What does Ward mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ward
A prison (Genesis 40:3,4 ); a watch-station (Isaiah 21:8 ); a guard (Nehemiah 13:30 ).
Webster's Dictionary - Bridge-Ward
(1):
(n.) The principal ward of a key.
(2):
(n.) A bridge keeper; a warden or a guard for a bridge.
Webster's Dictionary - Ward-Corn
(n.) The duty of keeping watch and ward (see the Note under Watch, n., 1) with a horn to be blown upon any occasion of surprise.
Webster's Dictionary - Ward
(1):
(n.) One who, or that which, guards; garrison; defender; protector; means of guarding; defense; protection.
(2):
(n.) A projecting ridge of metal in the interior of a lock, to prevent the use of any key which has not a corresponding notch for passing it.
(3):
(n.) A division of a hospital; as, a fever ward.
(4):
(a.) The act of guarding; watch; guard; guardianship; specifically, a guarding during the day. See the Note under Watch, n., 1.
(5):
(n.) The state of being under guard or guardianship; confinement under guard; the condition of a child under a guardian; custody.
(6):
(n.) One who, or that which, is guarded.
(7):
(n.) A minor or person under the care of a guardian; as, a ward in chancery.
(8):
(n.) A division of a county.
(9):
(n.) A division, district, or quarter of a town or city.
(10):
(n.) A division of a forest.
(11):
(n.) To defend by walls, fortifications, etc.
(12):
(n.) A notch or slit in a key corresponding to a ridge in the lock which it fits; a ward notch.
(13):
(v. i.) To be vigilant; to keep guard.
(14):
(n.) To keep in safety; to watch; to guard; formerly, in a specific sense, to guard during the day time.
(15):
(n.) To defend; to protect.
(16):
(n.) To fend off; to repel; to turn aside, as anything mischievous that approaches; - usually followed by off.
(17):
(v. i.) To act on the defensive with a weapon.
(18):
(n.) A guarding or defensive motion or position, as in fencing; guard.
Webster's Dictionary - March-Ward
(n.) A warden of the marches; a marcher.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ward
Ward. A prison, or an apartment of it. Genesis 40:3; Acts 12:10. Also a garrison or military post, Nehemiah 12:25, or a class or detachment of persons for any particular service. 1 Chronicles 9:23; 1 Chronicles 25:8; Nehemiah 13:30.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ward, or Guard
To put "in ward" was to place under guard, or in confinement, Genesis 40:3 ; Leviticus 24:12 . Ward also seems to mean a guard-room, Nehemiah 12:25 ; Isaiah 21:8 , and the guards themselves, Acts 12:10 , or any small band, 1 Chronicles 25:8 ; 26:16 .
King James Dictionary - Ward
WARD, in composition, as in toward, homeward, is the Saxon weard, from the root of L.
WARD,
1. To guard to deep in safety to watch. Whose gates he found fast shut, he living wight to ward the same--
In this sense, ward is obsolete, as we have adopted the French of the same word, to guard. We now never apply ward to the thing to be defended, but always to the thing against which it is to be defended. We ward off a blow or dagger, and we guard a person or place.
2. To defend to protect. Tell him it was a hand that warded him from thousand dangers. Obs. See the remark, supra.
3. To fend off to repel to turn aside any thing mischievous that approaches. Now wards a falling blow, now strikes again.
The pointed javlin warded off his rage.
It instructs the scholar in the various methods of warding off the force of objections.
This is the present use of ward. To ward off is now the more general expression, nor can I, with Johnson, think it less elegant.
WARD,
1. To be vigilant to keep guard. 2. To act on the defensive with a weapon. She drove the stranger to no other shift, than to ward and go back.
And on their warding arms light bucklers bear.
WARD, n.
1. Watch act of guarding. Still when she slept, he kept both watch and ward.
2. Garrison troops to defend a fort as small wards left in forts. Not in use. 3. Guard made by a weapon in fencing. For want of other ward, he lifted up his hand his front to guard.
4. A fortress a strong hold. 5. One whose business is to guard, watch and defend as a fire-ward. 6. A certain district, division or quarter of a town or city, committed to an alderman. There are twenty six wards in London. 7. Custody confinement under guard. Pharaoh put his butler and baker in ward. Genesis 40 . 8. A minor or person under the care of a guardian. See Blackstones chapter on the rights and duties of guardian and ward. 9. The state of a child under a guardian. I must attend his majestys commands, to whom I am now in ward.
10. Guardianship right over orphans. It is convenient in Ireland, that the wards and marriages of gentlemens children should be in the disposal of any of those lords.
11. The division of a forest. 12. The division of a hospital. 13. A part of a lock which corresponds to its proper key.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Ward
1: φυλακή (Strong's #5438 — Noun Feminine — phulake — foo-lak-ay' ) "a guard," is used of the place where persons are kept under guard (akin to phulax, "a keeper"), and translated "ward" in Acts 12:10 . See CAGE , HOLD (Noun), IMPRISONMENT, PRISON , WATCH.
2: τήρησις (Strong's #5084 — Noun Feminine — teresis — tay'-ray-sis ) primarily denotes "a watching" (tereo, "to watch"); hence "imprisonment, ward," Acts 4:3 (AV, "hold"); 5:18, RV, "(public) ward" [1]. See HOLD (Noun), KEEPING , B, PRISON.
Note: For "were kept in ward," Galatians 3:23 , see GUARD , B, No. 3, KEEP, No. 6.

Sentence search

Ward - Ward, in composition, as in toward, homeward, is the Saxon weard, from the root of L. ...
Ward, ...
1. Whose gates he found fast shut, he living wight to Ward the same-- ...
In this sense, Ward is obsolete, as we have adopted the French of the same word, to guard. We now never apply Ward to the thing to be defended, but always to the thing against which it is to be defended. We Ward off a blow or dagger, and we guard a person or place. Tell him it was a hand that Warded him from thousand dangers. Now Wards a falling blow, now strikes again. ...
The pointed javlin Warded off his rage. ...
It instructs the scholar in the various methods of Warding off the force of objections. ...
This is the present use of Ward. To Ward off is now the more general expression, nor can I, with Johnson, think it less elegant. ...
Ward, ...
1. She drove the stranger to no other shift, than to Ward and go back. ...
And on their Warding arms light bucklers bear. ...
Ward, n. Still when she slept, he kept both watch and Ward. Garrison troops to defend a fort as small Wards left in forts. For want of other Ward, he lifted up his hand his front to guard. One whose business is to guard, watch and defend as a fire-ward. There are twenty six Wards in London. Pharaoh put his butler and baker in Ward. See Blackstones chapter on the rights and duties of guardian and Ward. I must attend his majestys commands, to whom I am now in Ward. It is convenient in Ireland, that the Wards and marriages of gentlemens children should be in the disposal of any of those lords
Parry - In fencing, to Ward off to stop or to put or turn by as, to parry a thrust. To Ward off to turn aside to prevent a blow from taking effect. ...
