What does Trinity mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Most Blessed Trinity, Scapular of the
A white scapular with a red and blue cross. Badge of the Confraternity of the Most Blessed Trinity. Said to have originated in a vision vouchsafed to Pope Innocent II in 1198 in which an angel garbed in these colors appeared to him and directed him to approve the Order of the Most Blessed Trinity for the redemption of captives. Each person who joins the Confraternity of the Blessed Trinity must be invested with this scapular and must constantly wear it. The indulgences of this confraternity were last approved by a Decree of the Congregation of Indulgences of August 13, 1899. The General of the Trinitarians may communicate to other priests the faculty of receiving into the confraternity and of blessing and investing with the scapular.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Missionary Servants of the Most Holy Trinity
Religious community of priests and brothers in the United States, founded by the Reverend Thomas Augustine Judge, C.M., M.S.SS.T., to form a lay apostolate and to direct work among home missions, especially in the South. The formal decree of erection was read in Washington, DC, April 29, 1929. To provide for the support of missionaries in training, the community conducts work among boys in crowded Catholic centers and publishes the monthly S.O.S. for the Preservation of the Faith. Father Judge also founded the Missionary Servants of the Most Blessed Trinity now numbering about 300 sisters in 30 mission cenacles.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Order of the Most Holy Trinity
Religious order founded in the 12th century by Saint John of Matha and Saint Felix of Valois, at Cerfroid in the Diocese of Meaux, for the ransom of captives. During the lives of the founders, the order made 100 foundations; after their deaths it spread so rapidly, especially in the East, that Gregory IX in 1237 placed it under the direct protection of the Holy See. It was established in England, 1226, in Ireland, 1230, and from there the Trinitarians spread to every country. The Paris house erected in 1228, dedicated to Saint Mathurin, soon surpassed Cerfroid and eventually became the residence of the general of the order. In France the Trinitarians suffered greatly during the English invasion of the 15th century and the wars of religion of the 16th. Towards the end of the 16th century they separated into the Discalced and the Reformed Trinitarians. Their rule, originally very austere, was mitigated in 1263, and in 1771 they adopted the rule of Saint Augustine. The Trinitarians of Spain separated from those of France under Father Juan Bautista of the Immaculate Conception; the latter added fresh austerity to their rule by founding the Discalced Trinitarians of Spain. This rule spread to Italy and Austria, and the Discalced also went to France, where they were suppressed by a papal Bull in 1771. An edict of Joseph II in 1784 suppressed them in Austria and the Low Countries, and the Revolution in 1789 suppressed them in all the territories to which they had spread. They have retained a few houses in Italy, Spain, and the Spanish colonies. Their chief house is the Basilica of Saint John Chrysogonus at Rome, which was given to them by Pope Pius IX, 1856. Nuns have been affiliated to the order since 1256, but the true Trinitarian Sisters, forming an integral part of the congregation, date from 1612. They came to the United States in 1920. There are both Calced and Discalced Spanish Trinitarian Nuns with numerous houses in Spain.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Trinity
TRINITY
1. The doctrine approached . It is sometimes asked why we are not given a definite statement that there are three Persons in the Godhead. One reason for the absence of any such categorical and dogmatic teaching is probably to be found in the fact that the earliest hearers of the gospel were Jews, and that any such pronouncement might (and probably would) have seemed a contradiction of their own great truth of the unity of the Godhead. Consequently, instead of giving an intellectual statement of doctrine, which might have led to theological and philosophic discussion, and ended only in more Intense opposition to Christianity, the Apostles preached Jesus of Nazareth as a personal Redeemer from sin, and urged on every one the acceptance of Him and His claims. Then, in due course, would come the inevitable process of thought and meditation upon this personal experience, and this would in turn lead to the inference that Jesus, from whom, and in whom, these experiences were being enjoyed, must be more than man, must be none other than Divine, ‘for who can forgive sins but God only?’ Through such a personal impression and inference based on experience, a distinction in the Godhead would at once be realized. Then, in the course of their Christian life, and through fuller instruction, would be added the personal knowledge and experience of the Holy Spirit, and once again a similar inference would in due course follow, making another distinction in their thought of the Godhead. The intellectual conception and expression of these distinctions probably concerned only comparatively few of the early believers, but nevertheless all of them had in their lives an experience of definite action and blessing which could only have been from above, and which no difficulty of intellectual correlation or of theological co-ordination with former teachings could invalidate and destroy.
2. The doctrine derived . The doctrine of the Trinity is an expansion of the doctrine of the Incarnation, and emerges out of the personal claim of our Lord. We believe this position can be made good from the NT. We take first the Gospels, and note that our Lord’s method of revealing Himself to His disciples was by means of personal impression and influence. His character, teaching, and claim formed the centre and core of everything, and His one object was, as it were, to stamp Himself on His disciples, knowing that in the light of fuller experience His true nature and relations would become clear to them. We see the culmination of this impression and experience in the confession of the Apostle, ‘My Lord and my God.’ Then, as we turn to the Acts of the Apostles, we find St. Peter preaching to Jews, and emphasizing two associated truths: (1) the Sonship and Messiahship of Jesus, as proved by the Resurrection, and (2) the consequent relation of the hearers to Him as to a Saviour and Master. The emphasis is laid on the personal experience of forgiveness and grace, without any attempt to state our Lord’s position in relation to God. Indeed, the references to Jesus Christ as the ‘Servant [1] ‘Son’] of God’ in Acts 3:13 ; Acts 3:26 ; Acts 5:3-412 , seem to show that the Christian thought regarding our Lord was still immature, so far as there was any purely Intellectual consideration of it. It is worthy of note that this phrase, which is doubtless the NT counterpart of Isaiah’s teaching on the ‘Servant of the Lord,’ is not found in the NT later than these earlier chapters of the Acts. Yet in the preaching of St. Peter the claim made for Jesus of Nazareth as the Source of healing ( Acts 3:6 ; Acts 3:16 ), the Prince-Leader of Life ( Acts 3:15 ), the Head Stone of the corner ( Acts 4:11 ), and the one and only Way of Salvation ( Acts 4:12 ), was an unmistakable assumption of the position and power of Godhead.
In the same way the doctrine of the Godhead of the Holy Spirit arises directly out of our Lord’s revelation. Once grant a real personal distinction between the Father and the Son, and it is easy to believe it also of the Spirit as revealed by the Son. As long as Christ was present on earth there was no room and no need for the specific work of the Holy Spirit, but as Christ was departing from the world He revealed a doctrine which clearly associated the Holy Spirit with Himself and the Father in a new and unique way ( John 14:16-17 ; John 14:26 ; John 15:26 ; John 16:7-15 ). Arising immediately out of this, and consonant with it, is the place given to the Holy Spirit in the Book of the Acts. From ch. 5, where lying against the Holy Spirit is equivalent to lying against God ( John 5:3-4 ; John 5:9 ), we see throughout the book the essential Deity of the Holy Spirit in the work attributed to Him of superintending and controlling the life of the Apostolic Church ( John 2:4 , John 8:29 , John 10:19 , John 13:2 ; John 13:4 , John 16:6-7 , John 20:25 ).
Then, as we pass to the Epistles, we find references to our Lord Jesus and to the Holy Spirit which imply unmistakably the functions of Godhead. In the opening salutations our Lord is associated with God as the Source of grace and peace (1 Thessalonians 1:1 f., 1 Peter 1:2 ), and in the closing benedictions as the Divine Source of blessing ( Romans 15:30 , 2 Thessalonians 3:16 ; 2 Thessalonians 3:18 ). In the doctrinal statements He is referred to in practical relation to us and to our spiritual life in terms that can be predicated of God only, and in the revelations concerning things to come He is stated to be about to occupy a position which can refer to God only. In like manner, the correlation of the Holy Spirit with the Father and the Son in matters essentially Divine is clear ( 1 Corinthians 2:4-6 , 2 Corinthians 13:14 , 1 Peter 1:2 ).
In all these assertions and implications of the Godhead of Jesus Christ, it is to be noted very carefully that St. Paul has not the faintest idea of contradicting his Jewish monotheism. Though he and others thus proclaimed the Godhead of Christ, it is of great moment to remember that Christianity was never accused of polytheism. The NT doctrine of God is essentially a form of monotheism, and stands in no relation to polytheism. There can be no doubt that, however and whenever the Trinitarian idea was formulated, it arose in immediateconnexion with the monotheism of Judæa; and the Apostles, Jews though they were, in stating so unmistakably the Godhead of Jesus Christ, are never once conscious of teaching anything inconsistent with their most cherished ideas about the unity of God.
3. The doctrine confirmed . When we have approached the doctrine by means of the personal experience of redemption, we are prepared to give full consideration to the two lines of teaching found in the NT. ( a ) One line of teaching insists on the unity of the Godhead ( 1 Corinthians 8:4 , James 2:19 ); and ( b ) the other line reveals distinctions within the Godhead ( Matthew 3:16-17 ; Judges 13:8-219 , 2 Corinthians 13:14 ). We see clearly that (1) the Father is God ( Matthew 11:25 , Romans 15:6 , Ephesians 4:6 ); (2) the Son is God ( John 1:1 ; John 1:18 ; John 20:28 , Acts 20:26 , Romans 9:5 , Hebrews 1:8 , Colossians 2:9 , Philippians 2:6 , 2 Peter 1:1 ); (3) the Holy Spirit is God ( 1618612709_8 , 1 Corinthians 2:10-11 , Ephesians 2:22 ); (4) the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are distinct from one another, sending and being sent, honouring and being honoured. The Father honours the Son, the Son honours the Father, and the Holy Spirit honours the Son ( John 15:26 ; John 16:13-14 ; John 17:1 ; John 17:8 ; John 17:18 ; John 17:23 ). (5) Nevertheless, whatever relations of subordination there may be between the Persons in working out redemption, the three are alike regarded as God. The doctrine of the Trinity is the correlation, co-ordination, and synthesis of the teaching of these passages. In the Unity of the Godhead there is a Trinity of Persons working out redemption. God the Father is the Creator and Ruler of man and the Provider of redemption through His love ( John 3:16 ). God the Son is the Redeemer, who became man for the purpose of our redemption. God the Holy Spirit is the ‘Executive of the Godhead,’ who applies to each believing soul the benefits of redemption. The elements of the plan of redemption thus find their root, foundation, and spring in the nature of the Godhead; and the obvious reason why these distinctions which we express by the terms ‘Person’ and ‘Trinity’ were not revealed earlier than NT times is that not until then was redemption accomplished.
4. The doctrine stated . By the Trinity, therefore, we mean the specific and unique Christian idea of the Godhead. The foundation of the Christian idea of the Godhead is that of the One Supreme Almighty Spirit whom we worship, to whom we pray, from whom we receive grace, and whom we serve. But the specific Christian thought of God is that of a Spirit, in the unity of whose being is revealed a distinction of Persons whom we call Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; the God from whom, through whom, and by whom all things come the Father as the primal Source, the Son as the redemptive Mediator, and the Holy Spirit as the personal Applier of life and grace. The Christian idea of the Trinity may be summed up in the familiar words: ‘The Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Ghost is God. And yet they are not three Gods, but one God. The Godhead of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost is all one, the Glory equal, the Majesty coeternal. And in this Trinity none is afore or after other: none is greater or less than another, but the whole three Persons are co-eternal together and co-equal.’
The term ‘Trinity’ dates from the second century, being found in Greek in Theophilus of Antioch (a.d. 181); and the actual Latin word, from which we derive our English term, in Tertullian (a.d. 200). Its use is sometimes criticised because it is not found in the Bible, but this is no valid objection to it. Like other words. e.g . ‘Incarnation,’ it expresses in technical language the truth about the Godhead which is found implicitly in the NT. The real question is whether it is true, and whether it is fairly expressive of the Bible truth. It is intended to express and safeguard that real and essential unity of the Godhead which is at the root of the distinctions of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The term ‘Person’ is also sometimes objected to. Like all human language, it is liable to be accused of inadequacy and even positive error. It certainly must not be pressed too far, or it will lead to Tritheism. While we use the term to denote distinctions in the Godhead, we do not imply distinctions which amount to separateness, but distinctions which are associated with essential mutual coinherence or inclusiveness. We intend by the term ‘Person’ to express those real distinctions of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit which are found amid the oneness of the Godhead, distinctions which are no mere temporary manifestations of Deity, but essential and permanent elements within the Divine unity.
5. The doctrine supported . When all this is granted and so far settled, we may find a second line of teaching to support the foregoing in the revelation of God as Love. Following the suggestion of St. Augustine, most modern theologians have rightly seen in this a safe ground for our belief. It transcends, and perhaps renders unnecessary, all arguments drawn from human and natural analogies of the doctrine. ‘God is love’ means, as some one has well said, ‘God as the Infinite home of all moral emotions, the fullest and most highly differentiated life.’ Love must imply relationships, and, as He is eternally perfect in Himself, He can realize Himself as Love only through relationships within His own Being. We may go so far as to say that this is the only way of obtaining a living thought about God. Belief in Theism postulates a self-existent God, and yet it is impossible to think of a God without relationships. These relationships must be eternal and prior to His temporal relationships to the universe of His own creation. He must have relationships eternally adequate, and worthy, and when once we realize that love must have an object in God as well as in ourselves, we have the germ of that distinction in the Godhead which is theologically known as the Trinity.
6. The doctrine anticipated . At this stage, and only here, we may seek another support for the doctrine. In the light of the facts of the NT we cannot refrain from asking whether there may not have been some adumbrations of it in the OT. As the doctrine arises directly out of the facts of the NT, we do not for an instant look for any full discovery of it in the OT. But if the doctrine be true, we might expect that Christian Jews, at any rate, would seek for some anticipation of it in the OT. We believe we find it there. ( a ) The references to the ‘ Angel of Jehovah ’ prepare the way for the Christian doctrine of a distinction in the Godhead ( Genesis 18:2 ; Genesis 18:16 ; Genesis 17:22 with Genesis 19:1 , Joshua 5:13-15 with Joshua 6:1 , 1618612709_95 , Zechariah 13:7 ). ( b ) Allusions to the ‘ Spirit of Jehovah ’ form another line of OT teaching. In Genesis 1:2 the Spirit is an energy only, but in subsequent books an agent ( Isaiah 40:13 ; Isaiah 48:16 ; Isaiah 59:19 ; Isaiah 63:10 f.). ( c ) The personification of Divine Wisdom is also to be observed, for the connexion between the personification of Wisdom in Proverbs 8:1-36 , the Logos of John 1:1-18 , and the ‘wisdom’ of 1 Corinthians 1:24 can hardly be accidental. ( d ) There are also other hints, such as the triplicity of the Divine Names ( Numbers 6:24-27 , Psalms 29:3-5 , Isaiah 6:3 ), which may not be pressed, but can hardly be overlooked. Hints are all that were to be expected or desired until the fulness of time should have come. The function of Israel was to guard God’s transcendence and omnipresence; it was for Christianity to develop the doctrine of the Godhead into the fulness, depth, and richness that we find in the revelation of the Incarnate Son of God.
7. The doctrine justified . ( a ) From the facts of Scripture . It emerges clearly from the claim of Christ; it is an extension of the doctrine of the Incarnation. If the Incarnation was real, the Trinity is true. ( b ) From the facts of Christian experience . It is a simple fact that Christians of all periods of history claim to have personal direct fellowship with Christ. This claim must be accounted for. It is possible only by predicating Deity of our Lord, for such fellowship would be impossible with one who is not God. ( c ) From the facts of history . Compared with other religions, Christianity makes God a reality in a way in which no other system does. The doctrine of the Trinity has several positive theological and philosophical advantages over the Unitarian conception of God, but especially is this so in reference to the relation of God to the world. There are two conceivable relations of God to the world as transcendent (in Mohammedanism), or as immanent (in Buddhism). The first alone means Deism, the second alone Pantheism. But the Christian idea is of God as at once transcendent and immanent. It is therefore the true protection of a living Theism, which otherwise oscillates uncertainly between these two extremes of Deism and Pantheism, either of which is false to It. It is only in Christianity that the Semitic and Aryan conceptions of God are united, blended, correlated, balanced, and preserved. ( d ) From reason . It is simple truth to say that, if Jesus be not God, Christians are idolaters, for they worship One who is not God. There is no other alternative. But when once the truth of the doctrine of the Trinity is regarded as arising out of Christ’s claim to Godhead as Divine Redeemer, reason soon finds its warrant for the doctrine. The doctrine of the Trinity comes to us by revelation and not by nature, though it is soon seen to have points of contact with thought and reason.
The doctrine ‘started in the concrete, with the baptismal formula … emanating from Jesus Christ. And throughout the history of its dogmatic formulation, we are confronted with this fact. It was regarded as a revelation by the men who shaped its intellectual expression; and it was only in the process … of that expression that its congruity with human psychology came out; that psychology in fact being distinctly developed in the effort to give it utterance.… They did not accommodate Christian religion to their philosophy, but philosophy to their Christian religion.’ This doctrine appealed ‘first to unsophisticated men, far removed from Alexandria or Athens; yet the very words in which it does so, turn out, upon analysis, to involve a view of personality which the world had not attained, but which, once stated, is seen to be profoundly, philosophically true’ (Illingworth, Personality , p. 212f.).
W. H. Griffith Thomas.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Trinity
A word not found in Scripture, but used to express the doctrine of the unity of God as subsisting in three distinct Persons. This word is derived from the Gr. trias, first used by Theophilus (A.D. 168-183), or from the Lat. trinitas, first used by Tertullian (A.D. 220), to express this doctrine. The propositions involved in the doctrine are these: 1. That God is one, and that there is but one God (Deuteronomy 6:4 ; 1 Kings 8:60 ; Isaiah 44:6 ; Mark 12:29,32 ; John 10:30 ). 2 . That the Father is a distinct divine Person (hypostasis, subsistentia, persona, suppositum intellectuale), distinct from the Son and the Holy Spirit. 3. That Jesus Christ was truly God, and yet was a Person distinct from the Father and the Holy Spirit. 4. That the Holy Spirit is also a distinct divine Person.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Trinity
God is one, but he exists as a Trinity. Any attempt to define the Trinity is difficult and dangerous, as it is an attempt to do what the Bible does not do. However, by a study of the biblical teaching about God, we understand that although God is one, the form in which his godhead exists is that of three persons – Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Each of the three persons is fully God, yet there is only one God, not three.
One God, three persons
The Old Testament gives little clear teaching about the Trinity, for the emphasis there is on the oneness of God. Israel lived among nations that had many gods. The important truth impressed upon Israel was that there is only one God, and he is a unity (Hebrews 2:3-444).
Our understanding of the Trinity comes largely from the New Testament. This does not mean that the God of Old Testament times differed from the God of New Testament times, or that a God who was previously ‘one’ branched out into three. God has always existed in a Trinity. What is new in the New Testament is the revelation of the Trinity, not the Trinity itself.
The reason why the revelation of the Trinity is new in the New Testament is that it was related to the great acts of God in bringing his plan of salvation to completion in Christ. God did not reveal his truth in the form of abstract truths unrelated to the situation in which the people of the time lived. Rather he revealed his truth step by step as he brought his people closer to the full salvation he had planned.
Nevertheless, with the fuller knowledge that Christians gain from the New Testament, they may see suggestions of the Trinity in the Old Testament. Such suggestions are there, even though believers of Old Testament times may not have seen them (cf. 1 Peter 1:10-12).
For example, in the Old Testament references to the creation there was an inseparable connection between God, the creative power of God’s Word, and the life-giving power of God’s Spirit (Genesis 1:1-3; Job 33:4; Psalms 33:6). But with the coming of Jesus, people gained a clearer understanding of the work of the Trinity in all the activity of God, including the creation (John 1:1-4). This understanding increased further as Jesus taught his followers and left with them the gift of the Holy Spirit, who would interpret his teaching and continue to enlighten them (John 16:13-15).
The revelation through Jesus Christ
When God took human form in the person of Jesus Christ, much that was previously secret and hidden became open. Jesus revealed God to the world (Galatians 5:16-18; 2 Timothy 3:16-17; John 1:18).
Through Jesus Christ, God was now physically present in the world. But in another sense he was not physically present. Jesus made it plain that when people saw him they saw God (John 8:58-59), but he also made it plain that God existed elsewhere; for he himself came from God, and during his earthly life he spoke to God (John 6:38; John 11:41-42).
Jesus explained this apparent contradiction by pointing out that he was God the Son, and that the one from whom he came and to whom he spoke was God the Father. Although these two persons were distinct, they were uniquely united (John 5:18; John 5:37; John 8:42; John 10:30; John 11:41; Romans 8:26-27; John 16:26-28; see FATHER; SON OF GOD).
Having become a human being, God the Son now gave the additional revelation that there was a third person in the Godhead, the Holy Spirit. All three persons were involved in the miraculous coming of the Son into the world (Luke 1:35), and the life and ministry of Jesus that followed should have shown people that God existed as a Trinity – Father, Son and Holy Spirit (Matthew 3:16-17; Matthew 12:28; Luke 4:18; John 3:34-35). Just before he completed his ministry, Jesus explained about the Holy Spirit more fully. He promised that after he returned to his Father, he and the Father would send the Holy Spirit to be with his disciples, as he himself had been previously (John 14:16-17; John 14:26; John 15:26).
The Holy Spirit, though a separate person from the Father and the Son, is inseparably united with both (Acts 2:32-33). He comes from the Father as the bearer of the Father’s power and presence (John 15:26; John 16:7-11), and he comes from the Son as the bearer of the Son’s power and presence (John 14:18; John 16:7; Romans 8:9; see HOLY SPIRIT). Although there is a distinction between the three persons of the Godhead, there is no division. Each has his own personality and will, but he never acts independently of the others (John 14:26; Acts 16:6-7; Galatians 4:6).
No change in God
This three-in-one and one-in-three unity of the Godhead is well illustrated in the command that Jesus gave to his disciples to baptize their converts ‘in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit’ (Matthew 28:19). In Jewish thought the name represented the person (see NAME). Jesus here spoke of the name (singular), indicating one God, but at the same time he showed that this God existed in three persons. And these three persons were distinct from each other, yet uniquely and inseparably united.
As a God-fearing Jew, Jesus gave his complete allegiance to the one and only true God, and he taught others to do likewise (Deuteronomy 6:4; Matthew 22:37). Jesus’ statement therefore indicated that this God whom Israelites of former times worshipped under the name of Yahweh (Jehovah) was the same God as Christians worshipped under the name of Father, Son and Holy Spirit. The God who is ‘one’ is at the same time a Trinity.
