What does Tree mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
δένδρον a tree. 14
עֵ֥ץ tree 12
עֵ֣ץ tree 10
ξύλου wood. 7
συκῆν a fig tree. 6
συκῆ a fig tree. 5
הָעֵ֖ץ tree 4
הָעֵ֔ץ tree 4
συκῆς a fig tree. 4
אֵל֥וֹן tree 3
עֵץ֙ tree 3
הָעֵ֗ץ tree 3
ξύλον wood. 3
הָאֵלָ֖ה terebinth 2
עֵ֛ץ tree 2
עֵ֑ץ tree 2
עֵֽץ־ tree 2
רֹ֣תֶם broom-plant 2
זַ֔יִת olive 2
תְּאֵֽנָת֔וֹ fig 2
הָעֵץ֙ tree 2
עֵ֤ץ tree 2
אֵל֣וֹן tree 2
וְעֵ֥ץ tree 2
וּתְאַשּׁ֖וּר a species of tree. 2
אִֽילָנָא֙ tree. 2
תְּאֵנָת֖וֹ fig 1
וְתַפּ֗וּחַ apple 1
תֹּ֜מֶר palm tree 1
רִמּ֞וֹן pomegranate. 1
וְתִֽמֹרָה֙ palm tree figure (as ornament). 1
הָרִמּ֖וֹן pomegranate. 1
הַתִּֽמֹרָה֙ palm tree figure (as ornament). 1
הַתִּֽמֹרָ֖ה palm tree figure (as ornament). 1
הַקּוֹרָ֔ה rafter 1
כְּעֵץ֮ tree 1
צַפְצָפָ֖ה a kind of willow 1
בְתָמָ֔ר palm tree 1
כְּתַפּ֙וּחַ֙ apple 1
עֵץ־ tree 1
כָּעֵ֣ץ tree 1
כָּ֝עֵ֗ץ tree 1
לָעֵ֗ץ tree 1
לָעֵ֜ץ tree 1
כְּעֵ֣ץ ׀ tree 1
וְעֵ֣ץ tree 1
כְּתֹ֨מֶר palm tree 1
כַּתָּמָ֣ר palm tree 1
לְתָמָ֔ר palm tree 1
מִתְּאֵנָֽה fig 1
תְּ֭אֵנָה fig 1
לַתְּאֵנָ֑ה fig 1
תְּאֵנָ֥ה fig 1
הַתְּאֵנָה֙ fig 1
תְּאֵנָֽה fig 1
וְהַתְּאֵנָ֖ה fig 1
וּתְאֵנָתִ֖י fig 1
בַּתְּאֵנָ֗ה fig 1
בִתְאֵנָה֙ fig 1
הַתְּאֵנָ֔ה fig 1
וְהַתְּאֵנָ֧ה fig 1
תְאֵנָ֣ה fig 1
שָׁקֵ֖ד almond tree 1
תָּמָ֣ר palm tree 1
הַשָּׁקֵד֙ almond tree 1
שִׁטָּ֔ה acacia tree 1
רְתָמִֽים broom-plant 1
רְתָמִ֣ים broom-plant 1
תְּאֵנָת֔וֹ fig 1
ἀγριέλαιος of or belonging to the oleaster or wild olive. / the oleaster 1
מֵעֵ֣ץ tree 1
אִֽילָנָ֜א tree. 1
הָאֶ֙רֶז֙ cedar. 1
מֵֽאֵל֜וֹן city in Naphtali. 1
הָֽאֵלָה֙ terebinth 1
כָּאֵלָ֣ה terebinth 1
הָאֵלָֽה terebinth 1
בָּאֵלָֽה terebinth 1
הָאֵלָ֨ה terebinth 1
הָאֵלָה֙ terebinth 1
אִֽילָנָ֔א tree. 1
אִֽילָנָ֖א tree. 1
הָאֶ֖שֶׁל tamarisk tree. 1
אִילָ֛ן tree. 1
אֵלֵיהֶ֛ם ram. / pillar 1
כְּאֶזְרָ֥ח a native (one rising from the soil). 1
συκομορέαν a sycomore tree. 1
συκῇ a fig tree. 1
συκαμίνῳ sycamine tree 1
ξύλῳ wood. 1
καλλιέλαιον the garden olive as opposed to the wild olive. 1
ἐλαίᾳ an olive tree. / an olive 1
ἐλαίας an olive tree. / an olive 1
הָאֶ֤שֶׁל tamarisk tree. 1
אֶ֖שֶׁל tamarisk tree. 1
הָעֵ֨ץ tree 1
עֵ֔ץ tree 1
הָעֵץ֮ tree 1
וּמֵעֵ֗ץ tree 1
וְעֵ֤ץ tree 1
הָעֵֽץ tree 1
עֵ֖ץ tree 1
הָעֵ֛ץ tree 1
וְעֵ֧ץ tree 1
ἀγριελαίου of or belonging to the oleaster or wild olive. / the oleaster 1
עֵ֨ץ tree 1
עֵ֣ץ ׀ tree 1
כִּבְר֣וֹשׁ cypress 1
עֵֽץ tree 1
כְּזַ֣יִת olive 1
הַזַּ֔יִת olive 1
לַזַּ֖יִת olive 1
כַּ֝זַּ֗יִת olive 1
זַ֤יִת olive 1
כַזַּ֖יִת olive 1
הֲדַ֑ס myrtle (tree). 1
בְר֔וֹשׁ cypress 1
בְּר֛וֹשׁ cypress 1
הַתַּפּ֙וּחַ֙ apple 1

Definitions Related to Tree

G1186


   1 a Tree.
   

H6086


   1 Tree, wood, timber, stock, plank, stalk, stick, gallows.
      1a Tree, trees.
      1b wood, pieces of wood, gallows, firewood, cedar-wood, woody flax.
      

G3586


   1 wood.
      1a that which is made of wood.
         1a1 as a beam from which any one is suspended, a gibbet, a cross.
         1a2 a log or timber with holes in which the feet, hands, neck of prisoners were inserted and fastened with thongs.
         1a3 a fetter, or shackle for the feet.
         1a4 a cudgel, stick, staff.
   2 a Tree.
   

G4808


   1 a fig Tree.
   

H436


   1 Tree, great Tree, terebinth.
   2 plain.
   

H424


   1 terebinth, terebinth Tree.
   2 valley where David killed Goliath.
   

H2132


   1 olive, olive Tree.
      1a olive Tree.
      1b olives.
   2 mountain facing Jerusalem on the east side.
   

H8391


   1 a species of Tree.
      1a box Tree—a small evergreen Tree.
      1b perhaps cypress or cedar.
      

H8561


   1 palm Tree figure (as ornament).
   

H8384


   1 fig, fig Tree.
   

H7574


   1 broom-plant, retem.
      1a a kind of broom plant.
      

H363


   1 Tree.
   

H7416


   1 pomegranate.
      1a as Tree.
      1b as fruit.
      1c as pomegranate shaped ornaments in temple.
      

H8558


   1 palm Tree, date palm.
   

H8598


   1 apple, apple Tree.
      1a apple Tree.
      1b apples.
      

H438


   1 city in Naphtali.
   2 a Simeonite.
   Additional Information: Allon = “great Tree” or “oak”.
   

H8560


   1 palm Tree, post, column.
   

G2565


   1 the garden olive as opposed to the wild olive.
   

G65


   1 of or belonging to the oleaster or wild olive.
   2 the oleaster, wild olive Tree.
   

G1636


   1 an olive Tree.
   2 an olive, the fruit of an olive Tree.
   

G4809


   1 a sycomore Tree.
   

G4807


   1 sycamine Tree, having the form and foliage of the mulberry, but fruit resembling the fig.
   

H249


   1 a native (one rising from the soil).
      1a of man, native Israelites.
      1b of Tree, native (to Israel).
      

H352


   1 ram.
      1a ram (as food).
      1b ram (as sacrifice).
      1c ram (skin dyed red, for tabernacle).
   2 pillar, door post, jambs, pilaster.
   3 strong man, leader, chief.
   4 mighty Tree, terebinth.
   

H6851


   1 a kind of willow, willow Tree.
   

H8247


   1 almond Tree, almonds.
      1a almond (the nut).
      1b almond-Tree.
      

H815


   1 tamarisk Tree.
   

H6982


   1 rafter, beam.
   

H730


   1 cedar.
      1a cedar Tree.
      1b cedar timber, cedar wood (in building).
      1c cedar wood (in purifications).
      

H1918


   1 myrtle (Tree).
   

H1265


   1 cypress, fir, juniper, pine.
      1a a noble Tree (lit.
      ).
      1b of stateliness (fig.
      ).
      1c material for temple.
      

H7848


   1 acacia Tree, acacia wood.
   

Frequency of Tree (original languages)

