the eye of penitence, bedews the cheek of gratitude, and falls upon the page of holy Scripture when the word is applied with power. Standing where, when the rain is over, one can see the fair Lake of Cucerne brimming with crystal, and the clouds among the Alpine peaks all charged with moisture, rendered golden by the sun's clear shining, one feels indignant at the idea that the little driblets of nastiness in yonder pots and shells should be venerated, and all nature's reservoirs accounted common or unclean. It needs no small measure of prudence to restrain a man from tumbling pots and pans and holy liquids headlong to the ground. Human folly, how far wilt thou not go when priests lead thee by the nose!
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Water of Separation
Used along with the ashes of a red heifer for the ceremonial cleansing of persons defiled by contact with a dead body (Numbers 19 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Water of Purification
Used in cases of ceremonial cleansings at the consecration of the Levites (Numbers 8:7 ). It signified, figuratively, that purifying of the heart which must characterize the servants of God.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Bitter Water
The water drunk by a woman suspected of adultery (Numbers 5:11-31 ). If a man suspected his wife had been unfaithful to him but was not a witness to the act and could not produce witnesses to the act, the woman was taken to the priest who arranged an ordeal to determine the woman's innocence or guilt. When the man brought the woman to the priest, he brought an offering of jealousy or remembrance (a cereal offering of barley). The priest seated the woman before the sanctuary facing the altar. The woman's hair was unbound as a sign of her shame. The woman held the offering, and the priest held the vessel containing the bitter water. The bitter water was a combination of holy water and dust from the sanctuary floor. At this point the woman took an oath: if she was innocent, the water would not harm her; if she was guilty, then her “thigh would rot” and her “body swell.” The woman affirmed the oath with a double, “amen.” The priest wrote the curse (Numbers 5:21-22 ) on a parchment and washed the ink off the page into the water. The priest then took the offering and burned it upon the altar, after which the woman drank the bitter water. If she was innocent, she would not be harmed and would conceive children as a blessing. If she was guilty, the curse would take effect. The man bore no guilt if his suspicions proved false—that is, he had not willingly broken the ninth commandment against bearing false witness. The woman, on the other hand, bore the consequences of her guilt (Numbers 5:31 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Drawers of Water
Water carriers. See Occupations, Professions in the Bible.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Water of Jealousy
(Numbers 5:11-31 ) The ritual prescribed consisted in the husband's bringing before the priest the woman suspected of infidelity, and the essential part of it is unquestionably the oath to which the "water" was subsidiary, symbolical and ministerial. With her he was to bring an offering of barley meal. As she stood holding the offering, so the priest stood holding till earthen vessel of holy water mixed with the dust from the floor of the sanctuary, and, declaring her free from all evil consequences if innocent, solemnly devoted her in the name of Jehovah to be "a curse and an oath among her people" if guilty. He then "wrote these curses in a book and blotted them out with the bitter water." and having thrown the handful of meal on the altar, "caused the woman to drink" the potion thus drugged, she moreover answering to the words of his imprecation, "Amen, amen." Josephus adds, if the suspicion was unfounded, she obtained conception; if true, she died infamously, (This was entirely different from most trials of this kind, for the bitter water the woman must drink was harmless in itself, and only by a direct act of God could it injure her it guilty while in most heathen trials the suspected party must take poison, or suffer that which only a miracle would save them from if they were innocent. --ED.)
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Water of Separation
[1]
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Water
(ὕδωρ)
In the NT, after the Gospels, water is nearly always used in a figurative or symbolical sense.
1. The words employed by Christ in Acts 1:5 seem to echo Matthew 3:11, Mark 1:8, Luke 3:16, John 1:33. Water was the element in which John baptized his penitents, and the best that he had; but he was profoundly conscious of its inadequacy, and eagerly expectant of an altogether different kind of baptism, to be introduced by the Messiah. It has been contended that the πνεῦμα ἄγιον and the πῦρ which he desired were the sweeping wind and the destroying fire of judgment (so, e.g., A. B. Bruce, EGT , ‘Matthew,’ London, 1897, p. 84), but it is more likely that what he longed for was the life-giving breath and the purifying fire of the Messianic era. If we must not read into his words the Pentecostal and similar experiences, we need not eliminate from them the highest prophetic ideals. When Christ confirms His forerunner’s distinction between baptism in water and baptism in the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:5), He certainly regards the latter not as a blast of judgment but as the supreme gift of Divine grace; and Peter, who ‘remembered the word of the Lord,’ and no doubt the tone in which He uttered it, quotes it not as a menace but as an evangelical promise (Acts 11:16). Water is referred to in connexion with the baptism of the eunuch (Acts 8:36; Acts 8:38-39) and of Cornelius (Acts 10:47). In the latter case the baptism in water is the immediate sequel to the earliest baptism of the Gentiles with the Holy Spirit, which was attended with the rapturous utterances known as glossolalia.
2. In Ephesians 5:26 the Church is said to be cleansed by the washing (or laver, τῷ λουτρῷ) of water with the word, baptism being regarded as the seal and symbol of a spiritual experience which is mediated by faith in the gospel.
3. The writer of Hebrews (Hebrews 9:19) says that water was used along with blood-either to prevent coagulation or as a symbol of purity-at the institution of the ancient covenant, a detail which is not mentioned in Exodus 24:3 ff. It is a striking fact that in his review of the Levitical ordinances this writer never quotes the LXX phrase ὕδωρ ῥαντισμοῦ, ‘water of sprinkling,’ which occurs four times in Numbers 19, but coins in its place the phrase αἷμα ῥαντισμοῦ, ‘blood of sprinkling’ (Hebrews 12:24). It is his conviction that, while the blood of goats and bulls and the ashes of a heifer (according to a Scripture which he does not question) cleanse the flesh (Hebrews 9:13), and while water purifies the body (Hebrews 10:22), only the blood of Christ can sprinkle the heart from an evil conscience (Hebrews 9:14, Hebrews 10:22). He does not, as F. Delitzsch (Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews, ii. [1] 179) thinks, suggest that the water of baptism has cleansing virtue because ‘sacramentally impregnated’ with the blood of Christ. Just as he altogether ignores the sacramental value of the Levitical rites which he enumerates, it is not his task to give a philosophy of the Christian sacraments. His distinctive doctrine, to the enforcement of which he devotes his whole strength, is that, while all ritual is at the best but outward and symbolic, the spiritual appropriation of Christ and His atonement by faith has virtue to penetrate and purify the whole personality, beginning with the heart.
4. Peter sees a parallel between the water of Noah’s flood and that of baptism (1 Peter 3:20), and Paul finds a mystical and sacramental meaning in the sea and the cloud, in both of which the Israelites may be said to have been baptized into Moses (1 Corinthians 10:2).
5. It is the teaching of John that Jesus Christ came by (διά) water and blood, not with (ἐν) the water only, but with the water and the blood (1 John 5:6). Historically the baptism and death of the Messiah were crises in His activity, occurring once for all at the beginning and the end of His ministry, but spiritually He ever abides with and in the water and the blood, which are ‘the two wells of life in His Church, His baptism being repeated in every fresh act of baptism, and His blood of atonement never failing in the communion cup’ (H. J. Holtzmann, Handkomm. zum NT, Freiburg i. B., 1891, ii. 236).
6. James (James 3:11-12) illustrates the moral law that the same heart cannot overflow in both blessings and curses by the natural law that the same fountain cannot send forth both sweet water and bitter-a variation on Christ’s words in Matthew 7:16-17.
7. The prophet of the Revelation (recalling Ezekiel 1:24; Ezekiel 43:2) once compares the voice of Christ (Revelation 1:15), and twice that of the great multitude of the redeemed (Revelation 14:2, Revelation 19:6), to the voice of many waters, in the one case thinking perhaps of the music of waves quietly breaking, in the other of the thunder of great billows crashing, around the aegean island which was his place of exile. He constantly uses fountains of water, and clear rivers, as symbols of spiritual life and blessing. Per contra, he imagines ‘the angel of the waters’ turning Rome’s rivers and fountains of water into blood (Revelation 16:4); for, as she has shed the blood of saints like water, it is but just that she should have to drink blood-a grim species of poetic justice. The great star Wormwood falls in Earth’s sweet waters, turning them to wormwood, and those who drink of them die because they are so bitter (Revelation 8:9-11). The waters of the Euphrates are to be dried up, like the Jordan before Joshua, that the powers of the East-Parthia and her confederates-may come to the invasion of the Roman Empire (Revelation 16:12). The great harlot, Rome, sits proudly upon many waters-ruling peoples and nations by many rivers and seas (Revelation 17:1; Revelation 17:15)-but her day of judgment and dethronement is in sight (Revelation 17:1).
James Strahan.
 
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Water
In a hot and dry country such as Palestine, water was extremely important. God promised his people that if they were obedient to him, he would always send them enough rain to ensure a constant supply for all their needs. But if they were disobedient, he would send them droughts and famine (Deuteronomy 28:12-24; Psalms 51:1-29; Amos 4:7-8). (For further details concerning the problems of water in Palestine see PALESTINE; WEATHER.)
The refreshing and life-giving benefits of water made it a popular biblical symbol to picture the spiritual refreshment and eternal life that God gives to those who trust in him (Psalms 1:3; Psalms 23:1-3; Isaiah 44:3; Isaiah 55:1; Jeremiah 17:13; Ezekiel 36:25-26; John 7:37-39; Revelation 21:6; Revelation 22:1-2). Water could, however, be a means of judgment (Genesis 6:17; Exodus 14:23; Exodus 14:26-27; Psalms 32:6; Matthew 7:24-27; 2 Peter 2:5).
Water was also used in the cleansing rituals of the Israelite religion. Ceremonial washings for the priests spoke of the purity required of those in official religious positions (Exodus 29:4-5). At times the washing had additional practical benefits (Exodus 30:18-21). If people became ceremonially unclean, they had to be ceremonially cleansed with water. Again there were cases where the washing had additional practical benefits (Leviticus 14:1-9; Leviticus 15:16-18; Numbers 19:11-13; see UNCLEANNESS).
Ritual cleansings may have involved bathing the whole body (Numbers 19:7), bathing only parts of the body (Exodus 30:19), or merely sprinkling (Numbers 8:7). The water used in the rituals in some cases was pure water, in others a specially prepared mixture (Leviticus 15:13; Numbers 19:17).
In figurative speech, water was a picture of cleansing from sin (1618386159_5; John 4:14; John 13:5-10; Acts 22:16; Ephesians 5:26; Hebrews 10:22; see also BAPTISM). Such cleansing can occur only through the activity of God, who in his mercy removes sin and creates new life within the cleansed sinner (John 3:5-7; 1 Corinthians 6:9-11; Titus 3:5-7; Revelation 7:14; Revelation 7:17; see REGENERATION).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Water of Jealousy
Numbers 5:11-31. The appointed test of a wife's infidelity; an instance of the special providence which ruled the Israelite theocracy (Numbers 5). An ordeal which could not injure the innocent at all (for the ingredients were in themselves harmless), or punish the guilty except by miracle; whereas in the ordeals by fire in the dark ages the innocent could scarcely escape except by miracle. The husband brought the woman before the priest, bearing the tenth of an ephah of barley meal, which was thrown on the blazing altar. As she stood holding the offering, so the priest held an earthen vessel of holy water mixed with the dust of the floor of the sanctuary, and declared her freedom from hurt if innocent, but cursed her if guilty; he then wrote the curses in a book and washed them INTO (so translated Numbers 5:23) the bitter water, which the woman had then to drink, answering "amen" to the curse.
If innocent she obtained conception (Numbers 5:28). Thus the law provided a legal vent for jealousy, mitigating its violent outbursts, so terrible in orientals, protecting the woman if innocent, and punishing her by divine interposition if guilty. Dust is the emblem of condemnation (Genesis 3:14; Micah 7:17; compare John 8:6; John 8:8). Her drinking the water symbolized her full acceptance of the conditional curse (Ezekiel 3:1-3; Jeremiah 15:16; Revelation 10:9) and its actual operation on her if guilty (Psalms 109:18). The oath and the solemn ritual accompanying would deter a guilty woman from facing it. No instance is recorded of the use of this ordeal, as probably the husband of an .adulteress generally preferred the castor method, namely, to divorce the guilty wife.
The Talmud says the trial lapsed into disuse 40 years before the destruction of Jerusalem, and that because adultery was so common God would no longer inflict upon women the curses (compare Hosea 4:14). The Egyptian romance of Setnau (the third century B.C.) illustrates it; Ptahneferka takes a leaf of papyrus and on it copies a magical formula, then dissolves the writing in water, drinks the decoction, and knows in consequence all it contains. Moses probably, as in other cases, under God's direction modified existing usages. A trial by red water among West Africans somewhat accords with the Mosaic institution.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Water
The heat of summer and many mouths of drought necessitated also appliances for storing and conveying water; and remains still exist of the (See POOLS of Solomon situated near Bethlehem, and of the aqueduct near Jericho which was constructed by the Romans.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Water (2)
WATER (ὕδωρ).—For an Eastern country, Palestine (except in the Negeb and the districts which are desert) has a fairly abundant supply of water. It is described as ‘a land of brooks (torrent-valleys), of fountains and depths, that spring out of the valleys and hills’ (Deuteronomy 8:7). It is a matter of dispute whether the climate has changed since OT times. The rainy season is in winter, from November to March, when the rains are generally heavy. At other times there are only occasional showers. ‘The former rain and the latter rain’ (Deuteronomy 11:14) come about the autumn and spring equinox respectively. The rainfall on an average is from 25 to 30 inches in ordinary seasons (the average rainfall in England is less than 30 inches), but there are times of drought which cause great loss and suffering. In Galilee the water supply is much greater than in Judaea. The storage of water is much more imperfect than in former times. In many places the ruins of artificial tanks, pools, and aqueducts are visible. The chief waters which are referred to in the Gospels are those of the Sea of Galilee and the river Jordan.
Water is frequently mentioned in the Gospels (most instances are found in Jn.), both in its literal and figurative meanings. 1. Literally: e.g. ‘Jesus went up straightway out of the water’ (Matthew 3:16 || Mark 1:10); ‘Send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water’ (Luke 16:24); ‘John was baptizing in aenon, near to Salim, because there was much water there’ (John 5:1-7). The water of the pool of Bethesda (John 3:23) was supposed to have curative powers. Part of v. 3 (‘waiting for the moving of the waters’) and the whole of v. 4 are now rejected by critical editors. The moving of the water was a natural phenomenon, the flow of the spring being intermittent. The disciples who were sent to prepare for the observance of the Passover were instructed to look for ‘a man bearing a pitcher of water’ (Mark 14:13 || Luke 22:10). As water is usually carried by women in the East, the man bearing the pitcher would easily be distinguished. It was perhaps a token arranged beforehand, so that the place of observance should not be known till the last moment. See also art. Pitcher. In John 19:34 it is recorded that at the crucifixion of Jesus one of the soldiers pierced His side with a spear, and forthwith there came out blood and water; see art. Blood and Water.
2. The figurative use of water in the Gospels is varied. It is a symbol (i.) of the moral cleansing of life in repentance, ‘I baptize you with water unto repentance’ (Matthew 3:11, Mark 1:8, Luke 3:16, John 1:23-26); (ii.) its symbolical reference in connexion with the new birth is admitted, but its significance is uncertain, ‘Except a man be born of water and spirit (ἐξ ὕδατος καὶ πνεύματος), he cannot enter into the kingdom of God’ (John 3:5). The phrase ‘water and spirit’ has been regarded as an instance of hendiadys, and interpreted as ‘spiritual water’ (Neil, Figurative Language in the Bible). Others take it as referring to the baptism of John, and as indicating that repentance is an essential factor in the new birth (Expos. Times, vol. iii. p. 318). It has also been interpreted as referring to the sacrament of baptism. This is the most ancient and general view. Wendt and others, however, regard the words ὕδατος καί as a post-Apostolic interpolation (Gospel according to St. John, ad loc). This is the most probable conclusion, unless the words are interpreted as referring to the baptism of John unto repentance; see Expos. Times, vol. xv. p. 413. (iii.) Water is also used as a symbol of innocence: ‘Pilate took water, and washed his hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person’ (Matthew 27:24). (iv.) As a sign of hospitality or respect (see Genesis 24:32; Genesis 43:24). Jesus said to Simon the Pharisee, ‘I entered into thy house, thou gavest me no water for my feet’ (Luke 7:44). (v.) At the supper in the upper room (John 13:1-7) the water for the feet had not been provided. The disciples had not noticed the omission, or they were each unwilling to undertake the servile duty. Then ‘Jesus riseth from supper, and laid aside his garments; and took a towel, and girded himself. After that, he poureth water into a bason, and began to wash the disciples’ feet’ (John 13:4-5). The ordered detail of the narrative is an indication of the profound impression which the action of Jesus had made upon the Evangelist. The act was full of significance. It was a symbolic service. It taught the disciples the duty of humility, and the need of daily cleansing from the daily defilement of sin. (vi.) In His conversation with the woman of Samaria, Jesus linked the water which she sought at the well with the living water which He alone could give. He uses it as a symbol of eternal life, the blessings of the gospel in their satisfying and permanent power of good (John 4:11-15). (vii.) On the last day of the feast Jesus stood in the Temple and cried, ‘If any man thirst, let him come unto me and drink. He that believeth in me, as the scripture saith, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living Mater’ (John 7:37 f.). The Evangelist interprets the symbol: ‘This spake he of the Spirit, which they which believed on him should receive: for the Holy Spirit was not yet given; because Jesus was not yet glorified’ (John 7:39). The accuracy of the interpretation has been doubted (Wendt, Teaching of Jesus, vol. i. p. 256 n. [1] ). (viii.) It is also used as a symbol of the smallest service: ‘Whosoever shall give unto one of these little ones a cup of cold water only in the name of a disciple, verily I say unto you he shall in no wise lose his reward’ (Matthew 10:42 || Mark 9:41). It is possible to punctuate the sentence so that it reads ‘a cup of cold water only’ or ‘only in the name of a disciple.’ But the first is greatly to be preferred.
Literature.—Conder, Palestine, pp. 25–29; Robinson, BRP [2] i. 342 f.; Smith, Expositor, 6th ser. vii. [3] 212 ff.; art. ‘Water’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible ; Thomson, LB [4] p. 459; Neil, Figurative Language in the Bible; Expos. Times, vol. iii. [5] p. 318, vol. vi. [6] p. 389, vol. xv. [7] p. 413.
John Reid.
Webster's Dictionary - Selters Water
A mineral water from Sellers, in the district of Nassan, Germany, containing much free carbonic acid.
Webster's Dictionary - Apollinaris Water
An effervescing alkaline mineral water used as a table beverage. It is obtained from a spring in Apollinarisburg, near Bonn.
Webster's Dictionary - Seltzer Water
See Selters water.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Bitter Water
BITTER WATER (lit., as RV [1] , Water of Bitterness, Numbers 5:18 ). See Jealousy.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Water drawing celebrations, the:
Celebration accompanying the water libation ceremony on Sukkot in Temple times, recalled today by Sukkot celebrations.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Water
The word "water" is used in a variety of metaphorical ways in Scripture. It is used to symbolize the troublesome times in life that can and do come to human beings, especially God's children (Psalm 32:6 ; 69:1,2 , 14,15 ; Isaiah 43:2 ; Lamentations 3:54 ). In some contexts water stands for enemies who can attack and need to be overcome (2 Samuel 22:17-18 ; Psalm 18:16-17 ; 124:4-5 ; 144:7 ; Isaiah 8:7 ; Jeremiah 47:2 ). In both the Old and New Testaments, the word "water" is used for salvation and eternal life, which God offers humankind through faith in his Son (Isaiah 12:3 ; 55:1 ; Revelation 21:6 ; 22:1,2 , 17 ). In John 4:10-15 , part of Jesus' discourse with the Samaritan woman at the well, he speaks metaphorically of his salvation as "living water" and as "a spring of water welling up to eternal life."
Following along this same theme, water sometimes symbolizes the spiritual cleansing that comes with the acceptance of God's offer of salvation (Ezekiel 36:25 ; Ephesians 5:26 ; Hebrews 10:22 ). In fact, in Ephesians 5:26 , the "water" that does the cleansing of the bride, the church, is directly tied in with God's Word, of which it is a symbol.
In a very important passage, Jesus identifies the "streams of living water" that flow from within those who believe in him with the Holy Spirit (John 7:37-39 ). The reception of the Holy Spirit is clearly the special reception that was going to come after Jesus had been glorified at the Father's right hand and happened on the Day of Pentecost as described in Acts 2 . Two times in Jeremiah Yahweh is metaphorically identified as "the spring of living water" (Jeremiah 2:13 ; 17:13 ). In both instances Israel is rebuked for having forsaken the Lord for other cisterns that could in no way satisfy their "thirst."
In other passages of Scripture, the following are said metaphorically to be "water": God's help (Isaiah 8:6 : "the gently flowing waters of Shiloah" ); God's judgment (Isaiah 28:17 : "water will overflow your hiding place" ); man's words (Proverbs 18:4 : "The words of man's mouth are deep waters" ); man's purposes (Proverbs 20:5 : "The purposes of a man's heart are deep waters" ); an adulterous woman (Proverbs 9:17 : "Stolen water is sweet" ); and a person's posterity (Isaiah 48:1 : "Listen to this, O house of Jacob, who are called by the name of Israel and have come forth out of the line [1] of Judah" ).
The reference to "water" in John 3:5 has been variously interpreted by scholars. Some have taken the phrase, "being born of water, " to mean being born again by means of water baptism. Others have taken the verse to involve a hendiadys and take "water" and "Spirit" together as one reference since water is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in other passages. Still others take the birth by water to be one's natural birth and the birth by the Spirit to be the supernatural birth of being "born again" or regenerated. This seems to be what Nicodemus, in the context, understood Jesus to be saying. In order to enter the kingdom of God one must have two births, each a different kind. After all, water, in its ordinary sense, has a great part to play in the natural birth of a baby. Furthermore, there are too many clear passages and single verses in the Bible that base salvation, entrance into the kingdom of God, and eternal life on faith alone.
Wesley L. Gerig
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gregorian Water
A holy water used in the ceremony of the consecration of a church. It contains wine, salt, and ashes. It takes its name because its use was prescribed by Pope Gregory I.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Water
In the language of Scripture, this word hath numberless applications made of it, but in a peculiar manner is principally made use of in relation to the person, work, and offices of God the Holy Ghost. For as water is essentially necessary to animal life, so is the blessed Spirit to spiritual life. But it would form a subject in itself, and fill a volume, to shew how many and how various the ways by which the Holy Ghost is represented in the Bible under this sweet figure, as supplying the church with living water. Hence he is called the "water of life, a well of water springing up in the soul to everlasting life." And he is described as quickening the marshy ground; cleansing, refreshing, comforting, cooling, and strengthening the souls of his people, by the continued streams of his grace. "There is a river (said the Psalmist) the streams whereof do make glad the city of God..." (Psalms 46:4) It should not be overlooked or forgotten also, that each and all of the persons of the GODHEAD are so described in the word of God, and which by the way, let it be observed, becomes a decided proof of the unity of the GODHEAD, while it no less shews the distinction of person. Hence, God the Father is set forth by the prophet as a fountain. (Jeremiah 2:13) God the Son as a fountain. (Zechariah 13:1; Song of Song of Solomon 4:15) And God the Holy Ghost as a fountain, filling the hearts of the redeemed, and causing them to overflow in the day of Christ. (John 7:38)
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Springs of Water
No text for this entry.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Water
This type is sometimes presented as a river as in Psalm 1:3; Ezekiel 47:5; John 7:38. In these cases the water undoubtedly represents the Holy Spirit. It is plainly indicated. He is constantly working, blessing, enriching, and those who permit Him to be a living personal power in their lives do flourish for GOD, grow in grace, and bear much fruit. This type is sometimes presented as a fountain, as in John 4:14. Again, the Spirit of GOD is the one thus described. He does not stay dormant in the soul, but works up and out in the life, and produces evidences of His presence. Sometimes water is presented as a drink, as in John 7:37. This also represents the Holy Spirit, and we drink Him into our souls and lives, as the living Lord, who satisfies the cravings of the heart for the things of GOD. (See also1Co 12:13).
Proverbs 11:25 (a) In this wonderful passage the Lord is telling us plainly that if we will give blessings to others, they in turn will give blessings to us.
Isaiah 58:11 (a) The soul that is blessed by GOD, who walks with GOD, and loves the Word of GOD will be filled with joy and gladness, his life will be beautiful in character, and he will be a blessing to many. (See also Jeremiah 31:12).
Jeremiah 2:13 (b) Our Lord is the giver of the Holy Spirit who is the living Water. Those who turn away from GOD and refuse His life and His gifts find that the things in which they trust, and on which they lean, will fail them and they are left at the end of the journey with no peace, no eternal life, no hope, no joy, and only the outer dark.
1 Corinthians 3:0 (a) The work of ministering the Word of GOD to others has a two-fold aspect. The seed is the Word of GOD, and Paul planted it. No seed, however, will grow without water, no matter how good the seed, nor fertile the soil. Therefore, Apollos came ministering the Spirit of GOD to those who had heard the Word of GOD. The Holy Spirit is the water, and when He is present in power, recognized and trusted, then the seed of the Word of GOD grows and prospers in the hearts of the people.
Ephesians 5:26 (b) This type represents the cleansing effect of the Word of GOD on the habits and ways of the people of GOD. As the Christian studies the Scripture against temper, he will become sweet-spirited. As he reads the Scriptural warning against liquor and profanity, he will avoid it. In this way, evil ways are cleansed from a Christian's life.
Judges 1:12 (b) Water is typical of the refreshment and blessing that should characterize the ministry of one who claims to be the servant of GOD. In this Scripture the blessing is lacking, and the message is dry and unfruitful.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Holy Water
In Catholicism, special water that has been blessed by a priest, bishop, etc. or a liturgical ceremony. It is used to bring a blessing to a person when applied.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Blood And Water
BLOOD AND WATER (John 19:31-37).—When the soldier, whom tradition names Longinus,* [1]. Cf. ‘Aug.’ Manual. xxiii: ‘Longinus aperuit mihi latus Christi lancea, et ego intravi et ibi requiesco securus.’ The name is probably derived from λόγχη, ‘spear.’] to make sure that He was really dead, drove his spear into the side of Jesus on the cross (see Crucifixion), a strange thing happened. On being withdrawn the spear was followed by a gush of blood and water. It was a singular phenomenon. The Fathers regarded it as a miracle,† [2] but St. John does not venture on an opinion. He neither attempts to account for it nor pronounces it a miracle, but contents himself with solemnly asseverating that he had witnessed it, and could vouch for its actual occurrence. He felt the wonder of it to the last (cf. 1 John 5:6-8).
Medical science has confirmed his testimony, and furnished an explanation which at once defines the phenomenon as a perfectly natural occurrence, and reveals somewhat of the awfulness of our Lord’s Passion. During His dread and mysterious dereliction on the cross (see Dereliction) His heart swelled until it burst, and the blood was ‘effused into the distended sac of the pericardium, and afterwards separated, as is usual with extravasated blood, into these two parts, viz. (1) crassamentum or red clot, and (2) watery serum.’ When the distended sac was pierced from beneath, it discharged ‘its sanguineous contents in the form of red clots of blood and a stream of watery serum, exactly corresponding to the description given by the sacred narrative, “and forthwith came there out blood and water.” ’‡ [3] Jesus died literally of a broken heart—of ‘agony of mind, producing rupture of the heart.’
It was a favourite idea with the Fathers that the Water and the Blood were symbolic of the Sacraments. St. Augustine, following the v.l. ἤνοιξε for ἔνυξε in v. 34, comments (in Joan Ev. Tract. cxx. § 2): ‘Vigilanti verbo Evangelista usus est, ut non diceret, Latus ejus percussit, aut vulneravit, aut quid alind; sed, aperuit: ut illis quodammodo vitae ostium panderetur, unde Sacramenta Ecclesiae manaverunt, sine quibus ad vitam quae vera vita est, non intratur.’ Cf. Chrysost. in Joan. lxxxiv: οὐχ ἁπλῶς οὐδὲ ὠς ἔτυχεν αὖται ἐξῆλθον αἱ πηγαὶ, άλλʼ ἑπειδὴ ἐξ ἀμφοτέρων ἠ ἐκκλησία συνέστηκε. καὶ ἴσασιν οἱ μυσταγωγούμενοι, διʼ ὕδατος μὲν ἀναγεννώμενοι διʼ αἵματος δὲ καὶ σαρκὸς τρεφόμενοι. ἀρχὴν λαμβἁνει τὰ μυστήρια, ἴνʼ ὅταν προσίῃς τῷ φρικτῷ ποτηρίῳ, ὠς ἀπʼ αὐτῆς πίνων τῆς πλευρᾶς οὔτω προσίῃς.
Literature.—Besides the Comm. consult S. J. Andrews, Life of Our Lord upon the Earth, 566–569.
David Smith.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Water of Separation
Used for purification in cases of ceremonial defilement, without the re-application of blood. Numbers 19:9-21 . See HEIFER, RED.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Barometer
A barometer in which the changes of atmospheric pressure are indicated by the motion of a column of water instead of mercury. It requires a column of water about thirty-three feet in height.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Boatman
A boat bug.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Cell
A cell containing water; specifically (Zool.), one of the cells or chambers in which water is stored up in the stomach of a camel.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Tree
A climbing shrub (Tetracera alnifolia, / potatoria) of Western Africa, which pours out a watery sap from the freshly cut stems.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Radish
A coarse yellow-flowered plant (Nasturtium amphibium) related to the water cress and to the horse-radish.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Spaniel
A curly-haired breed of spaniels, naturally very fond of the water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Sapphire
A deep blue variety of iolite, sometimes used as a gem; - called also saphir d'eau.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Furrow
A deep furrow for conducting water from the ground, and keeping the surface soil dry.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Bath
A device for regulating the temperature of anything subjected to heat, by surrounding the vessel containing it with another vessel containing water which can be kept at a desired temperature; also, a vessel designed for this purpose.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Brain
A disease of sheep; gid.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Souchy
A dish consisting of small fish stewed and served in a little water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Tiger
A diving, or water, beetle, especially the larva of a water beetle. See Illust. b of Water beetle.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Crane
A goose-neck apparatus for supplying water from an elevated tank, as to the tender of a locomotive.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Poise
A hydrometer.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Monkey
A jar or bottle, as of porous earthenware, in which water is cooled by evaporation.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Agrimony
A kind of bur marigold (Bidens tripartita) found in wet places in Europe.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Bed
A kind of mattress made of, or covered with, waterproof fabric and filled with water. It is used in hospitals for bedridden patients.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Murrain
A kind of murrain affecting cattle.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Plantain
A kind of plant with acrid leaves. See under 2d Plantain.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Speedwell
A kind of speedwell (Veronica Anagallis) found in wet places in Europe and America.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Tabby
A kind of waved or watered tabby. See Tabby, n., 1.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Cock
A large gallinule (Gallicrex cristatus) native of Australia, India, and the East Indies. In the breeding season the male is black and has a fleshy red caruncle, or horn, on the top of its head. Called also kora.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Chevrotain
A large West African chevrotain (Hyaemoschus aquaticus). It has a larger body and shorter legs than the other allied species. Called also water deerlet.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Buck
A large, heavy antelope (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) native of Central Africa. It frequents the banks of rivers and is a good swimmer. It has a white ring around the rump. Called also photomok, water antelope, and waterbok.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Butt
A large, open-headed cask, set up on end, to contain water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Cress
A perennial cruciferous herb (Nasturtium officinale) growing usually in clear running or spring water. The leaves are pungent, and used for salad and as an antiscorbutic.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Pipe
A pipe for conveying water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Plant
A plant that grows in water; an aquatic plant.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Plate
A plate heated by hot water contained in a double bottom or jacket.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Rate
A rate or tax for a supply of water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Screw
A screw propeller.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Chickweed
A small annual plant (Montia fontana) growing in wet places in southern regions.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Sail
A small sail sometimes set under a studding sail or under a driver boom, and reaching nearly to the water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Pimpernel
A small white-flowered shrub; brookweed.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Tupelo
A species of large tupelo (Nyssa aquatica) growing in swamps in the southern of the United States. See Ogeechee lime.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Sprite
A sprite, or spirit, imagined as inhabiting the water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Parting
A summit from the opposite sides of which rain waters flow to different streams; a line separating the drainage districts of two streams or coasts; a divide.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Supply
A supply of water; specifically, water collected, as in reservoirs, and conveyed, as by pipes, for use in a city, mill, or the like.
Webster's Dictionary - Water tu Tuyere
A tuyere kept cool by water circulating within a casing. It is used for hot blast.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Pox
A variety of chicken pox, or varicella.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Moccasin
A venomous North American snake (Ancistrodon piscivorus) allied to the rattlesnake but destitute of a rattle. It lives in or about pools and ponds, and feeds largely of fishes. Called also water snake, water adder, water viper.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Monitor
A very large lizard (Varanaus salvator) native of India. It frequents the borders of streams and swims actively. It becomes five or six feet long. Called also two-banded monitor, and kabaragoya. The name is also applied to other aquatic monitors.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Pocket
A water hole in the bed of an intermittent stream, esp. the bowl at the foot of a cliff over which the stream leaps when in the flood stage.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Pillar
A waterspout.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Ousel
Alt. of Water ouzel
Webster's Dictionary - Water Rattle
Alt. of Water rattler
Webster's Dictionary - Water Willow
An American aquatic plant (Dianthera Americana) with long willowlike leaves, and spikes of small purplish flowers.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Shield
An aquatic American plant (Brasenia peltata) having floating oval leaves, and the covered with a clear jelly.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Crowfoot
An aquatic kind of buttercup (Ranunculus aquatilis), used as food for cattle in parts of England.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Star Grass
An aquatic plant (Schollera graminea) with grassy leaves, and yellow star-shaped blossoms.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Arum
An aroid herb (Calla palustris) having a white spathe. It is an inhabitant of the north temperate zone.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Ram
An hydraulic ram.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Clock
An instrument or machine serving to measure time by the fall, or flow, of a certain quantity of water; a clepsydra.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Bailiff
An officer of the customs, whose duty it is to search vessels.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Bird
Any aquatic bird; a water fowl.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Breather
Any arthropod that breathes by means of gills.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Beetle
Any one of numerous species of aquatic beetles belonging to Dytiscus and allied genera of the family Dytiscidae, and to various genera of the family Hydrophilidae. These beetles swim with great agility, the fringed hind legs acting together like oars.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Newt
Any one of numerous species of aquatic salamanders; a triton.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Rail
Any one of numerous species of rails of the genus Rallus, as the common European species (Rallus aquaticus). See Illust. of Rail.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Mouse
Any one of several species of mice belonging to the genus Hydromys, native of Australia and Tasmania. Their hind legs are strong and their toes partially webbed. They live on the borders of streams, and swim well. They are remarkable as being the only rodents found in Australia.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Can
Any one of several species of Nuphar; the yellow frog lily; - so called from the shape of the seed vessel. See Nuphar, and cf. Candock.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Shrew
Any one of several species of shrews having fringed feet and capable of swimming actively. The two common European species (Crossopus fodiens, and C. ciliatus) are the best known. The most common American water shrew, or marsh shrew (Neosorex palustris), is rarely seen, owing to its nocturnal habits.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Ouzel
Any one of several species of small insessorial birds of the genus Cinclus (or Hydrobates), especially the European water ousel (C. aquaticus), and the American water ousel (C. Mexicanus). These birds live about the water, and are in the habit of walking on the bottom of streams beneath the water in search of food.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Parsnip
Any plant of the aquatic umbelliferous genus Sium, poisonous herbs with pinnate or dissected leaves and small white flowers.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Bear
Any species of Tardigrada, 2. See Illust. of Tardigrada.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Cement
Hydraulic cement.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Oat
Indian rice. See under Rice.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Rice
Indian rice. See under Rice.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Pennywort
Marsh pennywort. See under Marsh.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Poa
Meadow reed grass. See under Reed.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Wing
One of two walls built on either side of the junction of a bridge with the bank of a river, to protect the abutment of the bridge and the bank from the action of the current.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Ordeal
Same as Ordeal by water. See the Note under Ordeal, n., 1.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Bellows
Same as Tromp.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Way
Same as Water course.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Tick
Same as Water mite.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Thyme
See Anacharis.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Scorpion
See Nepa.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Back
See under 1st Back.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Brash
See under Brash.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Purslane
See under Purslane.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Starwort
See under Starwort.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Vole
See under Vole.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Wagtail
See under Wagtail.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Qualm
See Water brash, under Brash.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Antelope
See Water buck.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Rabbit
See Water hare.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Viper
See Water moccasin.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Aloe
See Water soldier.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Bridge
See Water table.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Opossum
See Yapock, and the Note under Opossum.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Privilege
The advantage of using water as a mechanical power; also, the place where water is, or may be, so used. See under Privilege.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Beech
The American hornbeam. See Hornbeam.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Chinquapin
The American lotus, and its edible seeds, which somewhat resemble chinquapins. Cf. Yoncopin.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Turkey
The American snakebird. See Snakebird.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Trefoil
The buck bean.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Chicken
The common American gallinule.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Torch
The common cat-tail (Typha latifolia), the spike of which makes a good torch soaked in oil.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Rattler
The diamond rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus); - so called from its preference for damp places near water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Buffalo
The European buffalo.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Blackbird
The European water ousel, or dipper.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Chestnut
The fruit of Trapa natans and Trapa bicornis, Old World water plants bearing edible nutlike fruits armed with several hard and sharp points; also, the plant itself; - called also water caltrop.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Partridge
The ruddy duck.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Caltrop
The water chestnut.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Piet
The water ousel.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Spinner
The water spider.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Ballast
Water confined in specially constructed compartments in a vessel's hold, to serve as ballast.
Webster's Dictionary - Water tu Twist
Yarn made by the throstle, or water frame.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Logged
(a.) Filled or saturated with water so as to be heavy, unmanageable, or loglike; - said of a vessel, when, by receiving a great quantity of water into her hold, she has become so heavy as not to be manageable by the helm.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Laid
(a.) Having a left-hand twist; - said of cordage; as, a water-laid, or left-hand, rope.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Bound
(a.) Prevented by a flood from proceeding.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Tight
(a.) So tight as to retain, or not to admit, water; not leaky.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Standing
(a.) Tear-filled.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Retted
(imp. & p. p.) of Water-ret
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Rotted
(imp. & p. p.) of Water-rot
Webster's Dictionary - White-Water
(n.) A dangerous disease of sheep.
Webster's Dictionary - Ziment-Water
(n.) A kind of water found in copper mines; water impregnated with copper.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Closet
(n.) A privy; especially, a privy furnished with a contrivance for introducing a stream of water to cleanse it.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-White
(n.) A vinelike plant (Vitis Caribaea) growing in parched districts in the West Indies, and containing a great amount of sap which is sometimes used for quenching thirst.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Colorist
(n.) One who paints in water colors.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Bearer
(n.) The constellation Aquarius.
Webster's Dictionary - Tail-Water
(n.) Water in a tailrace.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Retting
(p. pr. & vb. n.) of Water-ret
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Rotting
(p. pr. & vb. n.) of Water-rot
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Ret
(v. t.) To ret, or rot, in water, as flax; to water-rot.
Webster's Dictionary - Water-Rot
(v. t.) To rot by steeping in water; to water-ret; as, to water-rot hemp or flax.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Rocket
(1):
A cruciferous plant (Nasturtium sylvestre) with small yellow flowers.
(2):
A kind of firework to be discharged in the water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Power
(1):
A fall of water which may be used to drive machinery; a site for a water mill; a water privilege.
(2):
The power of water employed to move machinery, etc.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Nymph
(1):
A goddess of any stream or other body of water, whether one of the Naiads, Nereids, or Oceanides.
(2):
A water lily (Nymphaea).
Webster's Dictionary - Water Tower
(1):
A large metal pipe made to be extended vertically by sections, and used for discharging water upon burning buildings.
(2):
A tower or standpipe used as a reservoir to deliver water at a required head, as to a fountain.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Table
(1):
A molding, or other projection, in the wall of a building, to throw off the water, - generally used in the United States for the first table above the surface of the ground (see Table, n., 9), that is, for the table at the top of the foundation and the beginning of the upper wall.
(2):
The upper limit of the portion of the ground wholly saturated with water. The water table may be within a few inches of the surface or many feet below it.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Thrush
(1):
A North American bird of the genus Seiurus, belonging to the Warbler family, especially the common species (S. Noveboracensis).
(2):
The European water ousel.
(3):
The pied wagtail.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Color
(1):
A picture painted with such colors.
(2):
A color ground with water and gum or other glutinous medium; a color the vehicle of which is water; - so called in distinction from oil color.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Pitcher
(1):
A pitcher for water.
(2):
One of a family of plants having pitcher-shaped leaves. The sidesaddle flower (Sarracenia purpurea) is the type.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Pore
(1):
A pore by which the water tubes of various invertebrates open externally.
(2):
One of certain minute pores in the leaves of some plants. They are without true guardian cells, but in other respects closely resemble ordinary stomata.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Battery
(1):
A voltaic battery in which the exciting fluid is water.
(2):
A battery nearly on a level with the water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Motor
(1):
A water wheel; especially, a small water wheel driven by water from a street main.
(2):
A water engine.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Snail
(1):
Any aquatic pulmonate gastropod belonging to Planorbis, Limnaea, and allied genera; a pond snail.
(2):
The Archimedean screw.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Snake
(1):
Any species of snakes of the family Homalopsidae, all of which are aquatic in their habits.
(2):
A common North American colubrine snake (Tropidonotus sipedon) which lives chiefly in the water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Spider
(1):
Any spider that habitually lives on or about the water, especially the large American species (Dolomedes lanceolatus) which runs rapidly on the surface of water; - called also raft spider.
(2):
An aquatic European spider (Argyoneta aquatica) which constructs its web beneath the surface of the water on water plants. It lives in a bell-shaped structure of silk, open beneath like a diving bell, and filled with air which the spider carries down in the form of small bubbles attached one at a time to the spinnerets and hind feet. Called also diving spider.
(3):
A water mite.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Wheel
(1):
Any wheel for propelling machinery or for other purposes, that is made to rotate by the direct action of water; - called an overshot wheel when the water is applied at the top, an undershot wheel when at the bottom, a breast wheel when at an intermediate point; other forms are called reaction wheel, vortex wheel, turbine wheel, etc.
(2):
A wheel for raising water; a noria, or the like.
(3):
The paddle wheel of a steam vessel.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Tube
(1):
One of a system of tubular excretory organs having external openings, found in many invertebrates. They are believed to be analogous in function to the kidneys of vertebrates. See Illust. under Trematodea, and Sporocyst.
(2):
Any tube for passing or holding water; specif., in some steam boilers, a tube in which water circulates and steam is generated.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Pepper
(1):
Smartweed.
(2):
Waterwort.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Pig
(1):
The capybara.
(2):
The gourami.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Adder
(1):
The common, harmless American water snake (Tropidonotus sipedon). See Illust. under Water Snake.
(2):
The water moccasin.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Bug
(1):
The Croton bug.
(2):
Any one of numerous species of large, rapacious, aquatic, hemipterous insects belonging to Belostoma, Benacus, Zaitha, and other genera of the family Belostomatidae. Their hind legs are long and fringed, and act like oars. Some of these insects are of great size, being among the largest existing Hemiptera. Many of them come out of the water and fly about at night.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Crow
(1):
The European coot.
(2):
The dipper.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Rat
(1):
The muskrat.
(2):
The beaver rat. See under Beaver.
(3):
A thief on the water; a pirate.
(4):
The water vole. See under Vole.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Pheasant
(1):
The pintail. See Pintail, n., 1.
(2):
(n.) The hooded merganser.
(3):
(n.) The goosander.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Sparrow
(1):
The reed bunting.
(2):
The reed warbler.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Mole
(1):
The shrew mole. See under Shrew.
(2):
The duck mole. See under Duck.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Witch
(1):
The stormy petrel.
(2):
The dabchick.
Webster's Dictionary - Fresh-Water
(1):
(a.) Of, pertaining to, or living in, water not salt; as, fresh-water geological deposits; a fresh-water fish; fresh-water mussels.
(2):
(a.) Accustomed to sail on fresh water only; unskilled as a seaman; as, a fresh-water sailor.
(3):
(a.) Unskilled; raw.
Webster's Dictionary - Water
(1):
(v. t.) An addition to the shares representing the capital of a stock company so that the aggregate par value of the shares is increased while their value for investment is diminished, or "diluted."
(2):
(n.) A wavy, lustrous pattern or decoration such as is imparted to linen, silk, metals, etc. See Water, v. t., 3, Damask, v. t., and Damaskeen.
(3):
(v. t.) To wet or supply with water; to moisten; to overflow with water; to irrigate; as, to water land; to water flowers.
(4):
(n.) The limpidity and luster of a precious stone, especially a diamond; as, a diamond of the first water, that is, perfectly pure and transparent. Hence, of the first water, that is, of the first excellence.
(5):
(n.) A solution in water of a gaseous or readily volatile substance; as, ammonia water.
(6):
(n.) Any liquid secretion, humor, or the like, resembling water; esp., the urine.
(7):
(n.) A body of water, standing or flowing; a lake, river, or other collection of water.
(8):
(n.) The fluid which descends from the clouds in rain, and which forms rivers, lakes, seas, etc.
(9):
(n.) To add water to (anything), thereby extending the quantity or bulk while reducing the strength or quality; to extend; to dilute; to weaken.
(10):
(v. t.) To wet and calender, as cloth, so as to impart to it a lustrous appearance in wavy lines; to diversify with wavelike lines; as, to water silk. Cf. Water, n., 6.
(11):
(v. t.) To supply with water for drink; to cause or allow to drink; as, to water cattle and horses.
(12):
(v. i.) To get or take in water; as, the ship put into port to water.
(13):
(v. i.) To shed, secrete, or fill with, water or liquid matter; as, his eyes began to water.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Easter Water
One of the varieties of holy water, so called because it is blessed with special ceremonies and distributed to the people on Holy Saturday Eve of Easter.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Water
Mayim (מַיִם, Strong's #4325), “water; flood.” This word has cognates in Ugaritic and old South Arabic. It occurs about 580 times and in every period of biblical Hebrew.
First, “water” is one of the original basic substances. This is its significance in Gen. 1:2 (the first occurrence of the word): “And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.” In Gen. 1:7 God separated the “waters” above and the “waters” below (cf. Exod. 20:4) the expanse of the heavens.
Second, the word represents that which is in a well, “water” to be drunk (Gen. 21:19). “Living water” is “water” that flows: “And Isaac’s servants digged in the valley, and found there a well of springing [1] water …” (Gen. 26:19). “Water” of oppression or affliction is so designated because it is drunk in prison: “Put this fellow in the prison, and feed him with bread of affliction and with water of affliction, until I come in peace” (1 Kings 22:27). Job 9:30 speaks of slush or snow water: “If I wash myself with snow water, and make my hands never so clean.…”
Third, mayim can represent liquid in general: “… For the Lord our God hath put us to silence, and given us water of gall to drink, because we have sinned against the Lord” (Jer. 8:14). The phrase, me raglayim (“water of one’s feet”) is urine: “Hath my master sent me to thy master, and to thee, to speak these words? hath he not sent me to the men which sit on the wall, that they may eat their own dung, and drink their own piss [2] with you?” (2 Kings 18:27; cf. Isa. 25:10).