Faith of the New Testament writers
The early disciples reached a fuller understanding of the Trinity through the life, teaching, death and triumph of Jesus Christ. They then passed on their insights through the writings of the New Testament. They never tried to define the Trinity, nor did they try to ‘prove’ it in a theoretical sense. Since they knew God as the one who gave his Son to die for them and gave his Spirit to indwell them, they thought of God in no other way than as a Trinity. The New Testament writings therefore assume the fact of the Trinity at all times (Ephesians 4:4-6; Ephesians 5:18-20; 1 Thessalonians 1:3-5; 1 Peter 1:2). Yet they also assume the oneness of God (Ephesians 1:3-109; 1 Corinthians 8:4).
In keeping with the teachings of Jesus, the teachings of the New Testament writers show that the three persons of the Trinity are fully and equally God. No one person is inferior to, or superior to, any other. Concerning their operations, however, there is a difference. The Son is willingly subject to the Father (John 5:30; John 7:16; John 12:49; Philippians 2:5-8; Hebrews 10:5-7), and the Spirit is willingly subject to both the Father and the Son (John 14:26; John 15:26; John 16:13-15; John 14:9; Galatians 4:6; Philippians 1:19).
Because of the unity between the persons of the Trinity, all three are active in all the work of God. This work is not, as it were, divided among three persons. In a sense, what one does they all do. But the Bible story shows that there is also a sense in which their activities differ.
The name ‘Father’ speaks of one who has to do with the origin of things, and this is seen in the great works of creation, history and redemption (Malachi 2:10; Ephesians 1:3-10; Hebrews 12:9; James 1:17). The Son is the one who reveals the Father, the one through whom the Father does these works (John 10:25; John 10:38; John 14:10; 2 Corinthians 5:19; 1618612709_68; Colossians 1:15-16). The Spirit is the one by whom God’s power operates in the world, the one who applies the truth of God’s works to people’s lives (John 14:17; John 16:7-13; Acts 1:8; Romans 8:2-4; John 1:1; 1 Peter 1:2). God’s salvation comes from the Father, through the Son, by the Spirit (Titus 3:4-6), and people’s approach to God is by the Spirit, through the Son, to the Father (Ephesians 2:18).
Relationship with the triune God
In making statements about the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, the New Testament writers were not attempting a theoretical analysis of God. Their concern was not to set out in systematic form the character and activities of the persons of the Trinity, but to express the relationship that Christians have with God. Christians cannot fully understand the mysteries of the Godhead, but they should try to learn all they can about God; for the life they have in Christ depends on God being the sort of God he is – a Trinity.
Jesus Christ, for example, could not be humankind’s Saviour if he were not the unique person that he is. The fact of the Trinity was essential to his birth (Luke 1:35), his life (John 3:34; John 5:36-37; 1618612709_7; 1 John 5:6-9), his death (Romans 8:32; Galatians 2:20; Hebrews 9:14), his resurrection (Acts 2:42; John 10:18; Romans 8:11) and his exaltation (Acts 5:30-32).
The fact of the Trinity is essential also for the life of believers: their indwelling by God (Ephesians 4:6; Colossians 1:27; 1 Corinthians 6:19); their sanctification (John 1:14; Hebrews 2:11; 1 Corinthians 6:11), their enjoyment of salvation (2 Corinthians 13:14), their exercise of prayer (Romans 8:26-27; Romans 8:34; Ephesians 2:18), their eternal security (John 10:28-29; Ephesians 4:30) and their ultimate victory over death (John 5:21; Romans 8:11).
Likewise the Trinity is involved in the life of the church (1 Corinthians 12:4-6) and in Christian service (2 Corinthians 3:5-6; 1 Timothy 1:12; Acts 20:28). The Scriptures that Christians possess are a provision from the triune God (John 17:17; 1 Peter 1:10-11; 2 Peter 1:21). They are one of the means by which the same God wants to work in and through his people, as they build themselves up in their faith and prepare themselves for fellowship with him in the age to come (Judges 1:20-21).
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Trinity
The union of three in one; generally applied to the ineffable mystery of three persons in one God,
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. This doctrine is rejected by many because it is incomprehensible; but, as Mr. Scott observes, if distinct personality, agency, and divine perfections, be in Scripture ascribed to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, no words can more exactly express the doctrine, which must unavoidably be thence inferred, than those commonly used on this subject, viz. that there are three distinct Persons in the Unity of the Godhead. The sacred oracles most assuredly teach us, that the One living and true God is, in some inexplicable manner, Triune, for he is spoken of, as One in some respects, and as Three in others, Genesis 1:26 , Genesis 2:6-7 . Is. 48: 16. Is. 34: 16. 2 Corinthians 13:14 . John 14:23 . Matthew 28:19 . 2 Thessalonians 3:3 . 1 John 5:7 . Acts 5:3-4 . The Trinity of Persons in the Diety consists with the Unity of the Divine Essence; though we pretend not to explain the modus of it, and deem those reprehensible who have attempted it; as the modus in which any being subsists, according to its distinct nature and known properties, is a secret to the most learned naturalists to this present day, and probably will always continue so. But if the most common of God's works, with which we are the most conversant, be in this respect incomprehensible, how can men think that the modus existetendi (or manner of existence) of the infinite Creator can be level to their capacities?
The doctrine of the Trinity is indeed a mystery, but no man hath yet shown that it involves in it a real contradiction. Many have ventured to say, that it ought to be ranked with transubstantiation, as equally absurd. But Archbishop Tillotson has shown, by the most convincing arguments imaginable, that transubstantiation includes, the most palpable contradictions; and that we have the evidence of our eyes, feeling, and taste, that what we receive in the Lord's supper is bread, and not the body of a man; whereas we have the testimony of our eyes alone, that the words "This is my body, " are at all in the Scriptures. Now this in intelligible to the meanest capacity: it is fairly made out, and perfectly unanswerable: but who ever attempted thus to prove the doctrine of the Trinity to be self-contradictory? What testimony of our senses, or what demonstrated truth, does it contradict? Yet till this be shown, it is neither fair nor convincing, to exclaim against it as contradictory, absurd, and irrational."
See articles JESUS CHRIST and HOLY GHOST; also Owen, Watts, Jones, S. Browne, Fawcett, A. Taylor, J. Scott, Sampson, and Wesley's Pieces on the Subject; Bull's Defensio Fidei Nicaenae; Dr. Allix's Testimonies of the Jewish Church; Display of the Trinity by a Layman; Scott's Essays.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - o Trinity of Blessed Light
Hymn for Vespers on Trinity Sunday. This is the original text of the hymn; the Roman Breviary text is "Jam sol recedit igneus". The hymn was written by Saint .Ambrose (340-397). There are 12 translations of the original text; the title given above is by J. Neale.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Trinity
Theological term used to define God as an undivided unity expressed in the threefold nature of God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. As a distinctive Christian doctrine, the Trinity is considered as a divine mystery beyond human comprehension to be reflected upon only through scriptual revelation. The Trinity is a biblical concept that expresses the dynamic character of God, not a Greek idea pressed into Scripture from philosophical or religious speculation. While the term trinity does not appear in Scripture, the trinitarian structure appears throughout the New Testament to affirm that God Himself is manifested through Jesus Christ by means of the Spirit.
A proper biblical view of the Trinity balances the concepts of unity and distinctiveness. Two errors that appear in the history of the consideration of the doctrine are tritheism and unitarianism. In tritheism, error is made in emphasizing the distinctiveness of the Godhead to the point that the Trinity is seen as three separate Gods, or a Christian polytheism. On the other hand, unitarianism excludes the concept of distinctiveness while focusing solely on the aspect of God the Father. In this way, Christ and the Holy Spirit are placed in lower categories and made less than divine. Both errors compromise the effectiveness and contribution of the activity of God in redemptive history.
The biblical concept of the Trinity developed through progressive revelation. See Revelation. The Old Testament consistently affirms the unity of God through such statements as, “Hear, O Israel: the Lord our God is one Lord” (Deuteronomy 6:4 ). See Shema . God's oneness is stressed to caution the Israelites against the polytheism and practical atheism of their heathen neighbors.
The Old Testament does feature implications of the trinitarian idea. This does not mean that the Trinity was fully knowable from the Old Testament, but that a vocabulary was established through the events of God's nearness and creativity; both receive developed meaning from New Testament writers. For example, the word of God is recognized as the agent of creation (Psalm 33:6 ,Psalms 33:6,33:9 ; compare Proverbs 3:19 ; Proverbs 8:27 ), revelation, and salvation (Psalm 107:20 ). This same vocabulary is given distinct personality in John's prologue (John 1:1-4 ) in the person of Jesus Christ. Other vocabulary categories include the wisdom of God (Proverbs 8:1 ) and the Spirit of God (Genesis 1:2 ; Psalm 104:30 ; Zechariah 4:6 ).
A distinguishing feature of the New Testament is the doctrine of the Trinity. It is remarkable that New Testament writers present the doctrine in such a manner that it does not violate the Old Testament concept of the oneness of God. In fact, they unanimously affirm the Hebrew monothestic faith, but they extend it to include the coming of Jesus and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit. The early Christian church experienced the God of Abraham in a new and dramatic way without abandoning the oneness of God that permeates the Old Testament. As a fresh expression of God, the concept of the Trinity—rooted in the God of the past and consistent with the God of the past—absorbs the idea of the God of the past, but goes beyond the God of the past in a more personal encounter.
The New Testament does not present a systematic presentation of the Trinity. The scattered segments from various writers that appear throughout the New Testament reflect a seemingly accepted understanding that exists without a full-length discussion. It is embedded in the framework of the Christian experience and simply assumed as true. The New Testament writers focus on statements drawn from the obvious existence of the trinitarian experience as opposed to a detailed exposition.
The New Testament evidence for the Trinity can be grouped into four types of passages. The first is the trinitarian formula of Matthew 28:19 ; 2 Corinthians 13:14 ; 1 Peter 1:2 ; Revelation 1:4 . In each passage a trinitarian formula, repeated in summation fashion, registers a distinctive contribution of each person of the Godhead. Matthew 28:19 , for example, follows the triple formula of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit that distinguishes Christian baptism. The risen Lord commissioned the disciples to baptize converts with a trinitarian emphasis that carries the distinctiveness of each person of the Godhead while associating their inner relationship. This passage is the clearest scriptural reference to a systematic presentation of the doctrine of the Trinity.
Paul, in 2 Corinthians 13:14 , finalized his thoughts to the Corinthian church with a pastoral appeal that is grounded in “the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit” (NIV). The formulation is designed to have the practical impact of bringing that divided church together through their personal experinece of the Trinity in their daily lives. Significantly, in the trinitarian order Christ is mentioned first. This reflects the actual process of Christian salvation, since Christ is the key to opening insight into the work of the Godhead. Paul was calling attention to the trinitarian consciousness, not in the initial work of salvation which has already been accomplished at Corinth, but in the sustaining work that enables divisive Christians to achieve unity.
In 1 Peter 1:2 , the trinitarian formula is followed with reference to each person of the Godhead. The scattered Christians are reminded through reference to the Trinity that their election (foreknowledge of the Father) and redemption (the sanctifying work of the Spirit) should lead to holy living obedience to the Son).
John addressed the readers of Revelation with an expanded trinitarian formula that includes references to the persons of the Godhead (Revelation 1:4-6 ). The focus on the triumph of Christianity crystallizes the trinitarian greeting into a doxology that acknowledges the accomplished work and the future return of Christ. This elongated presentation serves as an encouragement to churches facing persecution.
A second type of New Testament passage is the triadic form. Two passages cast in this structure are Ephesians 4:4-6 and 1 Corinthians 12:3-6 . Both passages refer to the three Persons, but not in the definitive formula of the previous passage. Each Scripture balances the unity of the church. Emphasis is placed on the administration of gifts by the Godhead.
A third category of passages mentions the three persons of the Godhead, but without a clear triadic structure. In the accounts of the baptism of Jesus (Matthew 3:3-17 ; Mark 1:9-11 ; and Luke 3:21-22 ), the three synoptic writers recorded the presence of the Trinity when the Son was baptized, the Spirit descended, and the Father spoke with approval. Paul, in Galatians 4:4-6 , outlined the work of the Trinity in the aspect of the sending Father. Other representative passages in this category (2 Thessalonians 2:13-15 ; Titus 3:4-6 ; and Jude 1:20-21 ) portray each member of the Trinity in relation to a particular redemptive function.
The fourth category of trinitarian passages includes those presented in the farewell discourse of Jesus to His disciples (John 14:16 ; John 15:26 ; John 16:13-15 ). In the context of these passages, Jesus expounded the work and ministry of the third person of the Godhead as the Agent of God in the continuing ministry of the Son. The Spirit is a Teacher who facilitates understanding on the disciples' part and, in being sent from the Father and the Son, is one in nature with the other Persons of the Trinity. He makes known the Son and “at the same time makes known the Father who is revealed in the Son” (John 16:15 ). The discourse emphasizes the interrelatedness of the Trinity in equality and operational significance.
All of these passages are embryonic efforts by the early church to express its awareness of the Trinity. The New Testament is Christological in its approach, but it involves the fullness of God being made available to the individual believer through Jesus and by the Spirit. The consistent trinitarian expression is not a formulation of the doctrine, as such, but reveals an experiencing of God's persistent self-revelation.
In the postbiblical era, the Christian church tried to express its doctrine in terms that were philosophically acceptable and logically coherent. Greek categories of understanding began to appear in explanation efforts. Discussion shifted from the New Testament emphasis on the function of the Trinity in redemptive history to an analysis of the unity of essence of the Godhead.
A major question during those early centuries focused on the oneness of God. The Sabelians described the Godhead in terms of modes that existed only one at a time. This theory upheld the unity of God, but excluded His permanent distinctiveness. The Docetists understood Christ as an appearance of God in human form, while Ebonites described Jesus as an ordinary man indwelt with God's power at baptism. Arius was also an influential theologian who viewed Jesus as subordinate to God. To Arius, Jesus was a being created by God, higher than man, but less than God. This idea, as well as the others, was challenged by Athanasius at Nicea (A.D. 325), and the council decided for the position of Jesus as “of the exact same substance as the Father.”
Probably the most outstanding thinker of the early centuries was Augustine of Hippo (A.D. 354-430). He began with the idea of God as one substance and sought explanation of the Godhead in psychological analogy: a person exists as one being with three dimensions of memory, understanding, and will; so also the Godhead exists as a unity of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. While this explanation is helpful and contains the concept of three persons in one, it does not resolve the complex nature of God.
Perhaps four statements can summarize and clarify this study.
1. God is One. The God of the Old Testament is the same God of the New Testament. His offer of salvation in the Old Testament receives a fuller revelation in the New Testament in a way that is not different, but more complete. The doctrine of the Trinity does not abandon the monotheistic faith of Israel.
2. God has three distinct ways of being in the redemptive event, yet He remains an undivided unity. That God the Father imparts Himself to mankind through Son and Spirit without ceasing to be Himself is at the very heart of the Christian faith. A compromise in either the absolute sameness of the Godhead or the true diversity reduces the reality of salvation.
3. The primary way of grasping the concept of the Trinity is through the threefold participation in salvation. The approach of the New Testament is not to discuss the essence of the Godhead, but the particular aspects of the revelatory event that includes the definitive presence of the Father in the person of Jesus Christ through the Holy Spirit.
4. The doctrine of the Trinity is an absolute mystery. It is primarily known, not through speculation, but through experiencing the act of grace through personal faith. See God ; Jesus Christ ; Holy Spirit .
Jerry M. Henry
CARM Theological Dictionary - Trinity
The word "trinity" is not found in the Bible. Nevertheless, it is a word used to describe one fact the Bible teaches about God: Our God is a Trinity. This means there are three persons in one God, not three Gods. The persons are known as the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit and they have all always existed as three separate persons. The person of the Father is not the same person as the Son. The person of the Son is not the same person as the Holy Spirit. The person of the Holy Spirit is not the same person as the Father. If you take away any one, there is no God. God has always been a trinity from all eternity: "From everlasting to everlasting, Thou art God" (Psalms 90:2).
God is not one person who took three forms, the Father who became the Son, who then became the Holy Spirit. This belief is known today as the "Jesus Only Movement". It is taught by the United Apostolic and United Pentecostal churches, and is an incorrect teaching.
Nor is God only one person as the Jehovah's Witnesses, the Way International, and the Christadelphians teach (These groups are classified as non-Christian cults). For proof that there is more than one person in the Godhead, see the Plurality Study.
The Bible says there is only one God. Yet, it says Jesus is God (John 1:1; Joh 1:14); it says the Father is God (Philippians 1:2); and it says the Holy Spirit is God (Acts 5:3-4). Since the Son speaks to the Father, they are separate persons. Since the Holy Spirit speaks also (Acts 13:2), He is a separate person. There is one God who exists in three persons.
The following chart should help you understand how the Trinity doctrine is derived.
T H E T R I N I T Y
FatherSonHoly Spirit
Called God
Philippians 1:2
John 1:1; Joh 1:14; Colossians 2:9
Acts 5:3-4
Creator
Isaiah 64:8; Isa 44:24
John 1:3; Colossians 1:15-17
Job 33:4; Job 26:13
Resurrects
1 Thessalonians 1:10
John 2:19; Joh 10:17
Romans 8:11
Indwells
2 Corinthians 6:16
Colossians 1:27
John 14:17
Everywhere
1 Kings 8:27
Matthew 28:20
Psalms 139:7-10
All knowing
1 John 3:20
John 16:30; Joh 21:17
1 Corinthians 2:10-11
Sanctifies
1 Thessalonians 5:23
Hebrews 2:11
1 Peter 1:2
Life giver
Genesis 2:7: John 5:21
John 1:3; Joh 5:21
2 Corinthians 3:6; 2Co 3:8
Fellowship
1 John 1:3
1 Corinthians 1:9
2 Corinthians 13:14; Philippians 2:1
Eternal
Psalms 90:2
Micah 5:1-2
Romans 8:11; Hebrews 9:14
A Will
Luke 22:42
Luke 22:42
1 Corinthians 12:11
Speaks
Matthew 3:17; Luke 9:25
Luke 5:20; Luk 7:48
Acts 8:29; Act 11:12; Act 13:2
Love
John 3:16
Ephesians 5:25
Romans 15:30
Searches the heart
Jeremiah 17:10
Revelation 2:23
1 Corinthians 2:10
We belong to
John 17:9
John 17:6
Savior
1 Timothy 1:1; 1Ti 2:3; 1Ti 4:10
2 Timothy 1:10; Titus 1:4; Tit 3:6
We serve
Matthew 4:10
Colossians 3:24
Believe in
John 14:1
John 14:1
Gives joy
John 15:11
John 14:7
JudgesJohn 8:50
John 5:21; Joh 5:30
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Trinity: Its Mystery
It was reported of Alanus, when he promised his auditory to discourse the next Sunday more clearly of the Trinity, and to make plain that mystery, while he was studying the point by the sea-side, he spied a boy very busy with a little spoon trudging often between the sea and a small hole he had digged in the ground. Alanus asked him what he meant. The boy answers, 'I intend to bring all the sea into this pit.' Alanus replies, 'Why dost thou attempt such impossibilities, and misspend thy time?' The boy answers, 'So dost thou, Alanus: I shall as soon bring all the sea into this hole, as thou bring all the knowledge of the Trinity into thy head. All is equally possible; we have begun together, we shall finish together; saving of the two, my labour hath more hope and possibility of taking effect.': Thomas Adams.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Trinity
A word only used to convey the thought of a plurality of Persons in the Godhead. This was revealed at the baptism of the Lord Jesus. The Holy Spirit descended 'like a dove' and abode upon Him; and God the Father declared "This is my beloved Son in whom I am well pleased." That the Father is a distinct Person and is God is plainly stated, as in John 20:17 . Many passages prove that the Lord Jesus is God: one will suffice: ". . . . in his Son Jesus Christ. This is the true God, and eternal life." 1 John 5:20 . That the Holy Spirit is a Person and is God the following passages clearly prove: Genesis 1:2 ; Matthew 4:1 ; John 16:13 ; Acts 10:19 ; Acts 13:2,4 ; Acts 20:28 ; Romans 15:30 ; 1 Corinthians 2:10 . The three Persons are also named in the formula instituted by Christ in baptism. Matthew 28:19 . Yet there is but one God. 1 Timothy 2:5 . Satan will have an imitation of the Trinity in the Roman beast, the false prophet, and himself. Revelation 13:4,11 ; Revelation 20:10 .
Webster's Dictionary - Trinity
(1):
(n.) Any union of three in one; three units treated as one; a triad, as the Hindu trinity, or Trimurti.
(2):
(n.) Any symbol of the Trinity employed in Christian art, especially the triangle.
(3):
(n.) The union of three persons (the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost) in one Godhead, so that all the three are one God as to substance, but three persons as to individuality.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Trinity
Trinity. This word does not occur in Scripture. As a fact the Scripture reveals the doctrine of the Trinity in two ways: first in passages in which the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are mentioned together as God; and secondly, in passages which speak of each as divine. In the New Testament clear evidence is given. See Matthew 3:16-17; Matthew 28:19; 1 Corinthians 12:3-6; 2 Corinthians 13:14; Ephesians 4:4-6; Titus 3:4-6; 1 Peter 1:2; Judges 1:20-21. These passages, carefully read, are sufficient to prove that "the Godhead of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost is one, the glory equal, the majesty co-eternal; such as the Father is, such is the Son, and such is the Holy Ghost; the Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Ghost is God; and yet they are not three Gods, but one God."