PAR'RY, To Ward off to put by thrusts or strokes to fence
Wardship - ) The office of a Ward or keeper; care and protection of a Ward; guardianship; right of guardianship
Ward - 1: φυλακή (Strong's #5438 — Noun Feminine — phulake — foo-lak-ay' ) "a guard," is used of the place where persons are kept under guard (akin to phulax, "a keeper"), and translated "ward" in Acts 12:10 . ...
2: τήρησις (Strong's #5084 — Noun Feminine — teresis — tay'-ray-sis ) primarily denotes "a watching" (tereo, "to watch"); hence "imprisonment, Ward," Acts 4:3 (AV, "hold"); 5:18, RV, "(public) Ward" [1]. ...
Note: For "were kept in Ward," Galatians 3:23 , see GUARD , B, No
Hold - 1: τήρησις (Strong's #5084 — Noun Feminine — teresis — tay'-ray-sis ) translated "hold" in Acts 4:3 , AV, "prison" in Acts 5:18 (RV, "ward"), signifies (a) "a watching, guarding;" hence, "imprisonment, Ward" (from tereo, "to watch, keep"); the RV, has "ward" in both places; (b) "a keeping," as a commandments, 1 Corinthians 7:19 . See KEEPING , Ward
Warded - ) of Ward...
Warding - ) of Ward...
Ward, or Guard - To put "in Ward" was to place under guard, or in confinement, Genesis 40:3 ; Leviticus 24:12 . Ward also seems to mean a guard-room, Nehemiah 12:25 ; Isaiah 21:8 , and the guards themselves, Acts 12:10 , or any small band, 1 Chronicles 25:8 ; 26:16
Wardsman - ) A man who keeps Ward; a guard
Thitherward - ) To Ward that place; in that direction
Westward - Sea-ward, i. , toward the Mediterranean (Deuteronomy 3:27 )
Castle-Guard - ) A tax or imposition an a dwelling within a certain distance of a castle, for the purpose of maintaining watch and Ward in it; castle-ward
Afterward - 'AFTERWARD, or 'AFTERWARDS, adv. See Ward
Afterwards - 'AFTERWARD, or 'AFTERWARDS, adv. See Ward
Irijah - 'Captain of the Ward' at Jerusalem who arrested Jeremiah
Averruncate - ) To avert; to Ward off
Domett - ) A kind of baize of which the Ward is cotton and the weft woolen
Aldermanry - ) The district or Ward of an alderman
Tyburn Ticket - A certificate given to one who prosecutes a felon to conviction, exempting him from certain parish and Ward offices
Bridge-Ward - ) The principal Ward of a key. ) A bridge keeper; a Warden or a guard for a bridge
Pupillary - ) Of or pertaining to a pupil or Ward
Barrio - ) In Spain and countries colonized by Spain, a village, Ward, or district outside a town or city to whose jurisdiction it belongs
Parry - ) To Ward off, evade, or turn aside something, as a blow, argument, etc. ) To Ward off; to stop, or to turn aside; as, to parry a thrust, a blow, or anything that means or threatens harm. ) A Warding off of a thrust or blow, as in sword and bayonet exercises or in boxing; hence, figuratively, a defensive movement in debate or other intellectual encounter
Ward-Corn - ) The duty of keeping watch and Ward (see the Note under Watch, n
Upward - UP'WARD, a. up and Ward, L. ...
Directed to a higher place as with upward eye with upward speed. ...
UP'WARD, n. ...
UP'WARD,...
Eastward - E'ASTWARD, adv. east and Ward. Toward the east in the direction of east from some point or place. New Haven lies eastward from New York. Turn your eyes eastward
Wardian - , or for transporting growing plants from a distance; as, a Wardian case of plants; - so named from the inventor, Nathaniel B. Ward, an Englishman
Abracadabra - Worn on an amulet it was supposed to Ward off fever
Avert - ) To turn aside, or away; as, to avert the eyes from an object; to Ward off, or prevent, the occurrence or effects of; as, how can the danger be averted? "To avert his ire
Ward - Ward
Acta Sanctorum Hiberniae - , assisted-by Hugh Ward and Michael O'Cleary of the same order, and Stephen White, S
Iri'Jah - (seen by the Lord ), son of Shelemiah, a captain in the Ward, who met Jeremiah in the gate of Jerusalem called the "gate of Benjamin" accused him of being about to desert to the Chaldeans; and led him back to the princes
Fend - ) To keep off; to prevent from entering or hitting; to Ward off; to shut out; - often with off; as, to fend off blows
Shelemiah - ...
...
Father of a captain of the Ward (Jeremiah 37:13 )
Defend - 1: ἀμύνομαι (Strong's #292 — Verb — amuno — am-oo'-nom-ahee ) "to Ward off," is used in the Middle Voice in Acts 7:24 , of the assistance given by Moses to his fellow Israelite against an Egyptian (translated, "defended")
Relieve - 1: ἐπαρκέω (Strong's #1884 — Verb — eparkeo — ep-ar-keh'-o ) signifies "to be strong enough for," and so either "to Ward off," or "to aid, to relieve" (a strengthened form of arkeo, which has the same three meanings, epi being intensive); it is used in 1 Timothy 5:10,16 (twice)
Ravishment - ) The act of carrying away by force or against consent; abduction; as, the ravishment of children from their parents, of a Ward from his guardian, or of a wife from her husband
Ward - ) A division of a hospital; as, a fever Ward. ) A minor or person under the care of a guardian; as, a Ward in chancery. ) A notch or slit in a key corresponding to a ridge in the lock which it fits; a Ward notch
Public, Publicly - A — 1: δημόσιος (Strong's #1219 — Adjective — demosios — day-mos'-ee-os ) "belonging to the people" (demos, "the people"), is translated "public" in Acts 5:18 , RV, "public (ward)," AV, "common (prison)
Dutiful - ) Performing, or ready to perform, the duties required by one who has the right to claim submission, obedience, or deference; submissive to natural or legal superiors; obedient, as to parents or superiors; as, a dutiful son or daughter; a dutiful Ward or servant; a dutiful subject
Tuition - ) Superintending care over a young person; the particular watch and care of a tutor or guardian over his pupil or Ward; guardianship
Precaution - ) A measure taken beforehand to Ward off evil or secure good or success; a precautionary act; as, to take precautions against accident
Iri - Son of Shelemiah, "captain of the Ward"; met Jeremiah at the Jerusalem "gate of Benjamin," accused him of deserting to the Chaldees, and brought him to the princes (Jeremiah 37:13-14)
Administration - In 1 Corinthians 12:5 the aspect, alluded to is especially that of practical service rendered to a master [1], whereas in 2 Corinthians 9:12 it is particularly the concrete form of that service which is intended, in its God Ward and man-ward aspects
a'Vim -
A people among the early inhabitants of Palestine, whom we meet with in the southwest corner of the seacoast, whither they may have made their way north-ward from the desert, (2:23) probably the same as the Hivites
Pupil - ) A person under a guardian; a Ward
Warn - ) To Ward off
Fend - ...