Fourth, in Israel’s cultus “water” was poured or sprinkled (no one was ever immersed into water), symbolizing purification. So Aaron and his sons were to be washed with “water” as a part of the rite consecrating them to the priesthood: “And Aaron and his sons thou shalt bring unto the door of the tabernacle of the congregation, and shalt wash them with water” (Exod. 29:4). Parts of the sacrificial animal were to be ritually cleansed with “water” during the sacrifice: “But his inwards and his legs shall he wash in water …” (Lev. 1:9). Israel’s rites sometimes include consecrated “water”: “And the priest shall take holy water in an earthen vessel; and of the dust that is in the floor of the tabernacle the priest shall take, and put it into the water” (Num. 5:17). “Bitter water” was used in Israel’s rituals, too: “And the priest shall set the woman before the Lord, and uncover the woman’s head, and put the offering of memorial in her hands, which is the jealousy offering: and the priest shall have in his hand the bitter water that causeth the curse” (Num. 5:18). It was “water” which when drunk brought a curse and caused bitterness (Num. 5:24).
Fifth, in proper names this word is used of springs, streams, or seas and/or the area in the immediate vicinity of such bodies of water: “Say unto Aaron, Take thy rod, and stretch out thine hand upon the waters of Egypt, upon their streams, upon their rivers, and upon their ponds, and upon all their pools of water, that they may become blood …” (Exod. 7:19).
Sixth, this word is used figuratively in many senses. Mayim symbolizes danger or distress: “He sent from above, he took me; he drew me out of many waters” (2 Sam. 22:17). Outbursting force is represented by mayim in 2 Sam. 5:20: “The Lord hath broken forth upon mine enemies before me, as the [3] of waters.” “Mighty waters” describes the onrush of the godless nations against God: “The nations shall rush like the rushing of many waters …” (Isa. 17:13). Thus the word is used to picture something impetuous, violent, and overwhelming: “Terrors take hold on him as waters, a tempest stealeth him away in the night” (Job 27:20). In other passages “water” is used to represent timidity: “… Wherefore the hearts of the people melted, and became as water” (Josh. 7:5). Related to this nuance is the connotation “transitory”: “… Because thou shalt forget thy misery, and remember it as waters that pass away” (Job 11:16). In Isa. 32:2 “water” represents that which is refreshing: “And a man shall be as a hiding place from the wind, and a covert from the tempest; as rivers of water in a dry place, as the shadow of a great rock in a weary land.” Rest and peace are figured by waters of rest, or quiet waters: “… He leadeth me beside the still waters” (Ps. 23:2). Similar ideas are involved when one’s wife’s charms are termed “water of life” or “water which enlivens”: “Drink waters out of thine own cistern, and running waters out of thine own well” (Prov. 5:15). Outpoured “water” represents bloodshed (Deut. 12:16), wrath (Hos. 5:10), justice (Amos 5:24; KJV, “judgment”), and strong feelings (Job 3:24).
Tehôm (תְּהֹם, Strong's #8415), “deep water; ocean; water table; waters; flood of waters.” Cognates of this word appear in Ugaritic, Akkadian (as early as Ebla, around 2400-2250 B.C.), and Arabic. The 36 occurrences of this word appear almost exclusively in poetical passages but in all historical periods.
The word represents the “deep water” whose surface freezes when cold: “The waters are hid as with a stone, and the face of the deep is frozen” (Job 38:30). In Ps. 135:6 tehôm is used of the “ocean” in contrast to the seas: “Whatsoever the Lord pleased, that did he in heaven, and in earth, in the seas, and all deep places [4]” (cf. Ps. 148:7 et al.).
The word has special reference to the deep floods or sources of water. Sailors in the midst of a violent storm “mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths” (Ps. 107:26). This is hyperbolic or exaggerated poetical talk, but it presents the “depths” as the opposite of the heavens or skies. This emphasis is especially prominent in the Song of Moses, where the word represents the ever-existing (but not eternal), ever-threatening, and perilous “deep,” not simply an element of nature but a dangerous element: “The depths have covered them: they sank into the bottom as a stone” (Exod. 15:5). On the other hand, in such contexts tehôm may mean no more than “deep water” into which heavy objects quickly sink.
Tehôm can represent an inexhaustible source of water or, by way of poetic comparison, of blessing: “… With blessings of heaven above, blessings of the deep that lieth under …” (Gen. 49:25). In such contexts the word represents the “water table” always available below the surface of the earth—what was tapped by digging wells, out of which flowed springs, and what was one with the waters beneath the surface of oceans, lakes, seas, and rivers. This was what God opened together with the waters above the expanse (Gen. 7:11; cf. 1:7) and what later was closed to cause and terminate the great Flood (Gen. 8:2; cf. Ps. 33:6; 104:6; Ezek. 26:19). In such contexts the word represents a “flood of waters” (Ps. 33:6).
In Gen. 1:2 (the first occurrence of the word) tehôm is used of “all waters” which initially covered the surface of the entire earth: “… And darkness was upon the face of the deepw (cf. Prov. 3:20; 8:24, 27-28).
Webster's Dictionary - Napha Water
A perfume distilled from orange flowers.
Webster's Dictionary - Rose Water
Water tinctured with roses by distillation.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Water
In the sacred Scriptures, bread and water are commonly mentioned as the chief supports of human life; and to provide a sufficient quantity of water, to prepare it for use, and to deal it out to the thirsty, are among the principal cares of an oriental householder, The Moabites and Ammonites are reproached for not meeting the Israelites with bread and water; that is, with proper refreshments, Deuteronomy 33:4 . Nabal says in an insulting manner to David's messengers, "Shall I then take my bread and my water, and my flesh that I have killed for my shearers, and give it unto men whom I know not whence they be?" 1 Samuel 25:11 . To furnish travellers with water is, even in present times, reckoned of so great importance, that many of the eastern philanthropists have been at considerable expense to procure them that enjoyment. The nature of the climate, and the general aspect of the oriental regions, require numerous fountains to excite and sustain the languid powers of vegetation; and the sun, burning with intense heat in a cloudless sky, demands for the fainting inhabitants the verdure, shade, and coolness which vegetation produces. Hence fountains of living water are met with in the towns and villages, in the fields and gardens, and by the sides of the roads and of the beaten tracks on the mountains; and a cup of cold water from these wells is no contemptible present. "Fatigued with heat and thirst," says Carne, "we came to a few cottages in a palm wood, and stopped to drink of a fountain of delicious water. In this northern climate no idea can be formed of the luxury of drinking in Egypt: little appetite for food is felt; but when, after crossing the burning sands, you reach the rich line of woods on the brink of the Nile, and pluck the fresh limes, and mixing their juice with Egyptian sugar and the soft river water, drink repeated bowls of lemonade, you feel that every other pleasure of the senses must yield to this. One then perceives the beauty and force of those similes in Scripture, where the sweetest emotions of the heart are compared to the assuaging of thirst in a thirsty land." In Arabia, equal attention is paid, by the wealthy and benevolent, to the refreshment of the traveller. On one of the mountains of Arabia, Niebuhr found three little reservoirs, which are always kept full of fine water for the use of passengers. These reservoirs, which are about two feet and a half square, and from five to seven feet high, are round, or pointed at the top, of mason's work, having only a small opening in one of the sides, by which they pour water into them. Sometimes he found, near these places of Arab refreshment, a piece of a ground shell, or a little scoop of wood, for lifting the water. The same attention to the comfort of travellers is manifested in Egypt, where public buildings are set apart in some of their cities, the business of whose inhabitants is to supply the passengers with water free of expense. Some of these houses make a very handsome appearance; and the persons appointed to wait on the passengers are required to have some vessels of copper, curiously tinned and filled with water, always ready on the window next the street. Some of the Mohammedan villages in Palestine, not far from Nazareth, brought Mr. Buckingham and his party bread and water, while on horseback, without even being solicited to do so; and when they halted to accept it, both compliments and blessings were mutually interchanged, "Here, as in every other part of Nubia," says Burckhardt, "the thirsty traveller finds, at short distances, water jars placed by the road side under a low roof. Every village pays a small monthly stipend to some person to fill these jars in the morning, and again toward evening. The same custom prevails in Upper Egypt, but on a larger scale: and there are caravanserais often found near the wells which supply travellers with water." In India the Hindoos go sometimes a great way to fetch water, and then boil it, that it may not be hurtful to travellers that are hot; and after this stand from morning till night in some great road, where there is neither pit nor rivulet, and offer it in honour of their gods, to be drunk by the passengers. This necessary work of charity in these hot countries seems to have been practised among the more pious and humane Jews; and our Lord assures them, that if they do this in his name, they shall not lose their reward. Hence a cup of water is a present in the east of great value, though there are some other refreshments of a superior quality. It is still the proper business of the females to supply the family with water. From this drudgery, however, the married women are exempted, unless when single women are wanting. The proper time for drawing water in those burning climates is in the morning, or when the sun is going down; then they go forth to perform that humble office adorned with their trinkets, some of which are often of great value. Agreeably to this custom Rebecca went instead of her mother to fetch water from the well, and the servant of Abraham expected to meet an unmarried female there who might prove a suitable match for his master's son. In the East Indies, the women also draw water at the public wells, as Rebecca did, on that occasion, for travellers, their servants and their cattle; and women of no mean rank literally illustrate the conduct of an unfortunate princess in the Jewish history, by performing the services of a menial, 2 Samuel 13:8 . The young women of Guzerat daily draw water from the wells, and carry the jars upon the head; but those of high rank carry them upon the shoulder. In the same way Rebecca carried her pitcher; and probably for the same reason, because she was the daughter of an eastern prince, Genesis 24:45 .
Water sometimes signifies the element of water, Genesis 1:10 ; and metaphorically, trouble and afflictions, Psalms 69:1 . In the language of the prophets, waters often denote a great multitude of people, Isaiah 8:7 ; Revelation 17:15 . Water is put for children or posterity, Numbers 24:7 ; Isaiah 48:1 ; for the clouds, Psalms 104:3 . Waters sometimes stand for tears, Jeremiah 9:1 ; Jeremiah 9:7 ; for the ordinances of the Gospel, Isaiah 12:3 ; Isaiah 35:6-7 ; Isaiah 55:1 ; John 7:37-38 . "Stolen waters," denote unlawful pleasures with strange women, Proverbs 9:17 . The Israelites are reproached with having forsaken the fountain of living water, to quench their thirst at broken cisterns, Jeremiah 2:13 ; that is, with having quitted the worship of God for the worship of false and ridiculous deities. Waters of Meribah, or the waters of strife, were so called because of the quarrelling or contention and murmuring of the Israelites against Moses and against God. When they came to Kadesh, and there happened to be in want of water, they made a sedition against him and his brother Aaron, Numbers 20:1 , &c. Upon this occasion Moses committed that great sin with which God was so much displeased, that he deprived him of the honour of introducing his people into the land of promise.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Lily
A blossom or plant of any species of the genus Nymphaea, distinguished for its large floating leaves and beautiful flowers. See Nymphaea.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Meter
A contrivance for measuring a supply of water delivered or received for any purpose, as from a street main.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Deck
A covering of painting canvas for the equipments of a dragoon's horse.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Furrow
A deep furrow for conducting water from the ground, and keeping the surface soil dry.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Drain
A drain or channel for draining off water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Dropwort
A European poisonous umbelliferous plant (Enanthe fistulosa) with large hollow stems and finely divided leaves.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Flag
A European species of Iris (Iris Pseudacorus) having bright yellow flowers.
Webster's Dictionary - Water God
A fabulous deity supposed to dwell in, and preside over, some body of water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Flannel
A floating mass formed in pools by the entangled filaments of a European fresh-water alga (Cladophora crispata).
Webster's Dictionary - Water Joint
A joint in a stone pavement where the stones are left slightly higher than elsewhere, the rest of the surface being sunken or dished. The raised surface is intended to prevent the settling of water in the joints.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Gruel
A liquid food composed of water and a small portion of meal, or other farinaceous substance, boiled and seasoned.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Meadow
A meadow, or piece of low, flat land, capable of being kept in a state of fertility by being overflowed with water from some adjoining river or stream.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Measure
A measure formerly used for articles brought by water, as coals, oysters, etc. The water-measure bushel was three gallons larger than the Winchester bushel.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Frame
A name given to the first power spinning machine, because driven by water power.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Gang
A passage for water, such as was usually made in a sea wall, to drain water out of marshes.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Lettuce
A plant (Pistia stratiotes) which floats on tropical waters, and forms a rosette of spongy, wedge-shaped leaves.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Hare
A small American hare or rabbit (Lepus aquaticus) found on or near the southern coasts of the United States; - called also water rabbit, and swamp hare.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Dock
A tall, coarse dock growing in wet places. The American water dock is Rumex orbiculatus, the European is R. Hydrolapathum.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Locust
A thorny leguminous tree (Gleditschia monosperma) which grows in the swamps of the Mississippi valley.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Feather
Alt. of Water feather-foil
Webster's Dictionary - Water Engine
An engine to raise water; or an engine moved by water; also, an engine or machine for extinguishing fires; a fire engine.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Lizard
Any aquatic lizard of the genus Varanus, as the monitor of the Nile. See Monitor, n., 3.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Flea
Any one of numerous species of small aquatic Entomostraca belonging to the genera Cyclops, Daphnia, etc; - so called because they swim with sudden leaps, or starts.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Measurer
Any one of numerous species of water; the skater. See Skater, n., 2.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Milfoil
Any plant of the genus Myriophyllum, aquatic herbs with whorled leaves, the submersed ones pinnately parted into capillary divisions.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Horehound
Bugleweed.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Hyacinth
Either of several tropical aquatic plants of the genus Eichhornia, related to the pickerel weed.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Lime
Hydraulic lime.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Inch
Same as Inch of water, under Water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Leg
See Leg, 7.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Gas
See under Gas.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Hemp
See under Hemp.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Deerlet
See Water chevrotain.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Gage
See Water gauge.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Hog
The capybara.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Fox
The carp; - so called on account of its cunning.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Junket
The common sandpiper.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Laverock
The common sandpiper.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Drainage
The draining off of water.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Lemon
The edible fruit of two species of passion flower (Passiflora laurifolia, and P. maliformis); - so called in the West Indies.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Elder
The guelder-rose.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Elephant
The hippopotamus.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Eagle
The osprey.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Devil
The rapacious larva of a large water beetle (Hydrophilus piceus), and of other similar species. See Illust. of Water beetle.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Dressing
The treatment of wounds or ulcers by the application of water; also, a dressing saturated with water only, for application to a wound or an ulcer.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Feather-Foil
The water violet (Hottonia palustris); also, the less showy American plant H. inflata.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Flounder
The windowpane (Pleuronectes maculatus).
Webster's Dictionary - Water Ice
Water flavored, sweetened, and frozen, to be eaten as a confection.
Webster's Dictionary - Rose Water
Water tinctured with roses by distillation.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Hammer
(1):
A concussion, or blow, made by water in striking, as against the sides of a pipe or vessel containing it.
(2):
A metal hammer used when heated, as by dipping in hot water, to blister the skin, as for counterritation.
(3):
A vessel partly filled with water, exhausted of air, and hermetically sealed. When reversed or shaken, the water being unimpeded by air, strikes the sides in solid mass with a sound like that of a hammer.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Cure
(1):
A hydropathic institution.
(2):
Hydropathy.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Doctor
(1):
A physician who treats diseases with water; an hydropathist.
(2):
One who professes to be able to divine diseases by inspection of the urine.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Hemlock
(1):
A poisonous plant (/nanthe crocata) resembling the above.
(2):
A poisonous umbelliferous plant (Cicuta virosa) of Europe; also, any one of several plants of that genus.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Glass
(1):
A water gauge for a steam boiler.
(2):
An instrument consisting of an open box or tube with a glass bottom, used for examining objects in the water, as upon the sea bottom in shallow places.
(3):
A clepsydra.
(4):
See Soluble glass, under Glass.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Gall
(1):
A watery appearance in the sky, accompanying the rainbow; a secondary or broken rainbow.
(2):
A cavity made in the earth by a torrent of water; a washout.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Line
(1):
Any one of certain lines of a vessel, model, or plan, parallel with the surface of the water at various heights from the keel.
(2):
Any one of several lines marked upon the outside of a vessel, corresponding with the surface of the water when she is afloat on an even keel. The lowest line indicates the vessel's proper submergence when not loaded, and is called the light water line; the highest, called the load water line, indicates her proper submergence when loaded.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Hen
(1):
The common American coot.
(2):
Any gallinule.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Level
(1):
The level formed by the surface of still water.
(2):
A kind of leveling instrument. See under Level, n.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Dog
(1):
The menobranchus.
(2):
A small floating cloud, supposed to indicate rain.
(3):
A dog accustomed to the water, or trained to retrieve waterfowl. Retrievers, waters spaniels, and Newfoundland dogs are so trained.
(4):
A sailor, esp. an old sailor; an old salt.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Deer
(1):
The water chevrotain.
(2):
A small Chinese deer (Hydropotes inermis). Both sexes are destitute of antlers, but the male has large, descending canine tusks.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Grass
(1):
The water cress.
(2):
A tall march perennial grass (Paspalum dilatatum) of the southern United States and the American tropics.
(3):
One of various horsetails.
(4):
Manna grass.
(5):
Velvet grass.
(6):
The grass Chloris elegans.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Water, Gregorian
A holy water used in the ceremony of the consecration of a church. It contains wine, salt, and ashes. It takes its name because its use was prescribed by Pope Gregory I.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Water of Consecration
A holy water used in the ceremony of the consecration of a church. It contains wine, salt, and ashes. It takes its name because its use was prescribed by Pope Gregory I.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Water, Holy
A sacramental blessed by a priest to invoke God's blessing on those who use it. There are four kinds: ordinary holy water, blessed by the priest for the sprinkling of the people before Mass (see ASPERGEs), for use at the door of the church, and for the blessing of persons and things in the church and at horne, sometimes used with salt, as a symbol of wisdom and of preservation from corruption; Baptismal water, in which the oil of catechumens and the holy chrism are mingled, used only in the administration of Baptism; water of consecration, or Gregorian water, and Easter water. As used in nearly all the blessings of the Church's ritual, it is usually contained in a bowl-shaped vessel having a swinging handle and provided with a sprinkler. At the church door it is kept in a fixed vessel called a font, so that the people may use it conveniently when entering or leaving. There is an indulgence of 100 days for using it. Water is the natural element for cleansing; and symbolically it denotes interior purification. It has been used in many religions. The laws of Moses enjoined the sprinkling of the people, the sacrifices, etc. In the Christian Church its use goes back probably to the 2century. Holy water is usually blessed just before the principal Mass on Sunday, but may be blessed at any other time. The priest reads several prayers, including an exorcism of the salt and the water, and puts the salt into the water in the form of a threefold cross, in the name of the three Persons of the Blessed Trinity. He then asks God's blessing on it.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Water-Spouts
Are well-known phenomena in the Levant , and are supposed to be produced by whirlwinds. A dense, black, funnel-shaped cloud is seen depending from the sky, and sometimes moving rapidly over the sea, from which at times a similar cone ascends to meet the upper one. Where they unite, the column may be three or four feet thick; and when they break, torrents of water descend. The word occurs in Psalm 42:7 , where, however, the psalmist probably alludes to cataracts of water.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Water, Easter
One of the varieties of holy water, so called because it is blessed with special ceremonies and distributed to the people on Holy Saturday Eve of Easter.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Jealousy, Water of
See Bitter Water .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Water
See CISTERN and WELLS.
In Isaiah 35:7 , the Hebrew word for "parched ground" that shall become a pool of water, is the same with the Arabic term for the mirage, a peculiar optical illusion by which travelers in hot and dry deserts think they see broad lakes and flowing waters; they seem to discern the very ripple of the waves, and the swaying of tail trees on the margin in the cool breeze; green hills and houses and city ramparts rise before the astonished sight, recede as the traveler advances, and at length melt away in the hot haze. Not so the blessings of the gospel; they are no alluring mockery, but real waters of everlasting life, Isaiah 55:1 John 4:14 Revelation 22:1 . Compare Isaiah 29:8 Jeremiah 15:18 .
King James Dictionary - Water
WATER, n. Wauter. G., Gr.
1. A fluid, the most abundant and most necessary for living beings of any in nature, except air. Water when pure, is colorless, destitute of taste and smell, ponderous, transparent, and in a very small degree compressible. It is reposited in the earth in inexhaustible quantities, where it is preserved fresh and cool, and from which it issues in springs, which form streams and rivers. But the great reservoirs of water on the globe are the ocean, seas and lakes, which cover more than three fifths of its surface, and from which it is raised by evaporation, and uniting with the air in the state of vapor, is wafted over the earth, ready to be precipitated in the form of rain, snow or hail. Water by the abstraction or loss of heat becomes solid, or in other words, is converted into ice or snow and by heat it is converted into steam, an elastic vapor, one of the most powerful agents in nature. Modern chemical experiments prove that water is a compound substance, consisting of a combination of oxygen and hydrogen gases, or rather the bases or ponderable matter of those gases or about two volumes or measures of hydrogen gas and one of oxygen gas. The proportion of the ingredients in weight, is nearly 85 parts of oxygen to 15 of hydrogen.
2. The ocean a sea a lake a river any great collection of water as in the phrases, to go by water, to travel by water. 3. Urine the animal liquor secreted by the kidneys and discharged from the bladder. 4. The color or luster of a diamond or pearl, sometimes perhaps of other precious stones as a diamond of the first water, that is, perfectly pure and transparent. Hence the figurative phrase, a man or a genius of the first water, that is, of the first excellence. 5. Water is a name given to several liquid substances or humors in animal bodies as the water of the pericardium, of dropsy, &c. Mineral waters, are those waters which are so impregnated with foreign ingredients, such as gaseous, sulphurous and saline substances, as to give them medicinal, or at least sensible properties. Most natural waters contain more or less of these foreign substances, but the proportion is generally too minute to affect the senses.
To hold water, to be sound or tight. Obsolete or vulgar.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Water Watering, Waterless
A — 1: ὕδωρ (Strong's #5204 — Noun Neuter — hudor — ) whence Eng. prefix, "hydro-," is used (a) of the natural element, frequently in the Gospels; in the plural especially in the Apocalypse; elsewhere, e.g., Hebrews 9:19 ; James 3:12 ; in 1 John 5:6 , that Christ "came by water and blood," may refer either (1) to the elements that flowed from His side on the Cross after His Death, or, in view of the order of the words and the prepositions here used, (2) to His baptism in Jordan and His Death on the Cross. As to (1), the "water" would symbolize the moral and practical cleansing effected by the removal of defilement by our taking heed to the Word of God in heart, life and habit; cp. Leviticus 14 , as to the cleansing of the leper. As to (2), Jesus the Son of God came on His mission by, or through, "water" and blood, namely, at His baptism, when He publicly entered upon His mission and was declared to be the Son of God by the witness of the Father, and at the Cross, when He publicly closed His witness; the Apostle's statement thus counteracts the doctrine of the Gnostics that the Divine Logos united Himself with the Man Jesus at His baptism, and left him at Gethsemane. On the contrary, He who was baptized and He who was crucified was the Son of God throughout in His combined Deity and humanity.
The word "water" is used symbolically in John 3:5 , either (1) of the Word of God, as in 1 Peter 1:23 (cp. the symbolic use in Ephesians 5:26 ), or, in view of the preposition ek, "out of," (2) of the truth conveyed by baptism, this being the expression, not the medium, the symbol, not the cause, of the believer's identification with Christ in His death, burial and resurrection. So the New Birth is, in one sense, the setting aside of all that the believer was according to the flesh, for it is evident that there must be an entirely new beginning. Some regard the kai, "and," in John 3:5 , as epexegetic, == "even," in which case the "water" would be emblematic of the Spirit, as in John 7:38 (cp. John 4:10,14 ), but not in 1 John 5:8 , where the Spirit and the "water" are distinguished. "The water of life," Revelation 21:6 ; 22:1,17 , is emblematic of the maintenance of spiritual life in perpetuity. In Revelation 17:1 the "waters" are symbolic of nations, peoples, etc.
Note: For potamos, rendered "waters" in 2 Corinthians 11:26 , see RIVER.
B — 1: ποτίζω (Strong's #4222 — Verb — potizo — pot-id'-zo ) "to give to drink," is used (a) naturally in Luke 13:15 , "watering," with reference to animals; (b) figuratively, with reference to spiritual ministry to converts, 1 Corinthians 3:6-8 . See DRINK , B, No. 3.
Notes: (1) For hudropoteo, "to drink water," 1 Timothy 5:23 , see DRINK , B, No. 5. (2) For the adjective anudros, "waterless" (RV), "without water," see DRY , No 2.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Water
In the Church Catechism it is declared that the outwardvisible sign or form in Baptism is, "Water; wherein the person isbaptized. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of theHoly Ghost." By the rubric in the Office for Holy Baptism it isdirected that the Font is to be filled with "pure water." It isthus the Church fulfils our Lord's command, following literallyHis words, "baptizing them with water." Water, therefore, is theessential element of Holy Baptism, just as the bread and wine arethe elements in the Holy Communion. Water as used in HolyBaptism signifies "cleansing," The amount of water to be used theChurch has always regarded as matter of indifference.

Sentence search

Fresh-Water - ) Of, pertaining to, or living in, Water not salt; as, fresh-water geological deposits; a fresh-water fish; fresh-water mussels. ) Accustomed to sail on fresh Water only; unskilled as a seaman; as, a fresh-water sailor
Water Motor - (1):...
A Water wheel; especially, a small Water wheel driven by Water from a street main. ...
(2):...
A Water engine
Water - See Water, v. ) To wet or supply with Water; to moisten; to overflow with Water; to irrigate; as, to Water land; to Water flowers. ) The limpidity and luster of a precious stone, especially a diamond; as, a diamond of the first Water, that is, perfectly pure and transparent. Hence, of the first Water, that is, of the first excellence. ) A solution in Water of a gaseous or readily volatile substance; as, ammonia Water. ) Any liquid secretion, humor, or the like, resembling Water; esp. ) A body of Water, standing or flowing; a lake, river, or other collection of Water. ) To add Water to (anything), thereby extending the quantity or bulk while reducing the strength or quality; to extend; to dilute; to weaken. ) To wet and calender, as cloth, so as to impart to it a lustrous appearance in wavy lines; to diversify with wavelike lines; as, to Water silk. Water, n. ) To supply with Water for drink; to cause or allow to drink; as, to Water cattle and horses. ) To get or take in Water; as, the ship put into port to Water. ) To shed, secrete, or fill with, Water or liquid matter; as, his eyes began to Water
Watering - WaterING, ppr. Overflowing sprinkling or wetting with Water supplying with Water giving Water for drink giving a way appearance to. ...
WaterING, n. The act of overflowing or sprinkling with Water the act of supplying with Water for drink or other purposes the act of wetting and calendering for giving luster to, as cloth. The place where Water is supplied
Water Power - (1):...
A fall of Water which may be used to drive machinery; a site for a Water mill; a Water privilege. ...
(2):...
The power of Water employed to move machinery, etc
Water Tiger - A diving, or Water, beetle, especially the larva of a Water beetle. b of Water beetle
Water-Rot - ) To rot by steeping in Water; to Water-ret; as, to Water-rot hemp or flax
Water Adder - (1):...
The common, harmless American Water snake (Tropidonotus sipedon). under Water Snake. ...
(2):...
The Water moccasin
Watery - ) Abounding with Water; wet; hence, tearful. ) Resembling Water; thin or transparent, as a liquid; as, Watery humors. ) Of or pertaining to Water; consisting of Water
Water Inch - Same as Inch of Water, under Water
Drown - ) To overwhelm in Water; to submerge; to inundate. ) To deprive of life by immersion in Water or other liquid. ) To be suffocated in Water or other fluid; to perish in Water
Water Ouzel - Any one of several species of small insessorial birds of the genus Cinclus (or Hydrobates), especially the European Water ousel (C. aquaticus), and the American Water ousel (C. These birds live about the Water, and are in the habit of walking on the bottom of streams beneath the Water in search of food
Flowage - ) An overflowing with Water; also, the Water which thus overflows
Water-Soak - ) To soak Water; to fill the interstices of with Water
Ziment-Water - ) A kind of Water found in copper mines; Water impregnated with copper
Yote - ) To pour Water on; to soak in, or mix with, Water
Water-Ret - ) To ret, or rot, in Water, as flax; to Water-rot
Watering - from Water, v. ) of Water...
Water Moccasin - Called also Water snake, Water adder, Water viper
Bouget - ) A charge representing a leather vessel for carrying Water; - also called Water bouget
Water - In the Church Catechism it is declared that the outwardvisible sign or form in Baptism is, "Water; wherein the person isbaptized. " By the rubric in the Office for Holy Baptism it isdirected that the Font is to be filled with "pure Water. " It isthus the Church fulfils our Lord's command, following literallyHis words, "baptizing them with Water. " Water, therefore, is theessential element of Holy Baptism, just as the bread and wine arethe elements in the Holy Communion. Water as used in HolyBaptism signifies "cleansing," The amount of Water to be used theChurch has always regarded as matter of indifference
Dehydrate - ) To deprive of Water; to render free from Water; as, to dehydrate alcohol
Aquatic - ) Sports or exercises practiced in or on the Water. ) Pertaining to Water; growing in Water; living in, swimming in, or frequenting the margins of Waters; as, aquatic plants and fowls
Water Cart - A cart carrying Water; esp. , one carrying Water for sale, or for sprinkling streets, gardens, etc
Water Carriage - ...
(2):...
Transportation or conveyance by Water; means of transporting by Water
Bitter Water - BITTER Water (lit. ]'>[1] , Water of Bitterness, Numbers 5:18 )
Waterpot - ) A vessel for holding or conveying Water, or for sprinkling Water on cloth, plants, etc
Urceole - ) A vessel for Water for washing the hands; also, one to hold wine or Water
Vichy Water - A mineral Water found at Vichy, France. It is essentially an effervescent solution of sodium, calcium, and magnetism carbonates, with sodium and potassium chlorides; also, by extension, any artificial or natural Water resembling in composition the Vichy Water proper
Lapping - Of Water like a dog, i. , by putting the hand filled with Water to the mouth. The dog drinks by shaping the end of his long thin tongue into the form of a spoon, thus rapidly lifting up Water, which he throws into his mouth. The three hundred men that went with Gideon thus employed their hands and lapped the Water out of their hands (Judges 7:7 )
Waterpot - A vessel made for carrying Water, usually made of clay although some were made of stone (John 2:6 ). Large pots stored Water (1 Kings 18:33 ; John 2:6 ); smaller pots a woman could carry on her shoulder (John 4:28 ). Small pitchers were used for pouring Water (Luke 22:10 ; see Jeremiah 19:1 ). Water was also carried in animal skins
Anas - ) A genus of Water fowls, of the order Anseres, including certain species of fresh-water ducks
Drown - Literally, to overwhelm in Water an appropriately, to extinguish life by immersion in Water or other fluid applied to animals also, to suspend animation by submersion. To overwhelm in Water as, to drown weeds. ...
DROWN, To be suffocated in Water or other fluid to perish in Water
Water Spider - (1):...
Any spider that habitually lives on or about the Water, especially the large American species (Dolomedes lanceolatus) which runs rapidly on the surface of Water; - called also raft spider. ...
(2):...
An aquatic European spider (Argyoneta aquatica) which constructs its web beneath the surface of the Water on Water plants. ...
(3):...
A Water mite
Waterproof - ) Proof against penetration or permeation by Water; impervious to Water; as, a Waterproof garment; a Waterproof roof. ) To render impervious to Water, as cloth, leather, etc. ) Cloth made Waterproof, or any article made of such cloth, or of other Waterproof material, as rubber; esp. , impervious to Water
Driftwood - ) Wood drifted or floated by Water. : Whatever is drifting or floating as on Water
Ripply - ) Having ripples; as, ripply Water; hence, resembling the sound of rippling Water; as, ripply laughter; a ripply cove
Water Gang - A passage for Water, such as was usually made in a sea wall, to drain Water out of marshes
Watered - WaterED, pp. Overspread or sprinkled with Water made wet supplied with Water made lustrous by being wet and calendered
Flash Boiler - A variety of Water-tube boiler, used chiefly in steam automobiles, consisting of a nest of strong tubes with very little Water space, kept nearly red hot so that the Water as it trickles drop by drop into the tubes is immediately flashed into steam and superheated
Water Devil - The rapacious larva of a large Water beetle (Hydrophilus piceus), and of other similar species. of Water beetle
Conduit - Channel for conducting Water. There are still the remains of one that conveyed Water from what are called Solomon's pools to Jerusalem. We read that Hezekiah by means of a pool and a conduit brought Water into Jerusalem
Watermark - ) A mark indicating the height to which Water has risen, or at which it has stood; the usual limit of high or low Water. ) See Water line, 2
Water Hammer - (1):...
A concussion, or blow, made by Water in striking, as against the sides of a pipe or vessel containing it. ...
(2):...
A metal hammer used when heated, as by dipping in hot Water, to blister the skin, as for counterritation. ...
(3):...
A vessel partly filled with Water, exhausted of air, and hermetically sealed. When reversed or shaken, the Water being unimpeded by air, strikes the sides in solid mass with a sound like that of a hammer
Catchwork - ) A work or artificial Water-course for throwing Water on lands that lie on the slopes of hills; a catchdrain
Spring - A place where Water bubbles up freely from the ground (NAS, NIV, NRSV). ” See Fountain ; Water ; Well
Water Battery - (1):...
A voltaic battery in which the exciting fluid is Water. ...
(2):...
A battery nearly on a level with the Water
Aqueous - ) Made from, or by means of, Water. ) Partaking of the nature of Water, or abounding with it; Watery
Dehydration - ) The act or process of freeing from Water; also, the condition of a body from which the Water has been removed
Water Engine - An engine to raise Water; or an engine moved by Water; also, an engine or machine for extinguishing fires; a fire engine
Wet - Containing Water, as wet land, or a wet cloth or having Water or other liquid upon the surface, as a wet table. Wet implies more Water or liquid than moist or humid. Water or wetness moisture or humidity in considerable degree. To fill or moisten with Water or other liquid to sprinkle or humectate to cause to have Water or other fluid adherent to the surface to dip or soak in liquor as, to wet a spunge to wet the hands to wet cloth
Water - Water . The scarcity of Water in the East lends it a special value. The fruitfulness of the land depends on the quantity available for Watering. But this is confined to the months from April till October; and the Water would rush down the slopes to the sea, were it not caught and stored for future use. The limestone formation, with its many caves, made easy the construction of cisterns and reservoirs to collect the rain Water: thence supplies were drawn as required during the dry months. Wherever Water is found, there is greenery and beauty all through the year. ...
In the Maritime Plain plentiful supplies of Water are found on digging (Genesis 26:13 ff. ...
The earliest use of Water was doubtless to allay the thirst of man and beast. It is held a meritorious act to set a vessel of Water by the wayside for the refreshment of the wayfarer. ), for which Water must often be purchased. Use and wont have established certain regulations for the Watering of animals, infringement of which frequently causes strife ( Genesis 29:2 ff. To this time also belong many ruins of massive aqueducts, leading Water to the cities from distant sources. Every considerable house has a cistern for rain Water from roof and adjoining areas. Importance is attached to plunging in the buckets by which the Water is drawn up, this preventing stagnation. The springs, and cisterns made in the open country, are the property of the local family or tribe, from whom Water, if required in any quantity, must be bought. Drawing of Water for domestic purposes is almost exclusively the work of women ( Genesis 24:11 , John 4:7 etc. In crossing the desert, Water is carried in ‘bottles’ of skin ( Genesis 21:14 ). ‘flowing’ Water of the spring is greatly preferred to the ‘dead’ Water of the cistern, and it stands frequently for the vitalizing Influences of God’s grace ( Jeremiah 2:13 , Zechariah 14:3 , John 4:10 etc. Many Scripture references show how the cool, refreshing, fertilizing qualities of Water are prized in a thirsty land ( Proverbs 25:26 , Isaiah 44:14 , Jeremiah 17:8 , Luke 16:24 etc. Water is furnished to wash the feet and hands of a guest ( Luke 7:44 ). To pour Water on the hands is the office of a servant ( 2 Kings 3:11 ). Water is also the symbol of weakness and Instability ( Genesis 49:4 , Ezekiel 21:7 etc. For ‘Water-gate’ see Nethinim, p
Water Privilege - The advantage of using Water as a mechanical power; also, the place where Water is, or may be, so used
Milldam - ) A dam or mound to obstruct a Water course, and raise the Water to a height sufficient to turn a mill wheel
Washed - Cleansed in Water purified. Overflowed dashed against with Water
Jet d'Eau - (1):...
A stream of Water spouting, esp. ...
(2):...
A stream of Water spouting from a fountain or pipe (especially from one arranged to throw Water upward), in a public place or in a garden, for ornament
Asperges - ) The brush or instrument used in sprinkling holy Water; an aspergill. ) The service or ceremony of sprinkling with holy Water
Cistern - ) An artificial reservoir or tank for holding Water, beer, or other liquids. ) A natural reservoir; a hollow place containing Water
Water Cell - A cell containing Water; specifically (Zool. ), one of the cells or chambers in which Water is stored up in the stomach of a camel
Water Supply - A supply of Water; specifically, Water collected, as in reservoirs, and conveyed, as by pipes, for use in a city, mill, or the like
Water Nymph - (1):...
A goddess of any stream or other body of Water, whether one of the Naiads, Nereids, or Oceanides. ...
(2):...
A Water lily (Nymphaea)
Water - Mayim (מַיִם, Strong's #4325), “water; flood. ...
First, “water” is one of the original basic substances. 1:2 (the first occurrence of the word): “And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the Waters. 1:7 God separated the “waters” above and the “waters” below (cf. ...
Second, the word represents that which is in a well, “water” to be drunk ( Water” is “water” that flows: “And Isaac’s servants digged in the valley, and found there a well of springing [1] Water …” ( Water of affliction, until I come in peace” (1 Kings 22:27). Job 9:30 speaks of slush or snow Water: “If I wash myself with snow Water, and make my hands never so clean. …”...
Third, mayim can represent liquid in general: “… For the Lord our God hath put us to silence, and given us Water of gall to drink, because we have sinned against the Lord” (2 Kings 18:27; cf. ...
Fourth, in Israel’s cultus “water” was poured or sprinkled (no one was ever immersed into Water), symbolizing purification. So Aaron and his sons were to be washed with “water” as a part of the rite consecrating them to the priesthood: “And Aaron and his sons thou shalt bring unto the door of the tabernacle of the congregation, and shalt wash them with Water” ( Water …” ( Water in an earthen vessel; and of the dust that is in the floor of the tabernacle the priest shall take, and put it into the Water” ( Water” was used in Israel’s rituals, too: “And the priest shall set the woman before the Lord, and uncover the woman’s head, and put the offering of memorial in her hands, which is the jealousy offering: and the priest shall have in his hand the bitter Water that causeth the curse” (
Fifth, in proper names this word is used of springs, streams, or seas and/or the area in the immediate vicinity of such bodies of Water: “Say unto Aaron, Take thy rod, and stretch out thine hand upon the Waters of Egypt, upon their streams, upon their rivers, and upon their ponds, and upon all their pools of Water, that they may become blood …” ( Waters” ( Waters. ” “Mighty Waters” describes the onrush of the godless nations against God: “The nations shall rush like the rushing of many Waters …” ( Waters, a tempest stealeth him away in the night” (Job 27:20). In other passages “water” is used to represent timidity: “… Wherefore the hearts of the people melted, and became as Water” ( Waters that pass away” (Job 11:16). 32:2 “water” represents that which is refreshing: “And a man shall be as a hiding place from the wind, and a covert from the tempest; as rivers of Water in a dry place, as the shadow of a great rock in a weary land. ” Rest and peace are figured by Waters of rest, or quiet Waters: “… He leadeth me beside the still Waters” ( Waters out of thine own cistern, and running Waters out of thine own well” (
Tehôm (תְּהֹם, Strong's #8415), “deep Water; ocean; Water table; Waters; flood of Waters. ...
The word represents the “deep Water” whose surface freezes when cold: “The Waters are hid as with a stone, and the face of the deep is frozen” (
Job 38:30). ...
The word has special reference to the deep floods or sources of Water. On the other hand, in such contexts tehôm may mean no more than “deep Water” into which heavy objects quickly sink. ...
Tehôm can represent an inexhaustible source of Water or, by way of poetic comparison, of blessing: “… With blessings of heaven above, blessings of the deep that lieth under …” ( Waters beneath the surface of oceans, lakes, seas, and rivers. This was what God opened together with the Waters above the expanse ( Waters” ( Waters” which initially covered the surface of the entire earth: “… And darkness was upon the face of the deepw (cf
Liturgical Use of Salt - It is put into ordinary holy Water and Gregorian Water (water of consecration), and is also used in the ceremonies of Baptism, a small quantity being placed on the tongue of the person to be baptized, with the words: "Receive the salt of wisdom; may it be to thee a propitiation unto eternal life
Alluvion - ) Wash or flow of Water against the shore or bank. ) An accession of land gradually washed to the shore or bank by the flowing of Water. ) Matter deposited by an inundation or the action of flowing Water; alluvium
Salt, Liturgical Use of - It is put into ordinary holy Water and Gregorian Water (water of consecration), and is also used in the ceremonies of Baptism, a small quantity being placed on the tongue of the person to be baptized, with the words: "Receive the salt of wisdom; may it be to thee a propitiation unto eternal life
Sail - ) To move through or on the Water; to swim, as a fish or a Water fowl. ) An extent of canvas or other fabric by means of which the wind is made serviceable as a power for propelling vessels through the Water. ) A passage by a sailing vessel; a journey or excursion upon the Water. ) To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on Water; to be impelled on a body of Water by the action of steam or other power. ) To pass or move upon, as in a ship, by means of sails; hence, to move or journey upon (the Water) by means of steam or other force. ) To be conveyed in a vessel on Water; to pass by Water; as, they sailed from London to Canton
Water Line - (1):...
Any one of certain lines of a vessel, model, or plan, parallel with the surface of the Water at various heights from the keel. ...
(2):...
Any one of several lines marked upon the outside of a vessel, corresponding with the surface of the Water when she is afloat on an even keel. The lowest line indicates the vessel's proper submergence when not loaded, and is called the light Water line; the highest, called the load Water line, indicates her proper submergence when loaded
Cryohydrate - , which crystallizes with Water of crystallization only at low temperatures, or below the freezing point of Water
Aspersorium - ) The stoup, basin, or other vessel for holy Water in Roman Catholic churches. ) A brush for sprinkling holy Water; an aspergill
Demersion - ) The state of being overwhelmed in Water, or as if in Water
Barrage - ) An artificial bar or obstruction placed in a river or Water course to increase the depth of Water; as, the barrages of the Nile
Rainfall - ) A fall or descent of rain; the Water, or amount of Water, that falls in rain; as, the average annual rainfall of a region
Water Rat - ...
(3):...
A thief on the Water; a pirate. ...
(4):...
The Water vole
Water Measure - A measure formerly used for articles brought by Water, as coals, oysters, etc. The Water-measure bushel was three gallons larger than the Winchester bushel
Water - The Bible speaks of Water in three different ways: as a material resource, as a symbol, and as a metaphor. ...
A Material Necessity which God Provides Water as a material resource is necessary for life. The Bible states that God made Water a part of His good creation and that He exercises sovereignty over it (Genesis 1-2 ; Isaiah 40:12 ). He controls the natural processes of precipitation and evaporation, as well as the courses of bodies of Water (Job 5:10 ; Job 36:27 ; Job 37:10 ; Ezekiel 47:1-126 ; Psalm 107:33 ; Proverbs 8:29 ). God normally assures the provision of Water for human needs (Deuteronomy 11:14 ). However, Water is sometimes used in punishment for sin, as with the flood of Noah's day (Genesis 6:17 ) or the drought proclaimed by Elijah (1 Kings 17:1 ). The divine control of Water teaches people obedience to and dependency upon God. ...
Many of the great acts of God in history have involved Water, such as the parting of the sea (Exodus 14:21 ), the provision of Water for the Israelites in the wilderness (Exodus 15:25 ; Exodus 17:6 ), and the crossing of the Jordan River (Joshua 3:14-17 ). Water was also involved in several of Jesus' miracles (Matthew 14:25 ; Luke 8:24-25 ; John 2:1-11 ). ...
Water was a crucial element in God's gift of the Promised Land to Israel (Deuteronomy 8:7 ). Palestine contains several natural sources of Water: rain, springs, wells, and a few short, perennial streams. The dry months of May to October made necessary the use of cisterns and pools for Water storage. ...
A Theological Symbol and Metaphor The Old Testament contains laws for the use of Water in rituals as a symbol of purification. The Book of Genesis uses Water as a symbol of instability before the completion of creation (Genesis 1:2 ), and Ezekiel spoke of Water as a symbol of renewal in the age to come (1618386159_8 ). ...
