What does Violence mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
חָמָֽס violence 7
חָמָ֖ס violence 6
חָמָ֣ס violence 4
חָמָ֥ס violence 4
וַחֲמַס־ violence 2
חָמָס֙ violence 2
βίαν strength 1
חֲמָסִ֤י violence 1
וְחָמָ֣ס violence 1
מֵֽחֲמַס֙ violence 1
הֶחָמָ֖ס violence 1
חָמָ֔ס violence 1
מֵחֲמַ֛ס violence 1
חֲמָסִ֣ים violence 1
חָמָ֑ס violence 1
חֲמַ֥ס violence 1
וּ֭מֵחָמָס violence 1
הַמְּרוּצָ֖ה crushing 1
שֹׁד־ havoc 1
חֲמַ֤ס violence 1
חָמָ֗ס violence 1
לְחָמָ֣ס violence 1
וּגְזֵלָ֖ה plunder 1
βιάζεται to use force 1
ὁρμήματι a rush 1
וְגָזָ֔לוּ to tear away 1
גֵּ֣זֶל 1
גְּזֵלָ֖ה plunder 1
גְּזֵל֣וֹת plunder 1
תַּחְמֹ֔סוּ to wrong 1
וְחָמָ֖ס violence 1
וַיַּחְמֹ֤ס to wrong 1
חָמְס֖וּ to wrong 1
מֵחָמָ֖ס violence 1
מֵחֲמַ֖ס violence 1
חָמָ֤ס violence 1
הֶחָמָ֥ס ׀ violence 1
βίας strength 1
שֹׁ֭ד havoc 1

Definitions Related to Violence

H2555


   1 Violence, wrong, cruelty, injustice.
   

H7701


   1 havoc, Violence, destruction, devastation, ruin.
      1a Violence, havoc (as social sin).
      1b devastation, ruin.
      

H2554


   1 to wrong, do Violence to, treat violently, do wrongly.
      1a (Qal) to treat violently, do wrong.
         1a1 of physical wrong.
         1a2 of ethical wrong.
         1a3 of physical and ethical wrong.
      1b (Niphal) to be treated violently.
      

G970


   1 strength, whether of body or mind.
   2 strength in violent action, force.
   Additional Information: For synonyms see entries 1411, dunamis; 1753, energeia; 1849, exousia; 2479, ischus; and 2904, kratos.
   See entry 5820 for comparison of synonyms.
   

G971


   1 to use force, to apply force.
   2 to force, inflict Violence on.
   

H1497


   1 to tear away, seize, plunder, tear off, pull off, rob, take away by force.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to tear away, rob.
         1a2 to seize, plunder (with acc cognate).
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to be robbed.
         1b2 to be taken away.
         

H4835


   1 crushing, oppression.
   

H1499


H1500


   1 plunder, spoil, robbery.
   

G3731


   1 a rush, impulse.
   2 that which is impelled or hurried away by impulse.
   

Frequency of Violence (original languages)

Frequency of Violence (English)

Dictionary

Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Violence
Old Testament terms that particularly explicate the concept are chamac [1], gazal [2], and asaq [3], (and their derivatives). Primary among these is chamac [1]. The main New Testament term is bia [5], although it is used sparingly. An understanding of the phenomenon should not be built on isolated readings of what appear to be narratives of violence.
The term chamac [ Genesis 4:8,23 ). Jacob describes the swords of Simeon and Levi as "weapons of violence" (Genesis 49:5 ), an apparent reference to their killing the Shechemites (Genesis 34 ).
Sarah perceived the conception of Ishmael as violence done to her (Genesis 16:5 ). The Book of the Covenant identifies the act of carrying a false rumor with being a form of verbal violence (Exodus 23:1 ).
The Former Prophets also link violence with murder in the Gideon narrative, when the narrator refers to the murder of Abimelech's brothers as "violence" (Nehemiah 5:1-57 ). The specific nature of violence remains unspecified in 2 Samuel 22:3 , where David celebrates his deliverance from violence by God, although physical violence, including murder, might well be within the scope of the reference.
The Latter Prophets reflect the dual nuance of physical violence and nonphysical violence/ethical violence of the term. Jeremiah's complaint that his message is one of "violence and destruction" (20:8) is of particular interest because it serves as a possible double entendre. On the one hand, Jeremiah's message anticipated the violence of Babylonian destruction; in the context of his complaint, the prophet has just announced to Pashur ben Immer, the priest, that he will go into Babylonian captivity (20:1-6). The subsequent destruction of Jerusalem and the temple by Babylon, lamented by the prophet in Lamentations, is described as violence achieved by Yahweh (Lamentations 2:6 ). Furthermore, proclamation of the message elicited a violent act from Pashur ben Immer toward Jeremiah. On the other hand, from the prophet's perspective, the message itself appears to constitute verbal violence. Elsewhere, Jeremiah portrays taking advantage of the disadvantaged (orphan, widow, and stranger) as violence (Jeremiah 22:3 ).
In the dramatic prophetic narration of Ezekiel 8 , violence is described as pagan idolatry that had come to characterize Israel (v. 17). Ezekiel 45:9 confronts the "princes of Israel" for violence against their own people; the context takes the term in the direction of heavy taxation of the covenant community (cf. 1618453740_19 ).
Amos's antithetic woe to Zion and Samaria concerning delaying the day of calamity but bringing near "the seat of violence" (6:3) is ambiguous, but may allude to a reign/rule of violence that contextually refers to oppression of the disadvantaged (c.f. 3:9-10; 4:1). Micah's use of the term in 6:12 connotes verbal violence when he links it to "speaking lies" and "deceitful tongues." Three of Habakkuk's six uses of the term refer to violence done to the land (2:8,17 [6]). In two of those three uses, violence done to the land is paired with bloodshed (Habakkuk 2:8,17 ). Included in Zephaniah's excoriation of the covenant leaders of his day were the priests, who are accused of doing violence to the Law (3:4). Cultic violence seems to be the object of Yahweh's hatred, according to Malachi 2:16 .
The psalms employ the root fourteen times, mostly in unspecified contexts. However, two psalms use the term in the sense of verbal violence (27:12; 35:11)—two uses that seem to share some commonality with Exodus 23:1 and Deuteronomy 19:16 . This is a nuance that may also be intended by the dual proverbial use of the observation that the mouth of the wicked conceals violence (Proverbs 10:6,11 ). Lady Wisdom simply asserts that one who misses her inflicts violence on himself (Proverbs 8:36 ).
From an examination of the term chamac [1] we conclude that it may refer to either physical or nonphysical/ethical violence. However, from among the latter usages, one can further isolate the nuances of verbal violence and cultic violence.
The Pentateuch uses the term gazal [ Genesis 21:25 ).
Similar usage of the term is found in the Former Prophets when Judges 9:25 asserts that the Shechemites "plundered" all who passed by. Perhaps the Judges narrator intones a sense of ethical violence in his description of certain of the Benjaminites who carried away wives from among the dancing maidens (21:23). That the term is sometimes associated with physical harm is demonstrated by its use in 2 Samuel 23:21 (cf. 1 Chronicles 11:23 ).
Several of the Latter Prophets inveigh against various leaders of Israel because they, through legal manipulation or in some situations physical abuse, "plunder" the poor (Isaiah 3:14 ; 10:2 ; Jeremiah 22:3 ; Micah 2:2 ; 3:2 ; Malachi 1:13 ).
Wisdom use of the term correlates with the indictments of the prophets; one of the words of the wise counseled against plundering the poor because he is poor (Proverbs 22:22 ; cf. Job 20:19 ; 24:2,9 , 19 ). Ironically, evil men are "plundered" of sleep unless they are engaged in evil activity (Proverbs 4:16 ).
Conceptually, asaq [ 1 Samuel 12:2-3 ); the context appears to refer to activity akin to extortion/bribery, which he declares he had shunned in carrying out his covenant functions.
Hosea accused Ephraim of loving to oppress, a description that is paired with a description of a merchant with false balances (Hosea 12:7 ). Ezekiel indicates that neighbors have oppressed neighbors for profit by taking (charging) interest (22:12); and the prophet indicts the nation for "oppressing" the alien (22:7). Various pre- and postexilic prophets use the term with a similar nuance of ethical violence.
Verbal violence is, likewise, included in the scope of this term; Israel confessed in Isaiah's day that she was guilty of speaking oppression (Isaiah 59:13 ; cf. Psalm 73:8 ).
The wisdom slant tends to focus on ethical violence as well. An antithetical proverb juxtaposes oppressing the poor with being gracious to the needy (Proverbs 14:31 ); oppressing the poor for much gain is said to bring poverty (Proverbs 22:16 ). In a context where it is paired with bribery, Qoheleth asserts that "oppression" makes a wise person mad (Ecclesiastes 7:7 ).
Contextually, gazal [2] and asaq [3] come alongside each other quite literally inasmuch as the terms are paired in several passages. Leviticus 6:2,4 pair gazal [2] with asaq [3] as "plundering" and "extortion." The context is a continued discussion of the trespass offering, the introduction of which speaks of unintentional sin. That 6:1-7 addresses a trespass offering for intentional sin is evident from the nature of the situations described. Noteworthy is the fact that violent plundering of one's neighbor, whether figurative or literal, is cast as sin against Yahweh.
The two terms are paired again in Leviticus 19:13 , where "plundering" and "extortion" appear to be associated with withholding the wages of a hired person until the morning (cf. Deuteronomy 24:14 ).
Micah charges the officials of his day with coveting fields and "grasping" them (Micah 2:2 a); perhaps this violence was accomplished by means of "extortion" of the household (2:2b). Although none of the terms under examination is used by the narrator, the Ahab/Naboth incident appears to offer a classic narrative illustration of the Micah situation in the extreme. There, the "coveting"/"grasping" went beyond use of extortion as the vehicle. The violence of murder was Ahab's means of "grasping a field" (1 Kings 21 ).
The psalmist counsels not to trust in "oppression" (asaq [ Psalm 62:10 ). Wisdom literature pairs the terms in much the same way. Qoheleth recognized that officials were characterized by "extortion, " (asaq [ Ecclesiastes 5:8 ).
The range of meaning exposed by examination of the uses of the primary term, chamac [1], appears to be paradigmatic. inasmuch as the latter two terms mirror the physical/nonphysical (ethical) range, but stop short of the more particular nuances of ethical violence delineated above.
It is noteworthy that terms alluding to and the narrative descriptions of violence in the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles are less common than in the older biblical corpus.
In the much discussed context of Matthew 11:12 , Christ is narrated as using two forms of the term bia [2:2; 5:26; 21:25; 27:41) connote violence that either involves or potentially involves some form of physical harm.
John I. Lawlor
See also Judgment ; Justice ; Providence of God ; War, Holy War ; Wrath of God
Bibliography . P. C. Craigie, The Problem of War in the Old Testament ; J. Ellul, Violence: Reflections from a Christian Perspective ; H. Haag, TDOT , 4:478-87.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Violence
VIOLENCE.—In Luke 3:14 part of the advice given by John the Baptist to the soldiers was, ‘Do violence to no man’ (μηδένα διασείσητε), the verb meaning, ‘like concutio in juridical Latin, to extort from one by intimidation money or other property’ (Grimm-Thayer). The word occurs again in Matthew 11:12, where the adjective ‘violent’ is also found in Authorized Version . The adverb ‘violently’ appears in Luke 8:33 Authorized Version , ‘the herd ran violently (ὤρμησεν) down a steep place,’ and in Luke 16:16 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , ‘every man entereth violently into it’ (βιάζεται). Interest centres chiefly on the two passages Matthew 11:12 and Luke 16:16, which are so much alike, though in different contexts, that they are obviously two versions of the same saying. We place them side by side in order that they may be more easily compared.
Matthew 11:12-13.
Luke 16:16.
(a) πάντες γὰρ αἱ προφῆται χαὶ ὁ νόμος ἕως Ἰωάννου προεφήτευσαν (Matthew 11:13).
(α) ὁ νόμος καὶ οἱ προφῆται μίχρι Ἰωάννου.
(b) ἀπὸ δὲ τῶν ἡμερῶν Ἰωάννου τοῦ βαττιστοῦ ἔως ἄρτι.
(β) ἀπὸ τότε.
(c) ἡ βασιλεία τῶν οὐρανῶν βιάζεται.
(γ) ἡ βασιλεία τοῦ θεοῦ εὐαγ γελίζεται.
(d) καὶ βιασταὶ ἁρπάζουσιν αὐτήν.
(δ) καὶ πᾶς εἰς αὐτὴν βιάζεται.
It is evident that a, b, d closely correspond to α, β, δ; why, then, should not c be taken to convey the same idea as γ? This is the view of Melanchthon, Stier, Banks, and others, who hold that βιάζεται in Mt. is the Middle voice, as it undoubtedly is in the last clause of Luke. The translation will then be, ‘the kingdom of heaven advanceth violently,’ it forcibly introduces itself, coming with urgency and beating down all obstacles, ‘sese vi quasi obtrudit’ (Bengel, who adds ‘saepe LXX Septuagint βιάζομαι ponunt, vim adhibeo’). This is quite in keeping with the context, where Christ is extolling the work which John the Baptist had done as a pioneer and forerunner (cf. Matthew 3:5 f., Mark 1:5, Luke 7:29). It may be illustrated by the parables of the Mustard Seed and the Leaven (Matthew 13:31-33), and it has the great advantage of conveying the same sense as the parallel clause in Lk. ‘the kingdom of God is preached.’ The only serious objection urged against such a rendering by Meyer, Alford, and Bruce (in Expos. Gr. Test.) is that it would be inconsistent with the words following—‘the violent take it by force.’ Is there necessarily any inconsistency, however? May we not have here one of those passages where by a slight change in the expression, by a turning of the coin, as it were, a new and complementary truth is conveyed? Would there be any inconsistency if one were to say ‘the train is advancing quickly, and those who are quick succeed in entering it’? On the other hand, the translation of the Authorized and Revised Versions is open to the charge of being tautological.
βιάζεται is, however, usually taken as Passive in Matthew 11:12 (‘suffereth violence,’ Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ; ‘is gotten by force,’ AVm [1] ; vim patitur, Vulgate ; βιαίως κρατεῖται, Hesychius). The image may be taken from the storming of a city or from forcing an entrance through an opposing army: the word is used in Thucyd. Hist. vii. 70, 72, of the Athenian fleet forcing its way out of Syracuse (βιάζεσθαι τὸν ἔκπλουν), and in Xen. Hell. [2] v. ii. 23, of cities forced into a union (πόλεις τὰς βεβιασμένας).
The further question now arises, From whom does the violence proceed? and three answers are possible: (1) from true disciples, (2) from other aspirants, (3) from enemies, e.g. the scribes and Pharisees. If the last be adopted, the meaning will then be, ‘the kingdom of heaven is violently resisted, is crushed, and violent men tear it to pieces.’ So Dalman explains the passage (see below), and similarly Hilgenfeld in Mt. (‘is violently crushed’), but he would render in Lk. ‘every man is constrained by the gospel,’ taking βιάζεται as Passive). This, however, is partly an anachronism, for the imprisonment of John hardly justifies such strong language, and is partly forbidden by the connexion with v. 13 and with what goes before (see Meyer’s note). ‘Non est h. l. querela de vi mala, nam querela incipit versu 16’ (Bengel). ‘The subject is not the resistance made to the kingdom of heaven, but the difference between a prophesied and a present kingdom of heaven’ (Alford). The second answer is based on the supposition that Jesus here meant to rebuke a wrong method, not to commend a right one, and expressed disapproval of the violence of those who, misled by the free invitations of the gospel, were inclined to force an entrance, disregarding the requirements of the Law. In its favour it may be urged that this explanation admirably snits the difficult context of Luke 16:16 and the use of πᾶς, ‘every man entereth violently into it.’ Jesus shows in v. 17 f. that ‘the same orderly methods were to obtain in the Kingdom as under the Law; so much so that the Law itself might be said to be maintained in every detail. The Gospel was not a release from, but a deepening and widening and spiritualizing of the Law’s requirements’ (Canon Bindley, who advocates this view in a paper entitled ‘The Method of the Christ,’ Expos. Times, Feb. 1905).
The first answer, however, is preferred by most commentators, viz. that the βιασταί are the disciples who seek a share in the Heavenly Kingdom with ardent zeal and intensest exertions, ‘who strive to obtain its privileges with the utmost eagerness and effort’ (Grimm-Thayer), ‘men of violence’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ; there is no art. in the Greek), ‘violent men’ (Wycl. [3] ), ‘they that go to it with violence’ (Tind. [4] ), ‘the violent’ (Authorized Version , Cran. [1] , Gen. [6] , Rhem. [7] ), πάντες οἱ μετὰ σπουδῆς προσιόντες (Chrys.). Like the publicans and sinners, like Zacchaeus, they take the Kingdom by force, they drag it to themselves (ἀρπάζουσι, cf. John 6:15), they clutch at it like spoils and make it their own, ‘ut raptim, celerrima vi, perruptis obstaculis, ad se redigant bonum in medio positum’ (Bengel). This explanation agrees best with Pindar’s use of the similar word βιατάς, which has always a good sense (Meyer), ‘mighty, strong,’ and closely corresponds to Luke’s πᾶς εἰς αὐτὴν βιάζεται, ‘entereth violently into it’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ), ‘vi ingruit pia’ (Bengel); ‘presseth into it’ (Authorized Version ) is too weak. The hindrances are like a hostile army round a city which must be broken through with force; the same strenuous effort is required which is commanded in such passages as ‘strive (ἀγωνίζεσθε) to enter in by the narrow door’ (Luke 13:24), ‘ask, seek, and knock’ (Matthew 7:7), ‘fight the good fight of the faith’ (ἀγωνίζου, 1 Timothy 6:12), ‘so run that ye may attain’ (1 Corinthians 9:24), ‘contend earnestly for the faith’ (ἐπαγωμίζεσθαι, Judges 1:3). ‘Every man’ (πᾶς) is perhaps emphatic, showing that the Pharisees and the scribes must no longer look on the Kingdom as the exclusive possession of their nation or class; it was open to all nations, and might be entered by even the lowest men, though it would appear from the warning of the following verses that not all would seek it in the right spirit. ‘Jesus uses this strong figurative expression of violence and seizure, which in their peculiar meaning were applied to the unjust, forcible appropriation of others’ goods, not because He finds the point of analogy in the injustice and violence, as if men could appropriate a share in the Kingdom of God in opposition to the Divine will, but because He sought to lay stress upon the necessity of urgent energetic laying hold of a good to which they can make no claim. It is of no avail in regard to the Kingdom of God to wait idly, as in other cases men may take a waiting attitude in regard to a gift; nor does it avail to seek laboriously to earn it: but it does avail energetically to lay hold of and to retain it. It is ready as a gift of God for men, but men must direct their desire and will towards it’ (Wendt, The Teaching of Jesus, ii. 49, English translation ). It is possible, however, to take the words as a description rather than as a commendation of the disciples, and to find in them a reference to those earthly ideas of the Messianic Kingdom which even the Apostles held until the day of the Ascension (cf. Acts 1:6).
Dalman (The Words of Jesus, pp. 139–143, English translation ) in an important section, the substance of which is here transcribed, seeks to find the probable Aramaic antecedent of βιάζειται. A. Meyer suggests חסן, cf. Daniel 7:18; Daniel 7:22; but this would mean merely ‘to take possession of,’ and would hardly cause one writing in. Greek to use βιάζειν. He finds a better equivalent in חָּקף, which means in Peal ‘to be strong,’ in Aphel ‘to hold fast’; in Deuteronomy 22:25, Onkelos has וְיִחְקִף for Heb. וְהֶחֱזִיק, while the LXX Septuagint renders by βιασάμενος. It is important to remember that חְּקִף has no Passive; from this it would follow that the Passive βιάζεται, is not derived immediately from an Aramaic prototype. A solution more in conformity with the Greek may be arrived at provided אַנִם he made the starting-point, for it can mean ‘to use force’ and ‘to rob.’ The text (Matthew 11:12) thus refers to that period of the theocracy (i.e. the Kingdom of God) which was introduced by the imprisonment of John the Baptist; it is its peculiarity that the theocracy suffers violence, not, of course, from believers, but from those in authority. The words ἀρπάζουσιν αὐτήν (אִנְסוּהָא) are not intended to suggest that the violent seize the theocracy, but merely that they maltreat it in the persons of its representatives. The utterance occurs in St. Luke in an entirely different connexion. According to him, it is applied in opposition to the Pharisees, who despised the admonition as to the right use of money. Jesus declared to them that the proclamation of the theocracy since the time of John made it possible for any one to intrude himself violently into it: nevertheless it was not their own estimate, but the judgment of God that decided who was worthy of entrance. The context, however, in Lk. may be pronounced peculiarly Greek. Neither the Passive εὐαγγελίζεται nor εἰς αὐτὴν βιάζεται is capable of being directly rendered into Aramaic, especially if אֲנִם is used.
If it be supposed, adds Dalman, that by using (Luke 16:15-18) sayings of our Lord which originally had quite a different association, Lk. obtains the transition to a new parable, it may be surmised that he has given to Luke 16:16 its present form to accommodate it to the context. The saying which Mt. and Lk. found in their sources made mention only of the violent treatment of the theocracy since the time of John. St. Luke thought of attempted entrance into it, and thus found it natural to insert it here. St. Matthew, with greater reason, understood it to refer to the violent treatment of the preachers of the theocracy, and therefore connected it with the answer of Jesus to John. Neither by Jesus nor by the Evangelists is it suggested that any one could actually appropriate the theocracy by force. Unless absolutely driven to it, we ought not to try to discover beneath these words an idea so distinctly at variance with the whole style of our Lord’s teaching.
Literature.—In addition to the works cited above, a good article in Expos. Times, 1892–93, p. 510, by J. S. Banks, will be found useful. See also Expositor, i. iii. [8] 252, v. [9] 197, iv. vii. [10] 224.
W. H. Dundas
Holman Bible Dictionary - Violence
Use of force to injure or wrong. The Old Testament affirms that God hates violence (Malachi 2:16 ). The flood was God's response to a world filled and corrupted by violence (Genesis 6:11 ,Genesis 6:11,6:13 ). The Exile was likewise God's response to a Jerusalem filled with violence (Ezekiel 7:23 ). The Wisdom Literature often warns that those who live lives of violence will meet violent ends (Psalm 7:16 ; Proverbs 1:18-19 ; Proverbs 21:7 ; compare Matthew 26:52 ). Through the prophets God demanded an end to violence (Jeremiah 22:3 ; Ezekiel 45:9 ). Such violence was especially evidenced in the oppression of the poor by the rich (Psalm 55:9 ,Psalms 55:9,55:11 ; Psalm 73:6 ; Jeremiah 22:17 ; Micah 6:12 ; James 5:1-6 ). The servant of the Lord models a nonviolent response to violence (Isaiah 53:9 ; compare 1 Peter 2:23 ; James 5:6 ). Isaiah anticipated the end of violence in the Messianic age (Isaiah 60:18 ).
Matthew 11:12 is one of the most difficult texts in the New Testament. Does the kingdom of heaven suffer violence (KJV, NAS, REB, NRSV), or does the kingdom come “forcefully” (NIV)? The violence which John the Baptist ( Matthew 14:3-10 ) and believers (Matthew 5:10-11 ; Matthew 10:17 ; Matthew 23:34 ) suffer argues for the former. Other “violent” images of the kingdom's coming (Matthew 10:34-36 ; Luke 14:26-27 ) support the latter. Likewise, do violent men lay siege to the kingdom, or do “forceful men lay hold of it” (NIV)? Though the NIV interpretation fits well with Luke's parallel (Luke 16:16 ), it appears too much like an effort to tone down the real harshness of Matthew's language. Candidates for church leadership should be nonviolent persons (1 Timothy 3:3 ; Titus 1:7 ).
Webster's Dictionary - Violence
(1):
(v. t.) To assault; to injure; also, to bring by violence; to compel.
(2):
(n.) Ravishment; rape; constupration.
(3):
(n.) The quality or state of being violent; highly excited action, whether physical or moral; vehemence; impetuosity; force.
(4):
(n.) Injury done to that which is entitled to respect, reverence, or observance; profanation; infringement; unjust force; outrage; assault.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Violence
A. Noun.
Châmâs (חָמָס, Strong's #2555), “violence; wrong; maliciousness.” This word appears about 60 times and in all periods of biblical Hebrew.
Basically châmâs connotes the disruption of the divinely established order of things. It has a wide range of nuances within this legal sphere. The expression “a witness in the case of violent wrongdoing” means someone who bears witness in a case having to do with such an offense (cf. Deut. 19:16). In this context the truthfulness of the witness is not established except upon further investigation (Deut. 19:18). Once he was established as a false witness, the penalty for the crime concerning which he bore false witness was to be executed against the lair (cf. Deut. 19:19). In Exod. 23:1 Israel is admonished: “… Put not thine hand with the wicked to be an unrighteous witness,” i.e., a witness who in accusing someone of a violent crime intends to see the accused punished severely.
Châmâs perhaps connotes a “violent wrongdoing” which has not been righted, the guilt of which lies on an entire area (its inhabitants) disrupting their relationship with God and thereby interfering with His blessings.
It is this latter sense which appears in the phrase “the earth was full of violent wrongdoing”: “The earth also was corrupt before God, and the earth was filled with violence” (Gen. 6:11—the first occurrence of the word). Thus, in Gen. 16:5 Sarai summons God to judge between Abram and herself because he has not acted properly toward her keeping Hagar in submission: “My wrong [1] be upon thee: I have given my maid into thy bosom; and when she saw that she had conceived, I was despised in her eyes: the Lord judge between me and thee.” Abram as God’s judge (in God’s stead) accepts the correctness of her case and commits Hagar to Sarai’s care to be dealt with properly.
B. Verb.
Hamas means “to treat violently.” This verb, which occurs 7 times in biblical Hebrew, has cognates in Aramaic, Akkadian, and Arabic. This verb appears in Jer. 22:3 with the meaning of “to do no violence”: “… And do no wrong, do no violence to the stranger, the fatherless, nor the widow, neither shed innocent blood in this place.”
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Violence, Violent, Violently
A — 1: βία (Strong's #970 — Noun Feminine — bia — bee'-ah ) denotes "force, violence," said of men, Acts 5:26 ; 21:35 ; 24:7 ; of waves, 27:41.
A — 2: ὅρμημα (Strong's #3731 — Noun Neuter — hormema — hor'-may-mah ) "a rush" (akin to hormao, "to urge on, to rush"), is used of the fall of Babylon, Revelation 18:21 , AV, "violence," RV, "mighty fall."
A — 3: βιαστής (Strong's #973 — Noun Masculine — biastes — bee-as-tace' ) "a forceful or violent man," is used in Matthew 11:12 . See FORCE , B, No. 1, Note.
Note: In Hebrews 11:34 , AV, dunamis, "power" (RV), is rendered "violence."
B — 1: διασείω (Strong's #1286 — Verb — diaseio — dee-as-i'-o ) "to shake violently," is used in Luke 3:14 , "do violence," including intimidation. In the Sept., Job 4:14 .
B — 2: βιάζω (Strong's #971 — Verb — biazo — bee-ad'-zo ) in the Passive Voice, is rendered "suffereth violence" in Matthew 11:12 ; see FORCE , B, Nos. 1 and 2. Some, e.g., Cremer (Lexicon) and Dalman (Words of Jesus, pp. 139,ff.), hold that the reference is to the antagonism of the enemies of the kingdom, but Luke 16:16 (Middle Voice: RV, "entereth violently") indicates the meaning as referring to those who make an effort to enter the kingdom in spite of violent opposition: see PRESS , A, No. 3.
Note: For hormao, rendered "ran violently," in Matthew 8:32 and parallels, see RUN , RUSH.
King James Dictionary - Violence
VI'OLENCE, n. L. violentia.
1. Physical force strength of action or motion as the violence of a storm the violence of a blow or of a conflict. 2. Moral force vehemence. The critic attacked the work with violence. 3. Outrage unjust force crimes of all kinds. The earth was filled with violence. Genesis 6 .
4. Eagerness vehemence. You ask with violence.
5. Injury infringement. Offer no violence to the laws, or to the rules of civility. 6. Injury hurt. Do violence to no man. Luke 3 .
7. Ravishment rape. To do violence to or on, to attack to murder.
But, as it seems, did violence on herself.
To do violence to, to outrage to force to injure. He does violence to his own opinions.
VI'OLENCE, To assault to injure also, to bring by violence. Little used.