To keep off to prevent from entering to Ward off to shut out
Nasbas - It has been suggested also that he is the same as Aman or Nadan, the Ward of Achiacharus ( Tob 14:10 ), in which case the uncle adopted the nephew and brought him up as his son
Henry Ryder - The three pamphlets which he wrote in protest against the extravagant views of Wilfrid Ward on papal infallibility are remarkable for their style and theological knowledge. Ward's Scheme of Dogmatic Authority, and Poems Original and Translated
Cage - " See HOLD , IMPRISONMENT, PRISON , Ward , WATCH
Dublin Review - A critical journal of high literary merit, its list of editors includes such names as Herbert Cardinal Vaughan and Wilfrid Ward, and it counts among its contributors many of the foremost figures in British Catholic literature
Lys'Ias - 164 he, together with his Ward, fell into the hands of Demetrius Soter, who put them both to death
Particle - ) A subordinate word that is never inflected (a preposition, conjunction, interjection); or a word that can not be used except in compositions; as, Ward in backward, ly in lovely
Charm - Human grace and attractiveness; magic objects intended to Ward off evil; and a method used to prevent poisonous snakes from biting. Magic charms sewn as wristbands (Ezekiel 13:18 NIV) to Ward off evil spirits and diseases receive prophetic condemnation
Sin: the Toil of it - Henry Ward Beecher says, 'There was a man in the town where I was born who used to steal all his firewood
Downward - DOWNWARD, DOWNWARDS, adv. See Ward. From a higher place to a lower in a descending course, whether directly toward the center of the earth, or not as, to tend downward to move or roll downwards to look downward to take root downwards. Water flows downward toward the sea we sailed downward on the stream. In a course of lineal descent from an ancestor, considered as a head as, to trace successive generations downward from Adam or Abraham
Charles Browne - Humorist, best known under the pseudonym of Artemus Ward (1834-1867). Shortly afterwards he went to New York and subsequently became the editor of "Vanity Fair" in which paper many of his humorous sketches appeared
Quaternion - The second two were apparently the ‘first Ward’ (φυλακή), which had to be passed before the iron gate was reached (Acts 12:10)
Defence - ) That which defends or protects; anything employed to oppose attack, Ward off violence or danger, or maintain security; a guard; a protection
Defend - ) To Ward or fend off; to drive back or away; to repel
Watch - Someone who guards something keeps “watch” over it: “Mattaniah, and Bakbukiah, … were porters keeping the Ward at the thresholds of the gates” (Job 7:12 mishmâr means “watch” or “guard” in general (over a potentially dangerous criminal): “Am I a sea, or a whale, that thou settest a watch over me?”...
Mishmâr can also represent a “place of confinement,” such as a jail: “And he put them in Ward in the house of the captain of the guard, into the prison, the place where Joseph was bound” ( Ward three days” ( Ward against Ward” ( Wards whole nights
Hiss - A sound made by forcing breath between the tongue and teeth in mockery or to Ward off demons
Shelemi'ah - (Jeremiah 37:3 ) ...
The father of Irijah, the captain of the Ward who arrested Jeremiah
Jer'Imoth - (1 Chronicles 24:30 ) ...
Son of Heman, head of fifteenth Ward of musicians
Warn - To Ward off
Earrings - These may have been magical apparel with engraving of words supposed to Ward off evil
Forcible - Violent impetuous driving forward with force as a forcible stream. ...
Forcible abduction, is the act of taking away wrongfully, as a child without the consent of the father, a Ward without the consent of the guardian, or any person contrary to his or her will
Jareb - Instead of "avenger" to Ward off foes, the expected protector proved to be God's "avenger" for Israel's and Judah's sins
Institute of Mary - Founded by Mary Ward at Rome, 1633; reconstituted from her first congregation suppressed in 1630
Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary - Founded by Mary Ward at Rome, 1633; reconstituted from her first congregation suppressed in 1630
Loretto Nuns - Founded by Mary Ward at Rome, 1633; reconstituted from her first congregation suppressed in 1630
English Ladies, the - Founded by Mary Ward at Rome, 1633; reconstituted from her first congregation suppressed in 1630
Prison, Prison-House - ...
3: τήρησις (Strong's #5084 — Noun Feminine — teresis — tay'-ray-sis ) "a watching, keeping," then "a place of keeping" is translated "prison" in Acts 5:18 AV (RV "ward")
Doublet - ) One of two or more words in the same language derived by different courses from the same original from; as, crypt and grot are doublets; also, guard and Ward; yard and garden; abridge and abbreviate, etc
Shield - ) To Ward off; to keep off or out
Virgin - 1: παρθένος (Strong's #3933 — Noun Feminine — parthenos — par-then'-os ) is used (a) of "the Virgin Mary," Matthew 1:23 ; Luke 1:27 ; (b) of the ten "virgins" in the parable, Matthew 25:1,7,11 ; (c) of the "daughters" of Philip the evangelist, Acts 21:9 ; (d) those concerning whom the Apostle Paul gives instructions regarding marriage, 1 Corinthians 7:25,28,34 ; in 1 Corinthians 7:36-38 , the subject passes to that of "virgin daughters" (RV), which almost certainly formed one of the subjects upon which the church at Corinth sent for instructions from the Apostle; one difficulty was relative to the discredit which might be brought upon a father (or guardian), if he allowed his daughter or Ward to grow old unmarried
Innocent Iii, Pope - He reasserted the papal suzerainty over Sicily, which he ruled conscientiously during the minority of his Ward Frederick II; was arbiter in Germany between Otto and Philip of Swabia; secured the election of Frederick II, 1211; and formed a truce between France and England
Lotario de' Conti - He reasserted the papal suzerainty over Sicily, which he ruled conscientiously during the minority of his Ward Frederick II; was arbiter in Germany between Otto and Philip of Swabia; secured the election of Frederick II, 1211; and formed a truce between France and England
Prison - In the wilderness two persons were "put in Ward" (Leviticus 24:12 ; Numbers 15:34 ), but it was only till the mind of God concerning them should be ascertained
Content, Contentment - A — 1: ἀκάνθινος (Strong's #174 — Adjective — arkeo — ak-an'-thee-nos ) primarily signifies "to be sufficient, to be possessed of sufficient strength, to be strong, to be enough for a thing;" hence, "to defend, Ward off;" in the Middle Voice, "to be satisfied, contented with," Luke 3:14 , with wages; 1 Timothy 6:8 , with food and raiment; Hebrews 13:5 , with "such things as ye have;" negatively of Diotrephes, in 3 John 1:10 , "not content therewith
Obadiah - A gatekeeper and guardian of “the Ward” (“the storerooms at the gates,” NIV) during the leadership of Ezra and Nehemiah (Nehemiah 12:25 )
After - ) Moving toward from behind; following, in search of; in pursuit of. ) To Ward the stern of the ship; - applied to any object in the rear part of a vessel; as the after cabin, after hatchway. ) Subsequently in time or place; behind; afterward; as, he follows after
Ahasue'Rus - He divorced his queen Vashti for refusing to appear in public at this banquet, and married, four years afterwards, the Jewess Esther, cousin and Ward of Mordecai
Ahasuerus - He divorced his queen Vashti for refusing to appear in public at this banquet, and married, four years afterwards, the Jewess Esther, cousin and Ward of Mordecai
Enough - " ...