Frequency of Tree (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Candleberry Tree
A shrub (the Myrica cerifera, or wax-bearing myrtle), common in North America, the little nuts of which are covered with a greenish white wax, which was formerly, used for hardening candles; - also called bayberry tree, bayberry, or candleberry.
Webster's Dictionary - Bito Tree
A small scrubby tree (Balanites Aegyptiaca) growing in dry regions of tropical Africa and Asia.
Webster's Dictionary - Cow Tree
A tree (Galactodendron utile or Brosimum Galactodendron) of South America, which yields, on incision, a nourishing fluid, resembling milk.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Olive Olive-Tree
Olive, Olive-Tree. 1 Kings 6:23. The olive, olea Europæa. It grows plentifully almost everywhere near the shores of the Mediterranean, and is abundant in Palestine. Deuteronomy 6:11; Deuteronomy 8:8. Olive yards are therefore commonly mentioned as a considerable part of a man's property. 1 Samuel 8:14; 1 Chronicles 27:28. This tree flourishes in Syria, in warm and sunny situations, on a rocky soil, at a height not greater than about 3000 feet above the level of the sea. It increases slowly to a moderate altitude of twenty or thirty feet, with a knotty trunk, and numerous extended branches. The leaves grow in pairs, of a pale dusty color, and are not deciduous. The white flowers appear in June; and the fruit is an oblong berry, first green, and, when fully ripe, a blackish-purple. The wood is something like box, but softer, with dark gray veins. The olive tree lives to a great age. With an olive leaf in her mouth the dove returned to Noah when the waters of the flood were abated. Genesis 8:11. The high estimation in which the olive tree was held is seen by its being placed first in Jotham's parable. Judges 9:8-9. And it is often mentioned as indicating plenty, prosperity, and strength; the allusion taking its force from the products, from the evergreen character, and the protracted existence of the tree, e.g., Psalms 52:8, an olive being often planted in the court of a building, Psalms 128:3, young shoots springing, from an old trunk; Jeremiah 11:16; Hosea 14:6. And various applications of the berries are referred to, Deuteronomy 24:20, the oil, Leviticus 24:2, which was an article of commerce, 1 Kings 5:11, and the wood, 6:31-33.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Palm Palm Tree
Palm, Palm Tree. Exodus 15:27; Leviticus 23:40; Deuteronomy 34:3. There are several hundred species of palm; but the Phœnix dactylifera, or date-palm, is that which, growing in Palestine, is often referred to in Scripture. Its fruit furnishes a considerable part of subsistence to the inhabitants of Egypt, Persia, and Arabia. A conserve is also made of it with sugar; while the stones are ground in the handmills for the food of camels. Baskets, bags, mate, etc., are manufactured of the leaves; the trunk is split up, and is serviceable in various ways; the weblike integuments at the bases of the leaves are twisted into ropes: the sap is collected, and is at first a sweetish mild beverage, but afterwards ferments, and a kind of arrack is produced from it by distillation. Every part, therefore, of the tree has its use. The names of many places show that palms were abundant: Elim, Elath, Hazezon-tamar—"felling of palm tree"—Genesis 14:6; Bethany, "house of dates." John 11:1; John 12:13.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Apple Tree
A tree known in the Old Testament for its fruit, shade, beauty, and fragrance (Joel 1:12 ; Proverbs 25:11 ; Song of Song of Solomon 2:3 ,Song of Song of Solomon 2:5 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:8 ; Song of Song of Solomon 8:5 ). Some scholars doubt that the Hebrew text is referring to the apple tree. They think the common apple tree was only recently introduced to Palestine, and that the wild variety hardly matches the description given to the tree and its fruit in the Bible. The citron, quince, and apricot have been proposed as the tree spoken of in the Bible. Of the three, the apricot seems to have the best support. Having been introduced from China prior to the time of Abraham, the apricot is widespread in Palestine. When conditions for it are right, the apricot tree can grow to a height of about thirty feet with spreading branches, which make it a good shade tree. Hebrew tappuach “apple” does appear as a place name in the Bible and may indicate apple trees were known as unusual occurrences in some Palestinian sites.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Chestnut Tree
CHESTNUT TREE ( ‘armôn , Genesis 30:37 , Ezekiel 31:8 . RV [1] plane ). There is no doubt that the RV [1] is correct. The chestnut tree is only an exotic in Palestine, but the plane (Arab. [3] dilb ) is one of the finest trees of the land. It attains great development; a wonderful specimen, which has a small room or shop within its hollow trunk, is to be seen in one of the streets of Damascus. The plane ( Planus orientalis ) peels its outer layers of bark annually, leaving a white streaky surface. It flourishes specially by watercourses ( Sir 24:14 ).
E. W. G. Masterman.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Shittah Tree
SHITTAH TREE ( shittâh , Isaiah 41:19 RV [1] ‘ acacia tree’; shittim wood [2] Exodus 25:5 ; Exodus 25:10 ; Exodus 25:13 ; Exodus 26:15 ; Exodus 26:26 ; Exodus 27:1 ; Exodus 27:6 , Deuteronomy 10:3 , RV [1] ‘acacia wood’). shittâh was originally shintâh , and is equivalent to Arab. [4] sunt , which is the Acacia nilotica ; but the word no doubt included other desert acacias. The seyât of the Arabs, which includes the gum-arabic tree ( A. seyat ), and A. tortilis would both furnish suitable wood. Both these trees are plentiful around the Dead Sea, particularly at ‘Ain Jidy .
E. W. G. Masterman.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Holm Tree
Small, holly-like, evergreen oak (Quercus ilex ). The identity of the tree of Isaiah 44:14 is disputed: cypress (NAS, NIV); ilex (REB); holm oak or tree (NAS margin, NRSV); oak (TEV).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fig Tree
The Bible supposes the presence of the fig-tree throughout all Palestine, and regards it as one of the characteristic products of the land (Deuteronomy 8), together with the vine, so that a land which has neither fig-tree nor vine is considered wretched (Numbers 20). Figs, with other fruit, were brought back from Palestine by the envoys of Moses to give an idea of the fertility of the land (Numbers 13). The tree loses its leaves during the winter, but these begin to grow again towards the end of March, or the beginning of April. As early as the end of February, little figs grow at the junction of the old wood and the leaves, but they develop only to the size of a cherry, are inedible, and soon fall for the most part. The few that continue to develop ripen in June, and are "the figs of the first season," described as "very good" (Jeremiah 24). In the meantime other buds grow which form the real crop, ripe in August. Figs were eaten fresh or dried, and in the latter case were pressed into solid cakes (1 Kings 25). Figs were also used for medicinal purposes as in the poultice which healed the boil of Ezechias (4Kings 20). Both the sweet fruit and the abundant foliage, which protects from the sun, are often referred to in Scripture, in descriptions of peace and prosperity (Judges 9; 3Kings 4). The fig-tree figures in the New Testament in the symbolic action of Our Lord (Matthew 21; Mark 11), which is a reminder of the symbolic actions of the prophets of the Old Testament. Other references in the New Testament to the fig-tree and figs are in Matthew 7,24; John 1; James 3; Apocalypse 6.
The parable of the Barren Fig-tree is given in Luke 13, in connection with the call to repentance, inspired by recent misfortunes which should cause the nation of Israel to think, else destruction awaits them. The parable speaks of a fig-tree, planted in a vineyard. After a lapse of time which would allow the tree to grow to the bearing stage, the owner comes three years in succession, but finds no fruit. Disappointed by continual failure which leaves no hope for the future, the owner orders the tree cut down, but at the request of the vine dresser he consents to try again and to spare the tree for another year. The vine dresser hopes that additional care may help the tree to bear fruit. The application of the parable to the case of Israel is sufficiently clear to need no further explanation. Like the fig-tree Israel receives special care from God; the mission of Christ is the last of those proofs of the Divine love for the nation, and if the people fail to respond and to heed the call, they are doomed to destruction.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Almond-Tree
This tree resembles a peach-tree, but is larger. In Palestine, it blossoms in January, and in March has fruit. Its blossoms are white. Its Hebrew name signifies a watcher, and to this there is an allusion in Jeremiah 1:11 . In Ecclesiastes 12:5 , the hoary head is beautifully compared with the almond-tree, both on account of its snowy whiteness and its winter blossoming.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Tree
TREE . ‘Tree’ is used as a poetic name for the Cross in Acts 5:30 ; Acts 10:39 ; Acts 13:29 , 1 Peter 2:24 ; cf. Galatians 3:12 . For sacred trees see High Place, 1 ; and Israel, ii. 1 (5); and, for the various trees of the Bible, the artt. under their respective names.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Turpentine Tree
TURPENTINE TREE . See Terebinth.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Teil Tree
(An old name for the lime-tree, the tilia), Isaiah 6:13 , the terebinth, or turpentine-tree, the Pistacia terebinthus of botanists. The Hebrew word here used (elah) is rendered oak (q.v.) in Genesis 35:4 ; Judges 6:11,19 ; Isaiah 1:29 , etc. In Isaiah 61:3 it is rendered in the plural "trees;" Hosea 4:13 , "elm" (RSV, "terebinth"). Hosea 4:13 , "elm" (RSV, "terebinth"). In 1 Samuel 17:2,19 it is taken as a proper name, "Elah" (RSV marg., "terebinth"). "The terebinth of Mamre, or its lineal successor, remained from the days of Abraham till the fourth century of the Christian era, and on its site Constantine erected a Christian church, the ruins of which still remain."
This tree "is seldom seen in clumps or groves, never in forests, but stands isolated and weird-like in some bare ravine or on a hill-side where nothing else towers above the low brushwood" (Tristram).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Palm Tree
(Heb. tamar), the date-palm characteristic of Palestine. It is described as "flourishing" (Psalm 92:12 ), tall (Song of Solomon 7:7 ), "upright" (Jeremiah 10:5 ). Its branches are a symbol of victory (Revelation 7:9 ). "Rising with slender stem 40 or 50, at times even 80, feet aloft, its only branches, the feathery, snow-like, pale-green fronds from 6 to 12 feet long, bending from its top, the palm attracts the eye wherever it is seen." The whole land of Palestine was called by the Greeks and Romans Phoenicia, i.e., "the land of palms." Tadmor in the desert was called by the Greeks and Romans Palmyra, i.e., "the city of palms." The finest specimens of this tree grew at Jericho (Deuteronomy 34:3 ) and Engedi and along the banks of the Jordan. Branches of the palm tree were carried at the feast of Tabernacles (Leviticus 23:40 ). At our Lord's triumphal entrance into Jerusalem the crowds took palm branches, and went forth to meet him, crying, "Hosanna: Blessed is the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord" (Matthew 21:8 ; John 12:13 ). (See DATE .)
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Box-Tree
(Heb. teashshur), mentioned in Isaiah 60:13 ; 41:19 , was, according to some, a species of cedar growing in Lebanon. The words of Ezekiel 27:6 literally translated are, "Thy benches they have made of ivory, the daughter of the ashur tree," i.e., inlaid with ashur wood. The ashur is the box-tree, and accordingly the Revised Version rightly reads "inlaid in box wood." This is the Buxus sempervirens of botanists. It is remarkable for the beauty of its evergreen foliage and for the utility of its hard and durable wood.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Oil-Tree
(Isaiah 41:19 ; RSV marg., "oleaster"), Heb. 'etz shemen, rendered "olive tree" in 1 Kings 6:23,31,32,33 (RSV, "olive wood") and "pine branches" in Nehemiah 8:15 (RSV, "branches of wild olive"), was some tree distinct from the olive. It was probably the oleaster (Eleagnus angustifolius), which grows abundantly in almost all parts of Palestine, especially about Hebron and Samaria. "It has a fine hard wood," says Tristram, "and yields an inferior oil, but it has no relationship to the olive, which, however, it resembles in general appearance."
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Teil Tree,
[1]
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Pine Tree
Heb. tidhar, mentioned along with the fir-tree in Isaiah 41:19 ; 60:13 . This is probably the cypress; or it may be the stone-pine, which is common on the northern slopes of Lebanon. Some suppose that the elm, others that the oak, or holm, or ilex, is meant by the Hebrew word. In Nehemiah 8:15 the Revised Version has "wild olive" instead of "pine." (See FIR .)
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Olive-Tree
Is frequently mentioned in Scripture. The dove from the ark brought an olive-branch to Noah (Genesis 8:11 ). It is mentioned among the most notable trees of Palestine, where it was cultivated long before the time of the Hebrews (Deuteronomy 6:11 ; 8:8 ). It is mentioned in the first Old Testament parable, that of Jotham (Judges 9:9 ), and is named among the blessings of the "good land," and is at the present day the one characteristic tree of Palestine. The oldest olive-trees in the country are those which are enclosed in the Garden of Gethsemane. It is referred to as an emblem of prosperity and beauty and religious privilege (Psalm 52:8 ; Jeremiah 11:16 ; Hosea 14:6 ). The two "witnesses" mentioned in Revelation 11:4 are spoken of as "two olive trees standing before the God of the earth." (Compare Zechariah 4:3,11-14 .) The "olive-tree, wild by nature" (Romans 11:24 ), is the shoot or cutting of the good olive-tree which, left ungrafted, grows up to be a "wild olive." In Romans 11:17 Paul refers to the practice of grafting shoots of the wild olive into a "good" olive which has become unfruitful. By such a process the sap of the good olive, by pervading the branch which is "graffed in," makes it a good branch, bearing good olives. Thus the Gentiles, being a "wild olive," but now "graffed in," yield fruit, but only through the sap of the tree into which they have been graffed. This is a process "contrary to nature" (11:24).
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Sycamine Tree
is mentioned only in (Luke 17:6 ) There is no reason to doubt that the sycamine is distinct from the sycamore of the same evangelist. (Luke 19:4 ) The sycamine is the mulberry tree (Morus ). Both black and white mulberry trees are common in Syria and Palestine.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Mulberry Tree
The word baka is supposed to be from a root signifying 'weeping,' and to refer to some tree that distils an odoriferous gum; but what tree is alluded to is unknown. David was to wait for some secret sign from God in the mulberry trees before attacking the enemy. 2 Samuel 5:23,24 ; 1 Chronicles 14:14,15 ; Psalm 84:6 margin. The true mulberry is supposed to be the tree called in the A.V. SYCAMINE,q.v.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Shittah-Tree
(Isaiah 41:19 ; RSV, "acacia tree"). Shittah wood was employed in making the various parts of the tabernacle in the wilderness, and must therefore have been indigenous in the desert in which the Israelites wandered. It was the acacia or mimosa (Acacia Nilotica and A. seyal). "The wild acacia (Mimosa Nilotica), under the name of Sunt , Everywhere represents the seneh, or senna, of the burning bush. A slightly different form of the tree, equally common under the name of Seyal , Is the ancient 'shittah,' or, as more usually expressed in the plural form, the 'shittim,' of which the tabernacle was made." Stanley's Sinai, etc. ( Exodus 25:10,13,23,28 ).
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Fig Tree
1: συκῆ (Strong's #4808 — Noun Feminine — suke or sukea — soo-kay' ) "a fig tree," is found in Matthew 21:19,20,21 ; 24:32 ; Mark 11:13,20,21 ; 13:28 ; Luke 13:6,7 ; 21:29 ; John 1:48,50 ; James 3:12 ; Revelation 6:13 (see sukon, above).
Note: A "fig tree" with leaves must have young fruits already, or it will be barren for the season. The first figs ripen in late May or early June. The tree in Mark 11:13 should have had fruit, unripe indeed, but existing. In some lands "fig trees" bear the early fruit under the leaves and the later fruit above the leaves. In that case the leaves were a sign that there should have been fruit, unseen from a distance, underneath the leaves. The condemnation of this fig tree lay in the absence of any sign of fruit.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Tree of Life
1. Sources.-There are three sources for our knowledge of the idea of the tree of life: the OT, Jewish apocalypses and Jewish theology, and ethnic legends.