The Bible contains dozens of metaphorical usages of Water. For example, in the Old Testament Water is a metaphor or simile for fear (Joshua 7:5 ), death (2 Samuel 14:14 ), sin (Job 15:16 ), God's presence (Psalm 72:6 ), marital fidelity (Proverbs 5:15-16 ), the knowledge of God (Isaiah 11:9 ), salvation (Psalm 33:74 ), the Spirit (Isaiah 44:3-4 ), God's blessings (Isaiah 58:11 ), God's voice (Ezekiel 43:2 ), God's wrath (Hosea 5:10 ), and justice (Amos 5:24 ). Among the metaphorical uses of Water in the New Testament are references to birth (John 3:5 ), the Spirit (John 4:10 ), spiritual training (1 Corinthians 3:6 ), and life (Revelation 7:17 )
Waterman - ) A Water demon. , who supplies Water to the horses. ) A man who plies for hire on rivers, lakes, or canals, or in harbors, in distinction from a seaman who is engaged on the high seas; a man who manages fresh-water craft; a boatman; a ferryman
Jackal's Well - Water source outside Jerusalem, accessible from the Valley Gate (Nehemiah 2:13 , NIV, RSV). Other English translations designate this Water source as the Dragon(s) fountain (TEV), spring (NRSV, REB), or well (KJV, NAS). The spring is possibly En-rogel or more likely a Water source in the upper part of the Hinnom Valley
Breastwheel - ) A Water wheel, on which the stream of Water strikes neither so high as in the overshot wheel, nor so low as in the undershot, but generally at about half the height of the wheel, being kept in contact with it by the breasting. The Water acts on the float boards partly by impulse, partly by its weight
Boiling - Bubbling heaving in bubbles being agitated as boiling liquor swelling with heat, ardor or passion dressing or preparing for some purpose by hot Water. The act or state of bubbling agitation by heat ebullition the act of dressing by hot Water the act of preparing by hot Water, or of evaporating by heat
Conduit - Used to signify some mode for conveying Water, as a "water course" (R. " It probably included an aqueduct, such as must have been used to convey the Water from the Pool of Solomon to Jerusalem
Simchat beit hashoeivah - �the rejoicing of the place of the Water-drawing�); celebration accompanying the Water libation ceremony on Sukkot in Temple times, recalled today by Sukkot celebrations
Water Dressing - The treatment of wounds or ulcers by the application of Water; also, a dressing saturated with Water only, for application to a wound or an ulcer
Knee-Deep - ) Sunk to the knees; as, men knee-deep in Water. ) Rising to the knees; knee-high; as, Water or snow knee-deep
Dive - ) To plunge into Water head foremost; to thrust the body under, or deeply into, Water or other fluid. ) To plunge (a person or thing) into Water; to dip; to duck. ) A plunge headforemost into Water, the act of one who dives, literally or figuratively
Plash - ) To dabble in Water; to splash. ) To splash, as Water. ) A dash of Water; a splash. ) A small pool of standing Water; a puddle
Clepsydra - ) A Water clock; a contrivance for measuring time by the graduated flow of a liquid, as of Water, through a small aperture
Bordeaux Mixture - A fungicidal mixture composed of blue vitriol, lime, and Water. ; Water, 35 - 50 gallons
Sakiyeh - ) A kind of Water wheel used in Egypt for raising Water, from wells or pits, in buckets attached to its periphery or to an endless rope
Littoral - the zone between high-water and low-water mark
Washing - Cleansing with Water purifying overflowing overspreading. The act of cleansing with Water ablution
Bathe - ) The immersion of the body in Water; as to take one's usual bathe. ) To apply Water or some liquid medicament to; as, to bathe the eye with warm Water or with sea Water; to bathe one's forehead with camphor. ) To surround, or envelop, as Water surrounds a person immersed
Shoal - ) Having little depth; shallow; as, shoal Water. ) A place where the Water of a sea, lake, river, pond, etc. ) A sandbank or bar which makes the Water shoal. ) To become shallow; as, the color of the Water shows where it shoals. ) To cause to become more shallow; to come to a more shallow part of; as, a ship shoals her Water by advancing into that which is less deep
Dam - A mole, bank or mound of earth, or any wall, or a frame of wood, raised to obstruct a current of Water, and to raise it, for the purpose of driving millwheels, or for other purposes. Any work that stops and confines Water in a pond or bason, or causes it to rise. To make a dam, or to stop a stream of Water by a bank of earth, or by any other work to confine or shut in Water. It is common to use, after the verb, in, up, or out as, to dam in, or to dam up, the Water, and to dam out is to prevent Water from entering
Wet - ) Containing, or consisting of, Water or other liquid; moist; soaked with a liquid; having Water or other liquid upon the surface; as, wet land; a wet cloth; a wet table. ) To fill or moisten with Water or other liquid; to sprinkle; to cause to have Water or other fluid adherent to the surface; to dip or soak in a liquid; as, to wet a sponge; to wet the hands; to wet cloth. ) Employing, or done by means of, Water or some other liquid; as, the wet extraction of copper, in distinction from dry extraction in which dry heat or fusion is employed. ) Water or wetness; moisture or humidity in considerable degree
Cryophorus - ) An instrument used to illustrate the freezing of Water by its own evaporation. The ordinary form consists of two glass bulbs, connected by a tube of the same material, and containing only a quantity of Water and its vapor, devoid of air. The Water is in one of the bulbs, and freezes when the other is cooled below 32� Fahr
Living Waters - (1) Spring Water as contrasted with well-water, promised by Our Lord to the Samaritan woman at the well of Jacob (John 4; Isaiah 12; Jeremias 2; Ezechias 47; Zacheriah 14). but he that shall drink of the Water that I will give him, shall not thirst forever" (John 4)
Downcomer - ) In some Water-tube boilers, a tube larger in diameter than the Water tubes to conduct the Water from each top drum to a bottom drum, thus completing the circulation
Waters, Living - (1) Spring Water as contrasted with well-water, promised by Our Lord to the Samaritan woman at the well of Jacob (John 4; Isaiah 12; Jeremias 2; Ezechias 47; Zacheriah 14). but he that shall drink of the Water that I will give him, shall not thirst forever" (John 4)
Water - Water, n. Water when pure, is colorless, destitute of taste and smell, ponderous, transparent, and in a very small degree compressible. But the great reservoirs of Water on the globe are the ocean, seas and lakes, which cover more than three fifths of its surface, and from which it is raised by evaporation, and uniting with the air in the state of vapor, is wafted over the earth, ready to be precipitated in the form of rain, snow or hail. Water by the abstraction or loss of heat becomes solid, or in other words, is converted into ice or snow and by heat it is converted into steam, an elastic vapor, one of the most powerful agents in nature. Modern chemical experiments prove that Water is a compound substance, consisting of a combination of oxygen and hydrogen gases, or rather the bases or ponderable matter of those gases or about two volumes or measures of hydrogen gas and one of oxygen gas. The ocean a sea a lake a river any great collection of Water as in the phrases, to go by Water, to travel by Water. The color or luster of a diamond or pearl, sometimes perhaps of other precious stones as a diamond of the first Water, that is, perfectly pure and transparent. Hence the figurative phrase, a man or a genius of the first Water, that is, of the first excellence. Water is a name given to several liquid substances or humors in animal bodies as the Water of the pericardium, of dropsy, &c. Mineral Waters, are those Waters which are so impregnated with foreign ingredients, such as gaseous, sulphurous and saline substances, as to give them medicinal, or at least sensible properties. Most natural Waters contain more or less of these foreign substances, but the proportion is generally too minute to affect the senses. ...
To hold Water, to be sound or tight
Anacharis - ) A fresh-water weed of the frog's-bit family (Hydrocharidaceae), native to America. Called also Waterweed and Water thyme
Croton Bug - A small, active, winged species of cockroach (Ectobia Germanica), the Water bug. in those with hot-water pipes
Catchdrain - ) A ditch or drain along the side of a hill to catch the surface Water; also, a ditch at the side of a canal to catch the surplus Water
Hasty Pudding - (1):...
A batter or pudding made of flour or oatmeal, stirred into boiling Water or milk. ...
(2):...
A thick batter pudding made of Indian meal stirred into boiling Water; mush
Conduit - ) A pipe, canal, channel, or passage for conveying Water or fluid. ) A structure forming a reservoir for Water
Ice - ) Water, cream, custard, etc. ) Water or other fluid frozen or reduced to the solid state by cold; frozen Water. 92, that of Water at 4¡ C. 0) being less than that of Water, ice floats
Water Chestnut - The fruit of Trapa natans and Trapa bicornis, Old World Water plants bearing edible nutlike fruits armed with several hard and sharp points; also, the plant itself; - called also Water caltrop
Backwater - ) Water turned back in its course by an obstruction, an opposing current , or the flow of the tide, as in a sewer or river channel, or across a river bar. ) Water thrown back by the turning of a Waterwheel, or by the paddle wheels of a steamer. ) An accumulation of Water overflowing the low lands, caused by an obstruction
Ford - A place in a river or other Water, where it may be passed by man or beast on foot, or by wading. ...
FORD, To pass or cross a river or other Water by treading or walking on the bottom to pass through Water by wading to wade through
Sailing - Moving on Water or in air passing in a ship or other vessel. The act of moving on Water or the movement of a ship or vessel impelled or wafted along the surface of Water by the action of wind on her sails
Irrigation - As streams were few in Palestine, Water was generally stored up in winter in reservoirs, and distributed through gardens in numerous rills, which could easily be turned or diverted by the foot (Deuteronomy 11:10 ). For purposes of irrigation, Water was raised from streams or pools by Water-wheels, or by a shaduf, commonly used on the banks of the Nile to the present day
Water, Holy - There are four kinds: ordinary holy Water, blessed by the priest for the sprinkling of the people before Mass (see ASPERGEs), for use at the door of the church, and for the blessing of persons and things in the church and at horne, sometimes used with salt, as a symbol of wisdom and of preservation from corruption; Baptismal Water, in which the oil of catechumens and the holy chrism are mingled, used only in the administration of Baptism; Water of consecration, or Gregorian Water, and Easter Water. Water is the natural element for cleansing; and symbolically it denotes interior purification. Holy Water is usually blessed just before the principal Mass on Sunday, but may be blessed at any other time. The priest reads several prayers, including an exorcism of the salt and the Water, and puts the salt into the Water in the form of a threefold cross, in the name of the three Persons of the Blessed Trinity
Fountain - , "eye" of the Water desert), a natural source of living Water. Palestine was a "land of brooks of Water, of fountains, and depths that spring out of valleys and hills" (Deuteronomy 8:7 ; 11:11 ). All the perennial rivers and streams of the country are supplied from fountains, and depend comparatively little on surface Water. "Palestine is a country of mountains and hills, and it abounds in fountains of Water. The murmur of these Waters is heard in every dell, and the luxuriant foliage which surrounds them is seen in every plain. " Besides its rain-water, its cisterns and fountains, Jerusalem had also an abundant supply of Water in the magnificent reservoir called "Solomon's Pools" (q. These have all been long ago destroyed, so that no Water from the "Pools" now reaches Jerusalem
Corrasion - ) The erosion of the bed of a stream by running Water, principally by attrition of the detritus carried along by the stream, but also by the solvent action of the Water
Penstock - ) A close conduit or pipe for conducting Water, as, to a Water wheel, or for emptying a pond, or for domestic uses
Aquarians - Those who consecrated Water in the Eucharist instead of wine. Another branch of them approved of wine at the sacrament, when received in the evening: they likewise mixed Water with the wine
Water - The word "water" is used in a variety of metaphorical ways in Scripture. In some contexts Water stands for enemies who can attack and need to be overcome (2 Samuel 22:17-18 ; Psalm 18:16-17 ; 124:4-5 ; 144:7 ; Isaiah 8:7 ; Jeremiah 47:2 ). In both the Old and New Testaments, the word "water" is used for salvation and eternal life, which God offers humankind through faith in his Son (Isaiah 12:3 ; 55:1 ; Revelation 21:6 ; 22:1,2 , 17 ). In John 4:10-15 , part of Jesus' discourse with the Samaritan woman at the well, he speaks metaphorically of his salvation as "living Water" and as "a spring of Water welling up to eternal life. "...
Following along this same theme, Water sometimes symbolizes the spiritual cleansing that comes with the acceptance of God's offer of salvation (Ezekiel 36:25 ; Ephesians 5:26 ; Hebrews 10:22 ). In fact, in Ephesians 5:26 , the "water" that does the cleansing of the bride, the church, is directly tied in with God's Word, of which it is a symbol. ...
In a very important passage, Jesus identifies the "streams of living Water" that flow from within those who believe in him with the Holy Spirit (John 7:37-39 ). Two times in Jeremiah Yahweh is metaphorically identified as "the spring of living Water" (Jeremiah 2:13 ; 17:13 ). "...
In other passages of Scripture, the following are said metaphorically to be "water": God's help (Isaiah 8:6 : "the gently flowing Waters of Shiloah" ); God's judgment (Isaiah 28:17 : "water will overflow your hiding place" ); man's words (Proverbs 18:4 : "The words of man's mouth are deep Waters" ); man's purposes (Proverbs 20:5 : "The purposes of a man's heart are deep Waters" ); an adulterous woman (Proverbs 9:17 : "Stolen Water is sweet" ); and a person's posterity (Isaiah 48:1 : "Listen to this, O house of Jacob, who are called by the name of Israel and have come forth out of the line [1] of Judah" ). ...
The reference to "water" in John 3:5 has been variously interpreted by scholars. Some have taken the phrase, "being born of Water, " to mean being born again by means of Water baptism. Others have taken the verse to involve a hendiadys and take "water" and "Spirit" together as one reference since Water is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in other passages. Still others take the birth by Water to be one's natural birth and the birth by the Spirit to be the supernatural birth of being "born again" or regenerated. After all, Water, in its ordinary sense, has a great part to play in the natural birth of a baby
Sea - ) One of the larger bodies of salt Water, less than an ocean, found on the earth's surface; a body of salt Water of second rank, generally forming part of, or connecting with, an ocean or a larger sea; as, the Mediterranean Sea; the Sea of Marmora; the North Sea; the Carribean Sea. ) An inland body of Water, esp. if large or if salt or brackish; as, the Caspian Sea; the Sea of Aral; sometimes, a small fresh-water lake; as, the Sea of Galilee. ) The ocean; the whole body of the salt Water which covers a large part of the globe. ) The swell of the ocean or other body of Water in a high wind; motion of the Water's surface; also, a single wave; a billow; as, there was a high sea after the storm; the vessel shipped a sea
Bucket - ) One of the receptacles on the rim of a Water wheel into which the Water rushes, causing the wheel to revolve; also, a float of a paddle wheel. ) A vessel for drawing up Water from a well, or for catching, holding, or carrying Water, sap, or other liquids. ) To draw or lift in, or as if in, buckets; as, to bucket Water
Water Barometer - A barometer in which the changes of atmospheric pressure are indicated by the motion of a column of Water instead of mercury. It requires a column of Water about thirty-three feet in height
Water Color - ...
(2):...
A color ground with Water and gum or other glutinous medium; a color the vehicle of which is Water; - so called in distinction from oil color
Baume - One, which is used with liquids heavier than Water, sinks to 0� in pure Water, and to 15� in a 15 per cent salt solution; the other, for liquids lighter than Water, sinks to 0� in a 10 per cent salt solution and to 10� in pure Water
Cofferdam - ) A Water-tight inclosure, as of piles packed with clay, from which the Water is pumped to expose the bottom (of a river, etc
Aspersion - ) A sprinkling, as with Water or dust, in a literal sense. ) The spreading of calumniations reports or charges which tarnish reputation, like the bespattering of a body with foul Water; calumny
Pitot's Tube - A bent tube used to determine the velocity of running Water, by placing the curved end under Water, and observing the height to which the fluid rises in the tube; a kind of current meter
Conduit, - meaning an aqueduct or trench through which Water was carried. Tradition, both oral and as represented by Talmudical writers, ascribes to Solomon the formation of the original aqueduct by which Water was brought to Jerusalem
Gihon - ” The primary Water supply for Jerusalem and one of the four rivers into which the river of Eden divided (Genesis 2:13 ). ...
During the Old Testament period the spring of Gihon was the primary Water supply for the city of Jerusalem. Water issues from a crack sixteen feet long in the rock. At some point in the ancient past a wall was built at the eastern end of the crack, diverting Water into a cave at the other end. Water jugs were let down into the pool through another vertical shaft. During the early Israelite occupation, Water was collected outside the city walls in an open basin called the “upper pool” (Isaiah 7:3 ). An open aqueduct carried Water from there to the “old pool” at the southern end of the city (Isaiah 22:11 ; cf. Before Sennacherib's arrival, Hezekiah plugged the aqueduct and dug his famous Water tunnel (2 Kings 20:20 ; 2 Chronicles 32:30 ). See Eden ; Hezekiah ; Jerusalem ; Kidron Valley ; Siloam ; Water
Aqueducts - were troughs cut out of rock or soil or pipes made of stone, leather, or bronze that were used from very early times in the Middle East to transport Water from distant places into towns and cities. These troughs carried Water from hillsides to the valleys below. Jerusalem was served by a system of aqueducts which brought mountain spring Water first to collecting reservoirs outside the city, and then into the city itself. Hezekiah's tunnel, the Siloam tunnel, was a twisting underground aqueduct that diverted Water from the Gihon Spring to the Pool of Siloam (2 Kings 20:20 ). At Masada, two small wadis were dammed up and the Water diverted by open channel to rock-cut cisterns in the mound. ) brought Water into Nineveh from the river Gomel. Ancient aqueducts, the non-pressure type, carried Water downhill by means of gravity. Although most conduits were beneath the ground, lowlands were crossed on high, arched structures, each containing a built-in slope so that Water flow was not impeded. Sometimes these elevated sections, while also carrying several channels of Water, served as footbridges
Brose - It is called beef brose, Water brose, etc. , according to the name of the liquid (beef broth, hot Water, etc
Cistern - An artificial reservoir or receptacle for holding Water, beer or other liquor, as in domestic uses, distilleries, and breweries. A natural reservoir a hollow place containing Water as a fountain or lake
Langya - ) One of several species of East Indian and Asiatic fresh-water fishes of the genus Ophiocephalus, remarkable for their power of living out of Water, and for their tenacity of life; - called also walking fishes
Undershot - ) Moved by Water passing beneath; - said of a Water wheel, and opposed to overshot; as, an undershot wheel
Marah - ” Place in the Wilderness of Shur, so named because of the bitter Water found there by the wandering Israelites (Exodus 15:23 ). The site is typical of pools in the Sinai pennisula, having undrinkable Water. God answered the leader's prayer by telling him to cast a tree into the Water which became sweet and drinkable
Bucket - The vessel in which Water is drawn out of a well it is nearly in the form of a pail. A vessel or pail used at sea to draw Water up at the side of a ship, for washing the decks, &c. A vessel made of leather, nearly in the form of a pail, but narrower and deeper, used to convey Water by hand for extinguishing fires
Wash - ) To cleanse by ablution, or dipping or rubbing in Water; to apply Water or other liquid to for the purpose of cleansing; to scrub with Water, etc. , or as with Water; as, to wash the hands or body; to wash garments; to wash sheep or wool; to wash the pavement or floor; to wash the bark of trees. ) To cover with a thin or Watery coat of color; to tint lightly and thinly. ) To cover with Water or any liquid; to wet; to fall on and moisten; hence, to overflow or dash against; as, waves wash the shore. ) To waste or abrade by the force of Water in motion; as, heavy rains wash a road or an embankment. Water color. ) The blade of an oar, or the thin part which enters the Water. ) The backward current or disturbed Water caused by the action of oars, or of a steamer's screw or paddles, etc. ) The flow, swash, or breaking of a body of Water, as a wave; also, the sound of it. ) To remove by washing to take away by, or as by, the action of Water; to drag or draw off as by the tide; - often with away, off, out, etc. ) To clean anything by rubbing or dipping it in Water; to perform the business of cleansing clothes, ore, etc. , in Water. ) To be wasted or worn away by the action of Water, as by a running or overflowing stream, or by the dashing of the sea; - said of road, a beach, etc. ) The act of washing; an ablution; a cleansing, wetting, or dashing with Water; hence, a quantity, as of clothes, washed at once. ) Substances collected and deposited by the action of Water; as, the wash of a sewer, of a river, etc. ) A mixture of dunder, molasses, Water, and scummings, used in the West Indies for distillation. ) To move with a lapping or swashing sound, or the like; to lap; splash; as, to hear the Water washing. ) Gravel and other rock debris transported and deposited by running Water; coarse alluvium. ) The upper surface of a member or material when given a slope to shed Water. Hence, a structure or receptacle shaped so as to receive and carry off Water, as a carriage wash in a stable
Anhydride - ) An oxide of a nonmetallic body or an organic radical, capable of forming an acid by uniting with the elements of Water; - so called because it may be formed from an acid by the abstraction of Water
Ship Railway - (1):...
A railway on which to transport vessels overland between bodies of Water. ...
(2):...
An inclined railway running into the Water with a cradelike car on which a vessel may be drawn out on land, as for repairs
Washerwoman - ) The pied wagtail; - so called in allusion to its beating the Water with its tail while tripping along the leaves of Water plants
Trass - Hence, a coarse sort of plaster or mortar, durable in Water, and used to line cisterns and other reservoirs of Water
Flood - A great flow of Water a body of moving Water particularly, a body of Water, rising, swelling and overflowing land not usually covered with Water. The flood, by way of eminence, the deluge the great body of Water which inundated the earth in the days of Noah. The flowing of the tide the semi-diurnal swell or rise of Water in the ocean opposed to ebb
Swan - tinshemeth ), thus rendered by the Authorized Version in ( Leviticus 11:18 ; 14:16) where it occurs in the list of unclean birds Rut either of the renderings "porphyrio" (purple Water-hen) and "ibis" is more probable. Neither of these birds occurs elsewhere in the catalogue; both would be familiar to residents in Egypt, and the original seems to point to some Water-fowl. The purple Water-hen is allied to our corn-crake and Water-hen, and is the largest and most beautiful of the family Rallidae
Fountain - A word applied to living springs of Water as contrasted with cisterns ( Leviticus 11:35 ); specifically of Besr-lahai-roi ( Genesis 16:7 ), Elim ( Numbers 33:8 , RV Flume - ) A stream; especially, a passage channel, or conduit for the Water that drives a mill wheel; or an artifical channel of Water for hydraulic or placer mining; also, a chute for conveying logs or lumber down a declivity
Shallow - ) To become shallow, as Water. ) A place in a body of Water where the Water is not deep; a shoal; a flat; a shelf
Force Pump - (1):...
A pump having a solid piston, or plunger, for drawing and forcing a liquid, as Water, through the valves; in distinction from a pump having a bucket, or valved piston. ...
(2):...
A pump adapted for delivering Water at a considerable height above the pump, or under a considerable pressure; in distinction from one which lifts the Water only to the top of the pump or delivers it through a spout
Water Wheel - (1):...
Any wheel for propelling machinery or for other purposes, that is made to rotate by the direct action of Water; - called an overshot wheel when the Water is applied at the top, an undershot wheel when at the bottom, a breast wheel when at an intermediate point; other forms are called reaction wheel, vortex wheel, turbine wheel, etc. ...
(2):...
A wheel for raising Water; a noria, or the like
Water (2) - WATER (ὕδωρ). —For an Eastern country, Palestine (except in the Negeb and the districts which are desert) has a fairly abundant supply of Water. In Galilee the Water supply is much greater than in Judaea. The storage of Water is much more imperfect than in former times. The chief Waters which are referred to in the Gospels are those of the Sea of Galilee and the river Jordan. ...
Water is frequently mentioned in the Gospels (most instances are found in Jn. ‘Jesus went up straightway out of the Water’ (Matthew 3:16 || Mark 1:10); ‘Send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in Water’ (Luke 16:24); ‘John was baptizing in aenon, near to Salim, because there was much Water there’ (John 5:1-7). The Water of the pool of Bethesda (John 3:23) was supposed to have curative powers. 3 (‘waiting for the moving of the Waters’) and the whole of v. The moving of the Water was a natural phenomenon, the flow of the spring being intermittent. The disciples who were sent to prepare for the observance of the Passover were instructed to look for ‘a man bearing a pitcher of Water’ (Mark 14:13 || Luke 22:10). As Water is usually carried by women in the East, the man bearing the pitcher would easily be distinguished. In John 19:34 it is recorded that at the crucifixion of Jesus one of the soldiers pierced His side with a spear, and forthwith there came out blood and Water; see art. Blood and Water. The figurative use of Water in the Gospels is varied. ) of the moral cleansing of life in repentance, ‘I baptize you with Water unto repentance’ (Matthew 3:11, Mark 1:8, Luke 3:16, John 1:23-26); (ii. ) its symbolical reference in connexion with the new birth is admitted, but its significance is uncertain, ‘Except a man be born of Water and spirit (ἐξ ὕδατος καὶ πνεύματος), he cannot enter into the kingdom of God’ (John 3:5). The phrase ‘water and spirit’ has been regarded as an instance of hendiadys, and interpreted as ‘spiritual Water’ (Neil, Figurative Language in the Bible). ) Water is also used as a symbol of innocence: ‘Pilate took Water, and washed his hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person’ (Matthew 27:24). Jesus said to Simon the Pharisee, ‘I entered into thy house, thou gavest me no Water for my feet’ (Luke 7:44). ) At the supper in the upper room (John 13:1-7) the Water for the feet had not been provided. After that, he poureth Water into a bason, and began to wash the disciples’ feet’ (John 13:4-5). ) In His conversation with the woman of Samaria, Jesus linked the Water which she sought at the well with the living Water which He alone could give. ) It is also used as a symbol of the smallest service: ‘Whosoever shall give unto one of these little ones a cup of cold Water only in the name of a disciple, verily I say unto you he shall in no wise lose his reward’ (Matthew 10:42 || Mark 9:41). It is possible to punctuate the sentence so that it reads ‘a cup of cold Water only’ or ‘only in the name of a disciple. ‘Water’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible ; Thomson, LB Conduit - A Water-course or channel (Job 38:25 ). The "conduit of the upper pool" (Isaiah 7:3 ) was formed by Hezekiah for the purpose of conveying the Waters from the upper pool in the valley of Gihon to the west side of the city of David (2 Kings 18:17 ; 20:20 ; 2 Chronicles 32:30 ). In carrying out this work he stopped "the Waters of the fountains which were without the city" i. , "the upper Water-course of Gihon", and conveyed it down from the west through a canal into the city, so that in case of a siege the inhabitants of the city might have a supply of Water, which would thus be withdrawn from the enemy. ) There are also the remains of a conduit which conducted Water from the so-called "Pools of Solomon," beyond Bethlehem, into the city. Water is still conveyed into the city from the fountains which supplied these pools by a channel which crosses the valley of Hinnom
Duck - ) To thrust or plunge under Water or other liquid and suddenly withdraw. ) To plunge the head of under Water, immediately withdrawing it; as, duck the boy. ) To go under the surface of Water and immediately reappear; to dive; to plunge the head in Water or other liquid; to dip. ) A sudden inclination of the bead or dropping of the person, resembling the motion of a duck in Water
Water Gauge - (1):...
A wall or bank to hold Water back. ...
(2):...
An instrument for measuring or ascertaining the depth or quantity of Water, or for indicating the height of its surface, as in the boiler of a steam engine
Aqueduct - ) A conductor, conduit, or artificial channel for conveying Water, especially one for supplying large cities with Water
Lukewarm - The city of Laodicea received its Water from an aqueduct several miles long. The lukewarm Water which arrived at the city served as an appropriate illustration for a tasteless, good-for-nothing Christianity
Pelton Wheel - A form of impulse turbine or Water wheel, consisting of a row of double cup-shaped buckets arranged round the rim of a wheel and actuated by one or more jets of Water playing into the cups at high velocity
Pulsometer - ) A device, with valves, for raising Water by steam, partly by atmospheric pressure, and partly by the direct action of the steam on the Water, without the intervention of a piston; - also called vacuum pump
Water Tower - (1):...
A large metal pipe made to be extended vertically by sections, and used for discharging Water upon burning buildings. ...
(2):...
A tower or standpipe used as a reservoir to deliver Water at a required head, as to a fountain
Pond - ) To make into a pond; to collect, as Water, in a pond by damming. ) A body of Water, naturally or artificially confined, and usually of less extent than a lake
Brook Mint - See Water mint
Seltzer Water - See Selters Water
Theudas - Flowing with Water
Leummim - Countries; without Water
Water Antelope - See Water buck
Water Rabbit - See Water hare
Water Viper - See Water moccasin
Water Aloe - See Water soldier
Water Bridge - See Water table
Water Caltrop - The Water chestnut
Water Piet - The Water ousel
Water Spinner - The Water spider
Water Deerlet - See Water chevrotain
Water Gage - See Water gauge
Jealousy, Water of - See Bitter Water
Voyage - ) To take a voyage; especially, to sail or pass by Water. ) Formerly, a passage either by sea or land; a journey, in general; but not chiefly limited to a passing by sea or Water from one place, port, or country, to another; especially, a passing or journey by Water to a distant place or country
High-Pressure - ) Having or involving a pressure greatly exceeding that of the atmosphere; - said of steam, air, Water, etc. , and of steam, air, or hydraulic engines, Water wheels, etc
Amphibious - ) Pertaining to, adapted for, or connected with, both land and Water. ) Having the ability to live both on land and in Water, as frogs, crocodiles, beavers, and some plants
Dew - The Water or moisture collected or deposited on or near the surface of the earth, during the night, by the escape of the heat which held the Water in solution
Embankment - , raised to prevent Water from overflowing a level tract of country, to retain Water in a reservoir, or to carry a roadway, etc
Water-Logged - ) Filled or saturated with Water so as to be heavy, unmanageable, or loglike; - said of a vessel, when, by receiving a great quantity of Water into her hold, she has become so heavy as not to be manageable by the helm
Affusion - ) The act of pouring Water or other fluid on the whole or a part of the body, as a remedy in disease. ) The act of pouring upon, or sprinkling with a liquid, as Water upon a child in baptism
Mead - ) A fermented drink made of Water and honey with malt, yeast, etc. ) A drink composed of sirup of sarsaparilla or other flavoring extract, and Water
Sluice - ) An artifical passage for Water, fitted with a valve or gate, as in a mill stream, for stopping or regulating the flow; also, a Water gate or flood gate. ) A long box or trough through which Water flows, - used for washing auriferous earth. ) To wash with, or in, a stream of Water running through a sluice; as, to sluice eart or gold dust in mining
Craber - ) The Water rat
Arsesmart - ) Smartweed; Water pepper
Carabao - ) The Water buffalo
Jidlaph - He that distills Water
Water Ousel - of Water ouzel...
Water Rattle - of Water rattler...
Water Way - Same as Water course
Water Tick - Same as Water mite
Waterbok - ) A Water buck
Skilty - ) The Water rail
Undigenous - ) Generated by Water
Dowse - ) To use the dipping or divining rod, as in search of Water, ore, etc. ) To plunge, or duck into Water; to immerse; to douse
Ravine - ) A torrent of Water. ) A deep and narrow hollow, usually worn by a stream or torrent of Water; a gorge; a mountain cleft
Rinse - ) To wash lightly; to cleanse with a second or repeated application of Water after washing. ) To cleancse by the introduction of Water; - applied especially to hollow vessels; as, to rinse a bottle
Hexaemeron - On three days God separates: light from darkness; Water above from Water below; Water from dry land
Water Table - (1):...
A molding, or other projection, in the wall of a building, to throw off the Water, - generally used in the United States for the first table above the surface of the ground (see Table, n. ...
(2):...
The upper limit of the portion of the ground wholly saturated with Water. The Water table may be within a few inches of the surface or many feet below it
Mixed Chalice - The symbolical mixing of Water with wine in the HolyCommunion to represent the union of the human with the Divine naturein the Incarnation. It is also a lively memorial of Him who for ourRedemption did shed out of His most precious side both Water andBlood. This mixing of Water with Wine for this purpose seems to havebeen an Apostolical use and very probably was practiced by our LordHimself
Water of Bitterness - Water OF BITTERNESS
Well - See Cistern, Fountain, Water
Bilcock - ) The European Water rail
Benitier - ) A holy-water stoup
Water Pipe - A pipe for conveying Water
Sea Pool - A pool of salt Water
Water Qualm - See Water brash, under Brash
Waterless - ) Destitute of Water; dry
Roily - ) Turbid; as, roily Water
Watered - ) of Water...
Ote - ) A channel for Water
Scourage - ) Refuse Water after scouring
Tail-Water - ) Water in a tailrace
Water Feather - of Water feather-foil...
Water Drainage - The draining off of Water
Irrigation - Transportation of Water by man-made means such as canals, dams, aqueducts, and cisterns. Old Testament The dry climate of the Ancient Near East made the transportation of Water, often across long distances, a necessity. Large canal systems crossed the lands of Egypt and Mesopotamia, providing the vast amounts of Water necessary to support crops during the dry months of March to October. In Egypt, the second highest official, the vizier, oversaw the maintenance of canals and the allocation of Water to the provinces. Water was drawn from the Nile River and offshoot irrigation canals by means of a hinged pole with a hanging bucket on the end. During the Exile of Judah in Babylon, canals as large as twenty-five yards wide and several miles long carried the Waters of the Tigris and Euphrates to field and city. Commercial ships used these Waterways to transport produce between outlying farms and major cities. Instead, farmers relied upon the winter rains to provide all the Water necessary for crops during the coming year. Fields and gardens close to Water sources may have used small irrigation channels, and some fields may have been Watered by hand in particularly dry years. Runoff from the rains was collected and diverted through conduits to both communal and private cisterns for drinking Water. In larger cities such as Gezer, Megiddo, Hazor, and Jerusalem engineers and workmen produced huge underground tunnel systems to provide the citizens with ample supplies of Water. ...
New Testament During Intertestamental and New Testament times massive Roman aqueducts were built to provide fresh Water for the growing cities. Water for Jerusalem was carried northward through an elaborate series of canals and pools from the Bethlehem area
Rudder Bands - These, when not in use, were lifted out of the Water and bound or tied up. When required for use, these bands were unloosed and the rudders allowed to drop into the Water (Acts 27:40 )
Bulkhead - ) A structure of wood or stone, to resist the pressure of earth or Water; a partition wall or structure, as in a mine; the limiting wall along a Water front
Douse - ) To fall suddenly into Water. ) To plunge suddenly into Water; to duck; to immerse; to dowse
Water Glass - (1):...
A Water gauge for a steam boiler. ...
(2):...
An instrument consisting of an open box or tube with a glass bottom, used for examining objects in the Water, as upon the sea bottom in shallow places
Lin - ) A Waterfall, or cataract; as, a roaring lin. ) A pool or collection of Water, particularly one above or below a fall of Water
Conduit - A Water channel or aqueduct in or near Jerusalem channeling Water into the city (2 Kings 18:17 ; 2 Kings 20:20 ; 2Chronicles 32:2-4,2 ). The same Hebrew word refers to a trench built up to conduct Water flow (1 Kings 18:32-38 ; Job 38:25 ; Ezekiel 31:4 ). Aqueducts had been built for Jerusalem before David conquered it with a tunnel providing Water for the city (2 Samuel 5:8 ). In a marvelous engineering feat, Hezekiah had workmen start at both ends and meet in the middle to construct a Water tunnel connecting Gihon Spring and the Pool of Siloam (2 Kings 20:20 ; Isaiah 7:3 Chronicles 32:30 )
Puddle - ) A small quantity of dirty standing Water; a muddy plash; a small pool. ) Clay, or a mixture of clay and sand, kneaded or worked, when wet, to render it impervious to Water. ) To make dense or close, as clay or loam, by working when wet, so as to render impervious to Water. ) To make foul or muddy; to pollute with dirt; to mix dirt with (water)
Separation, Water of - SEPARATION, Water OF
Water of Separation - Water OF SEPARATION
Aquiform - ) Having the form of Water
Sea Green - The green color of sea Water
Rhine - ) A Water course; a ditch
Pyrosis - ) See Water brash, under Brash
Sea Green - The green color of sea Water
Medad - He that measures; Water of love
Water Bird - Any aquatic bird; a Water fowl
Water Blackbird - The European Water ousel, or dipper
Water-Retted - ) of Water-ret...
Water-Rotted - ) of Water-rot...
Headrace - ) See Race, a Water course
Saligot - ) The Water chestnut (Trapa natans)
Rose Water - Water tinctured with roses by distillation
Kickup - ) The Water thrush or accentor
Rose Water - Water tinctured with roses by distillation
Dropsy - , Water the face. In medicine, an unnatural collection of Water, in an part of the body, proceeding from a greater effusion of serum by the exhalant arteries, than the absorbents take up. The dropsy takes different names, according to the part affected as ascites, or dropsy of the abdomen hydrocephalus, or Water in the head anasarca, or a Watery swelling over the whole body &c
Elim - It was the first place where they found Water. It had twelve wells of Water and seventy palm trees (Numbers 33:9 )
Ford - ) A place in a river, or other Water, where it may be passed by man or beast on foot, by wading. ) To pass or cross, as a river or other Water, by wading; to wade through
Enhydros - ) A variety of chalcedony containing Water
Chaffern - ) A vessel for heating Water
Bilgy - ) Having the smell of bilge Water
Aquiparous - ) Secreting Water; - applied to certain glands
Adaliah - One that draws Water; poverty; cloud; death
Devil Bird - ) A small Water bird
Waterflood - ) A flood of Water; an inundation
Water-Colorist - ) One who paints in Water colors
Water-Retting - ) of Water-ret...
Water-Rotting - ) of Water-rot...
Malashaganay - ) The fresh-water drumfish (Haploidonotus grunniens)
Leche - ) See Water buck, under 3d Buck
Water - In the sacred Scriptures, bread and Water are commonly mentioned as the chief supports of human life; and to provide a sufficient quantity of Water, to prepare it for use, and to deal it out to the thirsty, are among the principal cares of an oriental householder, The Moabites and Ammonites are reproached for not meeting the Israelites with bread and Water; that is, with proper refreshments, Deuteronomy 33:4 . Nabal says in an insulting manner to David's messengers, "Shall I then take my bread and my Water, and my flesh that I have killed for my shearers, and give it unto men whom I know not whence they be?" 1 Samuel 25:11 . To furnish travellers with Water is, even in present times, reckoned of so great importance, that many of the eastern philanthropists have been at considerable expense to procure them that enjoyment. Hence fountains of living Water are met with in the towns and villages, in the fields and gardens, and by the sides of the roads and of the beaten tracks on the mountains; and a cup of cold Water from these wells is no contemptible present. "Fatigued with heat and thirst," says Carne, "we came to a few cottages in a palm wood, and stopped to drink of a fountain of delicious Water. In this northern climate no idea can be formed of the luxury of drinking in Egypt: little appetite for food is felt; but when, after crossing the burning sands, you reach the rich line of woods on the brink of the Nile, and pluck the fresh limes, and mixing their juice with Egyptian sugar and the soft river Water, drink repeated bowls of lemonade, you feel that every other pleasure of the senses must yield to this. On one of the mountains of Arabia, Niebuhr found three little reservoirs, which are always kept full of fine Water for the use of passengers. These reservoirs, which are about two feet and a half square, and from five to seven feet high, are round, or pointed at the top, of mason's work, having only a small opening in one of the sides, by which they pour Water into them. Sometimes he found, near these places of Arab refreshment, a piece of a ground shell, or a little scoop of wood, for lifting the Water. The same attention to the comfort of travellers is manifested in Egypt, where public buildings are set apart in some of their cities, the business of whose inhabitants is to supply the passengers with Water free of expense. Some of these houses make a very handsome appearance; and the persons appointed to wait on the passengers are required to have some vessels of copper, curiously tinned and filled with Water, always ready on the window next the street. Buckingham and his party bread and Water, while on horseback, without even being solicited to do so; and when they halted to accept it, both compliments and blessings were mutually interchanged, "Here, as in every other part of Nubia," says Burckhardt, "the thirsty traveller finds, at short distances, Water jars placed by the road side under a low roof. The same custom prevails in Upper Egypt, but on a larger scale: and there are caravanserais often found near the wells which supply travellers with Water. " In India the Hindoos go sometimes a great way to fetch Water, and then boil it, that it may not be hurtful to travellers that are hot; and after this stand from morning till night in some great road, where there is neither pit nor rivulet, and offer it in honour of their gods, to be drunk by the passengers. Hence a cup of Water is a present in the east of great value, though there are some other refreshments of a superior quality. It is still the proper business of the females to supply the family with Water. The proper time for drawing Water in those burning climates is in the morning, or when the sun is going down; then they go forth to perform that humble office adorned with their trinkets, some of which are often of great value. Agreeably to this custom Rebecca went instead of her mother to fetch Water from the well, and the servant of Abraham expected to meet an unmarried female there who might prove a suitable match for his master's son. In the East Indies, the women also draw Water at the public wells, as Rebecca did, on that occasion, for travellers, their servants and their cattle; and women of no mean rank literally illustrate the conduct of an unfortunate princess in the Jewish history, by performing the services of a menial, 2 Samuel 13:8 . The young women of Guzerat daily draw Water from the wells, and carry the jars upon the head; but those of high rank carry them upon the shoulder. ...
Water sometimes signifies the element of Water, Genesis 1:10 ; and metaphorically, trouble and afflictions, Psalms 69:1 . In the language of the prophets, Waters often denote a great multitude of people, Isaiah 8:7 ; Revelation 17:15 . Water is put for children or posterity, Numbers 24:7 ; Isaiah 48:1 ; for the clouds, Psalms 104:3 . Waters sometimes stand for tears, Jeremiah 9:1 ; Jeremiah 9:7 ; for the ordinances of the Gospel, Isaiah 12:3 ; Isaiah 35:6-7 ; Isaiah 55:1 ; John 7:37-38 . "Stolen Waters," denote unlawful pleasures with strange women, Proverbs 9:17 . The Israelites are reproached with having forsaken the fountain of living Water, to quench their thirst at broken cisterns, Jeremiah 2:13 ; that is, with having quitted the worship of God for the worship of false and ridiculous deities. Waters of Meribah, or the Waters of strife, were so called because of the quarrelling or contention and murmuring of the Israelites against Moses and against God. When they came to Kadesh, and there happened to be in want of Water, they made a sedition against him and his brother Aaron, Numbers 20:1 , &c
Cistern - The innumerable cisterns, wells, and pools that exist in Palestine are evidence of the efforts of ancient people to supplement the natural Water supply. The cistern of Palestine was usually a bottle or pear-shaped reservoir into which Water could drain from a roof, tunnel, or courtyard. The porous limestone out of which the cisterns were dug allowed much of the Water put into the cistern to escape. cisterns began to be plastered, which resulted in a more efficient system of Water storage. ...
The biblical writers revealed that cisterns were used for purposes other than holding Water. In Jeremiah 14:1 , the pagan gods were symbolized as broken cisterns that could not hold Water. See Waterworks; Wells
Dipper - ) The Water ouzel (Cinolus aquaticus) of Europe. ) One who, or that which, dips; especially, a vessel used to dip Water or other liquid; a ladle
Tromp - ) A blowing apparatus, in which air, drawn into the upper part of a vertical tube through side holes by a stream of Water within, is carried down with the Water into a box or chamber below which it is led to a furnace
Bitter Water - The Water drunk by a woman suspected of adultery (Numbers 5:11-31 ). The woman held the offering, and the priest held the vessel containing the bitter Water. The bitter Water was a combination of holy Water and dust from the sanctuary floor. At this point the woman took an oath: if she was innocent, the Water would not harm her; if she was guilty, then her “thigh would rot” and her “body swell. ” The priest wrote the curse (Numbers 5:21-22 ) on a parchment and washed the ink off the page into the Water. The priest then took the offering and burned it upon the altar, after which the woman drank the bitter Water
Cistern - A vessel to hold Water; also reservoirs. The chief dependence of a large portion of the population was upon the Water which fell in the rainy season and which they gathered in cisterns. The Water is conducted into them during the rainy season, and with proper care remains pure and sweet during the whole summer and autumn. When dry, they might be used as a prison, Genesis 37:22; Jeremiah 38:6; the "pit" was doubtless a cistern, or a granary, as at this day; and to drink Water only from one's own domestic cistern means, to content one's self with the lawful enjoyments of his own home
Dephlegmedness - ) A state of being freed from Water
Urinate - ) To discharge urine; to make Water
Bewash - ) To drench or souse with Water
Aquarellist - ) A painter in thin transparent Water colors
Drawers of Water - Water carriers
Emersed - ) Standing out of, or rising above, Water
Petrescent - ) Petrifying; converting into stone; as, petrescent Water
Potamospongiae - ) The fresh-water sponges
Peplis - ) A genus of plants including Water purslane
Divedapper - ) A Water fowl; the didapper
Dishwater - ) Water in which dishes have been washed
Sea Salt - Common salt, obtained from sea Water by evaporation
Water tu Twist - Yarn made by the throstle, or Water frame
Zope - ) A European fresh-water bream (Abramis ballerus)
Water Drain - A drain or channel for draining off Water
Salination - ) The act of washing with salt Water
Reservoir - Place for catching and storing Water for later use, either agricultural (2 Chronicles 26:10 ; Ecclesiastes 2:6 ) or as an urban supply in anticipation of a siege (2 Kings 20:20 ; Isaiah 22:8-11 ). Reservoirs were a necessity in most of Palestine where seasonal rains were the major Water source
Discolor - ) To alter the natural hue or color of; to change to a different color; to stain; to tinge; as, a drop of wine will discolor Water; silver is discolored by sea Water
Dead Sea - Although 6,500,000 tons of fresh Water pour into it every day, there is no outlet, the excess Water being taken off by evaporation, and the Water is so salt that no organic life can exist in it
Fountain - ) An artificially produced jet or stream of Water; also, the structure or works in which such a jet or stream rises or flows; a basin built and constantly supplied with pure Water for drinking and other useful purposes, or for ornament. ) A spring of Water issuing from the earth
Anhydrous - ) Destitute of Water; as, anhydrous salts or acids
Bottler - ) One who bottles wine, beer, soda Water, etc
Saur - ) Soil; dirt; dirty Water; urine from a cowhouse
Demersed - ) Situated or growing under Water, as leaves; submersed
Sacalait - ) A kind of fresh-water bass; the crappie
Valve-Shell - ) Any fresh-water gastropod of the genus Valvata
Emyd - ) A fresh-water tortoise of the family Emydidae
Drainpipe - ) A pipe used for carrying off surplus Water
Water Plant - A plant that grows in Water; an aquatic plant
Water Rate - A rate or tax for a supply of Water
Ablen - A small fresh-water fish (Leuciscus alburnus); the bleak
Water Sprite - A sprite, or spirit, imagined as inhabiting the Water
Relicted - ) Left uncovered, as land by recession of Water
Emyd - ) A fresh-water tortoise of the family Emydidae
Sailed - Passed in ships or other Water craft
Electropoion Fluid - Electropoion is best prepared by mixing one gallon of concentrated sulphuric acid diluted with three gallons of Water, with a solution of six pounds of potassium bichromate in two gallons of boiling Water
Broth - In America, the word is often applied to foaming Water, and especially to a mixture of snow and Water in the highways which is called snow-broth
Boil - ) To pass from a liquid to an aeriform state or vapor when heated; as, the Water boils away. ) To be in boiling Water, as in cooking; as, the potatoes are boiling. ) To heat to the boiling point, or so as to cause ebullition; as, to boil Water. ) To be agitated like boiling Water, by any other cause than heat; to bubble; to effervesce; as, the boiling waves. ) To steep or soak in warm Water. ) To be agitated, or tumultuously moved, as a liquid by the generation and rising of bubbles of steam (or vapor), or of currents produced by heating it to the boiling point; to be in a state of ebullition; as, the Water boils
Camel - ) A Water-tight structure (as a large box or boxes) used to assist a vessel in passing over a shoal or bar or in navigating shallow Water. By admitting Water, the camel or camels may be sunk and attached beneath or at the sides of a vessel, and when the Water is pumped out the vessel is lifted
Pump - ) To raise with a pump, as Water or other liquid. ) To draw Water, or the like, from; to from Water by means of a pump; as, they pumped the well dry; to pump a ship. ) To work, or raise Water, a pump
Cisterns - These were extensively used in Palestine for the collection of rain Water. Solomon also brought Water from long distances to be stored in cisterns, of which there are many under the Temple area. For every man to be able to drink Water out of his own cistern, was held out as a boon. Israel is charged with forsaking God, the fountain of blessing, and making for themselves cisterns which could hold no Water
Catchwater - ) A ditch or drain for catching Water
Four elements - The four basic elements of creation: fire, wind, Water, earth
Apus - ) A genus of fresh-water phyllopod crustaceans
Carene - ) A fast of forty days on bread and Water
Arapaima - ) A large fresh-water food fish of South America
Perca - ) A genus of fishes, including the fresh-water perch
Damourite - ) A kind of Muscovite, or potash mica, containing Water
Plim - ) To swell, as grain or wood with Water
Disponge - ) To sprinkle, as with Water from a sponge
Edulcorative - ) Tending to /weeten or purify by affusions of Water
Elatiniferous - ) Yielding gelatin on boiling with Water; capable of gelatination
Dephlegm - ) To rid of phlegm or Water; to dephlegmate
Thermae - ) Springs or baths of warm or hot Water
Urglet - ) A porous earthen jar for cooling Water by evaporation
Waftage - ) Conveyance on a buoyant medium, as air or Water
Waterage - , by Water
Metheglin - ) A fermented beverage made of honey and Water; mead
Unwashen - Not washed not cleansed by Water
Wash - To cleanse by ablution, or by rubbing in Water as, to wash the hands or the body to wash garments. To overflow or dash against to cover with Water as, the waves wash the strand or shore the sea washes the rocks on the shore or beach. To scrub in Water as, to wash a deck or a floor. To squeeze and cleanse in Water as, to wash wool. So sheep are said to be washed, when they are immersed in Water and their wool squeezed, by which means it is cleansed. To cleanse by a current of Water as, showers wash the streets. To perform the business of cleansing clothes in Water. Alluvial matter substances collected and deposited by Water as the wash of a river. With distillers, the fermentable liquor made b dissolving the proper subject for fermentation and distillation in common Water. In the distillery of malt, the wash is made by mixing the Water hot, with the malt ground into meal. The blade of an oar the thin part, which enters the Water and by whose impulse the boat is moved. In the west Indies, a mixture of dunder, molasses, Water and scummings, for distillation
Cistern - Βor , a dug pit for receiving Water conducted from a spring or the rainfall. The rain is conducted to them from the roofs of the houses, most of which are furnished with them; from whence is derived the metaphor, Proverbs 5:15, "drink Waters out of thine own cistern," i. ...