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Trinity
That nearly all the Pagan nations of antiquity, says Bishop Tomline, in their various theological systems, acknowledged a kind of Trinity, has been fully evinced by those learned men who have made the Heathen mythology the subject of their elaborate inquiries. The almost universal prevalence of this doctrine in the Gentile kingdoms must be considered as a strong argument in favour of its truth. The doctrine itself bears such striking internal marks of a divine original, and is so very unlikely to have been the invention of mere human reason that there is no way of accounting for the general adoption of so singular a belief, but by supposing that it was revealed by God to the early patriarchs, and that it was transmitted by them to their posterity. In its progress, indeed, to remote countries, and to distant generations, this belief became depraved and corrupted in the highest degree; and he alone who brought "life and immortality to light," could restore it to its original simplicity and purity. The discovery of the existence of this doctrine in the early ages, among the nations whose records have been the best preserved, has been of great service to the cause of Christianity, and completely refutes the assertion of infidels and skeptics, that the sublime and mysterious doctrine of the Trinity owes its origin to the philosophers of Greece. "If we extend," says Mr. Maurice, "our eye through the remote region of antiquity, we shall find this very doctrine, which the primitive Christians are said to have borrowed from the Platonic school, universally and immemorially flourishing in all those countries where history and tradition have united to fix those virtuous ancestors of the human race, who, for their distinguished attainments in piety, were admitted to a familiar intercourse with Jehovah and the angels, the divine heralds of his commands." The same learned author justly considers the first two verses of the Old Testament as containing very strong, if not decisive, evidence in support of the truth of this doctrine: Elohim, a noun substantive of the plural number, by which the Creator is expressed, appears as evidently to point toward a plurality of persons in the divine nature, as the verb in the singular, with which it is joined, does to the unity of that nature: "In the beginning God created;" with strict attention to grammatical propriety, the passage should be rendered, "In the beginning Gods created," but our belief in the unity of God forbids us thus to translate the word Elohim. Since, therefore, Elohim is plural, and no plural can consist of less than two in number, and since creation can alone be the work of Deity, we are to understand by this term so particularly used in this place, God the Father, and the eternal Logos, or Word of God; that Logos whom St. John, supplying us with an excellent comment upon this passage, says, was in the beginning with God, and who also was God. As the Father and the Son are expressly pointed out in the first verse of this chapter, so is the Third Person in the blessed Trinity not less decisively revealed to us in Genesis 1:2 : "And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters:" "brooded upon" the water, incubavit, as a hen broods over her eggs. Thus we see the Spirit exerted upon this occasion an active effectual energy, by that energy agitating the vast abyss, and infusing into it a powerful vital principle.
Elohim seems to be the general appellation by which the Triune Godhead is collectively distinguished in Scripture; and in the concise history of the creation only, the expression, bara Elohim, "the Gods created," is used above thirty times. The combining this plural noun with a verb in the singular would not appear so remarkable, if Moses had uniformly adhered to that mode of expression; for then it would be evident that he adopted the mode used by the Gentiles in speaking of their false gods in the plural number, but by joining with it a singular verb or adjective, rectified a phrase that might appear to give a direct sanction to the error of polytheism. But, in reality, the reverse is the fact; for in Deuteronomy 32:15 ; Deuteronomy 32:17 , and other places, he uses the singular number of this very noun to express the Deity, though not employed in the August work of creation: "He forsook God," Eloah; "they sacrificed to devils, not to God," Eloah. But farther, Moses himself uses this very word Elohim with verbs and adjectives in the plural. Of this usage Dr. Allix enumerates many other striking instances that might be brought from the Pentateuch; and other inspired writers use it in the same manner in various parts of the Old Testament, Job 35:10 ; Joshua 24:19 ; Psalms 109:1 ; Ecclesiastes 12:3 ; 2 Samuel 7:23 . It must appear, therefore, to every reader of reflection, exceedingly singular, that when Moses was endeavouring to establish a theological system, of which the unity of the Godhead was the leading principle, and in which it differed from all other systems, he should make use of terms directly implicative of a plurality in it; yet so deeply was the awful truth under consideration impressed upon the mind of the Hebrew legislator, that this is constantly done by him; and, indeed, as Allix has observed, there is scarcely any method of speaking from which a plurality in Deity may be inferred, that is not used either by himself in the Pentateuch, or by the other inspired writers in various parts of the Old Testament. A plural is joined with a verb singular, as in the passage cited before from Genesis 1:1 ; a plural is joined with a verb plural, as in Genesis 35:7 , "And Jacob called the name of the place El- beth-el, because the Gods there appeared to him;" a plural is joined with an adjective plural, Joshua 24:19 , "You cannot serve the Lord; for he is the holy Gods." To these passages, if we add that remarkable one from Ecclesiastes, "Remember thy Creators in the days of thy youth," and the predominant use of the terms, Jehovah Elohim, or, the "Lord thy Gods," which occur a hundred times in the law, (the word Jehovah implying the unity of the essence, and Elohim a plurality in that unity,) we must allow that nothing can be more plainly marked than this doctrine in the ancient Scriptures.
Though the August name of Jehovah in a more peculiar manner belongs to God the Father, yet is that name, in various parts of Scripture, applied to each person in the holy Trinity. The Hebrews considered that name in so sacred a light, that they never pronounced it, and used the word Adonai instead of it. It was, indeed a name that ranked first among their profoundest cabbala; a mystery, sublime, ineffable, incommunicable. It was called tetragrammaton, or the name of four letters, and these letters are jod, he, vau, he, the proper pronunciation of which, from long disuse, is said to be no longer known to the Jews themselves. This awful name was first revealed by God to Moses from the centre of the burning bush; and Josephus, who, as well as Scripture, relates this circumstance, evinces his veneration for it, by calling it the name which his religion did not permit him to mention. From this word the Pagan title of Iao and Jove is, with the greatest probability, supposed to have been originally formed; and in the Golden Verses of Pythagoras, there is an oath still extant to this purpose, "By Him who has the four letters." As the name Jehovah, however, in some instances applied to the Son and the Holy Spirit, was the proper name of God the Father, so is Logos in as peculiar a manner the appropriated name of God the Son. The Chaldee Paraphrasts translate the original Hebrew text by Mimra da Jehovah, literally, "the word of Jehovah," a term totally different, as Bishop Kidder has incontestably proved, in its signification, and in its general application among the Jews, from the Hebrew dabar, which simply means a discourse or decree, and is properly rendered by pithgam. In the Septuagint translation of the Bible, a work supposed by the Jews to have been undertaken by men immediately inspired from above, the former term is universally rendered Λογος , and it is so rendered and so understood by Philo and all the more ancient rabbins. The name of the third person in the ever blessed Trinity has descended unaltered from the days of Moses to our own time; for, as well in the sacred writings as by the Targumists, and by the modern doctors of the Jewish church, he is styled Ruach Hakhodesh, the Holy Spirit. He is sometimes, however, in the rabbinical books, denominated by Shechinah, or glory of Jehovah; in some places he is called Sephirah, or Wisdom; and in others the Binah, or Understanding. From the enumeration of these circumstances, it must be sufficiently evident to the mind which unites piety and reflection, that so far from being silent upon the subject, the ancient Scriptures commence with an avowal of this doctrine, and that, in fact, the creation was the result of the joint operations of the Trinity.
If the argument above offered should still appear inconclusive, the twenty- sixth verse of the first chapter of Genesis contains so pointed an attestation to the truth of it, that, when duly considered, it must stagger the most hardened skeptic; for in that text not only the plurality is unequivocally expressed, but the act which is the peculiar prerogative of Deity is mentioned together with that plurality, the one circumstance illustrating the other, and both being highly elucidatory of this doctrine: "And God (Elohim) said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness." Why the Deity should speak of himself in the plural number, unless that Deity consisted of more than one person, it is difficult to conceive; for the answer given by the modern Jews, that this is only a figurative mode of expression, implying the high dignity of the speaker, and that it is usual for earthly sovereigns to use this language by way of distinction, is futile, for two reasons. In the first place it is highly degrading to the Supreme Majesty to suppose he would take his model of speaking and thinking from man, though it is highly consistent with the vanity of man to arrogate to himself, as doubtless was the case in the licentiousness of succeeding ages, the style and imagined conceptions of Deity; and it will be remembered, that these solemn words were spoken before the creation of any of those mortals, whose false notions of greatness and sublimity the Almighty is thus impiously supposed to adopt. In truth, there does not seem to be any real dignity in an expression, which, when used by a human sovereign in relation to himself, approaches very near to absurdity. The genuine fact, however, appears to be this. When the tyrants of the east first began to assume divine honours, they assumed likewise the majestic language appropriated to, and highly becoming, the Deity, but totally inapplicable to man. The error was propagated from age to age through a long succession of despots, and at length Judaic apostasy arrived at such a pitch of profane absurdity, as to affirm that very phraseology to be borrowed from man which was the original and peculiar language of the Divinity. It was, indeed, remarkably pertinent when applied to Deity; for in a succeeding chapter, we have more decisive authority for what is thus asserted, where the Lord God himself says. "Behold, the man is become as one of us;" a very singular expression, which some Jewish commentators, with equal effrontery, contend was spoken by the Deity to the council of angels, that, according to their assertions, attended him at the creation. From the name of the Lord God being used in so emphatical a manner, it evidently appears to be addressed to those sacred persons to whom it was before said, "Let us make man;" for would indeed the omnipotent Jehovah, presiding in a less dignified council, use words that have such an evident tendency to place the Deity on a level with created beings?
The first passage to be adduced from the New Testament in proof of this important doctrine of the Trinity, is, the charge and commission which our Saviour gave to his apostles, to "go and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost,"
Matthew 28:19 . The Gospel is every where in Scripture represented as a covenant or conditional offer of eternal salvation from God to man; and baptism was the appointed ordinance by which men were to be admitted into that covenant, by which that offer was made and accepted. This covenant being to be made with God himself, the ordinance must of course be performed in his name; but Christ directed that it should be performed in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost; and therefore we conclude that God is the same as the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. Since baptism is to be performed in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, they must be all three persons; and since no superiority or difference whatever is mentioned in this solemn form of baptism, we conclude that these three persons are all of one substance, power, and eternity. Are we to be baptized in the name of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, and is it possible that the Father should be self-existent, eternal, the Lord God Omnipotent; and that the Son, in whose name we are equally baptized, should be a mere man, born of a woman, and subject to all the frailties and imperfections of human nature? or, is it possible that the Holy Ghost, in whose name also we are equally baptized, should be a bare energy or operation, a quality or power, without even personal existence? Our feelings, as well as our reason, revolt from the idea of such disparity.
This argument will derive great strength from the practice of the early ages, and from the observations which we meet with in several of the ancient fathers relative to it. We learn from Ambrose, that persons at the time of their baptism, declared their belief in the three persons of the Holy Trinity, and that they were dipped in the water three times. In his Treatise upon the Sacraments he says, "Thou wast asked at thy baptism, Dost thou believe in God the Father Almighty? and thou didst reply, I believe, and thou wast dipped; and a second time thou wast asked, Dost thou believe in Jesus Christ the Lord? thou didst answer again, I believe, and thou wast dipped; a third time the question was repeated, Dost thou believe in the Holy Ghost? and the answer was, I believe, then thou wast dipped a third time." It is to be noticed, that the belief, here expressed separately, in the three persons of the Trinity, is precisely the same in all. Tertullian, Basil, and Jerom, all mention this practice of trine immersion as ancient; and Jerom says, "We are thrice dipped in the water, that the mystery of the Trinity may appear to be but one. We are not baptized in the names of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, but in one name, which is God's; and, therefore, though we be thrice put under water to represent the mystery of the Trinity, yet it is reputed but one baptism." Thus the mysterious union of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, as one God, was, in the opinion of the purer ages of the Christian church, clearly expressed in this form of baptism. By it the primitive Christians understood the Father's gracious acceptance of the atonement offered by the Messiah; the peculiar protection of the Son, our great High Priest and Intercessor; and the readiness of the Holy Ghost to sanctify, to assist, and to comfort all the obedient followers of Christ, confirmed by the visible gift of tongues, of prophecy, and divers other gifts to the first disciples. And as their great Master's instructions evidently distinguished these persons from each other, without any difference in their authority or power, all standing forth as equally dispensing the benefits of Christianity, as equally the objects of the faith required in converts upon admission into the church, they clearly understood that the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, were likewise equally the objects of their grateful worship: this fully appears from their prayers, doxologies, hymns, and creeds, which are still extant.
The second passage to be produced in support of the doctrine now under consideration, is, the doxology at the conclusion of St. Paul's Second Epistle to the Corinthians, "The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with you." The manner in which Christ and the Holy Ghost are here mentioned, implies that they are persons, for none but persons can confer grace or fellowship; and these three great blessings of grace, love, and fellowship, being respectively prayed for by the inspired apostle from Jesus Christ, God the Father, and the Holy Ghost, without any intimation of disparity, we conclude that these three persons are equal and Divine. This solemn benediction may therefore be considered as another proof of the Trinity, since it acknowledges the divinity of Jesus Christ and of the Holy Ghost. The third passage is the following salutation or benediction in the beginning of the Revelation of St. John: "Grace and peace from Him which is, and which was, and which is to come; and from the seven spirits which are before his throne, and from Jesus Christ." Here the Father is described by a periphrasis taken from his attribute of eternity; and "the seven spirits" is a mystical expression for the Holy Ghost, used upon this occasion either because the salutation is addressed to seven churches, every one of which had partaken of the Spirit. or because seven was a sacred number among the Jews, denoting both variety and perfection, and in this case alluding to the various gifts, administrations, and operations of the Holy Ghost. Since grace and peace are prayed for from these three persons jointly and without discrimination, we infer an equality in their power to dispense those blessings; and we farther conclude that these three persons together constitute the Supreme Being, who is alone the object of prayer, and is alone the Giver of every good and of every perfect gift. It might be right to remark, that the seven spirits cannot mean angels, since prayers are never in Scripture addressed to angels, nor are blessings ever pronounced in their name. It is unnecessary to quote any of the numerous passages in which the Father is singly called God, as some of them must be recollected by every one, and the divinity of the Father is not called in question by any sect of Christians; and those passages which prove the divinity of the Son and of the Holy Ghost separately, will be more properly, considered under those heads. In the mean time we may observe, that if it shall appear from Scripture, that Christ is God, and the Holy Ghost is God, it will follow, since we are assured that there is but one God, that the three persons, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, by a mysterious union, constitute the one God, or, as it is expressed in the first article of the church of England: "There is a Trinity in Unity; and in the unity of this Godhead there be three Persons of one substance, power, and eternity, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost."
The word Trinity does not occur in Scripture, nor do we find it in any of the early confessions of faith; but this is no argument against the doctrine itself, since we learn from the fathers of the first three centuries, that the divinity of the Son and of the Holy Ghost was, from the days of the Apostles, acknowledged by the catholic church, and that those who maintained a contrary opinion were considered as heretics; and as every one knows that neither the divinity of the Father, nor the unity of the Godhead, was ever called in question at any period, it follows that the doctrine of the Trinity in Unity has been in substance, in all its constituent parts, always known among Christians. In the fourth century it became the subject of eager and general controversy; and it was not till then that this doctrine was particularly discussed. While there was no denial or dispute, proof and defence were unnecessary: Nunquid enim perfecte de Trinitate tractatum est, antequam oblatrarent Ariani? But this doctrine is positively mentioned as being admitted among catholic Christians, by writers who lived long before that age of controversy. Justin Martyr, in refuting the charge of atheism urged against Christians, because they did not believe in the gods of the Heathen, expressly says, "We worship and adore the Father, and the Son who came from him and taught us these things, and the prophetic Spirit;" and soon after, in the same apology, he undertakes to show the reasonableness of the honour paid by Christians to the Father in the first place, to the Son in the second, and to the Holy Ghost in the third; and says, that their assigning the second place to a crucified man, was, by unbelievers, denominated madness, because they were ignorant of the mystery, which he then proceeds to explain. Athenagoras, in replying to the same charge of atheism urged against Christians, because they refused to worship the false gods of the Heathen, says "Who would not wonder, when he knows that we, who call upon God the Father, and God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit, showing their power in the unity, and their distinction in order, should be called atheists?" Clement of Alexandria not only mentions three divine persons, but invokes them as one only God. Praxeas, Sabellius, and other Unitarians, accused the orthodox Christians of tritheism, which is of itself a clear proof that the orthodox worshipped the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost; and though in reality they considered these three persons as constituting the one true God, it is obvious that their enemies might easily represent that worship as an acknowledgment of three Gods. Tertullian, in writing against Praxeas, maintains, that a Trinity rationally conceived is consistent with truth, and that unity irrationally conceived forms heresy. He had before said, in speaking of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, that "there are three of one substance, and of one condition, and of one power, because there is one God:" and he afterward adds, "The connection of the Father in the Son, and of the Son in the Comforter, makes three united together, the one with the other; which three are one thing, not one person; as it is said, I and the Father are one thing, with regard to the unity of substance, not to the singularity of number:" and he also expressly says, "The Father is God, and the Son is God, and the Holy Ghost is God;" and again, "The Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, believed to be three, constitute one God." And in another part of his works he says, "There is a Trinity of one Divinity, the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Ghost." And Tertullian not only maintains these doctrines, but asserts that they were prior to any heresy, and had, indeed, been the faith of Christians from the first promulgation of the Gospel. To these writers of the second century, we may add Origen and Cyprian in the third; the former of whom mentions baptism (alluding to its appointed form) as "the source and fountain of graces to him who dedicates himself to the divinity of the adorable Trinity." And the latter, after reciting the same form of baptism, says that "by it Christ delivered the doctrine of the Trinity, unto which mystery or sacrament the nations were to be baptized." It would be easy to multiply quotations upon this subject; but these are amply sufficient to show the opinions of the early fathers, and to refute the assertion that the doctrine of the Trinity was an invention of the fourth century. To these positive testimonies may be subjoined a negative argument: those who acknowledged the divinity of Christ and of the Holy Ghost, are never called heretics by any writer of the first three centuries; and this circumstance is surely a strong proof that the doctrine of the Trinity was the doctrine of the primitive church; more especially, since the names of those who first denied the divinity of Christ and of the Holy Ghost, are transmitted to us as of persons who dissented from the common faith of Christians.
But while we contend that the doctrine of the Trinity in Unity is founded in Scripture, and supported by the authority of the early Christians, we must acknowledge that it is not given to man to understand in what manner the three persons are united, or how, separately and jointly, they are God. It would, perhaps, have been well, if divines, in treating this awful and mysterious subject, had confined themselves to the expressions of Scripture; for the moment we begin to explain it beyond the written word of God, we plunge ourselves into inextricable difficulties. And how can it be otherwise? Is it to be expected that our finite understandings should be competent to the full comprehension of the nature and properties of an infinite Being? "Can we find out the Almighty to perfection," Job 11:7 ; or penetrate into the essence of the Most High? "God is a Spirit," John 4:24 , and our gross conceptions are but ill-adapted to the contemplation of a pure and spiritual Being. We know not the essence of our own mind, nor the precise distinction of its several faculties; and why then should we hope to comprehend the personal characters which exist in the Godhead? "If I tell you earthly things, and you understand them not, how shall ye understand if I tell you heavenly things?" When we attempt to investigate the nature of the Deity, whose existence is commensurate with eternity, by whose power the universe was created, and by whose wisdom it is governed; whose presence fills all space, and whose knowledge extends to the thoughts of every man in every age, and to the events of all places, past, present, and to come, the mind is quickly lost in the vastness of these ideas, and, unable to find any sure guide to direct its progress, it becomes, at every step, more bewildered and entangled in the endless mazes of metaphysical abstraction. "God is a God that hideth himself." "We cannot by searching find out God." "Behold, God is great, and we know him not,"
Job 23:9 ; Job 11:7 ; Job 36:26 . "Such knowledge is too wonderful and excellent for us; it is high; we cannot attain unto it," Psalms 139:6 . It is for us, simply and in that docile spirit which becomes us, to receive the testimony of God as to himself, and to fix ourselves upon that firmest of all foundations, and most rational of all evidence, "Thus saith the Lord."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Scapular of the Most Blessed Trinity
A white scapular with a red and blue cross. Badge of the Confraternity of the Most Blessed Trinity. Said to have originated in a vision vouchsafed to Pope Innocent II in 1198 in which an angel garbed in these colors appeared to him and directed him to approve the Order of the Most Blessed Trinity for the redemption of captives. Each person who joins the Confraternity of the Blessed Trinity must be invested with this scapular and must constantly wear it. The indulgences of this confraternity were last approved by a Decree of the Congregation of Indulgences of August 13, 1899. The General of the Trinitarians may communicate to other priests the faculty of receiving into the confraternity and of blessing and investing with the scapular.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Trinity, the Holy
A name applied to the Godhead and signifyingThree in One and One in Three—the Father, the Son, and the HolyGhost—a doctrine which is held by all branches of the CatholicChurch, and by the greater number of the various Christiandenominations. The word "Trinity" is not found in the Bible and issaid to have been first used by Theophilus, Bishop of Antioch, inthe second century as a concise expression of the Christian Faithconcerning the Godhead, that "there is but one living and true God,everlasting, without body, parts or passions; of infinite power,wisdom and goodness; the Maker and Preserver of all things bothvisible and invisible. And in the unity of this Godhead therebe three Persons, of one substance, power and eternity: the Father,the Son, and the Holy Ghost." (Art. I). The doctrine of the Trinitydeals with matter beyond reason but not contrary to reason; is thesubject of Revelation and as such is proposed to our faith faculty.For this reason it is called a Mystery of the Gospel.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Trinity Season, the
The long period between Trinity Sunday and theFirst Sunday in Advent is so called. Its length is dependent on thetime Easter is kept and may include as many as twenty-seven Sundays.The devotions and the Scriptural Lessons are intended to bringbefore us the moralities of the Gospel and the practical duties ofthe Christian life. Or as Bishop Coxe has finely expressed it, "Thefirst half of the year is devoted to Doctrine primarily, and toDuty as seen in direct relation to Doctrine. So, the second halfis devoted to Duty primarily, and to Doctrine only as reduced topractical Piety, Thus is the Christian Year divided between theCreed and the Decalogue." The Last Sunday of the Season is observedas the "Sunday next before Advent," but is popularly called "Stirup Sunday" from the first two words of the Collect for the Day. TheChurch color for the Trinity Season is green.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Trinity Sunday
Trinity Sunday is a Festival of late institution,as the day on which it is observed was originally kept as the Octaveof Whitsun Day. It was not until A.D. 1260 that it was firstdirected by the Synod of Aries to be observed by the whole Church asTrinity Sunday, although Thomas a Beckett is said to have institutedthis Festival in England in A.D. 1162, and reference ismade to it as early as A.D. 834. The observance of this day is verysignificant and rounds out or completes the former commemorationsof the year. As set forth in "Thoughts on the Services," "TheChurch's services have culminated; to-day they mount up to theThrone of the Godhead; for knowing the Son and the Holy Ghost, weknow the Father also, and that these Three are not three Gods, butone God. The Church to-day celebrates the glory and majesty of Godin His essence and in His works. In the word Trinity, she simplysums up what is revealed concerning Him,—that in Substance He isOne, but in Persons, Three. . . . The Collect enables us to worshipthe Unity which exists in the power of the Divine Majesty, evenwhile we acknowledge the glory of the Eternal Trinity." ProperLessons, Proper Psalms and Proper Preface in the Communion Officeemphasize the importance of the Festival and mark it as one of thegreat days of the Church. The ecclesiastical color is white.