B — 1: ἀρκέω (Strong's #714 — Verb — arkeo — ar-keh'-o ) "to Ward off;" hence, "to aid, assist;" then, "to be strong enough," i. It is difficult, however, to find examples of this meaning in Greek usage of the word, and apecho may here refer, in its commercial significance, to Judas (who is mentioned immediately afterwards), with the meaning "he hath received" (his payment); cp
Widow - ...
Wives whose husbands shut them away from themselves are sometimes called “widows”: “And David came to his house at Jerusalem; and the king took the ten women his concubines, whom he had left to keep the house, and put them in Ward, and fed them, but went not in unto them
Net - The Egyptians make it a tent over their sleeping place to Ward off insects (Herodotus ii. In Proverbs 1:17 explain" surely in vain the net is spread in the sight of any bird," because the bird sees the net and is on its guard; so youths warned by God's word raise their souls heavenward, on the wings of the fear, faith, and love of God, as the bird flies upward; and therefore escape the net which the tempters fancy they are going to entrap the "innocent" in, but in which really "their own blood and their own lives" are taken (Proverbs 1:11; Proverbs 1:18)
Wheat, - Wheat is reaped to Ward the end of April, in May, and in June, according to the differences of soil and position; it was sown either broadcast and then ploughed in or trampled in by cattle, ( Isaiah 32:20 ) or in rows, if we rightly understand (Isaiah 28:25 ) which seems to imply that the seeds were planted apart in order to insure larger and fuller ears
Prison - ]'>[4] ‘ward’) was doubtless the same as ‘the public Ward’ of Acts 5:18 RV Day by Day (2) - ': Henry Ward Beecher
Prison - It is also used in a more restricted sense to designate a portion of a prison, in one instance ‘the first and the second Ward’ (Acts 12:10 AV_ and RV_), traversed by the apostle Peter on his way to freedom; in another, ‘the inner prison’ (Acts 16:24 AV_ and RV_) in which St. Another word for prison, τήρησις, translated ‘hold’ (RV_ ‘ward’), is employed in Acts 4:3 to designate the place of confinement into which the apostles were thrown by the sacerdotal authorities at Jerusalem; also in Acts 5:18 qualified by the adjective δημοσία (AV_ ‘common prison,’ RV_ ‘public Ward’). This was probably a guard-room in the fortress Antonia, situated at the north-west corner of the Temple area, escape from which could be effected only by passing through ‘the first and the second Wards,’ lying between it and the iron gate leading into the city. (2) The discovery of the plot aiming at his assassination led to his being transferred to Caesarea, where he was detained for upwards of two years in the praetorium of Herod, now the residence of the procurator (Acts 23:35)
Chaplain - the persons vested with a power of retaining chaplains, together with the number each is allowed to qualify, are as follow: an archbishop eight; a duke or bishop six; marquis or earl five; viscount four; baron, knight of the garter, or lord chancellor, three: a duchess, marchioness, countess, baroness, the treasurer or comptroller of the king's house, clerk of the closet, the king's secretary, dean of the chapel, almoner, and master of the rolls, each of them two; chief justice of the king's bench, and Ward of the cinque ports, each one
Sacrament - (ssac' ruh mehnt) an outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace. ...
There is strong biblical support for the theological idea of an outward sign carrying an inward spiritual power. It depends upon the inward faith and spiritual response of the believer. ...
Wayne Ward...
...
Guard - Arrested by the high priest Annas, and put ‘in public Ward’ (Acts 5:18 : ἐν τηρήσει δημοσίᾳ), Peter and John were not chained; their keepers merely shut the prison-house (δεσμωτήριον) and stood on guard outside. The station of the latter two was apparently ‘the first Ward’ (φυλακή, Vulgate custodia) which the prisoner had to pass before he could effect his escape
Guard - Ward
Hanani'ah - ...
Grandfather of Irijah, the captain of the Ward at the gate of Benjamin who arrested Jeremiah on the charge of deserting to the Chaldeans
Groaning - ...
But the stirrings of the Spirit which make the soul conscious of earth’s ‘broken arcs’ give the promise of heaven’s ‘perfect round’-of ‘the glory which shall be revealed to us-ward’ (cf
Continually - 21:8: “… My lord, I stand continually upon the watchtower in the daytime, and I am set in my Ward whole nights
Fear - Fear is accompanied with a desire to avoid or Ward off the expected evil. ...
Fear not, Abram: I am thy shield, and thy exceeding great reward
Baptists - The churches in this union keep up a friendly acquaintance, in some outward things, with those from whom they have separated; but in things more essential disclaim any connection with them, particularly as to changing ministers, and the admission of members. Ward, of Gresham College. They have liberally contributed, however, towards the translation of the Scriptures into the Bengalee language, which some of the Baptist brethren are now accomplishing in the East
Hospitality - Ward, "than to see travellers and guests eating under the shade of trees
Watch - He kept both watch and Ward. This period among the Israelites, seems to have been originally four hours, but was afterwards three hours, and there were four watches during the night
Keep, Keeping - , Galatians 3:23 , RV, "kept in Ward;" see GUARD , B, No. 1, denotes (a) "a watching," and hence, "imprisonment, prison," Acts 4:3 ; 5:18 , "ward," RV (AV, "hold" and "prison"); (b) "keeping," 1 Corinthians 7:19
Under - In a state of pupilage or subjection as a youth under a tutor a Ward under a guardian colonies under the British government
Purification - It puts into dogmatic form the vague God-ward instincts of the primeval heart. So the sin-offering was eaten (Leviticus 6:26), embodying man’s guilty feelings towards God and God’s appeased feelings towards man
Hezekiah - He then marched toward Egypt. Hoping to Ward off any interference from Judah, Sennacherib sent letters to Hezekiah ordering him to surrender (Isaiah 37:9-38 )
Repetitions - Additional illustrations are supplied by Hindu practice (Ward, cited by Rosenmüller, Das alte und neue Morgenland, v
Priesthood of the Believer - ...
Wayne Ward...
...
Shepherd - The shepherd had a mantle of sheepskin with the fleece on (Jeremiah 43:12), a wallet for food (1 Samuel 17:40), a sling such as the Bedouin still carries, a staff to Ward off foes and to guide the flock with its crook (Psalms 23:4; Zechariah 11:7; so Jehovah "lifts up His staff against" His people's foes, Isaiah 10:1-24; His word is at once our prop of support and our defense against Satan)
Prison (2) - τήρησις, ‘the place of keeping’ (Acts 4:3; Acts 5:18), translation ‘hold’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘ward’) and ‘prison’ (probably that attached to the Temple or the high priest’s palace, Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iv
Irish Martyrs - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P. MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Martyrs, Irish - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P. MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Toleration Act - whereby all persons are required to resort to their parish church or chapel, upon pain of punishment by the censures of the church; and also upon pain that every person so offending, shall forfeit for every such offence twelve pence; nor the statute made in the 3d year of the late King James, inituled "An act for the better discovering and repressing Popish Recusants;" nor that other statute, intituled ...