(1) In the OT the tree of life appears neither in Psalms nor in the Prophets, but only in Genesis and Proverbs. The Genesis story (Genesis 2:9; Genesis 3:22) intimates that there are two objects which man would grasp at-knowledge and immortality. It has been maintained, however, that in Genesis 2:9 the tree of life is a later addition, and was inserted only when the idea of the under world had suffered such a change that immortality became an object of desire (K. Budde, Die biblische Urgeschichte untersuch?, Giessen, 1883, p. 53 f.; but cf. A. Dillmann, Genesis, Eng. translation , Edinburgh, 1897, i. 121 f.). In any case, by reason of his sin man was not permitted to eat of the fruit of this tree, which signified fullness of life. Driven out from the Garden of Eden, he was effectually debarred from this Divine good. In Proverbs (Proverbs 3:18; Proverbs 11:30; Proverbs 13:12; Proverbs 15:4) wisdom, the fruit of the righteous, desire fulfilled, and a wholesome tongue are each a ‘tree of life.’ The reference is not to the recovery of a lost, or to the winning of a future, but to the enjoyment of a present, good (cf. Budde, op. cit., p. 85f.).
(2) In Jewish apocalyptic three constant factors are associated with the tree of life: it is in Paradise; the righteous have access to its fruit; it will be available only after the judgment. Its first appearance is in Enoch, xxiv. 1-6, xxv. 4-6, xxxi. 1-3 (cf. Slavonic Enoch, viii. 3-5, 4 Ezr_7:123; Ezr_8:52, Pss.- Son_14:3, Test, of Levi, xviii.-a Christian interpolation [1]). According to Jewish theology, its branches cover the whole of Paradise, and it has 500,000 kinds of taste and smell (F. Weber, Jüd. Theologie2, Leipzig, 1897, p. 346; A. Wünsche, Die Sagen vom Lebensbaum und Lebenswasser, Leipzig, 1905).
(3) All Oriental religions which have risen above the nature stage have their legends of a tree of life. Sometimes it appears in a simple, at other times in a fantastic, form; but whoever, even a god, partakes of its fruit or its sap renews and preserves his life (cf. E. Schrader, Jahrbücher für protestantische Theologie i. [2] 124 ff.; W. W. von Baudissin, Studien zur semitischen Religionsgeschichte, ii. [3] 189 ff.; Friedrich Delitzsch, Wo lag das Paradies?, Leipzig, 1881, p. 148 f.). In the Babylonian-Assyrian circle this tree was date-palm, cedar, or vine (F. R. Tennant, The Sources of the Doctrines of the Fall and Original Sin, Cambridge, 1903, p. 49; T. G. Pinches, The OT in the Light of the Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia2, London, 1903, p. 71 ff.). In the Gilgamesh Epic the hero obtained a scion from the ‘plant of life’ which healed his mortal illness (cf. B. Meissner, Ein altbabylon. Fragment des Gilgamosepos, Berlin, 1902; A. Jeremias, Die babylonisch-assyrischen Vorstellungen vom Leben nach dem Tode, Leipzig, 1887, p. 93). In the Zend-Avesta the tree of life is the white Haoma-death-destroyer-similar to a grape vine, with plentiful buds and jasmine-like leaves; whoever eats of the fruit becomes immortal (SBE [4] xxiii. [2] 20; cf. Rigveda, X. xcvii. 17). The Hindu tree of life grows in the midst of water; whoever looks on it is made young.
Much that is fantastic and unreliable has been written by Assyriologists concerning the tree of life. Two facts, however, stand out as incontestable: there was throughout the ancient world a worship of trees, and man’s dependence on particular trees for support of life offered the basis for a profound religious suggestion. ‘The tree had always been the seat of Divine life and the intermediary between Divine and human nature.… In the holy tree the Divine life is bringing itself closer to man’ (W. M. Ramsay, The Letters to the Seven Churches of Asia, London, 1904, p. 248).
2. In Revelation.-The dependence of the idea of the tree of life in Revelation (Revelation 2:7; Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14) upon earlier, especially Jewish, conceptions is evident. The legend has been traced to an Arabian or North African oasis, thence to Babylon, where the habitat of the tree became a garden; thence the Hebrews derived it (G. A. Barton, A Sketch of Semitic Origins, New York, 1902, p. 95 f.). With the shifting fortunes of Jerusalem, the garden was transformed into a city. The apocalyptists show this transformation under way. They picture the future as a garden (Enoch, xxiv., xxv.); then as a city-Jerusalem (Pss.- Solomon 17:33 f.; J. R. Harris, The Odes and Psalms of Solomon, Cambridge, 1909); finally, it is a city indeed, but with a garden enclosed (Revelation 21; Revelation 22:2; cf. also R. H. Charles, The Book of the Secrets of Enoch, Oxford, 1912, p. 53). Ezekiel 47:12 has been influential here. In the prophet’s vision, on each side of the river grow all trees bearing new fruits according to their months, which shall be for food, and their leaves for healing. The picture in the Revelation is of a city, in the midst of which is a garden; through this flows a river, on each bank of which is the tree of life (a word used collectively)-a row of trees bearing either twelve manner of fruits (Authorized Version , Revised Version ) or twelve crops (Revised Version margin). In the garden of God, then, grows the tree of life. For those who have been purified by faith, the doom man brought on himself in Eden, of prohibition from its food, is repealed. All that Judaism had lost, or mythology dreamed of, or Christianity awakened in the soul in the way of immortal longing was restored and fulfilled in the world to come. Not only is the fruit for food, but even the leaves have healing virtue. How this therapeutic property of the leaves is to be available for the ‘nations’ (cf. Revelation 21:24-27, Isaiah 60:3; Enoch, xxv. 4-6)-those not yet belonging to the New Jerusalem-is problematic. It may suggest the present functions of the Church in respect of social ills, or imply that after the Parousia the citizens of the city will have a ministry towards those outside, or, yet again, indicate that the writer had not fully assimilated the ideal proposed by Ezekiel (cf. C. A. Scott, Revelation [6], London, n.d., p. 297).
C. A. Beckwith.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Fir Tree
KJV term for a tree most often identified with the aleppo pine (NIV, REB, TEV). Others have identified the tree with the juniper (NAS at Isaiah 41:19 and Isaiah 60:13 only) or cypress (NRSV, NAS elsewhere). See Plants in the Bible .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Sycamine Tree
Mentioned only in Luke 17:6 . It is rendered by Luther "mulberry tree" (q.v.), which is most probably the correct rendering. It is found of two species, the black mulberry (Morus nigra) and the white mulberry (Mourea), which are common in Palestine. The silk-worm feeds on their leaves. The rearing of them is one of the chief industries of the peasantry of Lebanon and of other parts of the land. It is of the order of the fig-tree. Some contend, however, that this name denotes the sycamore-fig of Luke 19:4 .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Bay Tree
Named only in Psalm 37:35 , Authorized Version. The Hebrew word so rendered is Ereh , which simply means "native born", i.e., a tree not transplanted, but growing on its native soil, and therefore luxuriantly. If the psalmist intended by this word to denote any particular tree, it may have been the evergreen bay laurel (Laurus nobilis), which is a native of Palestine. Instead of "like a green bay tree" in the Authorized Version, the Revised Version has, "like a green tree in its native soil."
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Tree of Life
Stood also in the midst of the garden of Eden (Genesis 2:9 ; 3:22 ). Some writers have advanced the opinion that this tree had some secret virtue, which was fitted to preserve life. Probably the lesson conveyed was that life was to be sought by man, not in himself or in his own power, but from without, from Him who is emphatically the Life (John 1:4 ; 14:6 ). Wisdom is compared to the tree of life (Proverbs 3:18 ). The "tree of life" spoken of in the Book of Revelation (Revelation 2:7 ; 22:2,14 ) is an emblem of the joys of the celestial paradise.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Tree of the Knowledge of Good And Evil
Stood in the midst of the garden of Eden, beside the tree of life (Genesis 23,3 ). Adam and Eve were forbidden to take of the fruit which grew upon it. But they disobeyed the divine injunction, and so sin and death by sin entered our world and became the heritage of Adam's posterity. (See ADAM .)
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Mulberry Tree
בכא , 2 Samuel 5:23-24 ; 1 Chronicles 14:14-15 ; Psalms 84:7 . The LXX, in Chronicles, render the word by απιων , "pear trees;" so Aquila and the Vulgate, both in Samuel and Chronicles, "purorum." Others translate it the "mulberry tree:" More probably it is the large shrub which the Arabs still call "baca;" and which gave name to the valley where it abounded. Of this valley Celsius remarks, that it was "rugged and embarrassed with bushes and stones, which could not be passed through without labour and tears;" referring to Psalms 84:7 ; and the "rough valley," Deuteronomy 21:4 ; and he quotes from a manuscript of Abu'l Fideli a description of the tree which grew there, and mentions it as bearing a fruit of an acrid taste.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Fig Tree
תאגה , Genesis 3:7 ; Numbers 13:23 ; συκη , Matthew 7:16 ; Matthew 21:19 ; Matthew 24:32 ; Mark 11:13 ; Mark 11:20-21 ; Mark 13:28 ; Luke 6:44 ; Luke 13:6-7 ; Luke 21:29 ; John 1:48 ; James 3:12 ; Revelation 6:13 . This tree was very common in Palestine. It becomes large, dividing into many branches, which are furnished with leaves shaped like those of the mulberry, and affords a friendly shade. Accordingly, we read, in the Old Testament, of Juda and Israel dwelling, or sitting securely, every man under his fig tree, 1 Kings 4:25 ; Micah 4:4 ; Zechariah 3:10 ; 1Ma_14:12 . And, in the New Testament, we find Nathanael under a fig tree, probably for the purposes of devotional retirement, John 1:49-51 . Hasselquist, in his journey from Nazareth to Tiberias, says, "We refreshed ourselves under the shade of a fig tree, where a shepherd and his herd had their rendezvous; but without either house or hut." The fruit which it bears is produced from the trunk and large branches, and not from the smaller shoots, as in most other trees. It is soft, sweet, and very nourishing. Milton is of opinion that the banian tree was that with the leaves of which our first parents made themselves aprons. But his account, as to the matter of fact, wants even probability to countenance it; for the leaves of this are so far from being, as he has described them, of the bigness of an Amazonian target, that they seldom or never exceed five inches in length, and three in breadth. Therefore, we must look for another of the fig kind, that better answers the purpose referred to by Moses, Genesis 3:7 ; and as the fruit of the banana tree, is often, by the most ancient authors, called a fig, may we not suppose this to have been the fig tree of paradise? Pliny, describing this tree, says that its leaves were the greatest and most shady of all others; and as the leaves of these are often six feet long, and about two broad, are thin, smooth, and very flexible, they may be deemed more proper than any other for the covering spoken of, especially since they may be easily joined together with the numerous threadlike filaments, which may, without labour, be peeled from the body of the tree. The first ripe fig is still called boccore in the Levant, which is nearly its Hebrew name, בכורה , Jeremiah 24:2 . Thus Dr. Shaw, in giving an account of the fruits in Barbary, mentions "the black and white boccore, or ‘early fig,' which is produced in June, though the kermes, or kermouse, the ‘fig,' probably so called, which they preserve and make up into cakes, is rarely ripe before August." And on Nahum 3:12 , he observes, that "the boccores drop as soon as they are ripe, and, according to the beautiful allusion of the prophet, fall into the mouth of the eater upon being shaken." Farther, "It frequently falls out in Barbary," says he; "and we need not doubt of the like in this hotter climate of Judea, that, according to the quality of the preceding season, some of the more forward and vigorous trees will now and then yield a few ripe figs six weeks or more before the full season. Something like this may be alluded to by the Prophet Hosea, when he says, ‘I saw your fathers as בכורה , the first ripe, in the fig tree, at her first time,' Hosea 9:10 . Such figs were reckoned a great dainty." See Isaiah 28:4 . The Prophet Isaiah gave orders to apply a lump of figs to Hezekiah's boil; and immediately after it was cured. God, in effecting this miraculous cure, was pleased to order the use of means not improper for that end.
2. The account of our Saviour's denunciation against the barren fig tree, Matthew 21:19 ; Mark 11:13 , has occasioned some of the boldest cavils of infidelity; and the vindication of it has exercised the ingenuity of several of the most learned critics and commentators. The whole difficulty arises from the circumstance of his disappointment in not finding fruit on the tree, when it is expressly said, that "the time of figs was not yet." While it was supposed that this expression signified, that the time for such trees to bring forth fruit was not yet come, it looked very unaccountable that Christ should reckon a tree barren, though it had leaves, and curse it as such, when he knew that the time of bearing figs was not come; and that he should come to seek figs on this tree, when he knew that figs were not used to be ripe so soon in the year. But the expression does not signify the time of the coming forth of figs, but the time of the gathering in of ripe figs, as is plain from the parallel expressions. Thus, "the time of the fruit,"
Matthew 21:34 , most plainly signifies the time of gathering in ripe fruits, since the servants were sent to receive those fruits for their master's use. St. Mark and St. Luke express the same by the word time, or season: "At the season he sent a servant," &c; that is, at the season or time of gathering in ripe fruit, Mark 12:2 ; Luke 20:10 . In like manner, if any one should say in our language, the season of fruit, the season of apples, the season of figs, every one would understand him to speak of the season or time of gathering in these fruits. When, therefore, St. Mark says, that "the time or season of figs was not yet," he evidently means that the time of gathering ripe figs was not yet past; and, if so, it was natural to expect figs upon all those trees that were not barren; whereas, after the time of gathering figs, no one would expect to find them on a fig tree, and its having none then would be no sign of barrenness. St. Mark, by saying, "For the time of figs was not yet," does not design to give a reason for "his finding nothing but leaves;" but he gives a reason for what he said in the clause before: "He came, if haply he might find any thereon;" and it was a good reason for our Saviour's coming and seeking figs on the tree, because the time for their being gathered was not come. We have other like instances in the Gospels, and, indeed, in the writings of all mankind, of another clause coming in between the assertion and the proof. Thus, in this very evangelist: "They said among themselves, Who shall roll away the stone from the door of the sepulchre? and when they looked, they saw the stone was rolled away; for it was very great:" Mark 16:3-4 ; where its being very great is not assigned as a reason of its being rolled away, but of the women's wishing for some one to roll it away for them. St. Matthew informs us that the tree was "in the way," that is, in the common road, and therefore, probably, no particular person's property; but if it was, being barren, the timber might be as serviceable to the owner as before. So that here was no real injury; but Jesus was pleased to make use of this innocent miracle to prefigure the speedy ruin of the Jewish nation on account of its unfruitfulness under greater advantages than any other people enjoyed at that day; and, like all the rest of his miracles, it was done with a gracious intention, namely, to alarm his countrymen, and induce them to repent. In the blasting of this barren fig tree, the distant appearance of which was so fair and promising, he delivered one more awful lesson to a degenerate nation, of whose hypocritical exterior and flattering but delusive pretensions it was a just and striking emblem.
Webster's Dictionary - Amber Tree
A species of Anthospermum, a shrub with evergreen leaves, which, when bruised, emit a fragrant odor.
Webster's Dictionary - Bay Tree
A species of laurel. (Laurus nobilis).
Webster's Dictionary - Caper Tree
See Capper, a plant, 2.
Webster's Dictionary - Crab Tree
See under Crab.
Webster's Dictionary - Bully Tree
The name of several West Indian trees of the order Sapotaceae, as Dipholis nigra and species of Sapota and Mimusops. Most of them yield a substance closely resembling gutta-percha.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Holm Tree
HOLM TREE . See Cypress.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Teil Tree