Sentence search

o.ss.t. - = Order of the Holy Trinity; Trinitarians...
- or -...
= Third order secular of the Most Holy Trinity ...
Anti-Trinitarians - Those who deny the Trinity, and teach that there are not three persons in the Godhead. ...
See Trinity
Holy Ghost, the - A monthly bulletin published at Holy Trinity, Alabama, by the League of the Holy Ghost in order to promote devotion to the Third Person of the Holy Trinity; founded, 1923; circulation,
Triniunity - ) Triunity; Trinity
Modalist Monarchianism - A heretical system, begun about the 2century, which so distorts the monarchy (monarchia) of God as to deny the distinction of Persons in the Trinity. It takes the three following forms: ...
(1) Crass Monarchianism absolutely denies any distinction of Persons in the Trinity and concludes naturally that the Father became incarnate and died on the cross. 50,recognized a distinction in the Trinity, not of Persons but of energies or modes. ...
(3) Subordinationism, which admits a real and true distinction of Persons in the Trinity but denies equality between them
Monarchianism - A heretical system, begun about the 2century, which so distorts the monarchy (monarchia) of God as to deny the distinction of Persons in the Trinity. It takes the three following forms: ...
(1) Crass Monarchianism absolutely denies any distinction of Persons in the Trinity and concludes naturally that the Father became incarnate and died on the cross. 50,recognized a distinction in the Trinity, not of Persons but of energies or modes. ...
(3) Subordinationism, which admits a real and true distinction of Persons in the Trinity but denies equality between them
Subordinationism - A heretical system, begun about the 2century, which so distorts the monarchy (monarchia) of God as to deny the distinction of Persons in the Trinity. It takes the three following forms: ...
(1) Crass Monarchianism absolutely denies any distinction of Persons in the Trinity and concludes naturally that the Father became incarnate and died on the cross. 50,recognized a distinction in the Trinity, not of Persons but of energies or modes. ...
(3) Subordinationism, which admits a real and true distinction of Persons in the Trinity but denies equality between them
Monarchianism - A heretical system, begun about the 2century, which so distorts the monarchy (monarchia) of God as to deny the distinction of Persons in the Trinity. It takes the three following forms: ...
(1) Crass Monarchianism absolutely denies any distinction of Persons in the Trinity and concludes naturally that the Father became incarnate and died on the cross. 50,recognized a distinction in the Trinity, not of Persons but of energies or modes. ...
(3) Subordinationism, which admits a real and true distinction of Persons in the Trinity but denies equality between them
s.t. - = Missionary Servants of Most Holy Trinity ...
s.ss.t. - = Society of the Most Holy Trinity ...
m.s.b.t. - = Missionary Servants of the Most Blessed Trinity ...
m.t. - = Missionary Servants of the Most Holy Trinity ...
s.o.l.t. - = Society of Our Lady of Most Holy Trinity ...
Triunity - ) The quality or state of being triune; Trinity
Tripersonality - ) The state of existing as three persons in one Godhead; Trinity
Logos - (Greek: word) ...
Saint John's name for the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity
Circumincession - ) The reciprocal existence in each other of the three persons of the Trinity
Devotions - Pious practises in honor of the Blessed Trinity, Our Lord, the Blessed Virgin, angels, and saints
Paraclete - An advocate or comforter; generally applied to the third person in the Trinity, John 15:26
Branch Pilot - A pilot who has a branch or commission, as from Trinity House, England, for special navigation
Trinity - ) Any union of three in one; three units treated as one; a triad, as the Hindu Trinity, or Trimurti. ) Any symbol of the Trinity employed in Christian art, especially the triangle
Most Blessed Trinity, Scapular of the - Badge of the Confraternity of the Most Blessed Trinity. Said to have originated in a vision vouchsafed to Pope Innocent II in 1198 in which an angel garbed in these colors appeared to him and directed him to approve the Order of the Most Blessed Trinity for the redemption of captives. Each person who joins the Confraternity of the Blessed Trinity must be invested with this scapular and must constantly wear it
Scapular of the Most Blessed Trinity - Badge of the Confraternity of the Most Blessed Trinity. Said to have originated in a vision vouchsafed to Pope Innocent II in 1198 in which an angel garbed in these colors appeared to him and directed him to approve the Order of the Most Blessed Trinity for the redemption of captives. Each person who joins the Confraternity of the Blessed Trinity must be invested with this scapular and must constantly wear it
Trinitarianism - ) The doctrine of the Trinity; the doctrine that there are three distinct persons in the Godhead
Triune - ) Being three in one; - an epithet used to express the unity of a Trinity of persons in the Godhead
Trimurti - ) The triad, or Trinity, of Hindu gods, consisting of Brahma, the Creator, Vishnu, the Preserver, and Siva, the Destroyer
Monarchian - ) One of a sect in the early Christian church which rejected the doctrine of the Trinity; - called also patripassian
Damianist - ) A follower of Damian, patriarch of Alexandria in the 6th century, who held heretical opinions on the doctrine of the Holy Trinity
Quaternity - ) The union of four in one, as of four persons; - analogous to the theological term Trinity
Modalist - ) One who regards Father, Son, and Spirit as modes of being, and not as persons, thus denying personal distinction in the Trinity
Act of Toleration - Passed in England in the reign of Will1am and Mary, granted freedom of religious worship to all, except Catholics and persons denying the Trinity
Time, Paschal - In liturgy, season of joy after Easter, between Low and Trinity Sundays
Vishnu - ) A divinity of the modern Hindu trimurti, or Trinity
Antitrinitarians - Those who deny the Trinity of Persons in the Godhead; in early days, the Sabellians, Macedonians, and Arians; in later times Protestant bodies such as the Socinians and Unitarians
God, Son of - Second Person of the Blessed Trinity; Jesus Christ the Redeemer: "Indeed thou art the Son of God" (Matthew 14), "Thou art Christ, the Son of the Living God" (16)
Antitrinitarians - Those who deny the Trinity of Persons in the Godhead; in early days, the Sabellians, Macedonians, and Arians; in later times Protestant bodies such as the Socinians and Unitarians
Son of God - Second Person of the Blessed Trinity; Jesus Christ the Redeemer: "Indeed thou art the Son of God" (Matthew 14), "Thou art Christ, the Son of the Living God" (16)
Kilmore, Ireland, Diocese of - Ruins of several abbeys may be seen in the diocese, including that of Creevelea, Drumlane, and the Abbey of the Holy Trinity on Trinity Island, a carved doorway of which may be seen in the Protestant cathedral of Kilmore
Shamrock - Patrick once plucked a leaf of it for use in illustrating the doctrine of the Trinity
Whitsun Tide - During this week the Whitsun Ember Days are observed, (Wednesday,Friday, and Saturday), as a preparation for Trinity Sunday, one ofthe stated times of Ordination
Trefoil - , three leaved)clover, as an emblem of the Trinity
Jesus Only Movement - It is an error in the understanding of the nature of the Trinity. The biblical Trinity consists of three persons simultaneously and eternally existing in one God
Catholic University of America - Washington, DC; founded, 1889; conducted by the bishops of the United States; schools of philosophy, letters, sciences, law, sacred sciences, canon law; summer school; professors, 114; students (including Sisters College, Trinity College, and Summer School), 2,245; degrees conferred in 1929,237
Om - among the Hindus an exclamation of assent, like Amen, then an invocation, and later a symbol of the Trinity formed by Vishnu, Siva, and Brahma
Trinity - As a distinctive Christian doctrine, the Trinity is considered as a divine mystery beyond human comprehension to be reflected upon only through scriptual revelation. The Trinity is a biblical concept that expresses the dynamic character of God, not a Greek idea pressed into Scripture from philosophical or religious speculation. While the term Trinity does not appear in Scripture, the trinitarian structure appears throughout the New Testament to affirm that God Himself is manifested through Jesus Christ by means of the Spirit. ...
A proper biblical view of the Trinity balances the concepts of unity and distinctiveness. In tritheism, error is made in emphasizing the distinctiveness of the Godhead to the point that the Trinity is seen as three separate Gods, or a Christian polytheism. ...
The biblical concept of the Trinity developed through progressive revelation. This does not mean that the Trinity was fully knowable from the Old Testament, but that a vocabulary was established through the events of God's nearness and creativity; both receive developed meaning from New Testament writers. ...
A distinguishing feature of the New Testament is the doctrine of the Trinity. As a fresh expression of God, the concept of the Trinity—rooted in the God of the past and consistent with the God of the past—absorbs the idea of the God of the past, but goes beyond the God of the past in a more personal encounter. ...
The New Testament does not present a systematic presentation of the Trinity. ...
The New Testament evidence for the Trinity can be grouped into four types of passages. This passage is the clearest scriptural reference to a systematic presentation of the doctrine of the Trinity. The formulation is designed to have the practical impact of bringing that divided church together through their personal experinece of the Trinity in their daily lives. The scattered Christians are reminded through reference to the Trinity that their election (foreknowledge of the Father) and redemption (the sanctifying work of the Spirit) should lead to holy living obedience to the Son). In the accounts of the baptism of Jesus (Matthew 3:3-17 ; Mark 1:9-11 ; and Luke 3:21-22 ), the three synoptic writers recorded the presence of the Trinity when the Son was baptized, the Spirit descended, and the Father spoke with approval. Paul, in Galatians 4:4-6 , outlined the work of the Trinity in the aspect of the sending Father. Other representative passages in this category (2 Thessalonians 2:13-15 ; Titus 3:4-6 ; and Jude 1:20-21 ) portray each member of the Trinity in relation to a particular redemptive function. The Spirit is a Teacher who facilitates understanding on the disciples' part and, in being sent from the Father and the Son, is one in nature with the other Persons of the Trinity. The discourse emphasizes the interrelatedness of the Trinity in equality and operational significance. ...
All of these passages are embryonic efforts by the early church to express its awareness of the Trinity. Discussion shifted from the New Testament emphasis on the function of the Trinity in redemptive history to an analysis of the unity of essence of the Godhead. The doctrine of the Trinity does not abandon the monotheistic faith of Israel. The primary way of grasping the concept of the Trinity is through the threefold participation in salvation. The doctrine of the Trinity is an absolute mystery
Godhead - A word used with reference to God when one speaks of God's divine nature or essence or of the three persons of the Trinity. See Trinity . The most important addition in the New Testament understanding of God is the concept of the Trinity. While not explicitly formulated in the Bible, the Trinity is alluded to in Matthew 28:19 and other passages
Trinity - God is one, but he exists as a Trinity. Any attempt to define the Trinity is difficult and dangerous, as it is an attempt to do what the Bible does not do. ...
One God, three persons...
The Old Testament gives little clear teaching about the Trinity, for the emphasis there is on the oneness of God. ...
Our understanding of the Trinity comes largely from the New Testament. God has always existed in a Trinity. What is new in the New Testament is the revelation of the Trinity, not the Trinity itself. ...
The reason why the revelation of the Trinity is new in the New Testament is that it was related to the great acts of God in bringing his plan of salvation to completion in Christ. ...
Nevertheless, with the fuller knowledge that Christians gain from the New Testament, they may see suggestions of the Trinity in the Old Testament. But with the coming of Jesus, people gained a clearer understanding of the work of the Trinity in all the activity of God, including the creation (John 1:1-4). All three persons were involved in the miraculous coming of the Son into the world (Luke 1:35), and the life and ministry of Jesus that followed should have shown people that God existed as a Trinity – Father, Son and Holy Spirit (Matthew 3:16-17; Matthew 12:28; Luke 4:18; John 3:34-35). The God who is ‘one’ is at the same time a Trinity. ...
Faith of the New Testament writers...
The early disciples reached a fuller understanding of the Trinity through the life, teaching, death and triumph of Jesus Christ. They never tried to define the Trinity, nor did they try to ‘prove’ it in a theoretical sense. Since they knew God as the one who gave his Son to die for them and gave his Spirit to indwell them, they thought of God in no other way than as a Trinity. The New Testament writings therefore assume the fact of the Trinity at all times (Ephesians 4:4-6; Ephesians 5:18-20; 1 Thessalonians 1:3-5; 1 Peter 1:2). ...
In keeping with the teachings of Jesus, the teachings of the New Testament writers show that the three persons of the Trinity are fully and equally God. ...
Because of the unity between the persons of the Trinity, all three are active in all the work of God. Their concern was not to set out in systematic form the character and activities of the persons of the Trinity, but to express the relationship that Christians have with God. Christians cannot fully understand the mysteries of the Godhead, but they should try to learn all they can about God; for the life they have in Christ depends on God being the sort of God he is – a Trinity. The fact of the Trinity was essential to his birth (Hebrews 2:3-4), his life (John 3:34; John 5:36-37; Luke 1:35; 1 John 5:6-9), his death (Romans 8:32; Galatians 2:20; Hebrews 9:14), his resurrection (Acts 2:42; John 10:18; Romans 8:11) and his exaltation (Acts 5:30-32). ...
The fact of the Trinity is essential also for the life of believers: their indwelling by God (Ephesians 4:6; Colossians 1:27; 1 Corinthians 6:19); their sanctification (John 17:17; Hebrews 2:11; 1 Corinthians 6:11), their enjoyment of salvation (2 Corinthians 13:14), their exercise of prayer (Romans 8:26-27; Romans 8:34; Ephesians 2:18), their eternal security (John 10:28-29; Ephesians 4:30) and their ultimate victory over death (John 5:21; Romans 8:11). ...
Likewise the Trinity is involved in the life of the church (1 Corinthians 12:4-6) and in Christian service (2 Corinthians 3:5-6; 1 Timothy 1:12; Acts 20:28)
Trine - ) A triad; Trinity
o Lux Beata Trinitas - Hymn for Vespers on Trinity Sunday
o Trinity of Blessed Light - Hymn for Vespers on Trinity Sunday
Trinity Sunday - Trinity Sunday is a Festival of late institution,as the day on which it is observed was originally kept as the Octaveof Whitsun Day. 1260 that it was firstdirected by the Synod of Aries to be observed by the whole Church asTrinity Sunday, although Thomas a Beckett is said to have institutedthis Festival in England in A. In the word Trinity, she simplysums up what is revealed concerning Him,—that in Substance He isOne, but in Persons, Three. The Collect enables us to worshipthe Unity which exists in the power of the Divine Majesty, evenwhile we acknowledge the glory of the Eternal Trinity
Corpulent - A festival of the church of England, kept on the next Thursday after Trinity-Sunday, in honor of the Eucharist
Liberalism - The result is often a denial of essential biblical doctrines such as the Trinity, the deity of Christ, His virgin birth, His resurrection, and salvation by grace
Proper Preface - The Preface is that portion of the CommunionOffice, beginning with the words "Lift up your hearts," immediatelypreceding the TER SANCTUS (which see), and the Proper Prefacecontains the additional words set forth to emphasize the greatTruths commemorated on certain High Festivals, namely, ChristmasDay, Easter Day, Ascension Day, Whitsun Day and Trinity Sunday
Trinitarians - Those who believe in the Trinity
Unitarian - ) One who denies the doctrine of the Trinity, believing that God exists only in one person; a unipersonalist; also, one of a denomination of Christians holding this belief
Alciati, Giovanni Paolo - He became a disciple of Socinus, and denied the doctrines of the Trinity and the Divinity of Christ
Trinity: Its Mystery - It was reported of Alanus, when he promised his auditory to discourse the next Sunday more clearly of the Trinity, and to make plain that mystery, while he was studying the point by the sea-side, he spied a boy very busy with a little spoon trudging often between the sea and a small hole he had digged in the ground. ' Alanus replies, 'Why dost thou attempt such impossibilities, and misspend thy time?' The boy answers, 'So dost thou, Alanus: I shall as soon bring all the sea into this hole, as thou bring all the knowledge of the Trinity into thy head
Trinity Season, the - The long period between Trinity Sunday and theFirst Sunday in Advent is so called. TheChurch color for the Trinity Season is green
Kells, Book of - 800,now in Trinity College, Dublin
Indwelling of the Holy Ghost - When this grace is produced in the soul, the three Persons of the Blessed Trinity come to dwell therein in a special manner (John 14)
Triad - ) A union of three; three objects treated as one; a ternary; a Trinity; as, a triad of deities
Monarchianism - Unfortunately, it also contradicts the orthodox doctrine of the Trinity
Son, the - God the Son is the second Person of the Blessed Trinity
the Son - God the Son is the second Person of the Blessed Trinity
Trinity - Trinity. As a fact the Scripture reveals the doctrine of the Trinity in two ways: first in passages in which the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are mentioned together as God; and secondly, in passages which speak of each as divine
Movable Feasts And Fasts - 30) whether before or after; the three remainingSundays in Advent; Septuagesima, Sexagesima and QuinquagesimaSundays; the Six Sundays in Lent; Rogation Sunday; Ascension Day,Whitsun Day and Trinity Sunday; Monday and Tuesday in Easter Week;Monday and Tuesday in Whitsun Week; also the number of Sundaysduring the Epiphany and Trinity Seasons is variable, these Seasonsbeing longer or shorter according to the time Easter is kept
Didacus, Blessed - Known as "the Apostle of the Blessed Trinity and of Our Lady, the Mother of the Good Shepherd," he spent most of his time in the confessional
Diego, Blessed - Known as "the Apostle of the Blessed Trinity and of Our Lady, the Mother of the Good Shepherd," he spent most of his time in the confessional
Five Scapulars - Those commonly used for that purpose are ...
the brown scapular of Mount Carmel
the red of the Passion
the black of the Seven Dolors
the blue of the Immaculate Conception
the white of the Trinity
Doxology - Any form or verse in which glory is ascribed to God orthe Blessed Trinity, for example, the Gloria in Excelsis, whichis called the greater Doxology, and the Gloria Patri, the lesserDoxology
Appropriation - (Latin: appropriare, to make one's own) ...
In theology the attributing of certain names, qualities, or operations to one of the Persons of the Blessed Trinity in preference to, but not to the exclusion of, the others; thus we characterize the Father by omnipotence, the Son by wisdom, the Holy Ghost by love, though all Three possess these essentially and in an infinite degree
Hail to the Queen Who Reigns Above - Antiphon of Our Lady from Vespers of Trinity Sunday until None of the Saturday preceding the first Sunday of Advent
Salve Regina, Mater Misericordire - Antiphon of Our Lady from Vespers of Trinity Sunday until None of the Saturday preceding the first Sunday of Advent
Scapulars, Five - Those commonly used for that purpose are ...
the brown scapular of Mount Carmel
the red of the Passion
the black of the Seven Dolors
the blue of the Immaculate Conception
the white of the Trinity
Felix i, Pope Saint - Felix sent a letter containing dogmatic exposition of the Catholic doctrine on the subject of the Trinity to the Synod of Antioch which had deposed Paul of Samosata, 269, a follower of Apollinaris, for his heretical teaching on the subject
Bogomill - They held that the use of churches, of the sacrament of the Lord's supper, and all prayer except the Lord's prayer, ought to be abolished; that the baptism of Catholics is imperfect; that the persons of the Trinity are unequal, and that they often made themselves visible to those of their sect
Baptism, John's - It was not administered in the name of the Trinity, and those whom John baptized were rebaptized by Paul (Acts 18:24 ; 19:7 )
Person - In reference to the Trinity as three persons, the word refers to the attributes of personhood: self-awareness, choice, can reason, love, possessing a will and consciousness, etc
Three - ...
- the Trinity of Heaven is the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. ...
- the Trinity of evil is the devil, the antichrist and the false prophet. ...
- the Trinity of blessing is grace, mercy and peace. ...
- the Trinity of wickedness is the world, the flesh and the devil
Disciplina, Arcani - A modern term describing a practise of the ancient Church, by which knowledge of the more intimate mysteries of the Christian religion, such as the Trinity and the doctrine of some of the Sacraments, were kept from the heathen and, at least in the earlier stages of their instruction, from catechumens
Discipline of the Secret - A modern term describing a practise of the ancient Church, by which knowledge of the more intimate mysteries of the Christian religion, such as the Trinity and the doctrine of some of the Sacraments, were kept from the heathen and, at least in the earlier stages of their instruction, from catechumens
Secret, Discipline of the - A modern term describing a practise of the ancient Church, by which knowledge of the more intimate mysteries of the Christian religion, such as the Trinity and the doctrine of some of the Sacraments, were kept from the heathen and, at least in the earlier stages of their instruction, from catechumens
Alabama - The Catholic origin of place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Holy Trinity
Saint Bernard
Saint Clair
Saint Clair Springs
Saint Elmo
Saint Stephens
Trinity
Ecclesiastical divisions include, ...
Birmingham, diocese
Mobile, archdiocese
See also, ...
patron saints index
Armagh, Book of - Technically known as Liber Ar(d)machanus, celebrated Irish-Latin manuscript, preserved at Trinity College, Dublin
Kenosis - " This emptying of self is to be properly understood of the abasement involved in the fact of the Incarnation, wherein the Second Person of the Trinity, retaining in the full sense His Godhead, assumed a lower nature with its limitations and imperfections
de Vere, Aubrey Thomas Hunt - He was graduated from Trinity College, Dublin
Immersion - (Latin: immergere) ...
The act of dipping or plunging the subject into the water used in the administration of Baptism; called triple or trine immersion when the candidate is dipped three times, in the name of each Person of the Holy Trinity
Ghost - ...
The Holy Ghost, is the third person in the adorable Trinity
Aubrey Thomas Hunt de Vere - He was graduated from Trinity College, Dublin
Nicene Creed - The rubric directs that it be specially recited in theservice on Christmas Day, Easter Day, Ascension Day, Whitsun Dayand Trinity Sunday; but it is always used at the Holy Communionwhenever celebrated
Francis Cruise - Educated at Clongowes and Trinity College, Dublin, he became president of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (1884-1886), was knighted (1896), and was appointed physician in ordinary to the king in Ireland (1901)
Inner Life of Mary - The supernatural life which Mary led on earth, particularly her advancement in grace and wisdom, in her intimate union with Jesus, her Divine Son, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity
Trinity - The Trinity of Persons in the Diety consists with the Unity of the Divine Essence; though we pretend not to explain the modus of it, and deem those reprehensible who have attempted it; as the modus in which any being subsists, according to its distinct nature and known properties, is a secret to the most learned naturalists to this present day, and probably will always continue so. But if the most common of God's works, with which we are the most conversant, be in this respect incomprehensible, how can men think that the modus existetendi (or manner of existence) of the infinite Creator can be level to their capacities?...