"An act to prevent and avoid dangers which may grow by Popish Recussants;" nor any other law or statute of this realm made against Papists or Popish Recusants, shall be construed to extend to any person or persons dissenting from the Church of England, that shall take the oaths (of allegiance and supremacy) and shall make and subscribe the declaration (against Popery;) which oaths and declaration the justices of the peace at the general sessions of the peace for the county, or place where such persons shall live, are hereby required to administer to such persons as shall offer themselves to make and subscribe the same, and thereof to keep a register; and likewise, none of the persons aforesaid shall give or pay, as any fee or reward, to any officer belonging to the court, above the sum of sixpence, for his entry of his taking the said oaths, &c. as aforesaid, shall hereafter be chosen high constable, or petit constable, church-warden, oversee of the poor, or any other parochial or Ward officer, and such person shall scruple to take upon him any of the said offices, in regard of the oaths, or any other matter or thing required by the law to be taken or done in respect of such office, every such person shall and may execute such office by a sufficient deputy, that shall comply with the laws on this behalf. shall be exempted from serving upon any jury, or from being appointed to bear the office of churchwarden, overseer of the poor, or any other parochial or Ward office, or other office in any hundred of any shire, city, town, parish, division, or wapentake. That no congregation or assembly for religious worship shall be permitted or allowed by this act until the place of such meeting shall be certified to the Bishop of the diocess, or to the Archdeacon of that archdeaconry, or to the justices of the peace at the General or Quarter Sessions of the peace for the county, city, or place in which such meeting shall be held, and registered in the said Bishop's or Archdeacon's court respectively, or recorded at the said General or Quarter Sessions; the register or clerk of the peace whereof respectively is hereby required to register the same, and to give certificate thereof to such person as shall demand the same; for which there shall be no greater fee or reward taken than the sum of sixpence. Vast numbers of petitions from all parts of the country were presented against the bill; so that when it was brought forward on May 21, 1811, (after a considerable discussion, ) the question for a second reading was put and negatived without a division
Jordan - One of these, near Banias, anciently Caesarea Philippi, issues from a large cave in a rocky mountain side, and flows several miles towards the south-west, where it is joined by the second and larger stream, which originates in a fountain at Tellel-Kady, three miles west of Banias. But besides these, there is a third and longer stream, which rises beyond the northern limit of Palestine, near Hasbeia on the west side of mount Hermon, flows twenty-four miles to the south, and unites with the other streams before they enter the "waters of Merom," now lake Huleh, the Jordan flows about nine miles south-ward to the sea of Tiberias, through which its clear and smooth course may be traced twelve miles to the lower end. Twice afterwards the Jordan was miraculously crossed, by Elijah and Elisha, 2 Kings 5:14 6:6 . ...
At the present day, the Jordan is lost in the Dead sea; but many have supposed that in very ancient times, before the destruction of the cities in the vale of Sodom, the Jordan passed through the Dead Sea and the vale of Siddim, and continued its course southward to the Elanitic Gulf of the Red Sea
Keep, Watch, Guard - In 2 Kings 22:14 Harhas is called “keeper of the Wardrobe” (the priest’s garments). ” In the first of its 22 occurrences mishmâr means “guard”: “And he put them in Ward [3] in the house of the captain of the guard, into the prison …” ( Cities - The place where the Apostle was imprisoned seems to have been secured in the same manner; for, says the inspired historian, "When they were past the first and second Ward, they came unto the iron gate that leadeth unto the city; which opened to them of its own accord," Acts 12:10
Nature - Ward, Naturalism and Agnosticism, London, 1899; P
Arms - The SLING (Judges 20:16), the usual weapon of a shepherd, as David, to Ward off beasts from the flock
Touch - Trust in the wicked cannot Ward off the touch of a divine scourge (Isaiah 28:15 ; Jeremiah 14:15 )
Flies - They like to fasten themselves in preference on the corners of the eye, and on the edge of the eyelid; tender parts, toward which a gentle moisture attracts them. They were punished by the very things they revered; and though they boasted of spells and charms, yet they could not Ward off the evil. This is not a partial emigration; the inhabitants of all the countries, from the mountains of Abyssinia northward, to the confluence of the Nile and Astaboras, are, once in a year, obliged to change their abode, and seek protection in the sands of Beja, till the danger of the insect is over
Procurator - Before the Roman Empire was ever thought of, and regularly also after it had come into existence, a procurator (Greek, ἐπίτροπος) was one qui procurat, ‘who attends to’ or ‘manages,’ particularly the affairs of a house-hold or an estate-an agent, steward, or bailiff, in fact. In the ordinary Civil Court (Recorder’s Court, Court of Common Pleas) they had a jurisdiction like that of other governors, and in later times at least they could appoint a guardian to a Ward (tutoris datio)
Sanctification, Sanctify - ]'>[7] or His ‘name’ is to recognize and act towards Him as holy, to ‘make him holy’ in one’s thoughts and attitude (see Isaiah 8:13 ; cf. This He effects God-ward by ‘making propitiation for’ their ‘sins’ ( Hebrews 2:17 ), and man-ward by ‘cleansing their conscience’ with the virtue of ‘his blood’ by removing the sense of personal guilt before God even as the animal sacrifices ‘sanctified’ the Israelites ‘unto the cleanness of the flesh’ ( Hebrews 9:13 f
Jews - There was constant fighting amongst themselves, and a desperate effort to Ward off foreign invaders. ...
They were driven from one country to another till, towards the end of the 18th century, "Edicts of Toleration" were passed by various governments which abolished the harsh laws against them and granted them civilrights
Saint - Everywhere in the NT God is One whose heart, purpose, and power towards men are revealed as redeeming love in Jesus Christ. Saintliness is an impossibility unless it contains as its essence an experience of God’s love common to all which finds expression in common worship, and certain corresponding mutual obligations of loving thought and ministry towards others. Humphry Ward, London, 1898, p
Marriage - Marriage with Canaanites and idolaters was strictly forbidden, Exodus 34:16 ; and afterwards with any of the heathen nations around them, especially such as were uncircumcised, Nehemiah 13:1-31 . Ward, "the bridegroom came from a distance, and the bride lived at Serampre, to which place the bridegroom was to come by water. ' All the persons employed now lighted their lamps, and ran with them in their hands to fill up their stations in the procession; some of them had lost their lights, and were unprepared; but it was then too late to seek them, and the cavalcade moved forward to the house of the bride, at which place the company entered a large and splendidly illuminated area, before the house, covered with an awning, where a great multitude of friends, dressed in their best apparel, were seated upon mats
Jehoiada - The third to guard the house (the temple) "that it be not broken down" (Keil, "to Ward off" intruders), "to be guards ('porters') of the thresholds" (of the ascent to the temple, 1 Chronicles 9:19 margin, 2 Chronicles 23:4 margin). He therefore was honoured (1 Samuel 2:30) with the unique privilege of interment "among the kings in the city of David, because he had done good in Israel, both toward God and toward His (God's) house
Lamentations, Theology of - Israel's wound, now deep as the sea, came because the prophets failed to expose her sin and so failed to Ward off her captivity (2:14)
Obsolete or Obscure Words in the English av Bible - ...