KJV term meaning, “lime” or “linden tree,” used to translate a Hebrew term generally rendered oak or terebinth (Isaiah 6:13 ). See Plants in the Bible ; Terebinth .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Box Tree
KJV, REB and NAS translation in Isaiah 41:19 ; Isaiah 60:13 . The box tree grows in Asia Minor and Persia but does not occur in Palestine. The tree has been identified as the pine (NRSV) or cypress (TEV, NIV). “Box tree”is based on early Greek and Latin translations. The Hebrew word means, “to be straight” and apparently refers to the tall, majestic cypress trees. Such wonders of nature reflect the greatness of the Creator (Isaiah 41:20 ).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Oil Tree
OIL TREE ( ‘çts-shemen , 1 Kings 6:23 ] 1 Kings 6:31-33 [1], AV [2] ‘olive tree,’ mg. ‘trees of oil’ or ‘oily trees,’ RV [3] ‘olive wood’; Nehemiah 8:15 AV [2] ‘ pine branches ,’ RV [3] ‘branches of wild olive’; Isaiah 41:19 AV [2] and RV [3] ‘oil tree,’ RVm [3]7 ‘oleaster’). Where there is such variation in translation, it is evident that what particular ‘tree of oil’ is here referred to is far from determined. The olive itself is improbable from Nehemiah 8:15 , where the olive tree is mentioned just before; and that the branches of ‘wild olive’ should be specially specified, where so like those of the cultivated variety, is improbable. The oleaster ( Eleagnus angustifolia ), a beautiful and common shrub, would suit, except that it is difficult to see how it could ever have furnished a block of wood sufficient for the two cherubim ‘each ten cubits high’ ( 1 Kings 6:23 ); olive wood (as RV [3] suggests) would certainly seem more appropriate. Perhaps Post’s suggestion that it was some kind of pine the ‘oil’ or ‘fat’ being the resin is as likely as any.
E. W. G. Masterman.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Tree of Life
Plant in Garden of Eden symbolizing access to eternal life and metaphor used in Proverbs. For the biblical writer the tree of life was an important consideration only after Adam and Eve disobeyed. Sin interrupted the quality of life God intended for them. They were to obey God (Genesis 2:17 ) in a family setting (Genesis 2:18-25 ) and perform their assigned tasks (Genesis 2:15 ). The implication is that they had access to all the trees in the garden, including the tree of life, but God gave an explicit command not to eat of the tree of knowledge. Their relationship to God changed radically when they disobeyed that command. Chief among the radical changes was that they no longer had access to the tree of life (Genesis 3:22-24 ).
The “tree of life” appears in Proverbs four times (Proverbs 3:18 ; Proverbs 11:30 ; Proverbs 13:12 ; Proverbs 15:4 ) and in Revelation 2:7 ; Revelation 22:2 ,Revelation 22:2,22:14 . To lay hold of wisdom is to lay hold on “a tree of life” (Proverbs 3:18 ). “The fruit of the righteous is a tree of life” (Proverbs 11:30 NIV). Yet another proverb has this comparison: “a longing fulfilled is a tree of life” ( Proverbs 13:12 NIV). The author of another proverb wrote, “The tongue that brings healing is a tree of life” ( Proverbs 15:4 NIV). None of these proverbs seems to refer to “the tree of life” mentioned in Genesis. All of the references in Revelation do. See Adam and Eve ; Eden ; Tree of Knowledge .
Billy K. Smith
Holman Bible Dictionary - Tree of Knowledge
Plant in midst of Garden of Eden used to prove the first couple's loyalty to the Creator (Genesis 2-3 ). Reference to “the tree of the knowledge of good and evil” is in a context concerned with the fall. In Genesis 3:3 the tree is designated as “the tree which is in the midst of the garden.” Eating from the tree brought the knowledge of good and evil ( Genesis 3:5 ,Genesis 3:5,3:22 ). One of many trees in the garden, this tree alone was forbidden to mankind under the penalty of death (Genesis 2:17 ).
The tree of knowledge was Adam and Eve's opportunity to demonstrate obedience and loyalty to God, but the serpent used it to tempt Eve to eat and to become like God “knowing good and evil” (Genesis 3:5 ). When Adam joined Eve in eating the forbidden fruit, the result was shame, guilt, exclusion from the garden, and separation from the tree of life and from God. The Bible's primary interest about the tree of knowledge is not what kind of knowledge it represented—moral judgment, secular knowledge, sexual knowledge, universal knowledge, or some other kind—but how it served as God's test and Satan's temptation. The result for mankind was disaster as they failed the test and fell to the temptation. See Adam and Eve ; Eden ; Tree of Life .
Billy K. Smith
Holman Bible Dictionary - Pine Tree
See Plants in the Bible .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Plane Tree
See Plants in the Bible .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Chestnut Tree
(Heb. 'Armon ; I.e., "naked"), mentioned in connection with Jacob's artifice regarding the cattle ( Genesis 30:37 ). It is one of the trees of which, because of its strength and beauty, the Assyrian empire is likened (Ezekiel 31:8 ; RSV, "plane trees"). It is probably the Oriental plane tree (Platanus orientalis) that is intended. It is a characteristic of this tree that it annually sheds its outer bark, becomes "naked." The chestnut tree proper is not a native of Palestine.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Shittah Tree, Shittim
(Heb. shittah, the thorny ), is without doubt correctly referred to some species of Acacia , of which three or four kinds occur in the Bible lands. The woof of this tree --perhaps the Acacia seyal is more definitely signified --was extensively employed in the construction of the tabernacle. See Exodus 25,26,36,37,38 . (This tree is sometimes three or four feet in diameter (Tristram). The wood is close-grained and hard, of a fine orange-brown color, and admirably adapted to cabinet work. --ED.) The A. seyal is very common in some parts of the peninsula of Sinai. It yields the well-known substance called gum arabic, which is obtained by incisions in the bark, but it is impossible to say whether the ancient Jews were acquainted with its use. From the tangled thicket into which the stem of this tree expands, Stanley well remarks that hence is to be traced the use of the plural form of the Heb. noun shittim , the singular number occurring once only in the Bible. This acacia must not be confounded with the tree ( Robinia pseudo-acacia ) popularly known by this name in England, which is a North American plant, and belongs to a different genus and suborder. The true acacias belong to the order Leguminosae , sub-order Mimoseae .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Plane Tree
Heb. 'armon (Genesis 30:37 ; Ezekiel 31:8 ), rendered "chesnut" in the Authorized Version, but correctly "plane tree" in the Revised Version and the LXX. This tree is frequently found in Palestine, both on the coast and in the north. It usually sheds its outer bark, and hence its Hebrew name, which means "naked." (See CHESTNUT .)
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Turpentine Tree
occurs only once, via. in the Apocrypha. Sirach 24:16 . It is the Pistacia terebinthus , terebinth tree, common in Palestine and the East. The terebinth occasionally grows to a large size. It belongs to the natural order Anacurdiaceas , the plants of which order generally contain resinous secretions.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Chestnut Tree
('armon ). Genesis 30:37, from which Jacob pilled rods to set before the flock. Ezekiel 31:7-8, to which the Assyrian empire is compared in beauty and strength. A tree, stately and wide spreading and growing near water, must be meant. The eastern plane tree (not ours, which is a maple, Acer pseudoplatanus) fulfills the conditions; its root, 'aaram "to be naked," "to strip off the bark," corresponds; for it yearly sheds its bark. The groves of the Academy at Athens, where Plato and Aristotle taught, were of eastern plane.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Tree
(ξύλον)
‘Tree’ is used five times in the NT as a synonym for the Cross (Acts 5:30; Acts 10:39; Acts 13:29, Galatians 3:13; 1 Peter 2:24). In classical Greek ξύλον means wood cut, timber (as in 1 Corinthians 3:12, Revelation 18:12); an instrument of punishment, resembling the pillory (Herod. vi. 75, ix. 37; so in Acts 16:24); rarely a living tree (as in Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14; Revelation 22:19); and never a cross. But in the Septuagint , where ξύλον is used for עַץ, ‘tree,’ the phrase ‘hang on a tree’ occurs several times (Genesis 40:19, Deuteronomy 21:22, Joshua 10:26); and the dread saying, κατηραμένος ὑπὸ θεοῦ πᾶς κρεμάμενος ἐπὶ ξύλον (‘maledictus a Deo est qui pendet in ligno’), seems to have been applied very early in the Christian Church-apparently many years before the writing of the Epistle to the Galatians-with a deep theological meaning as well as a poignant pathos, to the death of Christ, whose Cross then came to be commonly known as ‘the tree.’
Among the ancient Israelites the criminal was not executed by being hanged, but hanged after execution, his corpse being exposed before all eyes as a proof that he had met the reward of his deeds (2 Samuel 4:12; 2 Samuel 21:9-10). But Genesis 40:19, which refers to a case in Egypt, may denote a death by suspension (see J. Skinner, International Critical Commentary , ‘Genesis,’ Edinburgh, 1910). Be that as it may, the tree used for this gruesome purpose was no doubt a literal living tree, not an artificial ‘gallows-tree.’
The Cross is called ‘a tree’ in two addresses which are said to have been delivered by St. Peter (Acts 5:30; Acts 10:39), and 1 Peter 2:24 refers to Christ bearing our sins in His body upon the tree. Cf. also St. Paul’s words in Acts 13:29 with Galatians 3:18. The theme ‘crux est arbor’ is a favourite one in mediaeval poetry, and ‘the tree’ is a common synonym for ‘the Cross’ in modern hymnology.
In Judges 1:12 apostates are compared to autumn trees without fruit. The writer of the Apocalypse refers to a conflagration among forest trees (Revelation 8:7); also to trees spared by hurricanes (Revelation 7:1; Revelation 7:3) and by locusts (Revelation 9:4). See also Tree of Life.
James Strahan.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Tree (2)
TREE (ξύλον, Lat. lignum, arbor).—A poetic name for the Cross (Acts 5:30; Acts 10:39; Acts 13:29, 1 Peter 2:24; cf. Galatians 3:13; nowhere in Gospels). The name no doubt originated in the practice (cf. Joshua 10:26) of employing a tree in case of haste for the purpose of crucifixion* [1] (cf. gallows-tree), but in mediaeval times it was explained by a quaint legend. As he lay a dying, it was said, Adam sent his son Seth to the angel that guarded Paradise, to crave a bough from the tree of life. The angel gave it, and Seth carried it to his father, but found him dead. He planted the bough upon his grave. In course of time, when Solomon was building the Temple, the tree was cut down, but it refused to be fitted into any part of the Temple, and was placed over a stream to serve as a bridge. By and by the queen of Sheba came with her gifts and offerings. Seeing the tree she would not walk over it, since she recognized that the Redeemer of the world would suffer on it. Long afterwards the Jews took it and cast it into a stagnant pool, which derived a miraculous virtue from its presence: an angel descended from time to time and troubled the water, and the first that stepped in after the troubling was healed (cf. John 5:4). There it remained until the time of our Lord’s Passion, when it was taken out of the pool and fashioned into the Cross on which He suffered.† [2]
Much devout fancy was inspired by the term. It suggested a reference to the Cross in Song of Solomon 2:3; Song of Solomon 2:5, which runs thus in the Vulgate: ‘Sicut malus inter ligna silvarum, sic dilectus meus inter filios. Sub umbra illius, quem desideraveram, sedi: et fructus ejus dulcis gutturi meo. Fulcite me floribus, stipate me malis: quia amore langueo.’ The hymn-writers extolled the ‘arbor salutifera’ which bore such sweet and precious fruit. One says:‡ [3]
‘Fertilitate potens, O dulce et nobile lignum,
Quando tuis ramis tam nova poma geris.’
And in his exquisite Laudismus de S. Cruce St. Bonaventura says:§ [4]
‘Crux est arbor decorata,
Christi sanguine sacrata,
Cunctis plena fructibus;
Quibus animae eruuntur,
Cum supernis nutriuntur
Cibis in cœlestibus.’
The Fathers loved to contrast the first tree whose fruit brought death into the world, and the second tree whose ‘leaves are for the healing of the nations’ (Revelation 22:2). Cf. St. Jerome on Mark 15:23 ‘Hic figitur salus in ligno, ligno primo infixa est mors. Lignum primum lignum scientiae boni et mali est. Et secundum lignum boni tantum nobis et vitae lignum est.’ In Evangel. Nicodem. xxiii., after the ‘harrying of hell’ Hades says to Satan: ‘All that thou gainedst by the tree of knowledge (διὰ τοῦ ξύλου τῆς γνώσεως), by the tree of the Cross (διὰ τοῦ ξύλου τοῦ σταυροῦ) thou hast lost.’ See also art. Cross.
Literature—Reference may be made to ‘The Legend of the Cross’ in Baring-Gould’s Curious Myths of the Middle Ages, and to Farrar’s Christ in Art, p. 276.
David Smith.
Webster's Dictionary - Beam Tree
A tree (Pyrus aria) related to the apple.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Broom Tree
A bush that often grows large enough to provide shade (1 Kings 19:4-5 ). Its foliage and roots were often used as fuel (Job 30:4 ; Psalm 120:4 ). Its white flowers with maroon center beautify the Dead Sea area. Bees buzz among its blooms. The name Rithmah—a place along the route of the Exodus (Numbers 33:18-19 )—was named for this shrub (rothem ). Although KJV, NAS identify the bush as the juniper, modern scholars agree that the bush intended by the Hebrew writer was the broom tree—Retama raetam (NIV, REB, NRSV).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Bay-Tree
BAY-TREE ( ’ezrâch , Psalms 37:35 ) is probably a mistranslation for ‘a tree in its native soil’ (RV [1] ). Many authorities, however, would here emend the Heb. text to read ’erez , ‘cedar.’
E. W. G. Masterman.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Box-Tree
BOX-TREE ( teashshûr , Isaiah 41:19 ; Isaiah 60:13 , Ezekiel 27:6 ). Whether the teashshûr was the box-tree ( Buxus longifolia ) or the sherbin , mod. Arab. [1] for the cypress ( Cupressus sempervirens ), as RV [2] adopts, or, as others propose, a kind of juniper, is quite unsettled. So good an authority as Post rejects the first as improbable.
E. W. G. Masterman.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Shittah Tree
KJV spelling of Shittim tree (Isaiah 41:19 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Bay Tree
KJV translation in Psalm 37:35 . The Hebrew word (ezrah ) means “native” or “indigenous.” While the bay tree is native to Palestine, Psalm 37:35 gives no indication of referring to that tree. The NRSV and TEV hardly come closer to a correct translation with cedar tree. NAS, NIV, and REB come closer to the meaning of the Hebrew text when they speak of a tree in its native soil.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Oil Tree
KJV translation of the Hebrew phrase “tree of oil” (Isaiah 41:19 ). Other translation include olive (NAS, NIV, NRSV, TEV), oleaster (NAS margin), and wild olive (REB). The same Hebrew phrase is rendered “olivewood” at 1Kings 6:23,1 Kings 6:31-33 and “wild olive” at Nehemiah 8:15 . The latter text distinguishes the “oil tree” from the olive. Some interpreters suggest pine or cypress as the material of the carved cherubim in 1Kings.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Mulberry Tree
See Plants in the Bible .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Shittim Tree, Wood
See Plants.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Pine (Tree)
Isaiah 41:19 (c) This is a type of the Christian who is made useful, profitable and beautiful by the Lord in the midst of unhappy situations and conditions which surround him.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Olive (Tree)
Judges 9:8 (b) In this parable probably this tree represents some delightful, refreshing person who might be called to be the leader of the people. You will note that other trees represent other kinds of people in this same parable.
Isaiah 17:6 (c) Perhaps this represents the fact that Damascus would not be completely destroyed, but that some families would remain and the city would continue to be a city. This certainly has been the case.
Hosea 14:6 (b) Here we see a picture of Israel restored to her place of prominence and power with the land healed, the rains falling on rich pastures, and the glory of all lands again seen in Palestine.
Zechariah 4:3 (a) Plainly the passage indicates that these two olive trees are types of the Holy Spirit of GOD and the Word of GOD. The Spirit has, in Himself, might on the one hand, and power on the other. He is able to move mountains out of the life of the believer. Might refers to inward ability. Power refers to outside influence. The Spirit needs neither one. He is able in Himself to give the victory to the believer, and He does it. Some think that these two trees represent Moses and Elijah, Moses the lawgiver, and Elijah the grace giver. Others think that these two trees represent two angelic beings, who stand guard over the believer to protect and preserve him, and make him a radiant conqueror.