The doctrine of the Trinity is indeed a mystery, but no man hath yet shown that it involves in it a real contradiction. Now this in intelligible to the meanest capacity: it is fairly made out, and perfectly unanswerable: but who ever attempted thus to prove the doctrine of the Trinity to be self-contradictory? What testimony of our senses, or what demonstrated truth, does it contradict? Yet till this be shown, it is neither fair nor convincing, to exclaim against it as contradictory, absurd, and irrational. Allix's Testimonies of the Jewish Church; Display of the Trinity by a Layman; Scott's Essays
Missionary Servants of the Most Holy Trinity - Father Judge also founded the Missionary Servants of the Most Blessed Trinity now numbering about 300 sisters in 30 mission cenacles
Minories, the - East of the street is the old church of the Holy Trinity (once an appanage of an abbey of Minoresses) which contains the arms (stars and stripes) of the Washington family
Moyer's Lectures - A great number of English writers having endeavoured, in a variety of ways, to invalidate the doctrine of the Trinity, this opulent and orthodox lady was influenced to think of an institution which should produce to posterity an ample collection of productions in defense of this branch of Christian faith
Trine Immersion - , at each name of thethree Persons in the Blessed Trinity
Final Antiphon - These antiphons are: "Alma Redemptoris Mater," recited from Advent to the feast of the Purification; "Ave Regina Crelorum," from the feast of the Purification to Wednesday of Holy Week inclusively: "Regina Creli," recited during Eastertide; "Salve Regina," from Trinity Sunday to Advent
Josaphat Kuncevyc, Saint - He entered the Basilian monastery of the Trinity at Vilna, was ordained priest, 1609, and subsequently became superior in several monasteries, Bishop of Vitebsk (1617), and Archbishop of Polotsk (1618)
Kunceyyc, Josaphat, Saint - He entered the Basilian monastery of the Trinity at Vilna, was ordained priest, 1609, and subsequently became superior in several monasteries, Bishop of Vitebsk (1617), and Archbishop of Polotsk (1618)
Antiphon, Final - These antiphons are: "Alma Redemptoris Mater," recited from Advent to the feast of the Purification; "Ave Regina Crelorum," from the feast of the Purification to Wednesday of Holy Week inclusively: "Regina Creli," recited during Eastertide; "Salve Regina," from Trinity Sunday to Advent
Henry Rawes - He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, and entered the Anglican ministry in 1853
Angelites - They held that the persons of the Trinity are not the same; that none of them exists of himself, and of his own nature; but that there is a common God or Deity existing in them all, and that each is God by a participation of his Deity
Rawes, Henry Augustus - He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, and entered the Anglican ministry in 1853
Redmond, John Edward - Educated at Clongowes and at Trinity College, Dublin, he was called to the English and Irish Bars
Maximinus, Arian Bishop of Hippo Regius - Augustine on the Trinity
Procession of the Holy Ghost - The word "Procession" is used toexpress the relation in the Blessed Trinity between the Father andthe Holy Ghost
Athanasians - This creed says, "The Catholic faith is this: that we worship One God in Trinity, and Trinity in Unity: neither confounding the persons, nor dividing the substance
Trinity - The word "trinity" is not found in the Bible. Nevertheless, it is a word used to describe one fact the Bible teaches about God: Our God is a Trinity. God has always been a Trinity from all eternity: "From everlasting to everlasting, Thou art God" (Micah 5:1-2). ...
The following chart should help you understand how the Trinity doctrine is derived
District of Columbia - The first church in Georgetown was that of Holy Trinity, built in 1792; and the first church in Washington was Saint Patrick's, built soon after 1794 by Reverend Anthony Caffrey
Devotions, Popular - Various prayers and pious practises, whether in common at Church or in private, in honor of: the Blessed Trinity; Our Divine Lord, His Holy Infancy, His Holy Name, His Five Wounds, His Passion, His Sacred Heart, His Presence in the Holy Eucharist; the Holy Ghost; the Angels Guardian, Saint Michael; the Blessed Virgin, under her various titles as Help of Christians, Mediatrix of Divine Grace, Queen of the Holy Rosary; and of certain saints, Joseph, Anne, Monica, Benedict, Francis of Assisi, Anthony of Padua, Dominic, Francis Xavier, Aloysius, Rita, Teresa of Jesus, each treated in the article under these several titles; for the souls in Purgatory and for a Happy Death (Bona Mars)
Holy Spirit, the - (See Trinity and Holy Spirit
Amaurites - But according to him, religion had three epochas, which bore a similitude to the reign of the three persons in the Trinity
Sentences, Book of the - The first book treats of God and the Trinity, Providence, predestination, and evil; the second, or creation, the angels, the fall, grace, and sin; the third, of the Incarnation, Redemption, the virtues, and commandments; the fourth, of the Sacraments and the four last things
Emblems - ...
THE TRIANGLE is the emblem of the Holy Trinity, as is also theTREFOIL (which see). ...
THE CIRCLE is the ancient emblem of Eternity, being withoutbeginning or end; enclosing a triangle it means Three in One orthe Blessed Trinity; enclosing a cross it symbolizes Eternal Life
Chime - The bells of Boston, Bradford, Manchester, Rochdale, Shoreditch, and Worcester are noted in England, and in the United States those of Old Christ Church, Philadelphia; Christ Church, Boston; Trinity Church, New York; Saint Patrick's Cathedral, New York; the West Point chapel chime; and the chimes in the Church of Our Lady of Mercy, New York, which are most beautiful
Joseph Cottolengo, Blessed - In connection with this work he established houses of the Sisters of Saint Vincent de Paul, of Saint Thais, of Carmel, of Suffrage, of Mary of the Seven Dolors, of the Good Shepherd, of Brothers of Saint Vincent de Paul, of Hermits of Gassin, and of Fathers of the Holy Trinity
Theoctistus Psathyropola - Led by a certain Marinus from Thrace, they maintained that the First Person of the Trinity was in a proper sense Father, and so to be styled before the Son existed; while their opponents, the followers of the Antiochene Dorotheus, maintained that He was only a Father after the existence of the Son
Son of God - The second Person of the Trinity, because of his eternal relation to the first Person, is the Son of God. In the singular it is always used of the second Person of the Trinity, with the single exception of Luke 3:38 , where it is used of Adam
Person - Some have been offended at the term persons as applied to the Trinity, as unwarrantable. 159; Gill on the Trinity, p
International Holiness Church - " They emphasize "belief in the Trinity and faith in the Holy Scriptures as divinely and supernaturally inspired, infallibly true as originally given, and as the only divinely authorized rule of faith and practise
Father - The First Person of the Blessed Trinity
Father, God the - The First Person of the Blessed Trinity
God the Father - The First Person of the Blessed Trinity
Leucopetrians - The name of a fanatical sect which sprang up in the Greek and eastern churches towards the close of the twelfth century: they professed to believe in a double Trinity, rejected wedlock, abstained from flesh, treated with the utmost contempt the sacraments of baptism and the Lord's supper, and all the various branches of external worship: placed the essence of religion in internal prayer alone; and maintained, as it is said, that an evil being or genius dwelt in the breast of every mortal, and could be expelled from thence by no other method than by perpetual supplication to the Supreme Being
Athanasius - the celebrated patriarch of Alexandria, resisted Arius and his erroneous doctrines; and his sentiments as to the Trinity are embodied in the creed which bears his name, though not composed by him. 362, held a council at Alexandria, where the belief of a consubstantial Trinity was openly professed. The Scripture doctrine of the Trinity, as explained by him, at length triumphed over the heresies which at one time met with so much support and sanction; and the views of Athanasius have been received, in substance, by all orthodox churches to the present time
Holy - The Holy Spirit or Holy Ghost is the third Person of the Holy Trinity, of one essence or nature with the Father and the Son, yet distinct from them
Benson, Robert Hugh - Son of Edward Benson, Archbishop of Canterbury, he was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, received Anglican orders 1894, entered the Catholic Church, 1903, was ordained, and became assistant priest at Cambridge, but retired from pastoral work, 1908, to devote himself to preaching and writing
Nicholas Cryfts - In his philosophy Nicholas of Cusa cast off Aristotelean methods and definitions for deep speculations and mystical forms of his own; in theology, he discussed the Trinity profoundly, and though some have proclaimed his idea of God pantheistic, his writings are all strictly Christian
Nicholas of Cusa - In his philosophy Nicholas of Cusa cast off Aristotelean methods and definitions for deep speculations and mystical forms of his own; in theology, he discussed the Trinity profoundly, and though some have proclaimed his idea of God pantheistic, his writings are all strictly Christian
Memorial - ...
Churches have names some as memorials of peace, some of wisdom, some of the Trinity
God - )...
God is a Trinity, knows all things (1 John 3:20), can do all things (Jeremiah 32:17; Jer 32:27 - except those things against His nature like lie, break His word, cheat, steal, etc
Robert Benson - Son of Edward Benson, Archbishop of Canterbury, he was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, received Anglican orders 1894, entered the Catholic Church, 1903, was ordained, and became assistant priest at Cambridge, but retired from pastoral work, 1908, to devote himself to preaching and writing
Three - " (1 John 5:7) It is somewhat remarkable that the word Trinity is never used by any of the sacred writers: that is to say, by the translators of the Bible into our mother tongue, while they are so express in numberless instances, giving the sum and substance of it. And they expressed the union of those Three Glorious persons by the word Shalithith, which is as near as possible the word Trinity
Feasts, Movable - Forty days after Easter comes Ascension Day; ten days later, Pentecost or Whitsunday; and a week later, Trinity Sunday, followed after four days by the feast of Corpus Christi
Movable Feasts - Forty days after Easter comes Ascension Day; ten days later, Pentecost or Whitsunday; and a week later, Trinity Sunday, followed after four days by the feast of Corpus Christi
Henry Spelman - He was educated at Walsingham School and Trinity College, Cambridge, and was called to the Bar
Athanasian Creed - One of the ecclesiastically approved formularies of faith which contains a brief but philosophically exact summary of the fundamental doctrines of the Trinity and Incarnation together with a cursory reference to other dogmas
Spelman, Henry - He was educated at Walsingham School and Trinity College, Cambridge, and was called to the Bar
Ring - It is placed on the fourthfinger of the woman's left hand, and the ancient ceremony of doingso was to place it first on the thumb at the Name of the firstPerson of the Trinity; on the next finger, at the Name of the Son;on the third at the Name of the Holy Ghost, and then on the fourthfinger, and leaving it there at the word "Amen
Parish - John's, Christ Church, Trinity, etc
God - God is revealed to us as a Trinity consisting of three Persons who are of one essence, Matthew 28:19; 2 Corinthians 13:14; John 1:1-3—God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Ghost. To each of these Persons of the Trinity are ascribed the essential attributes of the Supreme God. The unity of the Godhead is emphasized in the Old Testament, while the Trinity is only shadowed forth, or at best faintly brought out
Felix of Valois, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Order of the Holy Trinity for the Redemption of Captives, born province of Valois, France, 1127; died Cerfroi, 1212
la Farge, John - Admirable examples of his work are in Trinity Church, Boston, the Church of the Ascension, the Paulist Church in New York, and in the capitol in Saint Paul
Origenism - In his voluminous writings, most of which have perished, he aimed at systematizing Christian doctrines and defending them against the Gnostics but he himself is thought to have fallen into various errors concerning the Trinity and other fundamental dogmas, though this is not certain
John la Farge - Admirable examples of his work are in Trinity Church, Boston, the Church of the Ascension, the Paulist Church in New York, and in the capitol in Saint Paul
Frogs - "...
Awful parody of the Trinity
Semi-Arianism - In their explanation of the Trinity they inclined to the view of subordinating the Son to the Father, not always realizing that any real subordination militated against the divinity of the Second Person
Valois, Felix of, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Order of the Holy Trinity for the Redemption of Captives, born province of Valois, France, 1127; died Cerfroi, 1212
Sabellianism - Sabellians, so called after Sabellius, a theologian of the early 3century, were heretics belonging to the school known as the Monarchians because they held only one Divine principle in the Trinity
Sabellians - Sabellians, so called after Sabellius, a theologian of the early 3century, were heretics belonging to the school known as the Monarchians because they held only one Divine principle in the Trinity
Sabellius - Sabellians, so called after Sabellius, a theologian of the early 3century, were heretics belonging to the school known as the Monarchians because they held only one Divine principle in the Trinity
Georgia - In Augusta the first church, that of the Holy Trinity, was built in 1810, by the Reverend Robert Browne, an Augustinian
Semi-Arianism - In their explanation of the Trinity they inclined to the view of subordinating the Son to the Father, not always realizing that any real subordination militated against the divinity of the Second Person
Sabellianism - Sabellians, so called after Sabellius, a theologian of the early 3century, were heretics belonging to the school known as the Monarchians because they held only one Divine principle in the Trinity
Apostles' Creed - ) There are twelve articles grouped into threeparagraphs each setting forth what is to be believed concerningeach Person of the Blessed Trinity
Sabellians - As, from their doctrine, it follows that God the Father suffered, they were hence called by their adversaries, Patripassians; and, as their idea of the Trinity was by some called a modal Trinity, they have likewise been called Modalists. Hence the Sabellians reduced the three persons in the Trinity to three characters or relations, and maintained that the Word and Holy Spirit are only virtues, emanations, or functions, of the Deity; that he who is in heaven is the Father of all things; that he descended into the virgin, became a child, and was born of her as a son; and that, having accomplished the mystery of our redemption, he effused himself upon the Apostles in tongues of fire, and was then denominated the Holy Ghost. His sentiments on the Trinity appear to have been, that the Godhead, the Deity itself, personally distinguished as the Father, was united to the man Christ Jesus; in consequence of which union or indwelling of the Godhead, he became properly God
Christadelphians - Not accepting the doctrine of the Trinity, they hold that Christ was Son of God and Son of man
Kingdom of God - This consists in the complete union of minds and wills, with the Trinity, which God as Eternal King gives to the blessed in Heaven
Kingdom of Heaven - This consists in the complete union of minds and wills, with the Trinity, which God as Eternal King gives to the blessed in Heaven
Duty, Easter - The prescribed time for fulfilling the Easter duty extends: from the first Sunday of Lent to Trinity Sunday, in the United States; from Ash Wednesday to Low Sunday, in England; from Ash Wednesday to the octave of Saint Peter and Saint Paul (July 6,), in Ireland; from the first Sunday of Lent to the octave of the Ascension, in Scotland, or in some places to Low Sunday
God, Kingdom of - This consists in the complete union of minds and wills, with the Trinity, which God as Eternal King gives to the blessed in Heaven
Easter Duty - The prescribed time for fulfilling the Easter duty extends: from the first Sunday of Lent to Trinity Sunday, in the United States; from Ash Wednesday to Low Sunday, in England; from Ash Wednesday to the octave of Saint Peter and Saint Paul (July 6,), in Ireland; from the first Sunday of Lent to the octave of the Ascension, in Scotland, or in some places to Low Sunday
Heaven, Kingdom of - This consists in the complete union of minds and wills, with the Trinity, which God as Eternal King gives to the blessed in Heaven
Trinity, the Holy - The word "Trinity" is not found in the Bible and issaid to have been first used by Theophilus, Bishop of Antioch, inthe second century as a concise expression of the Christian Faithconcerning the Godhead, that "there is but one living and true God,everlasting, without body, parts or passions; of infinite power,wisdom and goodness; the Maker and Preserver of all things bothvisible and invisible. The doctrine of the Trinitydeals with matter beyond reason but not contrary to reason; is thesubject of Revelation and as such is proposed to our faith faculty
Trinity - Trinity...
1. The doctrine of the Trinity is an expansion of the doctrine of the Incarnation, and emerges out of the personal claim of our Lord. The doctrine of the Trinity is the correlation, co-ordination, and synthesis of the teaching of these passages. In the Unity of the Godhead there is a Trinity of Persons working out redemption. The elements of the plan of redemption thus find their root, foundation, and spring in the nature of the Godhead; and the obvious reason why these distinctions which we express by the terms ‘Person’ and ‘Trinity’ were not revealed earlier than NT times is that not until then was redemption accomplished. By the Trinity, therefore, we mean the specific and unique Christian idea of the Godhead. The Christian idea of the Trinity may be summed up in the familiar words: ‘The Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Ghost is God. And in this Trinity none is afore or after other: none is greater or less than another, but the whole three Persons are co-eternal together and co-equal. ’...
The term ‘Trinity’ dates from the second century, being found in Greek in Theophilus of Antioch (a. He must have relationships eternally adequate, and worthy, and when once we realize that love must have an object in God as well as in ourselves, we have the germ of that distinction in the Godhead which is theologically known as the Trinity. If the Incarnation was real, the Trinity is true. The doctrine of the Trinity has several positive theological and philosophical advantages over the Unitarian conception of God, but especially is this so in reference to the relation of God to the world. But when once the truth of the doctrine of the Trinity is regarded as arising out of Christ’s claim to Godhead as Divine Redeemer, reason soon finds its warrant for the doctrine. The doctrine of the Trinity comes to us by revelation and not by nature, though it is soon seen to have points of contact with thought and reason
Bonosus, Founder Bonosiani Sect - 445, on the ground that, like the Arians, they baptized in the name of the Trinity (Labbe, iv. 61), includes them in those whose baptism the church rejected because the name of the Trinity was not invoked (cf
Trinity - That nearly all the Pagan nations of antiquity, says Bishop Tomline, in their various theological systems, acknowledged a kind of Trinity, has been fully evinced by those learned men who have made the Heathen mythology the subject of their elaborate inquiries. The discovery of the existence of this doctrine in the early ages, among the nations whose records have been the best preserved, has been of great service to the cause of Christianity, and completely refutes the assertion of infidels and skeptics, that the sublime and mysterious doctrine of the Trinity owes its origin to the philosophers of Greece. As the Father and the Son are expressly pointed out in the first verse of this chapter, so is the Third Person in the blessed Trinity not less decisively revealed to us in Genesis 1:2 : "And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters:" "brooded upon" the water, incubavit, as a hen broods over her eggs. ...
Though the August name of Jehovah in a more peculiar manner belongs to God the Father, yet is that name, in various parts of Scripture, applied to each person in the holy Trinity. The name of the third person in the ever blessed Trinity has descended unaltered from the days of Moses to our own time; for, as well in the sacred writings as by the Targumists, and by the modern doctors of the Jewish church, he is styled Ruach Hakhodesh, the Holy Spirit. From the enumeration of these circumstances, it must be sufficiently evident to the mind which unites piety and reflection, that so far from being silent upon the subject, the ancient Scriptures commence with an avowal of this doctrine, and that, in fact, the creation was the result of the joint operations of the Trinity. From the name of the Lord God being used in so emphatical a manner, it evidently appears to be addressed to those sacred persons to whom it was before said, "Let us make man;" for would indeed the omnipotent Jehovah, presiding in a less dignified council, use words that have such an evident tendency to place the Deity on a level with created beings?...
The first passage to be adduced from the New Testament in proof of this important doctrine of the Trinity, is, the charge and commission which our Saviour gave to his apostles, to "go and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost,"...
Matthew 28:19 . We learn from Ambrose, that persons at the time of their baptism, declared their belief in the three persons of the Holy Trinity, and that they were dipped in the water three times. " It is to be noticed, that the belief, here expressed separately, in the three persons of the Trinity, is precisely the same in all. Tertullian, Basil, and Jerom, all mention this practice of trine immersion as ancient; and Jerom says, "We are thrice dipped in the water, that the mystery of the Trinity may appear to be but one. We are not baptized in the names of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, but in one name, which is God's; and, therefore, though we be thrice put under water to represent the mystery of the Trinity, yet it is reputed but one baptism. This solemn benediction may therefore be considered as another proof of the Trinity, since it acknowledges the divinity of Jesus Christ and of the Holy Ghost. In the mean time we may observe, that if it shall appear from Scripture, that Christ is God, and the Holy Ghost is God, it will follow, since we are assured that there is but one God, that the three persons, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, by a mysterious union, constitute the one God, or, as it is expressed in the first article of the church of England: "There is a Trinity in Unity; and in the unity of this Godhead there be three Persons of one substance, power, and eternity, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. "...
The word Trinity does not occur in Scripture, nor do we find it in any of the early confessions of faith; but this is no argument against the doctrine itself, since we learn from the fathers of the first three centuries, that the divinity of the Son and of the Holy Ghost was, from the days of the Apostles, acknowledged by the catholic church, and that those who maintained a contrary opinion were considered as heretics; and as every one knows that neither the divinity of the Father, nor the unity of the Godhead, was ever called in question at any period, it follows that the doctrine of the Trinity in Unity has been in substance, in all its constituent parts, always known among Christians. Tertullian, in writing against Praxeas, maintains, that a Trinity rationally conceived is consistent with truth, and that unity irrationally conceived forms heresy. " And in another part of his works he says, "There is a Trinity of one Divinity, the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Ghost. To these writers of the second century, we may add Origen and Cyprian in the third; the former of whom mentions baptism (alluding to its appointed form) as "the source and fountain of graces to him who dedicates himself to the divinity of the adorable Trinity. " And the latter, after reciting the same form of baptism, says that "by it Christ delivered the doctrine of the Trinity, unto which mystery or sacrament the nations were to be baptized. " It would be easy to multiply quotations upon this subject; but these are amply sufficient to show the opinions of the early fathers, and to refute the assertion that the doctrine of the Trinity was an invention of the fourth century. To these positive testimonies may be subjoined a negative argument: those who acknowledged the divinity of Christ and of the Holy Ghost, are never called heretics by any writer of the first three centuries; and this circumstance is surely a strong proof that the doctrine of the Trinity was the doctrine of the primitive church; more especially, since the names of those who first denied the divinity of Christ and of the Holy Ghost, are transmitted to us as of persons who dissented from the common faith of Christians. ...