Sentence search

Violence - Physical force strength of action or motion as the Violence of a storm the Violence of a blow or of a conflict. The critic attacked the work with Violence. The earth was filled with Violence. You ask with Violence. Offer no Violence to the laws, or to the rules of civility. Do Violence to no man. To do Violence to or on, to attack to murder. ...
But, as it seems, did Violence on herself. ...
To do Violence to, to outrage to force to injure. He does Violence to his own opinions. ...
VI'OLENCE, To assault to injure also, to bring by Violence
Rapture - ) The state or condition of being rapt, or carried away from one's self by agreeable excitement; Violence of a pleasing passion; extreme joy or pleasure; ecstasy. ) A seizing by Violence; a hurrying along; rapidity with Violence
Bluster - ) Fitful noise and Violence, as of a storm; violent winds; boisterousness. ) To utter, or do, with noisy Violence; to force by blustering; to bully. ) To blow fitfully with Violence and noise, as wind; to be windy and boisterous, as the weather. ) To talk with noisy Violence; to swagger, as a turbulent or boasting person; to act in a noisy, tumultuous way; to play the bully; to storm; to rage
Violence - The Old Testament affirms that God hates Violence (Malachi 2:16 ). The flood was God's response to a world filled and corrupted by Violence (Genesis 6:11 ,Genesis 6:11,6:13 ). The Exile was likewise God's response to a Jerusalem filled with Violence (Ezekiel 7:23 ). The Wisdom Literature often warns that those who live lives of Violence will meet violent ends (Psalm 7:16 ; Proverbs 1:18-19 ; Proverbs 21:7 ; compare Matthew 26:52 ). Through the prophets God demanded an end to Violence (Jeremiah 22:3 ; Ezekiel 45:9 ). Such Violence was especially evidenced in the oppression of the poor by the rich (Psalm 55:9 ,Psalms 55:9,55:11 ; Psalm 73:6 ; Jeremiah 22:17 ; Micah 6:12 ; James 5:1-6 ). The servant of the Lord models a nonviolent response to Violence (Isaiah 53:9 ; compare 1 Peter 2:23 ; James 5:6 ). Isaiah anticipated the end of Violence in the Messianic age (Isaiah 60:18 ). Does the kingdom of heaven suffer Violence (KJV, NAS, REB, NRSV), or does the kingdom come “forcefully” (NIV)? The Violence which John the Baptist ( Matthew 14:3-10 ) and believers (Matthew 5:10-11 ; Matthew 10:17 ; Matthew 23:34 ) suffer argues for the former
Raging - Acting with Violence or fury. Fury Violence impetuosity
Violence - An understanding of the phenomenon should not be built on isolated readings of what appear to be narratives of Violence. Jacob describes the swords of Simeon and Levi as "weapons of Violence" (Genesis 49:5 ), an apparent reference to their killing the Shechemites (Genesis 34 ). ...
Sarah perceived the conception of Ishmael as Violence done to her (Genesis 16:5 ). The Book of the Covenant identifies the act of carrying a false rumor with being a form of verbal Violence (Exodus 23:1 ). ...
The Former Prophets also link Violence with murder in the Gideon narrative, when the narrator refers to the murder of Abimelech's brothers as "violence" (Judges 9:5,24 ). The specific nature of Violence remains unspecified in 2 Samuel 22:3 , where David celebrates his deliverance from Violence by God, although physical Violence, including murder, might well be within the scope of the reference. ...
The Latter Prophets reflect the dual nuance of physical Violence and nonphysical Violence/ethical Violence of the term. Jeremiah's complaint that his message is one of "violence and destruction" (20:8) is of particular interest because it serves as a possible double entendre. On the one hand, Jeremiah's message anticipated the Violence of Babylonian destruction; in the context of his complaint, the prophet has just announced to Pashur ben Immer, the priest, that he will go into Babylonian captivity (20:1-6). The subsequent destruction of Jerusalem and the temple by Babylon, lamented by the prophet in Lamentations, is described as Violence achieved by Yahweh (Lamentations 2:6 ). On the other hand, from the prophet's perspective, the message itself appears to constitute verbal Violence. Elsewhere, Jeremiah portrays taking advantage of the disadvantaged (orphan, widow, and stranger) as Violence (Jeremiah 22:3 ). ...
In the dramatic prophetic narration of Ezekiel 8 , Violence is described as pagan idolatry that had come to characterize Israel (v. Ezekiel 45:9 confronts the "princes of Israel" for Violence against their own people; the context takes the term in the direction of heavy taxation of the covenant community (cf. ...
Amos's antithetic woe to Zion and Samaria concerning delaying the day of calamity but bringing near "the seat of Violence" (6:3) is ambiguous, but may allude to a reign/rule of Violence that contextually refers to oppression of the disadvantaged (c. Micah's use of the term in 6:12 connotes verbal Violence when he links it to "speaking lies" and "deceitful tongues. " Three of Habakkuk's six uses of the term refer to Violence done to the land (2:8,17 [6]). In two of those three uses, Violence done to the land is paired with bloodshed (Habakkuk 2:8,17 ). Included in Zephaniah's excoriation of the covenant leaders of his day were the priests, who are accused of doing Violence to the Law (3:4). Cultic Violence seems to be the object of Yahweh's hatred, according to Malachi 2:16 . However, two psalms use the term in the sense of verbal Violence (27:12; 35:11)—two uses that seem to share some commonality with Exodus 23:1 and Deuteronomy 19:16 . This is a nuance that may also be intended by the dual proverbial use of the observation that the mouth of the wicked conceals Violence (Proverbs 10:6,11 ). Lady Wisdom simply asserts that one who misses her inflicts Violence on himself (Proverbs 8:36 ). ...
From an examination of the term chamac [1] we conclude that it may refer to either physical or nonphysical/ethical Violence. However, from among the latter usages, one can further isolate the nuances of verbal Violence and cultic Violence. Perhaps the Judges narrator intones a sense of ethical Violence in his description of certain of the Benjaminites who carried away wives from among the dancing maidens (21:23). Various pre- and postexilic prophets use the term with a similar nuance of ethical Violence. ...
Verbal Violence is, likewise, included in the scope of this term; Israel confessed in Isaiah's day that she was guilty of speaking oppression (Isaiah 59:13 ; cf. ...
The wisdom slant tends to focus on ethical Violence as well. ...
Micah charges the officials of his day with coveting fields and "grasping" them (Micah 2:2 a); perhaps this Violence was accomplished by means of "extortion" of the household (2:2b). The Violence of murder was Ahab's means of "grasping a field" (1 Kings 21 ). inasmuch as the latter two terms mirror the physical/nonphysical (ethical) range, but stop short of the more particular nuances of ethical Violence delineated above. ...
It is noteworthy that terms alluding to and the narrative descriptions of Violence in the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles are less common than in the older biblical corpus. ...
In the much discussed context of Matthew 11:12 , Christ is narrated as using two forms of the term bia [2:2; 5:26; 21:25; 27:41) connote Violence that either involves or potentially involves some form of physical harm. Ellul, Violence: Reflections from a Christian Perspective ; H
Eshek - Violence
Reddour - ) Rigor; Violence
Overforce - ) Excessive force; Violence
Terrorism - ) The practise of coercing governments to accede to political demands by committing Violence on civilian targets; any similar use of Violence to achieve goals
Exacerbation - ) A periodical increase of Violence in a disease, as in remittent or continious fever; an increased energy of diseased and painful action. ) The act rendering more violent or bitter; the state of being exacerbated or intensified in Violence or malignity; as, exacerbation of passion
Pellmell - ) In utter confusion; with confused Violence
Direptitiously - ) With plundering Violence; by violent injustice
Prensation - ) The act of seizing with Violence
Rabidly - ) In a rabid manner; with extreme Violence
Hauling - Drawing by force or Violence dragging
Rampageous - ) Characterized by Violence and passion; unruly; rampant
Bursting - Rending or parting by Violence exploding
Breaking - Parting by Violence rending asunder becoming bankrupt
Render - One that tears by Violence
Rapacious - ) Given to plunder; disposed or accustomed to seize by Violence; seizing by force. ) Accustomed to seize food; subsisting on prey, or animals seized by Violence; as, a tiger is a rapacious animal; a rapacious bird
Ravage - ) To lay waste by force; to desolate by Violence; to commit havoc or devastation upon; to spoil; to plunder; to consume. ) Desolation by Violence; violent ruin or destruction; devastation; havoc; waste; as, the ravage of a lion; the ravages of fire or tempest; the ravages of an army, or of time
Assassination - ) The act of assassinating; a killing by treacherous Violence
Slam-Bang - ) With great Violence; with a slamming or banging noise
Exasperater - ) One who exasperates or inflames anger, enmity, or Violence
Assaulted - Attacked with force, arms, Violence, or hostile views
Rifled - Seized and carried away by Violence pillaged channeled
Hurl - To throw with Violence to drive with great force as, to hurl a stone. The act of throwing with Violence
Hary - ) To draw; to drag; to carry off by Violence
Outwrest - ) To extort; to draw from or forth by Violence
Moderating - Reducing in Violence or excess allaying tempering becoming more mild
Tear - To separate by Violence or pulling to rend to lacerate as, to tear cloth to tear a garment, to tear the skin or flesh. To rend to break to form fissures by any Violence as, torrents tear the ground. To pull with Violence as, to tear the hair. To remove by Violence to break up. ...
To tear off, to pull off by Violence to strip. ...
To tear out, to pull or draw out by Violence as, to tear out the eyes. ...
To tear up, to rip up to remove from a fixed state by Violence as, to tear up a floor to tear up the foundations of government or order. ...
TEAR, To rave to rage to rant to move and act with turbulent Violence as a mad bull
Tragedy - ) A fatal and mournful event; any event in which human lives are lost by human Violence, more especially by unauthorized Violence
Broken - Parted by Violence rent asunder infirm made bankrupt
Exacerbescence - ) Increase of irritation or Violence, particularly the increase of a fever or disease
Abusiveness - ) The quality of being abusive; rudeness of language, or Violence to the person
Tearer - ) One who tears or rends anything; also, one who rages or raves with Violence
Ravished - Snatched away by Violence forced to submit to carnal embrace delighted to ecstasy
Burst - To fly or break open with force, or with sudden Violence to suffer a violent disruption. The peculiar force of this word is, in expressing a sudden rupture, with Violence, or expansion, or both. To come or fall upon suddenly or with Violence to rush upon unexpectedly as, a sound bursts upon our ears. To break or rush in with Violence as, to burst into a house or a room. ...
BURST, To break or rend by force or Violence to open suddenly as, to burst a chain or a door to burst a cannon. Opened or rent asunder by Violence
Craunch - ) To crush with the teeth; to chew with Violence and noise; to crunch
Vehemently - With great force and Violence
Prey - , taken or got by Violence; anything taken by force from an enemy in war; spoil; booty; plunder. ) To take booty; to gather spoil; to ravage; to take food by Violence
Out-Herod - ) To surpass (Herod) in Violence or wickedness; to exceed in any vicious or offensive particular
Violence, Violent, Violently - A — 1: βία (Strong's #970 — Noun Feminine — bia — bee'-ah ) denotes "force, Violence," said of men, Acts 5:26 ; 21:35 ; 24:7 ; of waves, 27:41. ...
A — 2: ὅρμημα (Strong's #3731 — Noun Neuter — hormema — hor'-may-mah ) "a rush" (akin to hormao, "to urge on, to rush"), is used of the fall of Babylon, Revelation 18:21 , AV, "violence," RV, "mighty fall. ...
Note: In Hebrews 11:34 , AV, dunamis, "power" (RV), is rendered "violence. " ...
B — 1: διασείω (Strong's #1286 — Verb — diaseio — dee-as-i'-o ) "to shake violently," is used in Luke 3:14 , "do Violence," including intimidation. ...
B — 2: βιάζω (Strong's #971 — Verb — biazo — bee-ad'-zo ) in the Passive Voice, is rendered "suffereth Violence" in Matthew 11:12 ; see FORCE , B, Nos
Booty - ) That which is seized by Violence or obtained by robbery, especially collective spoil taken in war; plunder; pillage
Seaworthiness - ) The state or quality of being seaworthy, or able to resist the ordinary Violence of wind and weather
Forced - Compelled impelled driven by Violence urged stormed ravished
Outrage - ) Injurious Violence or wanton wrong done to persons or things; a gross violation of right or decency; excessive abuse; wanton mischief; gross injury. ) To commit outrage upon; to subject to outrage; to treat with Violence or excessive abuse
Gently - Without Violence, roughness or asperity
Slay - ) To put to death with a weapon, or by Violence; hence, to kill; to put an end to; to destroy
Bulldoze - ) To intimidate; to restrain or coerce by intimidation or Violence; - used originally of the intimidation of negro voters, in Louisiana
Moderately - Temperately mildly without Violence
Tempestuous - Blowing with Violence as a tempestuous wind
Wrest - To twist or extort by Violence to pull or force from by violent wringing or twisting as, to wrest an instrument from anothers hands. To take or force from by Violence. To distort to turn from truth or twist from its natural meaning by Violence to pervert
Camorra - ) A secret organization formed at Naples, Italy, early in the 19th century, and used partly for political ends and partly for practicing extortion, Violence, etc
Blustering - ) Exhibiting noisy Violence, as the wind; stormy; tumultuous
Exasperation - ) Increase of Violence or malignity; aggravation; exacerbation
Robber - ) One who robs; in law, one who feloniously takes goods or money from the person of another by Violence or by putting him in fear
Traumatism - ) A wound or injury directly produced by causes external to the body; also, Violence producing a wound or injury; as, rupture of the stomach caused by traumatism
Breakwater - ) Any structure or contrivance, as a mole, or a wall at the mouth of a harbor, to break the force of waves, and afford protection from their Violence
Buffeting - ) A succession of blows; continued Violence, as of winds or waves; afflictions; adversity
Eagre - ) A wave, or two or three successive waves, of great height and Violence, at flood tide moving up an estuary or river; - commonly called the bore
Furious - ) Rushing with impetuosity; moving with Violence; as, a furious stream; a furious wind or storm
Crash - ) To break in pieces violently; to dash together with noise and Violence. ) To break with Violence and noise; as, the chimney in falling crashed through the roof
Rescue - ) To free or deliver from any confinement, Violence, danger, or evil; to liberate from actual restraint; to remove or withdraw from a state of exposure to evil; as, to rescue a prisoner from the enemy; to rescue seamen from destruction. ) The act of rescuing; deliverance from restraint, Violence, or danger; liberation
Raven - To obtain by Violence. Prey plunder food obtained by Violence
Revolting - Doing Violence, as to the feelings exciting abhorrence
Sever - To part or divide by Violence to separate by parting or rending as, to sever the body or the arm at a single stroke. To part from the rest by Violence as, to sever the head from the body. To disjoin to disunite in a general sense, but usually applying Violence
Violent - Produced by Violence not natural as a violent death. Acting by Violence assailant not authorized. ...
VI'OLENT, To urge with Violence
Tremendous - ) Fitted to excite fear or terror; such as may astonish or terrify by its magnitude, force, or Violence; terrible; dreadful; as, a tremendous wind; a tremendous shower; a tremendous shock or fall
Booty - That which is seized by Violence and robbery
Furious - Rushing with impetuosity moving with Violence as a furious stream a furious wind or storm
Vehemence - ) The quality pr state of being vehement; impetuous force; impetuosity; Violence; fury; as, the vehemence
Wrest - , to twist or extort by Violence; to pull of force away by, or as if by, violent wringing or twisting. ) To turn from truth; to twist from its natural or proper use or meaning by Violence; to pervert; to distort
Brunt - ) The heat, or utmost Violence, of an onset; the strength or greatest fury of any contention; as, the brunt of a battle
Lahmas - (lah' muhss) Place name perhaps meaning “violence
Euripus - ) A strait; a narrow tract of water, where the tide, or a current, flows and reflows with Violence, as the ancient fright of this name between Eubaea and Baeotia
Tear - ) To pull with Violence; as, to tear the hair. ) To move and act with turbulent Violence; to rush with Violence; hence, to rage; to rave. ) To separate by Violence; to pull apart by force; to rend; to lacerate; as, to tear cloth; to tear a garment; to tear the skin or flesh
Demolition - ) The act of overthrowing, pulling down, or destroying a pile or structure; destruction by Violence; utter overthrow; - opposed to construction; as, the demolition of a house, of military works, of a town, or of hopes
Rent - , are 'a rent']'>[1] by the hand of Violence
Boisterous - ) Exhibiting tumultuous Violence and fury; acting with noisy turbulence; violent; rough; stormy
Epitasis - ) The period of Violence in a fever or disease; paroxysm
Force - ) To use Violence; to make violent effort; to strive; to endeavor. ) Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; Violence; coercion. ) Strength or power exercised without law, or contrary to law, upon persons or things; Violence. ) To do Violence to; to overpower, or to compel by Violence to one;s will; especially, to ravish; to violate; to commit rape upon. ) To obtain or win by strength; to take by Violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress. , by main strength or Violence; - with a following adverb, as along, away, from, into, through, out, etc
Ushing - ) Rushing forth with Violence, as a fluid; flowing copiously; as, gushing waters
Abduct - ) To take away surreptitiously by force; to carry away (a human being) wrongfully and usually by Violence; to kidnap
Assault - ) To make an assault upon, as by a sudden rush of armed men; to attack with unlawful or insulting physical Violence or menaces. ) An apparently violent attempt, or willful offer with force or Violence, to do hurt to another; an attempt or offer to beat another, accompanied by a degree of Violence, but without touching his person, as by lifting the fist, or a cane, in a threatening manner, or by striking at him, and missing him
Rap - ...
To rap out, to utter with sudden Violence as, to rap out an oath. To seize by Violence. To rap and rend, to seize and tear or strip to fall on and plunder to snatch by Violence
Defence - ) That which defends or protects; anything employed to oppose attack, ward off Violence or danger, or maintain security; a guard; a protection. ) The act of defending, or the state of being defended; protection, as from Violence or danger
Wound - A breach of the skin and flesh of an animal, or of the bark and wood of a tree, or of the bark and substance of other plants, caused by Violence or external force. WOUND, To hurt by Violence as, to wound the head or the arm to wound a tree
Recaption - ) The act of retaking, as of one who has escaped after arrest; reprisal; the retaking of one's own goods, chattels, wife, or children, without force or Violence, from one who has taken them and who wrongfully detains them
Amnon - Eldest son of David by Ahinoam: he was slain by Absalom for the Violence done to his sister Tamar
Assassinate - ) To kill by surprise or secret assault; to murder by treacherous Violence
Unhinge - ) To displace; to unfix by Violence
Euroclydon - " It blows from all points, and its danger results from its Violence and the uncertainty of its course
Writhe - To twist with Violence as, to writhe the body
Ravine - ) Food obtained by Violence; plunder; prey; raven
Ravish - ) To seize and carry away by Violence; to snatch by force
Misuse - ) Violence, or its effects
Piracy - ) Robbery on the high seas; the taking of property from others on the open sea by open Violence; without lawful authority, and with intent to steal; - a crime answering to robbery on land
Ahikam - Later he used his influence to protect Jeremiah from the Violence of the populace during the reign of Jehoiakim ( Jeremiah 26:24 )
Wring - ) To extract or obtain by twisting and compressing; to squeeze or press (out); hence, to extort; to draw forth by Violence, or against resistance or repugnance; - usually with out or form. ) To twist and compress; to turn and strain with Violence; to writhe; to squeeze hard; to pinch; as, to wring clothes in washing
Burke - ) To murder by suffocation, or so as to produce few marks of Violence, for the purpose of obtaining a body to be sold for dissection
Heteronomy - ) A term applied by Kant to those laws which are imposed on us from without, or the Violence done to us by our passions, wants, or desires
Wreck - ) To bring wreck or ruin upon by any kind of Violence; to destroy, as a railroad train. ) Destruction or injury of anything, especially by Violence; ruin; as, the wreck of a railroad train. ) The ruins of a ship stranded; a ship dashed against rocks or land, and broken, or otherwise rendered useless, by Violence and fracture; as, they burned the wreck
Shalman - His name became synonymous with Violence and ruthlessness
Prester - ) A meteor or exhalation formerly supposed to be thrown from the clouds with such Violence that by collision it is set on fire
Abduction - (Latin: abducere, to lead away) ...