College, 2 Kings 22:14—refers to "second Ward," or port. ...
Rereward, Isaiah 52:12; Isaiah 58:8—rear-guard
Thessalonians, Epistles to the - Their faith God-ward had been noised abroad, indeed they were ensamples, or models, to all around. They were also to attend to their own business and to work , walking in good repute towards those without: a needed exhortation, as we see by 2 Thessalonians 3:11,12
Time - ...
It is true that biblical writers perceive history as cyclical, in that various predictable, recurring sequence of events are inherent to it: the ordliness and seasonal regularity of nature (Psalm 19:1-6 ; 104:19 ; Ecclesiastes 1:4-7 ), the cycle of life (Ecclesiastes 3:1-15 ) and its wearisomeness (Ecclesiastes 1:8-11 ), the rise and fall of kings and empires (Daniel 2:21 ), and the universal inclination toward evil (Judges 2:6-23 ; 2 Chronicles 36:15-16 ; Nehemiah 9:5-37 ; Romans 1:18-32 ). ...
Time is meaningfully forward-moving. Believers are encouraged to make the most of every opportunity in serving God (Ephesians 5:16 ; Colossians 4:5 ) and to mature in faith "as long as it is called Today" to Ward off encroaching apostasy (Hebrews 3:13 )
King - It is not quite certain whether anything of the nature of a land tax or property tax existed, though something of this kind may be referred to in the reward promised by Saul to the slayer of Goliath ( 1 Samuel 17:25 ); and it may have been the tenth mentioned in 1 Samuel 8:15 ; 1 Samuel 8:17 . ( e ) The officer who was ‘over the tribute’ ( 2 Samuel 20:24 ) seems to have superintended the forced labour and the collecting of the taxes, ( f ) The governor of the royal household, the royal steward or High Chamberlain, seems to have held an important position in the days of the later monarchy ( Isaiah 36:3 ; Isaiah 36:22 ; Isaiah 22:15 ). Mention is also made of several minor officials, such as the ‘king’s servant’ ( 2 Kings 22:12 ), the ‘king’s friend’ ( 1 Kings 4:5 ), the ‘king’s counsellor’ ( 1 Chronicles 27:33 ), the ‘head of the Ward-robe’ ( 2 Kings 22:14 ), the head of the eunuchs (AV Perfect Perfection - Edwards (1 Corinthians2, London, 1885, p. For the Thessalonians’ ‘faith to God-ward’ (1 Thessalonians 1:8) St. Hebrews 5:14) the forward movement towards perfection is conceived as advance in the knowledge of Christ
Corinthians, First And Second, Theology of - 13]'>[4]7; the egalitarian attitudes toward males and females 2 Corinthians 3:1-7:16 ; 10:13 ). The downward pull of this age threatens to dilute their loyalty to God and thus tempt them to repeat ancient Israel's mistakes (10:1-10). On the positive side, their repentance toward God and acceptance of his servant Paul will sustain their salvation ( Ward off divine judgment for those whose lives disrupt the unity of the church
Esther - Mordecai and his uncle Abihail's daughter (his own adopted Ward) lived at Shushan, the Persian royal city. "...
So thenceforward the feast Purlin (lots) on the 14th and 15th of the month Adar (February and March) was kept by the Jews as "a day of gladness and of sending portions to one another, and gifts to the poor
Faith - Faith is not a solitary act but a continuous attitude of the inner life towards Christ Jesus. Paul towards the close of the Epistle to the Romans 14, where those weak in faith do not understand the extent of their freedom in Christ, and find themselves bound in conscience by irritating non-Christian customs. Even when Christians are perfect (τέλειοι, Philippians 3:15), possessors of a mature faith as well as full knowledge, they have not reached the goal, but they must still press on toward the goal unto the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus (Philippians 3:14). Paul faith was an experience that touched the inmost part of his nature, but it had perforce to find outward expression. ...
If faith must be associated with such outward testimony it must be even more intimately associated with many Christian graces, and especially with love or charity. It had a mission even concerning faith, but it was the mission of an attendant slave to bring those who were in Ward unto Christ; but when that mission was fulfilled, they were no longer under law, but were all sons of God, through faith in Christ Jesus (Galatians 3:24-26). , which is among the very earliest of the Pauline Epistles, there is found the expression: ‘Before the faith came, we were kept in Ward under the law, shut up unto the faith which should afterwards be revealed’ (Galatians 3:23). Paul’s phrases, the foundation of repentance from dead works, and of faith toward God’ (ἐπὶ θεόν, Hebrews 6:1). salvation is regarded as future, certainly near at hand, but still as an inheritance to which Christians are to look forward
Faith - Faith is not a solitary act but a continuous attitude of the inner life towards Christ Jesus. Paul towards the close of the Epistle to the Romans 14, where those weak in faith do not understand the extent of their freedom in Christ, and find themselves bound in conscience by irritating non-Christian customs. Even when Christians are perfect (τέλειοι, Philippians 3:15), possessors of a mature faith as well as full knowledge, they have not reached the goal, but they must still press on toward the goal unto the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus (Philippians 3:14). Paul faith was an experience that touched the inmost part of his nature, but it had perforce to find outward expression. ...
If faith must be associated with such outward testimony it must be even more intimately associated with many Christian graces, and especially with love or charity. It had a mission even concerning faith, but it was the mission of an attendant slave to bring those who were in Ward unto Christ; but when that mission was fulfilled, they were no longer under law, but were all sons of God, through faith in Christ Jesus (Galatians 3:24-26). , which is among the very earliest of the Pauline Epistles, there is found the expression: ‘Before the faith came, we were kept in Ward under the law, shut up unto the faith which should afterwards be revealed’ (Galatians 3:23). Paul’s phrases, the foundation of repentance from dead works, and of faith toward God’ (ἐπὶ θεόν, Hebrews 6:1). salvation is regarded as future, certainly near at hand, but still as an inheritance to which Christians are to look forward
Houses - Pococke was at Tiberias, in Galilee, he was entertained by the sheik's steward, and with his company supped upon the top of the house for coolness, according to their custom, and lodged there likewise, in a sort of closet of about eight feet square, formed of wicker-work, plastered round toward the bottom, but without any door, each person having his cell. Ward, "in Bengal very frequently dig through the mud walls, and under the clay floors of houses, and, entering unperceived, plunder them while the inhabitants are asleep. " Our Lord's parable of the foolish man who built his house on the sand derives illustration from the following passages in Ward's "View," and Belzoni's "Travels:" "The fishermen in Bengal build their huts in the dry season on the beds of sand, from which the river has retired
Reprobation - " "How often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings, and ye would not!" "The Lord is long-suffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish
Desire - All the endowments of his nature, whether intellectual, emotional, or volitional, whether they are bodily or mental, may fruitfully be looked at as teleological, as a means towards the great end of living. Every external object makes its own appeal, and the inward nature of man makes a response in correspondence with the appeal. Ward says, ‘Provided the cravings of appetite are felt, any signs of the presence of pleasurable objects prompt to movements for their enjoyment or appropriation. ...