But while we contend that the doctrine of the Trinity in Unity is founded in Scripture, and supported by the authority of the early Christians, we must acknowledge that it is not given to man to understand in what manner the three persons are united, or how, separately and jointly, they are God
Angel - This indicates clearly that He was one of the persons of the Trinity. ...
Genesis 48:16 (a) This portion brings before us the three Persons of the Trinity. The Spirit of GOD has a human form, as do the other two persons of the Trinity. They accepted the worship of Abraham and therefore they seemed to be two persons of the Trinity. Some think that all three Persons of the Trinity were there
Gregory of Neocaesarea, Saint - " He is also well known as a writer and some of his chief works are: "Oratio Panegyrica," in honor of Origen; "Tractatus ad Theopompum," on the passibility and impassibility of God; "Epistola Canonica," an explanation of the organization of the churches of Pontus under Gregory; and "Exposition of the Faith," showing Gregory's idea of the Trinity
Gregory Thaumaturgus, Saint - " He is also well known as a writer and some of his chief works are: "Oratio Panegyrica," in honor of Origen; "Tractatus ad Theopompum," on the passibility and impassibility of God; "Epistola Canonica," an explanation of the organization of the churches of Pontus under Gregory; and "Exposition of the Faith," showing Gregory's idea of the Trinity
Trinity - Satan will have an imitation of the Trinity in the Roman beast, the false prophet, and himself
Thaumaturgus, Gregory, Saint - " He is also well known as a writer and some of his chief works are: "Oratio Panegyrica," in honor of Origen; "Tractatus ad Theopompum," on the passibility and impassibility of God; "Epistola Canonica," an explanation of the organization of the churches of Pontus under Gregory; and "Exposition of the Faith," showing Gregory's idea of the Trinity
Relation of Soul And Body - In Christ the human nature consisting of soul and body exists in the Divine Personality of the Word, the Second Person of the Holy Trinity
Incarnation, the - A Latinized name for the act by which the SecondPerson of the Blessed Trinity, God's Only Son, the Eternal "Wordwas made Flesh," i
Dove (2) - (Anglo-Saxon: gast) ...
The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
Man - But Revelation also adds the fact of man's fall, which reason only dimly suspects, of man's redemption through the Incarnation and Death of the Second Person of the Trinity, of the institution of the Church, which is commanded to carry on the work of redemption till the end of time
Methodist Episcopal Church - " The latter emphasize "belief in the Trinity, the fall of man and his need of repentance, freedom of the will, sanctification, future rewards and punishments, and the sufficiency of the Scriptures for salvation
Love, Spirit of - (Anglo-Saxon: gast) ...
The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
Holy Ghost - (Anglo-Saxon: gast) ...
The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
Holy Spirit - (Anglo-Saxon: gast) ...
The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
Truth, Spirit of - (Anglo-Saxon: gast) ...
The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
Spirit, Creator - (Anglo-Saxon: gast) ...
The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
Spirit, Holy - (Anglo-Saxon: gast) ...
The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
Spirit of Love - (Anglo-Saxon: gast) ...
The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
Spirit of Truth - (Anglo-Saxon: gast) ...
The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
Sanctifier, the - (Anglo-Saxon: gast) ...
The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
Ghost, Holy - (Anglo-Saxon: gast) ...
The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
Word - One of the titles of the second person of the Trinity, indicating perhaps that by his acts and teachings God is revealed, somewhat as thought is by words, 1 John 1:1 5:7 Revelation 19:13
North Carolina - ...
Catholic influence on the place-names of the State is shown in the following: ...
Saint Paul's
Trinity
Valle Crucis
Ecclesiastically, the state is ruled by the dioceses of ...
Charlotte
Raleigh
See also ...
patron saints index
Artemon, Artemonites - Schleiermacher's essay on the Sabellian and Athanasian conceptions of the Trinity ( Works , vol
Montallegro - Apparently of Byzantine origin, the portrait represents the Blessed Virgin lying on a bier, surrounded by several saints, and two angels, supporting a representation of the Holy Trinity symbolized by three human bodies merged into one
Incarnation - The addition of human nature to the nature of God the second person of the Trinity
Epiphany, the - Anexamination of the services for the Feast of the Epiphany showsthat the commemoration is really threefold: (1) Our Lord'sManifestation by a star to the Magi; (2) The Manifestation ofthe glorious Trinity at His Baptism, and (3) The Manifestation ofthe glory and Divinity of Christ by His miraculous turning waterinto wine at the marriage in Cana of Galilee; all of which are saidto have happened on the same day, though not in the same year
Father - ) The Supreme Being and Creator; God; in theology, the first person in the Trinity
Spirit - in Hebrew, רות in Greek, πνευμα , and in Latin, spiritus, is in the Scriptures sometimes taken for the Holy Ghost, the third person of the Holy Trinity
Gospel - In the New Testament the word "Gospel" is appliedexclusively to the announcement of certain events, certain outwardfacts connected with the Second Person in the Blessed Trinity,namely, the Incarnation, Birth, Life, Death, Burial, Resurrectionand Ascension of the Son of God
Hutchinsonians - In this work he also intimated that the idea of a Trinity is to be taken from the grand agents in the natural system, fire, light, and spirit. His editors tell us, he found, upon examination, that the Hebrew Scriptures nowhere ascribe motion to the body of the sun, nor fixedness to the earth; that they describe the created system to be a plenum without any vacuum at all, and reject the assistance of gravitation, attraction, or any such occult qualities, for performing the stated operations of nature, which are carried on by the mechanism of the heavens, in their threefold condition of fire, light, and spirit, or air, the material agents set to work at the beginning; that the heavens, thus framed by almighty Wisdom, are an instituted emblem and visible substitute of Jehovah Aleim, the eternal Three, the coequal and co- adorable Trinity in Unity; that the unity of substance in the heavens points out the unity of essence and the distinction of conditions, the personality in Deity, without confounding the persons or dividing the substance; and that, from their being made emblems, they are called in Hebrew shemim, the names, representatives, or substitutes, expressing by their names that they are emblems, and, by their conditions or offices, what it is they are emblems of. " His followers maintain, that the cherubim, and the glory around them, with the divine presence in them, were not only emblematical figures, representing the persons of the ever blessed Trinity, as engaged in covenant for the redemption of man, but also that they were intended "to keep or preserve the way of the tree of life, to show man the way to life eternal, and keep him from losing or departing from it. " That Melchizedec was an eminent type of Christ, there can be little doubt; but that he was actually the second person of the Trinity, in a human form, is a tenet of the Hutchinsonians, though not entirely peculiar to them
Christian Calendar - Furthermore it determines the following feasts that were introduced much later: Patronage of Saint Joseph, Trinity Sunday, Corpus Christi, and the Sacred Heart
Moore, Thomas - " Graduated from Trinity College, Dublin, 1798, he went to London to study law, but literature attracted him more, and his early works met with immediate success
Dryden, John - from Trinity College, Cambridge, he immediately gained recognition as a poet upon the publication of "Heroic Stanzas" on the death of Oliver Cromwell, 1658
John Dryden - from Trinity College, Cambridge, he immediately gained recognition as a poet upon the publication of "Heroic Stanzas" on the death of Oliver Cromwell, 1658
Calendar, Christian - Furthermore it determines the following feasts that were introduced much later: Patronage of Saint Joseph, Trinity Sunday, Corpus Christi, and the Sacred Heart
Abomination of Desolation - The 'abomination of desolation' is evidently connected with the Trinity of evil spoken of in Revelation 13 and will be the work of Satan, the Roman beast, and the false prophet
Thomas Moore - " Graduated from Trinity College, Dublin, 1798, he went to London to study law, but literature attracted him more, and his early works met with immediate success
Benedicite - All Mankind, from verse 26 to the end; this last division beinga call to mankind in general—the people of Israel, Priests andservants of the Lord, Spirits and Souls of the Righteous, and all"holy and humble men of heart," to praise the Lord and magnify Himforever,—followed in Christian Worship by the Gloria Patri, as anact of high praise of the holy, blessed and adorable Trinity, madeknown to us by the Revelation of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ
Holy Ghost, the - The Third Person of the Blessed Trinity
John Newman, Venerable - In 1816 he matriculated at Trinity College, Oxford, and in 1818 won a scholarship tenable for nine years. " Trinity made him honorary fellow, 1878
Newman, John Henry, Venerable - In 1816 he matriculated at Trinity College, Oxford, and in 1818 won a scholarship tenable for nine years. " Trinity made him honorary fellow, 1878
Cambridge, England, University of - ...
Trinity, founded 1546, by Henry VIII, absorbed several earlier institutions including King's Hall (1336), Saint Michael's or Michaelhouse (1323), and Fyswick or Physick's Hostel, belonging to Gonville Hall; the largest college in any English university and the principal legal college of Cambridge. ...
Trinity Hall, founded 1350, by Sir William Bateman, Bishop of Norwich, on the site of the former school of the monastic students from Ely
University of Cambridge, England - ...
Trinity, founded 1546, by Henry VIII, absorbed several earlier institutions including King's Hall (1336), Saint Michael's or Michaelhouse (1323), and Fyswick or Physick's Hostel, belonging to Gonville Hall; the largest college in any English university and the principal legal college of Cambridge. ...
Trinity Hall, founded 1350, by Sir William Bateman, Bishop of Norwich, on the site of the former school of the monastic students from Ely
Messalians - They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Filthy, the - They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Devotion to the Sacred Heart - Devotion which has as its dogmatic foundation the Incarnation of the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity
Adelphians - They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Holy - ...
Holy Ghost, or Holy Spirit, the Divine Spirit the third person in the Trinity the sanctifier of souls
Euchites - They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Adelphians - They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Water, Holy - The priest reads several prayers, including an exorcism of the salt and the water, and puts the salt into the water in the form of a threefold cross, in the name of the three Persons of the Blessed Trinity
Sacred Heart, Devotion to the - Devotion which has as its dogmatic foundation the Incarnation of the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity
Holy, Holiness - The Messiah is called "the Holy One," Psalm 16:10 ; Luke 4:34 ; Acts 3:14 ; and Holy is the common epithet given to the third person of the Trinity, the Holy Spirit
Messalians - They said that after a period of constant prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world
Feast of the Body of Christ - Celebrated on Thursday after Trinity Sunday in honor of the Body of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament and in commemoration of the institution of the Blessed Sacrament
Feast of Corpus Chrisi - Celebrated on Thursday after Trinity Sunday in honor of the Body of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament and in commemoration of the institution of the Blessed Sacrament
Kentucky - ...
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Louisville
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Bardstown
Covington
Lexington
Owensboro
Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Cardinal
Christmas
Gethsemane
Holy Cross
Loretto
Mount Carmel
Nazareth
Sacramento
Saint Catharine
Saint Charles
Saint Helen's
Saint John
Saint Joseph
Saint Mary
Saint Mary's City
Saint Paul
Saint Vincent
Trappist
Trinity
See also, ...
patron saints index
Mystical Numbers - From the four winds shall the elect be gathered, for they are called in the Trinity, being baptized in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost
Euchites - The same denomination was used in the twelfth century to denote certain fanatics who infested the Greek and Eastern churches, and who were charged with believing a double Trinity, rejecting wedlock, abstaining from flesh, treating with contempt the sacraments of baptism and the Lord's supper, and the various branches of external worship, and placing the essence of religion solely in external prayer; and maintaining the efficacy of perpetual supplications to the Supreme Being for expelling an evil being or genius, which dwelt in the breast of every mortal
Doxology - Post-biblical doxologies, in reaction against the Arians and other heretical groups, tended to emphasize the doctrine of the Trinity
Numbers, Mystical - From the four winds shall the elect be gathered, for they are called in the Trinity, being baptized in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost
Easter - Its celebration is preceded by 40 days of prayer and fasting and followed till Trinity Sunday by some 50 days of festivity
Augsburgh - It consisted of twenty-one articles, including the following points:—The Trinity, original sin, the incarnation, justification by faith, the word and sacraments, necessity of good works, the perpetuity of the church, infant baptism, the Lord's Supper, repentance and confession, the proper use of the sacraments, church order, rites and ceremonies, the magistracy, a future judgment, free will, the worship of saints, &c
Joannes ii, Mercurius, Bishop of Rome - Pope Hormisdas had in 522 written in strong condemnation of certain Scythian monks who had upheld the statement that "one of the Trinity" (Unus ex Trinitate ) "suffered in the flesh. ), and now the Acoemetae , or "Sleepless Monks," of Constantinople argued from it in favour of the Nestorian position that Mary was not truly and properly the mother of God; saying with reason that, if He Who suffered in the flesh was not of the Trinity, neither was He Who was born in the flesh
Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel - ...
Carmelite saints include ...
Albert of Jerusalem
Albert of Sicily
Andrew Corsini
Angelus of Jerusalem
Anne of Saint Bartholomew
Cyril of Constantinople
Denis of the Nativity
Elizabeth of the Trinity
Jacobinus de Canepaci
Jane of Toulouse
Joaquina Vedruna de Mas
John Baptist Spagnuolo
John of the Cross
John Soreth
Maria Lopez of Jesus
Marie of the Incarnation
Mary Fontanella
Mary Magdalen of Pazzi
Nuno Alveres Pereira
Peter Thomas
Raphael Kalinowski
Redemptorus of the Cross
Romeo of Limoges
Rose Chretien
Simon Stock
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross
Teresa Margaret Redi
Teresa Maria of the Cross
Teresa of Avila
Teresa of the Andes
Theresa of Lisieux
Carmelite Order - ...
Carmelite saints include ...
Albert of Jerusalem
Albert of Sicily
Andrew Corsini
Angelus of Jerusalem
Anne of Saint Bartholomew
Cyril of Constantinople
Denis of the Nativity
Elizabeth of the Trinity
Jacobinus de Canepaci
Jane of Toulouse
Joaquina Vedruna de Mas
John Baptist Spagnuolo
John of the Cross
John Soreth
Maria Lopez of Jesus
Marie of the Incarnation
Mary Fontanella
Mary Magdalen of Pazzi
Nuno Alveres Pereira
Peter Thomas
Raphael Kalinowski
Redemptorus of the Cross
Romeo of Limoges
Rose Chretien
Simon Stock
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross
Teresa Margaret Redi
Teresa Maria of the Cross
Teresa of Avila
Teresa of the Andes
Theresa of Lisieux
Carmelites - ...
Carmelite saints include ...
Albert of Jerusalem
Albert of Sicily
Andrew Corsini
Angelus of Jerusalem
Anne of Saint Bartholomew
Cyril of Constantinople
Denis of the Nativity
Elizabeth of the Trinity
Jacobinus de Canepaci
Jane of Toulouse
Joaquina Vedruna de Mas
John Baptist Spagnuolo
John of the Cross
John Soreth
Maria Lopez of Jesus
Marie of the Incarnation
Mary Fontanella
Mary Magdalen of Pazzi
Nuno Alveres Pereira
Peter Thomas
Raphael Kalinowski
Redemptorus of the Cross
Romeo of Limoges
Rose Chretien
Simon Stock
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross
Teresa Margaret Redi
Teresa Maria of the Cross
Teresa of Avila
Teresa of the Andes
Theresa of Lisieux
Bochim - "The (Hebrew) angel of the Lord (the Second Person in the Trinity, "the Lord," Exodus 23:20) came up from Gilgal to Bochim, and said, I made you go up out of Egypt," etc
Blasphemy - are offences by the common law, and punishable by fine, imprisonment, and pillory; and, by the statute law, he that denies one of the persons in the Trinity, or asserts that there are more than one God, or denies Christianity to be true, for the first offence is rendered incapable of any office; for the second, adjudged incapable of suing, being executor or guardian, receiving any gift or legacy, and to be imprisoned for years
Feast - Such are Palm Sunday, Good Friday, Ash Wednesday, Sexagesima, Ascension-day, Pentecost, and Trinity Sunday
Isaacus Senior, Disciple of Ephraim the Syrian - 26, says: "Isaac wrote, concerning the Three Persons of the Holy Trinity and the Incarnation of the Lord, a book of very dark disputation and involved discourse; proving that there are three Persons in the one Godhead, each possessing a proprium peculiar to himself
Rationalism - As early as the 16th century some Protestants applying the principle of private interpretation rejected or interpreted symbolically the supernatural mysteries of the Trinity, the Incarnation, the Redemption, and the Eucharist
Holy Spirit or Holy Ghost - The third person in the blessed Trinity
Sign of the Cross - We say "In the name" - expressing the unity of God; we mention the three Persons of the Trinity; the cross itself, made with the hand, manifests our belief in the Incarnation, death, and resurrection of Our Saviour, and shows that we regard Him not only as God but as man - for otherwise He could not die
Salvius, Bishop of Alby - As bishop Salvius indignantly scouted the heretical and somewhat crude views on the Trinity which king Chilperic wished to force upon the church ( ib
Holy Ghost - The third person in the Trinity. ...
See Trinity, and Scott's Four Sermons on Repentance, the Evil of Sin, Love to God, and the Promise of the Holy Spirit, p
God - Thus Jesus receives the same titles as the Father, leading to a doctrine of the Trinity. ...
God as Trinity Finally, God has revealed Himself as Father and Creator, as Son and Savior, and as Holy Spirit and Comforter. This has led the church to formulate the uniquely Christian doctrine of the Trinity. New Testament passages make statements about the work and person of each member of the Trinity to show that each is God; yet the Bible strongly affirms that God is one, not three (Matthew 28:19 ; John 16:5-11 ; Romans 1:1-4 ; 1 Corinthians 12:4-6 ; 2 Corinthians 13:14 ; Ephesians 4:4-6 ). The doctrine of the Trinity is a human attempt to explain this biblical evidence and revelation. See Christ; Holy Spirit ; Trinity
Hutchinsonians - The Hutchinsonians maintain that the great mystery of the Trinity is conveyed to our understandings by ideas of sense; and that the created substance of the air, or heaven, in its three-fold agency of fire, light, and spirit, is the enigma of the one essence or one Jehovah in three persons. The unity of essence is exhibited by its unity of substance; the Trinity of conditions, fire, light, and spirit. Thus the one substance of the air, or heaven in its three conditions, shows the unity in Trinity; and its three conditions in or of one substance, the Trinity in unity
Holy Spirit - There is only one God, and this God has always existed in a Trinity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Our understanding of the Holy Spirit is therefore tied up with our understanding of the Trinity, and that in turn is tied up with the life and ministry of Jesus Christ. ...
In spite of all this, it is probably still true to say that when the Old Testament people spoke of the Spirit of God, they were thinking more of the living and active power of God than of a person within a Trinity. It was all a preparation for the fuller revelation of the Trinity that came through the life and work of Jesus Christ. Certainly, the Spirit demonstrated the power of God, but people now began to see that the Spirit was a person – someone distinct from Father and Son, yet equal with them and inseparably united with them (Matthew 28:19; John 14:15-17; John 16:13-15; Acts 5:30-32; 1 Corinthians 12:4-6; see Trinity)
Augustinians Hermits - The original branches of the Hermits were: the Williamites, the Bonites, the Brittinians, the Hermits of the Holy Trinity in Tuscany, and other houses in Italy
Christian Year, the - The Trinity SEASON, the completed Revelation; the moralities ofthe Gospel
One - The three Persons of the Trinity operate together
Baptism - " Defined theologically, it is a sacrament, instituted by Christ, in which by the invocation of the Holy Trinity and external ablution with water one becomes spiritually regenerated and a disciple of Christ
Hermits of Saint Augustine - The original branches of the Hermits were: the Williamites, the Bonites, the Brittinians, the Hermits of the Holy Trinity in Tuscany, and other houses in Italy
Inghamites - He contends very strongly for salvation by the imputation of Christ's righteousness; and as to doctrine, the chief point wherein the Inghamites differ from the Independents, is respecting the Trinity
Joachimites - They likewise divided every thing relating to men, doctrine, and manner of living, into three classes, according to the three persons of the Trinity
Seven - As to the reason of the fact, three is the signature of God, in the ever-blessed Trinity; four of the world—four elements, four seasons, four winds, etc
Scapular - The rules concerning scapulars are: ...
the investing must be done by an authorized person
the scapular may be given in any place, to any Catholic, even to an infant
it must be worn as described above
if replaced, no blessing is required
if it is laid aside for a considerable time, the benefits are forfeited during that time
The Church has approved 18 kinds of scapulars: ...
Scapular of Mount Carmel
Scapular of Our Lady of Ransom
Scapular of Saint Benedict
Scapular of Saint Dominic
Scapular of Saint Joseph
Scapular of Saint Michael the Archangel
Scapular of the Hearts of Jesus and Mary
Scapular of the Help of the Sick
Scapular of the Holy Face
Scapular of the Immaculate Conception
Scapular of the Immaculate Heart of Mary
Scapular of the Most Blessed Trinity
Scapular of the Mother of Good Counsel
Scapular of the Passion (black)
Scapular of the Passion (red)
Scapular of the Precious Blood
Scapular of the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Scapular of the Seven Dolors
Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ - They differ from the Socinians, who believe no existence of Jesus Christ before his incarnation; they differ from the Sabellians, who only own a Trinity of names: they differ also from the generally received opinion, which is, that Christ's human soul began to exist in the womb of his mother, in exact conformity to that likeness unto his brethren of which St. A pure intelligent spirit, the first, the most ancient, and the most excellent of creatures, created before the foundation of the world, so exactly resembles the second person of the Arian Trinity, that it is impossible to show the least difference except in name
Platonists - In this divine Being, Plato admitted a sort of Trinity of three hypostases. From the above use of Logos for the second person of the Platonic Trinity, it has been thought that St
Holy Ghost, Holy Spirit - The third Person in the Trinity, as seen in the formula of baptism
African Church - In his treatise on the Trinity he has left a finished theological exposition
Seed Growing Secretly, Parable of the - It is one of a Trinity of parables which describe the Kingdom of God on earth, the others being the "Sower" and the "Mustard Seed
Joseph, Litany of Saint - ...
Holy Trinity, one God, Have mercy on us
Litany of Saint Joseph - ...
Holy Trinity, one God, Have mercy on us
Reason - Watts, "which are plainly and expressly asserted in Scripture, and that in a sense which contradicts not other parts of Scripture, or natural light, our reason must submit, and believe the thing, though it cannot find the modus or manner of its being so in the doctrines of the Trinity and Incarnation, which are above the reach of our reason in this present state
Mysteries - There are three great and fundamental mysteries in the Catholic religion: ...