Romans 11:17 (a) This represents GOD's plan, purpose and program which began with Israel and which continues all through the church. Israel was in that plan as a green tree, and after Pentecost the Gentiles were brought into that same plan.
All are saved by grace.
All are redeemed by the Blood.
All are dependent entirely upon the Lord JESUS for salvation and redemption.
The olive tree represents Israel from a religious aspect, while the fig tree represents Israel from the political aspect. The Lord did not curse an olive tree, for the religion of Israel had GOD's approval. He did curse the political Israel as a nation and scatter them over the world. It is the fig tree that buds, and is a type of the restoration of Israel from the political standpoint.
Revelation 11:4 (a) The two olive trees in this passage certainly represent the two witnesses. Just who they are we do not know. Most Bible students think they are Moses and Elijah who return to this earth in person with a message from GOD, and are persecuted. (See Zechariah 4:3-6).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Almond Tree
(Jeremiah 1:11-12; Hebrew "I see a rod of the wakeful tree (the emblem of wakefulness) ... Thou hast well seen: for I will be wakeful (Hebrew for "hasten") as to My word.") It first wakes out of the wintry sleep and buds in January. In Ecclesiastes 12:5, instead of "the almond tree shall flourish," Gesenius translates "(the old man) loathes (through want of appetite) even the (sweet) almond;" for the blossom is pink, not white, the color of the old man's hair.
But as the Hebrew means "bud" or "blossom" in Song of Solomon 6:11 it probably means here "the wakefulness of old age sets in." Or the color may not be the point, but the blossoms on the leafless branch, as the hoary locks flourish as a crown on the now arid body. Exodus 25:33-34; in the tabernacle the candlesticks had "bowls made in the form of the almond flower" or "nut," most graceful in shape; perhaps the pointed nut within was the design for the cup, the sarcocarp containing the oil, and the flame shaped nut of gold emitting the light from its apex. Luz, the original name of Bethel, was derived from one species of almond (Genesis 28:19; Genesis 30:37), luz.
It was almond, not hazel, rods wherewith Jacob secured the ringstraked and speckled offspring from the flocks. Jordan almonds were famed. The almonds growing on Aaron's rod, when laid up over night before the Lord, denote the ever wakeful priesthood which should continue until the Antitype should come; type also of the vigilance and fruitfulness which Christ's ministers should exhibit;. also of the rod of Christ's strength which shall finally destroy every adversary (Numbers 17:8; Psalms 110:2; Psalms 110:5-6).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Oil Tree
eets shemen (Isaiah 41:19), but in KJV Nehemiah 8:15 "pine branches." Probably the zackum or Βalanites Αegyptiaca is meant. Distinct from the zayit , "olive tree." The zackum is a small tree abundant in the Jordan plain. It is found all the way from India to Syria, Abyssinia, and the Niger. The zackum oil is highly esteemed by the Arabs as a remedy for wounds.
Webster's Dictionary - Tree Calf
A bright brown polished calfskin binding of books, stained with a conventional treelike design.
Webster's Dictionary - Planer Tree
A small-leaved North American tree (Planera aquatica) related to the elm, but having a wingless, nutlike fruit.
Webster's Dictionary - Pine-Tree State
Maine; - a nickname alluding to the pine tree in its coat of arms.
Webster's Dictionary - Plane Tree
Same as 1st Plane.
Webster's Dictionary - Pipal Tree
Same as Peepul tree.
Webster's Dictionary - Pippul Tree
Same as Peepul tree.
Webster's Dictionary - Fir Tree
See Fir.
Webster's Dictionary - Hip Tree
The dog-rose.
Webster's Dictionary - Quicken Tree
The European rowan tree; - called also quickbeam, and quickenbeam. See Rowan tree.
Webster's Dictionary - Rass Tree
(1):
An Australian plant of the genus Xanthorrhoea, having a thick trunk crowned with a dense tuft of pendulous, grasslike leaves, from the center of which arises a long stem, bearing at its summit a dense flower spike looking somewhat like a large cat-tail. These plants are often called "blackboys" from the large trunks denuded and blackened by fire. They yield two kinds of fragrant resin, called Botany-bay gum, and Gum Acaroides.
(2):
A similar Australian plant (Kingia australis).
Webster's Dictionary - Enip Tree
(1):
Any tree or shrub of the genus Genipa.
(2):
The West Indian sapindaceous tree Melicocca bijuga, which yields the honeyberry; also, the related trees Exothea paniculata and E. trifoliata.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Fir (Tree)
2 Kings 19:23 (b) This is a type of the finest and best of Israel's men. (See also Isaiah 37:24).
Isaiah 14:8 (b) Probably this refers to the millennial time when Satan will be cast down and will be unable to bring trouble on the earth. The fir tree is a type of the happy life of a believer. It is a picture of joy particularly when found in the life of a leader. So these leaders may rejoice in peace when Satan is cast out of the earth and chained for the thousand years.
Isaiah 41:19 (c) This is a picture of the joy of the Lord that fills the believer's heart when he is in the midst of distressing and disturbing conditions.
Ezekiel 31:8 (a) This is a type of the great men of Assyria who excelled in might, power, pomp and dress. They were not like the great men of Israel, but were more beautiful and attractive in their appearance and demeanor.
Hosea 14:8 (c) By this figure is represented a happy Christian life, a life of usefulness for the Lord, and a happy situation.
Nahum 2:3 (b) By this figure is indicated that the great men of Israel, the leaders of their worship and service, were to be humbled and defeated by GOD's command.
Zechariah 11:2 (b) The comparison here is between the size of the little fir tree and the great cedar tree. The lesser person weeps and grieves when the greater person dies or falls in the battle. This Scripture was used at Spurgeon's funeral.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Fir, Fir-Tree,
berosh. This is supposed to be one of the conifers, but the species alluded to is not known. It came from Lebanon, and was used in the construction of houses, and for musical instruments. 2 Samuel 6:5 ; 1 Kings 5:8,10 ; 1 Kings 6:15,34 ; 2 Chronicles 2:8 ; 2 Chronicles 3:5 . It will be produced instead of the thornin the millennium, and Israel, when she returns in blessing, will say, "I am like a green fir-tree." Isaiah 55:13 ; Hosea 14:8 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Bay Tree
From 'native born,' or that which springs up without transplanting. Psalm 37:35 reads in the margin, 'tree that groweth in his own soil,' a striking emblem of the wicked spreading himself in his own earthly soil.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Ash (Tree)
Isaiah 44:14 (b) This tree represents the established works of men which become their idols. It may be a great, solid, substantial business, in which a man's money, fame and fortune leave him no time for GOD. He makes a god out of that enterprise which he has built up by his ingenuity, persistence and effort.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Fig (Tree)
Judges 9:10-11 (b) This is an allegory. Gideon was the fig tree. Jotham his son was the vine, Abimelech was the bramble. Jotham in speaking to Israel reminded them that while both he and his father really cared for the blessing and the good of the nation, Abimelech would not be a blessing, but would be to them a curse and would bring only sorrow and trouble to them.
1 Kings 4:25 (c) This is an interesting type of general prosperity. There would be no mortgages and no debts, but each man would own his own property and be able to recline at ease in his own home. (See also Micah 4:4; Zechariah 3:10).
2 Kings 18:31 (b) This is a promise from the King of Babylon that if the Jews would come over to him, surrender to him, and yield themselves to him, he would take them away to a fruitful land and give them their freedom. (See also Isaiah 36:16).
Song of Solomon 2:13 (a) This is a type of the prosperity of Israel as a nation. Their fruit trees would abound in fruit, and their fields would be fertile and productive.
Isaiah 34:4 (a) This represents the result of GOD's curse on the nation. He will cause all blessings to cease so that the land will be barren. (See Jeremiah 8:13; Habakkuk 3:17).
Nahum 3:12 (b) This is a type of the curse that is to come upon Nineveh. Their riches and their treasures would fall an easy prey to the invader.
Hosea 9:10 (a) GOD chose Israel in the beginning as a nation which would be full of possibilities for His glory; it would be a nation giving Him an opportunity to manifest His wisdom, His power, and His grace.
Joel 1:7 (b) The Lord uses this type to describe the action of the enemy in their damage to Israel so that she could not, and would not, bring forth fruit unto GOD. However, in Joel 2:22 GOD promises a restoration.
Habakkuk 3:17 (b) Here we find a picture of utter desolation. The lack or the absence of flowers was certain evidence that there would be no fruit in the future. The lack of grapes on the vines indicated a present need. The efforts of the olive trees to become fine fruitful trees would fail, and there would be no oil for the use of the owner. The barren fields would tell the story of dearth and drought. The flock cut off from the fold would indicate either the invasion of the enemy who would steal the cattle, or else the prevalence of a disease which would kill off the animals. The empty stalls would assure them that there would be no milk, no meat, and no supply for their needs. In spite of this absence of all prosperity, the heart of this servant of GOD would still sing and rejoice in GOD. (See Haggai 2:19).
Matthew 21:19 (b) Here as usual the fig tree is a type of the nation of Israel in its political aspect. The Lord cursed the fig tree, but not an olive tree. The olive tree represents Israel from the religious viewpoint. Paul tells in his epistle that the believers are grafted into the olive tree, not into the fig tree. We do come to Israel's GOD, but we do not become a part of the nation of Israel. You will note that this passage does not say that CHRIST expected to find figs, but it says "if haply He might find." It was not the season for figs actually, and neither was it the season for blessing in Israel, for they were slaves to Rome, and were living in rebellion and hypocrisy to GOD. The cursing of the fig tree was really not a curse. All the Saviour said was, "No fruit grow on thee." Peter considered this a curse. This was really a type of the coming destruction of the nation of Israel as a political power. This was accomplished at the time of the destruction of Jerusalem.
Matthew 24:32 (a) The budding of this tree refers to the beginning of the restoration of the nation of Israel as a political power. We see these "buds" appearing today. The nation has been formed in Palestine. A good part of the country is controlled by the Jews. They have their own government, postage, coinage and educational institutions. All of this is just an evidence of the coming greatness of that great nation. One day they will conquer Jerusalem entirely, will expel all foreign influences, will destroy the Mosque of the Mohammedans, and will establish their king again upon his throne in that great city. (See also Luke 21:29).
Luke 13:6 (a) This fig tree represents Israel as a political nation. During the three years that CHRIST was preaching on the earth, He sought to bring them back to GOD by His ministry. He sought to restore the real worship of the true GOD. There was no response to these efforts of His. They repudiated Him, they rejected His Word, they renounced His claims, they refused to return to the GOD of their fathers. All the efforts He put forth, plus those of His disciples, are represented in this parable by the efforts made to fertilize the tree. Because of their failure to respond, Israel was doomed by the Lord to be dispersed among the nations.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Mustard (Tree)
Matthew 13:31 (a) This figure represents the great religious group called "the church." It began with a very small group, but has spread all over the earth, and has become a monstrosity. Its members include atheists, idolators and evildoers of every kind. Its branches reach out into every part of society, and in every nation. The birds in this church tree represent evil spirits ruling in church councils. (See also Mark 4:31; Luke 13:19).
Matthew 17:20 (Seed). (a) This figure is used to represent the individual believer. It does not refer to the size of his faith, for the Lord always condemned little faith. Little faith means big doubts. The Lord condemns these. He is telling us that though one may be obscure, unknown, uneducated and unimportant in life, yet if that person is full of faith as the seed is full of mustard, then he may see miracles performed in his life. (See also Luke 17:6).
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Willow (Tree)
Psalm 137:2 (c) We may use this as a type of sorrow in separation. Its drooping leaves and branches indicate the depressed and drooping spirit of those who have been separated from the things they love.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Bay Tree
Psalm 37:35 (a) This tree is a type of the prosperous sinner whose business grows to tremendous proportions and whose interests enter into many departments of life, all of which are successful. GOD is good. He gives some men a Heaven on earth because He knows they will not have one hereafter.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Plane Tree
The Hebrews were very partial to trees; and it is not to be wondered at, for those trees which formed shades, by their long growing and wide spreading branches, must have been highly grateful in sheltering them from the heat. The plane tree is supposed to have been the chesnut spoken of Genesis 30:37. The word Harmon, or Ormon, is so rendered in that Scripture. We have a lofty description of Pharaoh, king of Egypt, under the similitude of those elegant tress of the forest. (Ezekiel 31:8) But when the reader hath pondered over these beauties of nature, I beg him to observe how, in a yet far higher degree, the Holy Ghost is pleased to make use of them in setting forth the glories of grace, when describing the Lord Jesus under the similitude of the wide spreading branches of the trees of the wood, to represent the shelter he affords to his people. Hence the church sings of sitting under "his shadow with great delight, and his fruit becoming sweet to her taste." (Song of Song of Solomon 2:3) Hence the prophet describes Jesus as "a strength to the poor, a strength to the needy in distress, a refuge from the storm, a shadow from the heat, when the blast of the terrible ones is as a storm against the wall." (Isaiah 25:4) And in many other parts of Scripture the same figures are beautifully chosen by way of representing the Lord Jesus as both a protecting power from every danger, and a source of refreshment in all good. Jesus is all this, and infinitely more; for like the wide spreading branches of some rich and fruitful tree of the desert, he forms every thing that is lovely to our view, and both shelters from the heat, and refresheth our thirst by his fruit in this desert of our nature, when from under his shadow "we revive as the corn, and grow as the vine, and his scent is more fragrant than the wine of Lebanon." (Hosea 14:7)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Fig, Fig-Tree
There are several kinds of fig-trees, but the well-known tree called the Ficus Carica is common in Palestine and very productive. It also agrees with the description of "sitting under the fig-tree" for repose, its branches and leaves giving protection from the heat of the sun. It was one of the trees in the garden of Eden, of the leaves of which Adam and Eve made aprons. Genesis 3:7 ; 1 Kings 4:25 ; John 1:48 . The figs were made into cakes by being pressed together. 1 Samuel 25:18 ; 1 Samuel 30:12 . The trees bear figs at different times, hence the expressions 'first-ripe figs,' and also 'untimely figs.' Nahum 3:12 ; Revelation 6:13 . The fruit is produced before the leaves; so that leaves being found, there should have been fruit on the fig-tree cursed by the Lord, although the ordinary fig-season had not arrived. Matthew 21:19 20 ; Mark 11:13,20,21 . This was typical of Israel which had been compared to a fig-tree, bringing forth its first-ripefigs, Hosea 9:10 ; but in the days ofthe Lord, Israel had plenty of leaves, professing to be God's favoured people, but producing no real fruit to Him. Luke 13:6,7 . As a nation in the flesh no fruit will ever be found on it.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Pine Tree
This tree is spoken of in Scripture by the Lord himself, as one of the trees which the Lord would take to beautify his sanctuary, (Isaiah 60:13) No doubt, it is figuratively spoken in allusion to believers. See Cedar Tree
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Tree