Also known as rape; force, or Violence
Rob - by Violence. ) To take the property of (any one) from his person, or in his presence, feloniously, and against his will, by Violence or by putting him in fear
Crunch - ) To grind or press with Violence and noise
Anabaptists - ” They believed in non-violence and opposed state run churches
Top Fermentation - It proceeds with some Violence and requires a temperature of 14-30� C
Dint - ) The mark left by a blow; an indentation or impression made by Violence; a dent
Duress - ) The state of compulsion or necessity in which a person is influenced, whether by the unlawful restrain of his liberty or by actual or threatened physical Violence, to incur a civil liability or to commit an offense
Belch - To throw or eject wind from the stomach with Violence
Malevolence - It discovers itself in frowns and a lowering countenance; in uncharitableness, in evil sentiments; hard speeches to or of its object; in cursing and reviling; and doing mischief either with open Violence or secret spite, as far as there is power
Madness - In Scripture "madness" is recognized as a derangement proceeding either from weakness and misdirection of intellect or from ungovernable Violence of passion
Wound - ) To hurt by Violence; to produce a breach, or separation of parts, in, as by a cut, stab, blow, or the like. ) A hurt or injury caused by Violence; specifically, a breach of the skin and flesh of an animal, or in the substance of any creature or living thing; a cut, stab, rent, or the like
Franco, Boniface - He died, probably by Violence, after a reign of less than two years
Cheek - To be smitten on the cheek was the climax of insult and Violence
John Xiv, Pope - After the death of Otto, the pope was incarcerated by the antipope, Boniface VII, in the Castle of Sant' Angelo where he died, possibly by Violence
Campanora, Peter - After the death of Otto, the pope was incarcerated by the antipope, Boniface VII, in the Castle of Sant' Angelo where he died, possibly by Violence
Methuselah - The name is interpreted by Holzinger as ‘man of the javelin’ a fitting name for a time when the earth was full of Violence
Rend - ) To separate into parts with force or sudden Violence; to tear asunder; to split; to burst; as, powder rends a rock in blasting; lightning rends an oak
Violence - ) To assault; to injure; also, to bring by Violence; to compel
Violate - ) To do Violence to, as to anything that should be held sacred or respected; to profane; to desecrate; to break forcibly; to trench upon; to infringe
Explode - ) To drive out with Violence and noise, as by powder. ) To burst forth with sudden Violence and noise; as, at this, his wrath exploded
Rend - To separate any substance into parts with force or sudden Violence to tear asunder to split as, powder rends a rock in blasting lightning rends an oak. To separate or part with Violence
Combat - ) A fight; a contest of Violence; a struggle for supremacy
Concussion - ) The unlawful forcing of another by threats of Violence to yield up something of value
Pillage - ) To strip of money or goods by open Violence; to plunder; to spoil; to lay waste; as, to pillage the camp of an enemy
Highness - Violence as the highness of wind
Smash - ) To break in pieces by Violence; to dash to pieces; to crush
Precipitation - ) A falling, flowing, or rushing downward with Violence and rapidity
Parting - In seamen's language, the breaking of a cable by Violence
Flame - Rage Violence as the flames of war. To break out in Violence of passion
Rush - ) To move forward with impetuosity, Violence, and tumultuous rapidity or haste; as, armies rush to battle; waters rush down a precipice. ) To push or urge forward with impetuosity or Violence; to hurry forward
Violence - ...
Châmâs (חָמָס, Strong's #2555), “violence; wrong; maliciousness. ...
It is this latter sense which appears in the phrase “the earth was full of violent wrongdoing”: “The earth also was corrupt before God, and the earth was filled with Violence” ( Violence”: “… And do no wrong, do no Violence to the stranger, the fatherless, nor the widow, neither shed innocent blood in this place
Booming - ) Rushing with Violence; swelling with a hollow sound; making a hollow sound or note; roaring; resounding
Slot - ) To shut with Violence; to slam; as, to slot a door
Violation - ) The act of violating, treating with Violence, or injuring; the state of being violated
Julius - He suffered him to land at Sidon, and to visit his friends there; and in a subsequent part of the voyage he opposed the Violence of the soldiers, directed against the prisoners generally, in order to save the apostle, Acts 27:1-44
Obadiah - He protected God’s prophets from Jezebel’s Violence, and on one occasion carried a message from Elijah to Ahab (1 Kings 18:1-16)
Churn - ) To shake or agitate with Violence
Palliate - ) To reduce in Violence; to lessen or abate; to mitigate; to ease withhout curing; as, to palliate a disease
Explosion - ) A bursting with Violence and loud noise, because of internal pressure; as, the explosion of a gun, a bomb, a steam boiler, etc
Ananias - He was acquitted by Claudius of Rome from an accusation of permitting Violence, and murdered at the beginning of the Jewish war (Acts 23; 24)
Tempest - ) An extensive current of wind, rushing with great velocity and Violence, and commonly attended with rain, hail, or snow; a furious storm
Fury - ) Violent anger; extreme wrath; rage; - sometimes applied to inanimate things, as the wind or storms; impetuosity; Violence
Massacre - ) To kill in considerable numbers where much resistance can not be made; to kill with indiscriminate Violence, without necessity, and contrary to the usages of nations; to butcher; to slaughter; - limited to the killing of human beings
Fling - ) To cast, send, to throw from the hand; to hurl; to dart; to emit with Violence as if thrown from the hand; as, to fing a stone into the pond. ) To throw one's self in a violent or hasty manner; to rush or spring with Violence or haste
Lucius ii, Pope - He died as the result of Violence received from a Roman mob
Fierceness - Violence outrageous passion
Explosive - ) Driving or bursting out with Violence and noise; causing explosion; as, the explosive force of gunpowder
Acuteness - ) Violence of a disease, which brings it speedily to a crisis
Ephesus, Robber Council of - Disgraceful scenes of Violence occurred during one of the flrst sessions; Eutyches was vindicated, and Saint Flavian, and Theodoret, Bishop of Cyprus, were condemned without hearings
Fraction - ) The act of breaking, or state of being broken, especially by Violence
Wiredraw - ) Hence, to draw by art or Violence
Gherardo Caccianemici Dal Orbo - He died as the result of Violence received from a Roman mob
Robber Council of Ephesus - Disgraceful scenes of Violence occurred during one of the flrst sessions; Eutyches was vindicated, and Saint Flavian, and Theodoret, Bishop of Cyprus, were condemned without hearings
Fly - To part suddenly or with Violence to burst, as a bottle. To assail to resist to set at defiance to oppose with Violence to act in direct opposition. To fly open, to open suddenly or with Violence as, the doors flew open. To start or issue with Violence from any direction. To let fly, to discharge to throw or drive with Violence as, to let fly a shower of darts
Belch - ) To eject or throw up from the stomach with Violence; to eruct
Disgorge - ) To eject or discharge by the throat and mouth; to vomit; to pour forth or throw out with Violence, as if from the mouth; to discharge violently or in great quantities from a confined place
Compel - ) To take by force or Violence; to seize; to exact; to extort
Rosh - Herodotus, the Greek historian, says: "For twenty-eight years the Scythians ruled over Asia, and things were turned upside down by their Violence and contempt
Fend - , with too much Violence
Moderation - The state of being moderate, or of keeping a due mean between extremes or excess of Violence
Foam - ...
FOAM, To throw out with rage or Violence with out
Brute - Bestial in common with beasts as brute Violence
Thief - One who takes the property of another wrongfully, either secretly or by Violence
Baasha - Baasha gained the throne of Israel by Violence
Orlando Bandinelli - Elected pope almost unanimously, he was opposed with Violence by the anti-pope, Cardinal Octavian, the imperial candidate, and took refuge in Anagni
Agitation - ) The act of agitating, or the state of being agitated; the state of being moved with Violence, or with irregular action; commotion; as, the sea after a storm is in agitation
Assail - To leap or fall upon by Violence to assault to attack suddenly, as when one person falls upon another to beat him
Ospray, (Osprey) - The osprey belongs to the family of Falconidae, of the order of birds which seize their food with Violence
Gush - To issue with Violence and rapidity, as a fluid to rush forth as a fluid from confinement as, blood gushes from a vein in venesection
Violent - ) To urge with Violence
Remission - ) A temporary and incomplete subsidence of the force or Violence of a disease or of pain, as destinguished from intermission, in which the disease completely leaves the patient for a time; abatement
Ecclesiastical Privileges - , the clerical privileges of protection against Violence (privilegium canonis), of ecclesiastical court (privilegium fori), of personal immunity, of benefit in case of insolvency
Alexander Iii, Pope - Elected pope almost unanimously, he was opposed with Violence by the anti-pope, Cardinal Octavian, the imperial candidate, and took refuge in Anagni
Lamech - Lamech acknowledged his vengeance (sign of Violence), for some injury he had received, but intimated his belief that God would watch over him as He had over the life of Cain
Bandinelli, Orlando - Elected pope almost unanimously, he was opposed with Violence by the anti-pope, Cardinal Octavian, the imperial candidate, and took refuge in Anagni
Conflict - To strike or dash against to meet and oppose, as bodies driven by Violence as conflicting waves or elements. To drive or strike against, as contending men, or armies to fight to contend with Violence as conflicting armies
Tempest - An extensive current of wind, rushing with great velocity and Violence a storm of extreme Violence
Foam - ) To cause to foam; as,to foam the goblet; also (with out), to throw out with rage or Violence, as foam
Flame - ) To burst forth like flame; to break out in Violence of passion; to be kindled with zeal or ardor
Distrain - ) To press heavily upon; to bear down upon with Violence; hence, to constrain or compel; to bind; to distress, torment, or afflict
Fortify - To furnish with strength or means of resisting force, Violence or assault
Random - ) Force; Violence
Kick - To thrust out the foot or feet with Violence, either in wantonness, resistance, anger or contempt to manifest opposition
Pinianus, Husband of Melania the Younger - A tumult was raised in the church, and though Augustine refused to ordain a man against his will, he was unable, or not firm enough, to resist the Violence of the people, who extracted from Pinianus a promise that he would not leave Hippo nor be ordained in any other church. Next day, however, fearing further Violence, he, with Melania and her mother Albina, returned to Tagaste. Alypius considered that a promise extorted by Violence was not valid, Augustine demanded that it should be fulfilled; and the controversy lasted until, by the rapacity of the rebel count Heraclian, Pinianus was robbed of his property, and the people of Hippo no longer cared to enforce the promise
Flounce - ) To throw the limbs and body one way and the other; to spring, turn, or twist with sudden effort or Violence; to struggle, as a horse in mire; to flounder; to throw one's self with a jerk or spasm, often as in displeasure
Pant - ) To beat with unnatural Violence or rapidity; to palpitate, or throb; - said of the heart
Fairly - Without perversion or Violence as, an inference may be fairly deduced from the premises
Rescue - ...
To free or deliver from any confinement, Violence, danger or evil to liberate from actual restraint, or to remove or withdraw from a state of exposure to evil as, to rescue a prisoner from an officer to rescue seamen from destruction by shipwreck
Force - Violence power exerted against will or consent compulsory power. In law, any unlawful Violence to person or property. It is compound, when some other Violence or unlawful act is committed. To storm to assault and take by Violence as, to force a town or fort. To use Violence
Rape - This quest for dignity was a driving force behind acts of retaliatory Violence recorded in the narrative texts. These texts, however, suggest the ease with which the victim is forgotten in the spiral of vengeful Violence
Pirate - ) A robber on the high seas; one who by open Violence takes the property of another on the high seas; especially, one who makes it his business to cruise for robbery or plunder; a freebooter on the seas; also, one who steals in a harbor
Brute - Hence: Brutal; cruel; fierce; ferocious; savage; pitiless; as, brute Violence
Bull - They released their hatred in Violence against the precious Son of GOD
Rupture - ) To part by Violence; to break; to burst; as, to rupture a blood vessel
Pant - To palpitate to beat with preternatural Violence or rapidity, as the heart in terror, or after hard labor, or in anxious desire or suspense
Sebastian Rasle - In 1705 the English burned his church, part of the Violence of Queen Anne's War
Rasle, Sebastian - In 1705 the English burned his church, part of the Violence of Queen Anne's War
Chink - ) A short, sharp sound, as of metal struck with a slight degree of Violence
Dancers - It was their custom all of a sudden to fall a dancing, and, holding each other's hands, to continue thereat, till, being suffocated with the extraordinary Violence, they fell down breathless together
Distraction - We usually apply this word to a state of derangement which produces raving and Violence in the patient
Enosh - As the time of Cain was marked by sin and Violence, so that of Seth was marked by piety
Sever - ) To separate, as one from another; to cut off from something; to divide; to part in any way, especially by Violence, as by cutting, rending, etc
Harrow - To pillage to strip to lay waste by Violence
Shipwreck - , by the Violence of the winds and waves
Ramp - ) To move by leaps, or as by leaps; hence, to move swiftly or with Violence
Trash - ) To follow with Violence and trampling
Rahab - An appellation for Egypt, designating the insolence and Violence of its princes and inhabitants
Remission - In medicine, abatement a temporary subsidence of the force or Violence of a disease or of pain, as distinguished from intermission, in which the disease leaves the patient entirely for a time
Hophni And Phinehas - They grossly and continuously abused the influence of their position and sacred office; and their cupidity, Violence, and impious profligacy, overbearing the feeble remonstrances of their father, brought disgrace and ruin on their family
Flash - A body of water driven by Violence. To burst out into any kind of Violence
Salim - The difficulties of other suggested identifications can be got over only by doing Violence to the text (Cheyne, EBi Robber - 1: λῃστής (Strong's #3027 — Noun Masculine — lestes — lace-tace' ) "a robber, brigand" (akin to leia, "booty"), "one who plunders openly and by Violence" (in contrast to kleptes, "a thief," see below), is always translated "robber" or "robbers" in the RV , as the AV in John 10:1,8 ; 18:40 ; 2 Corinthians 11:26 ; the AV has "thief" or "thieves" in Matthew 21:13 , and parallel passages; Matthew 26:55 , and parallel passages; Matthew 27:38,44 ; Mark 15:27 ; Luke 10:30,36 ; but "thief" is the meaning of kleptes
Rigor - ) Violence; force; fury
Ag - ) To stop the mouth of, by thrusting sometimes in, so as to hinder speaking; hence, to silence by authority or by Violence; not to allow freedom of speech to
Inspiration - Though God used man as His instrument in writing these books, He did so in harmony with man's nature, no Violence being done to the natural activity of his human faculties
Injury - These injuries may be received by a fall or by other Violence
Batter - ) To beat with successive blows; to beat repeatedly and with Violence, so as to bruise, shatter, or demolish; as, to batter a wall or rampart
Peace - That state of mind in which persons are exposed to no open Violence to interrupt their tranquillity
Blast - To affect with some sudden Violence,plague, calamity, or destructive influence, which destroys or causes to fail as, to blast pride or hopes
Injurious - Violence is injurious to the person, as intemperance is to the health
Dump - ) To put or throw down with more or less of Violence; hence, to unload from a cart by tilting it; as, to dump sand, coal, etc
Enforce - ) To put in motion or action by Violence; to drive
Compel - To force to take by force, or Violence to seize
Stephanus, Bishop of Ephesus - Bassianus had been expelled by Violence from the see c
Shock - ) To give a shock to; to cause to shake or waver; hence, to strike against suddenly; to encounter with Violence. ) To strike with surprise, terror, horror, or disgust; to cause to recoil; as, his Violence shocked his associates
Bernardo Paganelli - He was elected pope, and forced to take up his residence at Viterbo, due to the Violence of the Roman mob
Bernardo Pignatelli - He was elected pope, and forced to take up his residence at Viterbo, due to the Violence of the Roman mob
Paganelli, Bernardo - He was elected pope, and forced to take up his residence at Viterbo, due to the Violence of the Roman mob
Leah - When Jacob returned to Palestine from Padan-aram, Leah and her children were placed in front of Rachel and Joseph, evidently to absorb any Violence from Esau, Jacob's brother
Cruelty - ]'>[1] has introduced ‘rigour’ and ‘violence’ in its stead
Shiver - ) One of the small pieces, or splinters, into which a brittle thing is broken by sudden Violence; - generally used in the plural
Anarchy - Others are revolutionary and propose to establish anarchism by Violence
Breach - ) A gap or opening made made by breaking or battering, as in a wall or fortification; the space between the parts of a solid body rent by Violence; a break; a rupture
Forcible - Containing force acting by Violence as forcible means
Revolt - ) To do Violence to; to cause to turn away or shrink with abhorrence; to shock; as, to revolt the feelings
Eugene Iii, Pope Blessed - He was elected pope, and forced to take up his residence at Viterbo, due to the Violence of the Roman mob
Flour - Were not the whole of these offerings with an eye to Christ? Was not Jesus the first of the finest flour? And if the church, while presenting their offerings of the finest flour, with an eye to Christ, were in the appointments of the Lord, may we not, without Violence to the original, suppose, that JEHOVAH feeding the people with the finest wheat had an eye to Christ?...
Rid - To drive away to remove by Violence to destroy
Domenis, Marco Antonio de - Having recanted all that he had written against the papacy, he attacked the Anglican Church with equal Violence
Marco Antonio de Dominis - Having recanted all that he had written against the papacy, he attacked the Anglican Church with equal Violence
Buffeting - It vividly represents the brutal manual Violence to which our Lord was subjected
Broken - ) Separated into parts or pieces by Violence; divided into fragments; as, a broken chain or rope; a broken dish
Pain - ) Any uneasy sensation in animal bodies, from slight uneasiness to extreme distress or torture, proceeding from a derangement of functions, disease, or injury by Violence; bodily distress; bodily suffering; an ache; a smart
Wrench - ) To pull with a twist; to wrest, twist, or force by Violence
Abate - ) To decrease, or become less in strength or Violence; as, pain abates, a storm abates
Remit - ) To abate in force or in Violence; to grow less intense; to become moderated; to abate; to relax; as, a fever remits; the severity of the weather remits
Kick - ) To thrust out the foot or feet with Violence; to strike out with the foot or feet, as in defense or in bad temper; esp
Achan - " Some of the critics have made efforts to confine the stoning to Achan, and the burning to his goods; but not without Violence to the text
Obadiah - It cannot indeed be decided with certainty when he lived, but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah and Ezekiel, who denounced the same dreadful judgments on the Edomites, as the punishment of their pride, Violence, and cruel insulting over the Jews after the destruction of their city
Ram - To thrust or drive with Violence to force in to drive down or together as, to ram down a cartridge to ram piles into the earth
Vengeance - ...
With a vengeance, in familiar language, signifies with great Violence or vehemence as, to strike one with a vengeance
Levi - Jacob announced that because of his son’s Violence, the descendants of Levi would be scattered in Israel (Genesis 49:5-7); but because of their zeal against idolatry in the time of Moses, God made their scattering honourable
Violence - VIOLENCE. —In Luke 3:14 part of the advice given by John the Baptist to the soldiers was, ‘Do Violence to no man’ (μηδένα διασείσητε), the verb meaning, ‘like concutio in juridical Latin, to extort from one by intimidation money or other property’ (Grimm-Thayer). ...
βιάζεται is, however, usually taken as Passive in Matthew 11:12 (‘suffereth Violence,’ Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ; ‘is gotten by force,’ AVm