Hezekiah stopped the Water supply outside Jerusalem at the invasion of Sennacherib, while within there was abundant Water (2 Chronicles 32:3-4). So it has been in all the great sieges of Jerusalem, scarcity of Water outside, abundance within. " Cisterns yield only a limited supply of Water, not an everflowing spring; representing creature comforts soon exhausted, and therefore never worth forsaking the never failing, ever fresh supplies of God. The stonework of tanks often becomes broken, and the Water leaks into the earth; and, at best, the Water is not fresh long
Dabble - ) To play in Water, as with the hands; to paddle or splash in mud or Water
Drink - To drink Water by measure (Ezekiel 4:11 ), and to buy Water to drink (Lamentations 5:4 ), denote great scarcity
Darter - ) The snakebird, a Water bird of the genus Plotus; - so called because it darts out its long, snakelike neck at its prey. ) A small fresh-water etheostomoid fish
Aerator - an apparatus used for charging mineral Waters with gas and in making soda Water. ) An apparatus used for charging mineral Waters with gas and in making soda Water
Plumbing - ) The lead or iron pipes, and other apparatus, used in conveying Water, sewage, etc. ) The art of casting and working in lead, and applying it to building purposes; especially, the business of furnishing, fitting, and repairing pipes for conducting Water, sewage, etc
Water Tube - ...
(2):...
Any tube for passing or holding Water; specif. , in some steam boilers, a tube in which Water circulates and steam is generated
Afloat - ) Covered with Water bearing floating articles; flooded; as, the decks are afloat. ) Borne on the Water; floating; on board ship
Burial - The act of burying a deceased person sepulture interment the act of depositing a dead body in the earth, in a tomb or vault, or in the Water. The act of placing any thing under earth or Water as, to bury see in the earth
Liquor - ) A solution of a medicinal substance in Water; - distinguished from tincture and aqua. ) Any liquid substance, as Water, milk, blood, sap, juice, or the like
Jealousy, Ordeal of - The ordeal consisted of two parts: a grain offering “of memorial bringing iniquity to remembrance” (Numbers 5:15 ) and the “bitter Water that causeth the curse” (Numbers 5:18 ). See Bitter Water
Water - In a hot and dry country such as Palestine, Water was extremely important. (For further details concerning the problems of Water in Palestine see PALESTINE; WEATHER. )...
The refreshing and life-giving benefits of Water made it a popular biblical symbol to picture the spiritual refreshment and eternal life that God gives to those who trust in him (Psalms 1:3; Psalms 23:1-3; Isaiah 44:3; Isaiah 55:1; Jeremiah 17:13; John 4:14; John 7:37-39; Revelation 21:6; Revelation 22:1-2). Water could, however, be a means of judgment (Genesis 6:17; Exodus 14:23; Exodus 14:26-27; Psalms 32:6; Matthew 7:24-27; 2 Peter 2:5). ...
Water was also used in the cleansing rituals of the Israelite religion. If people became ceremonially unclean, they had to be ceremonially cleansed with Water. The Water used in the rituals in some cases was pure Water, in others a specially prepared mixture (Leviticus 15:13; Numbers 19:17). ...
In figurative speech, Water was a picture of cleansing from sin (Psalms 51:1-2; Ezekiel 36:25-26; John 13:5-10; Acts 22:16; Ephesians 5:26; Hebrews 10:22; see also BAPTISM)
Cauf - ) A chest with holes for keeping fish alive in Water
Bheestie - ) A Water carrier, as to a household or a regiment
Mozah - An issuing of Water, a city of Benjamin (Joshua 18:26 )
Bell Animalcule - An infusorian of the family Vorticellidae, common in fresh-water ponds
Aquapuncture - ) The introduction of Water subcutaneously for the relief of pain
Fountainless - ) Having no fountain; destitute of springs or sources of Water
Sammier - ) A machine for pressing the Water from skins in tanning
Silverfin - ) A small North American fresh-water cyprinoid fish (Notropis Whipplei)
Piet - ) The dipper, or Water ouzel
Enhydrous - ) Having Water within; containing fluid drops; - said of certain crystals
Esox - ) A genus of fresh-water fishes, including pike and pickerel
Sea Foam - ...
(2):...
Foam of sea Water
Orce - ) A pool of Water to keep fish in; a wear
Water Ice - Water flavored, sweetened, and frozen, to be eaten as a confection
Voyageable - ) That may be sailed over, as Water or air; navigable
Marah - When the Israelites came out of Egypt, and had arrived at the desert of Etham, they found the Water so bitter that neither themselves nor their cattle could drink of it, Exodus 15:23 . And here their murmurings began against Moses; for they asked, "What shall we drink?" Moses prayed to the Lord, who instructed him to take a particular kind of wood, and cast it into the Water, which he did; and immediately the Water became palatable
Slop - ) Water or other liquid carelessly spilled or thrown aboyt, as upon a table or a floor; a puddle; a soiled spot. ) Dirty Water; Water in which anything has been washed or rinsed; Water from wash-bowls, etc
Atmidometer - ) An instrument for measuring the evaporation from Water, ice, or snow
Beduck - ) To duck; to put the head under Water; to immerse
Relay Governor - A speed regulator, as a Water-wheel governor, embodying the relay principle
Ellachick - ) A fresh-water tortoise (Chelopus marmoratus) of California; - used as food
Valvata - ) A genus of small spiral fresh-water gastropods having an operculum
Sangaree - ) Wine and Water sweetened and spiced, - a favorite West Indian drink
Ebb Tide - The reflux of tide Water; the retiring tide; - opposed to flood tide
Water Spaniel - A curly-haired breed of spaniels, naturally very fond of the Water
Water Butt - A large, open-headed cask, set up on end, to contain Water
Water Ordeal - Same as Ordeal by Water
Pookoo - ) A red African antelope (Kobus Vardoni) allied to the Water buck
Latrine - ) A privy, or Water-closet, esp
Lemonade - ) A beverage consisting of lemon juice mixed with Water and sweetened
Moorball - ) A fresh-water alga (Cladophora Aegagropila) which forms a globular mass
Leat - ) An artificial Water trench, esp
Muride - ) Bromine; - formerly so called from its being obtained from sea Water
Priests: Superstitious Reverence of - A writer on the manners and customs of India, says:: 'I was informed that vast numbers of Shoodras drink the Water in which a Brahmin has dipped his foot, and abstain from food in the morning till this ceremony be over. Persons may be seen carrying a small quantity of Water in a cup, and intreating the first Brahmin they see to put his toe in it. This person then drinks the Water, and bows or prostrates to the Brahmin, who gives him a blessing. Some persons keep Water thus sanctified in their houses. Believing all this of their sacerdotal fathers, to drink the Water in which they wash their feet would be no humiliation; their minds have stooped to drink far fouler puddle, they may well put their bodies on the same level
Fountain - mabbua , 'spring of Water,' Ecclesiastes 12:6 : translated 'spring' in Isaiah 35:7 ; Isaiah 49:10 . 'eye,' and hence orifice through which Water flows. It is used for the 'fountain of blood,' Mark 5:29 ; the 'fountain of life,' as applied to Jehovah for Israel, Psalm 36:9 ; the 'fountain of tears,' Jeremiah 9:1 ; the 'fountain of living Waters. ...
The fountains form a striking feature in Palestine, which is described as "a land of brooks of Water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills. The Water from such is called 'living Water' in distinction from the Water in wells or cisterns
Careen - ) To cause (a vessel) to lean over so that she floats on one side, leaving the other side out of Water and accessible for repairs below the Water line; to case to be off the keel
Eddy - ) A current of air or Water running back, or in a direction contrary to the main current. ) A current of Water or air moving in a circular direction; a whirlpool
Whelm - : To cover completely, as if with Water; to immerse; to overcome; as, to whelm one in sorrows. ) To cover with Water or other fluid; to cover by immersion in something that envelops on all sides; to overwhelm; to ingulf
Overflow - To spread over, as Water to inundate to cover with Water or other fluid
Waterworn - ) Worn, smoothed, or polished by the action of Water; as, Waterworn stones
Corrivate - ) To cause to flow together, as Water drawn from several streams
Anodon - ) A genus of fresh-water bivalves, having no teeth at the hinge
Bulrush - ) A kind of large rush, growing in wet land or in Water
Cayo - ) A small island or ledge of rock in the Water; a key
Carafe - ) A glass Water bottle for the table or toilet; - called also croft
Aerohydrodynamic - ) Acting by the force of air and Water; as, an aerohydrodynamic wheel
Podoscaph - ) A canoe-shaped float attached to the foot, for walking on Water
Vanfess - ) A ditch on the outside of the counterscarp, usually full of Water
Devaporation - ) The change of vapor into Water, as in the formation of rain
Shoaliness - ) The quality or state of being shoaly; little depth of Water; shallowness
Dap - ) To drop the bait gently on the surface of the Water
Argoulette - ) A Water cooler or jug with a handle and spout; a gurglet
Water Souchy - A dish consisting of small fish stewed and served in a little Water
Water Plate - A plate heated by hot Water contained in a double bottom or jacket
Terraqueous - ) Consisting of land and Water; as, the earth is a terraqueous globe
Salubrious - ) Favorable to health; healthful; promoting health; as, salubrious air, Water, or climate
Water-Tight - ) So tight as to retain, or not to admit, Water; not leaky
Teakettle - ) A kettle in which Water is boiled for making tea, coffee, etc
Oxymel - ) A mixture of honey, Water, vinegar, and spice, boiled to a sirup
Rog - ) A mixture of spirit and Water not sweetened; hence, any intoxicating liquor
Tideland - ) Land that is overflowed by tide Water; hence, land near the sea
Moonglade - ) The bright reflection of the moon's light on an expanse of Water
Water Measurer - Any one of numerous species of Water; the skater
Water Feather-Foil - The Water violet (Hottonia palustris); also, the less showy American plant H
Lethean - ) Of or pertaining to Lethe; resembling in effect the Water of Lethe
Voyager - ) One who voyages; one who sails or passes by sea or Water
Cesspipe - ) A pipe for carrying off waste Water, etc
Mithcah - "Place of sweetness," namely, sweet Water; a station in Israel's wanderings (Numbers 33:28)
Mezahab - ("waters of gold") ("gold was in his house as Water": Abarbanel)
Ciderkin - ) A kind of weak cider made by steeping the refuse pomace in Water
Hominy - ) Maize hulled and broken, and prepared for food by being boiled in Water
Deadworks - ) The parts of a ship above the Water when she is laden
Crow-Silk - ) A filamentous fresh-water alga (Conferva rivularis of Linnaeus, Rhizoclonium rivulare of Kutzing)
Seagirt - ) Surrounded by the Water of the sea or ocean; as, a seagirt isle
Atole - ) A porridge or gruel of maize meal and Water, milk, or the like
Ardyloo - ) An old cry in throwing Water, slops, etc
Amylogen - ) That part of the starch granule or granulose which is soluble in Water
Water Ballast - Water confined in specially constructed compartments in a vessel's hold, to serve as ballast
Washbowl - ) A basin, or bowl, to hold Water for washing one's hands, face, etc
Waterboard - ) A board set up to windward in a boat, to keep out Water
Orangeade - ) A drink made of orange juice and Water, corresponding to lemonade; orange sherbet
Waterish - ) Resembling Water; thin; Watery. ) Somewhat Watery; moist; as, Waterish land
Lakeweed - ) The Water pepper (Polygonum Hydropiper), an aquatic plant of Europe and North America
Water God - A fabulous deity supposed to dwell in, and preside over, some body of Water
Water Frame - A name given to the first power spinning machine, because driven by Water power
Knee-High - ) Rising or reaching upward to the knees; as, the Water is knee-high
Limewater - ) Water impregnated with lime; esp
Fresco - (Italian: fresh) ...
Painting in Water-color on a freshly laid wet surface of absorbent plaster. In true fresco (buon fresco), the earth pigments are mixed with Water of hydrate of lime on a wet surface; in dry fresco (fresco secco), the dry surface is wetted with Water only just before touching
Cistern - The rendering of a Hebrew word Bor , Which means a receptacle for Water conveyed to it; distinguished from Beer , Which denotes a place where Water rises on the spot ( Jeremiah 2:13 ; Proverbs 5:15 ; Isaiah 36:16 ), a fountain. The scarcity of springs in Palestine made it necessary to collect rain-water in reservoirs and cisterns (Numbers 21:22 )
Lake - A lake is a stand of Water, from the root of lay. A large and extensive collection of Water contained in a cavity or hollow of the earth. It differs from a pond in size, the latter being a collection of small extent but sometimes a collection of Water is called a pond or a lake indifferently
Centreboard - ) A movable or sliding keel formed of a broad board or slab of wood or metal which may be raised into a Water-tight case amidships, when in shallow Water, or may be lowered to increase the area of lateral resistance and prevent leeway when the vessel is beating to windward
Riffle - ) A ripple in a stream or current of Water; also, a place where the Water ripples, as on a shallow rapid
Diluvial - ) Effected or produced by a flood or deluge of Water; - said of coarse and imperfectly stratified deposits along ancient or existing Water courses
Argle - ) A liquid, as Water or some medicated preparation, used to cleanse the mouth and throat, especially for a medical effect. ) To wash or rinse, as the mouth or throat, particular the latter, agitating the liquid (water or a medicinal preparation) by an expulsion of air from the lungs
Weeping - ) Discharging Water, or other liquid, in drops or very slowly; surcharged with Water
Spoon - In some places a spoon is used to measure the few drops of Water mixed with wine at the celebration of the Mass. A spoonful of Water is used also to help the sick swallow the Sacred Host
Neph'Toah, - (opening ), The Water of. The spring or source of the Water or (inaccurately) Waters of Nephtoah was one of the landmarks in the boundary line which separated Judah from Benjamin
Water Gate - A gate, or valve, by which a flow of Water is permitted, prevented, or regulated
Brookweed - ) A small white-flowered herb (Samolus Valerandi) found usually in wet places; Water pimpernel
Cutinization - ) The conversion of cell walls into a material which repels Water, as in cork
Aquiferous - ) Consisting or conveying Water or a Watery fluid; as, aquiferous vessels; the aquiferous system
Azogene - ) A portable apparatus for making soda Water or aerated liquids on a small scale
Cicutoxin - ) The active principle of the Water hemlock (Cicuta) extracted as a poisonous gummy substance
Blunge - ) To amalgamate and blend; to beat up or mix in Water, as clay
Bedash - ) To wet by dashing or throwing Water or other liquid upon; to bespatter
Crowdy - ) A thick gruel of oatmeal and milk or Water; food of the porridge kind
Fluviometer - ) An instrument for measuring the height of Water in a river; a river gauge
Deliquiate - ) To melt and become liquid by absorbing Water from the air; to deliquesce
Cooter - ) A fresh-water tortoise (Pseudemus concinna) of Florida
Sipage - ) Water that seeped or oozed through a porous soil
Astyllen - ) A small dam to prevent free passage of Water in an adit or level
Water Furrow - A deep furrow for conducting Water from the ground, and keeping the surface soil dry
Water Monkey - A jar or bottle, as of porous earthenware, in which Water is cooled by evaporation
Water Rattler - The diamond rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus); - so called from its preference for damp places near Water
Copepoda - ) An order of Entomostraca, including many minute Crustacea, both fresh-water and marine
Warty-Back - ) An American fresh-water mussel (Quadrula pustulosa)
Telehydrobarometer - ) An instrument for indicating the level of Water in a distant tank or reservior
Urinator - ) One who dives under Water in search of something, as for pearls; a diver
Miscible - ) Capable of being mixed; mixable; as, Water and alcohol are miscible in all proportions
Jantu - ) A machine of great antiquity, used in Bengal for raising Water to irrigate land
Melanian - ) One of a family of fresh-water pectinibranchiate mollusks, having a turret-shaped shell
Water Furrow - A deep furrow for conducting Water from the ground, and keeping the surface soil dry
Lysimeter - ) An instrument for measuring the Water that percolates through a certain depth of soil
Scaphander - ) The case, or impermeable apparel, in which a diver can work while under Water
Plunge - ) To thrust or cast one's self into Water or other fluid; to submerge one's self; to dive, or to rush in; as, he plunged into the river. ) To thrust into Water, or into any substance that is penetrable; to immerse; to cause to penetrate or enter quickly and forcibly; to thrust; as, to plunge the body into Water; to plunge a dagger into the breast. ) The act of thrusting into or submerging; a dive, leap, rush, or pitch into, or as into, Water; as, to take the Water with a plunge
Fresh - ) The mingling of fresh Water with salt in rivers or bays, as by means of a flood of fresh Water flowing toward or into the sea. ) A stream or spring of fresh Water. ...
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(superl) Not salt; as, fresh Water, in distinction from that which is from the sea, or brackish; fresh meat, in distinction from that which is pickled or salted. ; lately come or made public; as, fresh news; recently taken from a well or spring; as, fresh Water
Rain - to rain, to Water, which we retain in brook, and the Latins, by dropping the prefix, in rigo, irrigo, to irrigate. To fall in drops from the clouds, as Water used mostly with it for a nominative as, it rains it will rain it rained, or it has rained. The descent of Water in drops from the clouds or the Water thus falling. When Water falls in very small drops or particles, we call it mist, and fog is composed of particles so fine as to be not only indistinguishable, but to float or be suspended in the air
Water Gavel - A gavel or rent paid for a privilege, as of fishing, in some river or Water
Catch-Meadow - ) A meadow irrigated by Water from a spring or rivulet on the side of hill
Cruse - ) A bottle for holding Water, oil, honey, etc
Aphotic Region - A depth of Water so great that only those organisms can exist that do not assimilate
Selters Water - A mineral Water from Sellers, in the district of Nassan, Germany, containing much free carbonic acid
Aylussite - ) A yellowish white, translucent mineral, consisting of the carbonates of lime and soda, with Water
Bowssen - ) To drench; to soak; especially, to immerse (in Water believed to have curative properties)
Arroyo - ) A Water course; a rivulet
Water drawing celebrations, the: - Celebration accompanying the Water libation ceremony on Sukkot in Temple times, recalled today by Sukkot celebrations
Piraya - ) A large voracious fresh-water fish (Serrasalmo piraya) of South America, having lancet-shaped teeth
Deadlight - ) A strong shutter, made to fit open ports and keep out Water in a storm
Pinfish - ) The salt-water bream (Diplodus Holbrooki)
Emydea - ) A group of chelonians which comprises many species of fresh-water tortoises and terrapins
ca?on - ) A deep gorge, ravine, or gulch, between high and steep banks, worn by Water courses
Asker - ) An ask; a Water newt
Aspergill - (Latin: aspergere, to sprinkle) ...
A small brush or instrument for sprinkling holy Water in liturgical services
Water tu Tuyere - A tuyere kept cool by Water circulating within a casing
Urt - ) A gutter or channel for Water, hewn out of the bottom of a working drift
Watercourse - ) One of the holes in floor or other plates to permit Water to flow through
Logged - ) Made slow and heavy in movement; Water-logged
Naiad - ) Any species of a tribe (Naiades) of freshwater bivalves, including Unio, Anodonta, and numerous allied genera; a river mussel. ) A Water nymph; one of the lower female divinities, fabled to preside over some body of fresh Water, as a lake, river, brook, or fountain
Island - This is an absurd compound of isle and land, that is, land-in-water land, or ieland-land. A tract of land surrounded by Water
Thirsty - ...
Give me a little Water, for I am thirsty. The thirsty land shall become springs of Water
Fenestbella - (Latin: fish-pond or basin) ...
Also called a sacrarium; thalassicon, or fenestbella, the baptismal font, or the cistern into which the Water flows after baptism. Also an excavation about two or three feet deep and one foot wide, covered with a stone slab, to receive the Water from the washing of the priest's hands and the Water used for washing the palls, purifiers, and corporals; also the bread crumbs, cotton, etc
Bethesda - A reservoir at Jerusalem, remarkable (according to a gloss inserted in the text in some authoritative MSS) for a periodic disturbance of the Water which was supposed to give it healing properties. ’ An impotent man, one of the many who waited for the troubling of the Water, was here healed by Christ ( John 5:2 ). The only body of Water at Jerusalem that presents any analogous phenomenon is the intermittent spring known as the Virgin’s Fountain, in the Kidron valley, but it is not near the Sheep-gate
Ferry - ...
To carry or transport over a river, strait or other Water, in a boat. ...
FER'RY, To pass over Water in a boat. A boat or small vessel in which passengers and goods are conveyed over rivers or other narrow Waters sometimes called a wherry. The place or passage where boats pass over Water to convey passengers
Lymph - ) A spring of Water; hence, Water, or a pure, transparent liquid like Water
Thalassicon - (Latin: fish-pond or basin) ...
Also called a sacrarium; thalassicon, or fenestbella, the baptismal font, or the cistern into which the Water flows after baptism. Also an excavation about two or three feet deep and one foot wide, covered with a stone slab, to receive the Water from the washing of the priest's hands and the Water used for washing the palls, purifiers, and corporals; also the bread crumbs, cotton, etc
Sacrarium - (Latin: fish-pond or basin) ...
Also called a sacrarium; thalassicon, or fenestbella, the baptismal font, or the cistern into which the Water flows after baptism. Also an excavation about two or three feet deep and one foot wide, covered with a stone slab, to receive the Water from the washing of the priest's hands and the Water used for washing the palls, purifiers, and corporals; also the bread crumbs, cotton, etc
Clepsine - ) A genus of fresh-water leeches, furnished with a proboscis
Cicuta - ) a genus of poisonous umbelliferous plants, of which the Water hemlock or cowbane is best known
by-Wash - ) The outlet from a dam or reservoir; also, a cut to divert the flow of Water
Ewer - , one used to hold Water for the toilet
Pulldevil - ) A number of fishhooks rigidly fastened back to be pulled through the Water to catch fish
Quillback - ) An American fresh-water fish (Ictiobus, / Carpiodes, cyprinus); - called also carp sucker, sailfish, spearfish, and skimback
Anticous - ) Facing toward the axis of the flower, as in the introrse anthers of the Water lily
Dragnet - ) A net to be drawn along the bottom of a body of Water, as in fishing
Ajutage - ) A tube through which Water is discharged; an efflux tube; as, the ajutage of a fountain
Calorifere - ) An apparatus for conveying and distributing heat, especially by means of hot Water circulating in tubes
Water Radish - A coarse yellow-flowered plant (Nasturtium amphibium) related to the Water cress and to the horse-radish
Shot Samples - Samples taken for assay from a molten metallic mass pouring a portion into Water, to granulate it
Water-Laid - ) Having a left-hand twist; - said of cordage; as, a Water-laid, or left-hand, rope
Unio - ) Any one of numerous species of fresh-water mussels belonging to Unio and many allied genera
Give Drink - Shâqâh (שָׁקָה, Strong's #8248), “to give drink, irrigate, Water. ” In its first occurrence in the biblical text, shâqâh expresses the idea of “to irrigate,” or “to Water”: “But there went up a mist from the earth, and Watered the whole face of the ground” ( Water to drink” to animals ( Water ( Water [1] to drink” to Israel (Job 21:24; literally, whose bones “are Watered” or “irrigated” with marrow)
Aquarelle - ) A design or painting in thin transparent Water colors; also, the mode of painting in such colors
Chondrigen - ) The chemical basis of cartilage, converted by long boiling in Water into a gelatinous body called chondrin
Amoeba - common in fresh Water, capable of undergoing many changes of form at will
Shadoof - ) A machine, resembling a well sweep, used in Egypt for raising Water from the Nile for irrigation
Enrockment - ) A mass of large stones thrown into Water at random to form bases of piers, breakwaters, etc
Phlegethon - ) One of the principal rivers of Hades, in the channel of which fire flowed instead of Water
Palmiped - ) Web-footed, as a Water fowl
Water Crane - A goose-neck apparatus for supplying Water from an elevated tank, as to the tender of a locomotive
Tom And Jerry - A hot sweetened drink of rum and Water spiced with cinnamon, cloves, etc
Paramylum - ) A substance resembling starch, found in the green frothy scum formed on the surface of stagnant Water
Water Flannel - A floating mass formed in pools by the entangled filaments of a European fresh-water alga (Cladophora crispata)
Well - A source of Water created by digging in the earth to find available Water. In the semiarid climate of ancient Israel, the availability of Water was a constant concern, the Bible contains many references to the sources used for obtaining it. See Cistern ; Fountain ; Pit ; Spring ; Water . Wells were located wherever a Water source could be found
Cutwater - ) A starling or other structure attached to the pier of a bridge, with an angle or edge directed up stream, in order better to resist the action of Water, ice, etc. ) The fore part of a ship's prow, which cuts the Water
Brine - ) The ocean; the Water of an ocean, sea, or salt lake. ) Water saturated or strongly impregnated with salt; pickle; hence, any strong saline solution; also, the saline residue or strong mother liquor resulting from the evaporation of natural or artificial Waters
Utta-Percha - It becomes soft, and unpressible at the tamperature of boiling Water, and, on cooling, retains its new shape. It dissolves in oils and ethers, but not in Water
Bucket - A vessel to draw Water with (Isaiah 40:15 ); used figuratively, probably, of a numerous issue (Numbers 24:7 )
Tymp - ) A hollow Water-cooled iron casting in the upper part of the archway in which the dam stands
Pacu - ) A South American freah-water fish (Myleies pacu), of the family Characinidae
Panade - ) Bread boiled in Water to the consistence of pulp, and sweetened or flavored
Aquamanile - (Latin: aqua, Water; manale, ewer), ...
Ancient name for the basin in which the priest washes his hands during Mass
Elutriation - ) The process of elutriating; a decanting or racking off by means of Water, as finer particles from heavier
Frue Vanner - A moving, inclined, endless apron on which ore is concentrated by a current of Water; a kind of buddle
Torchon Paper - , handmade paper of great hardness for the use of painters in Water colors
Cypris - ) A genus of small, bivalve, fresh-water Crustacea, belonging to the Ostracoda; also, a member of this genus
Water-Closet - ) A privy; especially, a privy furnished with a contrivance for introducing a stream of Water to cleanse it
Water Meter - A contrivance for measuring a supply of Water delivered or received for any purpose, as from a street main
Water Gruel - A liquid food composed of Water and a small portion of meal, or other farinaceous substance, boiled and seasoned
Coast - The land bordering a major body of Water and used by KJV in obsolete sense of territories, borders, frontiers
Pathros - (Isaiah 11:11; Jeremiah 44:1) Perhaps derived from Path, mouth,—and Raphos, Water
Dam - ) To obstruct or restrain the flow of, by a dam; to confine by constructing a dam, as a stream of Water; - generally used with in or up. , a bank of earth, or wall of any kind, as of masonry or wood, built across a Water course, to confine and keep back flowing Water
Pool - A collection of Water, natural or artificial. Small pools were commonly seen as a place to collect rain Water from the roof which was used for irrigation or drinking. These reservoirs were important sources of Water supply in the arid climate of the Middle East. Solomon also made pools to Water his nursery (Ecclesiastes 2:6 ). ...
Most of the pools near the cities were carved from stone, fed by rainwater channeled into them by channels cut in the rock
Chrismation - (Greek: chrio, anoint) The act of anointing persons, as in baptism, or things, as in the blessing of baptismal Water
Bleb - ) A large vesicle or bulla, usually containing a serous fluid; a blister; a bubble, as in Water, glass, etc
Brewis - ) Bread soaked in broth, drippings of roast meat, milk, or Water and butter
Apollinaris Water - An effervescing alkaline mineral Water used as a table beverage
Amidin - It is soluble in cold Water
Nimrah - (nihm' ruh) Place name meaning, “clear (water)
Western wall - Water Drawing Celebrations, The: the western retaining wall of the Temple Mount, the last remnant of the Temple in Jerusalem ...
Plectospondyli - ) An extensive suborder of fresh-water physostomous fishes having the anterior vertebrae united and much modified; the Eventognathi
Adiantum - ) A genus of ferns, the leaves of which shed Water; maidenhair
Ruel - ) A light, liquid food, made by boiling meal of maize, oatmeal, or fiour in Water or milk; thin porridge
Peninsula - ) A portion of land nearly surrounded by Water, and connected with a larger body by a neck, or isthmus
Elemin - ) A transparent, colorless oil obtained from elemi resin by distillation with Water; also, a crystallizable extract from the resin
Planorbis - ) Any fresh-water air-breathing mollusk belonging to Planorbis and other allied genera, having shells of a discoidal form
Pozzolana - ) Volcanic ashes from Pozzuoli, in Italy, used in the manufacture of a kind of mortar which hardens under Water
Dank - ) Moisture; humidity; Water
Alloxan - It is of a pale reddish color, readily soluble in Water or alcohol
Redeye - ) The goggle-eye, or fresh-water rock bass
Draining - ) The art of carrying off surplus Water, as from land
Water Sail - A small sail sometimes set under a studding sail or under a driver boom, and reaching nearly to the Water
Sericin - ) A gelatinous nitrogenous material extracted from crude silk and other similar fiber by boiling Water; - called also silk gelatin
Tilefish - ) A large, edible, deep-water food fish (Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps) more or less thickly covered with large, round, yellow spots
Conferva - ) Any unbranched, slender, green plant of the fresh-water algae
Temperer - , are mixed with Water
Ablaqueation - ) The act or process of laying bare the roots of trees to expose them to the air and Water
Marsh - ) A tract of soft wet land, commonly covered partially or wholly with Water; a fen; a swamp; a morass
Water Dock - The American Water dock is Rumex orbiculatus, the European is R
Metasilicic - ) Designating an acid derived from silicic acid by the removal of Water; of or pertaining to such an acid
Water Level - (1):...
The level formed by the surface of still Water
Reproofs: to be Given in Love - Just as in washing a brother's feet, you must not use boiling Water to scald, nor frozen Water to freeze them
Allinule - The common European gallinule (Gallinula chloropus) is also called moor hen, Water hen, Water rail, moor coot, night bird, and erroneously dabchick
Ricochet - ) A rebound or skipping, as of a ball along the ground when a gun is fired at a low angle of elevation, or of a fiat stone thrown along the surface of Water. ) To skip with a rebound or rebounds, as a flat stone on the surface of Water, or a cannon ball on the ground
Slake - ) To become mixed with Water, so that a true chemical combination takes place; as, the lime slakes. ) To mix with Water, so that a true chemical combination shall take place; to slack; as, to slake lime
Lobulin - ) An albuminous body, insoluble in Water, but soluble in dilute solutions of salt. , all insoluble in Water, but soluble in dilute salt solutions
Minnow - ) A small European fresh-water cyprinoid fish (Phoxinus laevis, formerly Leuciscus phoxinus); sometimes applied also to the young of larger kinds; - called also minim and minny. They live both in fresh and in salt Water
Pentacrinus - ) A genus of large, stalked crinoids, of which several species occur in deep Water among the West Indies and elsewhere
Reliction - ) A leaving dry; a recession of the sea or other Water, leaving dry land; land left uncovered by such recession
Alfet - ) A caldron of boiling Water into which an accused person plunged his forearm as a test of innocence or guilt
Chylaqueous - ) Consisting of chyle much diluted with Water; - said of a liquid which forms the circulating fluid of some inferior animals
Chatty - ) A porous earthen pot used in India for cooling Water, etc
Oxygenate - ) To unite, or cause to combine, with oxygen; to treat with oxygen; to oxidize; as, oxygenated Water (hydrogen dioxide)
Flusher - ) A workman employed in cleaning sewers by flushing them with Water
Flashboard - ) A board placed temporarily upon a milldam, to raise the Water in the pond above its usual level; a flushboard
Branchia - ) A gill; a respiratory organ for breathing the air contained in Water, such as many aquatic and semiaquatic animals have
Barramundi - ) A remarkable Australian fresh-water ganoid fish of the genus Ceratodus
Water Clock - An instrument or machine serving to measure time by the fall, or flow, of a certain quantity of Water; a clepsydra
Xenomi - ) A suborder of soft-rayed fresh-water fishes of which the blackfish of Alaska (Dallia pectoralis) is the type
Wasteweir - ) An overfall, or weir, for the escape, or overflow, of superfluous Water from a canal, reservoir, pond, or the like
Thelphusian - ) One of a tribe of fresh-water crabs which live in or on the banks of rivers in tropical countries
Water Rocket - ...
(2):...
A kind of firework to be discharged in the Water
Overboard - ) Over the side of a ship; hence, from on board of a ship, into the Water; as, to fall overboard
Naid - ) Any one of numerous species of small, fresh-water, chaetopod annelids of the tribe Naidina
Johnnycake - ) A kind of bread made of the meal of maize (Indian corn), mixed with Water or milk, etc
Kettle - ) A metallic vessel, with a wide mouth, often without a cover, used for heating and boiling Water or other liguids
Lebban - ) Coagulated sour milk diluted with Water; - a common beverage among the Arabs
Undine - ) One of a class of fabled female Water spirits who might receive a human soul by intermarrying with a mortal
Immersion - The dipping into the Water of recipients of HolyBaptism
Aqua - ) Water; - a word much used in pharmacy and the old chemistry, in various signification, determined by the word or words annexed
Aspergillum - ) See Wateringpot shell. ) The brush used in the Roman Catholic church for sprinkling holy Water on the people
Hookah - ) A pipe with a long, flexible stem, so arranged that the smoke is cooled by being made to pass through Water
Moderately - In a middle degree not excessively as Water moderately warm
Airometer - It is closed above and open below, and has its open end plunged into Water
Quadra - ) The plinth, or lowest member, of any pedestal, podium, Water table, or the like
Heliozoa - ) An order of fresh-water rhizopods having a more or less globular form, with slender radiating pseudopodia; the sun animalcule
Downhill - ) Towards the bottom of a hill; as, Water runs downhill
Wady - ) A ravine through which a brook flows; the channel of a Water course, which is dry except in the rainy season
Pondfish - ) Any one of numerous species of American fresh-water fishes belonging to the family Centrarchidae; - called also pond perch, and sunfish
Schlich - ) The finer portion of a crushed ore, as of gold, lead, or tin, separated by the Water in certain wet processes
Lecanomancy - ) divination practiced with Water in a basin, by throwing three stones into it, and invoking the demon whose aid was sought
Lixiviation - ) Lixiviating; the process of separating a soluble substance form one that is insoluble, by washing with some solvent, as Water; leaching
Elim - One of the stations in the wanderings of the children of Israel ( Exodus 15:27 , Numbers 33:9 ); apparently the fourth station after the passage of the Red Sea, and the first place where the Israelites met with fresh Water. Sinai be correct, the likeliest place for Elim is the Wady Gharandel , where there is a good deal of vegetation, especially stunted palms, and a number of Water-holes in the sand; but some travellers have pushed the site of Elim farther on, and placed it almost a day’s journey nearer to Sinai, in the Wady Tayibeh , where there are again palm trees and a scanty supply of brackish Water
Affusion - The pouring (which the word means) of Water on therecipient of Baptism, when the Baptism is not by immersion. Theoriginal mode was undoubtedly by the descent of the person to bebaptized into a stream or pool of Water. The method is amatter of indifference, the essential point being that the candidatefor Baptism come into actual contact with Water while the words, "Ibaptize thee in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of theHoly Ghost," are spoken
Water - (ὕδωρ)...
In the NT, after the Gospels, Water is nearly always used in a figurative or symbolical sense. Water was the element in which John baptized his penitents, and the best that he had; but he was profoundly conscious of its inadequacy, and eagerly expectant of an altogether different kind of baptism, to be introduced by the Messiah. When Christ confirms His forerunner’s distinction between baptism in Water and baptism in the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:5), He certainly regards the latter not as a blast of judgment but as the supreme gift of Divine grace; and Peter, who ‘remembered the word of the Lord,’ and no doubt the tone in which He uttered it, quotes it not as a menace but as an evangelical promise (Acts 11:16). Water is referred to in connexion with the baptism of the eunuch (Acts 8:36; Acts 8:38-39) and of Cornelius (Acts 10:47). In the latter case the baptism in Water is the immediate sequel to the earliest baptism of the Gentiles with the Holy Spirit, which was attended with the rapturous utterances known as glossolalia. In Ephesians 5:26 the Church is said to be cleansed by the washing (or laver, τῷ λουτρῷ) of Water with the word, baptism being regarded as the seal and symbol of a spiritual experience which is mediated by faith in the gospel. The writer of Hebrews (Hebrews 9:19) says that Water was used along with blood-either to prevent coagulation or as a symbol of purity-at the institution of the ancient covenant, a detail which is not mentioned in Exodus 24:3 ff. It is a striking fact that in his review of the Levitical ordinances this writer never quotes the LXX phrase ὕδωρ ῥαντισμοῦ, ‘water of sprinkling,’ which occurs four times in Numbers 19, but coins in its place the phrase αἷμα ῥαντισμοῦ, ‘blood of sprinkling’ (Hebrews 12:24). It is his conviction that, while the blood of goats and bulls and the ashes of a heifer (according to a Scripture which he does not question) cleanse the flesh (Hebrews 9:13), and while Water purifies the body (Hebrews 10:22), only the blood of Christ can sprinkle the heart from an evil conscience (Hebrews 9:14, Hebrews 10:22). [1] 179) thinks, suggest that the Water of baptism has cleansing virtue because ‘sacramentally impregnated’ with the blood of Christ. Peter sees a parallel between the Water of Noah’s flood and that of baptism (1 Peter 3:20), and Paul finds a mystical and sacramental meaning in the sea and the cloud, in both of which the Israelites may be said to have been baptized into Moses (1 Corinthians 10:2). It is the teaching of John that Jesus Christ came by (διά) Water and blood, not with (ἐν) the Water only, but with the Water and the blood (1 John 5:6). Historically the baptism and death of the Messiah were crises in His activity, occurring once for all at the beginning and the end of His ministry, but spiritually He ever abides with and in the Water and the blood, which are ‘the two wells of life in His Church, His baptism being repeated in every fresh act of baptism, and His blood of atonement never failing in the communion cup’ (H. James (James 3:11-12) illustrates the moral law that the same heart cannot overflow in both blessings and curses by the natural law that the same fountain cannot send forth both sweet Water and bitter-a variation on Christ’s words in Matthew 7:16-17. The prophet of the Revelation (recalling Ezekiel 1:24; Ezekiel 43:2) once compares the voice of Christ (Revelation 1:15), and twice that of the great multitude of the redeemed (Revelation 14:2, Revelation 19:6), to the voice of many Waters, in the one case thinking perhaps of the music of waves quietly breaking, in the other of the thunder of great billows crashing, around the aegean island which was his place of exile. He constantly uses fountains of Water, and clear rivers, as symbols of spiritual life and blessing. Per contra, he imagines ‘the angel of the Waters’ turning Rome’s rivers and fountains of Water into blood (Revelation 16:4); for, as she has shed the blood of saints like Water, it is but just that she should have to drink blood-a grim species of poetic justice. The great star Wormwood falls in Earth’s sweet Waters, turning them to wormwood, and those who drink of them die because they are so bitter (John 1:33). The Waters of the Euphrates are to be dried up, like the Jordan before Joshua, that the powers of the East-Parthia and her confederates-may come to the invasion of the Roman Empire (Revelation 16:12). The great harlot, Rome, sits proudly upon many Waters-ruling peoples and nations by many rivers and seas (Revelation 17:1; Revelation 17:15)-but her day of judgment and dethronement is in sight (Revelation 17:1)
Wells And Springs - By those living in a temperate climate, where the well or the aqueduct furnishes to every house a supply of Water practically inexhaustible, no idea can be formed of the extreme distress caused by thirst, and of the luxury of relieving it by drinking pure Watera luxury which is said to excel all other pleasures of sense. One must reside or travel in a Syrian climate to realize the beauty and force of the allusions of Scripture to "water out of the wells of salvation," "cold Water to a thirsty soul," "the fountain of living Waters," and many others. ...
So valuable was a supply of Water, that a field containing a spring was a princely dowry, Judges 1:13-15 , and a well was a matter of strife and negotiation between different tribes. Thus we read that Abraham, in making a treaty with king Abimelech, "reproved him because of a well of Water which Abimelich's servants had violently taken away," and the ownership of the well was sealed to Abraham by a special oath and covenant, Genesis 21:25-31 . In negotiating with the king of Edom for a passage through his territory, the Israelites said, "We will go by the highway; and if I and my cattle drink of thy Water, then I will pay for it," Numbers 20:17-19 . Still stronger is the expression in Lamentations 5:4 : "We have drunk our own Water for money:" that is, we bought it of our foreign rulers, though we are the natural proprietors of the wells that furnished it. The custom of demanding pay for Water of the traveler is still found in some parts of the East; while in many other towns a place is provided where cold Water and sometimes bread are offered gratuitously to the stranger, at the expense of the village, or as an act of charity by the benevolent, Mark 9:41 . ...
Wells are sometimes found in Palestine furnished with a well-sweep and bucket, or a windlass; and in some cases there were steps leading down to the Water, Genesis 24:15,16 ; but usually the Water is drawn with pitchers and ropes; and the stone curbs of ancient wells bear the marks of long use. They were often covered with a large flat stone, to exclude the flying sand and secure the Water to its owners, and also for the security of strangers, who were liable to fall into them unawares- a mischance which very often occurs in modern Syria, and against which the beneficent law of Moses made provision, Exodus 21:33-34 . This stone was removed about sunset, when the females of the vicinity drew their supply of Water for domestic use, and the flocks and herds drank from the stone troughs which are still found beside almost every well. ...
The cut above given presents a view of "The Fountain of the Virgin" at Nazareth, so called from the strong probability that the mother of our Lord was wont to draw Water from it, as the women of Nazareth do at this day. Every day witnesses there what might almost be described in the very words of Genesis 24:11 : "And he made his camels to kneel down without the city, by a well of Water, at the time of the evening, even the time that women go out to draw Water. " It is an uncommon sight to see "a man bearing a pitcher of Water," Mark 14:13 . This was found, almost destroyed by lying in Water. As the traveler stands by this venerated well and thinks of the long series of men of a hundred nations and generations who have drunk of its Waters, thirsted again, and died, he is most forcibly affected by the truth of Christ's words to the Samaritan woman, and made to feel his own perishing need of the Water "springing up into everlasting life," John 4:1-54
Transportation - The act of carrying or conveying from one place to another, either on beasts or in vehicles, by land or Water, or in air. But transportation by Water is the great means of commercial intercourse
Bream - ) An American fresh-water fish, of various species of Pomotis and allied genera, which are also called sunfishes and pondfishes. ) A European fresh-water cyprinoid fish of the genus Abramis, little valued as food
Hardness - ) The peculiar quality exhibited by Water which has mineral salts dissolved in it. Such Water forms an insoluble compound with soap, and is hence unfit for washing purposes
Motives - There are overshot Water-wheels and undershot. In the one case the motive power falls from above, in the other the Water turns the wheel from below; the first is the more powerful
Filter - ) Any porous substance, as cloth, paper, sand, or charcoal, through which Water or other liquid may passed to cleanse it from the solid or impure matter held in suspension; a chamber or device containing such substance; a strainer; also, a similar device for purifying air. ) To purify or defecate, as Water or other liquid, by causing it to pass through a filter
Sewer - ) A drain or passage to carry off Water and filth under ground; a subterraneous channel, particularly in cities. ) Formerly, an upper servant, or household officer, who set on and removed the dishes at a feast, and who also brought Water for the hands of the guests
Trough - ) A long, hollow vessel, generally for holding Water or other liquid, especially one formed by excavating a log longitudinally on one side; a long tray; also, a wooden channel for conveying Water, as to a mill wheel
Freshen - ) To make fresh; to separate, as Water, from saline ingredients; to make less salt; as, to freshen Water, fish, or flesh
Moccasin - The Water moccasin (Ancistrodon piscivorus) is usually found in or near Water
Pitcher - Lamentations 4:2 ‘earthen pitchers’) in which in all ages the women and maidens of Palestine have drawn and carried the Water from the village well ( Genesis 24:14 ff. For illustrations of Water-jars found in ancient cisterns, see Macalister, Bible Sidelights , etc
Alcoholate - ) A crystallizable compound of a salt with alcohol, in which the latter plays a part analogous to that of Water of crystallization
Hippocrepian - ) One of an order of fresh-water Bryozoa, in which the tentacles are on a lophophore, shaped like a horseshoe
Sicker - ) To percolate, trickle, or ooze, as Water through a crack
Cologne - ) A perfumed liquid, composed of alcohol and certain aromatic oils, used in the toilet; - called also cologne Water and eau de cologne
Chain Wheel - ...
(2):...
An inversion of the chain pump, by which it becomes a motor driven by Water
Astacus - ) A genus of crustaceans, containing the crawfish of fresh-water lobster of Europe, and allied species of western North America
Sauger - ) An American fresh-water food fish (Stizostedion Canadense); - called also gray pike, blue pike, hornfish, land pike, sand pike, pickering, and pickerel
Allize - ) In wine making, to add Water and sugar to (unfermented grape juice) so as to increase the quantity of wine produced
Mikveh - "collection or gathering [1]"); ritual bathing pool in which a person immerses himself as part of the transition to ritual purity
Pottage - ) A kind of food made by boiling vegetables or meat, or both together, in Water, until soft; a thick soup or porridge
Rowport - ) An opening in the side of small vessels of war, near the surface of the Water, to facilitate rowing in calm weather
Pierre-Perdu - ) Blocks of stone or concrete heaped loosely in the Water to make a foundation (as for a sea wall), a mole, etc
Detergent - ) A substance which cleanses the skin, as Water or soap; a medicine to cleanse wounds, ulcers, etc
Water Bed - A kind of mattress made of, or covered with, Waterproof fabric and filled with Water
Tench - ) A European fresh-water fish (Tinca tinca, or T
Tappoon - ) A piece of wood or sheet metal fitted into a ditch to dam up the Water so as to overflow a field
Skitty - ) A rail; as, the Water rail (called also skitty cock, and skitty coot); the spotted crake (Porzana maruetta), and the moor hen
Transfluent - ) Passing or flowing through a bridge; - said of Water
Nephtoah - We read of the Water of Nephtoah, which went towards mount Ephron, Joshua 15:9
Leachy - ) Permitting liquids to pass by percolation; not capable of retaining Water; porous; pervious; - said of gravelly or sandy soils, and the like
Lustral - ) Of or pertaining to, or used for, purification; as, lustral days; lustral Water
Midfeather - ) A vertical Water space in a fire box or combustion chamber
Jeopardy - ...
They were filled with Water and were in jeopardy
Saltness - The quality of being impregnated with salt as the saltness of sea Water or of provisions
Dry - ...