1) the Trinity
2) the Incarnation
3) the Eucharist
to which Monsignor Kolbe adds that of the Mystical Body of Christ
Council - Some authors tell us that they likewise condemned the several errors of Origen about the Trinity, the plurality of worlds, and pre-existence of souls. In this council the doctrine of the Trinity was decided: but upon separation the pope called a congregation, in which the cardinals pretended they had no right to judge of doctrinal points; that this was the privilege peculiar to the pope
Victorinus Afer - (4) Three Hymns , mainly consisting of formulas and prayers intended to elucidate the relations of the Trinity. Thomassin, whose theological judgment is weighty, speaks of him as "inferior to none in the profundity of his insight into the inmost mysteries" of the Divine Being, and the relation of the Persons of the Trinity to one another (de Incarn. The following is a summary of his mode of conceiving the relations of the Trinity and the processes of creation and redemption. ...
The distinction of Son and Spirit is carefully maintained, but yet the essential duality which is in God—the distinction of that which is from that which proceeds forth—the distinction expressed in all the antitheses referred to above, is clearer to Victorinus than the Trinity of relations. 13, 1048 B), or again the relations of the Trinity are expressed in formulas such as these: "visio, videre, discernere"; "esse, vivere, intelligere," expressing three stages of a great act (iii. Victorinus is the first theologian to speak of the Spirit as the principle of unity in the Godhead, the bond or "copula" of the eternal Trinity, completing the perfect circle of the Divine Being, the return of God upon Himself (i. ) It appeared in Plotinus's theory of the νοῦς and anima, which with the One, the God, make up what is called "the neo-Platonic Trinity. Again, Victorinus's formula for the Trinity, the "status, progressio, regressus," is the reflex of a neo-Platonic idea—an idea first definitely formulated by Proclus but implied by Plotinus—the idea of all progress and development of life involving (1) the immanence of the caused in that which causes it, (2) the issuing of the caused out of that which causes it, (3) the return of the caused into that which causes it. The Son is eternally abiding in the Father, eternally proceeding from the Father in His eternal Generation, and eternally pouring back into the bosom of the Father that which He receives, in that Holy Ghost Who is Himself the life of Father and Son, the love and bond of the Holy Trinity. His strong insistence in his Trinitarian theology on the double Procession of the Holy Spirit—his conception of the Holy Spirit as the "Bond" of the Blessed Trinity—his emphasis on the unity of Christ and His church—his strong predestinarianism—his vehement assertion of the doctrines of grace—his assertion of the priority of faith to intelligence (p
Fulgentius (4) Ferrandus, , Disciple And Companion of Ruspe - The Separability of the Persons of the Trinity
God - The fanciful idea that it referred to the Trinity of persons in the Godhead hardly finds now a supporter among scholars
Origen - He popularized the homily, being called its father, more than 20 of his discourses being preserved in Greek and 118 in Latin; in addition we have his brilliant polemic "Contra Celsum" and "De principiis," dealing with the Trinity, creation, free-will, and scriptural inspiration and interpretation
Faith And Reason - , the Blessed Trinity, which cannot be understood and demonstrated by reason even after their revelation, except in so far as God has revealed them
Indiana - The Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Carmel
Notre Dame
Saint Anthony
Saint Bernice
Saint Croix
Saint Henry
Saint Joe
Saint John
Saint Leon
Saint Louis Crossing
Saint Mary-of-the-Woods
Saint Meinrad
Saint Paul
Saint Pierre
Trinity Springs
Vera Cruz
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Indianapolis
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Evansville
Fort Wayne-South Bend
Gary
Lafayette
See also: ...
patron saints index: archdiocese of Indianapolis, Indiana
patron saints index: diocese of Evansville, Indiana
patron saints index: diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana
patron saints index: diocese of Gary, Indiana
patron saints index: diocese of Lafayette, Indiana
patron saints index: Indiana
God - But reserve was maintained while the tendency to polytheism prevailed, and as yet the redeeming and sanctifying work of the Son and the blessed Spirit was unaccomplished; when once these had been manifested the doctrine of the Trinity in Unity was fully revealed in New Testament
Reason, Faith And - , the Blessed Trinity, which cannot be understood and demonstrated by reason even after their revelation, except in so far as God has revealed them
Vigilius Thapsensis - Thus Chifflet, whose is the best edition (Dijon, 1664) of his writings, attributes to him a dialogue in 12 books on the Trinity , printed among the works of St
Ausonius, Decimus Magnus, Poet - 7), but a distinct confession of faith, in the form of a prayer to the first two Persons of the Trinity. Ausonius was not a Christian in the same sense as Paulinus; he was one who hovered on the borderland which separated the new from the old religion: not ashamed, it is true, to pen obscenities beneath the eye and at the challenge of his patron, yet in the quiet of his oratory feeling after the God of the Christians; convinced apparently of the dogma of the Trinity, yet so little penetrated by its awful mystery as to give it a haphazard place in a string of frivolous triplets composed at the dinner-table ( Gryph
Hormisdas, Bishop of Rome - The adoption of this addition at Constantinople under Anastasius had caused a popular tumult, and it was probably its abrogation during the reaction under Justin that caused certain Scythian monks to defend the formula, and to maintain that "one of the holy and undivided Trinity" suffered. For in 533 the emperor Justinian issued an edict asserting that "the sufferings and miracles are of one and the same—for we do not acknowledge God the Word to be one and Christ another, but one and the same: for the Trinity remained even after the Incarnation of the One Word of God, Who was of the Trinity; for the Holy Trinity does not admit of the addition of a fourth person. We anathematize Nestorius the man-worshipper, and those who think with him, who deny that our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God and our God, Incarnate, made man, and crucified, was One of the holy consubstantial Trinity" ( Lex Justinian
Oratory - Phillip de Neri, a native of Florence, who, in the year 1548, founded at Rome the Confraternity of the Holy Trinity
Appearance - Thus it is used with reference to each person of the Trinity
Saints, Litany of the - The litany begins with the usual invocation of the Persons of the Blessed Trinity and the Blessed Virgin
Joannes Scholasticus, Bishop of Constantinople - ) mentions his catechism, in which he established the Catholic teaching of the consubstantial Trinity, saying that he wrote it in 568, under Justin II
Sabellianism, or Patripassianism - Novatian on the Trinity (cc. it again burst forth when Marcellus of Ancyra, in opposing Arianism and the subordination theory of Origen, was led to deny any personal distinction between the First and Second Persons of the Trinity
Sheol - That some Old Testament saints believed in Sheol, while the New Testament teaches clearly about heaven and hell, is nor more of a problem than that the Old Testament contains a system of atonement by animal sacrifice now made obsolete in Christ (Matthew 16:18 ) or that the Old Testament teaches God is one (Deuteronomy 6:4 ) while the New Testament reveals a Trinity
Grief, Grieving - This holds true for each member of the Trinity
Coelicolae - If, moreover, as their name may indicate, the Coelicolae openly professed their adhesion to the Jewish worship of the One God and rejected the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, this would be an error for which their abhorrence of pagan forms of idolatry would not compensate
Baptists - A considerable number of the General Baptists have gone into Unitarianism; in consequence of which, those who maintained the doctrines of the Trinity and atonement, in the latter part of the eighteenth century, formed themselves into what is called The New Connection," or Association
Didymus, Head of the Catechetical School - His three books On the Trinity have not reached us in a perfect state. Occasionally he kindles and glows with strong devotional fervour, and concludes an eloquent passage on the glory of the Holy Trinity with a thrice-repeated Amen
Optatus, Bishop of Milevis - the sacraments which derive their virtue from the Trinity. The repetition of baptism he says is an insult to the Trinity worse than the doctrines of Praxeas and the Patripassians. Three elements are requisite: (1) the Trinity (2) the minister (3) the faithful receiver; but of these the Donatists exalt the second above the other two
Aphraat (Aphrahat, Farhad - ) and on another confess both the Trinity and the Divinity of Christ (vi
Gennadius (11) Massiliensis, Presbyter of Marseilles - Heretical baptism is not to be repeated, unless it has been administered by heretics who would have declined to employ the invocation of the Holy Trinity (52)
Justinus ii - 4), in which, after setting forth the orthodox belief as to the doctrines of the Trinity and the Incarnation, he exhorted all to return to the Catholic Church, which should remain firm and unchanged for ever; and that no one should for the future dispute about persons or syllables, probably referring to the person of Theodore and the writings of Theodoret and Ibas, and also to the question as to the Incorruptibility of the body of Christ
Son of God - ...
Eternally the Son...
God is a Trinity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit, all of whom are equally and eternally God (see Trinity)
Dionysius of Alexandria - The former therefore affirmed that to divide the ὑπόστασις was to make separate gods; the latter affirmed with equal justice that there could be no Trinity unless each ὑπόστασις was distinct. 24, 25); of his Refutation and Defence, addressed to Dionysius of Rome, in reply to the accusation of false teaching on the Holy Trinity (Athan
Joannes Cappadox, Bishop of Constantinople - As he came near the raised dais where the pulpit stood shouts arose, "Long live the patriarch! Long live the emperor! Why do we remain excommunicated? Why have we not communicated these many years? You are Catholic, what do you fear; worthy servant of the Trinity? Cast out Severus the Manichee! O Justin, our emperor, you win! This instant proclaim the synod of Chalcedon, because Justin reigns. Let us then glorify with one mouth the holy and consubstantial Trinity
Litany of the Sacred Heart - ...
Holy Trinity, one God, have mercy on us
Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - ...
Holy Trinity, one God, have mercy on us
Litany of Loreto - ...
Holy Trinity, one God, have mercy on us
Swedenborgians - " ...
With respect, therefore, to the sacred Trinity, though he rejected the idea of three distinct persons as destructive of the unity of the Godhead, he admitted three distinct essences, principles, or characters, as existing in it; namely, the divine essence or character, in virtue of which he is called the Father or Creator; the human essence, principle, or character, united to the divine in the person of Jesus Christ, in virtue of which he is called the Son and Redeemer; and, lastly, the proceeding essence or principle, in virtue of which he is called the Holy Ghost
Loreto, Litany of - ...
Holy Trinity, one God, have mercy on us
Mennonites - They also object to the terms person and Trinity, as not consistent with the simplicity of the Scriptures
Sacred Heart, Litany of the - ...
Holy Trinity, one God, have mercy on us
Spirit - For THE HOLY, HOLINESS SPIRIT, the third person of the Holy Trinity, who inspired the prophets, animates good men, pours his unction into our hearts, imparts to us life and comfort; and in whose name we are baptized and blessed, as well as in that of the Father and the Son
University of Oxford -
Trinity, founded by Sir Thomas Pope, 1554, on the site of the 13th century Durham College, for the Benedictines of Durham Abbey; Cardinal Newman was a scholar here in 1819
Father - Though distinct persons, they are inseparably united (John 10:30; John 14:10; see SON OF GOD; Trinity)
Titus, Theology of - There is no question that Paul believed Jesus to be a co-equal and consubstantial member of the divine Trinity. The entire Godhead, and especially the second Person of the Trinity, were and are directly involved in the salvation of humankind according to Paul
Enoch - ...
It vindicates God's government of the world, spiritual and natural, recognizes the Trinity, also Messiah "the Son of man" (the name "Jesus" never occurs), "the Elect One" from eternity, before whom "all kings shall fall down, and on whom they shall fix their hopes," the supreme Judge, who shall punish eternally the wicked and reward the just
Arians - 3: Abbadie, Waterland, Guyse, Hey, Robinson, Eveleigh, Hawker on the Divinity of Christ;...
Calamy, Taylor, Gill, Jones, Pike, and Simpson, on the Trinity
Alpha And Omega - We hear of no attempt to dispute it; and, relying on this as an established fact, the Gnostic teachers sought to deduce by various means and numerical quibbles the essential identity of all the Persona of the Trinity (cf
Nestorians - ...
As to the doctrine of the Trinity, it does not appear that Nestorius differed from his antagonists, admitting the coequality of the divine Persons; but he was charged with maintaining two distinct persons, as well as natures, in the mysterious character of Christ
Joannes Philoponus, Distinguished Philosopher - ...
We hear no more of Philoponus until 568, when, John, patriarch of Constantinople, having delivered a catechetical discourse on the "Holy and consubstantial Trinity," he published a treatise in reply to it
Litany of the Holy Name of Jesus - ...
Holy Trinity, one God, have mercy on us
Litany of the Holy Name - ...
Holy Trinity, one God, have mercy on us
Irish Martyrs - MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Image - 2 Corinthians 4:4 ) connects itself with the doctrine of the Trinity, and finds expression in various forms in the NT, notably in Hebrews 1:3 ‘who being the effulgence of his glory and the very image of his substance
Martyrs, Irish - MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Patriarchs - Rome in Europe, Antioch in Asia, and Alexandria in Africa: and thus formed a Trinity of patriarchs
Holy Name, Litany of the - ...
Holy Trinity, one God, have mercy on us
King, Christ as - Jesus will continue to reign as the second Person of the Trinity
New Birth - Belleville, Trinity 1 (1980): 125-41; F
Gregorius, Saint., the Illuminator - The venerable patriarch greatly rejoiced on reading them, and exclaimed, "Now let us praise Him Who was before the worlds, worshipping the most Holy Trinity and the Godhead of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, now and ever, world without end, Amen," which words are said after the Nicene Creed in the Armenian church (Malan
Adoption - Christ is the only Son of God by nature, being part of the divine Trinity
Manichaeans - Augustine, they believed, also, in a consubstantial Trinity, though they strangely supposed the Father to dwell in light inaccessible, the Son to have his residence in the solar orb, and the Holy Spirit to be diffused throughout the atmosphere; on which account they paid a superstitious, and perhaps an idolatrous, reverence to the sun and moon
Baltimore, Maryland, City of - The Second Plenary Council (1866) declared the Catholic doctrine on Divine Revelation, the one Church of Christ, nature and necessity of faith, the Holy Scripture, the Holy Trinity, the future life, and veneration of the Blessed Virgin and the saints; adopted regulations on the hierarchy and government of the Church, ecclesiastical persons, ecclesiastical property, the sacraments, Divine worship, uniformity of discipline, and education of youth
Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ - These divines differ from those called Arians, for the latter ascribe to Christ only a created deity, whereas the former hold his true and proper divinity: they differ from the Socinians, who believe no existence of Christ before his incarnation: they differ from the Sabillians, who only own a Trinity of names: they differ, also, from the generally received opinion, which is, that the human soul began to exist in his mother's womb, in exact conformity to that likeness unto his brethren, of which St. A pure intelligent spirit, say they, the first, the most ancient, and the most excellent of creatures, created before the foundation of the world, so exactly resembles the second person of the Arian Trinity, that it is impossible to show the least difference, except in name
Maxentius, Joannes, Presbyter And Archimandrite - They protest that it is from no disrespect to the council of Chalcedon, but in its defence, that they contend for their position on the subject of the Trinity, and declare that they anathematize all who either oppose that council or hold its decisions to be imperfect. The archimandrite refuses to believe the letter can have been written by Hormisdas, but argues that whether it was so or not, its author was "unquestionably a heretic," as he considers that to "maintain that Christ, the Son of God, is one of the Trinity is to contend about words
Eusebius, Bishop of Vercellae - Turner raised the two questions whether Eusebius of Vercelli was the author of the Seven Books on the Trinity by the Pseudo-Vigilius of Thapsus, and whether he could have been the author of Quicunque Vult ; and subsequently in the same vol
Mark of the Beast - The number 666 could well personify the imperfection of man, even implying in the triple number the unholy Trinity of the dragon, antichrist, and the false prophet
Eucherius, Saint, Bishop of Lyons - , such as the scriptural evidence for the doctrine of the Holy Trinity; the permission of polygamy to the patriarchs; the existence of evil, which (with many other divines) he makes simply the privation of good, etc
Jacobus Sarugensis, Bishop of Batnae - Isaacus at Gabûla; on the Trinity and Incarnation
Holy Spirit - The mysterious third Person of the Trinity through whom God acts, reveals His will, empowers individuals, and discloses His personal presence in the Old and New Testament
Antichrist - We thus see that in the Revelation the anti-christian power called also 'the false prophet' will work with the political head, and with Satan — a Trinity of evil — not only in deceiving mankind, but also, in Revelation 16:13-16 , gathering together by their influence the kings of the earth to the battle of that great day of God Almighty
Eusebius of Alexandria, a Writer of Sermons - He adheres to the Catholic doctrines of the Trinity and the Incarnation
Antichrist - As Christ is the second Person in the Trinity, so Antichrist is the second in the anti-trinity, composed of the dragon, the beast, and the false prophet (who bears witness to the first beast, as the Holy Spirit witnesseth of the Son)
Ascension of Isaiah - It is thus of considerable importance in the light which it throws upon the views held in certain circles of the Christian Church of the apostolic period with regard to the doctrines of the Trinity, the Incarnation, the Resurrection, the Seven Heavens, the Antichrist, angels and demons. The author wrote in Greek, and was a Christian with a Docetic tendency and a crude conception of the Trinity. Importance for New Testament study...
(a) The Trinity. The Holy Spirit and the angel of the Holy Spirit (see under ‘Trinity’) are identical, except perhaps in 3:16 and 11:4 There is an angel of death (9:16; 10:14), and an angel of Sheol (11:19)
God - The central truth of that revelation is that there is only one God (Deuteronomy 6:4; Isaiah 44:6; Jeremiah 10:10; Mark 12:29; 1 Thessalonians 1:9; 1 Timothy 2:5), though he exists in the form of a Trinity (see Trinity)
Heart - Two persons of the Trinity are said to reside in the heart of the believer
Greatness - The important point to be borne in mind is that the statement must not be interpreted apart from the rest of Christ’s teaching concerning His relationship to the First Person in the Trinity
Angels - It is generally believed that it was the second person in the Trinity who appeared as a man in the O
Spirit; Breath - ...
Seventh, the Bible often speaks of God’s “Spirit,” the third person of the Trinity
American Church, the - This took place in Trinity Church, New York,September 17th, 1792
Boethius, Anicus Manlius Severinus - 4) maintains Aristotle's distinction of substances, whereas the author of the first theological treatise insists upon the substantial indifference of the three persons in the Trinity. ), but of all this his contemporaries knew nothing, and no hint of it appears until three centuries after his death, when he also becomes the author of four dogmatic treatises on the mysteries of the Trinity
Euchites - They further thought that he who had arrived at the passionless state could see the Holy Trinity with his bodily eyes; that the three hypostases of the Trinity coalesced into one, which united itself with worthy souls
Peter, Second, Theology of - All three persons of the Trinity are mentioned in 2Peter, with strong expressions of the unity of the Father and the Son, and evidence of the unity of the Godhead in divine revelation
Nectarius, Archbaptist of Constantinople - After praying God for enlightenment, he rejected and destroyed all except that of the orthodox, because the others introduced a division into the Holy Trinity
Sedulius, 5th-Cent. Poet - on the Nature of the Trinity, i
Christ in the Seventeenth Century - The Arminian theologians adhered to the doctrine of the Trinity, but maintained that the Son, as begotten of the Father, was essentially subordinate, though still a Person within the Deity. The Trinity represents for Böhme the thought that God has life and movement, that He is no abstract, changeless entity apart from the world, but a living God, working in and through all, the source and goal and spirit of all, the unity in which all contradictions are resolved. But Böhme sees the Trinity everywhere: in the soul of man (power, light, and the spirit of understanding), in plants (power, sap, peculiar virtue), nay, in all things that conceivably exist—even in the burning candle with its heat, light, and ascending air
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - This document is of interest from the testimony it bears to the doctrine of the Trinity and the light it throws upon the faith of Gregory. It runs as follows: "There is therefore nothing created or servile in the Trinity; nor anything superinduced, as though previously non-existing and introduced afterwards. Never therefore was the Son wanting to the Father, nor the Spirit to the Son; but there is ever the same Trinity, unchangeable and unalterable" (cf
Holy Ghost - the third person in the Trinity. " On this refined view little can be said which has clear Scriptural authority; and yet the very term by which the Third Person in the Trinity is designated, Wind or Breath, may, as to the Third Person, be designed, like the term Son applied to the Second, to convey, though imperfectly, some intimation of that manner of being by which both are distinguished from each other, and from the Father; and it was a remarkable action of our Lord, and one certainly which does not discountenance this idea, that when he imparted the Holy Ghost to his disciples, "He breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost," John 20:22 . Allow the Trinity in unity, and you have no difficulty in calling the Spirit, the Spirit of the Father, and the Spirit of the Son, or the Spirit of either; but if the Spirit be an influence, that influence cannot be the influence of two persons,—one of them God, and the other a creature. ) The mode of his subsistence in the sacred Trinity proves his personality
Henoticon, the - " Those "who divide or confound the natures, or admit only a phantastical incarnation," are to be rejected, "since the incarnation without sin of the Mother of God did not cause the addition of a Son, for the Trinity remained even when one Person of the Trinity, God the Word, became incarnate
Jude, Theology of - ...
The second person of the Trinity is "our Lord Jesus Christ" (vv
Head, Headship - , Manhood and Womanhood: A Biblical Perspective ; idem, Trinity J NS (1985): 1438-59; G
God - ...
THE Trinity
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola - The pavement, walls, and columns of this apse were marble, and the vaulted roof, from which lamps were suspended by chains, was ceiled with mosaic representing the Trinity symbolically, and also the twelve apostles, with an inscription in verse describing the subjects represented. The poem last in order is dedicated to a friend whom he calls Antonius, by which name he has been thought to denote Ausonius, and consists of a discourse of the insufficiency of the old mythological systems and of the advantages of the true faith he has adopted, whose doctrines on the Trinity, final judgment, and redemption through Christ he has described, and he invites his friend to consider the blessing of eternal life open to all who accept the offer ( ib. He was studiously orthodox on the Catholic doctrine of the Holy Trinity, which he states clearly on many occasions, but seems in one letter to favour the views of the semi-Pelagians (Ep
Revelation, the - This is the second element in the Trinity of evil. We have thus the Trinity of evil arrayed against God and His Christ. A Trinity of evil spirits goes forth to gather the kings of the earth to the battle of the great day of Almighty God at Harmagedon — mount of Megiddo: cf
Gregorius (32) Turonensis, Bishop of Tours - 19); and when Chilperic wanted to force on his people his views of the doctrine of the Trinity, Gregory withstood him. " "No," said Gregory; "neither God nor His saints are your enemies," and he proceeded to expound the orthodox doctrine of the Trinity
Priscillianus And Priscillianism, Priscillian - If they held a Trinity at all, it was but a Trinity of names
Incarnation - ...