The further question now arises, From whom does the Violence proceed? and three answers are possible: (1) from true disciples, (2) from other aspirants, (3) from enemies, e. The second answer is based on the supposition that Jesus here meant to rebuke a wrong method, not to commend a right one, and expressed disapproval of the Violence of those who, misled by the free invitations of the gospel, were inclined to force an entrance, disregarding the requirements of the Law. that the βιασταί are the disciples who seek a share in the Heavenly Kingdom with ardent zeal and intensest exertions, ‘who strive to obtain its privileges with the utmost eagerness and effort’ (Grimm-Thayer), ‘men of Violence’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ; there is no art. ]'>[3] ), ‘they that go to it with Violence’ (Tind. ‘Jesus uses this strong figurative expression of Violence and seizure, which in their peculiar meaning were applied to the unjust, forcible appropriation of others’ goods, not because He finds the point of analogy in the injustice and Violence, as if men could appropriate a share in the Kingdom of God in opposition to the Divine will, but because He sought to lay stress upon the necessity of urgent energetic laying hold of a good to which they can make no claim. the Kingdom of God) which was introduced by the imprisonment of John the Baptist; it is its peculiarity that the theocracy suffers Violence, not, of course, from believers, but from those in authority
Knownothingism - The property and persons of its innocent victims were subjected to revolting examples of mob Violence
Excess - A synonymous noun is aselgeia, "lasciviousness, outrageous conduct, wanton Violence
Bleed - ) To lose or shed one's blood, as in case of a violent death or severe wounds; to die by Violence
Attack - ) The act of attacking, or falling on with force or Violence; an onset; an assault; - opposed to defense
Bang - ) To beat, as with a club or cudgel; to treat with Violence; to handle roughly
Trespass - ) An unlawful act committed with force and Violence (vi et armis) on the person, property, or relative rights of another
Breach - The act of breaking or state of being broken a rupture a break a gap the space between the severed parts of a solid body parted by Violence as a breach in a garment, or in a wall
Forbear - To be patient to restrain from action or Violence
Annihilation - Existence, say they, is a state of Violence; all things are continually endeavoring to return to their primitive nothing: it requires no power at all; it will do it itself: nay, more, it requires an infinite power to prevent it
Menandrians - He taught, that no person could be saved unless he were baptised in his name; and he conferred a peculiar sort of baptism, which would render those who received it immortal in the next world; exhibiting himself to the world with the phrenzy of a lunatic more than the founder of a sect as a promised saviour; for it appears by the testimonies of Irenxus, Justin, and Tertullian, that he pretended to be one of the xons sent from the pleroma, or ecclesiastical regious, to succour the souls that lay groaning under bodily oppression and servitude; and to maintain them against the Violence and stratagems of the daemons that hold the reins of empire in this sublunary world
War - ) To make war; to invade or attack a state or nation with force of arms; to carry on hostilities; to be in a state by Violence
Mole - , laid in the sea, often extended either in a right line or an arc of a circle before a port which it serves to defend from the Violence of the waves, thus protecting ships in a harbor; also, sometimes, the harbor itself
Epicureans - At Paul's time they had become exceedingly corrupt, and of course their philosophy and their life both led them to oppose with Violence his great truths concerning God, the resurrection, and the judgment ever lasting, Acts 17:16 - 34
Vomit - To eject with Violence from any hollow place
Serenus, Bishop of Marseilles - Gregory, commending his fervour against idolatry, reproved his Violence, since the use of representations in a church was that the unlearned might read on the walls what they were unable to read in the Scriptures (ix
Dash - ) To throw with Violence or haste; to cause to strike violently or hastily; - often used with against. ) To rust with Violence; to move impetuously; to strike violently; as, the waves dash upon rocks
Dash - To rush with Violence, and break through as, he dashed into the enemy's ranks or he dashed through thick and thin. a rushing, or onset with Violence as, to make a dash upon the enemy
Break - To part or divide by force and Violence, as a solid substance to rend apart as, to break a band to break a thread or a cable. To make way with Violence or suddenness to rush often with a particle as, to break in to break in upon, as calamities to break over, as a flood to break out, as a fire to break forth, as light or a sound. ...
To break loose, to get free by force to escape from confinement by Violence to shake off restraint. ...
To break off from, to part from with Violence. ...
This verb carries with it its primitive sense of straining, parting, severing, bursting, often with Violence, with the consequential senses of injury, defect and infirmity
Humility And Cheerpulness - Its cheerfulness, in that it seems to exult under all kinds of Violence and suffering
Buffet - ) A blow from any source, or that which affects like a blow, as the Violence of winds or waves; a stroke; an adverse action; an affliction; a trial; adversity
Sheminith - If therefore we suppose (and which I venture to think may be done without Violence) that the blessed things contained in them refer to Christ, may we not suppose also that the Psalm itself is therefore dedicated to him? If the reader wishes to see yet farther the foundation of such probable conclusions, I refer him to Parkhurst's Lexicon, page 696, or Fenwick on Titles of the Psalms, page 18
Defend - To secure against attacks or evil to fortify against danger or Violence to set obstacles to the approach of any thing that can annoy
Hurt - To bruise to give pain by a contusion, pressure, or any Violence to the body
Revolt - To shock to do Violence to to cause to shrink or turn away with abhorrence as, to revolt the mind or the feelings
Senuti, an Anchorite - Senuti's conduct at the council of Ephesus, as described by his disciple and successor Besa fully justifies the charges of outrageous Violence brought by the Nestorian party against their opponents. Senuti followed Nestorius with bitter persecution to the last, even offering him personal Violence when he lay dying in Egypt
Martyr - ...
There are five categories of martyrdom: ...
in odium fidei - from hatred of the faith
in defensum castitatis - in defense of chastity
ex aerumnis carceris - from the hardships of incarceration
per testimonium caritatis fortis - by witness of heroic charity
ex acertatibus et vexationibusque pro fidei quibus pertulit - by reason of the force and Violence which were endured for the faith
Thessalonica - The Violence of the Jews drove him from the city, when he fled to Berea (Acts 17:5-10 )
Devour - To destroy to consume with rapidity and Violence
Moderate - MOD'ERATE, To restrain from excess of any kind to reduce from a state of Violence to lessen to allay to repress as, to moderate rage, action, desires, &c
Assault - To attack or fall upon by Violence, or with a hostile intention as, to assault a man, a house or town
Precipitate - ) To urge or press on with eager haste or Violence; to cause to happen, or come to a crisis, suddenly or too soon; as, precipitate a journey, or a conflict
Load - ) Weight or Violence of blows
Remit - To abate in Violence for a time, without intermission as, a fever remits at a certain hour every day
Rephaim - They appear to have excelled in Violence and crime, and hence are monuments of divine justice
Dioscorus, the Monk - On the pretext of their adherence to the mystic views of Origen on the Person of the Deity, and their decided opposition to Anthropomorphism, which Theophilus had originally shared with them, Theophilus had them ejected from their monasteries and treated them with the utmost contumely and Violence when they went to Alexandria to appeal (Pallad. 401, Theophilus personally headed a night attack on their monastery, which was burnt and pillaged, and Dioscorus himself treated with Violence and indignity ( ib
Burn - To act with destructive Violence, as fire. To be in commotion to rage with destructive Violence
Truce of God - A scheme set on foot for the purpose of quelling the Violence and preventing the frequency of private wars, occasioned by the fierce spirit of the barbarians in the middle ages
Sihon - Churlishness and unprovoked Violence bring their own punishment (Proverbs 16:18; Proverbs 18:12; Numbers 21:21-31)
Burst - ) To break or rend by Violence, as by an overcharge or by strain or pressure, esp
Finger - To handle without Violence
Mighty - Vehement rushing with Violence as a mighty wind or tempest
Descend - ) To make an attack, or incursion, as if from a vantage ground; to come suddenly and with Violence; - with on or upon
Anger - This passion however varies in degrees of Violence, and in ingenuous minds, may be attended only with a desire to reprove or chide the offender
Crush - To press with Violence to force together into a mass
Action Francaise - The Action Francaise had disclosed its true nature as a school or cabal rather than as a mere political party, with a following mainly Catholic, dominated by atheists, and propagating a philosophy exalting politics above religion and urging a spirit of nationalistic hate and Violence
Lide - ) To move gently and smoothly; to pass along without noise, Violence, or apparent effort; to pass rapidly and easily, or with a smooth, silent motion, as a river in its channel, a bird in the air, a skater over ice
Rage - Fury extreme Violence as the rage of a tempest
Pearls - The Savior forbade his apostles to cast their pearls before swine, Matthew 7:6 ; that is, to expose the precious truths of the gospel unnecessarily to those who reject them with scorn and Violence
Without - " (2) In Acts 5:26 , ou, "not," meta, "with," is rendered "without (violence)
Harm - ...
A — 4: ὕβρις (Strong's #5196 — Noun Feminine — hubris — hoo'-bris ) primarily denotes "wantonness, insolence;" then, "an act of wanton Violence, an outrage, injury," 2 Corinthians 12:10 , RV, "injuries," AV, "reproaches" (more than reproach is conveyed by the term); metaphorically of a loss by sea, Acts 27:10 , RV, "injury," AV, "hurt," and Acts 27:21 , RV, "injury," AV, "harm
Lamech - " Lamech boasts thus, to assure his wives of security amidst the Violence of the times especially among the Cainites, which precipitated God's judgment of the flood (Genesis 6:4; Genesis 6:11; Genesis 6:13). Poetry, God's gift to man, has been awfully desecrated, so that its earliest extant fragment comes not from paradise but the house of Lamech, a man of Violence and lust
Die - To be deprived of respiration, of the circulation of blood, and other bodily functions, and rendered incapable of resuscitation, as animals, either by natural decay, by disease, or by Violence to cease to live to expire to decease to perish and with respect to man, to depart from this world. They die by the sword by famine by pestilence by Violence by sickness by disease
Press - ) To move on with urging and crowding; to make one's way with Violence or effort; to bear onward forcibly; to crowd; to throng; to encroach. ) To drive with Violence; to hurry; to urge on; to ply hard; as, to press a horse in a race
Heat - Utmost Violence rage vehemence as the heat of battle. Violence ardor as the heat of party
Antediluvians - ...
The genealogy in Genesis 4:1 is framed by two accounts of Violence—1) the murder of Abel by Cain and God's promise of seven-fold vengeance on anyone who harmed Cain ( Genesis 4:8-16 ), and Genesis 4:2 ) the war song of Lamech, threatening seventy-seven fold vengeance for any injury (Genesis 4:23-24 ). The text is aware of parallel developments—beside the achievements of civilization stood the perennial Violence which threatened it and used its technology for destructive purposes
Temptation - An unseen personal force bore him a certain Violence is implied in the words" (Matthew 4:1-11 )
Habacuc, Book of - God's assurance that whereas "the just shall live in His faith" the proud oppressor shall be destroyed, is followed by a taunting song in which the prophet represents the people pronouncing "Woes" against the rapacious Violence of the Chaldeans and the dishonesty and cruelty by which the magnificence of their cities was maintained, as well as against their idolatry
Hunt - ...
To hunt down, to depress to bear down by persecution or Violence
Latitudinarians - This plan failing, through the Violence of the bishops on one hand, (though sanctioned by the Lord Chancellor Clarendon,) and by the jealousy of the more rigid on the other, the name Latitudinarian became a term of reproach, as implying an indifferency to all religions, and has been generally so used ever since
Leap - To rush with Violence
Toss - To throw with Violence
Nomus, Leading Personage at Constantinople - ), where a libel or petition against him was presented by a nephew of Cyril, Athanasius by name, a presbyter of Alexandria, accusing him of Violence and extortion which had reduced Athanasius and his relatives to beggary and caused his brother to die of distress ( ib
Abate - ABA'TE, To decrease, or become less in strength or Violence as pain abates a storm abates
Home - ...
An anchor is said to come home, when it loosens from the ground by the Violence of the wind or current, &c
Gadarenes - What higher proofs can be needed to mark distinguishing grace! What an act of mercy had Jesus wrought, not only to the poor demoniac, but to the whole country, in delivering them from his Violence and outrage, while under possession of the devil
Moderate - ) To restrain from excess of any kind; to reduce from a state of Violence, intensity, or excess; to keep within bounds; to make temperate; to lessen; to allay; to repress; to temper; to qualify; as, to moderate rage, action, desires, etc
Earthquake - Josephus says that its Violence divided a mountain, which lay west of Jerusalem, and drove one part of it four furlongs
Jephthah - The Ephraimites were offended and threatened him with Violence
Beat - The usual meaning is that of "thrashing or cudgelling," and when used of a blow it indicates one of great Violence. It frequently signifies a "blow" of Violence, and, when used in a continuous tense, indicates a series of "blows
Winds - ...
But the wind most frequently mentioned in the Bible is the "cast wind," which is represented as blasting and drying up the fruits, Genesis 41:6 Ezekiel 17:10 19:12 , and also as blowing with great Violence, Psalm 48:7 Ezekiel 27:26 Jonah 4:8 . As it often blows with a terrible roaring and Violence, it carries dust and fine sand high up into the air, so that the whole atmosphere is lurid, and seems in a state of combustion, and the sun is shorn of his beams, and looks like a globe of dull smoldering fire
Petrus, Surnamed Fullo - But notwithstanding the imperial authority, Peter's personal influence, supported by the favour of Zeno, was so great in Antioch that Martyrius's position was rendered intolerable and, wearied by Violence and contumely, he soon left Antioch, abandoning his throne again to the intruder. Peter on his restoration enforced the addition to the Trisagion, and behaved with great Violence to the orthodox party, crushing all opposition by an appeal to the mob, whom he had secured by his unworthy arts, and who confirmed the patriarch's anathemas by plunder and bloodshed. He at once resumed his career of Violence, expelling orthodox bishops who refused to sign the Henoticon and performing uncanonical ordinations, especially that of the notorious Xenaias (Philoxenus) to the see of Hierapolis (Theophan
Affliction: Effects of in Different People - ...
'How different are summer storms from winter ones! In winter they rush over the earth with their Violence; and if any poor remnants of foliage or flowers have lingered behind, these are swept along at one gust
Shoulder - ) To push or thrust with the shoulder; to push with Violence; to jostle
Magog - Their name thus was a terror in the East just before Ezekiel's prophecies, and naturally symbolizes rude Violence
Meekness - In the days of Israel’s conflict the men of pride and Violence came to the front, while the godly were thrust into the background, contemned and oppressed (cf
Steal - For some people stealing is part of their way of life, and they may even have deliberately set out on a path of robbery and Violence (Judges 9:25; Luke 10:30; John 10:10)
Blast - ) Hence, to affect with some sudden Violence, plague, calamity, or blighting influence, which destroys or causes to fail; to visit with a curse; to curse; to ruin; as, to blast pride, hopes, or character
Fire - ) Ardor of passion, whether love or hate; excessive warmth; consuming Violence of temper
Pull - ) A pluck; loss or Violence suffered
Heraclides Cyprius, Bishop of Ephesus - 401, there being a deadlock in the election through the number of rival candidates and the Violence of the opposing factions, Chrysostom brought Heraclides forward, and he was elected by the votes of seventy bishops to the vacant see
Foul - To fall foul, is to rush on with haste, rough force and unseasonable Violence
Beating - In Acts 18:17; Acts 21:32 the verb τύπτω is used to denote another mode of beating, namely, that inflicted by mob Violence
Hophni - Add to this, they were not content with the priest's portion, it should seem, but took more, and that, if not immediately given, by Violence
Earth - The earth, it is said, was filled with Violence
Chrysologus, Petrus, Archbishop of Ravenna - The ordinary account of Peter's elevation to the see of Ravenna, which is repeated by successive biographers with ever-increasing definiteness of statement, does too much Violence to the facts of history to be worthy of credit
Pain - An uneasy sensation in animal bodies, of any degree from slight uneasiness to extreme distress or torture, proceeding from pressure, tension or spasm, separation of parts by Violence, or any derangement of functions
Anger - Uncontrolled anger can have far-reaching consequences, producing Violence and even murder (Matthew 5:21-22; Luke 4:28-29; Acts 7:54; Acts 7:57-58; Acts 21:27-36)
Daniel o'Connell - The French Revolution had inspired him with a horror of Violence and he determined to secure his end by peaceful means, with the cooperation of the oppressed masses
Gentleness - It stands opposed to harshness and severity, to pride and arrogance, to Violence and oppression: it is properly that part of charity which makes us unwilling to give pain to any of our brethren
Boom - ) To rush with Violence and noise, as a ship under a press of sail, before a free wind
o'Connell, Daniel - The French Revolution had inspired him with a horror of Violence and he determined to secure his end by peaceful means, with the cooperation of the oppressed masses
Meditation - A wicked individual meditates upon Violence (Proverbs 24:1 : 2 )
Winds - " (Job 1:19 ; Jeremiah 13:14 ) It blows with Violence, and is hence supposed to be used generally for any violent wind
Power - 'ability, might, mighty, mighty deeds, miracles, power, strength, Violence, mighty works, wonderful works,' etc
Decline - ) That period of a disorder or paroxysm when the symptoms begin to abate in Violence; as, the decline of a fever
Blood - " It stresses the limitations of humanity; the two are essential elements in man's physical being; "the life of the flesh is in the blood," Leviticus 17:11 ; (b) for human generation, John 1:13 ; (c) for "blood" shed by Violence, e
Letter - We must observe the letter of the law, without doing Violence to the reason of the law, and the intentions of the lawgiver
Covet - Because covetousness drives people to get what they want, it produces all kinds of immoral and unlawful behaviour, such as stealing, oppression, deceit and Violence (Exodus 20:17; Joshua 7:21; Micah 2:2; 1 Corinthians 5:9-11)
Break - ) To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and Violence; to part; to burst asunder. ) To strain apart; to sever by fracture; to divide with Violence; as, to break a rope or chain; to break a seal; to break an axle; to break rocks or coal; to break a lock
Paulicians - In the seventh century, a zealot, called Constantine, revived this drooping sect, which had suffered much from the Violence of its adversaries, and was ready to expire under the severity of the imperial edicts, and that zeal with which they were carried into execution. But the cruel rage of persecution, which had for some years been suspended, broke forth with redoubled Violence under the reigns of Michael Curopalates, and Leo the Armenian, who inflicted capital punishment on such of the Paulicians as refused to return into the bosom of the church
Nazarene - After the Temptation, Jesus returned and remained there until the Violence of the people drove Him to Capernaum, which henceforth was known as ‘his own city’ (Matthew 9:1). This does not closely resemble Nazareth, but it does resemble Nôṣer as used in Ben Sira 40:15, referring to ‘the branch of Violence which is not to be unpunished. ’ That the enemies of Jesus should call Him Nôṣrî, ‘Branch of Violence,’ is intelligible if His friends called Him Nçṣer, ‘the true Branch
Chivalry - While her bishops strove hard to check Violence by means of the Truce of God and the Peace of God in the 11th century, they at the same time held before the knight a more exalted conception of his calling, assigning him nobler ends to fight for, and introducing religion as the first article in his code of conduct
Cabbalists - The plainest narrative, the most solemn command, the most clear and interesting declaration of doctrine, were made to bend beneath this irreverent Violence
Christ: the Soul's Only Defence - At last one told her to rest herself in the clefts of the rock, there she would be safe, Violence itself could not surprise her there
Captain of the Temple - Therefore the arrest was ejected courteously, ‘without Violence, for they feared the people lest they should be stoned
Rake - ) To pass with Violence or rapidity; to scrape along
Offer - To offer Violence, to assault to attack or commence attack