A — 2: ἄνυδρος (Strong's #504 — Adjective — anudros — an'-oo-dros ) "waterless" (a, negative, n, euphonic, hudor, "water"), is rendered "dry" in Matthew 12:43 , AV, and Luke 11:24 (RV, "waterless"); "without Water" in 2 Peter 2:17 ; Jude 1:12 . See Water. 1, "to dry, dry up, make dry, wither," is translated "dried" (of physical infirmity), in Mark 5:29 ; of a tree, in the AV of Mark 11:20 (RV, "withered away"); of Water, in Revelation 16:12
Irrigation - Owing to the lack of a sufficient rainfall, Babylonia and Egypt have to be supplied with Water from their respective rivers. The Water is conducted along these canals by various mechanical devices, and at a cost of great labour. They are always established near natural supplies of Water, which is made to flow from the source (either directly, or raised, when necessary, by a sakiyeh or endless chain of buckets worked by a horse, ox, or donkey) into little channels ramifying through the garden. Artificial Water-pools for gardens are referred to in Ecclesiastes 2:6
Pool, Pond - ’ăgam , a collection of standing Water, is distinguished from miqweh , a place into which Water flows, or is led ( Exodus 7:19 ). The former may denote the Water left in the hollows when the inundation of the Nile subsides, and the latter, reservoirs (cf. It is applied to great reservoirs constructed to furnish Water for cities, or for irrigation, like that at Gibeon ( 2 Samuel 2:18 ), those at Hebron ( 2 Samuel 4:12 ), and at Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 18:17 ), etc
Blackwash - ) A lotion made by mixing calomel and lime Water
Ariel - ) In the Cabala, a Water spirit; in later folklore, a light and graceful spirit of the air
Burbot - ) A fresh-water fish of the genus Lota, having on the nose two very small barbels, and a larger one on the chin
Quass - ) A thin, sour beer, made by pouring warm Water on rye or barley meal and letting it ferment, - much used by the Russians
Edulcorator - ) A contrivance used to supply small quantities of sweetened liquid, Water, etc
Cowbane - See Water hemlock
Fen - ) Low land overflowed, or covered wholly or partially with Water, but producing sedge, coarse grasses, or other aquatic plants; boggy land; moor; marsh
Shipper - one who sends goods by Water
Dephlegmate - ) To deprive of superabundant Water, as by evaporation or distillation; to clear of aqueous matter; to rectify; - used of spirits and acids
Ibstaff - ) A staff to guage Water, or to push a boat
Brack - ) Salt or brackish Water
Edulcoration - ) The act of freeing from acids or any soluble substances, by affusions of Water
Water Chevrotain - Called also Water deerlet
Wash Drawing - In Water-color painting, work in, or a work done chiefly in, washes, as distinguished from that done in stipple, in body color, etc
Welldrain - ) To drain, as land; by means of wells, or pits, which receive the Water, and from which it is discharged by machinery
Water Pitcher - (1):...
A pitcher for Water
Kakaralli - ) A kind of wood common in Demerara, durable in salt Water, because not subject to the depredations of the sea worm and barnacle
Dropsy, - ὑδρωπικός, The Greek word implies that the disease was a collection of Water, which is the well known characteristic of dropsy
Whosoever - ...
Whosoever will, let him take of the Water of life freely
Piscina - A stone basin with a drain pipe to carry off Water used inthe ablutions of the sacred vessels at the celebration of the HolyEucharist
Well - ) As 'Αyin , "fount," literally, "eye", refers to the Water springing up to us, so beer , "well," from a root "to bore," refers to our finding our way down to it. "Drink Waters out of thine own cistern, and running Waters out of thine own well," i. ...
Wells and cisterns are the two sources of oriental supply, each house had its own cistern (2 Kings 18:31); to thirst for filthy Waters is suicidal. " A rope and bucket or Water skin raised the Water; the marks of the rope are still visible in the furrows worn in the low wall. See Numbers 24:7, "he shall stream with Water out of his two buckets," namely, suspended from the two ends of a pole, the usual way of fetching Water from the Euphrates in Balaam's neighbourhood. ...
Wells are often contended for and are places of Bedouin attacks on those drawing Water (Exodus 2:16-17; Judges 5:11; 2 Samuel 23:15-16). Οboth (Numbers 21:10-11) means holes dug in the ground for Water. deep, seven feet six inches in diameter, and lined with rough masonry; a pitcher unbroken at the bottom evidenced that there was Water at some seasons, otherwise the fall would have broken the pitcher
Bullhead - ) A small black Water insect. ) A fresh-water fish of many species, of the genus Uranidea, esp
Backboard - ) A board attached to the rim of a Water wheel to prevent the Water from running off the floats or paddies into the interior of the wheel
Deluge - ) A washing away; an overflowing of the land by Water; an inundation; a flood; specifically, The Deluge, the great flood in the days of Noah (Gen. ) To overflow with Water; to inundate; to overwhelm
Baptize - By some denominations of christians, baptism is performed by plunging, or immersing the whole body in Water, and this is done to none but adults. More generally the ceremony is performed by sprinkling Water on the face of a person, whether an infant or an adult,and in the case of an infant,by giving him a name, in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, which is called Christening
Drip - ) To fall in drops; as, Water drips from the eaves. ) That part of a cornice, sill course, or other horizontal member, which projects beyond the rest, and is of such section as to throw off the rain Water
Oyster - They are usually found adhering to rocks or other fixed objects in shallow Water along the seacoasts, or in brackish Water in the mouth of rivers
Overflow - ) A flowing over, as of Water or other fluid; an inundation. ) To flow over; to cover woth, or as with, Water or other fluid; to spread over; to inundate; to overwhelm
Water-Spouts - Where they unite, the column may be three or four feet thick; and when they break, torrents of Water descend. The word occurs in Psalm 42:7 , where, however, the psalmist probably alludes to cataracts of Water
Paste - ) A soft composition, as of flour moistened with Water or milk, or of earth moistened to the consistence of dough, as in making potter's ware. ) A kind of cement made of flour and Water, starch and Water, or the like, - used for uniting paper or other substances, as in bookbinding, etc
Feeder - ) A device for supplying steam boilers with Water as needed. ) A stream that flows into another body of Water; a tributary; specifically (Hydraulic Engin. ), a Water course which supplies a canal or reservoir by gravitation or natural flow
Waterfowl - ) Any bird that frequents the Water, or lives about rivers, lakes, etc
Commingler - , a device for noiseless heating of Water by steam, in a vessel filled with a porous mass, as of pebbles
Blow-Off - ) A blowing off steam, Water, etc
Lukewarm - Moderately warm tepid as lukewarm Water lukewarm heat
Hoecake - ) A cake of Indian meal, Water, and salt, baked before the fire or in the ashes; - so called because often cooked on a hoe
Scupper - ) An opening cut through the Waterway and bulwarks of a ship, so that Water falling on deck may flow overboard; - called also scupper hole
Dale - ) A trough or spout to carry off Water, as from a pump
Siphonobranchiate - ) Having a siphon, or siphons, to convey Water to the gills; belonging or pertaining to the Siphonobranchiata
Carron Oil - A lotion of linseed oil and lime Water, used as an application to burns and scalds; - first used at the Carron iron works in Scotland
Dowser - ) A divining rod used in searching for Water, ore, etc
Wash Stand - In a stable or garage, a place in the floor prepared so that carriages or automobiles may be washed there and the Water run off
Tipper - ) A kind of ale brewed with brackish Water obtained from a particular well; - so called from the first brewer of it, one Thomas Tipper
Thermotank - ) A tank containing pipes through which circulates steam, Water, air, or the like, for heating or cooling; - used in some heating and ventilation systems
Rissoid - ) Any one of very numerous species of small spiral gastropods of the genus Rissoa, or family Rissoidae, found both in fresh and salt Water
Saltness - ) The quality or state of being salt, or state of being salt, or impregnated with salt; salt taste; as, the saltness of sea Water
Water Doctor - (1):...
A physician who treats diseases with Water; an hydropathist
Water Deer - (1):...
The Water chevrotain
Baptismal Shell - A scallop shell, either real or made of preciousmetal, used by the Priest for pouring the Water on the head of thecandidate in Holy Baptism
Pit - ...
Be'êr means a “well” in which there may be Water. (By itself the word does not always infer the presence of Water. ) The word refers to the “pit” itself whether dug or natural: “And Abraham reproved Abimelech because of a well of Water, which Abimelech’s servants had violently taken away” ( Water the source of deep satisfaction for the thirsty. ...
A “pit” may contain something other than Water
Heifer, Red - When the ashes were used, a person that was clean mixed in a vessel some of the ashes with running Water, then he dipped hyssop into the Water, and sprinkled the person, tent, etc. It was a Water of separation — a purification for sin. It had not atonement in view, but the cleansing by Water of those who, having their dwelling and place in the camp, where Jehovah's sanctuary was, had become defiled by the way: cf. The washing of the feet of those that are clean, as taught by the Lord in John 13 has this character of cleansing with Water
Water Watering, Waterless - , Hebrews 9:19 ; James 3:12 ; in 1 John 5:6 , that Christ "came by Water and blood," may refer either (1) to the elements that flowed from His side on the Cross after His Death, or, in view of the order of the words and the prepositions here used, (2) to His baptism in Jordan and His Death on the Cross. As to (1), the "water" would symbolize the moral and practical cleansing effected by the removal of defilement by our taking heed to the Word of God in heart, life and habit; cp. As to (2), Jesus the Son of God came on His mission by, or through, "water" and blood, namely, at His baptism, when He publicly entered upon His mission and was declared to be the Son of God by the witness of the Father, and at the Cross, when He publicly closed His witness; the Apostle's statement thus counteracts the doctrine of the Gnostics that the Divine Logos united Himself with the Man Jesus at His baptism, and left him at Gethsemane. ...
The word "water" is used symbolically in John 3:5 , either (1) of the Word of God, as in 1 Peter 1:23 (cp. Some regard the kai, "and," in John 3:5 , as epexegetic, == "even," in which case the "water" would be emblematic of the Spirit, as in John 7:38 (cp. John 4:10,14 ), but not in 1 John 5:8 , where the Spirit and the "water" are distinguished. "The Water of life," Revelation 21:6 ; 22:1,17 , is emblematic of the maintenance of spiritual life in perpetuity. In Revelation 17:1 the "waters" are symbolic of nations, peoples, etc. ...
Note: For potamos, rendered "waters" in 2 Corinthians 11:26 , see RIVER. ...
B — 1: ποτίζω (Strong's #4222 — Verb — potizo — pot-id'-zo ) "to give to drink," is used (a) naturally in Luke 13:15 , "watering," with reference to animals; (b) figuratively, with reference to spiritual ministry to converts, 1 Corinthians 3:6-8 . ...
Notes: (1) For hudropoteo, "to drink Water," 1 Timothy 5:23 , see DRINK , B, No. (2) For the adjective anudros, "waterless" (RV), "without Water," see DRY , No 2
Wells - When the pool, the fountain, and the river fail, the oriental shepherd is reduced to the necessity of digging wells; and, in the patriarchal age, the discovery of Water was reckoned of sufficient importance to be the subject of a formal report to the master of the flock, who commonly distinguished the spot by an appropriate name. And Isaac digged again the wells of Water which they had digged in the days of Abraham his father; for the Philistines had stopped them after the death of Abraham; and he called their names after the names by which his father had called them. And Isaac's servants digged in the valley, and found there a well of springing Water. And the herdmen of Gerar did strive with Isaac's herdmen, saying, The Water is ours; and he called the name of the well Ezek, because they strove with him. " So important was the successful operation of sinking a well in Canaan, that the sacred historian remarks in another passage: "And it came to pass the same day, (that Isaac and Abimelech had concluded their treaty,) that Isaac's servants came and told him concerning the well which they had digged, and said unto him, We have found Water; and he called it Shebah, (the oath,) therefore the name of the city is Beershebah unto this day," Genesis 26:33 . In this manner the well was covered, from which the flocks of Laban were commonly Watered: and the shepherds, careful not to leave them open at any time, patiently waited till all the flocks were gathered together, before they removed the covering, and then, having drawn a sufficient quantity of Water, they replaced the stone immediately. The extreme scarcity of Water in these arid regions, entirely justifies such vigilant and parsimonious care in the management of this precious fluid; and accounts for the fierce contentions about the possession of a well, which so frequently happened between the shepherds of different masters. But after the question of right, or of possession, was decided, it would seem the shepherds were often detected in fraudulently Watering their flocks and herds from their neighbour's well. To prevent this, they secured the cover with a lock, which continued in use so late as the days of Chardin, who frequently saw such precautions used in different parts of Asia, on account of the real scarcity of Water there. This was probably the reason that the shepherds of Padanaram declined the invitation of Jacob to Water the flocks, before they were all assembled; either they had not the key of the lock which secured the stone, or, if they had, they durst not open it but in the presence of Rachel, to whose father the well belonged. It is ridiculous to suppose the stone was so heavy that the united strength of several Mesopotamian shepherds could not roll it from the mouth of the well, when Jacob had strength or address to remove it alone; or that, though a stranger, he ventured to break a standing rule for Watering the flocks, which the natives did not dare to do, and that without opposition. To Water the flocks was an operation of much labour, and occupied a considerable space of time. It was, therefore, an office of great kindness with which Jacob introduced himself to the notice of his relations, to roll back the stone which lay upon the mouth of the well, and draw Water for the flocks which Rachel tended. Some of these wells are furnished with troughs and flights of steps down to the Water, and other contrivances to facilitate the labour of Watering the cattle. It is evident the well to which Rebekah went to draw Water, near the city of Nahor, had some convenience of this kind, for it is written, "Rebekah hasted and emptied her pitcher into the trough, and ran again unto the well to draw Water, and drew for all his camels," Genesis 24:20 . A trough was also placed by the well, from which the daughters of Jethro Watered his flocks, Exodus 2:16 ; and, if we may judge from circumstances, was a usual contrivance in every part of the east. Park found a trough near the well, from which the Moors Watered their cattle, in the sandy deserts of Sahara. Shaw, speaking of the occupation of the Moorish women in Barbary, says, "To finish the day, at the time of the evening, even at the time that the women go out to draw Water, they are still to fit themselves with a pitcher or goat skin, and tying their sucking children behind them, trudge it in this manner two or three miles to fetch Water. " "The women in Persia," says Morier, "go in troops to draw Water for the place. I have seen the elder ones sitting and chatting at the well, and spinning the coarse cotton of the country, while the young girls filled the skins which contain the Water, and which they all carry on their backs into the town. " "A public well," says Forbes, "without the gate of Diamonds, in the city Dhuboy, was a place of great resort: there, most travellers halted for shade and refreshment: the women frequented the fountains and reservoirs morning and evening, to draw Water. Many of the Gwzerat wells have steps leading down to the surface of the Water; others have not, nor do I recollect any furnished with buckets and ropes for the convenience of a stranger; most travellers are therefore provided with them, and halcarras and religious pilgrims frequently carry a small brass pot affixed to a long string for this purpose
Blackwater State - Nebraska; - a nickname alluding to the dark color of the Water of its rivers, due to the presence of a black vegetable mold in the soil
Electrolysis - ) The act or process of chemical decomposition, by the action of electricity; as, the electrolysis of silver or nickel for plating; the electrolysis of Water
Anaclastic - ) Produced by the refraction of light, as seen through Water; as, anaclastic curves
Cataclysm - ) An extensive overflow or sweeping flood of Water; a deluge
Mezahab - Water of gold, the father of Matred (Genesis 36:39 ; 1 Chronicles 1:50 ), and grandfather of Mehetabel, wife of Hadar, the last king of Edom
Fallfish - ) A fresh-water fish of the United States (Semotilus bullaris); - called also silver chub, and Shiner
Collagen - On being boiled in Water it becomes gelatin or glue
Peanut Butter - A paste made by mixing ground fresh roasted peanuts with a small quantity of Water or oil, and used chiefly as a relish on sandwiches, etc
Crotonine - ) A supposed alkaloid obtained from croton oil by boiling it with Water and magnesia, since found to be merely a magnesia soap of the oil
Freshet - ) A stream of fresh Water
Piezometer - ) A gauge connected with a Water main to show the pressure at that point
Aquarians - (Latin: aqua, Water) ...
A group of early sects, notably the followers of Tatian (2century), who rejected the use of wine as sinful, even in the Eucharist
Bottomless - Without a bottom applied to Water, caverns &c
Cucumber, - Probably the Water melon, common in Egypt and highly valued in that hot country: the Israelites longed for them
Badiaga - ) A fresh-water sponge (Spongilla), common in the north of Europe, the powder of which is used to take away the livid marks of bruises
Dephlegmation - ) The operation of separating Water from spirits and acids, by evaporation or repeated distillation; - called also concentration, especially when acids are the subject of it
Torpedo Stern - It prevents settling in the Water at high speed
Water Cress - A perennial cruciferous herb (Nasturtium officinale) growing usually in clear running or spring Water
Zilla - Its leaves are boiled in Water, and eaten, by the Arabs
Ouache - ) A method of painting with opaque colors, which have been ground in Water and mingled with a preparation of gum; also, a picture thus painted
Voltameter - ) An instrument for measuring the voltaic electricity passing through it, by its effect in decomposing Water or some other chemical compound acting as an electrolyte
Thermobarometer - ) An instrument for determining altitudes by the boiling point of Water
Ahuma'i - (brother of Water , i
Water Hare - A small American hare or rabbit (Lepus aquaticus) found on or near the southern coasts of the United States; - called also Water rabbit, and swamp hare
Life-Preserver - ) An apparatus, made in very various forms, and of various materials, for saving one from drowning by buoying up the body while in the Water
Zaretan - When the Hebrews crossed the Jordan, as soon as the feet of the priests were dipped in the Water, the flow of the stream was arrested. There the Water "stood and rose upon an heap
Melons - ]'>[1] battîkh , which includes the Water-melon ( Citrullus vulgaris ) as well as other kinds). Here the Water-melon is specially referred to, as it was common in Egypt in ancient times
Bathe - Leviticus 15:5 (c) We have here a picture of the defiled Christian who washes his ways in the Water of the Word of GOD as we find in Ephesians 5:26. The Word of GOD like Water removes the dirt and the soil from our lives in order that we may live clean, upright lives before men
Conduit - A canal or pipe for the conveyance of Water an aqueduct. Any channel that conveys Water or fluids a sink, sewer or drain
Ocean - ) The whole body of salt Water which covers more than three fifths of the surface of the globe; - called also the sea, or great sea. ) One of the large bodies of Water into which the great ocean is regarded as divided, as the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic and Antarctic oceans
Exorcism - Certain things are exorcised in blessing them, as holy Water. In the prayer used in blessing holy Water, God is besought to protect those who use it against the influence of the devil
Leach - ) A quantity of wood ashes, through which Water passes, and thus imbibes the alkali. ) To remove the soluble constituents from by subjecting to the action of percolating Water or other liquid; as, to leach ashes or coffee
Lappeth - Orientals are accustomed to take up Water in the hollow of the hand to drink with surprising agility. When Gideon's army came to the Water side, some drank of it with the hand quickly, to be ready without delay to follow Gideon; while the thousands of fainthearted, that were sent away, stooped down to drink with so much tardiness and ceremony as to show that then- hearts were not with Gideon in his contemplated enterprise
Lade - To dip to throw in or out, as a fluid, with a ladle or dipper as, to lade Water out of a tub or into a cistern. To draw Water
ma'Rah - (bitterness ), a place which lay in the wilderness of Shur or Etham, three days journey distant, ( Exodus 15:23 ; Numbers 33:8 ) from the place at which the Israelites crossed the Red Sea, and where was a spring of bitter Water, sweetened subsequently by the casting in of a tree which "the Lord showed" to Moses. Howarah , distant 16 1/2 hours (47 miles) from Ayoun Mousa , the Israelites' first encampment, has been by many identified with it, apparently because it is the bitterest Water in the neighborhood
Hellbender - Also called alligator, and Water dog
Bay Salt - Salt which has been obtained from sea Water, by evaporation in shallow pits or basins, by the heat of the sun; the large crystalline salt of commerce
Bain-Marie - ) A vessel for holding hot Water in which another vessel may be heated without scorching its contents; - used for warming or preparing food or pharmaceutical preparations
Autodynamic - ) Supplying its own power; - applied to an instrument of the nature of a Water-ram
Persecution - The cold Water of persecution is often thrown on the church's face to fetch her to herself when she is in a swoon of indolence or pride
Salep - It is used to make a nutritious beverage by treating the powdered preparation with hot Water
Plentiful - ) Containing plenty; copious; abundant; ample; as, a plentiful harvest; a plentiful supply of Water
Crappie - ) A kind of fresh-water bass of the genus Pomoxys, found in the rivers of the Southern United States and Mississippi valley
Antipathy - ) Natural contrariety; incompatibility; repugnancy of qualities; as, oil and Water have antipathy
Ahumai - (uh hyoo' mawee) Personal name meaning, “a brother is it” or “brother of Water
Oscillaria - ) A genus of dark green, or purplish black, filamentous, fresh-water algae, the threads of which have an automatic swaying or crawling motion
Easter Water - One of the varieties of holy Water, so called because it is blessed with special ceremonies and distributed to the people on Holy Saturday Eve of Easter
Full-Bottomed - ) Of great capacity below the Water line
Leaky - ) Permitting Water or other fluid to leak in or out; as, a leaky roof or cask
Water, Easter - One of the varieties of holy Water, so called because it is blessed with special ceremonies and distributed to the people on Holy Saturday Eve of Easter
Carefulness - Drink thy Water with trembling and with carefulness
Pond - The ponds of Egypt, (Exodus 7:19 ; 13:5 ) were doubtless Water left by the inundation of the Nile
Drain - ) To exhaust of liquid contents by drawing them off; to make gradually dry or empty; to remove surface Water, as from streets, by gutters, etc. ) That means of which anything is drained; a channel; a trench; a Water course; a sewer; a sink. ) To flow gradually; as, the Water of low ground drains off
Water of Jealousy - (Numbers 5:11-31 ) The ritual prescribed consisted in the husband's bringing before the priest the woman suspected of infidelity, and the essential part of it is unquestionably the oath to which the "water" was subsidiary, symbolical and ministerial. As she stood holding the offering, so the priest stood holding till earthen vessel of holy Water mixed with the dust from the floor of the sanctuary, and, declaring her free from all evil consequences if innocent, solemnly devoted her in the name of Jehovah to be "a curse and an oath among her people" if guilty. He then "wrote these curses in a book and blotted them out with the bitter Water. " Josephus adds, if the suspicion was unfounded, she obtained conception; if true, she died infamously, (This was entirely different from most trials of this kind, for the bitter Water the woman must drink was harmless in itself, and only by a direct act of God could it injure her it guilty while in most heathen trials the suspected party must take poison, or suffer that which only a miracle would save them from if they were innocent
Moist - Containing Water or other liquid in a perceptible degree
Scaphognathite - It serves as a pumping organ to draw the Water through the gill cavity
Bouilli - ) Boiled or stewed meat; beef boiled with vegetables in Water from which its gravy is to be made; beef from which bouillon or soup has been made
Bottling - ) The act or the process of putting anything into bottles (as beer, mineral Water, etc
Everglade - ) A swamp or low tract of land inundated with Water and interspersed with hummocks, or small islands, and patches of high grass; as, the everglades of Florida
Pigfish - ) Any one of several species of salt-water grunts; - called also hogfish
Sediment - ) The matter which subsides to the bottom, frrom Water or any other liquid; settlings; lees; dregs
Protoplasta - ) A division of fresh-water rhizopods including those that have a soft body and delicate branched pseudopodia
Protamin - It is soluble in Water, which an alkaline reaction, and unites with acids and metallic bases
Frappe - ) A frappe mixture or beverage, as a Water ice, variously flavored, frozen soft, and served in glasses
Overfall - ) A cataract; a Waterfall. ) A turbulent surface of Water, caused by strong currents setting over submerged ridges; also, a dangerous submerged ridge or shoal
Mud - ) Earth and Water mixed so as to be soft and adhesive
Rush - גמא , Exodus 2:3 ; Job 8:11 ; Isaiah 18:2 ; Isaiah 35:7 ; a plant crowing in the Water at the sides of rivers, and in marshy grounds
Water Meadow - A meadow, or piece of low, flat land, capable of being kept in a state of fertility by being overflowed with Water from some adjoining river or stream
Luepot - ) A utensil for melting glue, consisting of an inner pot holding the glue, immersed in an outer one containing Water which is heated to soften the glue
Horseleech - The bloodsucker, a well-known Water-worm; an apt emblem of avarice and rapacity, Proverbs 30:15
Ark of Moses - It was covered with bitumen to make it Water tight
Cistern - In Palestine, the climate and geological formation of the country render the storage of Water a prime necessity of existence. ...
A cistern might contain only rain Water conveyed from the court or flat roof during the rainy season by gutters and pipes, or might be fed by a conduit led from a spring at a distance. The largest of the innumerable cisterns of Jerusalem, the ‘great sea’ in the Haram area, which is estimated to have held 3,000,000 gallons, derived its Water-supply partly from surface drainage and partly from Water brought by a conduit from Solomon’s Pools near Bethlehem (Wilson). ...
The mouth of a cistern, through which the Water was sometimes drawn by a wheel (Ecclesiastes 12:6 ), was legally required to have a cover ( Exodus 21:33 , cf
Flush - ) To cause by flow; to draw Water from, or pour it over or through (a pond, meadow, sewer, etc. ); to cleanse by means of a rush of Water. ) To cause to be full; to flood; to overflow; to overwhelm with Water; as, to flush the meadows; to flood for the purpose of cleaning; as, to flush a sewer. ) To fill underground spaces, especially in coal mines, with material carried by Water, which, after drainage, constitutes a compact mass. ) A sudden flowing; a rush which fills or overflows, as of Water for cleansing purposes. ) To operate a placer mine, where the continuous supply of Water is insufficient, by holding back the Water, and releasing it periodically in a flood
River of God - (Psalm 65:9 ), as opposed to earthly streams, denoting that the divine resources are inexhaustible, or the sum of all fertilizing streams that Water the earth (Genesis 2:10 )
Chalybeate - ) Any Water, liquid, or medicine, into which iron enters as an ingredient
Caribe - ) A south American fresh Water fish of the genus Serrasalmo of many species, remarkable for its voracity
Pluroderes - ) A group of fresh-water turtles in which the neck can not be retracted, but is bent to one side, for protection
Tremie - ) An apparatus for depositing and consolidating concrete under Water, essentially a tube of wood or sheet metal with a hooperlike top
Pipe Layer - ...
(2):...
One who lays conducting pipes in the ground, as for Water, gas, etc
Agrimony - ) The name is also given to various other plants; as, hemp agrimony (Eupatorium cannabinum); Water agrimony (Bidens)
Dephlegmator - ) An instrument or apparatus in which Water is separated by evaporation or distillation; the part of a distilling apparatus in which the separation of the vapors is effected
Bacterioscopy - ) The application of a knowledge of bacteria for their detection and identification, as in the examination of polluted Water
Holy Water - In Catholicism, special Water that has been blessed by a priest, bishop, etc
Triger Process - A method of sinking through Water-bearing ground, in which the shaft is lined with tubbing and provided with an air lock, work being proceeded with under air pressure
Water Pocket - A Water hole in the bed of an intermittent stream, esp
Ymnotus - ) A genus of South American fresh-water fishes, including the Gymnotus electricus, or electric eel
Uhr - ) A loose, earthy deposit from Water, found in the cavities or clefts of rocks, mostly white, but sometimes red or yellow, from a mixture of clay or ocher
Water Thrush - ...
(2):...
The European Water ousel
Turbid - ) Having the lees or sediment disturbed; roiled; muddy; thick; not clear; - used of liquids of any kind; as, turbid Water; turbid wine
Wringer - ) A machine for pressing Water out of anything, particularly from clothes after they have been washed
Moat - ) A deep trench around the rampart of a castle or other fortified place, sometimes filled with Water; a ditch
Water Gall - (1):...
A Watery appearance in the sky, accompanying the rainbow; a secondary or broken rainbow. ...
(2):...
A cavity made in the earth by a torrent of Water; a washout
Upokororo - ) An edible fresh-water New Zealand fish (Prototroctes oxyrhynchus) of the family Haplochitonidae
Popple - ) To move quickly up and down; to bob up and down, as a cork on rough Water; also, to bubble
Water of Jealousy - A phrase employed (not, however, in Scripture) to denote the Water used in the solemn ordeal prescribed by the law of Moses (Numbers 5:11-31 ) in cases of "jealousy
Aquarian - ) One of a sect of Christian in the primitive church who used Water instead of wine in the Lord's Supper
Coping - ) The highest or covering course of masonry in a wall, often with sloping edges to carry off Water; - sometimes called capping
Amia - ) A genus of fresh-water ganoid fishes, exclusively confined to North America; called bowfin in Lake Champlain, dogfish in Lake Erie, and mudfish in South Carolina, etc
Anhydrite - It is anhydrous sulphate of lime, and differs from gypsum in not containing Water (whence the name)
Bouillon - ) A nutritious liquid food made by boiling beef, or other meat, in Water; a clear soup or broth
Arquebusade - ) A distilled Water from a variety of aromatic plants, as rosemary, millefoil, etc
Oboth - (oh' bahth) Place name meaning, “fathers” or “water skins
Primulaceous - ) Of or pertaining to an order of herbaceous plants (Primulaceae), of which the primrose is the type, and the pimpernel, the cyclamen, and the Water violet are other examples
Duckweed - ) A genus (Lemna) of small plants, seen floating in great quantity on the surface of stagnant pools fresh Water, and supposed to furnish food for ducks; - called also duckmeat
Seashore - ) All the ground between the ordinary highwater and low-water marks
Ashore - ) On shore or on land; on the land adjacent to Water; to the shore; to the land; aground (when applied to a ship); - sometimes opposed to aboard or afloat
Boza - ) An acidulated fermented drink of the Arabs and Egyptians, made from millet seed and various astringent substances; also, an intoxicating beverage made from hemp seed, darnel meal, and Water
Coenurus - ) The larval stage of a tapeworm (Taenia coenurus) which forms bladderlike sacs in the brain of sheep, causing the fatal disease known as Water brain, vertigo, staggers or gid
Barracouata - ) A large edible fresh-water fish of Australia and New Zealand (Thyrsites atun)
Tufa - (1):...
A soft or porous stone formed by depositions from Water, usually calcareous; - called also calcareous tufa
Decoction - ) An extract got from a body by boiling it in Water. ) The act or process of boiling anything in a Watery fluid to extract its virtues
Separation - ) The operation of removing Water from steam
Twaddell's Hydrometer - A form of hydrometer for liquids heavier than Water, graduated with an arbitrary scale such that the readings when multiplied by
Laumontite - Exposed to the air, it loses Water, becomes opaque, and crumbles
Ahava - Ahava (a-hâ'vah or a'ha-vah), Water
Cruse, - a small vessel for holding Water, such as was carried by Saul when on his night expedition after David, (1 Samuel 26:11,12,16 ) and by Elijah
Ferry - ) To carry or transport over a river, strait, or other narrow Water, in a boat. ) A vessel in which passengers and goods are conveyed over narrow Waters; a ferryboat; a wherry. ) To pass over Water in a boat or by a ferry
Fibrin - ) The white, albuminous mass remaining after washing lean beef or other meat with Water until all coloring matter is removed; the fibrous portion of the muscle tissue; flesh fibrin. It is insoluble in Water, but is readily digestible in gastric and pancreatic juice
Elatine - ), a nitrogeneous colloid, not existing as such in the animal body, but formed by the hydrating action of boiling Water on the collagen of various kinds of connective tissue (as tendons, bones, ligaments, etc. Its distinguishing character is that of dissolving in hot Water, and forming a jelly on cooling
Terrestrial - ) Consisting of land, in distinction from Water; belonging to, or inhabiting, the land or ground, in distinction from trees, Water, or the like; as, terrestrial serpents
Murmur - ) To make a low continued noise, like the hum of bees, a stream of Water, distant waves, or the wind in a forest. ) A low, confused, and indistinct sound, like that of running Water
Lanch - To move, or cause to slide from the land into the Water as, to lanch a ship. The sliding or movement of a ship from the land into the Water, on ways prepared for the purpose
Crawl Stroke - A racing stroke, in which the swimmer, lying flat on the Water with face submerged, takes alternate overhand arm strokes while moving his legs up and down alternately from the knee
Chalk-Stones - The expression is of much interest, as showing that the practice of burning limestone and slaking with Water was followed in Pal
Barrel - The same word (cad) so rendered is also translated "pitcher," a vessel for carrying Water (Genesis 24:14 ; Judges 7:16 )
Balloon Fish - A fish of the genus Diodon or the genus Tetraodon, having the power of distending its body by taking air or Water into its dilatable esophagus
Archer Fish - A small fish (Toxotes jaculator), of the East Indies; - so called from its ejecting drops of Water from its mouth at its prey
Feeding - Giving food or nutriment furnishing provisions eating taking food or nourishment grazing supplying Water or that which is constantly consumed nourishing supplying fuel or incentives
Danaide - ) A Water wheel having a vertical axis, and an inner and outer tapering shell, between which are vanes or floats attached usually to both shells, but sometimes only to one
Plumber - , one who furnishes, fits, and repairs lead, iron, or glass pipes, and other apparatus for the conveyance of Water, gas, or drainage in buildings
Pinole - Mixed with Water, it makes a nutritious beverage
Poachard - ) A common European duck (Aythya ferina); - called also goldhead, poker, and fresh-water, / red-headed, widgeon
Iced - ) Covered with ice; chilled with ice; as, iced Water
Economizer - ) Specifically: (Steam Boilers) An arrangement of pipes for heating feed Water by waste heat in the gases passing to the chimney
Flowing - The act of running or moving as a fluid an issuing an overflowing rise of Water
Abdominales - ) A group including the greater part of fresh-water fishes, and many marine ones, having the ventral fins under the abdomen behind the pectorals
Lithontriptic - ) A lithontriptic remedy or agent, as distilled Water
Heath - Supposed to be the Juniper, a low tree found in desert and rocky places, and thus contrasted with a tree growing by a Water-course, Jeremiah 17:5-8 ; 48:6
Experience: Boasting of Its Depth - When this well was commenced, the owner of the place resolved to have Water, cost what it might. The well-sinkers dug through mud, and clay, and stone, but found no Water; here was the deep experience of the corruptionist, all earth and no living spring, the filth revealed but not removed, the leper discovered but not healed. Another hundred feet of hard digging deep in the dark, but no Water: still deeper experience. Still on, on, on went the workers, till one day leaving their tools to go to dinner, upon their return they found that the Water was rising fast, and their tools were drowned
Alga - the class of cellular cryptogamic plants which includes the black, red, and green seaweeds, as kelp, dulse, sea lettuce, also marine and fresh Water confervae, etc
Bailer - ) A utensil, as a bucket or cup, used in bailing; a machine for bailing Water out of a pit
Breakaway - ) A wild rush of sheep, cattle, horses, or camels (especially at the smell or the sight of Water); a stampede
Canteen - ) A vessel used by soldiers for carrying Water, liquor, or other drink
Bespatter - with dirty Water, mud, or anything which will leave foul spots or stains
Barrel - ” Jars were used for carrying Water and storing flour
Fishhawk - ) The osprey (Pandion haliaetus), found both in Europe and America; - so called because it plunges into the Water and seizes fishes in its talons
Pastel - ) A crayon made of a paste composed of a color ground with gum Water
Gregorian Water - A holy Water used in the ceremony of the consecration of a church
Sponge - Found on rocks in deep Water in the Levant and the parts of the Mediterranean which wash the Grecian Isles
Anabas - ) A genus of fishes, remarkable for their power of living long out of Water, and of making their way on land for considerable distances, and for climbing trees; the climbing fishes
Sap - Psalm 104:16 (a) This is a type of the live, fresh, sweet character of GOD's children in whom the Water of life (the Spirit) s free to have His own way
Phylactolaemata - ) An order of fresh-water Bryozoa in which the tentacles are arranged on a horseshoe-shaped lophophore, and the mouth is covered by an epistome
Dabchick - ) A small Water bird (Podilymbus podiceps), allied to the grebes, remarkable for its quickness in diving; - called also dapchick, dobchick, dipchick, didapper, dobber, devil-diver, hell-diver, and pied-billed grebe
Siphonarid - They cling to rocks between high and low Water marks and have both lunglike organs and gills
Vaporization - ) The act or process of vaporizing, or the state of being converted into vapor; the artificial formation of vapor; specifically, the conversion of Water into steam, as in a steam boiler
Water Snake - ...
(2):...
A common North American colubrine snake (Tropidonotus sipedon) which lives chiefly in the Water
Riprap - ) A foundation or sustaining wall of stones thrown together without order, as in deep Water or on a soft bottom
Milligramme - ) A measure of weight, in the metric system, being the thousandth part of a gram, equal to the weight of a cubic millimeter of Water, or
Samovar - It is filled with Water, which is heated by charcoal placed in a pipe, with chimney attached, which passes through the urn
Water, Gregorian - A holy Water used in the ceremony of the consecration of a church
Water of Consecration - A holy Water used in the ceremony of the consecration of a church
Bath - ) A receptacle or place where persons may immerse or wash their bodies in Water. , to Water, vapor, hot air, or the like; as, a cold or a hot bath; a medicated bath; a steam bath; a hip bath. ) Water or other liquid for bathing
Red Heifer - The function of the red heifer ceremony was production of ash for the Water used to remove ritual impurity contracted through contact with a corpse, bones, or a grave (Numbers 19:1 ). The Water for removing the impurity contracted through contact with the dead was prepared by mixing running Water with the ash
Lock - The barrier or works of a canal, which confine the Water, consisting of a dam, banks or walls, with two gates or pairs of gates, which may be opened or shut at pleasure. ...
Lock of Water, is the measure equal to the contents of the chamber of the locks by which the consumption of Water on a canal is estimated
Well - A spring a fountain the issuing of Water from the earth. A pit or cylindrical hole, sunk perpendicularly into the earth to such a depth as to reach a supply of Water, and walled with stone to prevent the earth from caving in. In a fishing vessel, an apartment in the middle of the hold, made tight at the sides, but having holes perforated int he bottom to let in fresh Water for the preservation of fish, while they are transported to market
Chondrin - ) A colorless, amorphous, nitrogenous substance, tasteless and odorless, formed from cartilaginous tissue by long-continued action of boiling Water
Shoad - ) A train of vein material mixed with rubbish; fragments of ore which have become separated by the action of Water or the weather, and serve to direct in the discovery of mines
Plop - ) To fall, drop, or move in any way, with a sudden splash or slap, as on the surface of Water
Cooler - ) Anything in or by which liquids or other things are cooled, as an ice chest, a vessel for ice Water, etc
Percolate - ) To pass through fine interstices; to filter; as, Water percolates through porous stone
Drakestone - ) A flat stone so thrown along the surface of Water as to skip from point to point before it sinks; also, the sport of so throwing stones; - sometimes called ducks and drakes
Toddy - ) A mixture of spirit and hot Water sweetened
Rocaille - ) The rococo system of scroll ornament, based in part on the forms of shells and Water-worn rocks
Silt - ) Mud or fine earth deposited from running or standing Water
Outfall - ) The mouth of a river; the lower end of a Water course; the open end of a drain, culvert, etc
Tatta - ) A bamboo frame or trellis hung at a door or window of a house, over which Water is suffered to trickle, in order to moisten and cool the air as it enters
Milky - ) Like, or somewhat like, milk; whitish and turbid; as, the Water is milky
Travertine - It is deposited from the Water of springs or streams holding lime in solution
Black Bass - (1):...
An edible, fresh-water fish of the United States, of the genus Micropterus
Hollander - ) A very hard, semi-glazed, green or dark brown brick, which will not absorb Water; - called also, Dutch clinker
Batardeau - ) A wall built across the ditch of a fortification, with a sluice gate to regulate the height of Water in the ditch on both sides of the wall
Blob - ) A small fresh-water fish (Uranidea Richardsoni); the miller's thumb
Boat Bug - Called also boat fly, boat insect, boatman, and Water boatman
Pail - for carrying liquids, as Water or milk, etc
Cascade - ) A fall of Water over a precipice, as in a river or brook; a Waterfall less than a cataract
Yapock - Called also Water opossum
Pipe Laying - (1):...
The laying of conducting pipes underground, as for Water, gas, etc
Cruse - A small vessel for holding Water and other liquids, 1 Samuel 26:11
Pools of Solomon - These pools derive their chief supply of Water from a spring called "the sealed fountain," about 200 yards to the north-west of the upper pool, to which it is conveyed by a large subterranean passage. It has been estimated that these pools cover in all a space of about 7 acres, and are capable of containing three million gallons of Water. These pools were primarily designed to supply Jerusalem with Water. From the lower pool an aqueduct has been traced conveying the Water through Bethlehem and across the valley of Gihon, and along the west slope of the Tyropoeon valley, till it finds its way into the great cisterns underneath the temple hill. The Water, however, from the pools reaches now only to Bethlehem
Sink - ) A shallow box or vessel of wood, stone, iron, or other material, connected with a drain, and used for receiving filthy Water, etc. ) To cause to sink; to put under Water; to immerse or submerge in a fluid; as, to sink a ship. ) A hole or low place in land or rock, where Waters sink and are lost; - called also sink hole. ) To fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in Water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west. ) The lowest part of a natural hollow or closed basin whence the Water of one or more streams escapes by evaporation; as, the sink of the Humboldt River. ) A drain to carry off filthy Water; a jakes
Pitcher - This word is used in the Authorized Version to denote the earthen Water-jars or pitchers with one or two handles, used chiefly by women for carrying Water, as in the story of Rebekah
Buoy - ) To keep from sinking in a fluid, as in Water or air; to keep afloat; - with up. a floating object moored to the bottom, to mark a channel or to point out the position of something beneath the Water, as an anchor, shoal, rock, etc
Arrive - In present usage: To come in progress by Water, or by traveling on land; to reach by Water or by land; - followed by at (formerly sometimes by to), also by in and from
Drop - A small portion of any fluid in a spherical form, which falls at once from any body, or a globule of any fluid which is pendent, as if about to fall a small portion of Water falling in rain as a drop of Water a drop of blood a drop of laudanum
Pant - It is compared to the deep craving of the deer for a drink of Water. It is compared to the thirst of an animal which causes it to seek out the Water hole
Arillus - ) A exterior covering, forming a false coat or appendage to a seed, as the loose, transparent bag inclosing the seed or the white Water lily
Chersonese - ) A peninsula; a tract of land nearly surrounded by Water, but united to a larger tract by a neck of land or isthmus; as, the Cimbric Chersonese, or Jutland; the Tauric Chersonese, or Crimea
Chute - ) A framework, trough, or tube, upon or through which objects are made to slide from a higher to a lower level, or through which Water passes to a wheel
Quasi-Public Corporation - A corporation, such as a railroad company, lighting company, Water company, etc
Pothole - ) A circular hole formed in the rocky beds of rivers by the grinding action of stones or gravel whirled round by the Water in what was at first a natural depression of the rock
Daggle - ) To run, go, or trail one's self through Water, mud, or slush; to draggle
Cruse - tsappachath, flask for Water, etc
Porridge - ) A food made by boiling some leguminous or farinaceous substance, or the meal of it, in Water or in milk, making of broth or thin pudding; as, barley porridge, milk porridge, bean porridge, etc
Euripus - ) A strait; a narrow tract of Water, where the tide, or a current, flows and reflows with violence, as the ancient fright of this name between Eubaea and Baeotia
Coping - The top or cover of a wall, made sloping to carry off the Water
Taenioglossa - It includes a large number of families both marine and fresh-water
Skilligalee - ) A kind of thin, weak broth or oatmeal porridge, served out to prisoners and paupers in England; also, a drink made of oatmeal, sugar, and Water, sometimes used in the English navy or army
Ouananiche - John, Canada, and neighboring Waters, noted for its vigor and activity, and habit of leaping from the Water when hooked
Frogbit - ) A European plant (Hydrocharis Morsus-ranae), floating on still Water and propagating itself by runners
Jigging - ) The act or using a jig; the act of separating ore with a jigger, or wire-bottomed sieve, which is moved up and down in Water
Awash - , when flush with the surface of the Water, so that the waves break over it
Bloated - ) Distended beyond the natural or usual size, as by the presence of Water, serum, etc
Aplysia - Some of the species when disturbed throw out a deep purple liquor, which colors the Water to some distance
Calabash - ) A Water dipper, bottle, bascket, or other utensil, made from the dry shell of a calabash or gourd
Headland - ) A cape; a promontory; a point of land projecting into the sea or other expanse of Water
Roundling - ) A fish that keeps at the bottom of the Water, as the loach
Adit - Specifically: The nearly horizontal opening by which a mine is entered, or by which Water and ores are carried away; - called also drift and tunnel
Ferro-Concrete - Floors, columns, piles, Water pipes, etc
Drought - ) Dryness; want of rain or of Water; especially, such dryness of the weather as affects the earth, and prevents the growth of plants; aridity
Water Buck - Called also photomok, Water antelope, and Waterbok
Phyllopoda - ) An order of Entomostraca including a large number of species, most of which live in fresh Water
Seine - It hangs vertically in the Water, and when its ends are brought together or drawn ashore incloses the fish
Thomsonianism - ) An empirical system which assumes that the human body is composed of four elements, earth, air, fire, and Water, and that vegetable medicines alone should be used; - from the founder, Dr
Jetson - ) Goods which sink when cast into the sea, and remain under Water; - distinguished from flotsam, goods which float, and ligan, goods which are sunk attached to a buoy
Bulrush - A large kind of rush, growing in wet land or Water, and without knots, says Johnson, but Dryden calls it, the knotty bulrush
Barker's Mill - The Water flows into a vertical tube and gushes from apertures in hollow horizontal arms, causing the machine to revolve on its axis
Accentor - In America sometimes applied to the Water thrushes
Chafer - ) A vessel for heating Water; - hence, a dish or pan
Sea of Jazer - Body of Water connected with town of Jazer (Jeremiah 48:32 ) but unknown to modern Bible students
Air Cooling - Water cooling
Flooding - ) The filling or covering with Water or other fluid; overflow; inundation; the filling anything to excess
Quay - ) A mole, bank, or wharf, formed toward the sea, or at the side of a harbor, river, or other navigable Water, for convenience in loading and unloading vessels
Rephidim - An encampment of Israel in the wilderness, Exodus 17:1 remarkable for the murmurings of the people grace in giving them Water
Fuller's Field - A place near Jerusalem where there was Water, and doubtless where the fullers carried on some of their work outside the city: its locality is not known
Water Bath - A device for regulating the temperature of anything subjected to heat, by surrounding the vessel containing it with another vessel containing Water which can be kept at a desired temperature; also, a vessel designed for this purpose
Teal - ) Any one of several species of small fresh-water ducks of the genus Anas and the subgenera Querquedula and Nettion
Phenicine - ) A purple powder precipitated when a sulphuric solution of indigo is diluted with Water
Watermanship - , skill in managing the blade in the Water, as distinguished from managing arms, body, etc. ) The business or skill of a Waterman
Water Grass - (1):...