We meet with the names of a great variety of trees in Scripture, but if we may give credit to ancient writers, there was nothing in the Hebrew language less determined than the special names of trees. The sacred writers, however, have very largely and very beautifully classed them under their respective names. I do not take upon me to say that in numberless instances the names and trees are not figurative, for I rather think they are. It has been thought so by some writers, and there is reason for the opinion; and when we consider how God the Holy Ghost, from the description of the garden of Eden, in the very opening of the Bible, to the closing the canon of Scripture, in the description of the Paradise of God, makes use of the several names of "the tree of life, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil," which were evidently symbolical and sacramental, I cannot but pause over the several elegantly and highly finished representations which the whole Book of God abounds with, more or less, from beginning to end, and accept them as such. Hence, in this point of view, are the "trees of the garden and of the forest, the trees of righteousness, and of the Lord's right hand planting;" but chiefly and above all in beholding that most striking and lovely representation of Jesus, under the similitude of the tree of life. (Revelation 22:2) Amidst a thousand beauties included in this lovely figure, how blessed is it to see that in his person, the life, the fruit, the healing, the shadow of his branches, the everlasting root, the verdure of his leaves, all, and every one, are beautifully described as figurative of temporal, spiritual, and eternal blessings in Jesus. And it is not the least of the beauty of this similitude, that this tree of life is said to be in the midst of the street, and on either side of the river. For as the church of Jesus, though but one, and the only one of her mother, (Song of Song of Solomon 6:9) is in both worlds, the river of Jordan only separating in place, but not in union; Jesus is equally the life of both, and gives blessedness to the body below as well as happiness to the society above. Hail! thou everlasting and eternal tree of life! Cause me to sit down under thy shadow with great delight this side the river, until thou shalt bring me home to the everlasting rest and enjoyment of thy fulness, in the paradise of God above. Amen.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Box-Tree
What tree is referred to under the name teashshur is not known: the ancient versions translate it 'cedar, fir, poplar,' etc. It is probably a species of cedar, called sherbin in the East. Isaiah 41:19 ; Isaiah 60:13 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Chesnut Tree
When the Assyrian is compared to a great tree it is described as excelling in its beauty the branches of the chesnut tree. Ezekiel 31:8 . It is identified with the 'Plane-tree' which grows in Palestine. It was known to Jacob. Genesis 30:37 . It is the Platanus orientalis. It thrives best in a rich moist soil, and is a noble and beautiful tree.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Pine Tree
1. tidhar. A tree that grew on Mount Lebanon, but of what sort is uncertain. Isaiah 41:19 ; Isaiah 60:13 .
2. ets shemen , 'trees of oil,' Nehemiah 8:15 . See OIL TREE.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Sycamine Tree
Luke 17:6; distinct from the SYCAMORE (Luke 19:4; Septuagint in Old Testament translated the latter however sycamine , meaning the Egyptian sycamine ). The sycamine is the mulberry tree (morus ) cultivated for supplying food for the silkworm caterpillars. Slow growing; but attaining large size, and stretching deep roots, so that it would require strong force to "pluck it up by the root."
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Shittah Tree
See SHITTIM WOOD.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Palm, Palm Tree,
tamar. This is a lofty tree without lateral branches, witha large tuft of leafy branches clustering at the top several feet long. At the base of the branches grow the dates in large clusters. Exodus 15:27 ; Numbers 33:9 ; Judges 4:5 ; Song of Solomon 7:7,8 ; Jeremiah 10:5 ; Joel 1:12 . The branches were used to construct the booths at the feast of tabernacles. Leviticus 23:40 ; Nehemiah 8:15 ; and were strewn in the path on the Lord's last entrance into Jerusalem. John 12:13 . There were many representations of palm-trees in the decorations of the temple, as there will also be in the future temple. 1 Kings 6:29-35 ; 1 Kings 7:36 ; 2 Chronicles 3:5 ; Ezekiel 40:16-37 ; Ezekiel 41:18-26 . The palm-tree is used as an emblem of fertility in Psalm 92:12 ; some trees will bear yearly more than a hundred-weight of dates and for a period of about seventy years. The palm-branches are a token of rest and peace after sorrow. Revelation 7:9 . The palm is the Phoenix dactylifera.
CITY OF PALM-TREES. Name given several times to Jericho because of the palms that grew there. Deuteronomy 34:3 ; Judges 1:16 ; Judges 3:13 , etc.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Shittim Wood, Shittah Tree
This is generally understood to be the Acacia, which is adopted in the R.V. There are several varieties which grow in Egypt and Palestine, the Acacia seyal being the most common. They differ from the acacias known in England, which are from North America. The wood was extensively used in building the tabernacle, and the ark, the table of showbread, and the altars were also made of the same. Exodus 25 — Exodus 38 ; Deuteronomy 10:3 . It is called the SHITTAH TREE(after the Hebrew, which is shittah in the singular) in Isaiah 41:19 . The 'burning bush' (Heb. seneh ), has been considered to be the wild acacia, A. nilotica. Livingstone judged that for the tabernacle the A. giraffa (Camel-thorn) was used, which he calls an 'imperishable' wood.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Oil Tree
This occurs but once in the A.V. (Isaiah 41:19 ), but the Hebrew (ets shemen ) occurs also in 1 Kings 6:23 , where it is translated 'olive tree;' and in Nehemiah 8:15 , where it is rendered 'pine branches:' 'olive branches' being mentioned in the same verse would seem to indicate that the 'tree of oil' is distinct from the olive tree. Some believe it to be the Balanites AEgyptiaca; but others identify it with the Elaeagnus angustifolius .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Olive, Olive Tree
This was the principal source of oil in the East, the trees being extensively cultivated on the sides of the hills, and formed into 'olive yards.' See OIL. In the temple, within the holy of holies, Solomon made two cherubim of olive wood; the doors into the oracle were also made of the same wood. 1 Kings 6:23-33 .
Israel in general is called a green olive tree, fair and of goodly fruit, Jeremiah 11:16 ; and a good olive tree, with root and fatness; in contrast to the Gentiles who are compared to a wild olive tree. The fact that the wild olive tree needs grafting gives point to the passage in Romans 11:17-24 . God's two Jewish witnesses in a future day are called the two olive trees and the two candlesticks standing before the God of the earth. They will then be the fruit and light bearers on the earth. Zechariah 4:3,11,14 ; Revelation 11:3,4 . The Hebrew is zayith , and the Arabic name is zeitun: it is the Olea Europaea .
Webster's Dictionary - Shea Tree
An African sapotaceous tree (Bassia, / Butyrospermum, Parkii), from the seeds of which a substance resembling butter is obtained; the African butter tree.
Webster's Dictionary - bo Tree
The peepul tree; esp., the very ancient tree standing at Anurajahpoora in Ceylon, grown from a slip of the tree under which Gautama is said to have received the heavenly light and so to have become Buddha.
Webster's Dictionary - Hep Tree
The wild dog-rose.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Fig, Fig-Tree
(συκῆ, σῦκου, ὄλυνθος)
Apart from the three references in the Gospels (Matthew 7:16, Mark 11:13, Luke 6:44), figs are mentioned only twice in the NT (James 3:12, Revelation 6:13). In James the ordinary words συκῆ, ‘fig-tree,’ and σῦκον, ‘fig,’ are used, but in Rev. ὄλυνθος is the word employed to denote the fruit. The latter term designates a fig which grows during the winter under the leaves, but seldom ripens.
The meaning of James 3:12 is clear: a tree is known by its fruits; a fig-tree cannot bring forth olives, neither can an olive-tree bring forth figs; a man’s ‘works’ are, in short, an infallible index to his ‘faith’ (James 2:18). In Revelation 6:13 figs form part of the imagery in the vision of the Opening of the First Six Seals. The Seer beholds the stars of heaven falling to the earth ‘as a fig-tree casteth her unripe figs, when she is shaken of a great gale,’ In the ordinary way these winter figs (ὄλυνθοι) did not ripen, so here the judgment predicted is not about to cut off prematurely those who if spared would develop into matured and useful fruit, but those who are ‘without hope and without God in the world’-in short, the ‘cumberers of the ground.’
The fig-tree is native to Palestine and is found either cultivated or wild all over the country. Those which are wild are usually barren or at all events boar no edible fruit, and they are known as ‘male’ fig-trees. There are many varieties of fig-trees cultivated, some of which yield a sharp, bitter fruit, and others a sweet, mellow one. It is noticeable that in the description of the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 8:8) fig-trees are mentioned as one of its leading natural characteristics. They are of moderate sine, though sometimes attaining a, height of 25 ft, while the stem is sometimes over 3 ft. in diameter. The bark is smooth, and the size and thickness of the leaves readily explain the point of the Jewish proverb-‘to sit under one’s own vine and one’s own fig-tree’ (1 Kings 4:25, Micah 4:4, Zechariah 3:10). As a matter of fact, its foliage affords better shade and protection than any other tree in Palestine. It is one of the earliest trees to shoot, and its first fruit-buds appear before its leases (cf. Matthew 24:32, Mark 13:28, Luke 21:29-30). The fruit is an enlarged succulent hollow receptacle, containing the imperfect flowers in its interior; consequently the flowers are invisible till the receptacle has been opened. The figs are eaten both fresh and dried, and they are often compressed into a cake (cf. 1 Samuel 25:18; 1 Samuel 30:12, 1 Chronicles 12:40). The time the tree comes into leaf and fruiting varies according to the situation, and is later in the hill-country than in the plains. On the hills, the branches which have remained bare and naked all through the winter put forth their early leaf-buds about the end of March, and at the same time diminutive figs begin to appear where the young leaves join the branches. These tiny figs Continue to grow with the leaves until they reach about the size of a cherry, then the majority of them fall to the ground or are blown down by the wind. These are the ὄλυνθοι of Revelation 6:13 (see above).
Literature.-H. B. Tristram, Natural History of Bible10, 1911, p. 350f; H. B. Swete, Apocalypse of St. John2, 1907. p. 93; W. M. Thomson The Land and the Book 1910 ed., p. 333; J. C. Geikie, The Holy Land and the Bible, 1903 ed., pp. 66, 74. Cf. also Hastings’ Single-vol. Dictionary of the Bible , p. 262f; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ii. 5, 6; Encyclopaedia Biblica ii. 1519-1522.
P. S. P. Handcock.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Fig-Tree
FIG-TREE (in NT συκῆ, in OT תּאנִה tĕ’çnâh; the Carica, L.).—. The fig is the principal shade and fruit-tree of Palestine, growing in all parts, in many places spontaneously. It seldom surpasses 20 ft. [1] , s.v. ‘Figs,’ says 15 ft.] in height, but has a spread of from 25 to 30 ft. Its welcome shade and refreshing fruit make it the emblem of peace and prosperity (Deuteronomy 8:8, Judges 9:10-11, 1 Kings 4:25, Micah 4:4, Matthew 21:19-22,6 1 Maccabees 14:12). Besides this general symbolism, two characteristics of the tree, appealing respectively to the eye and to the palate, have led to further comparisons.
(a) The fig-tree is conspicuous in early spring by the expanding of the tips of its twigs into little green knobs called פַנִים paggim (Gr. ὄλυνθοι, Song of Solomon 2:13 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘green figs’) which are the flower-fruit buds, and together with the leaf-bud, which expands shortly after and soon overshadows the pag, or fruit rudiment, serve as the herald of the coming summer (Matthew 24:32 and ||). This phenomenon of ‘all the trees’ (Luke 21:29) is particularly noticeable in the fig-tree because of its early and conspicuous verdure. The ripening of the pag follows the ‘appearance of the flowers on the earth,’ and accompanies the ‘blossoming of the vine’ as the feature of the advancing season and the time of mating (Ca 2:13). In the same connexion may be mentioned the phenomenon of the dropping of great quantities of the immature fruit in consequence of imperfect fertilization, so that the scattered paggim covering the ground under the fig-trees become to the author of Revelation 6:13 a symbol of the stars fallen to earth from the firmament, ‘as a fig-tree casteth her unripe figs when she is shaken of a great wind.’
(b) The fig-tree has two (not three) successive crops of fruit each year. The first-ripe fig (Heb. בִּכּוּרָה bikkûrâh, Matthew 7:18-19, Jeremiah 24:2, Hosea 9:10, Micah 7:1) is produced upon the old wood of the preceding year, the buds which remained undeveloped through the winter swelling into the little green îm already described, towards the end of the season of spring rains (March–April), and coming to maturity in June. The תִּאַנָה tĕʻçnâh, or autumn fig, is the fig of commerce, and is produced on the new wood of the same year. The leaf-bud, which expanded shortly after the and soon distanced it in growth, puts out in its turn a flower-fruit bud which matures in August, or later, according to the variety, the fruit hanging on the boughs until winter, when the branches are again left naked, grey, and straggling.
This phenomenon of successive fruitage in the fig-tree is doubtless the source of the description of the fruit-trees of the New Jerusalem (Ezekiel 47:12, Revelation 22:2 ‘the tree of life’) as ‘bearing fruit every month.’ In the Talmud it is a symbol for the acquisition of learning, which, to be permanent, must come by little and little (Hamburger, RE [2] i. 3, s.v. ‘Feige,’ p. 360 with references). Hence the saying, ‘Whoso sees a fig-tree in his dreams, his learning shall be safe from forgetfulness’ (Berakhoth, 57). The capacity of the tree for prolongation of its bearing season leads in fact to certain representations which easily pass over into exaggerations and misunderstandings important to avoid.
Edersheim (Life and Times, bk. iv. ch. xvi. p. 246) refers to ‘a species (the Benoth Shuach) mentioned in Shebh, v. 1, of which the fruit required three years for ripening,’ but which may more reasonably be understood as simply a late-bearing variety whose fruit reached maturity only in exceptionally favourable seasons, not oftener than once in three years. So with the rhetorical passage of Josephus (BJ iii. x. 8) celebrating the delightful climate of the plain of Gennesaret. His statement that ‘it supplies the principal fruits, as grapes and figs, uninterruptedly during ten months of the year,’ cannot reasonably be made to prove more than the fact that in that semi-tropical depression, 600 ft. below sea-level, fresh fruit, including figs, could be obtained almost to the end of winter.
To explain the narrative of Mark 11:13 two other facts have been advanced of doubtful value and trust-worthiness. It is asserted that neglected relics of the autumn crop sometimes cling to the branches of the fig-tree throughout the winter; but Post (l.c. p. 6) was unable during a residence of 33 years in Syria to find, or hear of, such. The statement of Edersheim (l.e. v. ii. p. 374) that such left-over fruit about April 1 ‘would of course be edible’ becomes admissible only by inserting a ‘not’ after ‘of course.’ It is also asserted that the pag, or green fruit, was eaten, even Benzinger (PRE [3] 3 [4] s.v. ‘Fruchtbäume,’ p. 304) declaring that ‘Jesus might expect to find such winter figs (the paggîm) on a tree already in leaf at the season of Passover, that is before the time of the ripening of figs.’ In the sense that the rudimentary fruit-buds would be discoverable under the leaves, upon examination (unless the tree had become sterile by reversion to the wild type, as sometimes occurs), this statement is true; the present writer has found such dry tasteless ‘figs’ at ‘Ain Far‘a near Jerusalem, on March 1, the size of an olive, though the tree was leafless. Boys sometimes nibble these buds, but to speak of the paggîm at this season as ‘winter figs’ is misleading. The evidence for the edible quality of the pag, drawn by Edersheim from the Talmud (Bk. v. ii. p. 375, referring to Shebh. iv. 7 and Jerus. [5] Shebh. 35b, last lines) suggests only that at a later season the unripe fruit was sometimes used as a condiment ‘with bread.’ This, however, was after the paggim ‘began to assume a red colour,’ and not when the foliage had only just begun to cover the setting fruit-bud. Apart from the question whether a tree could be properly rebuked for the absence of a quite exceptional product, the alleged phenomena, whether of neglected relics of the autumn harvest, or use of the unripe fruit, have neither of them any real bearing on the difficulty that Jesus should approach a wayside fig-tree, with the intention of staying His hunger, when, as so frankly stated in the record itself, ‘it was not the season of figs.’