Without entering on the question as to whether action can be determined by perceptions, or the further question as to whether there can be perceptions apart from something like ideation, we are disposed to contend that where there is awareness of an object, and a movement towards the appropriation of it, there must be the rudiments of Desire. Ward points out, ‘sufficiently self-sustaining to form trains that are not wholly shaped by the circumstances of the present—entirely new possibilities of action are opened up’ (p. Pleasure, according to Plato, is always a process towards the normal condition of a subject, and is never in itself an end. ...
While Aristotle builds so far on the results of the analysis of Plato, yet he is dissatisfied with the argument that pleasure cannot be the summum bonum because it is a mere process towards an end. Desire thus, according to Aristotle, implies deliberation, choice, the use of means towards an end. He takes for granted that the process of the self-conscious being on his way towards the appropriate action, towards the satisfaction he will feel when the object is attained, will always be right
Virgin Birth - ...
Jewish antagonism toward Christianity would have made the truth known if Jesus' birth had happened otherwise. ...
The relative silence of the Gospel tradition to the virgin birth probably reveals the true historical situation: Mary and Joseph kept the matter secret in an attempt to Ward off possible misunderstanding and ridicule. Edwards, The Virgin Birth in History and Faith ; R
the Angel of the Church in Philadelphia - And it was such things as these in Daniel Cormick that far more than made up for the fewness of the talents his Sovereign Master had seen good to commit to the stewardship of His servant. "You, brethren," said Andrew Bonar in Daniel Cormick's funeral sermon, "are witnesses that in all his ministry your pastor ceased not to preach in public, and from house to house, repentance towards God, and faith towards our Lord Jesus Christ. For if a minister is to be a real minister; if he is to know, as by the best and the latest science, all the diseases and all the pains in the souls of the saints who are in his Ward, of necessity he must have been taken through all those spiritual experiences himself; of necessity they have all been made to meet in him
the Angel of the Church in Sardis - Now it was after some great success of that pulpit kind; it was immediately on the back of some extravagant outburst of his popularity as a preacher, that his Master could keep silence no longer toward the minister of Sardis. And that because most of their appearances are before men, and that in the exercise of some gift of the mind which is supposed to hold forth the inward worth of a man more than any other gift. What He really said was this, 'I have not found thy work at all filled up on its secret and spiritual and God-ward side. On its intellectual and manward side I have nothing to complain about-but not before God. And his crowds of polished people were his reward. And as he was saved through this Epistle, so will they; and like him they will yet receive the heavenly reward that is here held out to us all by Him who has the seven Spirits of God and the seven stars
Priscillianus And Priscillianism, Priscillian - It led to further progress towards persecution. The Priscillianists had, however, friends at court powerful enough to Ward off the danger. In his letter afterwards to Siricius, who succeeded Damasus in 384 in the see of Rome, he expressly dwells upon these points and glories in the part he had consequently taken against the heresy of Priscillian. The emperor yielded to his importunity and Martin's firmness and zeal on the side of humanity were rewarded
Joseph - Sent to Shechem, he found that his brothers had taken their flocks northwards fifteen miles, to the richer pasturage of Dothan. ...
So far as Egypt was concerned, Joseph’s policy was to store the surplus corn of the years of plenty in granaries, and afterwards so to dispose of it as to change the system of land-tenure. The need of rewarding the services of successful generals or partisans would be a strong temptation to the expropriation of some of the royal lands. Joseph catches at the opportunity of discovering the truth concerning Benjamin, and, after further confirming in several ways the apprehensions of his brothers, retains one as a hostage in Ward and sends the others home. They set out homewards in high spirits, unaware that Joseph had directed that each man’s money should be placed in his sack, and his own divining-cup of silver ( Genesis 44:5 ; the method of divination was hydromancy an article was thrown into a vessel of water, and the movements of the water were thought to reveal the unknown) in that of Benjamin. The district was long afterwards known as ‘the land of Rameses’ (Genesis 47:11 ) from the care spent upon it by the second king of that name, who often resided there, and founded several cities in the neighbourhood. Allowance may be made for the play of imagination in the long period that elapsed before the traditions were reduced to writing in their present form, and for the tendency to project the characteristics of a tribe backwards upon some legendary hero. When all was over, he realized how cowardly a part he had played, and, stricken with shame and remorse, plucked up courage and ‘went in unto Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus’ ( Mark 15:43 )
Baxterianism - Ward differed from Amyraut, Martinius, and others of that school, on the topic of baptismal regeneration; and, as the subjects of baptism, according to the sentiments of the two former, are invested with invisible grace, and are regenerated in virtue of the ordinance when canonically performed, such divines far more easily disposed of their baptized converts in the ranks of strict predestination, than the others could who did not hold those sentiments. It denotes no separate sect or party, but rather a system of opinions on doctrinal points, verging toward Arminianism, and which ultimately passed to Arianism and Socinianism. Even during Baxter's own life, while the Presbyterians taxed the Independents with Antinomianism, the latter retorted the charge of Socinianism, or at least of a tendency toward it, in some of the opinions maintained both by Baxter and others of that party. ...
"I wish not to be understood as stating that Baxter either held any opinions of this description, or was conscious of a tendency in his sentiments toward such a fearful consummation; but, that there was an injurious tendency in his manner of discussing certain important subjects. While a portion of evil, however, probably resulted from Baxter's mode of conducting controversy, and no great light was thrown by him on some of the dark and difficult subjects which he so keenly discussed, I have no doubt he contributed considerably to produce...
a more moderate spirit toward each other, between Calvinists and Arminians, than had long prevailed
Sibylline Oracles - -Towards the end of the 6th, or about the beginning of the 5th, cent. Warde Fowler, The Religious Experience of the Roman People, London, 1911, p. These Roman oracles originally were not so much predictions of woes to come, like apocalyptic tracts, as explanations of what was required to avert the anger of the gods and Ward off evil to the State on earth. 270, when the Alemanni invaded Italy, the Senate hesitated to consult the Sibyllina, and Aurelian had to incite them (Vopiscus, Vita Aureliani, 20); the Emperor taunted them with behaving as if they were in a Christian church-a significant indication of the changed attitude towards these oracles! Their use lingered down to the age of Julian
Cures - Various incantations were in use to prevent miscarriage, and to Ward off the machinations of evil spirits from the cradle of the newborn. True sympathy is a mighty human energy in which the Divine power is at work, and even on the lower levels of our feeble personal force it has a continuous tendency towards healing
Sin (2) - The Christian is armed in order to Ward off the fiery darts of the Evil One (Ephesians 6:16). Lastly, there is no confusion, as in the popular mind, between those physical excesses which are called vice, and the inward refusal ‘to have God in their knowledge’ (Romans 3:28), whether it applies to the sensuous or the spiritual nature of men, which alone is sin. He is describing the common experience of an inward struggle, when neither good nor evil is finally in the ascendant. Paul’s general outlook on the spiritual world, can be none other than Satan, exercising, as captain of ‘spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places’ (Ephesians 6:12), not an external compulsion but an inward influence, not therefore impairing the responsible personalities that are indwelt
Amos, Theology of - Israelites in Amos's time are looking forward to that day (5:18), evidently expecting that the Gentile nations will be vanquished and Israel will be elevated to a place of preeminence among the nations because of her special relationship with Yahweh. Ward, Amos, Hosea ; H
Lord's Prayer (ii) - ...