The Water cress
Landlocked - ) Confined to a fresh-water lake by reason of Waterfalls or dams; - said of fishes that would naturally seek the sea, after spawning; as, the landlocked salmon
Underdrain - ) An underground drain or trench with openings through which the Water may percolate from the soil or ground above
Jealousy, Waters of - Water which the suspected wife was required to drink, so that the result might prove her guilt or innocence (Numbers 5:12-17,27 )
Baptism - ) The act of baptizing; the application of Water to a person, as a sacrament or religious ceremony, by which he is initiated into the visible church of Christ
Burial - ) The act of burying; depositing a dead body in the earth, in a tomb or vault, or in the Water, usually with attendant ceremonies; sepulture; interment
Bottleholder - ) One who attends a pugilist in a prize fight; - so called from the bottle of Water of which he has charge
Druse - ) A cavity in a rock, having its interior surface studded with crystals and sometimes filled with Water; a geode
Acolyte - ) One who has received the highest of the four minor orders in the Catholic church, being ordained to carry the wine and Water and the lights at the Mass
Dunnage - ) Fagots, boughs, or loose materials of any kind, laid on the bottom of the hold for the cargo to rest upon to prevent injury by Water, or stowed among casks and other cargo to prevent their motion
Sluiceway - ) An artificial channel into which Water is let by a sluice; specifically, a trough constructed over the bed of a stream, so that logs, lumber, or rubbish can be floated down to some convenient place of delivery
Wadd - ) An earthy oxide of manganese, or mixture of different oxides and Water, with some oxide of iron, and often silica, alumina, lime, or baryta; black ocher
Urgle - ) To run or flow in a broken, irregular, noisy current, as Water from a bottle, or a small stream among pebbles or stones
Kilogramme - It is equal to the weight of a cubic decimeter of distilled Water at the temperature of maximum density, or 39� Fahrenheit
Water Joint - The raised surface is intended to prevent the settling of Water in the joints
Drink - Water was the primary drink. In times of draught it was necessary to buy Water (Deuteronomy 2:28 ; Lamentations 5:4 ). See Milk ; Water ; Wine
Paddle - ) One of the broad boards, or floats, at the circumference of a Water wheel, or paddle wheel. ) A small gate in sluices or lock gates to admit or let off Water; - also called clough. ) To dabble in Water with hands or feet; to use a paddle, or something which serves as a paddle, in swimming, in paddling a boat, etc
Entrance - ) The angle which the bow of a vessel makes with the Water at the Water line. ) The bow, or entire wedgelike forepart of a vessel, below the Water line
Scour - ) A place scoured out by running Water, as in the bed of a stream below a fall. ) To remove by rubbing or cleansing; to sweep along or off; to carry away or remove, as by a current of Water; - often with off or away. ) To cleanse or clear, as by a current of Water; to flush
Launch - ) The movement of a vessel from land into the Water; especially, the sliding on ways from the stocks on which it is built. ) To move with force and swiftness like a sliding from the stocks into the Water; to plunge; to make a beginning; as, to launch into the current of a stream; to launch into an argument or discussion; to launch into lavish expenditures; - often with out. ) To cause to move or slide from the land into the Water; to set afloat; as, to launch a ship
Into - Water enters into the fine vessels of plants. Compound substances may be resolved into others which are more simple ice is convertible into Water, and Water into vapor
Isle, Island - The Hebrew word which is more commonly translated isle, means strictly dry land, habitable country, in opposition to Water, or to seas and rivers, Isaiah 42:15 . Hence, as opposed to Water in general, it means land adjacent to Water, either washed or surrounded by it, that is, maritime country, coast, island
Tide - The flow of the Water in the ocean and seas, twice in a little more than twenty four hours the flux and reflux, or ebb and flow. We commonly distinguish the flow or rising of the Water by the name of flood-tide, and the reflux by that of ebb-tide. There is much less tide or rise of Water in the main ocean, at a distance from land, than there is at the shore, and in sounds and bays
Snow - It was "carried to Tyre, Sidon, and Damascus as a luxury, and labourers sweltering in the hot harvest-fields used it for the purpose of cooling the Water which they drank (Proverbs 25:13 ; Jeremiah 18:14 ). No doubt Herod Antipas, at his feasts in Tiberias, enjoyed also from this very source the modern luxury of ice-water
Conversion (Sudden): Not All Genuine - Fish sometimes leap out of the Water with great energy, but it would be foolish to conclude that they have left the liquid element for ever, in a moment they are swimming again as if they had never forsaken the stream; indeed, it was but a fly that tempted them aloft, or a sudden freak, the Water is still their home, sweet home
Lehi - God did not make Water to flow out of the tooth socket of the jawbone which Samson threw away, to slake his thirst, but "cleft an hollow place (maqtesh ; Zephaniah 1:11) in Lehi," from whence" Water" miraculously "came out
Dragon Well - The Water source is described as a well (KJV, NAS, NIV), a spring (REB, NRSV), or a fountain (TEV). The Dragon Well has been identified with the Gihon spring, the main Water source during the time of Hezekiah, the Siloam pool which was fed by the Gihon, the En-rogel spring located 210 meters south of the confluence of the Hinnom and Kidron valleys, or with a spring along the east side of the Tyropoeon Valley which has since dried up
Bathe - To wash the body, or some part of it, by immersion, as in a bath it often differs from ordinary washing in a longer application of Water, to the body or to a particular part, as for the purpose of cleansing or stimulating the skin. BATHE, To be or lie in a bath to be in Water, or in other liquid, or to be immersed in a fluid, as in a bath as, to bathe in fiery floods
Distill - ; to distill fresh Water from sea Water
Frost - ) The act of freezing; - applied chiefly to the congelation of Water; congelation of fluids. ) The state or temperature of the air which occasions congelation, or the freezing of Water; severe cold or freezing weather
Gulf - A recess in the ocean from the general line of the shore into the land, or a tract of Water extending from the ocean or a sea into the land, between two points or promontories a large bay as the gulf of Mexico the gulf of Venice the gulf of Finland. We apply bay to a large or small recess of the sea, as the bay of Biscay, the bay of Fundy but gulf is applied only to a large extent of Water
Gihon - Hezekiah stopped the upper Water-courses of Gihon and brought the Water down to the west side of the city of David
Trout - ) Any one of several species of marine fishes more or less resembling a trout in appearance or habits, but not belonging to the same family, especially the California rock trouts, the common squeteague, and the southern, or spotted, squeteague; - called also salt-water trout, sea trout, shad trout, and gray trout. All the species breed in fresh Water, but after spawning many of them descend to the sea if they have an opportunity
Whitewash - ) A composition of line and Water, or of whiting size, and Water, or the like, used for whitening walls, ceilings, etc
Tabby - ) To Water; to cause to look wavy, by the process of calendering; to calender; as, to tabby silk, mohair, ribbon, etc. ) A mixture of lime with shells, gravel, or stones, in equal proportions, with an equal proportion of Water. ) Having a wavy or Watered appearance; as, a tabby waistcoat. ) A kind of waved silk, usually called Watered silk, manufactured like taffeta, but thicker and stronger. The Watering is given to it by calendering
Cistern - a reservoir chiefly for rain Water. The reason of their being so large was, that their cities were many of them built in elevated situations; and the rain falling only twice in the year, namely, spring and autumn, it became necessary for them to collect a quantity of Water, as well for the cattle as for the people
Paddle - To row to beat the Water, as with oars. To play in the Water with the hands, as children or with the feet, as fowls or other animals
Lehi - Probably the Hebrew word Lehi in, should be left untranslated, "God clave a hollow place that was in Lehi, and there came Water thereout. It continued to flow, and may even to this day be testifying that God hears the cry of his people, and can turn a dry land into springs of Water for their use, Genesis 21:19 ; Numbers 20:11
Windowpane - Called also spotted turbot, daylight, spotted sand flounder, and Water flounder
Bason - 1: νιπτήρ (Strong's #3537 — Noun Masculine — nipter — nip-tare' ) the vessel into which the Lord poured Water to wash the disciples' feet, was "a large ewer," John 13:5
Clough - ) A sluice used in returning Water to a channel after depositing its sediment on the flooded land
Carbureted - ) Saturated or impregnated with some volatile carbon compound; as, Water gas is carbureted to increase its illuminating power
Siphonobranchiata - ) A tribe of gastropods having the mantle border, on one or both sides, prolonged in the form of a spout through which Water enters the gill cavity
Skater - They have long legs, and run rapidly over the surface of the Water, as if skating
Eaves - ) The edges or lower borders of the roof of a building, which overhang the walls, and cast off the Water that falls on the roof
Waybill - When the goods are transported by Water, the list is called a bill of lading
Viaduct - ) A structure of considerable magnitude, usually with arches or supported on trestles, for carrying a road, as a railroad, high above the ground or Water; a bridge; especially, one for crossing a valley or a gorge
Slit-Shell - Many fossil species are known, and a few living ones are found in deep Water in tropical seas
Water Pore - (1):...
A pore by which the Water tubes of various invertebrates open externally
Cana - and first miracle that he wrought of turning Water into wine
Leet - ) To flow slowly, as Water
Leet - ) To flow slowly, as Water
Meribah - ) The designation which Moses gave the place at Rephidim where Israel, just before they reached Sinai in the second year after leaving Egypt, did chide with Moses, "give us Water that we may drink," and tempted (from whence came the other name Massah) Jehovah, saying "is Jehovah among us or not?" (Exodus 17:7; compare as to the sin, Matthew 4:7. " Thirty-eight years afterward at Kadesh, bordering on the promised laud, again, untaught by the severe discipline of the wilderness (Isaiah 9:13), Israel in want of Water cried, "would God we had died when our brethren died before the Lord!"...
God's glory appeared, and the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, "take the rod, and speak unto the rock before their eyes, and it shall give forth his Water. " But here Moses' old hastiness of spirit, which he had showed in the beginning of his career (Exodus 2), returned; "they provoked his spirit so that he spoke unadvisedly with his lips" (Psalms 106:32-33): "ye rebels, must we (forgetting that the power was that of God alone) fetch you Water out of this rock?" Then lifting up his hand he smote twice, whereas God had told him, "speak unto the rock. This repetition of the miracle disproves the notion from 1 Corinthians 10:4 that the stream literally "followed" them from Rephidim (Exodus 17) to Canaan; all that is meant is a supply of Water from time to time was provided naturally or miraculously, so that they never perished from thirst (so Exodus 15:24-25; Numbers 21:16). ...
Christ is the Rock (John 7:38); the Water flowed, and the people drank, at Meribah Kadesh
Siloam - The Water was approached by steps cut in the rock. From ‘Ain Sitti Maryam, the Fountain of the Virgin, on the slope below the eastern battlements, a conduit led the Water to the pool; but, probably in Hezekiah’s time, a tunnel was cut through the rock, and the fountain apparently covered over, as Josephus does not seem to have known it apart from Siloam. Josephus pronounces the Water good and plentiful, and says that this and other fountains flowed more copiously after falling into the hands of Titus. ...
On the last day of the Feast of Tabernacles, Water from this fountain was poured on the altar (Neubauer, Géog. the Water was ‘good’ (Mukaddasi); it is good no longer, percolating, as it does, through vast accumulations of refuse. Its handful of poor inhabitants still use the impure Water for domestic purposes
Boil - To swell,heave, or be agitated by the action of heat to bubble to rise in bubbles as, the Water boils. To be in boiling Water to suffer boiling heat in Water or other liquid, for cookery or other purpose. ...
BOIL, To dress or cook in boiling Water to seethe to extract the juice or quality of any thing by boiling
Water - For as Water is essentially necessary to animal life, so is the blessed Spirit to spiritual life. But it would form a subject in itself, and fill a volume, to shew how many and how various the ways by which the Holy Ghost is represented in the Bible under this sweet figure, as supplying the church with living Water. Hence he is called the "water of life, a well of Water springing up in the soul to everlasting life
Massah - Trial, temptation, a name given to the place where the Israelites, by their murmuring for want of Water, provoked Jehovah to anger against them
Rakkon - , "yellow Water
Coamings - ) Raised pieces of wood of iron around a hatchway, skylight, or other opening in the deck, to prevent Water from running bellow; esp
Cutin - ) A waxy substance which, combined with cellulose, forms a substance nearly impervious to Water and constituting the cuticle in plants. ) The substance which, added to the material of a cell wall, makes it Waterproof, as in cork
Barrel - ]'>[1] ) used for fetching Water from the well, storing grain, etc
Damasken - , with a peculiar marking or "water" produced in the process of manufacture, or with designs produced by inlaying or incrusting with another metal, as silver or gold, or by etching, etc
Hogfish - ) An American fresh-water fish; the log perch
Galloway, Scotland, Diocese of - Comprises the counties of Dumfries, nine-tenths of Ayr (south of the Lugton Water), Kirkcudbright, and Wigtown, founded by Saint Ninian, 397, as the See of Whithorn; suffragan of Saint Andrews and Edinburgh
Forcer - ) The solid piston of a force pump; the instrument by which Water is forced in a pump
Calorimeter - ) An apparatus for measuring the proportion of unevaporated Water contained in steam
Ejector - ) A jet jump for lifting Water or withdrawing air from a space
Elim - The second encampment of the Israelites after passing the Red Sea: it had twelve fountains of Water and seventy palm trees
Trionyx - ) A genus of fresh-water or river turtles which have the shell imperfectly developed and covered with a soft leathery skin
Sifter - ) Any lamellirostral bird, as a duck or goose; - so called because it sifts or strains its food from the Water and mud by means of the lamell/ of the beak
Wader - ) Any long-legged bird that wades in the Water in search of food, especially any species of limicoline or grallatorial birds; - called also wading bird
Massah - A name signifying 'temptation,' given, along with the name of MERIBAH,to the place where the Israelites tempted God when they were in want of Water
Lobefish - The globefishes can suck in Water or air and distend the body to a more or less globular form
Siloam - Steps lead to the bottom of the pool, three or four feet above which the Water flows off southeast to Water the cultivated grounds in the valley below. The Water flowing through it is tolerably sweet and clear, but has a marked taste, and in the dry season is slightly brackish. Thus the Water rose more than a foot in the upper fountain, and fell again within ten minutes, while Dr. At Siloam also the Water is used for washing animals, etc
Cruet - ) A vessel used to hold wine, oil, or Water for the service of the altar
Tortoise - Several kinds of land and Water tortoises are common in the Holy Land, but here the reference is probably to some kind of lizard
Cruets - For the greater convenience of the Priest in celebratingthe Holy Communion, vessels of glass or precious metal, calledcruets, are placed on the credence to hold the wine and Water,and from which at the proper time in the service, the chalice issupplied
Water - The heat of summer and many mouths of drought necessitated also appliances for storing and conveying Water; and remains still exist of the (See POOLS of Solomon situated near Bethlehem, and of the aqueduct near Jericho which was constructed by the Romans
Bur Fish - Chilo mycterus geometricus) having the power of distending its body with Water or air, so as to resemble a chestnut bur; - called also ball fish, balloon fish, and swellfish
Aquarius - ) The Water-bearer; the eleventh sign in the zodiac, which the sun enters about the 20th of January; - so called from the rains which prevail at that season in Italy and the East
Antefix - ) An ornament of the cymatium of a classic cornice, sometimes pierced for the escape of Water
Archipelago - ) Hence: Any sea or broad sheet of Water interspersed with many islands or with a group of islands
Baca - ” A valley in Psalm 84:6 which reflects a poetic play on words describing a person forced to go through a time of weeping who found God turned tears into a well, providing Water
Bucket - The reference is to Waterskin held open at the top by a stick in the shape of a cross (Numbers 24:7 ; Isaiah 40:15 ). The main purpose was for drawing Water from a well and is still used in Palestine today
Portland Cement - It contains a large proportion of clay, and hardens under Water
Adipocere - ) A soft, unctuous, or waxy substance, of a light brown color, into which the fat and muscle tissue of dead bodies sometimes are converted, by long immersion in Water or by burial in moist places
Slime - When mixed with tar it forms a hard cement impervious to Water
Calorie - ) The unit of heat according to the French standard; the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one kilogram (sometimes, one gram) of Water one degree centigrade, or from 0� to 1�
Colorless - ) Without color; not distinguished by any hue; transparent; as, colorless Water
Euryale - ) A genus of Water lilies, growing in India and China
Asoline - It is used in making air gas, and in giving illuminating power to Water gas
Calcimine - ) A white or colored wash for the ceiling or other plastering of a room, consisting of a mixture of clear glue, Paris white or zinc white, and Water
Hammath - The heat of the Water rises from 132 to 140 Fahr
Tardigrada - ) An order of minute aquatic arachnids; - called also bear animalcules, sloth animalcules, and Water bears
Oleograph - ) The form or figure assumed by a drop of oil when placed upon Water or some other liquid with which it does not mix
Siluroid - ) Belonging to the Siluroidei, or Nematognathi, an order of fishes including numerous species, among which are the American catfishes and numerous allied fresh-water species of the Old World, as the sheatfish (Silurus glanis) of Europe
Offtake - ) A channel for taking away air or Water; also, the point of beginning of such a channel; a take-off
Gerar - residence, or Water-pots
Tautog - Called also blackfish, oyster fish, salt-water chub, and moll
Mineralize - ) To impregnate with a mineral; as, mineralized Water
Aha'va - (water ), a place, ( Ezra 8:15 ) or a river, Ezra 8:21 On the banks of which Ezra collected the second expedition which returned with him from Babylon to Jerusalem
Resin - ) Any one of a class of yellowish brown solid inflammable substances, of vegetable origin, which are nonconductors of electricity, have a vitreous fracture, and are soluble in ether, alcohol, and essential oils, but not in Water; specif
Water Dog - ...
(3):...
A dog accustomed to the Water, or trained to retrieve Waterfowl. Retrievers, Waters spaniels, and Newfoundland dogs are so trained
Charger - A shallow vessel for receiving Water or blood, also for presenting offerings of fine flour with oil
Mortar - A mixture of lime and sand with Water, used as a cement for uniting stones and bricks in walls. If the lime is slaked and the materials mixed with lime Water, the cement will be much stronger
Judicium Dei - Or Judgment of God, was a term anciently applied to all extraordinary trials of secret crimes; as those by arms and single combat; and the ordeals, or those by fire, or red hot ploughshares, by plunging the arm in boiling Water, or the whole body in cold Water, in hopes that God would work a miracle, rather than suffer truth and innocence to perish
Nethinim - Joshua forced the Gibeonites to serve as woodcutters and Water bearers for the sanctuary (Joshua 9:27 ). The Nethinim resided in the Ophel district of Jerusalem, likely near the Water gate (Nehemiah 3:26 ), a site conducive with their task as Water bearers
Slacken - ) To lose cohesion or solidity by a chemical combination with Water; to slake; as, lime slacks. ) To deprive of cohesion by combining chemically with Water; to slake; as, to slack lime. ) To lose rapidity; to become more slow; as, a current of Water slackens
Kadesh, Kadeshbarnea - It was here also that Moses smote the rock when the people murmured for Water. The Water thus obtained is spoken of as both the 'water of MERIBAH,' or 'strife,' Numbers 20:13 ; Numbers 27:14 ; Psalm 81:7 , and the 'waters of strife in Kadesh
Beer-Sheba - One well is twelve feet in diameter and 44 feet deep to the Water; the other well is five feet in diameter, and was 42 feet to the Water. The curbstones around the mouths of both wells are worn into deep grooves by the action of the ropes used in drawing the Water for many centuries
Dead Sea - Inland lake at the end of the Jordan Valley on the southeastern border of Canaan with no outlets for Water it receives; known in the Bible as Salt Sea, Sea of the Plain, and Eastern Sea. ...
The main source of Water for the sea is the Jordan River, but other smaller rivers empty into the sea also. The Jordan River empties an average of six million tons of Water every twenty-four hours into the sea. The reason for this lies in the rapid evaporation of the Water because of the heat and acidness of its location below sea level
Holy Water - Holy Water, indeed! a vile mixture, neither fit for man nor beast. Holy Water! bah! See how the rain pours down from yonder black cloud which has passed over the rugged crags of Pilatus; that sort of holy Water is infinitely more likely to moisten the clay of the defunct, and bring plenteous blessing to the living, than all the hogsheads of aqueous fluid that priests ever mumbled over. Holy Water, indeed! If there be such a thing, it trickles from the eye of penitence, bedews the cheek of gratitude, and falls upon the page of holy Scripture when the word is applied with power
Bay - ) A small body of Water set off from the main body; as a compartment containing Water for a wheel; the portion of a canal just outside of the gates of a lock, etc. ) A bank or dam to keep back Water. ) To dam, as Water; - with up or back
Fountain - A spring of Water flowing from a hole in the earth. In semi-arid country springs are highly prized as Water sources and often determine the location of settlements. ” The goodness of Canaan was seen in its abundant Water supply, “a land with flowing streams, with springs and underground Waters welling up in valleys and hills” (Deuteronomy 8:7 NRSV). The unleashing of these Waters amounted to a return to the chaos before the creation (Genesis 1:1 ,Genesis 1:1,1:9 ). ...
Provisions of spring Water is an expression of God's providential care (Psalm 104:10 )
Well - (Genesis 24:16 ) The brims are furnished with a curb or low wall of stone, bearing marks of high antiquity in the furrows worn by the ropes used in drawing Water. The usual methods for raising Water are the following:
The rope and bucket, or Waterskin. Wells are usually furnished with troughs of wood or stone into which the Water is emptied for the use of persons or animals coming to the wells. Unless machinery is used, which is commonly worked by men, women are usually the Water-carriers
Brook - Ye’ôr almost always used of the Nile and Water-trenches of Egypt. Once it is used for the Water-channel ( Job 28:10 ); once ( Isaiah 33:21 ) it is rendered ‘stream’; while in Daniel 12:1-13 it stands for the Tigris. ’ It is the exact equivalent of the Arab wâdy , which means a valley containing a stream of Water. ), or to the Water-course alone ( Deuteronomy 9:21 etc
Flow - ) To cover with Water or other liquid; to overflow; to inundate; to flood. ) A stream of Water or other fluid; a current; as, a flow of Water; a flow of blood. ) The tidal setting in of the Water from the ocean to the shore. ) A low-lying piece of Watery land; - called also flow moss and flow bog
Bath - A place for bathing a convenient vat or receptacle of Water for persons to plunge or wash their bodies in. Natural baths are those which consist of spring Water, either hot or cold, which is often impregnated with iron, and called chalybeate, or with sulphur, carbonic acid, and other mineral qualities. These Waters are often very efficacious in scorbutic, bilious, dyspeptic and other complaints. ...
A metalline bath is Water impregnated with iron or other metallic substance, and applied to a diseased part. ...
In chimistry, a wet bath is formed by hot Water in which is placed a vessel containing the matter which requires a softer heat than the naked fire
Siloah, Siloam - In Isaiah 8:6 , under the name of SHILOAH, it is used symbolically: the people refused its Waters that went softly, preferring Syria and the king of Israel: the strong Waters of Assyria should sweep them away. It is supplied with Water from a fountain higher up the hill, called the Virgin's Fountain. The letters are ancient, which has led to the supposition that the passage was made in the days of Hezekiah, who made alterations in the Watercourses. The flow of the Water is intermitting, as if regulated by an underground siphon. In the winter the Water rises three or four times a day, but in the summer only once in several days. The superfluous Water flows in a channel cut in the rock to the gardens below
Salt - ) Overflowed with, or growing in, salt Water; as, a salt marsh; salt grass. ) Of or relating to salt; abounding in, or containing, salt; prepared or preserved with, or tasting of, salt; salted; as, salt beef; salt Water. It is found native in the earth, and is also produced, by evaporation and crystallization, from sea Water and other Water impregnated with saline particles
Salt - ) Overflowed with, or growing in, salt Water; as, a salt marsh; salt grass. ) Of or relating to salt; abounding in, or containing, salt; prepared or preserved with, or tasting of, salt; salted; as, salt beef; salt Water. It is found native in the earth, and is also produced, by evaporation and crystallization, from sea Water and other Water impregnated with saline particles
Bottle - The accompanying engraving shows the form and nature of an ancient goatskin bottle, out of which a Water-carrier is offering to sell a draught of Water. ...
Such bottles, or skins, are still universally employed in travelling in the East, as well as by the public Water-carriers, and for domestic uses. But the smaller ones of goatskins were more generally used for Water as well as wine
Catoptromancy - ) A species of divination, which was performed by letting down a mirror into Water, for a sick person to look at his face in it
Weathered - ) Made sloping, so as to throw off Water; as, a weathered cornice or window sill
Candlebomb - ) A small glass bubble, filled with Water, which, if placed in the flame of a candle, bursts by expansion of steam
Cudbear - ) A powder of a violet red color, difficult to moisten with Water, used for making violet or purple dye
Chrism - (Greek: chrisma, an anointing) A mixture of olive-oil and balsam, blessed by a bishop on Holy Thursday and used in administering Baptism, Confirmation, and Holy Orders, and in the consecration of churches, altars, chalices, patens, and in the blessing of bells, and baptismal Water
Matter, Sacramental - , Water in Baptism
Buddle - ) An apparatus, especially an inclined trough or vat, in which stamped ore is concentrated by subjecting it to the action of running Water so as to wash out the lighter and less valuable portions
Pishon - Some suggest the “river” was a canal connecting the Tigris and Euphrates or another body of Water, such as the Persian Gulf
Tophel - Ninety-nine springs and rivulets flowing into the Ghor Water the neighbourhood
Caesium - ) A rare alkaline metal found in mineral Water; - so called from the two characteristic blue lines in its spectrum
Factitive - ) Pertaining to that relation which is proper when the act, as of a transitive verb, is not merely received by an object, but produces some change in the object, as when we say, He made the Water wine
Beakhead - ) A small platform at the fore part of the upper deck of a vessel, which contains the Water closets of the crew
Behemoth - Hebrew word for beasts, left untranslated in Job 40, where it indicates a particular animal, probably mythical, in description similar to the hippopotamus and corresponding to the mythical Egyptian Water-ox, p-ehe-mu, probably adapted into Hebrew as behemah, plural behemothj hence, monstrous beast
Sponge - The skeleton of marine animals whose structure retains Water
Flying Fish - A fish which is able to leap from the Water, and fly a considerable distance by means of its large and long pectoral fins
Dayfly - ) A neuropterous insect of the genus Ephemera and related genera, of many species, and inhabiting fresh Water in the larval state; the ephemeral fly; - so called because it commonly lives but one day in the winged or adult state
Percolator - ) A kind of coffee pot in which the heated Water is caused to filter through the coffee and thus extract its essence
Denudation - ; or the excavation and removal of them by the action of running Water
Alluvial - ) Pertaining to, contained in, or composed of, alluvium; relating to the deposits made by flowing Water; washed away from one place and deposited in another; as, alluvial soil, mud, accumulations, deposits
Branlin - ) A small red worm or larva, used as bait for small fresh-water fish; - so called from its red color
Entrain - ) To draw along as a current does; as, Water entrained by steam
Wernerian - Werner, The German mineralogist and geologist, who classified minerals according to their external characters, and advocated the theory that the strata of the earth's crust were formed by depositions from Water; designating, or according to, Werner's system
Wraith - ) Sometimes, improperly, a spirit thought to preside over the Waters; - called also Water wraith
Jacana - They are able to run about over floating Water weeds by means of their very long, spreading toes
Moon-Eye - ) Any species of American fresh-water fishes of the genus Hyodon, esp. tergisus of the Great Lakes and adjacent Waters
Manger - ) The fore part of the deck, having a bulkhead athwart ships high enough to prevent Water which enters the hawse holes from running over it
Mysis - ) A genus of small schizopod shrimps found both in fresh and salt Water; the opossum shrimps
Loach - ) Any one of several small, fresh-water, cyprinoid fishes of the genera Cobitis, Nemachilus, and allied genera, having six or more barbules around the mouth
Sacramental Matter - , Water in Baptism
Charger, - a shallow vessel for receiving Water or blood, also for presenting offerings of fine flour with oil
Chocolate - ) The beverage made by dissolving a portion of the paste or cake in boiling Water or milk
Croaker - ) An American fresh-water fish (Aplodinotus grunniens); - called also drum
Alum - It has twenty-four molecules of Water of crystallization
Boulder - ) A large stone, worn smooth or rounded by the action of Water; a large pebble
Lap (Verb) - Gideon was to separate those who drank by cupping Water in their hands and then lapping it up, still keeping watch, from those who knelt down to drink
Pasteur's Fluid - It contains all the elements of protoplasm, and was originally made of the ash of yeast, some ammonia compound, sugar, and Water
Refrigeratory - ) In distillation, a vessel filled with cold Water, surrounding the worm, the vapor in which is thereby condensed
Propeller - ) A contrivance for propelling a steam vessel, usually consisting of a screw placed in the stern under Water, and made to revolve by an engine; a propeller wheel
Elutriate - ) To wash or strain out so as to purify; as, to elutriate the blood as it passes through the lungs; to strain off or decant, as a powder which is separated from heavier particles by being drawn off with Water; to cleanse, as by washing
Dung - ) To immerse or steep, as calico, in a bath of hot Water containing cow dung; - done to remove the superfluous mordant
Feathering - ) The act of turning the blade of the oar, as it rises from the Water in rowing, from a vertical to a horizontal position
Drizzle - ) To rain slightly in very small drops; to fall, as Water from the clouds, slowly and in fine particles; as, it drizzles; drizzling drops or rain
Archiparaphonista - His duties included: ...
choosing the chanters for a Pontifical Mass;
preceding the pope and placing a kneeling-stool before the altar for him; and
bringing the Water to the sub-deacon during the celebration of Mass
Pectin - It is extracted as variously colored, translucent substances, which are soluble in hot Water but become viscous on cooling
Varuna - ) The god of the Waters; the Indian Neptune. He is regarded as regent of the west, and lord of punishment, and is represented as riding on a sea monster, holding in his hand a snaky cord or noose with which to bind offenders, under Water
Remiped - See Water beetle
Oggle-Eye - ) One of two or more species of American fresh-water fishes of the family Centrarchidae, esp. Chaenobryttus antistius, of Lake Michigan and adjacent Waters, and Ambloplites rupestris, of the Great Lakes and Mississippi Valley; - so called from their prominent eyes
Permeate - ) To pass through the pores or interstices of; to penetrate and pass through without causing rupture or displacement; - applied especially to fluids which pass through substances of loose texture; as, Water permeates sand
Killifish - They live equally well in fresh and brackish Water, or even in the sea
Propeller - ) A contrivance for propelling a steam vessel, usually consisting of a screw placed in the stern under Water, and made to revolve by an engine; a propeller wheel
Hebdomadarian - (Greek: hebdomas, week) ...
Name applied in monasteries and churches to the priest officiating for the week who makes the intonations at the beginning of the various canonical hours, gives the required blessings, of holy Water, etc
Replenish - The springs are replenished with Water
Rephidim - Place near Horeb, where the Israelites encamped; Water gushed from the rock when Moses had smitten it, and there Joshua fought with Amalek, while Moses lifted up his hands to heaven, assisted by Aaron and Hur
Tympanum - ) A drum-shaped wheel with spirally curved partitions by which Water is raised to the axis when the wheel revolves with the lower part of the circumference submerged, - used for raising Water, as for irrigation
Bethnimrah - ("house of sweet Water," or "house of leopards. The wady Shoaib (possibly the modern form of Hobab) discharges its Waters into the Jordan near a ford above Jericho. That this is the scene of John 1:28; Mark 1:5; Matthew 3:5, appears from there being abundant Water, and its being near "the region round about Jordan," the CICCAR of the Old Testament, the oasis of Jericho, accessible to "Jerusalem and all Judea
Meadow - " So Job 8:11 "rush," the paper reed or papyrus of the Nile; "can the achu grow without Water?" The fat kine fed on the reed grass which in the plenteous years grew to the very margin of the Water, but the lean stood on the dry "brink" (Genesis 41:2-3)
Flue - ) A pipe or passage for conveying flame and hot gases through surrounding Water in a boiler; - distinguished from a tube which holds Water and is surrounded by fire
Mash - Specifically (Brewing), ground or bruised malt, or meal of rye, wheat, corn, or other grain (or a mixture of malt and meal) steeped and stirred in hot Water for making the wort. ) A mixture of meal or bran and Water fed to animals
Leak - ) A crack, crevice, fissure, or hole which admits Water or other fluid, or lets it escape; as, a leak in a roof; a leak in a boat; a leak in a gas pipe. ) To let Water or other fluid in or out through a hole, crevice, etc
Water of Jealousy - As she stood holding the offering, so the priest held an earthen vessel of holy Water mixed with the dust of the floor of the sanctuary, and declared her freedom from hurt if innocent, but cursed her if guilty; he then wrote the curses in a book and washed them INTO (so translated Numbers 5:23) the bitter Water, which the woman had then to drink, answering "amen" to the curse. Her drinking the Water symbolized her full acceptance of the conditional curse (Ezekiel 3:1-3; Jeremiah 15:16; Revelation 10:9) and its actual operation on her if guilty (Psalms 109:18). ) illustrates it; Ptahneferka takes a leaf of papyrus and on it copies a magical formula, then dissolves the writing in Water, drinks the decoction, and knows in consequence all it contains. A trial by red Water among West Africans somewhat accords with the Mosaic institution
Dash - To throw Water suddenly, in separate portions as, to dash Water on the head. To mix and reduce or adulterate by throwing in another substance as, to dash wine with Water the story is dashed with fables. To strike, break, scatter and fly off as, agitate Water and it will dash over the sides of a vessel the waves dashed over the side of the ship. To rush, strike and break or scatter as, the Waters dash down the precipice. Infusion admixture something thrown into another substance as, the wine has a dash of Water
Salt - It is found native in the earth, or it is produced by evaporation and crystallization from Water impregnated with saline particles. Having the taste of salt impregnated with salt as salt beef salt Water 2. Overflowed with salt Water, or impregnated with it as a salt marsh. Producing salt Water as a salt spring. The part of a river near the sea, where the Water is salt
Possession (2) - sextarius, and stands for a wooden vessel holding about a pint and a half, used at table for holding Water and wine. (John 4:28) tells us of the Samaritan woman, in the excitement of her new-found joy, ‘leaving her Water-pot,’ he uses the words τὴν ὑδρίαν, pointing doubtless to just such a portable earthen Water-pot as women in Palestine are everywhere to-day seen carrying on their heads. But in John 2:6 where he gives an account of the miracle at the marriage feast in Cana of Galilee, he tells of ‘six Water-pots of stone’ (λίθιναι ὑδρίαι), which were clearly ‘pots’ of a very different kind—too large to use at table, or to be portable in the ordinary way. Scarcity of drinking Water in Palestine made it necessary to keep a supply on hand in large vessels that would serve as coolers, especially in hot weather
Brook - ) A natural stream of Water smaller than a river or creek
Ethanim - Ethanim means, “always flowing with Water” and refers to the flooding streams fed by heavy fall rains
Adam, the City of - At this city the flow of the Water was arrested and rose up "upon an heap" at the time of the Israelites' passing over (Joshua 3:16 )
Biggin - ) A coffeepot with a strainer or perforated metallic vessel for holding the ground coffee, through which boiling Water is poured; - so called from Mr
Capybara - It somewhat resembles the Guinea pig, to which it is related; - called also cabiai and Water hog
Carbohydrate - ) One of a group of compounds including the sugars, starches, and gums, which contain six (or some multiple of six) carbon atoms, united with a variable number of hydrogen and oxygen atoms, but with the two latter always in proportion as to form Water; as dextrose, C6H12O6
Caramel - It is soluble in Water, and is used for coloring spirits, gravies, etc
Quicksand - ) Sand easily moved or readily yielding to pressure; especially, a deep mass of loose or moving sand mixed with Water, sometimes found at the mouth of a river or along some coasts, and very dangerous, from the difficulty of extricating a person who begins sinking into it
Air Pump - ...
(2):...
A pump used to exhaust from a condenser the condensed steam, the Water used for condensing, and any commingled air
Packer - ) A ring of packing or a special device to render gas-tight and Water-tight the space between the tubing and bore of an oil well
Baptist - As a contraction of Anabaptist, one who denies the doctrine of infant baptism, and maintains that baptism ought to be administered only to adults by immersing the body in Water
Asometer - ) An apparatus for holding and measuring of gas; in gas works, a huge iron cylinder closed at one end and having the other end immersed in Water, in which it is made to rise or fall, according to the volume of gas it contains, or the pressure required
Crevasse - ) A breach in the levee or embankment of a river, caused by the pressure of the Water, as on the lower Mississippi
Detector - ) An indicator showing the depth of the Water in a boiler
Erupt - lava, Water, etc
Water Shrew - The most common American Water shrew, or marsh shrew (Neosorex palustris), is rarely seen, owing to its nocturnal habits
Chalcedony - A subspecies of quartz, a mineral called also white agate, resembling milk diluted with Water, and more or less clouded or opake, with veins, circles and spots
Oil of Saints - Sometimes, the oil in lamps that burn before their shrines, the Water that flows from the wells near their burial places, or the oil and Water which in some way have come in contact with their relics. A chemical analysis has shown that the fluid is Water, but since it came into contact with the relics of the saint, the fact justifies the practise of using it as a remedy for diseases of body and soul
Manna Oil of Saints - Sometimes, the oil in lamps that burn before their shrines, the Water that flows from the wells near their burial places, or the oil and Water which in some way have come in contact with their relics. A chemical analysis has shown that the fluid is Water, but since it came into contact with the relics of the saint, the fact justifies the practise of using it as a remedy for diseases of body and soul
Ulai - ...
In Pehlevi Eulaeus or Aw-Halesh means "pure Water. " Strabo (15:3, section 22) says the Persian kings drank only of this Water at their table, and that it was lighter than ordinary Water
Bath, Bathing - (see article Clean and Unclean) and in this sense denotes the washing of the body with Water, not necessarily the total immersion of the body in Water. ...
The Hebrews were well acquainted with the use of mineral and vegetable alkalis for increasing the cleansing properties of Water (Jeremiah 2:22 , RV Aenon - The name ("springs") implies" there was much Water there. of Jordan; it agrees with this that, had it been near Jordan, John would scarcely have remarked that "much Water" was there: but if far from the river, it explains how the plentiful Water at AEnon was convenient for baptisms
Cool - Moderately cold being of a temperature between hot and cold as cool air cool Water. To allay heat to make cool or cold to reduce the temperature of a substance as, ice wools Water. Send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in Water, and cool my tongue
Saints, Manna Oil of - Sometimes, the oil in lamps that burn before their shrines, the Water that flows from the wells near their burial places, or the oil and Water which in some way have come in contact with their relics. A chemical analysis has shown that the fluid is Water, but since it came into contact with the relics of the saint, the fact justifies the practise of using it as a remedy for diseases of body and soul
Saints, Oil of - Sometimes, the oil in lamps that burn before their shrines, the Water that flows from the wells near their burial places, or the oil and Water which in some way have come in contact with their relics. A chemical analysis has shown that the fluid is Water, but since it came into contact with the relics of the saint, the fact justifies the practise of using it as a remedy for diseases of body and soul
Sea - This was called the brazen sea, and used to hold Water for the priests to wash themselves. A large body of Water, nearly inclosed by land, as the Baltic or the Mediterranean as the sea of Azof. Large bodies of Water inland, and situated above the level of the ocean, are lakes
Minister - On his back he bears a burden of Water, and in his hand a rack of bottles containing essences to flavour the draught if needed, and glasses to hold the cooling liquid. The present specimen of Water-dealers is a poor old man bent sideways, by the weight of his daily burden. He washes out a glass for us, fills it with sparkling Water, offers us the tincture which we abhor, puts it back into the rack again when we shake our head, receives half-a-dozen soldi with manifest gratitude, and trudges away across the square, crying still, 'Acqua! Acqua!' That cry, shrill as it is, has sounded sweetly in the ears of many a thirsty soul, and will for ages yet to come, if throats and thirst survive so long. How forcibly it calls to our mind the Saviour's favourite imagery, in which he compares the grace which he bestows on all who diligently seek it, to 'living Water;' and how much that old man is like the faithful preacher of the word, who, having filled his vessel at the well, wears himself out by continually bearing the burden of the Lord, and crying, 'Water! Water!' amid crowds of sinners, who must drink or die. Instead of the poor Italian Water-bearer, we see before us the man of God, whose voice is heard in the chief places of concourse, proclaiming the divine invitation, 'Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the Waters!' until he grows grey in the service, ançl men say, 'Surely those aged limbs have need of rest ;' yet rest he courts not, but pursues his task of mercy; never laying down his charge till he lays down his body, and never ceasing to work until he ceases to live. The Water was good enough, but the vessel which held it imparted an evil taste to it; the like has often happened in the ministry, the gospel preached has been true and divine, but the unhallowed savor of an inconsistent life, or a bitter disposition, has marred the sweetness of the Word. May all of us by whom the Lord hands out the Water of life, see that we are clean and pure in conversation, vessels fit for the Master's use. Men who are very thirsty will drink out of any cup, however dirty; but no conceivable advantage can arise from filth, and hundreds will turn away from the Water because of it, and thus a very faulty ministry may be useful because of the truth contained in it, but its sinfulness can do no good, and may serve as an excuse to the ungodly for refusing the gospel of Christ. ...
In the square of the Doge's palace are two wells, from which the sellers of Water obtain their stock-in-trade, but we can hardly compare either of them with the overflowing spring from which the preacher of righteousness draws his supplies. One of the wells is filled artificially and is not much used for drinking, since the coldness and freshness of Water springing naturally from earth's deep fountains is lacking. ' The other well yields most delicious Water, but its flow is scanty. The lower we can fall, the sooner will the springing Water of grace reach us, and the more completely shall we be filled with it. ...
It would be a great misfortune for those who buy their Water in the streets, if the itinerant vendors should begin to fill their casks and bottles from muddy streams. Sundry divines in our age have become weary of the old-fashioned well of which our fathers drank, and would fain have us go to their Abana and Pharpar, but we are still firm in the belief that the Water from the rock has no rival, and we shall not, we hope, forsake it for any other
Cold-Blooded - ) Having cold blood; - said of fish or animals whose blood is but little warmer than the Water or air about them
Catadromous - ) Living in fresh Water, and going to the sea to spawn; - opposed to anadromous, and said of the eel
Compartment - ) One of the sections into which the hold of a ship is divided by Water-tight bulkheads
Lay Baptism - The one baptizing pours natural Water over the head of subject, while saying, "I baptize thee in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost
Draught - ]'>[1] ‘draught-house,’ 2 Kings 10:27 ) both signify a privy or closet, which in the Mishna is ‘water-house
Bischof, Karl Gustav - Made notable contributions to speculative geology by his work on the role of Water in geological processes
Karl Bischof - Made notable contributions to speculative geology by his work on the role of Water in geological processes
en-Hakkore - ” Place where God gave Samson Water from the jawbone he had used to kill a thousand Philistines (Judges 15:18-19 )
Emerge - ) To rise out of a fluid; to come forth from that in which anything has been plunged, enveloped, or concealed; to issue and appear; as, to emerge from the Water or the ocean; the sun emerges from behind the moon in an eclipse; to emerge from poverty or obscurity
Creek - ) A stream of Water smaller than a river and larger than a brook
Pachuca Tank - A high and narrow tank, with a central cylinder for the introduction of compressed air, used in the agitation and settling of pulp (pulverized ore and Water) during treatment by the cyanide process; - so named because, though originally devised in New Zealand, it was first practically introduced in Pachuca, Mexico
Plasmon - A mixture of this with butter, Water, and salt is called Plasmon butter, and resembles clotted cream in appearance
Quilting - ) A coating of strands of rope for a Water vessel
Plummet - ) A piece of lead attached to a line, used in sounding the depth of Water
Fother - ) To stop (a leak in a ship at sea) by drawing under its bottom a thrummed sail, so that the pressure of the Water may force it into the crack
Periscope - ) an optical instrument of tubular shape containing an arrangement of lenses and mirrors (or prisms), allowing a person to observe a field of view otherwise obstructed, as beyond an obstructing object or (as in submarines) above the surface of the Water
Makaz - A city of Dan (1 Kings 4:9) Some have thought, that it was the same as Makteosh, which Samson called Enak kore, the jaw tooth; from the supply of Water the Lord gave him for his thirst, from the jaw bone of the ass
Barbel - ) A large fresh-water fish ( Barbus vulgaris) found in many European rivers
Brawl - ) To make a loud confused noise, as the Water of a rapid stream running over stones
Estuary - ) A place where Water boils up; a spring that wells forth
Eavesdrop - ) The Water which falls in drops from the eaves of a house
Enhakkore - This name, signifying 'the caller's spring,' was given by Samson to the place where God gave him Water in answer to his call
Ordius - ) A genus of long, slender, nematoid worms, parasitic in insects until near maturity, when they leave the insect, and live in Water, in which they deposit their eggs; - called also hair eel, hairworm, and hair snake, from the absurd, but common and widely diffused, notion that they are metamorphosed horsehairs
Toadfish - The American species (Batrachus tau) is very common in shallow Water
Taurocholic - It is exceedingly deliquescent, and hence appears generally as a thick, gummy mass, easily soluble in Water and alcohol
Dungeon - Pit used for Water, but sometimes dry and used as a prison
Metalline - ) Impregnated with metallic salts; chalybeate; as, metalline Water
Wiggle - ) To move to and fro with a quick, jerking motion; to bend rapidly, or with a wavering motion, from side to side; to wag; to squirm; to wriggle; as, the dog wiggles his tail; the tadpole wiggles in the Water
Lactose - It has a slightly sweet taste, is dextrorotary, and is much less soluble in Water than either cane sugar or glucose
Lightness - Want of weight levity the contrary to heaviness as the lightness of air, compared with Water
Liquor - Liquor is a word of general signification, extending to Water, milk, blood, say, juice, &c
Baptism, Lay - The one baptizing pours natural Water over the head of subject, while saying, "I baptize thee in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost
Caisson - ) A Water-tight box, of timber or iron within which work is carried on in building foundations or structures below the Water level
Siege - Battle tactic in which an army surrounds a city and cuts off all supplies so that the enemy army is forced to surrender for lack of food and Water. Preparing for siege, a city stored Water inside the city walls and repaired the walls ( Nahum 3:14 )
Pit - ...
(3) Βor , "a pit or cistern once full of Water, now empty", with miry clay beneath (Psalms 40:2; Zechariah 9:11); used as dungeon wherein the captive has no Water or food; so Jeremiah (Jeremiah 38:6; Jeremiah 38:9), Isaiah 51:14; hence symbolizing "the dishonored grave of the once haughty transgressor", with the idea of condign [2] punishment in the unseen world, shadowed forth by the ignominious state of the body (Ezekiel 31:14; Ezekiel 31:16; Ezekiel 32:18; Ezekiel 32:24)
Pot - The Water-pots of Cana appear to have been large amphorae, such as are in use at the present day in Syria. The Water-pot of the Samaritan woman may have been a leathern bucket, such as Bedouin women use
Hazael - (2 Kings 8:15) The circumstance of Hazael's spreading a cloth dipped in Water over the face of Benhadad, hath been thought by some to have been done not with the design to kill him. The patients drink cold Water, and a quantity of Water is thrown upon them. So that whether Hazael wished the death of his master, or not, the dipping the cloth in Water and covering his face with it, was among the methods used on those occasions for recovery
Weedless - ) Free from weeds; - said of a kind of motor-boat propeller the blades of which curve backwardly, as respects the direction of rotation, so that they draw through the Water, and so do not gather weeds with which they come in contact
Quarantines - Water, bread, and salt once a day was the only nourishment permitted
Foam - The expression in Hosea may therefore be read, "as a chip on the face of the Water," denoting the helplessness of the piece of wood as compared with the irresistable current
Hammath - It is identified with the warm baths (the heat of the Water ranging from 136 degrees to 144 degrees) still found on the shore a little to the south of Tiberias under the name of Hummam Tabariyeh ("Bath of Tiberias")
Misrephoth Maim - ("burning of Waters"), i. Waters for smelting work or glass manufacture; or salt Water exposed to the burning sun to obtain salt by evaporation. To this place, somewhere near Sidon, Joshua pursued the kings whom he conquered at the Waters of Merom (Joshua 11:8; Joshua 13:6)
Esek - ” A well Isaac's servants dug in the valley near Gerar to find Water for their herds. The shepherds of Gerar disputed Isaac's claim to the Watering place
Billabong - This is the sense of the word as used in the Public Works Department; but the term has also been locally applied to mere back-waters forming stagnant pools and to certain Water channels arising from a source
Blear - ) Dim or sore with Water or rheum; - said of the eyes. ) To make somewhat sore or Watery, as the eyes; to dim, or blur, as the sight
Dropsy - The condition involves the accumulation of Water fluid in the body cavities or in the limbs
Goatskin - Hide of goats desert dwellers used for clothing (Hebrews 11:37 ) and for containers for Water (Genesis 21:14 ) and wine (Joshua 9:4 )
Behemoth - The behemoth is apparently an animal that lives near Water (Job 40:15-22 )
Pebble - ) A small roundish stone or bowlder; especially, a stone worn and rounded by the action of Water; a pebblestone
Bucket - Numbers 24:7 (b) As a gardener Waters his garden with buckets of Water, so Jacob or Israel would bring blessing to every part of the earth
Amphipoda - ) A numerous group of fourteen - footed Crustacea, inhabiting both fresh and salt Water
Albumin - It is soluble in Water and is coagulated by heat and by certain chemical reagents
Dioptrics - ) The science of the refraction of light; that part of geometrical optics which treats of the laws of the refraction of light in passing from one medium into another, or through different mediums, as air, Water, or glass, and esp
Eelpout - ) A fresh-water fish, the burbot
Diodon - They are able to inflate the body by taking in air or Water, and, hence, are called globefishes, swellfishes, etc
Calefactory - ) A hollow sphere of metal, filled with hot Water, or a chafing dish, placed on the altar in cold weather for the priest to warm his hands with
Rudd - ) A fresh-water European fish of the Carp family (Leuciscus erythrophthalmus)
Waterfall - ) A fall, or perpendicular descent, of the Water of a river or stream, or a descent nearly perpendicular; a cascade; a cataract. ) An arrangement of a woman's back hair over a cushion or frame in some resemblance to a Waterfall
Widgeon - ) Any one of several species of fresh-water ducks, especially those belonging to the subgenus Mareca, of the genus Anas
Sailing - ) The act of one who, or that which, sails; the motion of a vessel on Water, impelled by wind or steam; the act of starting on a voyage
Beer - A station of the Hebrews in Moab, where God gave them Water, Numbers 21:16-18 ; Isaiah 15:8
Esh'Col, the Valley - ( Numbers 13:23,24 ; 1:24) The name is still attached to a spring of fine Water called 'Ain Eshkali , in a valley about two miles north of Hebron
Gihon - But as, according to the sacred narrative, all these rivers of Eden took their origin from the head-waters of the Euphrates and the Trigris, it is probable that the Gihon is the ancient Araxes, which, under the modern name of the Arras, discharges itself into the Caspian Sea. ) ...