As a biblical teaching, incarnation refers to the affirmation that God, in one of the modes of His existence as Trinity and without in any way ceasing to be the one God, has revealed Himself to humanity for its salvation by becoming human
Heresy - if any person, educated in the Christian religion, or professing the same, shall, by writing, printing, teaching, or advised speaking, deny any one of the persons in the Holy Trinity to be God, or maintain that there are more Gods than one, he shall undergo the same penalties and incapacities which were inflicted on apostasy by the same statute
Fellowship - Here the normal meanings of the words are transformed in service of the kingdom of God and as they identify a sharing in the communion of the blessed and Holy Trinity
Number - The Trinity (Revelation 1:4; Revelation 4:8); three great feasts (Exodus 23:14-17; Deuteronomy 16:16); the threefold blessing (Numbers 6:14; Numbers 6:24); the thrice holy (Isaiah 6:3); the three hours of prayer (Daniel 6:10; Psalms 55:17); the third heaven (2 Corinthians 12:2)
Nahum, Theology of - Cathcart, Biblical Studies in Contemporary Thought: The Tenth AnNIVersary Commemorative Volume of the Trinity College Bible Institute 1966-1975, pp
Culdees - They did not acknowledge auricular confession; they rejected penance and authoritative absolution; they made no use of chrism in baptism; confirmation was unknown; they opposed the doctrine of the real presence; they withstood the idolatrous worship of saints and angels, dedicating all their churches to the Holy Trinity; they denied the doctrine of works of supererogation; they were enemies to the celibacy of the clergy, themselves living in the married state
Unitarians - The Trinity of Persons in the Godhead
Arius the Heresiarch - Had the defenders of the Nicene doctrine made more general use of the term communication of Being , or Essence , they would have made it clearer that they were referring to a continual and unchangeable relation between the First and Second Persons in the Trinity, which bore a very slight analogy indeed to the process which calls inferior creatures into existence. There was no substantial difference between them, consisting as they did of a confession of faith in the Trinity, as well as a summary of the main facts recorded in the gospels. Athanasius had warmly attacked Arius for asserting that there were three hypostases in the Trinity
Bereans - The Bereans agree with the great majority of Christians respecting the doctrine of the Trinity, which they hold as a fundamental article; and they also agree in a great measure with the professed principles of both our established churches respecting predestination and election, though they allege that these doctrines are not consistently taught in either church
Prophets, the - Thus there will be formed a Trinity of evil
Theophilus, Bishop of Antioch - The first three days before the creation of the heavenly bodies are types of the Trinity—τύποι τῆς τρίαδος—the first place in Christian writings where the word is known to occur (lib
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - This is, in fact, a brief theological treatise on the doctrine of the Trinity, the power and nature of Christ, Paradise, angels, and men. It treats of faith in the Trinity, spiritual creation, the waters above the firmament, the firmament of heaven, the sun and moon, the devil and the nature of demons, the nature of waters and course of the ocean, Paradise, the nature of man after sin, the diversity of sinners and their place of punishment, purgatorial fire and the future life
Egypt - " Osiris and Horus, along with Isis, formed a Trinity, who were regarded as representing the sun-god under different forms
Toleration Act - Provided, That neither this act, nor any clause, article, or thing herein contained, shall extend, or be construed to extend, to give any ease, benefit, or advantage to any Papist or Popish Recusant whatsoever, or any person that shall deny in his preaching or writing the doctrine of the blessed Trinity, as it is declared in the above-said Articles of Religion
Monastery - He founded also the colleges of Christ Church in Oxford, and Trinity in Cambridge, and finished King's College there
Lord's Prayer, the - Since God is the relational Trinity in everlasting and inexhaustible fellowship as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, the divine design and nature of created humanity are to reflect relatedness and fellowship both vertically and horizontally as the Old Testament Decalogue indicates, and this Jesus does to perfection
Parable - Payne, Trinity J 2 ns (1981):3-23; R
Promise - ...
Paul gave great prominence to the work of the Holy Spirit, teaching that believers were sealed with the promised third person of the Trinity (Ephesians 1:13 ), thus culminating an ancient Hebrew promise (Isaiah 32:15 ; Ezekiel 36:27 )
Caecilia, Saint, Roman Lady - Augustine's work on the Trinity which appeared in a
Leander (2) - In a country where unity of faith had never been questioned, single or threefold immersion might be observed indifferently, as representing either the Unity or the Trinity of the God
Christ in the Middle Ages - The Incarnation was the work of the entire Trinity, and the Word stood in no nearer relation to the Son than did the entire Trinity (cf. 1142) was essentially Sabellian in his doctrine of the Trinity, and insisted that, being unchangeable, God could not have become something which He was not eternally
Divination - The three frog-like demons out of the mouths of the anti-trinity, the dragon, the beast, and the false prophet, shall "work miracles" to tempt the ten kings under Antichrist to the last battle for the kingship of the world, against Christ, in "the great day of God Almighty" (Revelation 16:13-14; compare Zechariah 13:2; Matthew 24:24; Revelation 13:14-15)
Poor And Poverty, Theology of - , Trinity J 9 (1988): 151-70; B
Head - This analogy is more than illustration; it forms an argument, like the psychological analogies of Augustine in regard to the Trinity
Head - This analogy is more than illustration; it forms an argument, like the psychological analogies of Augustine in regard to the Trinity
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - In the Trinity the Godhead is one but the hypostases are three (i. In Heb_1:3 the ἀπαύγασμα indicates the coeternity the χαρακτήρ the personality; it is in things made that "before" and "after" have place not in "the dread and sovereign Trinity;" (iii
Novatianus And Novatianism - Jerome describes his work on the Trinity as an epitome of Tertullian's and as attributed by some to Cyprian (Hieron. All sects previous to Novatianism had erred on the doctrine of the Trinity
Israel, Israelite - ]'>[2] According to the reports of His teaching as contained in the Gospel records, our Lord expressly formulated the truth of the unity of God, but never that of the Holy Trinity; and yet the latter pervades the whole record
Covenant - ...
If we believe, therefore, in a Trinity, it is more proper to suppose that they were all engaged in this plan of the covenant, than to suppose that the Father and Son were engaged exclusive of the Holy Spirit, 1 John 5:6-7
Swedenborgians - Thus it is taught, that in the person of Jesus Christ dwells the whole Trinity of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; the Father constituting the soul of the above humanity, while the humanity itself is the Son, and the divine virtue or operation proceeding from it is the Holy Spirit; forming altogether one God, just as the soul, the body, and operation of man, form one man
Gregorius Nyssenus, Bishop of Nyssa - Gregory was present at the synod at Constantinople in 383, when he delivered his discourse on the Godhead of the Second and Third Persons of the Trinity ( de Abraham , t. —These are deservedly regarded as among the most important patristic contributions towards a true view of the mystery of the Trinity, hardly, if at all, inferior to the writings of Basil
Ordination - The times of ordination are the four Sundays immediately following the Ember weeks; being the second Sunday in Lent, Trinity Sunday, and the Sundays following the first Wednesday after September 14 and December 13
Person, Personhood - Even as there is diversity (trinity) within unity in the Godhead so there is unity within diversity in humanity
Kindness (2) - God declares Himself ‘most chiefly in shewing mercy and pity’ (Collect for 11th Sunday after Trinity)
Manichees - Christ and the Holy Ghost; for the Manicheans held a consubstantial Trinity
Mss - ]'>[1] (at Trinity College, Dublin; identified by Dr. Codex Kenanensis , the Book of Kells, at Trinity College, Dublin; prob
Thousand Years - The unity of the Godhead will then be prominent, as His Trinity is now; "His name will be one," and He will come then first into direct communion with His redeemed
Baptism - The difficulty hence arising may be met by assuming ( a ) that Baptism in the name of Jesus was equivalent to Baptism in the name of the Trinity, or ( b ) that the shorter phrase does not represent the formula used by the baptizer (which may have been the fuller one), but the profession made by the baptized, and the essential fact that he became a Christian one of Christ’s acknowledged followers
Thessalonians, First And Second, Theology of - ...
In these early epistles there is little attempt to theologize about Christology or the Trinity
Name (2) - 61); Tertullian associates the name of the Church with the names of the Three Persons of the Trinity (de Bapt
Passion Week - Winterbotham, Sermons in Holy Trinity Church (1900), 140–184
Patricius, or Saint Patrick - ...
We have a copy of the Confession more than 1,000 years old preserved in the Book of Armagh, one of the great treasures of the library of Trinity College, Dublin
Christ in Reformation Theology - Like Athanasius, he preferred the word oneness to express the relation between the Persons in the Trinity. He even disliked the term Trinity or its German equivalents Dreifaltigkeit, Dreiheit
Gregorius (14) Nazianzenus, Bishop of Sasima And of Constantinople - Theological knowledge is absolutely necessary, especially of the doctrine of the Trinity, lest he fall into the Atheism of Sabellius, or the Judaism of Arius, or the Polytheism too common among the orthodox. He had heard men cavil at Basil's orthodoxy, and assert that he did not hold the Divinity of the Third Person in the Trinity; and humbly asked him, for the sake of silencing his detractors—he himself had no doubt—to express in definite words what he held as the true doctrine ( Ep
Back to Christ - The Christ of dogma is Christ as exhibited in the creeds—the eternally begotten Son of God, the second Person in the Trinity, who, for our redemption, assumed our human nature and submitted to death as an atonement for our sins. To believe the gospel is no longer, in the first place at least, to receive God’s message of love and forgiveness, and to obey His summons to repentance, trust, and service; it is to believe that Jesus is Messiah, a pre-existent, heavenly Being, the second Person in the Trinity
Donatus And Donatism - "...
It was probably soon after the cessation of the persecution that Gratus, Caecilian's successor, summoned a synod at Carthage, which established (1) the non-iteration of baptism, when duly administered in the name of the Trinity; (2) the necessary restrictions on reverence for martyrs, and on the assignment of that title. You may have offices Sacraments Liturgy Gospel belief and preaching in the name of the Trinity; but you can only find salvation in the Catholic Church
Confession - And God has given to him all power ‘above every name, as well of the inhabitants of heaven as of the earth and of the powers below, that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord and God;' whom we believe, and whose coming we expect, as presently about to be Judge of the living and dead, who will render unto every man according to his actions, and has poured upon us abundantly the gift of his Holy Spirit, and the pledge of immortality; who makes us that believe and are obedient to be the sons of God and joint heirs of Christ; whom we believe and adore, one God in the Trinity of the sacred name. The confession promulgated on this occasion, and which "gave the finishing touch to what the council of Nice had left imperfect, and fixed, in a full and determinate manner, the doctrine of the Trinity, as it is still received among the generality of Christians," exactly coincides with the Nicene confession, except in the article respecting the Spirit, which it thus extends: "And I believe in the Holy Ghost, the Lord, and Giver of life, who proceedeth from the Father and the Son, who, together with the Father and the Son, is worshipped and glorified
Jesus Christ - " Without referring here to the Scriptural doctrine of a Trinity of divine Persons in the unity of the Godhead, (see Trinity, ) it is sufficient now to show that both in the Old and New Testament Scriptures, the Messiah is contemplated as a divine Person
Pelagianism And Pelagius - To this period must be assigned his earliest 3 works: the first, in 3 books, on the Trinity; the second a collection of passages from Scripture, all bearing on Christian practice, called by Gennadius Eulogiarum Liber , by Augustine and Orosius Testimoniorum Liber ; the third an exposition of the Epp. Finally Pelagius professed his belief in the doctrine of the Holy Trinity and in all the teaching of the holy Catholic church and the synod acknowledged him as a Catholic and in full communion with the church
Eunomius, Bishop of Cyzicus - This is his most famous work, in which, with much subtlety, he seeks to refute the Nicene doctrine of the Trinity, especially the co-eternal and consubstantial divinity of Christ
Law - Augustine, to bring out the Trinity, made our first and second one, and divided our tenth into coveting the wife and coveting the rest; thus, three in the first table, seven in the second
Ephesians, Book of - The provision of redemption is presented as the work of the Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit
Confession - Ignatius expresses his faith in the Trinity-‘in the Son, and in the Father, and in the Spirit’ (ad Magn
Body (2) - ’ When the time was come in the counsels of God for the redemption of mankind, the Second Person of the Holy Trinity took upon Him human flesh by the operation of the Holy Spirit in the womb of the Virgin Mary (Matthew 1:18, cf
Commission - The unity in Trinity of the Godhead is distinctly marked by the use of the singular τὸ ὄνομα instead of τὰ ὀνόματα
Joannes, Bishop of Ephesus - The Monophysites are "the orthodox," "the faithful"; their opponents "Synodites," "Nestorians," or at least "half-Nestorians"; the synod of Chalcedon is "the stumbling-block and source of confusion of the whole church"; "it sunders Christ our God into two natures after the Union, and teaches a Quaternity instead of the holy Trinity" (i
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - there is a Trinity). ...
Mohammed represents Christians as worshipping a Trinity consisting of the Father, the Son, and the Virgin Mary
Epiphanius, Bishop of Salamis - The Ancoratus comprises in 121 sections a prolix exposition full of repetitions of the doctrines of the Trinity the true humanity of Christ and the resurrection of the body with a constant polemic against Origen and the heresiarchs of his own time especially Arians Sabellians Pneumatomachi and Dimoirites (Apollinarians)
Ecclesiastes, Theology of - Ambrose finds a reference to the Trinity in the three-strand cord of 4:12
Marriage - In the Trinity the Father leads, the Son submits to the Father, and the Holy Spirit submits to both the Father and the Son
God, Names of - " The plural form is accommodating of the doctrine of the Trinity
Gifts - a similar three-fold relationship with the three Persons of the Trinity in Ephesians 4:4)
Gratianus, Emperor - of Alexandria—that is to say, should confess the one deity and equal majesty of the three persons of the Blessed Trinity, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; and further, that they alone who hold this faith are to be called Catholics , and their places of meeting churches ; while the rest are branded as heretics, and are threatened with an indefinite punishment (Cod
Word - This term is likewise consecrated and appropriated to signify the only Son of the Father, the uncreated Wisdom, the second Person of the most holy Trinity, equal to and consubstantial with the Father
Presence (2) - This threefold presence is really the basis of the doctrine of the Trinity
Pseudo-Chrysostomus - The Third Person of the Trinity is comparatively seldom mentioned, but on this head the writer's doctrine is even more distinctly heretical
Church, the - The biblical teaching on the worship of the church involves three components, which are rooted in the Trinity
Persecution - Victor, one of the early pontiffs, because the Asiatic bishops differed from him about the rule for the observation of Easter, excommunicated them as guilty of heresy; and he acted in the same manner toward a person who held what he considered as erroneous notions respecting the Trinity
Manicheans - ) maintained strongly that they baptized even infants, and that in the name of the Trinity
Timothy, First And Second, Theology of - It is interesting to note that Paul, who believed strongly in the doctrine of the Trinity and had much to say in other epistles about the Person of the Holy Spirit, did not say much in his epistles to Timothy about him
Ephesians Epistle to the - This section falls into three strophes, marked by the refrain ‘unto the praise of his glory,’ and corresponding to the three Persons of the Trinity
Eternal Life, Eternality, Everlasting Life - , the Trinity, the incarnation, divine self-sacrifice for sin) are only adumbrated in earlier biblical history, to be fleshed out in the fullness of time
Union With God - ), gave rise to the Catholic Christian doctrine of the Trinity or Triunity of God which was explicitly set forth by the Council of Nicaea in a
Holy, Holiness - The Holy Spirit, that is, the Spirit who both is and makes holy, is the specific title given for the third person of the Trinity in the New Testament (93 usages, cf
Teaching - Although the dogma of the Divine Trinity was the outcome of much later reflexion, the elements of a doctrine of the three-fold nature of the Divine existence emerged in the teaching of the 1st century
Revelation, the Book of - ...
A Summary of Triumph, Warning, and Judgment (14:1-20) After the depressing news of the ongoing persecutions of the unholy Trinity, John's readers need another word of encouragement and warning
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - In modern and postmodern thought Jesus' essential oneness with God the Father, his full divinity as second person of the Trinity, has been widely rejected as Hellenistic embellishment of earliest Christian belief
Holy Spirit - Third person of the Trinity. Russell, TrinityJ 7 (1986): 47-63; E
Athenagoras - The angels, too—indubitably personal beings—are mentioned as holding a place after the Trinity, in Christian theology (c
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - Whereat the people in church murmured and Basil defended himself by saying that his Syrian visitor had taught him that the insertion of the conjunction was necessary for the more clear manifestation of the doctrine of the Holy Trinity
Will - " And this seems to have been the opinion of the compilers of our excellent liturgy, in many parts of which both a prevenient and a cooperating grace is unequivocally acknowledged; particularly in the second collect for the evening service; in the fourth collect at the end of the communion service; in the collect for Easter day; in the collect for the fifth Sunday after Easter; in the collects for the third, ninth, seventeenth, nineteenth, and twenty-fifth Sundays after Trinity
Adam - Everything therefore, as to man's creation, is given in a solemn and deliberative form, and contains also an intimation of a Trinity of Persons in the Godhead, all equally possessed of creative power, and therefore Divine, to each of whom man was to stand in relations the most sacred and intimate:—"And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion," &c
Quakers - But, according to Penn, they believe in the Holy Three, or the Trinity of the Father, Word, and Spirit, agreeable to the Scripture
Persecution - Denying the Trinity in any way
Jesus Christ - This affirmation of the Trinity will later by repeated at the end of Matthew's Gospel (28:19)
John, Theology of - In fact, the Johannine language of indwelling is expressed in categories that anticipate the Trinity
Gospels (2) - If it be permissible to use in this connexion the metaphor in which the Nicene Creed endeavours to set forth the relation of the Second Person of the Trinity to the First, the ethical teaching of Christ is light generated from light
Luke, Gospel According to - Salmon, the late Provost of Trinity College, Dublin, admitted that St
Manuscripts - 1185) except one leaf, which is in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin (N
Son of God - —As the word ‘Christ,’ which was at first a title, has come to be a proper name, this change being, indeed, accomplished even in the NT, so the title ‘Son of God’ is now appropriated to the Second Person of the Trinity; and the ordinary reader of the Bible assumes this to be the meaning wherever he finds the phrase
Arius, Followers of - The word οὐσία was used to indicate the Divine Nature, while ὑπόστασις was henceforth used by the Greeks of the Persons in the Trinity
Work - The cheap imitations of the satanic anti-Trinity (Satan, the beast, and the false prophet) are deceptive and destructive
Mahometanism - ...
The Koran, indeed, every where inculcates that grand and fundamental doctrine of the unity of the supreme Being, the establishment of which was constantly alleged by the impostor as the primary object of his pretended mission; but on the subject of the Christian Trinity, its author seems to have entertained very gross and mistaken ideas, and to have been totally ignorant of the perfect consistency of that opinion with the unity of the Deity
New Testament - ...
To the outcry against hint for omitting the testimony of the three heavenly witnesses he replied, it is not omission but non-addition; even some Latin copies do not have it, and Cyril of Alexandria showed in his Thesaurus he did not know it; on the Codex Montfortianus (originally in possession of a Franciscan, Froy, who possibly wrote it, now in Trinity College, Dublin) being produced with it, Erasmus INSERTED it
Prayer - Nor are we to pray to the Trinity, as three distinct Gods; for though the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost be addressed in various parts of the Scripture, 2 Corinthians 13:14
English Versions - MS 17376, the other being at Trinity College, Dublin) it is now bound up with his religious poems
Christ in Art - The Dove, at first used as an emblem of peace, sometimes with an olive branch in its mouth (though it occurs in pictures of the Baptism of Christ in the Catacombs), was the recognized symbol of the Holy Spirit in the apsidal mosaics of the 4th and 5th centuries, and thus has continued ever since: the Lamb, the Hand of God, and the Cross (see below), found in connexion with the Dove in these mosaics, also continued as common symbols in the Middle Ages, when interlaced triangles and circles further represented the Trinity
Authority in Religion - ...
What may be called, then, a qualitative analysis of Christ’s conception of religion reveals the fact, that it contains this Trinity of elements bound together in the indissoluble unity of the rational soul
Christianity - It not only professes to be from God, but to have been taught to men by the Son of God incarnate in our nature, the Second Person in the adorable Trinity of divine Persons, "the same in substance, equal in power and glory
Paul - There are not a few indications of the amplitude of the gospel preached by him amongst them-as, for instance, in the very first lines of the Epistle, a reference to the Trinity of Christian graces, faith, love, and hope
Monophysitism - The effect of these prolonged controversies has undoubtedly been to clear up the confusion which long existed in the Christian mind about the relations of the three Persons (or distinctions ) in the Trinity, and of the two natures in the one Christ
Text of the New Testament - Codex Dublinensis , at Trinity College, Dublin
Ambrosius of Milan - He preached them a sermon ( de Basilicis Tradendis ), assuring them of his steadfastness, and encouraging them to confidence, and at the same time gave them hymns composed by himself to sing—hymns in honour of the Trinity—by which their fervour was greatly stimulated
Character of Christ - ’]'>[1] No platitudes as to moral paternity, no pedantic references to the Trinity, help us to understand this wondering question
Christ in Jewish Literature - Their main quarrel was with the latter; and in their theological arguments they defended the unity of God, and denied the Trinity, upon Scripture grounds, with hardly any reference to the actual Jesus
Neology - We find some of them not content with applying demonstration to the truth of the system, but endeavouring to establish each separate dogma, the Trinity, the nature of the Redeemer, the incarnation, the eternity of punishment, on philosophical and, strange as it may appear, some of these truths on mathematical, grounds
Synods - At Arles, it was decreed, that Easter should be celebrated on the same Sunday throughout the world; and that heretics, who had been baptized in the name of the Trinity, should not be rebaptized
Justinianus i, Emperor - A series of 14 articles, or anathemas, was prepared, most of them corresponding closely with the articles of Justinian's ὁμολογία πίστεως , in which the orthodox faith as to the Trinity and Incarnation was restated
Originality - He had no conception of the Trinity, or the Incarnation, or other mysteries,—no idea of Church or Sacraments
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - he approached the mystery of the Holy Trinity and the relation of the creature to the Divine Nature; in xv