Check - It signifies to put an entire stop to motion, or to restrain its Violence, and cause an abatement to moderate
Rent - Torn asunder split or burst by Violence torn
Theodosius, a Monophysite Monk - The public prisons were thrown open and the liberated criminals were employed to terrify by their Violence those who refused communion with Theodosius
Giants - Νephilim ; Hebrew "those who fall on" men; men of Violence, robbers, tyrants; compare Genesis 6:13, "the earth is filled with Violence through them
Fatherless - The fatherless were subject to acts of Violence (Job 22:9 ), were treated as property to be gambled for (Job 6:27 TEV, NRSV, NAS, NIV), and were even murdered ( Psalm 94:6 )
Simeon - When Jacob blessed his sons before his death, he recalled the Violence of Simeon and Levi, and prophesied that their descendants would be scattered in Israel (Genesis 49:5-7)
Zephaniah - The Violence, cheating and false religion of Manasseh’s time were still widespread in Jerusalem (1:1-18)
Disease - The cause of pain or uneasiness distemper malady sickness disorder any state of a living body in which the natural functions of the organs are interrupted or disturbed, either by defective or preternatural action, without a disrupture of parts by Violence, which is called a wound
Malachi - And as we well know that Jesus Christ is the all in all of the covenant, both the angel or messenger of it; the fulfiller of it; the sum and substance of it; the administrator of it; in all present and everlasting concerns; we do no Violence to the expression, when we express Christ's personal offices in the great work of redemption, by all and every term of character that can tend to bring home the Lord Jesus to our affections, in the most endeared and endearing manner
Fair Havens - ’...
‘It now appears … that Fair Havens is so well protected by islands, that though not equal to Lutro, it must be a very fair winter harbour; and that considering the suddenness, the frequency, and the Violence with which gales of northerly wind spring up, and the certainty that, if such a gale sprang up in the passage from Fair Havens to Lutro, the ship must be driven off to sea, the prudence of the advice given by the master and owner was extremely questionable, and that the advice given by St
Archelaus - In the ninth or tenth year of his reign, after many acts of tyranny and Violence, he was banished by the emperor to Vienne in Gaul (Ant
Uard - ) To keep watch over, in order to prevent escape or restrain from acts of Violence, or the like
Load - Weight or Violence of blows
Sack - ...
SACK, From comparing this word and sack, a bag, in several languages, it appears that they are both from one root, and that the primary sense is to strain, pull, draw hence sack, a bag, is a tie, that which is tied or drawn together and sack, to pillage, is to pull, to strip, that is, to take away by Violence
Sponsors - Then there were the probabilities duringpersecution that the parents might not outlive the Violence ofthe times and be enabled to watch over the moral and religiouseducation of their baptized children
Leontius, Priest And Martyr of Armenia - Thus commenced the persecuting Violence of Persia
Maximianus, a Donatist - Forty-three met at Carthage; and their proceedings, notwithstanding the Violence of the supporters of Primian, who was himself absent, resulted in his condemnation
Giant - Symmachus translates it βιαιοι , violent men, cruel, whose only rule of action is Violence. As to the existence of giants, several writers, both ancient and modern, have thought that the giants of Scripture were men famous for Violence and crime, rather than for strength or stature
Heat - ) Utmost Violence; rage; vehemence; as, the heat of battle or party
Burn - ) To have a condition, quality, appearance, sensation, or emotion, as if on fire or excessively heated; to act or rage with destructive Violence; to be in a state of lively emotion or strong desire; as, the face burns; to burn with fever
Anchor - In seamen's language, the anchor comes home, when it is dislodged from its bed, so as to drag by the Violence of the wind, sea or current
Increase - Augmentation of strength or Violence as increase of heat, love or other passion increase of force
Habakkuk - The character and Violence of the Chaldeans are described
Amos - He frequently complains of the Violence offered him by those who endeavoured to impose silence on him
Babel - It is a ruinous heap, shattered by Violence, furrowed by storms, and strewn with fragments of brick, pottery, etc
Moth - These were, from their nature, exposed to the depredations of the moth; fabricated of perishing materials, they were liable to be prematurely consumed, or taken away by fraud or Violence; but the favour of God, and the graces of his Spirit, and the enjoyment of eternal happiness, are neither liable to internal decay nor external Violence, and by consequence, are the proper objects of our highest regard, chief solicitude, and constant pursuit
Malchus - " Another incidental propriety confirming genuineness is, Jesus says to Pilate, "if My kingdom were of this world then would My servants fight"; yet none charged Him, not even Malchus's kinsman who was near, with the Violence which Peter had used to Malchus
Winds - wind symbolizes empty Violence (Job 15:2; Hosea 12:1; Israel "followeth after" not only vain but pernicious things) and destruction (Jeremiah 18:17; Isaiah 27:8)
Millennium - Such an interpretation obviously does Violence to the connexion between the nineteenth and twentieth chapters of Revelation, and gives undue prominence to an expectation which was held by neither Jesus nor St
Aphthartodocetae, a Sect of the Monophysites - This whole question is rather one of scholastic subtlety, though not wholly idle, and may be solved in this way: that the body of Christ, before the Resurrection, was similar in its constitution to the body of Adam before the Fall, containing the germ or possibility of immortality and incorruptibility, but subject to the influence of the elements, and was actually put to death by external Violence, but through the indwelling power of the sinless Spirit was preserved from corruption and raised again to an imperishable life, when—to use an ingenious distinction of St
Wolf - " Instead of protecting the innocent and restraining the evil doer, or punishing him according to the demerit of his crimes, they delight in Violence and oppression, in blood and rapine; and so insatiable is their cupidity, that, like the evening wolf, they destroy more than they are able to possess
Temper - To soften to mollify to assuage to soothe to calm to reduce any Violence or excess
War - To make war to invade or attack a nation or state with force of arms to carry on hostilities or to be in a state of contest by Violence
Joannes Iii, Bishop of Jerusalem - Anastasius, utterly unprepared for this open violation of the compact, was too much terrified by the turbulent multitude, evidently prepared for Violence, and hastily escaped to Caesarea
Petrus, Bishop of Apamea - Evidence is given of insulting language and overbearing conduct toward his clergy, acts of Violence and grossness, and intercourse with females of loose character
Titus, Bishop of Bostra - 1, 362, charging Titus with calumniating them by his representations that they only abstained from Violence in obedience to his monitions, and calling upon them to drive him out of their city as a public enemy (Julian Imp
Bear - ) To admit or be capable of; that is, to suffer or sustain without Violence, injury, or change
Soldiers - They must be careful, he says, henceforth not to do Violence or extort money by false accusations, and to be content with their pay
Felix - " He and Cumanus were tried before Quadratus for winking at robbery and Violence and enriching themselves with bribes, according to Tacitus, and Felix was acquitted and reinstated
Babylas, Bishop of Antioch - 39), or by direct Violence (St
Asylum - (Greek: asylos, safe from Violence) ...
A place in which a person threatened with danger is protected from harm
Injury - Persecutors who succeed in their compulsive measures, though they cannot alter the real sentiments by external Violence, yet sometimes injure the soul by making the man a hypocrite
Throw - ) To drive by Violence; as, a vessel or sailors may be thrown upon a rock
Loose - To break loose, to escape from confinement to gain liberty by Violence
Jehu - But people never forgot his butchery, and his dynasty was doomed to end, as it had begun, with Violence (2 Kings 10:30; Hosea 1:4)
Valens, Emperor - ) give good accounts of the career and Violence of Valens
Fear, Fearful, Fearfulness - ...
(2) In Luke 3:14 , diaseio, "to shake violently, to intimidate, to extort by Violence, blackmail," is rendered "put no man in fear" in AV marg. See Violence
Waldenses - ...
Their rules of practice were extremely austere; for they adopted as the model of their moral discipline, the sermon of Christ on the mount, which they interpreted and explained in the most rigorous and literal manner; and consequently prohibited and condemned in their society all wars, and suits of law, and all attempts towards the acquisition of wealth; the inflicting of capital punishments, self- defense against unjust Violence, and oaths of all kinds. The most horrid scenes of Violence and bloodshed were exhibited in this theatre of papal tyranny; and the few Waldenses that survived, were indebted for their existence and support to the intercession made for them by the English and Dutch governments, and also by the Swiss cantons, who solicited the clemency of the duke of Savoy on their behalf
Suffering (2) - Against Him who came to destroy sin was displayed all the Violence of which evil was capable
Wages - John the Baptist bids the soldiers (probably those engaged in police duty connected with the customs) abstain from adding to their wages by extortion through Violence, threats, or false accusations
Drive - To rush and press with Violence as, a storm drives against the house
Guilt - The Bible is alive to the psychological effects of guilt, as can be seen, for instance, in characters like Jephthah and David: Jephthah in his horrifying Violence against fellow Israelites after his daughter's death, and David in his supine attitude toward the sins of his sons
Hate, Hatred - ...
The Bible says that God hates religiosity (Isaiah 1:14 ; Amos 5:21 ), hypocrisy and lies (Zechariah 8:17 ), wrongdoing (Isaiah 61:8 ); divorce (Malachi 2:16 ), Violence (Malachi 2:16 ), idolatrous practices (Hosea 9:15 ), and the way the prophets are treated (Jeremiah 44:4 )
Arsacius - Eudoxia and the party now triumphant wanted for their new archbishop a facile tool, under whose authority they might shelter the Violence of their proceedings
Drive - ) To rush and press with Violence; to move furiously
Fool (2) - Paul (Galatians 3:1) employed it in needful rebuke; but that use of it is condemned which springs from angry feelings, and which is one step on the way to Violence or even to murder
Interpreter - And it would have been no Violence to the passage if, instead of reading it as it is in our Bibles, it had been read, "and they knew not that Joseph heard them, for the Advocate was between them
Musician - And every one cannot but know that these Psalms are both of them spoken prophetically of the person of Christ, the God-man-Mediator; and therefore, as such, surely it is doing no Violence to the word Sheminith, joined with Lamenetz, to suppose that it forms an address to Christ, as the strength of Israel in his Sheminith or abundant riches, suited to his high character as the chief end of salvation to his people
Lift - 2), is used of "lifting" up the eyes, Matthew 17:8 ; Luke 6:20 ; 16:23 ; 18:13 ; John 4:35 ; 6:5 ; 17:1 ; the head, Luke 21:28 ; the hands, Luke 24:50 ; 1 Timothy 2:8 ; the voice, Luke 11:27 ; Acts 2:14 ; 14:11 ; 22:22 ; a foresail, Acts 27:40 ("hoisting," RV); metaphorically, of the heel, John 13:18 , as of one "lifting" up the foot before kicking; the expression indicates contempt and Violence; in the Passive Voice, Acts 1:9 , of Christ's ascension, "was taken up;" 2 Corinthians 10:5 , "is exalted" (with pride); 2 Corinthians 11:20 , "exalteth himself
Fire - Ardor of temper Violence of passion
Moon - ’ There are many still to be found who believe that the Violence and recurrence of epileptic fits vary with the phases of the moon
Birth - A miscarriage was caused by accident or Violence (Exodus 21:22-25 ), or may have been considered as divine judgment (Psalm 58:8 ; Hosea 9:14 )
Josiah - In the eighteenth year of his reign he proceeded to repair and beautify the temple, which by time and Violence had become sorely dilapidated (2 Kings 22:3,5,6 ; 23:23 ; 2 Chronicles 34:11 )
Bee - Samson's history, of which this incident is the epitome, sets forth Satan's lion-like Violence and harlot-like subtlety, overruled by divine might to his own destruction and fallen man's redemption
Athaliah - Worldly policy, the hope of reuniting Israel to Judah, and concession to his son, whose reckless Violence was afterward seen in the murder of his own brothers (2 Chronicles 21:3-4), infatuated Jehoshaphat to sanction the union
Self-Defence - This being so, I ask, whence should arise the obligation to let another kill me, rather than venture to save myself by destroying my enemy? It cannot arise from a regard to society, which, by my suffering another to kill me, loses two lives; that of an honest man by unjust Violence, and that of his murderer, if it can be called a loss, by the hand of justice
Deluge - ...
The cause of this judgment was the corruption and Violence that filled the earth in the ninth generation from Adam
Council - ) was an illegal assumption of power, an outbreak of fanatical Violence, as also the execution of the apostle James in the procurator's absence (Josephus, Fill - The earth was filled with Violence
Thigh - But if the loins and thigh in relation to Israel's seed were the same as we have seen, Genesis 46:26, surely the girding of Christ and the clothing of Christ may without Violence he considered not unsimilar
Hard - With Violence with a copious descent of water as, it rains hard
War - Unjust Violence was prohibited, but “war” as a part of ancient life was led ( Return - In some cases Violence is the means of bringing something to cease: “How then wilt thou turn away the face of one captain of the least of my master’s servants …” (2 Kings 18:24)
Claudius - 60; and many Jews going thither to complain of the extortions and Violence committed by him in Judea, he would have been put to death, if his brother Pallas, who had been Claudius's slave, and was now his freedman, had not preserved him
Archelaus - He governed Judea with so much Violence, that, after seven years, the chiefs of the Samaritans and Jews accused him before Augustus
Servant - Slaves were protected against Violence; for if they lost an eye or a tooth from rough handling they got their liberty
Throw - To cast to drive by Violence as a vessel or sailors thrown upon a rock
Refuge, Cities of - ...
Among most of the nations of antiquity, temples, and particularly the altars within them, were regarded as proffering an asylum for fugitives from Violence
Wind - When the air moves moderately, we call it a light wind, or a breeze when with more velocity, we call it a fresh breeze, and when with Violence, we call it a gale, storm or tempest
Joab - A violent death seemed a fitting end for one whose life had been marked by so many acts of Violence (1 Kings 2:28-35)
Julius, Bishop of Puteoli - They protested in the council, he says, and declared that no Violence should sever them from the truth ( Ep
Marcella, Friend of Jerome - The Goths, supposing her to be affecting poverty to conceal her wealth, used personal Violence, but at her entreaty spared Principia, and at last allowed them to take sanctuary in St
Silverius, Bishop of Rome - ) speaks of one Eugenius, a servant of Antonina, as having been her instrument in bringing about his death, the expression used seeming to imply a death by Violence
Habakkuk - The first question, Why does Violence rule where there should be justice (Habakkuk 1:2-5 ) expressed the prophet's sense of dismay, either about conditions within his own land caused by Jehoiakim, or by the oppression of weak countries by stronger powers. Prophet's first protest: A cry for deliverance from Violence and iniquity (Habakkuk 1:1-4 )
Joannes ii, Bishop of Jerusalem - Meanwhile, the more intemperate partisans of Pelagius resorted to open Violence. He does not imply that John had been accessory to the Violence; but, considering that a bishop ought to be able to prevent such acts or at least relieve their consequences, he bids him take care that no further Violence is done, on pain of the laws of the church being put in force against him
War, Holy War - Quite the opposite: Violence is thoroughly condemned. Violence that filled the earth with pain was one of the major causes of the flood (Genesis 6:11 ). ...
Simon and Levi lose their rights among the firstborn because their swords are weapons of Violence. Jehu was authorized by Yahweh to end Ahab's dynasty, but his Violence went far beyond his objectives. ...
In Jonah 3:8 the Ninevites are not faulted for their idolatry but because of their Violence
Slander - "His tongue, " says the great Massilon, "is a devouring fire, which tarnishes whatever it touches; which exercises its fury on the good grain equally as on the chaff; on the profane as on the sacred; which, wherever it passes, leaves only desolation and ruin; digs even into the bowels of the earth; turns into vile ashes what only a moment before had appeared to us so precious and brilliant, acts with more Violence and danger than ever, in the time when it was apparently smothered up and almost extinct; which blackens what it cannot consume, and sometimes sparkles and delights before it destroys
Beat - ) To come or act with Violence; to dash or fall with force; to strike anything, as, rain, wind, and waves do
Meekness - Meekness was hallowed as a Christian virtue by the beatitude of Matthew 5:5, though it is not improbable that our Lord’s use of the phrase ‘the meek’ implied the semi-technical connotation of the OT, where they are the godly remnant, often oppressed and nearly always obscure, in opposition to ‘the rich,’ the men of Violence and pride, who dominated the society of Israel in the ages of warfare, defensive and offensive
Fly - ) To move suddenly, or with Violence; to do an act suddenly or swiftly; - usually with a qualifying word; as, a door flies open; a bomb flies apart
Isaacus, Donatist Martyr - Having been first scourged with "plumbata," a whip armed with leaden bullets, and then beaten with sticks, they were both cast into prison, but Isaac disappointed the further Violence of his tormentors by death
Domnus ii, Bishop of Antioch - Cowed by the dictatorial spirit of Dioscorus, and unnerved by the Violence of Barsumas and his monks, Domnus revoked his former condemnation of Eutyches, and voted for his restoration ( ib
Temple - The Lord trieth the righteous: but the wicked and him that loveth Violence his soul hateth
Dispensation, - ...
This was followed by the lengthy period of nearly 1600 years till the flood — a time of no ordered dealing of God with men, during which men corrupted their way, and the earth was filled with Violence
Greece - At length, however, opinions fluctuated considerably on points of doctrine; schisms and heresies divided the church; and rancor, Violence, and even persecution followed in their train
Mustard - Jesus, the spokesman of the coming Kingdom, was derided in His teaching, persecuted in His Person, doomed to Violence and degradation; but He felt, and knew, and here affirms that the cause was supremely great, and that its greatness should be manifested to the world
Paulus i, Bishop of Constantinople - The people would not hear of Violence being done to their bishop; they rushed upon the house where the general was, set fire to it, killed him on the spot, tied a rope round his feet, pulled him out from the burning building, and dragged him in triumph round the city
Paulus, Bishop of Emesa - Paul was a sincere lover of peace and above all things anxious to put an end to the disputes on points of faith the mutual Violence of which was a disgrace to the church a scandal to the faithful and a stumbling-block to unbelievers
Fall - To die particularly by Violence. To decline from Violence to calmness from intensity to remission. Fall primarily denotes descending motion, either in a perpendicular or inclined direction, and in most of its applications, implies literally or figuratively velocity, haste, suddenness or Violence
Sadducees - The Sadducees had little following among the common people, and in fact were afraid of Violence from them if they treated the Christians too harshly (Acts 4:2; Acts 4:17; Acts 4:21; Acts 5:17; Acts 5:26)
Beat - ...
To beat upon, to act upon with Violence
Crucified - And as this was done by a jerk, some of the bones were generally broken by this act of Violence
Soul; Self; Life - 11:5: “The Lord trieth the righteous: but the wicked // and him that loveth Violence [2] hateth
Death - Isaiah predicted the Suffering Servant was to die a violent death: “And he made his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death; because he had done no Violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth” ( Noah - To him God revealed that because the earth was full of Violence, He would destroy all flesh with the earth
Noah - To him God revealed that because the earth was full of Violence, He would destroy all flesh with the earth
Waste - To destroy by Violence
Work - To make by action, labor or Violence
Porphyrius, Patriarch of Antioch - The influence of Porphyry secured the appointment of a savage officer as captain of the city guards, who by threats and Violence drove the people to the church ( ib
Symmachus, Bishop of Rome - Peter in the person of his vicar, and reminds him that spiritual dignity is, at least, on a par with that of an emperor; and he protests strongly against the Violence used against the orthodox in the East