...
The only natural spring of Water in or near Jerusalem is the "Fountain of the Virgin" (q. On the occasion of the approach of the Assyrian army under Sennacherib, Hezekiah, in order to prevent the besiegers from finding Water, "stopped the upper Water course of Gihon, and brought it straight down to the west side of the city of David" ( 2 Chronicles 32:30 ; 33:14 ). This "fountain" or spring is therefore to be regarded as the "upper Water course of Gihon. " From this "fountain" a tunnel cut through the ridge which forms the south part of the temple hill conveys the Water to the Pool of Siloam, which lies on the opposite side of this ridge at the head of the Tyropoeon ("cheesemakers'") valley, or valley of the son of Hinnom, now filled up by rubbish. If the "waters of Shiloah that go softly" (Isaiah 8:6 ) refers to the gentle stream that still flows through the tunnel into the Pool of Siloam, then this excavation must have existed before the time of Hezekiah
Ceratodus - They have lungs so well developed that they can leave the Water and breathe in air
Behemoth - Some have supposed this to be an Egyptian word meaning a "water-ox
Conversation: Edifying - The Spaniards in Chili believed that no Water was so wholesome or of so delicate a flavour as that which flowed through veins of gold; certainly no conversation is so edifying to the hearers as that which pours forth from a heart stored with sacred knowledge, sanctified experience, devout contemplations, and such like precious treasures
Breasting - It is closely adapted to the curve of the wheel through about a quarter of its circumference, and prevents the escape of the Water until it has spent its force upon the wheel
Plaster - A pasty combination, usually of Water, line, and sand which hardens on drying and is isued for coating walls and ceilings
Chub - ) A species to fresh-water fish of the Cyprinidae or Carp family
Separator - ) A device for depriving steam of particles of Water mixed with it
Lehi - ” City where Samson killed 1,000 Philistines with the jawbone of a donkey and where God provided Water from the jawbone (Judges 15:1 )
Elementary - ) Pertaining to one of the four elements, air, Water, earth, fire
Aerate - ) To supply or impregnate with common air; as, to aerate soil; to aerate Water
Harod - A well, or more correctly a spring, near which Gideon encamped, and at which apparently he tested his army by their manner of drinking the Water
Bad Lands - Barren regions, especially in the western United States, where horizontal strata (Tertiary deposits) have been often eroded into fantastic forms, and much intersected by ca?ons, and where lack of wood, Water, and forage increases the difficulty of traversing the country, whence the name, first given by the Canadian French, Mauvaises Terres (bad lands)
Digester - ) A strong closed vessel, in which bones or other substances may be subjected, usually in Water or other liquid, to a temperature above that of boiling, in order to soften them
Erosion - The chief agent of erosion is running Water; minor agents are glaciers, the wind, and waves breaking against the coast
Thallium - It is isolated as a heavy, soft, bluish white metal, easily oxidized in moist air, but preserved by keeping under Water
Frosty - ) Attended with, or producing, frost; having power to congeal Water; cold; freezing; as, a frosty night
Torrent - ) A violent stream, as of Water, lava, or the like; a stream suddenly raised and running rapidly, as down a precipice
Ramme - It was intended to be exactly, and is very nearly, equivalent to the weight in a vacuum of one cubic centimeter of pure Water at its maximum density
Meerschaum - ) A fine white claylike mineral, soft, and light enough when in dry masses to float in Water
Motor - ) A prime mover; a machine by means of which a source of power, as steam, moving Water, electricity, etc
Motor - ) A prime mover; a machine by means of which a source of power, as steam, moving Water, electricity, etc
Mudsill - ) The lowest sill of a structure, usually embedded in the soil; the lowest timber of a house; also, that sill or timber of a bridge which is laid at the bottom of the Water
ae'Non - (John 3:22 ) with John 3:26 and with John 1:28 And abounded in Water
Ink - The ordinary materials were powdered charcoal, or ivory black, Water, and gum
Ospray - It feeds on fish which it takes by suddenly darting upon them, when near the surface of the Water
Samaritan Woman - She had come to draw Water from the well for her material needs, but Jesus gradually aroused in her sinful soul a desire for the supernatural Waters that spring up into life everlasting
Woman, Samaritan - She had come to draw Water from the well for her material needs, but Jesus gradually aroused in her sinful soul a desire for the supernatural Waters that spring up into life everlasting
Acolyte - His chief duties are to arrange the elements on the Credence, tolight the candles, receive the offerings and present them, andalso the Bread, Wine and Water, to the Priest at the proper timein the Celebration
Well - Drawing Water from the cisterns or wells that abound in Palestine occupies much of the women’s time. Few experiences are more trying than to pass one of these ‘wells’ in the heat, seeing the Water in the cool depths but having ‘nothing to draw with. Even a Metâwileh, one of the most fanatical of all Oriental sects, will give Water to the thirsty, if appealed to, although to avoid the possibility of pollution he must destroy the vessel from which the infidel has drunk
Wells - Some may have been dug in connection with springs of Water and others have been principally supplied by Water from the surrounding land. The word ayin differs from either of the above: it signifies literally 'an eye,' and was like an eye in the ground from which the Waters sprang up, and is not said to be dug, and yet is called 'a well' in the A. ...
In 2 Peter 2:17 an apostate is a spring or fountain 'without Water:' he has left the only source of life
Marah - The beneficial effect of the tree cast into the bitter Water by God's direction is probably the cause why now this fountain is less bitter than others in the neighborhood. The fountain rises from a large mound, a whitish petrifaction, deposited by the Water, which seldom flows now; but there are traces of a formerly running stream. The cross is spiritually the tree which, when cast into life's bitterest Waters, sweetens and heals them (Philippians 3:8; Acts 20:24; Acts 16:23-25; Acts 5:41; Romans 5:3)
Dew - Dew is the moisture which forms into drops of Water upon the earth during a cool night. Upward dew results from the condensation of Water vapor from damp soil and is, therefore, more frequent in the winter season
Salvation: Near - When hailed by another vessel, they reported themselves as 'Dying for Water!' 'Dip it up then,' was the response, 'you are in the mouth of the Amazon river. ' There was fresh Water all around them, they had nothing to do but to dip it up, and yet they were dying of thirst, because they thought themselves to be surrounded by the salt sea
Drink, Strong - Honey wine was a mixture of wine, honey, and pepper, also a concoction from the grape called debaash by the Hebrew, by modern Syrians dibs, wine, milk or Water being added. " "Drinking iniquity like Water himself (Job 15:16), he corrupts others thirsting for it
Clay - A species of earths which are firmly coherent, weighty, compact, and hard when dry, but stiff, viscid and ductile when moist, and smooth to the touch not readily diffusible in Water, and when mixed, not readily subsiding in it. Clays absorb Water greedily, and become soft, but are so tenacious as to be molded into any shape, and hence they are the materials of bricks and various vessels, domestic and chimical
Wicket - ) A small gate by which the chamber of canal locks is emptied, or by which the amount of Water passing to a Water wheel is regulated
Overhang - ) The portion of the bow or stem of a vessel that projects over the Water beyond the Water line
Lotus - ) A name of several kinds of Water lilies; as Nelumbium speciosum, used in religious ceremonies, anciently in Egypt, and to this day in Asia; Nelumbium luteum, the American lotus; and Nymphaea Lotus and N. ) An ornament much used in Egyptian architecture, generally asserted to have been suggested by the Egyptian Water lily
Solomon's Pools - They are built of large stones, and plastered within; and the Water collected in them, and in several fountains in the vicinity, was conveyed in an aqueduct to Bethlehem and Jerusalem. At present they contain comparatively little Water; yet they are of incalculable importance to Bethlehem, and might easily be made so to Jerusalem
Cistern, - a receptacle for Water, either conducted from an external spring or proceeding from rain-fall. Jerusalem depends mainly for Water upon its cisterns, of which almost every private house possesses one or more, excavated in the rock on which the city is built
River - The word employed for the Nile is yeor, 'a fosse or channel'; for the Jordan and the Euphrates the word used is nahar, 'a river' always supplied with Water. The other streams in Palestine, though called 'rivers,' as the Arnon, are torrents running in valleys; for the most part they have Water only in the winter, and are then often impassable: these are described by the word nachal
Water - In these cases the Water undoubtedly represents the Holy Spirit. Sometimes Water is presented as a drink, as in John 7:37. ...
Jeremiah 2:13 (b) Our Lord is the giver of the Holy Spirit who is the living Water. No seed, however, will grow without Water, no matter how good the seed, nor fertile the soil. The Holy Spirit is the Water, and when He is present in power, recognized and trusted, then the seed of the Word of GOD grows and prospers in the hearts of the people. ...
Judges 1:12 (b) Water is typical of the refreshment and blessing that should characterize the ministry of one who claims to be the servant of GOD
Red Heifer - The ashes of a ‘red heifer’ more correctly a red cow added to ‘running Water,’ formed the most powerful means known to the Hebrews of removing the defilement produced by contact with a dead body. The method of preparing the ashes and the regulations for the application of the ‘water of impurity’ (see below) are the subject of a special section of the Priests’ Code ( Numbers 19:1-22 ). , extending the application of ‘the Water of impurity’ to uncleanness arising from a variety of sources connected with death. The special name given to the mixture of ‘running Water’ (Numbers 8:17 , lit. ‘living Water,’ i. Water from a spring, not a cistern) and the ashes is properly ‘water of impurity’ ( Numbers 8:9 ; Numbers 8:13 ; Numbers 8:20-21 so RVm [2] ‘water for impurity’; EV [1] Water of separation ), i. Water for the removal of impurity or uncleanness. The only other reference to ‘the Water of impurity’ is in the late passage, Numbers 31:23 . The ashes of the red heifer and the Water of impurity here appear, in virtue of their intense ‘holiness,’ as ‘a conducting vehicle of a dangerous spiritual electricity’ (Farnell, op
Sil'Oam - This is the more remarkable as it is a mere suburban tank of no great size, and for many an age not particularly good or plentiful in its Waters, though Josephus tells us that in his day they were both "sweet and abundant. At the back part of this fountain a subterraneous passage begins, through which the Water flows, and through which a man may make his way, sometimes walking erect, sometimes stooping, sometimes kneeling, and sometime crawling, to Siloam. This conduit Isaiah 1708 feet long, 16 feet high at the entrance, but only 16 inches at its narrowest tributaries which sent their Waters down from the city pools or temple wells to swell Siloam. To this you descend by a few rude steps, under which the Water pours itself into the main pool. This pool is oblong, about 52 feet long, 18 feet broad and 19 feet deep; but it is never filled, the Water either passing directly through or being maintained at a depth of three or four feet. This pool, which we may call the second , seems anciently to have poured its Waters into a third before it proceeded to Water the royal gardens. " ( Nehemiah 2:14 ) The expression in (Isaiah 8:6 ) "waters of Shiloah that go softly," seems to point to the slender rivulet, flowing gently though once very profusely out of Siloam into the lower breadth of level where the king's gardens, or royal paradise, stood, and which is still the greenest spot about the holy city. It was to Siloam that the Levite was sent with the golden pitcher on the "last and great day of the feast" of Tabernacles; it was from Siloam that he brought the Water which was then poured over the sacrifice, in memory of the Water from the rock of Rephidim; and it was to this Siloam Water that the Lord pointed when he stood in the temple on that day and cried, "If any man thirst let him come unto me and drink
Canal - ) An artificial channel filled with Water and designed for navigation, or for irrigating land, etc
Tubbing - ) A lining of timber or metal around the shaft of a mine; especially, a series of cast-iron cylinders bolted together, used to enable those who sink a shaft to penetrate quicksand, Water, etc
Pit - In old decayed cisterns the Water leaks out or becomes slimy, and such a pit becomes the image of dreariness and misery
Billfish - ) The American fresh-water garpike (Lepidosteus osseus)
Lime - Mixed with Water, lime was used as a plaster (Deuteronomy 27:2 ,Deuteronomy 27:2,27:4 )
Separation - KJV term for Water used to make one ritually pure or clean (Numbers 19:1 )
Quillwort - There are about seventeen American species, usually growing in the mud under still, shallow Water
Fistula - ) A pipe for convejing Water
Aground - On the ground a marine term, signifying that the bottom of a ship rests on the ground, for want of sufficient depth of Water
Baptism - The application of Water to a person, as a sacrament or religious ceremony, by which he is initiated into the visible church of Christ
Camphire - A powder made of the leaves and flowers is mixed with Water and used by the women to colour the nails of their hands and feet
Ice - Frozen Water or snow
Branchiopoda - It includes the fresh-water genera Branchipus, Apus, and Limnadia, and the genus Artemia found in salt lakes
Astropoda - It includes most of the marine spiral shells, and the land and fresh-water snails
Dereliction - ) A retiring of the sea, occasioning a change of high-water mark, whereby land is gained
Asperges - (Latin aspergere, to sprinkle) ...
The sprinkling of the people with holy Water on Sundays before the principal Mass
Ully - ) A channel or hollow worn in the earth by a current of Water; a short deep portion of a torrent's bed when dry
Zoospore - ) A spore provided with one or more slender cilia, by the vibration of which it swims in the Water
Waterwork - ) An hydraulic apparatus, or a system of works or fixtures, by which a supply of Water is furnished for useful or ornamental purposes, including dams, sluices, pumps, aqueducts, distributing pipes, fountains, etc
Decoct - ) To prepare by boiling; to digest in hot or boiling Water; to extract the strength or flavor of by boiling; to make an infusion of
Waver - ) To be unsettled in opinion; to vacillate; to be undetermined; to fluctuate; as, to Water in judgment
Gihon - Hezekiah stopped the upper Water-course of Gihon, and Manasseh built a wall on the west side of Gihon
Arabim - (ahr' uh bihm) NAS transliteration of name of Waterway mentioned in Isaiah 15:7 . The Water source indicated may be the wadi el-Chesa at the southern end of the Dead Sea in Moab
Japan Current - A branch of the equatorial current of the Pacific, washing the eastern coast of Formosa and thence flowing northeastward past Japan and merging into the easterly drift of the North Pacific; - called also Kuro-Siwo, or Black Stream, in allusion to the deep blue of its Water
Mineralization - ) The act of impregnating with a mineral, as Water
Lukewarm - ), is used metaphorically in Revelation 3:16 , of the state of the Laodicean church, which afforded no refreshment to the Lord, such as is ministered naturally by either cold or hot Water
Rupert's Drop - A kind of glass drop with a long tail, made by dropping melted glass into Water
Lizard - Large numbers are found in Syria, varying greatly in size, appearance, and place of abode; some dwelling partly in Water, and others on the rocks of the desert, or among old ruins
Causey - , serving as a dry passage over wet or marshy ground, or as a mole to confine Water to a pond or restrain it from overflowing lower ground
Kettle - A vessel of iron or other metal, with a wide mouth, usually without a cover, used for heating and boiling Water or other liquor
Respiration - The respiration of fishes, for these cannot live long without air, appears to be performed by the air contained in the Water acting on the gills
Basin - ) A hollow place containing Water, as a pond, a dock for ships, a little bay. ) A hollow vessel or dish, to hold Water for washing, and for various other uses
Pelican - A voracious Water-bird, unclean by the Levitical law. The female has a large pouch or bag capable of containing two or three gallons of Water, and food enough for six common men
Etam - It seems to have been in the district called Nephtoah (or Netophah), where were the sources of the Water from which Solomon's gardens and pleasure-grounds and pools, as well as Bethlehem and the temple, were supplied. It is now 'Ain 'Atan, at the head of the Wady Urtas, a fountain sending forth a copious supply of pure Water
Damask - , or with a peculiar marking or "water," as metal. ) Damask or Damascus steel; also, the peculiar markings or "water" of such steel
Crisp - ) Curled with the ripple of the Water. ) To cause to undulate irregularly, as crape or Water; to wrinkle; to cause to ripple
Cinnamon - ...
Cinnamon-water, is made by distilling the bark, first infused in barley Water, in spirit of wine, brandy or white wine
Interdict - Particular persons were also anciently interdicted of fire and Water, which signifies a banishment for some particular offence: by this censure no person was permitted to receive them, or allow them fire or Water; and, being thus wholly deprived of the two necessary elements of life, they were, doubtless under a kind of civil death
Tube - ) A small pipe forming part of the boiler, containing Water and surrounded by flame or hot gases, or else surrounded by Water and forming a flue for the gases to pass through
Um - ) A vegetable secretion of many trees or plants that hardens when it exudes, but is soluble in Water; as, gum arabic; gum tragacanth; the gum of the cherry tree. Also, with less propriety, exudations that are not soluble in Water; as, gum copal and gum sandarac, which are really resins
Channel - In a general sense, a passage a place of passing or flowing particularly, a Water course. The deeper part of a strait, bay, or harbor, where the principal current flows, either of tide or fresh Water, or which is the most convenient for the track of a ship
Baptism - The use of Water in this ordinance is grounded in part on its qualities as the great element of purification, and on the rites of the ancient dispensation, in which "water and blood: were the divinely appointed symbols of moral renovation and atonement
Gall - Compare Jeremiah 8:14 ; 23:15 , "water of gall," Gesenius, "poppy juice;" others, "water of hemlock," "bitter Water
Nimrah - ("leopard", or "clear Water". In Isaiah 15:6 "the Waters of Nimrim shall be desolate . there is no green thing"; even the city Nimrah, whose name means "limpid Waters," which came down from the mountains of Gilead near Jordan, is without Water, so that herbage is gone (Jeremiah 48:34), i. "the well Watered pastures of Nimrah shall be desolate. Bethnimra is perhaps Bethabara beyond Jordan, where John was baptizing (John 1:28); for the pure Water of Bethnimra, its situation in the center of "the region round about Jordan," and its accessibleness from "Jerusalem and Judaea" all accord
Dip - To plunge or immerse, for a moment or short time, in Water or other liquid substance to put into a fluid and withdraw. To take with a ladle or other vessel by immersing it in a fluid, as to dip Water from a boiler often with out, as to dip out Water
Preacher: to Avoid a Lofty Style - In the town of Goslar, in the Hartz mountains, there is in the principal square a fountain evidently of medieval date, but the peculiarity of its construction is that no one can reach the Water so as to fill a bucket or even get a drink to quench his thirst. Both the jets, and the basin into which they fall, are above the reach of any man of ordinary stature; yet the fountain was intended to supply the public with Water, and it fulfils its design by a method which we never saw in use before; every person brings a spout or trough with him long enough to reach the top of the fountain and bring the Water down into his pitcher
Beer-Elim - Hence, the prophet sings, "Because God (saith he) is my salvation, therefore, with joy shall ye draw Water out of those wells of salvation. " (Isaiah 12:2-3) And hence, if, with an eye to the Lord Jesus Christ, who is himself, in the souls of all his redeemed, a well of Water springing up unto everlasting life, (John 4:14) we accept those Beer-elim in the word, we then join the Lord's song, in the Lord's own words, as he directed Moses. This is the well whereof the Lord spake unto Moses, "Gather the people together, and I will give them Water
Wave - A moving swell or volume of Water usually, a swell raised and driven by wind. A pebble thrown into still Water produces waves, which form concentric circles, receding from the point where the pebble fell. But waves are generally raised and driven by wind, and the word comprehends any moving swell on the surface of Water, from the smallest ripple to the billows of a tempest. The line or streak of luster on cloth Watered and calendered
Dry - Destitute of moisture free from Water or wetness arid not moist as dry land dry clothes. To free from Water, or from moisture of any kind, and by any means originally by wiping, as to dry the eyes to exsiccate. To deprive of Water by draining to drain to exhaust as, to dry a meadow. To dry up, to deprive wholly of Water
Baptism - " Defined theologically, it is a sacrament, instituted by Christ, in which by the invocation of the Holy Trinity and external ablution with Water one becomes spiritually regenerated and a disciple of Christ. " The Sacrament of Baptism is absolutely necessary for salvation, because all are subject to original sin: wherefore Christ's words to Nicodemus, "Unless a man be born again of Water and the Holy Ghost, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God" (John 3). Baptism is administered by pouring Water on the head of the candidate, saying at the same time, ...
I baptize thee, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. The Water must flow over the skin
Cucking Stool - A kind of chair formerly used for punishing scolds, and also dishonest tradesmen, by fastening them in it, usually in front of their doors, to be pelted and hooted at by the mob, but sometimes to be taken to the Water and ducked; - called also a castigatory, a tumbrel, and a trebuchet; and often, but not so correctly, a ducking stool
Cataract - ) A great fall of Water over a precipice; a large Waterfall
Breaker - ) A small Water cask
Asperse - ) To sprinkle, as Water or dust, upon anybody or anything, or to besprinkle any one with a liquid or with dust
Dough - Flour or meal mixed with liquid, usually Water but sometimes olive oil as well, which is baked as bread
Bromine - In combination it is found in minute quantities in sea Water, and in many saline springs
Sherbet - ) A flavored Water ice
Ambulacrum - ) One of the radical zones of echinoderms, along which run the principal nerves, blood vessels, and Water tubes
Drouth - Dryness want of rain or of Water particularly, dryness of the weather, which affects the earth, and prevents the growth of plants aridness aridity
Manger - In ships of war, a space across the deck, within the hawse-holes, separated from the after part of the deck, to prevent the Water which enters the hawse-holes from running over the deck
Mist - Water falling in very numerous, but fine and almost imperceptible drops
Acetylene - It is a colorless gas, with a peculiar, unpleasant odor, and is produced for use as an illuminating gas in a number of ways, but chiefly by the action of Water on calcium carbide
Dashboard - ) A board placed on the fore part of a carriage, sleigh, or other vehicle, to intercept Water, mud, or snow, thrown up by the heels of the horses; - in England commonly called splashboard
Font - ) A basin or stone vessel in which Water is contained for baptizing
Dubbing - ) A dressing of flour and Water used by weavers; a mixture of oil and tallow for dressing leather; daubing
Anise - It is indigenous in Palestine, and is extensively used both in cooking and in the form of ‘dill Water’ as a domestic remedy for flatulence
Emit - ) To send forth; to throw or give out; to cause to issue; to give vent to; to eject; to discharge; as, fire emits heat and smoke; boiling Water emits steam; the sun emits light
Gad - Give the Water no passage, neither a wicked woman liberty to gad abroad
Hippopotamus - He delights in the Water, but feeds on herbage on land
Tragacanth - It comes in hard whitish or yellowish flakes or filaments, and is nearly insoluble in Water, but slowly swells into a mucilaginous mass, which is used as a substitute for gum arabic in medicine and the arts
Tansy - ) A dish common in the seventeenth century, made of eggs, sugar, rose Water, cream, and the juice of herbs, baked with butter in a shallow dish
Lycogen - ) A white, amorphous, tasteless substance resembling starch, soluble in Water to an opalescent fluid
Cormorant - Cormorant, the plunger, Leviticus 11:17; Deuteronomy 14:17, an unclean bird, like the cormorant—which is a Water-bird about the size of a goose
Genesareth - Capharnaum, where He walked on the Water (John 6), and healed the ruler's son (4), was located there
Carrying - ...
Carrying trade, the trade which consists in the transportation of goods by Water from country to country, or place to place
Mer'Ibah - [1] The name is also given to Kadesh, (Numbers 20:13,24 ; 27:14 ; 32:51) (Meribah-kadesh), because there also the people, when in want of Water, strove with God
Firmament - It is said, Genesis 1:7 , that God made the firmament in the midst of the Waters, to separate the inferior from the superior. This expansion is properly the atmosphere, which encompasses the globe on all sides, and separates the Water in the clouds from that on the earth
Lithography - The process depends, in the main, upon the antipathy between grease and Water, which prevents a printing ink containing oil from adhering to wetted parts of the stone not covered by the design
Landscape - ) A picture representing a scene by land or sea, actual or fancied, the chief subject being the general aspect of nature, as fields, hills, forests, Water
Reservoir - ) A place where anything is kept in store; especially, a place where Water is collected and kept for use when wanted, as to supply a fountain, a canal, or a city by means of aqueducts, or to drive a mill wheel, or the like
Lenticel - ) One of the small, oval, rounded spots upon the stem or branch of a plant, from which the underlying tissues may protrude or roots may issue, either in the air, or more commonly when the stem or branch is covered with Water or earth
Ships, Blessing of - It consists of prayers to be offered by the priest, supplicating God to bless the vessel and protect those who sail in it, as He protected the ark of Noe, and also Peter, when the latter was sinking in the sea; the ship is then sprinkled with holy Water
Cormorant - A Water bird about the size of a goose
Trough - The channel that conveys Water, as in mills
Jotbathah - one stage of Israel in the wilderness, "a land of torrents of Waters" (Numbers 33:33; Deuteronomy 10:7). of the head of the Elanitic gulf of the Red Sea, abounding in Water, tamarisks, and palms
Pour, Flow - 2:1), Water for washing purposes (2 Kings 3:11), and pottage for eating (2 Kings 4:41). While it is frequently used in this sense of “shedding” or “pouring out” blood, the word is commonly used of the “pouring out” of the contents of a vessel, such as Water ( Water” ( Water”; JB, “I am like Water draining away”)
Nile - Formerly this annual inundation turned Egypt into a vast lake, but in later times the Water has been distributed by a great network of canals, from which the huge basins of cultivated land into which the canals divide the country, are supplied with Water of the depth required to leave a deposit of mud to fertilize the land. The native uses his feet to regulate the flow of Water into each of the squares or basins of land, and by a dexterous movement of his toes forms or removes a tiny embankment, as may be required to admit the proper flow of Water, another common mode is to use the "shadoof," a bucket attached to a long pole hung on a pivot, balanced by a stone or a lump of clay at one end, and having the bucket on the other end. To this day the Nile is lined for hundreds of miles with these shadoofs, worked by men, women, and children, who lift the Water out of the river to Irrigate their fields. Both these methods are believed to be very ancient, and may be alluded to by Moses in contrasting the fountains and rainfalls in Palestine with the absence of this supply in Egypt: "For the land, whither thou goest in to possess it, is not as the land of Egypt, from whence ye came out, where thou sowedst thy seed, and Wateredst it with thy foot as a garden of herbs. Two of the ten plagues sent upon Pharaoh and Egypt before the departure of the Israelites were turning the Water of the Nile into blood and bringing forth frogs from the river
Exist - ) To live; to have life or the functions of vitality; as, men can not exist Water, nor fishes on land
Mass, Parochial - If it is a High Mass it is preceded by the aspersion of Water and the blessing on Sunday
Form, Sacramental - , "I baptize thee," pronounced as the minister pours Water on the head of a person
Cruse - An elongated pottery vessel about six inches tall used for holding liquids such as oil (1Kings 17:12,1Kings 17:14,1 Kings 17:16 ) or Water (1 Kings 19:6 )
Elisha - Among them: purification of Jericho's drinking Water, transformation of a single cruse of oil into many vessels' worth, resurrecting a dead child, and curing a Gentile general of leprosy
Crystal - " The ancients regarded the crystal as only pure Water congealed into extreme hardness by great length of time
Calefactory - ...
2) A hollow globe of precious metal containing hot Water, to warm the priest's fingers when administering Holy Communion in cold weather; a silver one, gilded and, carved with leaves, and weighing 9
Shalem - There is an abundant supply of Water, which may have been the reason for Jacob's settling at this place (Genesis 33:18-20 )
Dart - bole, "a stone's throw or cast," Luke 22:41 ; bolizo, "to sound" (to fathom the depth of Water), Acts 27:28
Moladah - Now Khirbet el Milh, a ruin with two wells, one dry, the other with Water at a depth of more than 40 ft
Purification - The outward purification with Water, symbolizing man's need of inward purity before admission into God's presence
Fountain Gate - A city gate at the southeast corner of the walls of ancient Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:14 ; Nehemiah 3:15 ; Nehemiah 12:37 ), probably so named because people brought Water from the En-rogel or Gihon springs into the city through this gate
Harod, the Well of - Gideon's encampment, where the 300 who drank the Water from their hands were selected
Sand - —Sand, which, however closely packed and hard, seems almost to melt at the touch of Water, is a foundation on which only a fool would build (Matthew 7:26)
Broadside - ) The side of a ship above the Water line, from the bow to the quarter
Concentration - ) The act or process of removing the dress of ore and of reducing the valuable part to smaller compass, as by currents of air or Water
Misrephoth-Maim - Suggestions include: Mishrephoth on the west (REB); “eminence of the Waters”; “hot springs”; “lime burning at the Water
Mash - To mix malt and Water together in brewing
Priming - ) The carrying over of Water, with the steam, from the boiler, as into the cylinder
Regime - ) The condition of a river with respect to the rate of its flow, as measured by the volume of Water passing different cross sections in a given time, uniform regime being the condition when the flow is equal and uniform at all the cross sections
Pap - ) A soft food for infants, made of bread boiled or softtened in milk or Water
Faucet - ) A fixture for drawing a liquid, as Water, molasses, oil, etc
Barber - ) A storm accompanied by driving ice spicules formed from sea Water, esp
Gier Eagle, - Being classed with the swan and the pelican, it has been thought to be some Water-fowl; but it is more generally considered to be the Egyptian Vulture
Volvox - ) A genus of minute, pale-green, globular, organisms, about one fiftieth of an inch in diameter, found rolling through Water, the motion being produced by minute colorless cilia
Water Bug - Many of them come out of the Water and fly about at night
Precipitation - ) A deposit on the earth of hail, mist, rain, sleet, or snow; also, the quantity of Water deposited
Wall-Eye - ) An American fresh-water food fish (Stizostedion vitreum) having large and prominent eyes; - called also glasseye, pike perch, yellow pike, and wall-eyed perch
Milk Sickness - Its origin in cattle has been variously ascribed to the presence of certain plants in their food, and to polluted Water
Motorcycle - 36) as limited to motor cars (self-propelled vehicles) designed to travel on not more than three wheels, and weighing unladen (that is, without Water, fuel, or accumulators necessary for propulsion) not more than three hundred weight (336 lbs
Thither - ) Being on the farther side from the person speaking; farther; - a correlative of hither; as, on the thither side of the Water
Malt - ) Barley or other grain, steeped in Water and dried in a kiln, thus forcing germination until the saccharine principle has been evolved
Loon - ) Any one of several aquatic, wed-footed, northern birds of the genus Urinator (formerly Colymbus), noted for their expertness in diving and swimming under Water
Rephidim - Near it was the fountain which flowed from the rock in Horeb, called "Meribah," and "Massah," whence they were miraculously supplied with Water
Syracuse - The site of Syracuse rendered it a convenient place for the African corn-ships to touch at, for the harbor was an excellent one, and the fountain Arethusa in the island furnished an unfailing supply of excellent Water
Cherith - Elijah pronounced God's judgment in the form of a two-year drought and then found God's protection at the Cherith, where he had Water to drink (1 Kings 17:3 )
Sacramental Form - , "I baptize thee," pronounced as the minister pours Water on the head of a person
Scarce - We say, Water is scarce, wheat, rye, barley is scarce, money is scarce, when the quantity is not fully adequate to the demand
Tow - To drag, as a boat or ship, through the Water by means of a rope
Jashobeam - He was the first of the three who broke through the host of the Philistines to fetch Water to David from the well of Bethlehem (2 Samuel 23:13-17 )
Siloam, the Pool of - of the temple mountain), the wall above the house of David, the Water gate, and the king's garden (compare Nehemiah 12:37 with Nehemiah 3:15). The Water passes hence by a channel cut in the rock, and covered for a short way, into the gardens below which occupy the site of "the lower pool" or "the king's pool" (Nehemiah 2:14). From this artificial cave at the west end of Siloam an open channel in the rock conveys the Water into Siloam. From Siloam he brought the Water to be poured over the sacrifice in memory of the Water at Rephidim. Messiah "the sent One" (Luke 4:18; John 10:36) answers to the type Siloam the sent Water (Job 5:10; Ezekiel 31:4) that healed; He flows gently, softly, and healing, like Siloam fertilising and beautifying, not turbid as the winter torrent Kedron, nor sweeping destructively all before it as Euphrates (symbol of Αssyria) , but gliding on in its silent mission of beneficence (Isaiah 8:6; Isaiah 42:1-4; Isaiah 40:11; 2 Corinthians 10:1). Siloam was called so from sending its Waters to refresh the gardens below, still the greenest spot about Jerusalem, and abounding in olives, figs, and pomegranates. The Water for the ashes of the red heifer also was taken from Siloam (Dach Τalm. Into Siloam probably Hezekiah led by a subterranean aqueduct down the Tyropoeon valley the Waters on the other side of the city when "he stopped the upper Watercourse of Gihon and brought it straight down to the W
Parched Ground - In Isaiah 35:7 , translated by Lowth "the glowing sand," by Henderson "the vapory illusion," and in German sand-mer and wasserschein, sand-sea and Water-show, is understood to refer to the mirage, an optical illusion described by almost all travelers in tropical deserts. The inexperienced wanderer sees at a distance what he thinks is an beautiful sheet of Water; and imagination clothes the farther shore with herbage, shrubbery, buildings, etc. He answered, that Water had all at once appeared there; that he saw the motion of the waves, and tall palms and other trees bending up and down over them, as if tossed by a strong wind. It was, as my friend had reported, a broad sheet of Water, with fresh green trees along its banks; and yet there was nothing actually before us but parched yellow sand. Never had I seen any landscape so vivid as this seeming one; never Water so bright or trees so softly green, so tall and stately. " ...
The same phenomenon may be alluded to in the expression, "waters that fail," Jeremiah 15:18 . The Savior and his proffered blessings are not, like earthly hopes, a deception and a mockery, but true Waters of eternal life
Elim - The Water is in most seasons good, and even the best on the journey from Cairo to Sinai. "natural springs") and 70 palmtrees, and encamped by the Waters; their stage next after Marah, now Huwara. Israel stayed here a long time; for they did not reach the wilderness until two and a half months after leaving Suez, finding Water and pasture abundant in the intermediate district
River (2) - ), ‘flood’ (Matthew 7:25), ‘stream’ (Luke 6:48), and ‘waters’ (2 Corinthians 11:26) stand for the same Greek word ποταμός. From Revelation 12:15-16 we gather that ποταμός may signify any great volume of Water rolling over the land. ...
To one reared in Palestine, where only Water is required to turn the wilderness into a garden, a river, with its beautifying and fertilizing power, might well seem an apt symbol of life (Revelation 22:1-2)
Distill - The clouds distill Water on the earth. To extract the pure part of a fluid as, to distill Water
Jealousy - The law of the ‘jealousy ordeal’ (in which a wife suspected of unfaithfulness had to prove her innocence by drinking the Water of bitterness [1]) is found in Numbers 5:11-31
Geliloth - " Its derivation is gaalal "to roll"; like the Scotch "links," meaning both the windings of the stream (Geliloth is near the Jordan) and the coasts; whereas Ciccar is the circle of vegetation or dwellings round the bends of the Water. They always occur near Water, and in alluvial clay plains, as in the clay lands between Succoth and Zarthan, where Solomon east his temple brasswork
Drink - The Holy Spirit is the "Living Water. We therefore drink Him into our souls as the Living Water, and as the Lord JESUS requests us to do
Drink - ) To swallow (a liquid); to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; to imbibe; as, to drink milk or Water. ) Liquid to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach for quenching thirst or for other purposes, as Water, coffee, or decoctions
Pool - Reservoir for Water, whether supplied by springs or rain (Isaiah 42:15). The three pools of Solomon near Bethlehem are famous, and still supply Jerusalem with Water by an aqueduct (Ecclesiastes 2:6)
me'Rom - (high place ) , The Waters of, a lake formed by the river Jordan, about ten miles north of the Sea of Galilee. ( Joshua 11:5,7 ) It is a remarkable fact that though by common consent "the Waters of Merom" are identified with the lake thorough which the Jordan runs between Banias and the Sea of Galilee --the Bahr el-Huleh of the modern Arabs-- Yet that identity cannot be proved by any ancient record. The Water is clear and sweet; it is covered in parts by a broad-leaved plant, and abounds in Water-fowl
Float - ) The hollow, metallic ball of a self-acting faucet, which floats upon the Water in a cistern or boiler. ) A contrivance for affording a copious stream of Water to the heated surface of an object of large bulk, as an anvil or die. ) To move quietly or gently on the Water, as a raft; to drift along; to move or glide without effort or impulse on the surface of a fluid, or through the air. ) To flood; to overflow; to cover with Water
Cat's-Paw - ) A light transitory air which ruffles the surface of the Water during a calm, or the ripples made by such a puff of air
Raining - ) A small European fresh-water fish (Leuciscus vulgaris); - called also dobule, and dace
Lotus Trees - ]'>[4] , dâl , the ‘dom -tree,’ and must not he confused with the Egyptian Water-lilies
Candle, Paschal - A large candle, symbolic of the Risen Saviour, the Light of the World which is blessed at the service on Holy Saturday, is used that day in the blessing of the baptismal Water, and is lighted on the Gospel side of the sanctuary during solemn services during the paschal season
Well - A "beer" was a deep shaft, bored far under the rocky surface by the art of man, which contained Water which percolated through the strata in its sides
Melon - The Arabs call the Water melon (Cucumis citrullus ) batech
Metheg-Ammah - ” Other suggestions for translation include: “bridle of the Water channel,” reins of the forearm,” “control of the mother city,” “take the common land,” or “wrest supremacy from
Pit - A hole in the ground (Exodus 21:33,34 ), a cistern for Water (Genesis 37:24 ; Jeremiah 14:3 ), a vault (41:9), a grave (Psalm 30:3 )
Appetency - ) Specifically: An instinctive inclination or propensity in animals to perform certain actions, as in the young to suck, in aquatic fowls to enter into Water and to swim; the tendency of an organized body to seek what satisfies the wants of its organism
Cana - ” In John 2:1 , the town that was the scene of a wedding during which Jesus changed Water into wine
Dirty - Not clean not pure turbid as dirty Water
Fin Keel - Its use is to ballast the boat and also to enable her to sail close to the wind and to make the least possible leeway by offering great resistance to lateral motion through the Water
Easement - ) A liberty, privilege, or advantage, which one proprietor has in the estate of another proprietor, distinct from the ownership of the soil, as a way, Water course, etc
Hammerhead - ) A fresh-water fish; the stone-roller
Accumulator - ) An apparatus by means of which energy or power can be stored, such as the cylinder or tank for storing Water for hydraulic elevators, the secondary or storage battery used for accumulating the energy of electrical charges, etc
Evaporation - ) The process by which any substance is converted from a liquid state into, and carried off in, vapor; as, the evaporation of Water, of ether, of camphor
Cormorant - It dashes down upon its prey, and can follow it in the Water or dive after it if it descends
Cowl - ) A vessel carried on a pole between two persons, for conveyance of Water
Ampulla - ) A cruet for the wine and Water at Mass
Aenon - The biblical text indicates that Aenon was a place richly endowed with Water near Salim, which precise location is unknown
Font - ...
A large basin or stone vessel in which Water is contained for baptizing children or other persons in the church
Ullet - ) A channel for Water
Rockfish - ) An American fresh-water darter; the log perch
Roove - ) A furrow, channel, or long hollow, such as may be formed by cutting, molding, grinding, the wearing force of flowing Water, or constant travel; a depressed way; a worn path; a rut
Tossing - ) A process which consists in washing ores by violent agitation in Water, in order to separate the lighter or earhy particles; - called also tozing, and treloobing, in Cornwall
Eucharistic Elements - These are bread and wine mixed with a little Water
Ullet - ) A channel for Water
Raining - ) A small European fresh-water fish (Leuciscus vulgaris); - called also dobule, and dace
Salad - ) A preparation of vegetables, as lettuce, celery, Water cress, onions, etc
Launder - ) A trough used by miners to receive the powdered ore from the box where it is beaten, or for carrying Water to the stamps, or other apparatus, for comminuting, or sorting, the ore
Lather - ) Foam or froth made by soap moistened with Water
Rephidim - An encampment of the Israelites between the wilderness of Sin and mount Sinai, where the people murmured, and God gave them Water from the rock
Elements, Eucharistic - These are bread and wine mixed with a little Water
Vale - A little trough or canal as a pump vale to carry off the Water from a ship's pump
e'Tam - (2 Chronicles 11:6 ) Here, according to the statements of Josephus and the Talmudists, were the sources of the Water from which Solomon's gardens and the pleasure-grounds were fed, and Bethlehem and the temple supplied
e'Lim - A few palm trees still remain, and the Water is excellent
Ablutions - A term used to designate the ceremonial washing of thesacred vessels after Holy Communion, with wine and Water which arereverently consumed by the Priest
Waterpot - WATERPOT (ὑδρία, freq. The stone Waterpots (כְּלֵי אֲבָנִים in Rabbinic writings) were placed outside the reception-room, for the washing of the hands before and after eating, as well as of the vessels used (cf. John (37, 38), that it was not the Water in those vessels that was changed into wine, but the Water which the servants drew from the source after having filled the vessels, has commended itself to many students of the Gospels. ) ‘It is unlikely that Water taken from vessels of purification should have been employed for the purpose of the miracle. ’ This argument holds good even supposing that the vessels had already been partially or wholly emptied by pouring Water on the hands of the guests (Plummer, in loc. , are perhaps most naturally understood to mean that the same action of drawing Water from the source was to be carried on as before, but that the Water so drawn was now to have a different destination. In like manner John 2:9 seems to imply that the servants who had drawn the Water had borne it, in obedience to Jesus’ word, straight from the source to the ruler of the feast. ) Though it would be hazardous to say that the words οἱ ἠντληκότες τὸ ὕδωρ in John 2:9 render it probable that ὕδωρ (also from the source) is to be understood after ἀντλήσατε in John 2:8, it may yet be stated that ἀντλεῖν is frequently used of the drawing of Water (cf. The turning of the Water into wine was a σημεῖον by which Jesus manifested His glory. The filling of the vessels with Water was part of the ‘sign,’ and pointed to the fulfilling of the Law (cf. It had reached its high-water mark, if we may so speak. The vessels were filled and then left as they stood, while the Water which the servants, in obedience to Jesus’ word, drew from the source was carried past them and delivered to the ruler of the feast, who on tasting it said to the bridegroom, ‘Thou hast kept the good wine until now. The Waterpot of the woman of Samaria was one of those Jars of sun-dried clay which are still in use in the East, and which are carried upon the head or on the shoulder (Encyc. 187–188, who calls attention to the word garrah or jarrah for a Water-pitcher, from which our word ‘jar’ is derived). Her leaving her Waterpot was not, as some say, because her faith in Christ made her forget the purpose for which she had originally come, but because it impelled her to announce her discovery of Him to others without delay; and in her haste to return to Sychar with the news, she did not choose to be encumbered with her heavy Waterpot, which could be fetched at any time
Baptism - The plural" baptisms" is used in the wider sense, all purifications by Water; as of the priest's hands and feet in the laver outside before entering the tabernacle, in the daily service (Exodus 30:17-21); of the high priest's flesh in the holy place on the day of atonement (Leviticus 16:23); of persons ceremonially unclean (Leviticus 14; 15; Leviticus 16:26-28; Leviticus 17:15; Leviticus 22:4-6), a leper, one with an issue, one who ate that which died of itself, one who touched a dead body, the one who let go the scape-goat or buried the ashes of the red heifer, of the people before a religious festival (Exodus 19:10; John 11:55). John's was with Water only; Christ's with the Holy Spirit and with fire (Luke 3:16). This is the sense of 1 John 5:6; "this is He that came by Water and blood;" by Water at His consecration by baptism to His mediatorial ministry for us, when He received the Father's testimony to His Messiahship and His divine Sonship (John 1:33-34). Corresponding to His is our baptism of Water and the Spirit, the seal of initiatory incorporation with Him (John 3:5). His coming "by Water and blood," as vividly set forth in the issue of Water and blood from His pierced side, was seen and solemnly attested by John (John 19:34-35). John Baptist came only baptizing with Water; therefore was not Messiah. Jesus came, undergoing Himself the double baptism of Water and blood, then baptizing us with the Spirit cleansing, of which Water is the sacramental seal, and with His atoning blood once for all shed and of perpetual efficacy; therefore He Messiah. It is His shed blood which gives Water baptism its spiritual significancy. ...
"The Spirit, the Water, and the blood agree in one" (Greek: "tend to the one result," "testify to the one truth"), i. , agree in testifying to Jesus' Sonship and Messiaship by the sacramental grace in Water baptism received by the penitent believer through His droning blood and His inwardly witnessing Spirit (1 John 5:5-6; 1 John 5:8; 1 John 5:10), answering to the testimony to Jesus' Sonship and Messiahship by His baptism, by His crucifixion, and by the Spirit's manifestation in Him. By Christ's baptism, by His blood shedding, and by the Spirit's past and present working in Him, the Spirit, the Water, and the blood are the threefold witness to His divine Messiahship. Any spiritualizing that denies outward baptism with Water, in the face of Christ's command and the apostles' practice, must logically lead to rationalistic evasions of Scripture in general. Thus 1 Peter 3:21, literally "which Water, being antitype (to the Water of the flood) is now saving (puts in a state of salvation) us also (as well as Noah), to wit, baptism. "...