2. The Gospel references to the fig-tree include both parables and incidents, and make allusion to phenomena both of its leafage and its fruitage. As questions arise to how great an extent the incidents may not be symbolic, parables becoming concrete in process of repetition, or even pure symbols, it is best to consider first the two instances in which the fig-tree is made the subject of undoubted parable by our Lord.
(a) The parable of the Fig-Tree (Mark 13:28-29 = Matthew 24:32-33, paraphrased and interpreted Luke 21:29-31) is based on the early verdure of the tree. Its general sense is clear from Luke 12:54 ff. (= Matthew 16:2-3 β text), a passage which leads to the insertion in Luke 21:29 of βλέποντες ἀφʼ ἑαυτῶν (cf. Luke 12:57). The meaning is: As you judge by the softening, burgeoning twigs of the fig-tree that the harvest season is approaching, so read the signs of the times. These (ταῦτα; Mark 13:29 treats the preceding context as if only premonitions of the Day had been spoken of, overlooking Mark 13:24-27; but cf. Luke 12:51-53; Luke 12:56 with Mark 13:12-13; Mark 13:29; πἀντα ταῦτα, Matthew 24:33 is more specific but less correct) signs prove that the judgment, the gleaning of God (cf. Mark 4:29, not ‘the kingdom of God,’ Luke 21:31) is close at hand. As regards closer exegesis and criticism, we must say, with E. Schwartz (‘Der verfluchte Feigenbaum’ in ZNTW [6] i. p. 81): ‘Whoever would interpret with exactitude will meet with more than one difficulty.’ Besides Schwartz, the reader may consult Gould, Swete, and Wellhausen, ad loc. The paraphrase of Lk. is the earliest attempt to interpret, but smooths over difficulties (note, e.g., the additions ‘and all the trees,’ ‘the kingdom of God,’ and other changes).
(b) The parable of the Barren Fig-Tree (Luke 13:6-9) stands in the same eschatological context as the warning to read the signs of the times (Luke 12:35 to Luke 13:9 paralleled by Mark 13:33-36; Mark 13:12-13), and forms its climax. One is tempted to conjecture that the problematic ‘parable’ referred to in Mark 13:28, Matthew 24:32 (ἀπὸ δὲ τῆς συκῆς μάθετε τὴν παραβολήν, cf. Mark 7:17 as against Luke 21:29 καὶ εἷπεν παραβολήν) was once no other than this. At all events it simply applies, in fuller form, the figure credited in Matthew 3:10 = Luke 3:9 to the Baptist.
This is the common prophetic doctrine of the Divine ἀνοχή, the present a time of suspension of the Divine sentence to leave opportunity for repentance.
The once favourite allegorizing method of interpretation (e.g. the gardener=the Messiah, the three years=the three (?) Passovers of Christ’s public ministry) is now fortunately discredited. Yet it is incorrect, with Wellhausen (Ev. Lucae, ad loc.) to say that the fig-tree stands for the individual. Not merely is the girdled fig-tree an OT emblem of the punishment of Israel (Joel 1:7, cf. Luke 23:31), but the parable concludes a context wherein the men of Jerusalem, overwhelmed by the fall of the tower in Siloam, and the Galilaeans, cut down by the sword of Pilate, are brought forward as ‘signs of the times.’ The warning, accordingly, is certainly against ‘the overthrow of the Jewish people’ (T. K. Cheyne, Encyc. Bibl. s.v. ‘Fig-tree,’ col. 1521). ‘Except ye repent ye shall all likewise perish’ is not spoken of the fate of individuals, but of the common overthrow, however this may be avoided by individual repentance; cf. Matthew 12:38-45 = Luke 11:29-32.
3. The cursing of the fig-tree (Mark 11:12-14; Mark 11:20-25 = Matthew 21:18-22).—Parabolic symbolism is so slightly concealed under the narrative features of this story that the majority of critics are disposed to regard it as a mere endowment of the Lukan parable of the Barren Fig-tree with concrete form, just as the parable of the Good Samaritan, and others, were long treated as instances of historical fact.
In favour of this explanation are several features of the narrative and its setting.
(a) The generally admitted incorporation of Mk. by Lk. implies that the omission of Mark 11:12-14; Mark 11:20-25 was deliberate. The most natural explanation of it is that St. Luke regarded the story as a double of his parable, Luke 13:6-9. Conversely the parable does not appear in Mt. or Mark.
(b) The withering of the tree (Mark 11:20-25), a sequel of the next day after the cursing (Mark 11:12-14), occupies a different position in 1618450344_73 taking place ‘on the spot.’ In both Gospels this appended sequel proves itself a secondary attachment, both by its material and its language. The contents of Mark 11:20-25 consist in the main of two logia, torn from their proper context (cf. Matthew 17:20, Luke 17:6, and Matthew 6:14-15) and characterized by non-Markan expressions (cf. ‘your Father in heaven,’ Mark 11:25). Such loose agglomerations of stray logia are frequent in our Second Gospel (Mark 3:22-30; Mark 4:11-12; Mark 4:21; Mark 4:25; Mark 8:15; Mark 8:34-36; Mark 9:42-50; Mark 10:10-12 etc.). In Matthew 21:19-22 the language is alien (παραχρῆμα, ‘on the spot,’ Matthew 21:19-20, occurs 17 times in Lk. and Acts, whereas Mt. and Mk. have invariably elsewhere εὐθύς or εὐθέως), and the logia taken from Mk. produce duplication of Matthew 17:20 and almost of Matthew 6:14-15. By transposing the sequel into immediate juxtaposition with the cursing, and abridging Mark 11:20-25, Mt. avoids one of the two interruptions of the principal narrative of the purging of the temple and its consequences (Mark 11:1-10; Mark 11:15-18; Mark 11:27 ff.), and heightens the marvel, but fails to remove the evidence of his own dependence afforded by the duplication of Matthew 17:20, and only brings into stronger relief the supplementary and supererogatory character of the sequel.
This superfluousness of Mark 11:20; Mark 11:25 is most apparent in the light of such attempted explanations as that of B. Weiss, who says: The cursing of the fig-tree was ‘of course’ meant by Jesus symbolically, the concrete fulfilment given it by God being without intention on Jesus’ part. On this statement Wellhausen (ad loc.) comments sarcastically: ‘Weiss understands him. God misunderstood him.’ Nevertheless Weiss is clearly right in maintaining that the purpose of Jesus would be just as completely met if the story stopped with Mark 11:14 a.
But even more fatal than the superfluousness of the sequel is its perversion of the real symbolism of the incident. Nothing is said of that which analogy (Matthew 3:10; Isaiah 28:4, Luke 13:6-9) proves to be the real moral lesson; but the appended sayings are adapted to find in it mere evidence of the wonder-working power of belief. The disciples are to learn that the prayer, or even the fiat, of faith—here taken as equivalent to undoubting assurance—can set at defiance the order of nature. This, the writer understands, was the purpose of the cursing. As part of the rebuke of the disciples half-heartedness (διψυχία) in the case of the epileptic boy (Matthew 17:19-20; cf. Luke 17:5-6, 1 Corinthians 13:2), the hyperbolic saying on mountain-moving faith is justified. Adapted along with Matthew 6:14-15 to give the moral lesson of the withering of the fig-tree, both fall to a lower plane, scarcely above that of mere thaumaturgy. The symbolism of the cursing is lost in the mere wonder of withering a tree, a needless miracle of display.
(c) Even after recognition of the unhistorical character of the addition Matthew 11:20-25, the incident of the cursing is still encumbered with inherent improbabilities, of which the most formidable is the imputation of hunger as the motive of Jesus’ approach to the tree. It is not enough to admit that the curse must be explained, if at all, by the discovery, made upon close inspection, that the tree was empty, not only of those supposititious edible products which could not be reasonably expected, but of even the rudiments of a crop in the season, and to suggest that when Jesus arrived ‘immediately the disappointment of unsatisfied hunger was lost in the moral lesson which flashed across His mind’ (Post, l.c.). Change of motive is inconceivable, because hunger cannot have caused the approach. Relics of the last season’s crop, if sought at all, would be sought on a tree whose still leafless branches left them in plain sight, no
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Teil Tree
The Hebrew word is elah, and is supposed to be the terebinth, though it is often translated 'oak.' In Isaiah 6:13 'the oak' ( allon ) is mentioned as well as the elah, different trees are therefore doubtless indicated by the two Hebrew words. It is now generally supposed that allon refers to the oak, and elah to the terebinth, the Pistacia terebinthus.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Tree
This beautiful plant of GOD's design and creation is used in many ways in the Scripture. Each type of tree represents a different truth. Trees are also used to represent positions of great power, or of lesser power. Trees represent GOD's people in some cases, while they represent Satan's product in other cases.
Genesis 2:17 (c) It has been suggested that this tree represents human reasonings, searchings and conclusions about GOD's matters. Men today prefer psychological investigations and mental processes rather than to believe GOD and His Word. The Devil offers many philosophies and theories which men eagerly grasp and prefer them to GOD's revealed truth. (See also Genesis 3:3).
Exodus 15:25 (c) Perhaps this tree represents the Lord JESUS CHRIST who certainly does sweeten the bitter things of life, and make the sorrows of earth a blessing to the soul.
Exodus 15:27 (c) Strangely enough, these trees may, and possibly do, represent the seventy persons who came down to Egypt from the land of Israel. The twelve springs may represent the twelve tribes. Certainly they were to be a blessing to the whole earth.
Numbers 24:6 (a) It is a type of the people of GOD seen in the light of GOD's thoughts, as His own choice planting, and bearing fruit for His glory. (See Jeremiah 17:8).
Job 14:7 (c) The teaching of this passage is that though a man may fail in business, or fall as a sinner, it is quite possible for him to be restored and to recover and to end his days in blessing, and with GOD's approval.
Psalm 1:3 (a) This is the child of GOD who is rooted and grounded in the Word of GOD, and is having his soul and life permeated by the Holy Spirit (the river). He is not planted in the river, but by the river. The finest tree will not grow in the best of soil unless there is water available. The water represents the Holy Spirit.
Proverbs 3:18 (a) GOD is giving us here a picture of "wisdom." Those who exercise this virtue certainly save themselves from much trouble, and become a rich blessing to many. CHRIST bears this name.
Proverbs 11:30 (a) The tree represents a fruitful life lived for the glory of GOD and the blessing of men.
Proverbs 13:12 (a) The Lord uses this picture to illustrate the blessings of answered prayer, and the receiving of the desires of the heart.
Proverbs 15:4 (a) Good talk and wise words certainly do bring the blessings that a tree of life would bring. The Lord tells us to let our conversation be always with grace. The Psalmist also requested that "the words of my mouth" might be acceptable to GOD.
Isaiah 56:3 (a) The eunuch had no power to propagate himself, he could have no posterity. He is like the dry tree in that there would be no fruit in his life that might produce posterity.
Isaiah 66:17 (b) Probably this tree represents some particular wicked religion which permits abominations and wicked practices. The self-righteous person is satisfied with that kind of arrangement.
Ezekiel 17:24 (a) GOD uses this strange illustration to describe His power in bringing down the important men of the nation, and exalting the obscure man. He wrecks the life of the great man, and promotes the welfare of the small man. The trees here represent people. (See also Ezekiel 21:10).
Ezekiel 31:8 (a) This allegory describes Satan in his original beauty and glory. The description of Satan begins at verse3. It runs through verse9.
Daniel 4:10 (a) This tree is King Nebuchadnezzar. Daniel explains this fully.
Matthew 3:10 (b) The primary application of this type is to Israel. The application is also to the individual. GOD did lay the ax to the root of Israel and destroyed the nation. The roots, however, remain in the earth, and are even now producing a new tree. This happens also to individuals who, because their lives are so utterly given over to the Devil and there is no fruit for GOD, that one is cut off and sent to hell. (See also Luke 6:43).
Matthew 12:33 (a) The Lord is propounding here a very deep truth, which should stir every heart. The individual must be born again to become a good tree, which will bring forth good fruit. No man is naturally a Christian. The tree itself must be made before the fruit can be right. An unsaved person lives the life of an unsaved person. If he is transformed by the power and grace of GOD, then he becomes a Christian and lives the life of a Christian. (See Luke 6:44).
Matthew 13:32 (a) Mustard does not grow on trees. There is no such things as a mustard tree. The mustard grows on a bush. Therefore, this tree is an unnatural thing, and it represents the great, unnatural religious system, which consists of many denominations having a multitude of beliefs, many of them grotesque, and even wicked. GOD never intended that His church should be of this sort. Those who really trust JESUS CHRIST and are true Christians form only a very small part of that great institution we call Christendom. The birds in this story represent evil spirits. They are made to feel at home in this great unnatural religious system, which is a curse to the earth. (See Luke 13:19).
Luke 17:6 (b) The reference is to any trouble or difficulty in the life, which seems like a mountain that cannot be moved by any human means. Our Lord is able to do it, and therefore He gives us the privilege of bringing the problem to Him. (See "SEED").
Revelation 2:7 (b) We find no indication of the meaning of this type, but we may assume that it refers to the blessings that come from the Lord JESUS CHRIST to those who walk with GOD, dwell in His presence, and are planted in His courts.
Webster's Dictionary - Water Tree
A climbing shrub (Tetracera alnifolia, / potatoria) of Western Africa, which pours out a watery sap from the freshly cut stems.
Webster's Dictionary - Peepul Tree
A sacred tree (Ficus religiosa) of the Buddhists, a kind of fig tree which attains great size and venerable age. See Bo tree.
Webster's Dictionary - Fringe Tree
A small oleaceous tree (Chionanthus virginica), of the southern United States, having clusters of white flowers with slender petals. It is often cultivated.
Webster's Dictionary - Ourd Tree
A tree (the Crescentia Cujete, or calabash tree) of the West Indies and Central America.
Webster's Dictionary - Whitten Tree
Either of two shrubs (Viburnum Lantana, and V. Opulus), so called on account of their whitish branches.
Webster's Dictionary - Ople Tree
The witch-hazel.
Webster's Dictionary - Shittah Tree
(n.) A tree that furnished the precious wood of which the ark, tables, altars, boards, etc., of the Jewish tabernacle were made; - now believed to have been the wood of the Acacia Seyal, which is hard, fine grained, and yellowish brown in color.
Webster's Dictionary - Witch-Tree
(n.) The witch-hazel.
Webster's Dictionary - Weeping Tree
(1):
A tree from which honeydew or other liquid secretions of insects drip in considerable quantities, esp. one infested by the larvae of any species of the genus Ptylus, allied to the cuckoo spits, which in tropical countries secrete large quantities of a watery fluid.
(2):
Any tree having pendulous branches.
Webster's Dictionary - Til Tree
(1):
See Teil.
(2):
An ill-smelling lauraceous tree (Ocotea foetens) of the Canary Islands; - sometimes disting. as Canary Island til tree.
(3):
Var. of Teil tree.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fig Tree
I should not think it necessary to notice this article in our Concordance, but for the occasion that offers thereby of making an observation on the fig tree which the Lord Jesus blighted near Bethany. It may be proper, for the better apprehension of the subject, to remark, that the fig tree grew, in Palestine, not unfrequently in the roads, and highways, and hedges, beside those that were cultivated in. the gardens. It is plain, that this fig tree which Christ withered was of this kind; a hedge fruit, and, consequently, it was no man's property. Matthew's account of this transaction is, that when Jesus "saw this fig tree in the way, he came to it, and found nothing but leaves only; and said unto it, Let no fruit grow on thee hence forward for ever: and presently the fig tree withered away." (Matthew 21:18) And Mark adds to this relation, that "the time of figs was not yet." (Mark 11:13)