Blood - It may also signify the unpitying Violence with which men treat their fellows (Romans 3:15). For the blood represents the life, even if this is taken by Violence
Blood - It may also signify the unpitying Violence with which men treat their fellows (Romans 3:15). For the blood represents the life, even if this is taken by Violence
Vigilantius - But the extremes of asceticism, the corruption produced by indiscriminate almsgiving, and the Violence, perhaps the insincerity, of Jerome's dealing with the question of Origen [1] produced a reaction against Jerome. The work is only known to us through the writings of Jerome, of whose unscrupulousness and Violence in controversy we have many proofs
Taxes - An unscrupulous adventurer would bid double that sum, and would then go down to the province, and by Violence and cruelty, like that of Turkish or Hindoo collectors, squeeze out a large margin of profit for himself
Franciscans - nor the Violence of John XXII
Judas the Galilaean - 1, 6) attributes to him and his ‘philosophy’ the Violence and miseries culminating in the destruction of the Temple
Wicked (2) - Violence (Matthew 5:39, Acts 17:5, 2 Thessalonians 3:2), hypocrisy (Matthew 22:18), an unforgiving spirit (Matthew 18:32), idleness (Matthew 25:26), unbelief (Hebrews 3:12), self-sufficiency (James 4:16), spite (3 John 1:10); everything, in fact, that is unlike Christ, flourishes in the devil’s Eden—the lost world
Blood - First, it can mean “blood shed by Violence”: “So ye shall not pollute the land wherein ye are: for blood it defileth the land: and the land cannot be cleansed of the blood that is shed therein …” ( Bear - To admit or be capable of that is, to suffer or sustain without Violence,injury,or change as, to give words the most favorable interpretation they will bear
Teeth - This kingdom was Rome, which is known in history for its Violence and cruelty
Face - The face being thus closely identified with the person, any Violence offered to the face was in the highest degree affronting (1 Samuel 11:2, 2 Samuel 10:4, Matthew 26:67)
Fill - 6:13, when God noted that “the earth is filled with Violence
Thessalonians - Paul, in his first journey upon the continent of Europe, preached the Gospel at Thessalonica, at that time the capital of Macedonia, with considerable success; but that after a short stay he was driven thence by the malice and Violence of the unbelieving Jews
Ability, Able - See ABUNDANCE , DEED , MIGHT , POWER , STRENGTH , Violence , VIRTUE , WORK
Paradise (2) - This man never knew much of any world beyond his own world of Violence and rapine
Valerianus, Emperor - The best proof of the Violence of the persecution is the long vacancies (about 11 months) of the sees of Rome and Carthage
Force - Matthew reports: ‘From the days of John the Baptist until now the kingdom of heaven suffereth Violence (βιάζεται = ‘is carried by force or assault’), and the violent (or assailants) take it by force’ (ἁρπάζουσιν). To subject Him in any way to the abusive treatment of the force of dominating powers or authorities, was to do ‘violence’ in His Person to the kingdom of heaven; and it was also ‘to take’ the kingdom, in the sense of making it in His Person an object of violent abuse. Might it not be His cross, then, that was in His mind when He spoke the words in question? Persecution - " The Violence of Pagan intolerance was most severely felt in Egypt, and particularly at Alexandria. Lactantius in particular has, with great force and beauty, delivered his opinion against persecution: "There is no need of compulsion and Violence, because religion cannot be forced; and men must be made willing, not by stripes, but by arguments. Slaughter and piety are quite opposite to each other; nor can truth consist with Violence, or justice with cruelty. Eusebius has recorded that Polycarp, after in vain endeavouring to persuade Anicetus, who was bishop of Rome, to embrace his opinion as to some point with respect to which they differed, gave him, notwithstanding, the kiss of peace, while Anicetus communicated with the martyr; and Irenaeus mentions that although Polycarp was much offended with the Gnostic heretics, who abounded in his days, he converted numbers of them, not by the application of constraint or Violence, but by the facts and arguments which he calmly submitted for their consideration
Manliness - Moreover, they are not to meet Violence with Violence. These principles, in their mutual interaction, condemn all personal vindictiveness and malice, such an appeal to Violence as duelling, that litigious spirit which aims at getting the better of another in a law-court, and all wars of aggression, as well as those which spring from national or personal pride
Roads - The roads were not, even in the days of the Romans, free from danger; witness Luke 10:30; but neither brigandage nor Violence was common upon them
Fall - ) To become prostrate and dead; to die; especially, to die by Violence, as in battle
Laying on of Hands - In addition, the Old Testament frequently uses the image of laying hands on someone as an act of arrest, capture, or Violence (Genesis 27:22 ; Exodus 22:11 ; 2 Chronicles 23:15 ; Esther 2:21 )
Pillar - " (1 Timothy 3:15) And it is not a Violence to the expression to consider this as in allusion to her Lord, who is the Head of his body the church
Economics - Some of the Fathers of the 4th century regarded private ownership as the result of sin, as a means of avoiding Violence and confusion, and almsgiving obligatory, because charity is part of justice
Wicked - In his way of life the “wicked” loves Violence ( Damasus, Pope - 366) the factions which had disgraced his election broke out with redoubled Violence
Micah, Book of - Schemes of Violence were devised by them to gratify their covetousness
Archangel - That combat who was to maintain? in that combat who was to be victorious, but the seed of the woman?...
From all this it is evident, that Michael is a name for our Lord himself, in his particular character of the champion of his faithful people, against the Violence of the apostate faction and the wiles of the devil
Euphemius, Patriarch of Constantinople - Theodorus speaks of the Violence with which he demanded back the profession of faith on which his coronation had depended (Theod. ...
Meanwhile Euphemius, fearing for his life, retired to the baptistery, and refused to go out until Macedonius had promised on the word of the emperor that no Violence should be done him when they conducted him to exile
Judgments of God - The wrath of God, however, ere long overtook him, and he died by the hands of Violence. He reigned only three years, and then fell under the hands of Violence. ...
He himself died miserably, and upon the rack, his eyes started out of his head through the Violence of his distemper, in the year three hundred and thirteen
Stranger - In the oldest Israelitish code (the Book of the Covenant, Exodus 21:1 to Exodus 23:13 ), the gçr is protected against injustice and Violence ( Exodus 21:20 , Exodus 23:9 )
Habakkuk - ...
The interests of God's righteous character, seemingly compromised in the Chaldees' successful Violence, are what Habakkuk has most at heart throughout; to solve this problem is his one grand theme
Samaritan, the Good - It wound up barren and rugged hills, infested by brigands, who assailed travellers, robbing and sometimes murdering them; and from those deeds of Violence it derived a ghastly name—the Ascent of Blood
Mary - ...
Because of the threat of Violence from Herod, Joseph sought safety for Mary and the baby Jesus by taking them to Egypt
Deluge - King supposes it to arise from subterraneous fires bursting forth with great Violence under the sea
Gentleness (2) - But, to John’s intense disappointment, Jesus found His ideal and method not in these symbols of Violence, but in the conception of the Servant of Jehovah, who did not strive or cry or lift up his voice in the streets, who did not break the bruised reed or quench the smoking flax (Matthew 12:19-20; cf
Israel, Kingdom of - Military Violence, it would seem, broke off the hereditary succession after the obscure and probably convulsed reign of Zachariah
Benhadad - He then led them into the city of Samaria, and having conducted them safely there, he prayed to God again to open their eyes, and induced Jehoram to dismiss them without Violence
Sennacherib - The huge stone tablets which formed the walls of its various apartments are covered with bas-reliefs and inscriptions; and though large portions of these have perished by Violence and time, the fragments that remain are full of interest
King - The succession in Judah remained all along in the house of David, and in the kingdom of the Ten Tribes father always succeeded son, unless Violence and revolution destroyed the royal house and brought a new adventurer to the throne. On the one hand, law and ancient custom exercised considerable restraint on the kings; while, on the other hand, acts of despotic Violence were allowed to pass unquestioned
Zephaniah, Book of - Punishment would come upon the nobles at the king's court, those who gained materially through Violence, the merchants, and those who denied the power of God to reward good or punish evil
Levi - ...
In the Blessing of Jacob (Genesis 49:5-7 ) we have one of the most important passages bearing upon the early history of this tribe and that of Simeon:...
’Simeon and Levi are brethren;...
Weapons of Violence are their swords
Slave/Servant - Why? Because slavery was so much a part of their society that to call for abolition would have resulted in Violence and bloodshed
Lasciviousness - 692), but particularly moral excess and outrage, contemptuous Violence and insolence towards others
Acacius, Bishop of Beroea - He added acts of open Violence to his urgency with the timid emperor, until he had gained his end in the final expulsion of the saint, June 20, 404
Maronites - ...
One body of these non-conforming Maronites retired into the valleys of Piedmont, where they joined the Waldenses; another, above six hundred in number, with a bishop and several ecclesiastics at their head, fled into Corsica, and implored the protection of the Republic of Genoa against the Violence of the inquisitors
Kill - ...
Rarely suggesting premeditated killing or murder, this term generally is used for the “killing” of animals, including sacrificially, and for ruthless personal Violence of man against man
Homosexuality - It appears that the rape of other males and the use of boys for sexual pleasure (pederasty) were performed as Acts of dominance, Violence, or experimentation by otherwise heterosexual men. ...
A parallel account of sexual Violence occurs in Judges 19-20 , where the men of Gibeah rape a man's concubine to the point of death in substitution for the man himself. There can be no doubt that this is fundamentally an act of Violence, but the initial desire for the man coupled with the sacrifice of the concubine to avoid "such a disgraceful thing" (19:24) suggests that same-gender sex, and not only inhospitality, is seen in a very negative light
Devote, Devoted - This does not mean that the Old Testament condones racial Violence
Bread - ...
There are several special or figurative uses of lechem! The “bread” of wickedness is “food” gained by wickedness: “For [1] eat the bread of wickedness, and drink the wine of Violence” ( Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic - ” The constant use of Violence and deceit by Satan requires that believers manifest courage and extreme vigilance ( James 4:7 ; 1 Peter 5:8-9 )
Samson - Satan's lion-like Violence and harlot-like subtlety are made to recoil on himself and to work out God's sweet and gracious purposes toward His elect
Georgius, Arian Bishop of Alexandria - "He was severe," says Sozomen, "to the adherents of Athanasius," not only forbidding the exercise of their worship, but "inflicting imprisonment and scourges on men and women after the fashion of a tyrant"; while, towards all alike, "he wielded his authority with more Violence than belonged to the episcopal rank and character
Four - ...
Daniel 3:25 (c) The number here represents GOD's power to overrule the king, and to quench the Violence of fire, and to deliver His own children
Nestorius And Nestorianism - "Before he had tasted of the waters of the city," the historian proceeds, using a proverbial phrase, he had flung himself headlong into acts of Violence and persecution. He next attacked the Quartodecimans and the Novatianists with equal Violence, although neither sect was involved in heresy by its schism from the church, and the Novatianists had steadily supported the church in its controversy with the Arians. The Violence of Nestorius and his supporters set fire to the material already provided; the immediate occasion being the sermon of a presbyter named Anastasius, whom Nestorius had brought with him from Antioch, and in whom he reposed much confidence. Nestorius came at the appointed time, but fearing the Violence of his adversary, requested a guard from the emperor. 433) he calls Nestorius δυσσέβης , and a worshipper of a foreign and new God, and classes his followers with Jews, Arians, and Eunomians; but he earnestly begged that the venerable age of Nestorius might be exempt from Violence or cruelty, and besought the patriarch John to use his influence to prevent this; and [8] he retrieved by his later conduct his reputation for courage and impartiality
Arius, Followers of - of Emesa), a man of principle and character, had declined to take his place, one Gregory was appointed, who speedily became unpopular in consequence of his Violence and cruelty. Athanasius therefore, unfettered by conditions, returned (346) to Alexandria, and the people, wearied of Arian Violence and cruelty, received him with the warmest demonstrations of joy. Among their opponents no concert reigned, but only confusion; their ascendancy was founded on court intrigue and imperial Violence. The cause of genuine, practical Christianity suffered seriously under these divisions, intrigues, and acts of Violence, and men of earnest and even indifferent minds were longing for peace
David - Violence and political intrigue are interspersed in the accounts of David's wars, Saul's attempts on David's life, the Violence of Joab and his brothers, the murder of Uriah, fratricide among David's sons, the slaughter of the helpless Absalom, and David's plans for the deaths of his enemies soon after his own death
Constantius ii, Son of Constantius - Early in 356, Syrianus, the duke of Egypt, began the open persecution of the Catholics at Alexandria, and Constantius, when appealed to, confirmed his actions and sent Heraclius to hand over all the churches to the Arians, which was done with great Violence and cruelty ( Hist. His suspicions were also aroused against his cousin Gallus, whose Violence and misgovernment in the East, especially in Antioch, were notorious
Melita - while the stern would be exposed to the Violence of the waves
Origenists - For the nature of the soul is such as to make her capable of existing eternally, backward as well as forward, because her spiritual essence, as such, makes it impossible that she should, either through age or Violence, be dissolved: so that nothing is wanting to her existence but the good pleasure of him from whom all things proceed
Smyrna - Death by Violence comes within her horizon, but it is transfigured: the martyr is not to be pitied but emulated, for fidelity unto death wins the crown which is life (v
Plagues of Egypt - There had not been a storm of such Violence since Egypt had been a nation
Ananias - He ruled in Jerusalem with all the arbitrariness of an Oriental despot, and his Violence and rapacity are noted by Josephus (Ant
Greek Church - The patriarch of Constantinople insisted on putting down the use of all images and pictures, not only in his own church, but at Rome also, which the pope resented with equal Violence and asperity
Cities - " The extraordinary strength of this tower, and the various means of defence which were accumulated within its narrow walls, may be inferred from the Violence of Abimelech's attack, and its fatal issue
Fuel - It is not easy to conceive an image more striking than this; the remains of two small twigs burning with Violence at one end, as appears by the steaming of the other, are soon reduced to ashes; so shall the kingdoms of Syria and Israel sink into ruin and disappear
Might, Mighty, Mightily, Mightier - ...
B — 4: βίαιος (Strong's #972 — Adjective — biaios — bee'-ah-yos ) "violent" (from bia, "force, Violence, strength," found in Acts 5:26 ; 21:35 ; 24:7 ; 27:41 ), occurs in Acts 2:2 , of wind
Government - Jesus refused to use Violence, either to protect what was good or remove what was bad (Matthew 26:52; John 18:36), but he did not keep silent when he saw disadvantaged and defenceless people ignored or exploited (Matthew 21:13; Matthew 23:4; Matthew 23:23; Matthew 25:42-45; Mark 12:20; Luke 6:24-25; Luke 16:19-26; cf
Naturalness - What was ‘contrary to nature,’ on the other hand, was not what put a man into antagonism with his surroundings, but what amounted to Violence done to his better self
Blood - The special significance of blood in the Bible is that it commonly signifies death; not death through natural causes, but death through killing or Violence
Take - Take differs from seize, as it does not always imply haste, force or Violence. ...
The Violence of storming is the course which God is forced to take for the destroying of sinners
Nineveh - "After having ruled for more than six hundred years with hideous tyranny and Violence, from the Caucasus and the Caspian to the Persian Gulf, and from beyond the Tigris to Asia Minor and Egypt, it vanished like a dream" (Nahum 2:6-11 )
Timothy, Letters to - This was a great disappointment to Paul, but God protected him from Violence and gave him the opportunity to make known the gospel to his captors (2 Timothy 4:16-17)
Earth, Land - Micah pronounced woes upon those who “covet fields, and take them by Violence; and houses, and take them away” (Micah 2:2 )
Roman Empire - John the Baptist implies that the soldiers' characteristic sins were Violence, false accusation, and discontented greed (Luke 3:14)
Galatia - It has been noted that he, as a Roman citizen and a statesman, invariably uses geographical terms in the Roman sense, and that he even does Violence to the Greek language by forcing the Latin names for ‘Philippians’ ( Philippians 4:15 ) and ‘Illyricum’ ( Romans 15:19 ) into Greek, and passes by the proper Greek term in each case
Lazarus - In the last year of His ministry Jesus sojourned at Jerusalem from the Feast of Tabernacles in October to that of the Dedication in December; and, on being driven out by the Violence of the rulers ( John 10:31 ; John 10:39 ), He retired to ‘Bethany beyond Jordan’ ( John 10:40 ; cf
Refuge - And it is no Violence to the expression to make application of this word to him whose government was declared to be upon his shoulder, Isaiah 9:6 line of the old writers, Raphelius, makes a very striking observation concerning this expression of the government being said to be upon Christ's shoulder; because said he we carry burdens on our shoulders, therefore Christ is said to carry his
Galerius, Emperor - Galerius, who had long coveted the promised diadem, would brook no more delay, and with much Violence compelled the enfeebled Augustus to retire, leaving himself nominally second to Constantius, whose death in July 306 left Galerius supreme
Habakkuk - How can a holy God, so ready to punish the ‘wicked’ in Israel, permit one who deserves far more the name of ‘wicked’ to rage unchecked? Are wrong and Violence to possess the earth for ever?...
(4) Habakkuk 2:1-4
Cast - To drive or impel by Violence
Maronites - One body of these non-conforming Maronites retired into the valleys of Piedmont, where they joined the Waldenses; another, above six hundred in number, with a bishop, and several ecclesiastics at their head, flew into Corsica, and implored the protection of the republic of Genoa, against the Violence of the inquisitors
Messiah - He was one of those banditti that infested Judea, and committed all kinds of Violence against the Romans; and had become so powerful that he was chosen king of the Jews, and by them acknowledged their messiah
Clothing, Cloths, Clothes, Cloke, Coat - In the passage in Luke an act of Violence is in view, and there is no mention of going to law
Rabbulas, Bishop of Edessa - Rabbûlas's Violence is also described in a letter of Andrew of Samosata to his metropolitan, Alexander of Hierapolis, shortly after Easter, 432, complaining that Rabbûlas was dealing with a high hand in Edessa, openly anathematizing Theodore's teaching of one nature in Christ, and excommunicating all who refused to accept the Cyrillian dogmas or who read Theodore's books, which he was everywhere committing to the flames
Severus, l. Septimius - By a strange inconsistency Origen was allowed to visit the martyrs in prison and to be present at their trial, and even to accompany them on their way to execution, apparently without being molested by the government, though several times in great danger from mob Violence
Siricius, Bishop of Rome - He was favourably received by Siricius, who gave him a commendatory letter on his departure, the quarrel with Jerome having recommenced with increased Violence
Hosius (1), a Confessor Under Maximian - At length, when 100 years old, he gave way for a brief moment to the Violence of his persecutors, and consented under torture to hold communion with Valens and Ursacius (Athan. ), "of his father's love for Hosius, without reverence for his great age, for he was then 100 years old, this patron of impiety and emperor of heresy used such Violence towards the old man that at last, broken down by suffering, he was brought, though with reluctance, to hold communion with Valens and Ursacius, but he would not subscribe against Athanasius" (a. " As he relates the Violence used towards him, he expresses only the tenderest commiseration for his friend; but against Constantius, his persecutor, his indignation knows no bounds (Hist. ...