It saves us also, not of itself (any more than the Water saved Noah of itself; the Water saved him only by sustaining the ark, built in faith), but the spiritual thing conjoined with it, repentance and faith, of which it is the seal: as Peter proceeds to explain, "not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God (the instrument whereby it so saves, being) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ" (Colossians 2:12; Ephesians 1:19-20); not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but of the soul. Water baptism can put away that filth, but the Spirit's baptism alone can put away this (Ephesians 2:11). The ark (Christ) and His Spirit-filled true church saves, by living union with Him and it; not the Water which only flowed round the ark and buoyed it up, and which so far from saving was the very instrument of destroying the ungodly. hence it is written, "they were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea" (the sea, according to some of the fathers, representing the Water, the cloud the Spirit). in connection with the laying on of hands (Acts 2:38; Acts 10:47; Acts 19:5-6); proving that the Water sign and the Spirit are not inseparably connected. At the same time, there being but one preposition to govern both nouns, "born of Water and the Spirit" implies the designed close connection of the two in the case of penitent believers (John 3:5). In Ephesians 5:26 "Christ gave Himself for the church, that He might sanctify and cleanse it with the laver (Greek) of Water by the word
Drink - Palestine lacks fresh Water rivers and lakes and its dependence upon rain after its yearly hot, dry period makes drought an ongoing possibility. In view of frequently occurring shortages of Water, thirst and drinking are of particular significance in the Scriptures. ...
The phrases "drink from your river of delights" (Psalm 36:8 ) and "spring of living Water" (Jeremiah 2:13 ) may well be sources of the title "river of the Water of life" that flows from the temple of God, creating so many joys (Ezekiel 47:1-12 ; Revelation 22:1-2 ). ...
In the New Testament Christ invites people to drink the Water that will "become in him a spring of Water welling up to eternal life" (John 4:14 ). While the Water here is designated as eternal life, in John 7:38-39 the drinking of "living Water" is related to the Spirit who would be given after Christ was glorified. "The Spirit and the bride say, Come!' And let him who hears say, Come!' Whoever is thirsty, let him come; and whoever wishes, let him take the free gift of the Water of life" ( Revelation 22:17 ; cf. This drinking of the Water of life is parallel to eating the bread of life (John 6:27,50-51 ). ...
Even the Water that David's mighty men had obtained from the well at Bethlehem at dire risk to their lives was viewed so dearly by David that he would not drink it but poured it out as an offering to God (2 Samuel 23:13-17 ). However in Jeremiah 8:14 ; 9:14 , and 23:15, God is said to give poisoned Water to his own people, referring to the bitter punishment they are being called to bear. "To drink Water from one's own cistern" means to ensure that your wife is the source of your sexual pleasure, as Water refreshes a thirsty man (Proverbs 5:15 )
Behemoth - ) The Egyptian, Coptic, pehemout , "the Water ox," Hebraized; our "river horse", hippopotamus. " Yet how great the difference! "He eateth grass as an ox;" a marvel in an animal so much in the Water, and that such a monster is not carnivorous. " "Behold (though) a river be overwhelming, he is not in hasty panic (for he can live in Water as well as land); he is secure, though a Jordan swell up to his mouth
Euphrates - ]'>[1] Purat , which is itself taken from the Sumerian Pura , ‘water,’ or Pura-nun , ‘the great Water. The alluvial plain between the Euphrates and the Tigris constituted Babylonia, the Water of the annual inundation (which took place in May, and was caused by the melting of the snows in Armenia) being regulated by means of canals and barrages
Turbine - ) A form of steam engine analogous in construction and action to the Water turbine. ) A Water wheel, commonly horizontal, variously constructed, but usually having a series of curved floats or buckets, against which the Water acts by its impulse or reaction in flowing either outward from a central chamber, inward from an external casing, or from above downward, etc
Egypt, Land of - As to rain the country differs materially from Palestine, which "drinketh Water of the rain of heaven;" for in Egypt, except by the sea-coast, it rarely rains, the land being Watered from the river, which rises once a year, overflowing its banks in many places, and, as it retires, leaving a rich sediment on the soil. Canals convey the Water to more distant parts. The land is Watered 'by the foot,' that is, by removing the soil, and letting the Water flow
Nile - It bore most of the internal traffic of Egypt; but it was pre-eminently the one source of Water, and so of life and fertility, in a land which, without it, would have been desert. The Waters of these tributaries are charged with organic matter washed down by the floods, and this is spread over the fields of Egypt by the inundation. The crops were sown as the Water retreated, and on the lower ground a second crop was obtained by artificial irrigation . Canals and embankments regulated the Waters in ancient times. The Water was raised for the irrigation of the fields by shadûfs , i. Water-wheels were probably introduced in Greek times. In modern days, vast dams to store the Water against the time of low Nile, and steam pumps (in Lower Egypt) to raise it, have changed the aspect of high Nile and revolutionized the system of irrigation; but for the smaller operations the old methods are still practised. bringing offerings to the gods; the figure is that of an obese man with Water-plants on his head
Meadow - ha'ahu (Genesis 41:2,18 ), probably an Egyptain word transferred to the Hebrew; some kind of reed or Water-plant
Toad - Toads are generally terrestrial in their habits except during the breeding season, when they seek the Water
Davy, Humphry, Sir - Experimented with nitrous oxide (laughing gas) and discovered and described its effect on the human system, made researches on marsh gas which led to the invention of his safety lamp, made investigations with the electrolysis of Water which resulted in his identification of affinity with electricity, decomposed alkalis by electricity, definitely established the fact that alkaline earths were compounds, and discovered that oxymuriatic acid (chlorine) was an element
Font, Baptismal - An ornamental receptacle (vase, basin), made of stone, metal, or wood, for holding baptismal Water used in solemn administration of the sacrament
Dalmanutha - end of the plain of Gennesaret, near the Water
Kedron - " The word means "black," and may refer to the colour of the Water or the gloom of the ravine, or the black green of the cedars which grew there
Ahava - Water, the river (Ezra 8:21 ) by the banks of which the Jewish exiles assembled under Ezra when about to return to Jerusalem from Babylon
Brim - ) The edge or margin, as of a fountain, or of the Water contained in it; the brink; border
Region Round About - Genesis 13:10-12, "cities of the circuit" round Jordan, the low plain along the Water (Genesis 19:17)
Cyclops - ) A genus of minute Entomostraca, found both in fresh and salt Water
Auricula - ) A genus of air-breathing mollusks mostly found near the sea, where the Water is brackish...
Alkali - ) One of a class of caustic bases, such as soda, potash, ammonia, and lithia, whose distinguishing peculiarities are solubility in alcohol and Water, uniting with oils and fats to form soap, neutralizing and forming salts with acids, turning to brown several vegetable yellows, and changing reddened litmus to blue. ) Soluble mineral matter, other than common salt, contained in soils of natural Waters
Arrival - ) The act of arriving, or coming; the act of reaching a place from a distance, whether by Water (as in its original sense) or by land
Marah - There was at Marah a spring of bitter Water, sweetened subsequently by the casting in of a tree which "the Lord showed" to Moses
Miriam - In her merit the Israelites were miraculously provided with Water in the desert
Zoheleth, Stone of -  ...
mazchelah ), from its nearness to the rock conduits that poured into Siloam; Bochart from zohel "a slow motion," the fullers here pressing out the Water dropping from the clothes which they had washed in the well Rogel, as they do to the present day
Fluent - ) A current of Water; a stream
Floss - ) A small stream of Water
Furring - ) A deposit from Water, as on the inside of a boiler; also, the operation of cleaning away this deposit
Carp - ) A fresh-water herbivorous fish (Cyprinus carpio
Baptismal Font - An ornamental receptacle (vase, basin), made of stone, metal, or wood, for holding baptismal Water used in solemn administration of the sacrament
Tears - The Lord intends for us to drink the Water of Life, and not be drinking tears of sorrow
Vicious - ) Wanting purity; foul; bad; noxious; as, vicious air, Water, etc
Pome - ) A ball of silver or other metal, which is filled with hot Water, and used by the priest in cold weather to warm his hands during the service
Oldfinch - The front of the head and throat are bright red; the nape, with part of the wings and tail, black; - called also goldspink, goldie, fool's coat, drawbird, draw-water, thistle finch, and sweet William
River - ) A large stream of Water flowing in a bed or channel and emptying into the ocean, a sea, a lake, or another stream; a stream larger than a rivulet or brook
Compress - ) To press or squeeze together; to force into a narrower compass; to reduce the volume of by pressure; to compact; to condense; as, to compress air or Water
Isle - The radical sense of the Hebrew word seems to be "habitable places," as opposed to Water, and in this sense it occurs in (Isaiah 42:15 ) Hence it means secondarily any maritime district, whether belonging to a continent or to an island; thus it is used of the shore of the Mediterranean, (Isaiah 20:6 ; 23:2,6 ) and of the coasts of Elishah, (Ezekiel 27:7 ) i
Saline - ) A salt spring; a place where salt Water is collected in the earth
Lue - When gently heated with Water, it becomes viscid and tenaceous, and is used as a cement for uniting substances
Bulrush - (or papyrus), a red growing in the shallow Water on the banks of the Nile
e'Non - (John 3:22 ) with John 3:26 and with John 1:28 And abounded in Water
Undressed Cloth - The present custom in Syria is to dip the cloth in Water, and lay it out on a flat surface of rock. It is then sprinkled with natrûn (lye) or kali (soap), and beaten with rods or clubs, and is finally rinsed in fresh Water and spread out under the sun to dry. The wool was further purified in several changes of Water containing the lye or soap already mentioned, and was finally rinsed in running Water. To remove this, the silk fibre had to be kept for several hours in a bath of hot Water containing soap made of olive oil and alkali salt. The raw silk was then transferred for a short time to a bath of Water in which dog or pigeon dung had been mixed, and, as in the case of the other materials, the last stage was a thorough washing in pure Water
Baptism - The Water is not put on the person, but contrariwise the person is always put in the Water. ...
Luke 7:29-30 (b) A type of burial wherein the believer accepts GOD's condemnation of himself, admits that he had to die at Calvary, and therefore should be buried out of sight in a Watery grave. He had already been baptized by John in the Water. "...
1 Corinthians 10:2 (b) This is the baptism accomplished in the Red Sea when the walls of Water on each side, and the cloud above hid Israel from the sight of the Egyptians. The Christian emerges from the Watery grave to bear witness and testimony that he is "alive unto God" and is walking with Him. ...
1 Peter 3:21 (a) We should note in this case that Noah and his family were not in the Water at all. " Those who stayed out of the Water were saved by the ark which was in the Water
Laver - ), a basin for the Water used by the priests in their ablutions. It contained Water wherewith the priests washed their hands and feet when they entered the tabernacle (40:32)
Lourdes, France - Numerous and well-attested cures have been made by bathing in the Water or by merely visiting the shrine and especially by the Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. The Water of the spring has been found by analysis to contain no curative properties
Pelican - Being a Water bird, it could not live in a place destitute of Water
Ark - The form of the Ark was an oblong, with a flat bottom, and a sloped roof, raised to a cubit in the middle; it had neither sails nor rudder; nor was it sharp at the ends for cutting the Water. This form was admirably calculated to make it lie steady on the Water, without rolling, which might have endangered the lives of the animals within
Dead Sea - An inland lake 47 miles long and from 2¾ to 9 miles in breadth, which receives the Waters of the Jordan. below that of the Mediterranean, being the lowest body of Water on the surface of the earth. It has no outlet, and the Water received by it is all carried off by evaporation. In consequence, the Waters of the Lake are impregnated with mineral substances to a remarkable degree; they yield 25 per cent. ...
The modern name is of late origin (first used apparently by Pausanias) and refers to the total absence of life in its Waters. Somewhere near the sea were Sodom and Gomorrah , but whether north or south of it is not settled; the one certain fact about their sites is that the popular belief that they are covered by the Waters of the Lake is quite inadmissible. ...
Round the border of the Lake are numerous small springs, some bursting actually under its Waters, others forming lagoons of comparatively brackish Water (as at ‘Ain Feshkhah on the western side). In these lagoons various specimens of small fish are to be found; but in the main body of the Water itself life of any kind is impossible
Radiator - ) Any of various devices for cooling an internal substance by radiation, as a system og rings on a gun barrel for cooling it, or a nest of tubes with large radiating surface for cooling circulating Water, as in an automobile
Eliezer ben hyrcanus, rabbi - (Circa 45-117 BCE) Mishnaic sage, studied under Rabbi Johanan ben Zakkai, who compared his memory to a �cemented pit, which loses not one drop of Water
Karkaa - " Karkaa is a level expanse, the receptacle of a large body of Water. the Waters of wady el Kureiyeh and its tributaries
Cuckoo - From a root "to be slender", "light of body" like a gull, whose body is small compared with its apparent size and outspread wings; it skims the waves, seeking its food in the agitated Water
Poison - Poisoned Water pictured God's judgment on sin ( Jeremiah 8:14 )
Hashmonah - of the Arabah, is a pool still of sweet living Water, surrounded by verdure, and with traces of ruins (Robinson, Biblical Research, 2:119)
Blowhole - ) A cavern in a cliff, at the Water level, opening to the air at its farther extremity, so that the Waters rush in with each surge and rise in a lofty jet from the extremity
Ampere - system of electro-magnetic units, or the practical equivalent of the unvarying current which, when passed through a standard solution of nitrate of silver in Water, deposits silver at the rate of 0
Drawer - One who draws or pulls one who takes Water from a well one who draws liquors from a cask
Horseleech - Leeches are abundant in Palestine, and the horseleech may simply refer to a large species that would settle on a horse's foot if placed in the Water where they abound
Preacher: Must Feed the People - Fromthe deck of an Austrian gunboat we threw into the Lago Garda a succession of little pieces of bread, and presently small fishes came in shoals, till there seemed to be, as the old proverb puts it, more fish than Water
Pitcher - ) A wide-mouthed, deep vessel for holding liquids, with a spout or protruding lip and a handle; a Water jug or jar with a large ear or handle
Displacement - ) The quantity of anything, as Water, displaced by a floating body, as by a ship, the weight of the displaced liquid being equal to that of the displacing body
Dirty - ) Defiled with dirt; foul; nasty; filthy; not clean or pure; serving to defile; as, dirty hands; dirty Water; a dirty white
Foment - ) To apply a warm lotion to; to bathe with a cloth or sponge wet with warm Water or medicated liquid
Ashdothpisgah - This is once translated 'springs of Pisgah,' pointing it out as a place from whence Water issued, being the sides of the mountain called Pisgah, or it may apply to the range of mountains on the east of the Dead Sea, of which Pisgah was a part
Cribbing - ) A framework of timbers and plank backing for a shaft lining, to prevent caving, percolation of Water, etc
Effusion - ) The act of pouring out; as, effusion of Water, of blood, of grace, of words, and the like
Expend - ) To lay out, apply, or employ in any way; to consume by use; to use up or distribute, either in payment or in donations; to spend; as, they expend money for food or in charity; to expend time labor, and thought; to expend hay in feeding cattle, oil in a lamp, Water in mechanical operations
Gallery - ' It is translated 'gutters ' in Genesis 30:38,41 , and 'troughs' in Exodus 2:16 , in which Water was collected for the cattle
Libation - Sometimes other liquids have been used, as oil, milk, Water, honey, but mostly wine
Torpedo Tube - A tube fixed below or near the Water line through which a torpedo is fired, usually by a small charge of gunpowder
um Ammoniac - It is inflammable, partially soluble in Water and in spirit of wine, and is used in medicine as an expectorant and resolvent, and for the formation of certain plasters
Weatherboard - ) A piece of plank placed in a porthole, or other opening, to keep out Water
Overnor - ) A contrivance applied to steam engines, Water wheels, and other machinery, to maintain nearly uniform speed when the resistances and motive force are variable
Transpiration - ) The evaporation of Water, or exhalation of aqueous vapor, from cells and masses of tissue
Whim - ) A large capstan or vertical drum turned by horse power or steam power, for raising ore or Water, etc
Alexander i, Saint, Pope - As commemorated in the ninth lesson of Nocturn for his feast, he inserted in the Canon of the Mass the words commemorative of the institution of the Eucharist beginning "Qui pridie," introduced the use of holy Water for blessing Christian homes, and suffered martyrdom
Lake - ) A large body of Water contained in a depression of the earth's surface, and supplied from the drainage of a more or less extended area
Clay - Clay consisted of various types of dirt or sand combined with Water to form a material which could be molded into bricks for building, sculptures, pottery, toys, or writing tablets
Zin - It formed part of the great wilderness of Paran, Numbers 13:26 ; and in its north-east corner was Kadesh-barnea, memorable for the death of Miriam, the mission of the twelve spies into Canaan, the murmuring of the Israelites, the rock flowing with Water, and the unholy passion of Moses, Numbers 13:21 20:1-13 27:14
Pit - A reservoir, either natural or artificial, for Water
Ooze - Water oozes from the earth and through a filter
Peleg - Its reference may be geographical, or racial, or, as the word means ordinarily ‘a Water-course,’ it may denote a land cut up by streams
Pool - Pools, like the tanks of India, are in many parts of Palestine and Syria the only resource for Water during the dry season, and the failure of them involves drought and calamity
Rephidim - Here Israel first suffered from want of Water, and here they defeated Amalek. is a plain without Water, Israel's encampment. of the pass is another plain, Amalek's encampment, within reach of abundant Water. " It was after receiving the Water supply at Rephidim from God that Israel conquered Amalek. ...
So it is only after the Christian receives the living Water front Christ the smitten Rock that he can effectively conquer his spiritual foes (1 John 5:4)
Achsa, Achsah - At her request for springs of Water Caleb gave her the upper springs and the nether springs for the quickening of dry ground
Camaldolites - On Sundays and Thursdays they fed on herbs, and the rest of the week only on bread and Water
Immersion - (Latin: immergere) ...
The act of dipping or plunging the subject into the Water used in the administration of Baptism; called triple or trine immersion when the candidate is dipped three times, in the name of each Person of the Holy Trinity
Rue - In the middle ages the priests used bunches of rue wherewith to sprinkle holy Water, from whence Shakespeare uses the term "herb of grace" (Rich
Benediction - , are blessed with holy Water, and formally dedicated to God
Stork - They eat fish and an assortment of animals that live around Water
Sprinkle - Sprinkle, namely, with blood to atone for guilt, as the high priest did (Leviticus 4:6; Leviticus 16:14; Leviticus 16:19), or with Water for purifying (Numbers 19:18-21; Acts 2:33)
Zalmonah - of Petra, one of the largest villages on the Meeca route, abounding in Water and vineyards; where Israel, as pilgrims in our days, might traffic for provisions
Purity - ) freedom from foreign admixture or deleterious matter; as, the purity of Water, of wine, of drugs, of metals
Oil - ) Any one of a great variety of unctuous combustible substances, not miscible with Water; as, olive oil, whale oil, rock oil, etc
Melons, - The common melon in the East is the cucumis melo , and the Water melon the cucurbita citrullus
Moss - , and a few in running Water
Moulder - ) To crumble into small particles; to turn to dust by natural decay; to lose form, or waste away, by a gradual separation of the component particles, without the presence of Water; to crumble away
Muddy - ) Turbid with mud; as, muddy Water
Brook - A small natural stream of Water, or a current flowing from a spring or fountain less than a river
Mussel - ) Any one of numerous species of Unio, and related fresh-water genera; - called also river mussel
Kennel - ) The Water course of a street; a little canal or channel; a gutter; also, a puddle
Mush - Indian meal) boiled in Water; hasty pudding; supawn
Bethesda - Bethesda (be-thĕs-dah), house of mercy, or flowing Water
Rare - Water is nineteen times lighter and by consequence nineteen times rarer than gold
Upper - ...
Upper-works, in a ship, the parts above Water when the ship is properly balanced for a voyage or that part which is above the main wale
Rose - Roses are greatly prized in the East, more especially for the sake of the rose-water, which is much request
Bason - ]'>[1] (νιπτήρ only in John 13:5 εἶτα βάλλει ὕδωρ εἰς τὸν νιπτῆρα: Vulgate deinde mittit aquam in pelvim: Authorized Version ‘after that he poureth Water into a bason’: Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘then he poureth Water into the bason’). ...
The Eastern mode of washing either hands or feet, when performed by an attendant, seems to have been always by the attendant pouring Water on the member, not by dipping the member in the Water. 2 Kings 3:11 ‘Elisha the son of Shaphat, which poured Water on the hands of Elijah. ...
‘The Hebrews were accustomed to wash their hands in the manner which is now universal in the East, and which, whatever may be thought of its convenience, is unquestionably more refreshing and cleanly than washing in the Water as it stands in a basin—which is a process regarded by Orientals with great disgust. The hands are therefore held over a basin, the use of which is only to receive the Water which has been poured upon the hands from the jug or ewer which is held above them. ...
(1) The incident of the sinful woman who wept over our Lord’s feet, and wiped them with the hairs of her head (Luke 7:37-38), is much better explained by comparing her action with that of the host or his servant pouring Water on a guest’s feet, than by supposing that the guest immersed his feet in a footbath (Luke 7:44). 257b) shows that ‘affusion, pouring on’ of Water, was probably meant in many cases where we read ‘bathe’ or ‘wash. 331) says: ‘In the East, the basin, which, as well as the ewer, is usually of tinned copper, has commonly a sort of cover, rising in the middle, and sunk into the basin at the margin, which, being pierced with holes, allows the Water to pass through, thus concealing it after being defiled by use. The former of these has a cover pierced with holes, with a raised receptacle for the soap in the middle; and the Water being poured upon the hands, passes through this cover into the space below, so that when the basin is brought to a second person the Water with which the former one has washed is not seen. The ibreeq (Syrian and Egyptian Arabic) is a Water-jug, with a spout for the Water to come through like a coffee-pot, from which the Water is poured on the hands or feet, which are held over the basin
Siloam, Pool of - The Water which flows into this pool intermittingly by a subterranean channel springs from the "Fountain of the Virgin" (q. The Water passes from it by a channel cut in the rock into the gardens below. ) ...
Many years ago (1880) a youth, while wading up the conduit by which the Water enters the pool, accidentally discovered an inscription cut in the rock, on the eastern side, about 19 feet from the pool
Bail - ) To dip or lade Water from; - often with out to express completeness; as, to bail a boat. ) To lade; to dip and throw; - usually with out; as, to bail Water out of a boat. ) A bucket or scoop used in bailing Water out of a boat
Pool - ) A small and rather deep collection of (usually) fresh Water, as one supplied by a spring, or occurring in the course of a stream; a reservoir for Water; as, the pools of Solomon. ) A small body of standing or stagnant Water; a puddle
Wave - ) Something resembling or likened to a Water wave, as in rising unusually high, in being of unusual extent, or in progressive motion; a swelling or excitement, as of feeling or energy; a tide; flood; period of intensity, usual activity, or the like; as, a wave of enthusiasm. ) Water; a body of Water. ) The undulating line or streak of luster on cloth Watered, or calendered, or on damask steel
Whirlwind - Passing over the sea, it draws up the Water, and the bursting of the column causes the Water-spout
Eucharist - As to the manner of celebrating the eucharist among the ancient Christians, after the customary oblations were made, the deacon brought Water to the bishops and presbyters standing round the table to wash their hands; according to that passage of the Psalmist, "I will wash my hands in innocency, and so will I compass thy altar, O Lord. The sacramental wine was usually diluted or mixed with Water
Streets - Larger towns constructed drainage canals beneath city streets, some to carry away waste Water and others to trap the run off from winter rains which was channeled into cisterns. Drains below the pavement carried away sewage and rain Water
Pot - Job 41:20 (c) This animal, the whale, or some other great sea monster blowing the Water from the head in some form, is likened to the boiling pot. ...
John 4:28 (c) This may be used as a type of earthly desires and preparations for earthly pleasures which are laid aside as of no further use when the soul trusts CHRIST and is satisfied with the Water of life
Exhaust - ) To subject to the action of various solvents in order to remove all soluble substances or extractives; as, to exhaust a drug successively with Water, alcohol, and ether. ) To draw or let out wholly; to drain off completely; as, to exhaust the Water of a well; the moisture of the earth is exhausted by evaporation
Troll - ) To fish with a rod whose line runs on a reel; also, to fish by drawing the hook through the Water. ) To angle for with a trolling line, or with a book drawn along the surface of the Water; hence, to allure
Kedron - Like the Ilissus, it is dry at least nine months in the year; its bed is narrow and deep, which indicates that it must formerly have been the channel for Waters that have found some other and probably subterranean course. There is now no Water in it, except after heavy rains. Stephen; and they say, that when there is Water, unless the torrent swells much, which very rarely occurs, it all runs under ground to the north of this bridge
Sick, Communion of the - The sick chamber should be neatly arranged and near the bed a small table covered with a white cloth, with a crucifix, two candles, a small vessel of clean Water, Holy Water and sprinkler, and communion card
New Birth - The best view appears to be that "being born of Water and the Spirit" presents a unified thought for the supernatural cleansing from sin that God through the Spirit effects on all who believe on his Son. This Water-Spirit combination is a reflection of Ezekiel 11,36 , and Jeremiah 31 . Water and Spirit are complementary rather than antithetical to each other. It does not see Water as a reference to Christian baptism at a time in Jesus' ministry when such baptism was not yet a historical reality. It interprets "born of Water and the Spirit" as equivalent to "born of God, " a common Johannine term (John 1:13 ; 1 John 2:29 ; 3:7-10 ; 4:7 ; 5:4 ). Finally, it coheres with the use of Water in the Old Testament to symbolize renewal and cleansing. ...
Many commentators argue that Titus 3:5 argues for Water baptism as the referent of the word "washing
Jacob's Well - The distance from Shechem (Sychar) is no objection; for even if the Samaritan woman's coming to the well was not the result of a providential accident, the sacredness of Jacob's well and the excellence of its deep drawn Water would account for her coming so far. It was not the public city well, otherwise it would have been furnished with some means of drawing the Water (John 4:11). ...
The patriarchs had never want of pasture in Canaan, but often difficulties as to Water (Genesis 21:25-30; Genesis 26:13-15; Genesis 26:18-22). With characteristic prudence he secured on his own property, by great labour, a perennial supply at a time when the surrounding Watersprings, which abound on the surface, were in the hands of unfriendly neighbours. The vault has fallen, so that stones have fallen in and much reduced its original depth, in Maundrell's time it was 105 feet deep; now it is often dry, at other times it has a few feet of Water
Font, Holy Water - (Latin: fons, fountain) ...
Vessels for holding holy Water
Cruse - A utensil; a flask or cup for holding Water (1 Samuel 26:11,12,16 ; 1 Kings 19:6 ) or oil (1 Kings 17:12,14,16 )
sa'Lim - John's last baptisms; Salim being the well-known town, and AEnon a place of fountains or other Waters near it. Near here is an abundant supply of Water
Cut-Off - ) Any device for stopping or changing a current, as of grain or Water in a spout
Willow - A tree usually found where Water is plentiful, particularly along the Jordan River
Lotus - This plant should be distinguished from the Egyptian lotus (Nymphae lotus ) which is a Water lily
Mist - Translation of several Hebrew and Greek terms with a combined range of meaning including subterranean Water, fog, and clouds. The mist of Genesis 2:6 refers to subterranean Waters welling up and Watering the ground
Agitate - ) To move with a violent, irregular action; as, the wind agitates the sea; to agitate Water in a vessel
Shelf - ) A sand bank in the sea, or a rock, or ledge of rocks, rendering the Water shallow, and dangerous to ships
Drench - ) To steep in moisture; to wet thoroughly; to soak; to saturate with Water or other liquid; to immerse
Rooted - As our hearts and minds are filled with the Scriptures, we feed on the Bread of Life, we drink the Living Water, and we grow in our knowledge of the Lord
Tunicata - The body is usually covered with a firm external tunic, consisting in part of cellulose, and having two openings, one for the entrance and one for the exit of Water
Pure - ) Separate from all heterogeneous or extraneous matter; free from mixture or combination; clean; mere; simple; unmixed; as, pure Water; pure clay; pure air; pure compassion
Wade - ) To walk in a substance that yields to the feet; to move, sinking at each step, as in Water, mud, sand, etc
Acolyte - The chief duties of this office are: to light the candles on the altar and to carry them in procession and during the solemn singing of the Gospel; to prepare wine and Water for the Sacrifice of the Mass; to assist the ministers at Mass and other public services of the Church
Lobster - The spiny lobsters of more southern Waters, belonging to Palinurus, Panulirus, and allied genera, have no large claws. The fresh-water crayfishes are sometimes called lobsters
Island - 'i, "dry land," as opposed to Water) occurs in its usual signification (Isaiah 42:4,10,12,15 , Compare Jeremiah 47:4 ), but more frequently simply denotes a maritime region or sea-coast (Isaiah 20:6 , RSV," coastland;" 23:2,6; Jeremiah 2:10 ; Ezekiel 27:6,7 )
Collotype - After the dichromate has been washed out, the film is soaked in glycerin and Water
Lefebvre, Camille - He was the principal agency, because of his indomitable energy and confidence in God, in raising the Acadians, who for over a century had been deliberately held down as woodcutters and Water carriers, to a position of genuine equality and freedom in intellectual, social, and commercial life
Chrism, Holy - Besides its use at Confirmation, it is also employed in the ceremonies of Baptism, in the consecration of a bishop and of a church, and in the blessing of chalices, patens, baptismal Water, and church bells
Christian Workers For Fellowship - Its most important tenets are "believers' baptism by immersion, the washing of saints' feet, and the use of Water and unleavened bread in the Lord's Supper
Sand - ’ However compact and firm, sand at once becomes soft at the touch of Water ( Matthew 7:26 etc
Camille Lefebvre - He was the principal agency, because of his indomitable energy and confidence in God, in raising the Acadians, who for over a century had been deliberately held down as woodcutters and Water carriers, to a position of genuine equality and freedom in intellectual, social, and commercial life
Migdol - Now Bir Suweis, two miles from Suez, having wells of Water, for Magdal or Maktal (Migdol), visited by Sethos I returning from a Syrian campaign, was built over a large well (Chabas, Voyage d'un Egyptien, 286)
Jacob's Well - There He met and conversed with a Samaritan woman on the subject of living Water
Oboth - Οboth means "holes dug for Water"; plural of Οb or obah , Arabic weibeh
Sceptics And Controversial Divines - The old fable tells us of a boy who mounted a scavenger's cart with base intent to throw dirt at the moon; whereat another boy, with better intentions, but scarcely less folly, came running with a basin of Water to wash the moon, and make its face clean again
Bloat - ) To make turgid, as with Water or air; to cause a swelling of the surface of, from effusion of serum in the cellular tissue, producing a morbid enlargement, often accompanied with softness
Buckler - ) A block of wood or plate of iron made to fit a hawse hole, or the circular opening in a half-port, to prevent Water from entering when the vessel pitches
Bilge - ) Bilge Water
Rephidim - There the people complained of thirst, and God commanded Moses to strike the rock out of which would come Water
Chestnut Tree - A tree, stately and wide spreading and growing near Water, must be meant
Buoyancy - ) The property of floating on the surface of a liquid, or in a fluid, as in the atmosphere; specific lightness, which is inversely as the weight compared with that of an equal volume of Water
Holy Chrism - Besides its use at Confirmation, it is also employed in the ceremonies of Baptism, in the consecration of a bishop and of a church, and in the blessing of chalices, patens, baptismal Water, and church bells
Lives: Wrecked - Sailing down the Thames one occasionally sees a green flag in tatters, inscribed with the word WRECK, floating in the breeze over a piece of a mast, or the funnel of a steamer which is just visible above the Water
Harvey Process - Harvey of New Jersey, consisting in the additional carburizing of the face of a piece of low carbon steel by subjecting it to the action of carbon under long-continued pressure at a very high heat, and then to a violent chilling, as by a spray of cold Water
Aerial - ) Growing, forming, or existing in the air, as opposed to growing or existing in earth or Water, or underground; as, aerial rootlets, aerial plants
Passport - ) Permission to pass; a document given by the competent officer of a state, permitting the person therein named to pass or travel from place to place, without molestation, by land or by Water
Peptone - Peptones are also formed from albuminous matter by the action of boiling Water and boiling dilute acids
Ascent - The act of rising motion upwards, whether in air, Water or other fluid, or on elevated objects rise a mounting upwards as the ascent of vapors from the earth
Desert - Isaiah 35:1 (c) This is typical of the marvelous change in a dry, barren human heart when CHRIST comes in to dwell and the living Water flows freely
Ospray, (Osprey) - It steadily balances itself over the Water with scarcely a wing moving, and darts down upon a fish when it comes to the surface, strikes its sharp hooked talons into its side, and carries it to the shore
Ark of Bulrushes - God answered the faith of the parents, and Moses was drawn out of the Water to be the saviour of His people
Pit - bor, beer, 'pit or well dug for Water,' but which could be used for a dungeon
Beer - A station of the Israelites when they drew near the Land, so called because of a well (which the word signifies) being sunk there, from which God gave them Water
Flint - challamish , 'hard rock,' out of which Water was brought
Cruse - צַפִּחַח), where it means a ‘small earthen bottle or jar’ in common use among the Hebrews chiefly for holding liquids, such as Water (1 Samuel 26:11) or oil (1 Kings 17:12)
Fathom - ) A measure of length, containing six feet; the space to which a man can extend his arms; - used chiefly in measuring cables, cordage, and the depth of navigable Water by soundings
Dike - ) A ditch; a channel for Water made by digging
Drainage - ) The mode in which the Waters of a country pass off by its streams and rivers. ) The system of drains and their operation, by which superfluous Water is removed from towns, railway beds, mines, and other works
Food - Whatever supplies nourishment and growth to plants, as Water, carbonic acid gas, &c
Ice - Water or other fluid congealed, or in a solid state a solid, transparent, brittle substance, formed by the congelation of a fluid, by means of the abstraction of the heat necessary to preserve its fluidity, or to use language, congealed by cold
Parable - Some of the OT parables are Trees Making a King (2 Samuel 12:1-4); The Thistle and the Cedar (2 Kings 14:9); Israel, a Vine Planted by Water (Ezekiel 24:1014), etc
Willow, - In Ezekiel 17:5 the word is tsaphtsaphah, supposed by some to be the Arabic safsâf, a willow or osier which grows by the Water
Tea - ) A decoction or infusion of tea leaves in boiling Water; as, tea is a common beverage
Roach - ) A European fresh-water fish of the Carp family (Leuciscus rutilus)
Anchor - A weight held on the end of a cable that when submerged in Water holds a ship in place
Muddle - ) To make turbid, or muddy, as Water
ja'Cob's Well, - At some seasons it is dry; at others it contains a few feet of Water
Cold - ...
B — 1: ψυχρός (Strong's #5593 — Adjective — psuchros — psoo-chros' ) "cool, fresh, cold, chilly" (fuller in expression than psuchos), is used in the natural sense in Matthew 10:42 , "cold Water;" metaphorically in Revelation 3:15,16
Ulai - Ulai (û'lâi or û'la-î), strong Water? A river of Susiana, on whose banks Daniel saw his vision of the ram and he-goat
Rephidim - There the people complained of thirst, and God commanded Moses to strike the rock out of which would come Water
Them - The common people continue to use it in the plural number as an adjective, for they say, bring them horses, or them horses are to be led to Water
Fountains - Perennial springs of good Water were of inestimable value in Palestine, and numerous places took their name from some fountain in their vicinity. Thus, God is the "Fountain of living Waters," Jeremiah 2:13
Wallow - To roll ones body on the earth, in mire, or on other substance to tumble and roll in Water
Hermon - It was the highest mountain of the region, and Water from its snow-covered heights was a major source of the Jordan River (Jeremiah 18:14)
Gall - Jeremiah 8:14, "water of gall," i. Opium Water would suit well for stupefying criminals in the agony of execution (Psalms 69:21; Matthew 27:34; Acts 8:23)
Lebanon - Hence the spouse in the Canticles speaks of Jesus as "a fountain of gardens, a well of living Waters, and streams from Lebanon. " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:15) And the idea is as beautiful as the figure is just and correct: for as the cold flowing Waters which descend from the mountain of Lebanon refresh the earth, and cool the hot climate, and are very copious, and run with rapidity; so the grace of God in Christ Jesus, like the Water of life, runs freely, graciously, and abundantly, to make "glad the city of God. " So Christ himself is said to be "as rivers of Water in a dry place, and as the shadow of a great rock in a weary land. " (Isaiah 32:2) Hence the prophet, exclaiming against the folly of Israel's leaving the Lord, saith, "Will a man leave the snow of Lebanon which cometh from the rock of the field; or shall the cold flowing Waters that come from another place be forgotten?" (Jeremiah 18:14)...
Garden, Gardener - Water was always necessary: in the garden of Eden there was a river by which it was Watered; and hence a fruitful place was described as well Watered, 'as the garden of the Lord. It is also used figuratively of great blessing: when Israel is restored, "their soul shall be as a Watered garden," Jeremiah 31:12 ; whereas under God's judgements they were like a garden that had no Water
Bottle - The Arabs keep their Water, milk and other liquids in leathern bottles. The great leathern bottles are made of the skin of a he-goat, and the small ones, that serve instead of a bottle of Water on the road, are made of a kid's skin
Drink, Strong - It was made by mashing the fruit in Water in certain proportions. , by putting them in jars of Water and burying them in the ground until fermentation took place
Living (2) - ...
(3) As applied to Water and Bread in the Fourth Gospel: John 4:10-11 ὕδωρ ζῶν; John 7:38 ποταμοὶ ὕδατος ζῶντος; John 6:51 ἐγώ εἰμι ὁ ἄρτος ὁ ζῶν. ‘Living Water’ is spring Water, as contrasted with that collected in a well or cistern. The woman of Samaria was familiar with the expression, and her question was quite natural and appropriate, ‘Art thou greater than our father Jacob?’ ‘Here is an ordinary man offering to supply better Water, spring Water, in the place where the patriarch Jacob had been obliged to content himself with building a cistern and drinking cistern Water’ (Wendt, St. The Water in Jacob’s Well (wh. Jeremiah 2:13 especially illustrates the difference between the spring or fountain, gushing forth with its unstinted and unfailing supply, ‘overflowing, ever-flowing,’ and the cistern, so liable to be destroyed by cracking (Land and Book, 287), which at the best cannot afford a refreshing draught like that of the bubbling spring, and which cannot permanently retain the Water collected in it. Christ does not call Himself ‘the Living Water,’ as He calls Himself ‘the Living bread. ’ What He means by ‘the living Water’ is the word of salvation which He preaches (cf. Wesley’s ‘Spring Thou up within my heart, Rise to all eternity,’ is quite in harmony with Israel’s Water-drawing song, in which the spring is addressed as a living being (Numbers 21:17, cf. —‘Pouring out Water before the Lord’ was a primitive ritual practice, of which the origin is uncertain. It was ‘in all probability a survival from a time when Water (in the desert) was considered an article of value’ (Kantzsch in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible , Ext. There are no traces of it beyond the time of David (a reference to it in 1 Kings 18:33 is not probable); but the practice of pouring out Water as a drink-offering continued to be observed, or was revived, in connexion with the Feast of Tabernacles. Every morning during the seven days of the feast Water was drawn from the spring of Siloam in a golden pitcher, and was poured into a basin at the top of the altar (Encyc. The libation of Water was probably a prayer-offering for abundant rain for the new seed-time (ib. Hosea 6:3); and we may well believe that the symbolical act of pouring out Water gave occasion to our Lord’s looking forward to the abundant showers with which He was soon to Water the earth. 1 Corinthians 10:4), and perhaps more especially those OT sayings in which it had been predicted that living Water should flow out from Jerusalem, or from the House of the Lord (Ezekiel 47:1; Ezekiel 47:12, Zechariah 14:8, Joel 3:18, cf. But may it not be the case that, in our Lord’s view, what had been spoken concerning Jerusalem and the Temple was now to be applied to the inner personal life of the believer, enriched by the entrance of His word, and renewed by His Holy Spirit? This sanctified personal life was what now answered to the sanctuary from which it had been foretold that living Waters should flow out. The saying was fulfilled after Pentecost, when ‘rivers of living Water’ flowed out from the Lord’s witnesses ‘unto the uttermost part of the earth,’ ‘beginning at Jerusalem’* Dissolve - Thus ice is converted into Water by dissolution. Thus Water dissolves salt and sugar. To be melted to be converted from a solid to a fluid state as, sugar dissolves in Water
Spring - She should be bringing the Living Water (the Holy Spirit). It is also true that in a typical sense the Lord does take the weary, worn and dried up Christian and sends into his life the Holy Spirit of GOD who is the Living Water, so that the life becomes radiant, fruitful and beautiful. ...
Isaiah 58:11 (a) In this beautiful picture we see the story of a child of GOD who walks with GOD, loves his Lord, obeys His Lord and permits the Holy Spirit, who is the Living Water, to flow through him into the lives of many
Bulrush - The stalk rises to the height of six or seven cubits, beside two under Water. These vegetables require much Water for their growth; when, therefore, the river on whose banks they grew was reduced, they perished sooner than other plants. This explains Job 8:11 , where the circumstance is referred to as an image of transient prosperity: "Can the flag grow without Water? Whilst it is yet in its greenness, and not cut down, it withereth before any other herb
Blood And Water - BLOOD AND Water (John 19:31-37). On being withdrawn the spear was followed by a gush of blood and Water. (1) crassamentum or red clot, and (2) Watery serum. ’ When the distended sac was pierced from beneath, it discharged ‘its sanguineous contents in the form of red clots of blood and a stream of Watery serum, exactly corresponding to the description given by the sacred narrative, “and forthwith came there out blood and Water. ’...
It was a favourite idea with the Fathers that the Water and the Blood were symbolic of the Sacraments
Salt (2) - This remarkable sheet of Water is of an elongated oval shape; but the regularity of the figure is broken by a large peninsula projecting from the eastern shore near to the southern end, dividing the whole into two reaches which communicate by a somewhat narrow channel. The superficial area has been estimated at about 300 square miles; but, as it would seem that the Water does not constantly stand at the same level, that carried off by evaporation not always balancing that Drought in by streams, the dimensions of the lake are subject to not inconsiderable variation. A line of drift-wood encircles the lake, branches and limbs of trees, brought down by the Jordan and other torrents, and marking the highest level of the Water. And, as there is no outlet, the Waters are intensely salt. The Waters were said to be almost motionless, and their steam pernicious. Moreover, the depth of the Water of the lake i& very great, 1310 feet at its deepest point towards the northern end; the southern end is shallow. The supposition, formerly most common was that these cities were submerged by the Waters of the sea at the time of the great catastrophe—a theory which appears to be inconsistent with the geological and physical character of the region
Nile River - The shore land could be cultivated as far as Nile Water could be brought. The many ancient cities in this area now lie below the Water table. Irrigation Waters raised laboriously from the river, let the Egyptians produce many varieties of crops in large quantities (Numbers 11:5 ; Genesis 42:1-2 ). ...
Even today Water is brought to the individual fields by small channels leading off the arterial ditches. These channels are closed off by earth dams which can be broken down with the foot when it is a particular farmer's turn to use the Water. The first of the ten plagues is often linked with conditions in the river at the peak of the flood season in August when large numbers of tiny organisms turn the Water red and could make it foul and undrinkable
Babble - ) To make a continuous murmuring noise, as shallow Water running over stones
Slush - ) A mixture of snow and Water; half-melted snow
Condensation - , to another and denser form, as gas to the condition of a liquid or steam to Water
Pulp - ) The material of which paper is made when ground up and suspended in Water
Condense - ) To reduce into another and denser form, as by cold or pressure; as, to condense gas into a liquid form, or steam into Water
Deepen - ) To become deeper; as, the Water deepens at every cast of the lead; the plot deepens
en-Rogel - The Water is pure and entirely sweet, quite different from that of Siloam; which proves that there is no connection between them
Cana - The miracle of the marriage feast of Cana which has made the city forever famous, when Christ turned Water into wine, was performed before His public life had fully begun, and is one of the best-authenticated of Our Lord's miracles
Bittern - But in the passages noted the kippod is associated with birds, with pools of Water, and with solitude and desolation
Melons - Of this plant there are various kinds, the Egyptian melon, the Cucumus chate, which has been called "the queen of cucumbers;" the Water melon, the Cucurbita citrullus; and the common or flesh melon, the Cucumus melo
Cana - A town where Jesus performed His first miracle, turning the Water into wine, and a second one, healing the nobleman's or courtier's son at Capernaum, by a word spoken at a distance (John 2; John 4:46; John 4:54)
Box - The wood, hard and firm, so as to be the only European wood that sinks in Water, is used now especially for inlaying and wood engraving, and takes a fine polish
Eder - (ee' dehr) Place and personal name meaning, “water puddle” or “herd
Rue - An essential oil, which is obtained by distillation with Water, is used in medicine, chiefly as an antispasmodic
Ingratitude: to God - In the winter, when the cold is severe, the Water freezes at the foot of the fall, and rises up in huge icicles like stalagmites, until it reaches the fall itself as though it sought to bind it in the same icy fetters
Auger - ) An instrument for boring or perforating soils or rocks, for determining the quality of soils, or the nature of the rocks or strata upon which they lie, and for obtaining Water
Chart - , a hydrographic or marine map; a map on which is projected a portion of Water and the land which it surrounds, or by which it is surrounded, intended especially for the use of seamen; as, the United States Coast Survey charts; the English Admiralty charts
Massah - Moses gave the name in response to the people's desire to put God to the test by demanding Water (Exodus 17:7 )
Stairs - Also wells and cisterns in many cities in Palestine would have stairs leading down to the Water
Bitter Herbs - Other salads, such as parsley, cucumber, chicory, and Water-cress, are also commonly eaten, indeed are prime favourites
Cana - A Galilæan village, where Christ turned Water into wine ( John 2:1 ) and healed with a word a nohleman’s son who lay sick at Capernaum ( John 4:46 )
King's Garden - This garden was clearly near the ‘gate of the two walls’ which was near the Pool of Siloam, and it was in all probability just outside the walls, being irrigated by overflow Water from the Siloam tunnel and pool, just as the land in this situation is treated to-day
Holiness as a Mark of the Church - Saint Paul writes to the Ephesians: ...
Christ also loved the church, and delivered himself up for it: that He might sanctify it; cleansing it by the laver of Water in the word of life: That he might present it to himself, a glorious church, not having spot or wrinkle, or any such thing, but that it should be holy, and without blemish
Life: Uncertain Tenure of - ...
'What boots your houses and your lands? In spite of close-drawn deed and fence, Like Water, 'twixt your cheated hands, They slip into the graveyard's sands, And mock your ownership's pretence
Shore - ) The coast or land adjacent to a large body of Water, as an ocean, lake, or large river
Floating - ) The process of rendering oysters and scallops plump by placing them in fresh or brackish Water; - called also fattening, plumping, and laying out
Foam - ) To form foam, or become filled with foam; - said of a steam boiler when the Water is unduly agitated and frothy, as because of chemical action
Puddling - , with Water, to render it compact, or impervious to liquids; also, the process of rendering anything impervious to liquids by means of puddled material
Shower - ) To Water with a shower; to //t copiously with rain
Boat - A small open vessel, or Water craft, usually moved by oars, or rowing
Brim - The feet of the priests were dipped in the brim of the Water
Syracuse - A convenient place for the Alexandrian grain ships to touch at, for the haven was good and the Water from the fountain Arethusa excellent
Dredge - ) Very fine mineral matter held in suspension in Water
Cricket - ) A small false roof, or the raising of a portion of a roof, so as to throw off Water from behind an obstacle, such as a chimney
Clearness - Freedom from foul or extraneous matter purity as the clearness of Water, or other liquor
Cormorant - The Water raven, a large fowl of the pelican kind the head and neck are black the coverts of the wings, the scapulars and the back are of a deep green, edged with black and glossed with blue
Engine - A machine for throwing Water to extinguish fire
Frost - In physiology, that state or temperature of the air which occasions freezing or the coagelation of Water
Acolythi - Their business was to light the tapers, carry the candlesticks and the incense pot, and prepare the wine and Water