Looking now at the six petitions, we observe at once that the first three have a Godward, the second three a manward reference. ’ We pass now from the God Ward to the manward aspects of the prayer
Animals - A camel-caravan would be one of the sights of our Lord’s boyhood, and the awkwardness of meeting a camel in the narrow street, which modern travellers experience, was not unknown nineteen hundred years ago. ’ The cunning and perhaps the cowardice of the animal are the basis of the comparison. Eastern shepherds employ dogs (if they employ them at all) not to help in herding the sheep, but to Ward off wolves. The contrast between outward profession and inward character could not be more vividly expressed
Old Testament - ...
The clearest reflexion of this simple attitude towards the OT is found in the apostolic preaching in Acts. ), and points forward to the final restoration of all things ‘whereof God spake by the mouth of his holy prophets which have been since the world began’ (Acts 3:21). ’ But so weak and sinful was human flesh that the very constraint of the Law not only awoke the consciousness of sin, but roused an inward opposition, and thus actually provoked sin. Its purpose was not to save men, but to hold them in Ward or prison until the true faith should be revealed (Galatians 3:23). The real value of the OT Scriptures, therefore, is to point forward to the Light, and then to pass away as the shadow before the sunshine. In these sacrifices remembrance was made of sins, and the worshipper’s thoughts were thereby directed towards the perfect Sacrifice yet to be offered (Hebrews 10:3)
Joseph - Having been long barren, she said at his birth "God hath taken away (asaph ) my reproach"; "the Lord (I regard this son as the earnest that He) will add (yaacaph ) to me another son," a hope fulfilled afterward in Benjamin's birth. Seventeen years old when sold into Egypt (Jacob being 108, and Isaac living 12 years afterward), 30 when made governor (Genesis 30:23-24; Genesis 37:2; Genesis 41:32-38), Genesis 41:39 before Jacob came into Egypt; so born 1906 B. His chief inquiries long afterward were about his father (Genesis 43:7; Genesis 45:13; Isaiah 61:2-3; Genesis 41:51), and the remembrance of "his father" was with him the strongest plea after Jacob's death, that the brothers thought they could urge for their being forgiven (Genesis 50:16-17). ) Joseph at first "prospered" as Potiphar's steward ("Jehovah making all that he did to prosper in his hand"), supervising his gardens, lands, fisheries, and cattle. Farming in Egypt was carried on with the utmost system, as the Egyptian monuments attest; the stewards registering all the operations, to check the notorious dishonesty of the workmen. With characteristic energy as a steward he made an immediate tour throughout Egypt, and laid up grain in immense quantities, all registered accurately by scribes when the granaries were being filled (as Egyptian monuments represent). " Joseph required that one of them should fetch the youngest who was they said with his father, and kept them three days in Ward, then let them take back grain for their households, but bound Simeon before their eyes as a hostage for their bringing Benjamin and so proving their truthfulness. Tremblingly they told the steward as to their money, for they feared on being brought into the house they should be imprisoned there. The steward reassured them and brought forth Benjamin. ) On the morrow, by putting his silver cup (bowl from which wine was poured into smaller cups) in Benjamin's sack, and sending his steward after them upon their leaving the city where Joseph lived, he elicited Judah's generous offer to be bondsman and so not bring his father's grey hairs with sorrow to the grave, bound up as Jacob's life was with Benjamin's
Augustine - His parents, Patricius and Monica, were Christians of respectable rank in life, who afforded their son all the means of instruction which his excellent genius and wonderful aptitude for learning seemed to require, he studied grammar and rhetoric at Madura; until he was sixteen years old; and afterward removed to Carthage, to complete his studies. His secession, however, was only a temporary one; for he and Alipius were, a few months afterward, received by baptism into the Christian church. By this distinction he rids himself of the difficulty which would have pressed upon his scheme of theology, had pardon, regeneration, and salvation been necessarily connected with the outward ordinance of baptism; and limits its proper efficacy to those who are comprehended, as the heirs of eternal life, in the decree of the Almighty. Ward: "This I do yield to my Lord of Sarum most willingly, that the justification, sanctification, and adoption which children have in baptism, is not univoce [1] the same with that which adulti [2] have
Possession - These were iéiÄéú, Lilith (the night-hag, Isaiah 34:13-14), a female night-demon who sucked the blood of her sleeping victims;_ äÇîÌÇùÑÀçÄéú, a demon servant of Jahweh Warded off by a blood-talisman (Exodus 12:23);_ Asmedai, the Asmodeus of Tobit 3:8-17, who is called in the Aramaic and Hebrew versions of Tobit 3:8 ‘king of the Shçdîm,’ a demon borrowed from Zarathustrianism, who is identified with Ἀπολλύων (Revelation 9:11). The Khonds of Orissa Ward off the same intruder by presenting the demon with gifts. As to the outward methods employed, it is noticeable that our Lord used no incantations or similar outward means
Christ in Jewish Literature - But they are a mere drop in the ocean of the Talmud, and do not warrant the assertion of a general and bitter hatred on the part of the Rabbis towards Him. On the one hand, there is the book called the Tôl’dôth Jçshû, which relates the story of Jesus as of a vulgar impostor; on the other hand, there are references to Jesus by Jews of repute which are dignified and respectful in tone, and show a real desire to be fair towards the Founder of that Christian religion whose adherents had inflicted such injuries on Jews. From this time onwards the Tôl’dôth has never wholly disappeared; but it was, naturally, never published by Jews, or even acknowledged by them. Three months afterwards, Johanan, learning the condition of Miriam, consults R. ’...
The foregoing may be taken to represent the general attitude of the mediaeval Rabbis towards Jesus; indeed, it is found in much later times. The attitude of Jews towards Christians began to change much earlier; but that does not come within the scope of this article. The reason is, of course, their desire to Ward off the charge made by the Christians, that the Talmud contains blasphemous allusions to Jesus
Belief (2) - The contributions towards the right understanding of the province and character of belief in more recent years have been of great value. James Ward, whose work in this relation is of the highest merit. He ventures in the belief that there is a correspondence between his inward nature and the world in which he lives; he believes that there is a constancy in things, that the qualities of things will remain constant. The earliest manifestation of belief among human beings is that which we call Animism, or the belief that all things have an inward life, and have their own nature and activity. We have spoken up to this point of the work of great personalities only so far as that work was a help towards the discovery of truth and a help to life. And each part of man’s complex nature makes its own demand and contributes its own share towards the realization of the ideal. Our moral nature demands its ideal of perfect goodness, righteousness, and holiness in order to meet the needs of our moral nature, and to give us scope for the exercise of reverence towards that which is above us, love towards all that helps and sustains us, and benevolence towards all that needs our help. The demand for unity, and the belief that unity is there, have led men on towards the conquest of the world,—which conquest has embodied itself, so far as it has gone, in the sciences and their practical applications and in the philosophies of the world