There is some doubt whether Hosius succumbed to the Violence used against him at Sirmium and died there in 357, or whether, after subscribing the Arian formula, he was permitted to end his days in Spain
Lunatic - The victim is possessed by an ungoverned Violence, having the command of a morbid muscular energy. This uncontrollable power was one that increased, for the description implies that in the earlier stages they had been able to control him in some measure by binding, but that the binding had increased the Violence of the power so that he could no longer be bound (Mark 5:3-4). The expression may be due (a) to the Evangelist’s sense of the Violence of the derangement to which she had been subject, or (b) to the current idea of manifold possession among the disciples, to which Jesus gave no sanction, or (e) to mania and delusion of manifold possession
Sanballat - He only was considered a completely safe man whose Violence was blind and boundless; and those who endeavoured to steer a middle course were spared by neither side. Violence shall no more be heard in thy land, wasting nor destruction within thy borders; but thou shalt call thy walls Salvation, and thy gates Praise
Jews - During this and earlier centuries, the popes were the staunchest defenders of the Jews, and by a series of Bulls tried to protect them from oppression and mob Violence
Relics - But there were many, who, unable to procute for themselves these spiritual treasures by voyages and prayers, had recourse to Violence and theft; for all sorts of means, and all sorts of attempts, in a cause of this nature, were considered, when successful, as pious and acceptable to the Supreme Being
Gestures - The laying of a hand or hands on someone can mean Violence (Genesis 37:22 ), or it can mean favor and blessing as on a son (Genesis 48:14 ) or in healing (Luke 4:40 ; Acts 28:8 )
Work - The Bible consistently condemns an over-concern with income, especially when it produces dishonesty, Violence and exploitation (Deuteronomy 24:14-15; Proverbs 20:17; Proverbs 21:6; Jeremiah 22:13; Jeremiah 22:17; Amos 8:4-6; Luke 3:10-14; 1 Timothy 6:9; 1 Corinthians 9:4-7)
Jehoiakim - "His eyes and heart were only for covetousness, shedding innocent blood, oppression, and Violence" (Jeremiah 22:13-17)
Quirinius - Lardner’s interpretation, however, does Violence to the construction of the text, and is at best a forced expedient to avoid a difficulty
Womanliness - the rebuke of Peter, Matthew 16:23); His repulse of the Syrophœnician mother (Mark 7:27) was His own indignant protest against Jewish exclusiveness; His requirement that the woman healed by touching His garment should confess her deed was no Violence done to her sense of modesty, but was intended to replace the uncertainty of a cure snatched unawares by the assurance of healing willingly bestowed (Mark 5:34)
Iconoclastes - ...
Those who, notwithstanding this decree of the council, raised commotions in the state, were severely punished, and new laws were enacted to set bounds to the Violence of monastic rage
Ammon - But the Ammonites’ Violence, cruelty and arrogance were inexcusable, and God’s prophets assured them of a fitting punishment (Jeremiah 49:1-6; 1618453740_31; Zephaniah 2:8-11)
Palladius, Bishop of Helenopolis - All threats and Violence proving vain, the bishops were banished to distant and opposite quarters of the empire; Palladius to Syene, on the extreme border of Egypt ( ib
Persecution - Christ never used any thing that looked like force or Violence, except once; and that was to drive bad men out of the temple, and not to drive them in. The third began in the third year of Trajan, in the year 100, and was carried on with great Violence for several years. It is related that 17, 000 were slain in one month's time; and that during the continuance of this persecution, in the province of Egypt alone, no less than 144, 000 Christians died by the Violence of their persecutors; besides 700, 000 that died through the fatigues of banishment, or the public works to which they were condemned
Jonah, Theology of - The sin is identified as evil conduct and Violence in their hands (3:8)
Drink - This is especially true of Violence (Proverbs 4:17 ; 26:6 )
Habakkuk, Theology of - The prophet Habakkuk faced the Violence and injustice of King Jehoiakim (609-597 see Jeremiah 22:13-18 ) as well as the cruel onslaught of Babylonia
Cain (1) - But all this allied to godlessness, Violence, and luxurious self indulgence, only prepared the world for the consummated corruption which brought down judgment, as it soon shall again in the last days (Revelation 17; 18; 19; Luke 17:26-37)
Fall, Fallen, Falling, Fell - Note: For "mighty fall," Revelation 18:21 , RV, see Violence
Burial - The empty grave-clothes, out of which the Risen Lord had passed, became thus a sign not only that no Violence had been offered to His body by human hands, but also a parable of the true meaning of His Resurrection: ‘all that was of Jesus of Nazareth has suffered its change and is gone
Amos - His word of judgment was severe for the “first ladies of Samaria” who encouraged the injustice and Violence of their husbands “who oppress the poor, who crush the needy, who say to their husbands, Bring, that we may drink!'” ( Amos 4:1 RSV)
Judah - Now it is evident, from the use of the Shebeth upon both occasions, (Genesis 49:10 and Judges 5:14) the one speaking of the office of a king, and the other of the scribe, that without Violence to the expressions in either case, and in reference to the glorious person typified, his ruling the sceptre, or writing with his pen, conveys the idea of equal offices
Matthew, Gospel by - ' It goes to the springs of evil, and condemns the principles of Violence and corruption; and the character of God Himself becomes the standard of practice for man here
Necessitarians - Finally: as to the allegation, that the doctrine of free agency puts man's self-determining power upon the throne of the universe, that view proceeds upon notions unworthy of God, as though he could not accomplish his plans without compelling and controlling all things by a fixed fate; whereas it is both more glorious to him, and certainly more in accordance with the Scriptures, to say that he has a perfect foresight of the manner in which all creatures will act, and that he, by a profound and infinite wisdom, subordinates every thing without Violence to the evolution and accomplishment of his own glorious purposes
Monophysitism - died, and was succeeded in 450 by Marcian, the reaction against Monophysitism broke out all the more fiercely in consequence of the Violence and long duration of these measures of repression. Even the patriarch Proclus [1] endeavoured to moderate the Violence of Cyril's methods. The Violence displayed at it by Dioscorus and his party caused it to be universally rejected by the Catholic church
Justice (2) - If in God’s nature mere power were supreme, and holiness and love subordinate, this would be as contrary to justice as when, in a kingdom, the rule of right has been overturned by irresponsible Violence. In like manner it would be very difficult to persuade people that it is right that they should be protected from the spread of Violence by the punishment of those to whom punishment was not justly due
Messiah - The swiftly passing series of short reigns terminated by Violence which filled the space of 15 years in Northern Israel from the close of the dynasty of Jehu (which lasted nearly a century) to the accession of Hoshea, Assyria’s nominee, to the dismembered kingdom, deeply impressed the prophet of Ephraim, who exclaims:—...
‘They have appointed kings, but not from me (i. In the first the Messiah is portrayed as a military conquering hero, ‘breaking in pieces the oppressor’s mace’; in the second, the sounds of discord cease, and He, sprung from Jesse’s stock, is the ruler of justice and peace in God’s ‘holy mountain’ of Zion, where even the powers of Violence and injustice are turned into submission to a Divine authority
Moses - Behind this dominant scene of Violence and death lies a different interpretation of the Exodus event
Devil - The constant use of Violence and deceit by Satan requires that believers manifest courage and extreme vigilance (James 4:7 ; 1 Peter 5:8-9 )
Fornication - Illicit sexual intercourse with a married woman is not only an infringement of the husband’s rights, but Violence done to the Holy Ghost
Council - They were caused respectively by the Arian, Apollinarian, Nestorian, and Eutychian controversies, and their decrees are in high esteem both among Papists and orthodox Protestants; but the deliberations of most councils were disgraced by Violence, disorder, and intrigue, and their decisions were usually made under the influence of some ruling party
Paulus of Samosata, Patriarch of Antioch - Yet, disgraceful as his life was, he had put so many under obligations and intimidated others by threats and Violence, so that it was very difficult to persuade any to witness against him (Eus
Idolatry - , when the earlier Jehovism was changing into typical Judaism, all such apparatus was felt to be wrong, and was attacked with increasing Violence by prophets and reformers, as their conception of God became more clear and spiritual
Fall, the - The wickedness of humanity became great and Violence filled the earth; polygamy became a way of life (Genesis 4:19 ; 6:2,5 )
Draw - To collect to apply to any purpose by Violence
Dead - The Greeks, and other nations around them, expressed the Violence of their sorrow in the same way; for in Homer, Ulysses and his companions, bewailing the death of Elpenor, howled and plucked off their hair
Possession - The right conclusion seems to be that the same disease was in some cases ascribed to ordinary causes and in others to possession, the distinguishing feature being possibly intractability due to the Violence of permanence of the symptoms
Psalms, Book of, - Now there are in the Psalter at least three psalms of which the interest evidently centers in a person distinct from the speaker, and which, since they cannot without Violence to the language be interpreted of any but the Messiah, may be termed directly and exclusively Messianic
Neighbour (2) - The true servant of the Kingdom, therefore, must be ever ready to give unstintingly and ungrudgingly of all that he has and is; and even to those who would take from him by Violence he must offer no resistance (Matthew 5:39-42)
Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrrhus - Dioscorus and his partisans, having by brutal Violence obtained the acquittal of Eutyches and the deposition of Flavian, Ibas, Irenaeus, and other sympathizers with Theodoret, proceeded on the third session to deal with him. The indictment was formulated by a presbyter of Antioch named Pelagius, who, in language of the most atrocious Violence, proceeded to demand of the council to take the sword of God and, as Samuel dealt with Agag, and Elijah with the priests of Baal, pitilessly destroy those who had introduced strange doctrines into the church. Theodoret's entrance was the signal for outrageous Violence on the part of the adherents of Dioscorus
Regeneration - It is directed to the renewing of the will, first of all, in the form of persuasion , for the Holy Spirit does none of His work by Violence
Peter - A fresh outburst of Violence against the Christians (5:17-21) led to the whole body of the apostles being cast into prison; but during the night they were wonderfully delivered, and were found in the morning teaching in the temple
Antiochus - The "upright ones with him" were Israelites, so called from their high privileges, though their practice of Violence in support of a pagan king is reprobated
Mammon - written during 1818) said that Luke 16:8 would form a suitable motto for a collection of Machiavelli’s most weighty aphorisms, by some vigorous mind, in order to illustrate thereby the ‘present triumph of lawless Violence’ as due to the imprudent neglect of such worldly-wise maxims
Polytheism - Many causes, however, would conspire to dissolve this family, after the death of its ancestor, into separate and independent tribes, of which some would be driven by Violence, or would voluntarily wander in a distance from the rest
Death (2) - ’ Destruction is in store for all sinners; and the punishment cannot therefore consist in death by Violence, which falls on few
Arrest - Apparently it provoked them to Violence
Jeremiah - When the people responded with hatred and Violence (11:19; 18:18), Jeremiah complained to God bitterly
Omnipotence - His death on the cross is no longer a matter of untoward circumstance, and human Violence prevailing over right; Christ permits His seizure only after proving His power to resist (John 18:6); and as He has freely laid down His life, so He freely takes it again (John 2:19; John 10:18)
Dates - It could certainly not have been due to rebellion or any other form of Violence. This is, however, a bare minimum, and may well be doubled without Violence to the situation
Nebuchadnezzar - Pride, Violence and fury, and cruel sternness, were Nebuchadnezzar's faults (Daniel 2:12; Daniel 3:19; 2 Kings 25:7; 2 Kings 24:8)
Sin - Ra describes the Violence associated with sin
Stoning - Although Jews were a party to the outbreak of Violence, the stoning was simply the method by which the fanatical mob of a heathen city vented their rage upon an advocate of the Christian faith
no'ah - If is probable also that the crimes and Violence of the previous age had greatly diminished the population, and that they would have utterly exterminated the race had not God in this way saved out some good seed from their destruction
Atheist - For what are towns, cities, or fleets, in comparison of the vast and amazing fabric of the universe! In short, Atheism offers such Violence to all our faculties, that it seems scarce credible it should ever really find any place in the human understanding
Isaiah - ...
Isaiah also greatly excels in all the graces of method, order, connection, and arrangement: though in asserting this we must not forget the nature of the prophetic impulse, which bears away the mind with irresistible Violence, and frequently in rapid transitions from near to remote objects, from human to divine
Proselyte - If the experience of Justin be any indication of the general attitude of the proselytes to the Church, they must have deemed it a duty to their adopted faith to manifest a Violence of speech and an aggressiveness of action unsurpassed by the Jews themselves; for he says, ‘the proselytes not only do not believe, but twofold more than yourselves blaspheme His name, and wish to torture and put to death us who believe in Him’ ( Dial
no'ah - If is probable also that the crimes and Violence of the previous age had greatly diminished the population, and that they would have utterly exterminated the race had not God in this way saved out some good seed from their destruction
Plagues, the Ten, - The plague may have been an extremely severe sandstorm, miraculous in its Violence and duration, for the length of three days does not make it natural since the severe storms are always very brief
Jacobus Baradaeus, Bishop of Edessa - Wearied out at last, and feeling the necessity for putting an end to the Violence and bloodshed which was raging unchecked, James suddenly set out for Alexandria, but never reached it
Theodosius i., the Great - , religious controversy burst forth with special Violence in Egypt or Antioch, the bishop applied for edicts imposing perpetual silence on the opposite factions (cf
Moses - His impetuous Violence retarded instead of expedited their deliverance. The same spirit prompted him to avenge his injured countryman, and to rescue the Midianite women from the shepherds' Violence, as afterward led him to confront Pharaoh; but in the first instance he was an illustration of the truth that "the wrath of man worketh not the righteousness of God" (James 1:20)
Noah - In contrast to the Cainite Lamech's boast of Violence with impunity, the Sethite Lamech, playing on Noah's ("rest") name, piously looks for "comfort" (nachum ) through him from Jehovah who had "cursed the ground. " "The earth was corrupt before God, and filled with Violence through them" (Genesis 6:11; Genesis 6:13)
Wandering Stars - from extorting money by Violence‡ and making false charges; they were also to be content with their pay (Luke 3:14). The ‘violence’ may mean overbearing poor civilians, and soldiers had many opportunities of taking such unfair advantage, not only in war but in the police-duties which they discharged during a peace
Seven Words, the - But they did not Know all, they did not know that they were crucifying the Lord of glory, they were but unconscious instruments doing what they were bidden; and so the Saviour prayed for them and made excuse for them, and not for them only, but for all who had taken part in that deed of Violence, for all who, during all the ages that have since elapsed, have been crucifying the Son of God afresh
the Penitent Thief - The kingdom of heaven suffered Violence that day at this thief's so suddenly repentant and so believing hands
Ishmael - ...
Scarcely had Jerusalem paid the awful penalty of her sin than her princes began new plots of Violence and bloodshed
Life - Where Violence has shed blood, there must be an accounting and a just penalty (Genesis 4:10-11 ; 9:5-6 ; Exodus 21:23 ; Leviticus 24:17-22 ; Deuteronomy 19:21 ; Matthew 5:38 )
Messiah - The murder of Abel (Genesis 4:8 ) and the Violence that saturated society before and during the first part of Noah's life, bear testimony to Satan's efforts (Genesis 4-5 ; 6:1-8 )
King, Kingship - ...
This approach, however, does Violence to the many positive biblical statements concerning God's design for the institution of kingship in the context of this sovereign plan for the redemption of his people, and ultimately for the uNIVersal triumph of peace and justice on the earth
Games - In the same city the Apostle and his friends Gains and Aristarchus came near experiencing the Violence of the mob in the theatre (Acts 19:23 ff
Heracleon, a Gnostic - He thinks it necessary to reconcile his own doctrine with that of the sacred writer, even at the cost of some Violence of interpretation
the Widow With the Two Mites - It is doing no exegetical or homiletical Violence to this exquisite scene to transfer every syllable of it to ourselves as a congregation and a court
Manichees - Christ, or the glorious intelligence, called by the Persians Mithras, subsisting in and by himself, and residing in the sun, appeared in the time among the Jews, clothed with the shadowy form of a human body, to disengage the rational soul from the corrupt body, and to conquer the Violence of malignant matter
Elijah - There is a volcanic suddenness, and a volcanic Violence, indeed, about all Elijah's descents upon us and all his disappearances from us
Law - Thus, the command, "Thou shalt not kill," condemns not merely the single crime of deliberate murder, but every kind of Violence, and every indulgence of passion and resentment, which tends either to excite such Violence, or to produce that malignant disposition of mind, in which the guilt of murder principally consists: and similarly of the rest
Time, Meaning of - Genesis teaches that this is intended to keep people from seizing immortality and becoming like God (Genesis 3:22 ), to limit a person's lifetime in order to restrain and order the penchant for self-exaltation and Violence (Genesis 6:3 ; Genesis 11:6 )
Flood, the - In contrast with the ancient Near Eastern flood stories, in which no cause of the flood is given (Gilgamesh Epic) or in which the gods decide to wipe out their human slaves because they are making too much noise (Atrahasis Epic and Eridu Genesis), the biblical account provides a profound theological motivation for the flood: humankind's moral depravity and sinfulness, the all-pervading corruption and Violence of all living beings ("all flesh") on earth (Genesis 6:1-8,11-12 ), which demands divine punishment
Widows - Aristides in his Apology can say of Christians as a whole: ‘From the widows they do not turn away their countenance; they rescue the orphan from him who does him Violence’ (see Hermas, Vis
Jonah - ’ And in fact a teacher might, without doing any Violence to right teaching, cite well-known fiction (The Pilgrim’s Progress, Rasselas, Shakespeare’s characters) to enforce warnings or moral truth, and so could our Saviour have done
John the Baptist - Do Violence to no man
Constantinus i - ), who had been exposed to little of the Violence of persecution under the mild rule of Constantius
Fall of Man - Thus we have been taught, that this account was intended to teach the evil of yielding to the Violence of appetite and to its control over reason; or the introduction of vice in conjunction with knowledge and the artificial refinements of society; or the necessity of keeping the great mass of mankind from acquiring too great a degree of knowledge, as being hurtful to society; or to consider it as another version of the story of the golden age, and its being succeeded by times more vicious and miserable; or as designed, enigmatically, to account for the origin of evil, or of mankind
Philippi - The scourging and imprisoning were acts of high-handed Violence
Prosper, Saint, a Native of Aquitaine - Ampère condemns what he considers its Violence, its hard, melancholy, and desponding tone, amounting sometimes "to a pale reflection of hell
Enoch Book of - -Noah calls on Enoch at the ends of the earth; he is told judgment is imminent because of sorcery and idolatry, and the Violence of the Satans; Noah is to be preserved: from him shall proceed a fountain of righteous and holy (= Israel) for ever (lxv. Methuselah and his family are summoned and exhorted to love righteousness; Violence must increase, but judgment will follow; idols will fail, and the heathen be judged in fire for ever; the righteous are to rise again (xci. -Noah calls on Enoch at the ends of the earth; he is told judgment is imminent because of sorcery and idolatry, and the Violence of the Satans; Noah is to be preserved: from him shall proceed a fountain of righteous and holy (= Israel) for ever (lxv
Synods - The professed object of these meetings was the tranquillity of the church; yet, from the unhappy divisions which prevailed in these assemblies, their deliberations were conducted with much of the Violence of party feeling; and, according as the one party or the other prevailed, they severally hurled spiritual thunder-bolts against their doctrinal rivals, as if against the enemies of God himself. Marcellus, Photinus, Macedonius, and Priscilian, were severally betrayed by their Violence into systems no less revolting to reason and common sense than the Arian impieties
Old Testament in the New Testament, the - Many New Testament scholars maintain that the New Testament use of the Old Testament works within a closed logical circle: it depends on Christian presuppositions and reads the Old Testament in a distinctly Christian way (even if employing Jewish methods of exegesis), often doing Violence to the true meaning of the Old Testament texts employed
Lazarus - The former proved obdurate, and finally proceeded to Violence (John 10:31; John 10:39)
Crucifixion - Two brigands had been crucified with Him, two of those outlaws who infested the steep road from Jericho to Jerusalem, and by their deeds of Violence gave it the grim name of ‘the Ascent of Blood’ (cf
Henoticon, the - Violence and falsehood characterized the conduct of Mongus
Paul as a Controversialist - He only was considered a completely safe man whose Violence was blind and boundless; and those who endeavoured to steer a middle course were spared by neither side
War - or WARFARE, the attempt to decide a contest or difference between princes, states, or large bodies of people, by resorting to extensive acts of Violence, or, as the phrase is, by an appeal to arms
Christianity (History Sketch) - No sooner, however, had the message of salvation been addressed indiscriminately to all men, and, from the evidence by which it was accompanied, had brought numbers to acknowledge the heavenly source from which it is derived, than the detestation of it previously entertained burst forth in all its Violence; and it is apparent that this had been widely and openly expressed before any imperial edicts were directed against the Christians
Jeroboam - ...
Failing by Violence, Jeroboam tried to win the prophet by favors; asking him home to refresh himself with food and offering him a present
Ibas, Bishop of Edessa - The council of Ephesus, so notorious for its scandalous Violence, which gained for it, from Leo the Great ( Ep
Isaiah, Book of - There is no reason for believing that the present arrangement of this matter, even within the several booklets, goes back to Isaiah himself; the division into chapters and verses is of course of very much later origin, and in several cases does Violence to the original connexion, either by uniting, as in ch
Resurrection - These wicked people mock, do Violence, oppress, are prideful, and speak evil (vv
Hating, Hatred - ’ For the abstraction of the sinful desire to injure from the word ‘hate,’ leaving in it nothing but an aversion of a purely moral kind, Wendt compares the use of ‘violence’ and ‘force’ in Matthew 11:12, where ‘they are used only so far as they denote energetic seizure and appropriation, but not the unlawfulness of this seizure
Gregorius (32) Turonensis, Bishop of Tours - Tours remained under Chilperic till his death in 584, and some of the best traits in Gregory's character appear in his resistance to the murderous Violence of the king and the truculent treachery of Fredegund
Jesuits - ...
At a time when the papal authority had received such a shock by the revolt of so many nations from the Romish church, at a time when every part of the popish system was attacked with so much Violence and success, the acquisition of a body of men, thus peculiarly devoted to the see of Rome, and whom it might set in opposition to all its enemies, was an object of the highest consequence
Political Conditions - ...
A similar policy of oppression was adopted by Pilate, who exceeded his predecessor in resentment, but whose Violence was apt to collapse in the presence of a stubbornness greater than his own
Paul - ) Rescued from their Violence by the Roman commandant, he was conveyed as a prisoner to Caesarea, where, from various causes, he was detained a prisoner for two years in Herod's praetorium (Acts 23:35 )
Mission - The Evangelists record sayings which prove that the great sacrifice was present to our Lord’s mind at an early stage of His ministry, so that there is no need to regard the explicit references to the death by Violence made near Caesarea Philippi (Mark 8:31 ff
Tribes of Israel, the - The radical response of the two brothers, in which they “took their swords and came against the city unawares, and killed all the males” (Genesis 34:25 ), is reflected in Jacob's blessing of the two: “Weapons of Violence are their swords cursed be their anger, for it is fierce, and their wrath, for it is cruel! I will divide them in Jacob, and scatter them in Israel” (Genesis 49:5-7 NRSV)
Ethics - So is the prevalent theft, murder, Violence, adultery, and constant neglect of widows, orphans, strangers
Ethics - passim ); a missing of the mark, Violence, transgression, rebellion, pollution ( Psalms 51:1-19 )
Faith - Paul has done no Violence to the text in Romans 1:17 , Galatians 3:11
Fire - ...
Habakkuk 2:13 (a) By this figure GOD is telling us that those who build up Violence and hatred in their sinful rebellion shall not see their labor succeed
Jonath - ...
Till the people of Nineveh believed God, and proclaimed a fast, and put on sackcloth, and turned every one from his evil way, and from the Violence that was in their hands
Transubstantiation - " He had no sooner escaped from the Violence which he had dreaded, than he shrunk from the tenet to which he had been forced to give his assent, and he again avowed his original sentiments; but he was afterward turned aside from his integrity by the arts and the infamous persecution of new councils, although he died adhering to the spirituality of Christ's presence in the eucharist
Manicheans - But this very Violence is the means of their destruction
Poetry of the Hebrews - It is farther to be remarked under this head, that, in the images of the awful and terrible kind, with which the sacred poets abound, they plainly draw their descriptions from that Violence of the elements, and those great concussions of nature, with which their climate rendered them acquainted
Unity (2) - It shows a threefold unity of the Church:—(1) An objective unity of origin and of vital relation of its constituent elements, which (like the racial unity of blood) is constituted by the Divine act and exists antecedently to any action, for it or against it, of ours; to which we may do Violence, but which we cannot abrogate; and which is the Church’s spiritual oneness
Forgiveness - The Ninevites, including the king, believed and repented of their evil ways and their Violence (Jonah 3:8 )
Revelation, the Book of - These riders, paralleling the chaos predicted in Mark 13:1 , represent God's judgments through the upheavals of war and its devastating social consequences (violence, famine, pestilence, and death)
Evil - They are frequently paired with synonyms with other words denoting persecution, wickedness, rebellion, Violence, and evil
Redemption (2) - Prayers, therefore, are frequent that Jehovah would redeem from oppression, from Violence, from sickness, from death, from captivity, etc
Sin - But sin also offends people; it is Violence and lovelessness toward other people, and ultimately, rebellion against God
Holiness Purity - ...
It is perplexing to find that in classical usage ὄσιος came to mean also ‘profane,’ but this is accounted for if we remember that a ‘profane’ place is one that may be trodden by all without doing Violence be the majesty of the god; ‘profane’ conduct, i
Sin - 1:3 also refers to the trouble inficted on others: “Why dost thou show me iniquity [10], and cause me to behold grievance [13]? For spoiling and Violence are before me; and there are that raise up strife and contention
Canon - If a book had, by some accident or Violence, been destroyed in one region, the loss could soon have been repaired, by sending for copies to other countries
Jeremiah - ) fifth year Jeremiah escaped his Violence by the Lord's hiding him and Baruch (1618453740_55), after the king had destroyed the prophetic roll of prophecies for the 23 years past of Jeremiah's ministry, which Jeremiah was commanded to write in Jehoiakim's fourth year, and which in the fifth Baruch, having first written them, read to the people assembled on the fast
Wisdom - Paul’s presentation of his message: οὐκ ἐν σοφίᾳ λόγου, ἵνα μὴ κενωθῇ ὁ σταυρὸς τοῦ Χριστοῦ (1 Corinthians 1:17), ‘The term κενοῦν denotes an act which does Violence to the object itself, and deprives it of its essence and virtue
Individualism - It has a right to resist force, to suppress Violence
Honorius, Flavius Augustus, Emperor - " He ended with a strong caution against any Violence on Christian pretences to pagans or Jews leading quiet and legal lives, with penalty of triple or fourfold f restitution
Anger (2) - ’ Jesus was on His way to die; and it moved Him as an indignity, which He was entitled to resent, that on the very path to the cross He should be attended by a shallow throng who did not have it in them to do the slightest Violence to themselves for the sake of the kingdom of God
Animals - The same antithesis is used by our Lord to portray the contrast between the Church and the world, between the patient non-resistance of the one and the brutal Violence of the other
Liberius, Bishop of Rome - the Arians']'>[1] Violence, and his hatred of heresy; for he supported me as long as he had free choice" ( Hist
Offence (2) - If a man will do no Violence to his nature, but claims liberty for it on every side,—if he will go wherever his feet can carry him, do whatever his hands itch to do, look at whatever his eyes long to see,—the end will not be a complete and rounded character, it will be the forfeiture of all character; it will not be an abundant entrance into life, it will be hell fire
Judgment Damnation - Jahweh avenged not only insults against His own honour, but also deeds of Violence and wrong (Genesis 4:11, Judges 9:56 f
Regeneration (2) - The man who refuses to do so, who cannot find it in him to do Violence to nature, is incapable of discipleship and of the life which is life indeed
Trial of Jesus - After His arrest, Jesus was detained in custody in the house of the high priest, and, in the absence of the judicial authorities, suffered Violence at the hands of His captors
Slave, Slavery - Moreover, an iron rule seemed the only means of keeping slaves in subjection and guarding against outbreaks of Violence
Gregorius Nyssenus, Bishop of Nyssa - the dangers of robbery and Violence in the Holy Land itself, of the moral state of which he draws a fearful picture
Work - ...
The main predeluvian human activity is social Violence (Genesis 6:11,13 )
Book - The materials generally used by the ancients for their books, were liable to be easily destroyed by the damp, when hidden in the earth; and in times of war, devastation, and rapacity, it was necessary to bury in the earth whatever they wished to preserve from the attacks of fraud and Violence
Canaan - Rain only falls during the autumn, winter, and spring, when it sometimes descends with great Violence: the greatest quantity, and that which properly constitutes the rainy season, happening between the autumnal equinox, or somewhat later, and the beginning of December; during which period, heavy clouds often obscure the sky, and several days of violent rain sometimes succeed each other with winds
Abram - Wars and Violences, droughts, famines, and the constant increase of population, continued to impel these innumerable, but at first, small streams of men into parts still more remote. This led to inquiry, and on discovering that he was detaining another man's wife by Violence, he sent her back, and dismissed Abraham laden with presents
Prayer - When Atys, the son of Croesus the king, who was dumb from his childhood, saw his father ready to be slain, the Violence of his passion broke the bonds wherewith his tongue was tied, and he cried out to save him
Trial-at-Law - At Ephesus, again, the Apostle was saved from the fanatical Violence of the mob by the sanity of the town-clerk (ὁ γραμματεύς, the city scribe or secretary), who reminded them that the courts were open and the proconsuls (ἀνθύπατοι, plur
Egypt - Abram's visit (Genesis 12:10-20) was in a time of Egypt's prosperity; nor is Abram's fear lest Sarai should be taken, and he slain for her sake, indicative of a savage state such as would exist under the foreign Hyksos rather than the previous native Egyptian kings; for in the papyrus d'Orbiney in the British Museum, of the age of Rameses II of a native dynasty, the 19th, the story of the two brothers (the wife of the elder of whom acts toward the younger as Potiphar's wife toward Joseph) represents a similar act of Violence (the Pharaoh of the time sending two armies to take a beautiful wife and murder her husband on the advice of the royal councilors), at the time of Egypt's highest civilization; and this attributed not to a tyrant, but to one beloved and deified at his decease
English Versions - Gasquet also denies that there is any real evidence connecting Wyclif with the production of an English Bible at all; but m order to make good this assertion he has to ignore several passages in Wyclif’s own writings in which he refers to the importance of a vernacular version (to the existence of his own version he could not refer, since that was produced only at the end of his life), and to do Violence alike to the proper translation and to the natural interpretation of passages written by Wyclif’s opponents (Arundel, Knyghton, and the Council of Oxford in 1408) in which Wyclif’s work is mentioned and condemned
Messiah - The Pharisaic expectation would never have led to Violence, but rather involved the patient waiting of the faithful for the time set by Jehovah
John Epistles of - It is the natural outcome of the new life which every man may have, if he will take it and use it, to follow Christ, not Cain, whose evil life found its natural expression in the final issue of hatred-murder with Violence (1 John 3:12)
Socialism - It has no necessary affinity with any forms of Violence, or confiscation, or class selfishness, or financial arrangement
Arius the Heresiarch - They were investigated (if the scenes of Violence and passion which took place can be termed an investigation) at a synod of 150 bishops at Tyre (335)
Jews - The Christian church, glorious in its martyrs, yet was considerably diminished by the persecutions to which it was exposed; nor was it easy to repair the breaches in it made by those acts of Violence
Messiah - He was one of those banditti that infested Judea, and committed all kinds of Violence against the Romans; and had become so powerful, that he was chosen king of the Jews, and by them acknowledged their Messiah
Eusebius (60), Bishop of Nicomedia - The first charge which Eusebius encouraged the Meletians to bring against Athanasius concerned his taxing the people of Egypt for linen vestments, and turned upon the supposed Violence of Macarius, the representative of Athanasius, in overthrowing the altar and the chalice, when reproving (for uncanonical proceedings) Ischyras, a priest of the Colluthian sect
Christianity - And now, without adding any more to this argument, we may ask, How could the Christian religion have thus prevailed had it not been introduced by the power of God and of truth? And it has been supported in the world by the same power through a course of many ages, amidst the treachery of its friends, the opposition of its enemies, the dangers of prosperous periods, and the persecutions and Violence of adverse circumstances; all which must have destroyed it, if it had not been founded in truth, and guarded by the protection of an almighty Providence
Moses - The ill success of the expedition against the Amalekites, according to Josephus, occasioned the rebellion of Korah, which broke out shortly after, against Moses and Aaron, with greater Violence than any of the foregoing, under Korah, the ringleader, who drew into it Dathan and Abiram, the heads of the senior tribe of Reuben, and two hundred and fifty princes of the assembly, among whom were even several of the Levites
Paul - Paul became distinguished among its enemies by his activity and Violence, Acts 8:3
Paul - Paul was rescued from the Violence of the multitude by the Roman officer, who made him his own prisoner, causing him to be chained to two soldiers, and then proceeded to inquire who he was and what he had done
Persecution - It is not always easy to decide whether Elijah or Ahab is the persecutor, for both believed in Violence as the only means to the end which they had in view
Paul - Paul, the representative of Christianity, is made to appear a personage of consideration to Roman officials, who are nearly always favourable to him, not infrequently defending him not only from the Violence of the mob but from officials who are not Roman; and from this he infers that the book was written at a date when persecution had been going on for a considerable time
Possession - _ But there are recorded four types of demonomania which appeared, and might well appear, to those of that age to be caused by the intrusion of a demon: (1) where certain organs existed but seemed prevented from fulfilling their proper functions, as cases of dumbness (Matthew 9:32, Luke 11:14), dumbness allied with blindness (Matthew 12:22), and dumbness aggravated by deafness, sudden convulsions, causing suicidal tendencies, foaming at the mouth and grinding the teeth (Matthew 17:15-18, Mark 9:17-26, Luke 9:37-43); (2) the case of the demoniac of Capernaum, where the demon made its presence felt in outcries, shrieks, and convulsions (Mark 1:23-26, Luke 4:33-35);_ (3) the demoniac or demoniacs of Gadara present still stronger evidence of what would be deemed embodiment, such as abnormal physical strength, exhibiting itself in fierceness, Violence, the breaking of chains and fetters, passion for seclusion among the tombs and mountains, frenzied shriekings, self-mutilation, nakedness, homicidal tendencies, loss of the sense of personality, and identification of the patient with the demon (Matthew 8:28-32, Mark 5:2-13, Luke 8:27-33);_ and (4) the case of the daughter of the SyrophCEnician woman, in which the cure was effected when the afflicted person was not present (Matthew 15:22-28, 1618453741_55)
Vulgate - When, therefore, readers found whole passages omitted or transposed, and the meanings of very many sentences altered beyond all recognition, they believed that Violence was being done to the sacred text; nor were they prepared to admit as axiomatic the superiority of the Hebrew text to the Greek, the OT of the Jews to the OT of the Christians
Reformation - ...
Meanwhile Charles was convinced that it was not a time to extirpate heresy by Violence; and at last terms of pacification were agreed upon at Nuremberg, and ratified solemnly in the diet at Ratisbon: and affairs so ordered by Divine Providence, that the Protestant obtained terms which amounted almost to a toleration of their religion
Ambrosius of Milan - Theodosius, hearing of this Violence, had ordered that the bishop should rebuild the synagogue at his own expense, and that the rioters, who were chiefly monks, should be punished at the discretion of the local governor
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - Lucifer of Cagliari having taken part in the appointment of Paulinus, a corrective was needed for the more extreme among the Western party at Antioch; and this was given in Jerome's dialogue, which is clear, moderate, and free from the Violence of his later controversial works
Basilius, Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia - "Violence would be the only course to adopt with one over whom threats and blandishments were equally powerless" (Greg
Authority of Christ - Nothing is less like Jesus than to do Violence to anyone’s liberty, or to invade the sacredness of conscience and of personal responsibility; but the broad fact is unquestionable, that without coercing others Jesus dominated them, without breaking their wills He imposed His own will upon them, and became for them a supreme moral authority to which they submitted absolutely, and by which they were inspired
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - The rabble, swelling in numbers and fury as it rushed through the city, proceeded to acts of open Violence
Dioscorus (1), Patriarch of Alexandria - " Stephen of Ephesus then narrated the Violence done to his secretaries: Acacias of Arianathia described the coercion scene
Donatus And Donatism - The return was marked by Violence and murder
Jerusalem - ...
From this time, during several succeeding Maccabean rulers, who were at once high priests and sovereigns of the Jews, but without the title of king, Jerusalem was able to preserve itself from Syrian Violence
Calvinism - If such thoughts ever enter into the minds of pious men, they will be sufficiently enabled to break their Violence by this one consideration, how exceedingly presumptuous it is, only to inquire into the causes of the divine will; which is, in fact, and is justly entitled to be, the cause of every thing that exists
Egypt - the assaults on Egypt were renewed with greater Violence than ever by Libyans from the west and by sea-rovers from the islands and coasts of the eastern Mediterranean