It is very evident from hence, that the Lord Jesus had an object of much higher moment to set forth by this action, than the mere blighting a hedge fig tree. For surely, the Lord did not expect fruit out of season; neither did he mean, as some have supposed, to shew anger, to a fig tree. It is well known, that in the eastern world almost all instruction was conveyed by parable and figure. And so much did the Lord Jesus, in his divine teaching, fall in with this popular way of conveying knowledge, that at one time we are told "without a parable spake he not unto them." (Matthew 13:34) The question becomes exceedingly interesting to know, what particular instruction to his disciples the Lord meant to have impressed on their minds by this event.
Perhaps I may be singular in my view of the subject. But if I err, may the Lord pity and pardon my ignorance, and the reader find no injury from my statement of it. The whole stress of the subject, as it strikes me, is in the nature and quality of this fig tree. It was hedge fruit. It was in the highway; and no man's property. Now the church is expressly compared by the Lord himself to a fig tree of his own, and planted in his vineyard. (Luke 13:6) And the prophet, in the Old Testament dispensation, celebrated the glories of God's grace to the church under a similar figure of his planting his vineyard with a choice vine. (Isaiah 5:1 etc.) The fruitless fig tree of the hedge, and which at the command of Jesus withered away, according to my view of the subject, was intended by the Lord to represent the mere professors of the gospel, who to a traveller afford leaves, but no fruit. It is, indeed, without; not in the garden, the church. It cannot bring forth fruit unto God; for the Lord saith, when speaking of his church, "From me is thy fruit found." (Hosea 14:8) Jesus hath a right and property in his people. They are his, both by the Father's gift, and by his own purchase. And he hath brought them in, and fenced them round, and they are "trees of his right hand planting." (Isaiah 61:3)
The instant withering of the barren fig tree, at Christ's command, became the emblem of what must ultimately follow all the way-side productions in nature, void of grace, at the great day of the Lord. And our Lord's own comment upon the blasted tree, seems very fully to justify this view of the subject. For when the disciples remarked to Jesus how soon the fig tree was withered away, the Lord made this striking answer, "Have faith in God." As if he had said, all are but the mere leaves of profession where there is no vital union in me. As he said elsewhere, "I am the vine; ye are the branches." (John 15:5) If this be the right sense of the passage, and the Lord Jesus meant to teach his disciples thereby, that every hedge fig tree hath no part in the church, no owner in Christ by his Father's gift or purchase, no union with him, and, consequently, no communion in his graces, but must in the hour of decision instantly wither away; then will this parable of the barren fig tree form one testimony more to the numberless other testimonies with which the word of God abounds, that the children of the wicked one, and the children of the kingdom, are totally separate and dissimilar from everlasting, and so must continue to everlasting. Tares can never become wheat; neither can wheat become tares. Goats must remain goats; for their nature cannot admit in them the nature of sheep. The fig tree of the hedge, never planted in the vineyard of Jesus, hath no fruit in him; and, consequently, always barren. So infinitely important is it, to be found in Christ.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cedar Tree
The cedar tree of Lebanon, forms an interesting object in holy Scripture, and merits attention. The tree itself seems, for majesty and beauty, to take place of every other among the trees of the forest. Its branches are wide and spreading. They begin to form themselves nearly from the ground, and stretch forth on each side. The tree itself is an evergreen, and sheds forth a gummy substance, which is said to contain many salutary qualities. The wood of it formed a part in the service of the cleansing of the leper. (See Leviticus 14:4) One of the kings of Israel called himself by the name of the Cedar of Lebanon, 2 Kings 14:9. The church, or Christ for the church, when celebrating the beauties and glories of their habitation, compares the beams of it to cedar. (Song of Song of Solomon 1:17) And the state of individual believers in the church is more than once spoken of, as resembled by the flourishing nature of the cedar of Lebanon. (Psalms 92:12; Psa 104:16) The Hebrews called it Tashur, which the Septuagint rendered cedar. There is somewhat very interesting in such representations of the Lord's inheritance, when by figure and similitude we are sent, by God the Holy Ghost, to the loveliest objects in nature to form our views of the Lord's pleasure and delight, which he taketh in his people. Taught by such an infallible Teacher methinks I would never read of the Cedar of Lebanon, without connecting with it some sweet resemblance to be discovered in his people, which he saith himself are the branch of his planting, and which are so, that they might be called trees of righteousness, "the planting of the Lord, that he might be glorified." (Isaiah 60:21; Psalms 92:13-155) And if Jesus himself, be in the view of JEHOVAH, and in his church's view, "the plant of renown," (Ezekiel 34:29) surely, it is blessed to know, that the church is in Jesus's view, the Cedar of Lebanon. And in how many ways do they bear resemblance to the glory of Lebanon, when made comely, from the comliness Jesus puts upon them! Is there any tree of the wood so graceful, or so lovely, as the Cedar of Lebanon? Neither is there any lily among the thorns so fair, and white, and fragrant, as Jesus's love is among the daughters. (Song of Song of Solomon 2:2) Do any trees out-top the Cedar of Lebanon, spread wider, or cast their branches with more luxuriancy farther than this fair one? Neither do any grow more upright, extend their usefulness in equal direction for general good, as the disciples of the Lord. For though they are poor and mean in man's opinion, yet do they stand high in the esteem of Christ Jesus; and in the grace of the Lord, like the branches of the cedar, they spread forth, by faith, in every direction, and by rich experience in the divine life, manifest forth the loveliness of their high calling all around. And as the Cedar of Lebanon is deep-rooted, ever-green, and ever-fragrant, so believers in Christ are deep-rooted in him, always flourishing in him, however unprofitable in themselves; and as the prophet describes the church, "their branches shall spread, and their beauty be as the olive tree, and their smell like Lebanon." (Hosea 14:6) Such, and many more of the like nature, open to our view, while considering the church in Jesus's esteem, as the Cedar of Lebanon. (See a lovely account of this, 1618450344_28)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Almond, Almond Tree
The tree and itsfruit are represented by the same word. It is derived from a root signifying 'to hasten,' which is appropriate, seeing it is the first tree to break out into blossom, as a forerunner of spring. The meaning is confirmed by Jeremiah 1:11,12 where the prophet saw an almond tree, and Jehovah said, "Thou hast well seen: for I will hasten my word to perform it." The bowls of the golden candlestick were to be made like almonds. Exodus 25:33,34 ; Exodus 37:19,20 . Aaron's rod budded, blossomed, and yielded almonds in one night, Numbers 17:8 : beautiful type of the coming of the Lord Jesus out of His grave perfect for His priestly functions. In Ecclesiastes 12:5 , when everything seems to be decaying instead of 'the almond tree shall flourish,' it may be translated 'the almond tree shall be despised;' others say, 'cause loathing;' others prefer to compare the almond tree to the white head of an old man hastening to the grave.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Apple, Apple Tree
This is generally supposed to refer to the citron but apples grow in Palestine, and the Arabicname for the apple (tuffuh ) differs little from the Hebrew word, tappuach . Others believe the quince is alluded to, which is fragrant and of a golden colour. Song of Solomon 2:3,5 ; Song of Solomon 7:8 ; Song of Solomon 8:5 ; Joel 1:12 . In Proverbs 25:11 "a word fitly spoken" is like some elegant device, as "apples of gold in pictures [1] of silver."
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Tree
‛Êts (עֵץ, Strong's #6086), “tree; wood; timber; stick; stalk.” This word has cognates in Ugaritic, Akkadian, Phoenician, Aramaic (‘e’), and Arabic. It occurs about 325 times in biblical Hebrew and in all periods.
In its first biblical appearance ‘ets is used as a collective noun representing all trees bearing fruit (Gen. 1:11). In Exod. 9:25 the word means “tree” indiscriminately: “… And the hail smote every herb of the field, and brake every tree of the field.” God forbids Israel to destroy the orchards around besieged cities: “When thou shalt besiege a city a long time, in making war against it to take it, thou shalt not destroy the trees … : for thou mayest eat of them [1] …” (Deut. 20:19).
This word may signify a single “tree,” as it does in Gen. 2:9: “… The tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil.”
This word may be used of the genus “tree.” So Isa. 41:19 lists the olive “tree” and the box “tree” in the midst of a long list of various species of trees.
‛Êts can mean “wood.” Thus, Deut. 16:21 should read: “You shall not plant for yourself an Asherah of any kind of wood” (NASB, “any kind of tree”). This word can represent “wood” as a material from which things are constructed, as a raw material to be carved: “… And in carving of timber, to work in all manner of workmanship” (Exod. 31:5). Large unprocessed pieces of “wood or timber” are also signified by ‛êts: “Go up to the mountain, and bring wood [2], and build the house …” (Hag. 1:8). The end product of wood already processed and fashioned into something may be indicated by ‛êts: “And upon whatsoever any of them, when they are dead, doth fall, it shall be unclean; whether it be any vessel of wood …” (Lev. 11:32). This word means “stick” or “piece of wood” in Ezek. 37:16: “… Thou son of man, take thee one stick, and write upon it.…” This may also refer to a “pole” or “gallows”: “… Within three days shall Pharaoh lift up thy head from off thee, and shall hang thee on a tree [3] …” (Gen. 40:19).
‛Êts once means “stalk”: “But she had brought them up to the roof of the house, and hid them with the stalks of flax, which she had laid in order upon the roof” (Josh. 2:6).
'Ayil (אַיִל, Strong's #352), “large, mighty tree.” This word occurs 4 times and only in poetical passages. This does not mean a particular genus or species of tree but merely a large, mighty tree: “For they shall be ashamed of the [4] [5] which ye have desired …” (Isa. 1:29—the first biblical occurrence).
'Êlôn (אֵלוֹן, Strong's #436), “large tree.” This noun is probably related to ‘ayil, “large tree.” ‘Elon occurs 10 times and only in relation to places of worship. It may well be that these were all ancient cultic sites. The word does not represent a particular genus or species of tree but, like the noun to which it is related, simply a “big tree”: “Gaal spoke again and said, Look, men are coming down from the center of the land, and one company is coming from the direction of the Diviners’ oak [6]” (Judg. 9:37, RSV). Judg. 9:6 speaks of the “tree of the pillar” (KJV, “plain of the piilar”) in Shechem where the men of Shechem and Beth-millo made Abimelech king.
Webster's Dictionary - Mahwa Tree
An East Indian sapotaceous tree (Bassia latifolia, and also B. butyracea), whose timber is used for wagon wheels, and the flowers for food and in preparing an intoxicating drink. It is one of the butter trees. The oil, known as mahwa and yallah, is obtained from the kernels of the fruit.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Box Tree
Box Tree. Isaiah 41:19. A small evergreen tree, either the same with or closely resembling the shrubby box of our gardens.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Chestnut Tree
(Heb. 'armon .) ( Genesis 30:37 ; Ezekiel 31:8 ) Probably the "palm tree" (Platanus orientalis ) is intended. This tree thrives best in low and rather moist situations in the north of Palestine, and resembles our sycamore or buttonwood ( Platanus occidentalis ).
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Almug Tree
a certain kind of wood, mentioned 1 Kings 10:11 ; 2 Chronicles 2:8 ; 2 Chronicles 9:10-11 . Jerom and the Vulgate render it, ligna thyina, and the Septuagint ξυλα πελεκητα , wrought wood. Several critics understand it to mean gummy wood; but a wood abounding in resin must be very unfit for the uses to which this is said to be applied. Celsus queries if it be not the sandal; but Michaelis thinks the particular species of wood to be wholly unknown to us. Dr. Shaw supposes that the almug tree was the cypress; and he observes that the wood of this tree is still used in Italy and other places for violins, harpsichords, and other stringed instruments.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Tree
is the first and largest of the vegetable kind, consisting of a single trunk, out of which spring forth branches and leaves. Heat is so essential to the growth of trees, that we see them grow larger and smaller in a sort of gradation as the climates in which they stand are more or less hot. The hottest countries yield, in general, the largest and tallest trees, and those, also, in much greater beauty and variety than the colder do; and even those plants which are common to both arrive at a much greater bulk in the southern than in the northern climates; nay, there are some regions so bleak and chill, that they raise no vegetables at all to any considerable height. Greenland, Iceland, and similar places, afford no trees at all; and the shrubs which grow in them are always little and low. In the warmer climates, where trees grow to a moderate size, any accidental diminution of the common heat is found very greatly to impede vegetation; and even in England the cold summers we sometimes have give us an evident proof of this in the scarcity of produce from all our large fruit trees. Heat, whatever be the producing cause, acts as well upon vegetation one way as another. Thus the heat of manure, and the artificial heat of coal fires in stoves, are found to supply the place of the sun. Great numbers of the eastern trees, in their native soil, flower twice in a year, and some flower and bear ripe fruit all the year round; and it is observed of these last, that they are at once the most frequent and the most useful to the inhabitants; their fruits, which always hang on them in readiness, containing cool juices, which are good in fevers, and other of the common diseases of hot countries. The umbrageous foliage, with which the God of providence has generally furnished all trees in warm climates, affords a most refreshing and grateful shade to those who seek relief from the direct and hurtful rays of a tropical sun.
The Land of Promise cannot boast, like many other countries, of extensive woods; but considerable thickets of trees and of reeds sometimes arise to diversify and adorn the scene. Between the Lake Samochonites and the sea of Tiberias, the river Jordan is almost concealed by shady trees from the view of the traveller. When the waters of the Jordan are low, the Lake Samochonites is only a marsh, for the most part dry and overgrown with shrubs and reeds. In these thickets, among other ferocious animals, the wild boar seeks a covert from the burning rays of the sun. Large herds of them are sometimes to be seen on the banks of the river, near the sea of Tiberias, lying among the reeds, or feeding under the trees. Such moist and shady places are in all countries the favourite haunts of these fierce and dangerous animals. Those marshy coverts are styled woods in the sacred Scriptures; for the wild boar of the wood is the name which that creature receives from the royal psalmist: "The boar out of the wood doth waste it; and the wild beast of the field doth devour it," Psalms 80:13 . The wood of Ephraim, where the battle was fought between the forces of Absalom and the servants of David, was probably a place of the same kind; for the sacred historian observes, that the wood devoured more people that day than the sword, 2 Samuel 18:8 . Some have supposed the meaning of this passage to be, that the soldiers of Absalom were destroyed by the wild beasts of the wood; but it can scarcely be supposed, that in the reign of David, when the Holy Land was crowded with inhabitants, the wild beasts could be so numerous in one of the woods as to cause such a destruction. But, supposing the wood of Ephraim to have been a morass covered with trees and bushes, like the haunts of the wild boar near the banks of Jordan, the difficulty is easily removed. It is certain that such a place has more than once proved fatal to contending armies, partly by suffocating those who in the hurry of flight inadvertently venture over places incapable of supporting them, and partly by retarding them till their pursuers come up and cut them to pieces. In this manner a greater number of men than fell in the heat of battle may be destroyed. It is probable, however, that nothing more is intended by the sacred historian, than the mention of a fact familiar to military men in all ages, and whatever kind of weapons were then employed in warfare,—that forests, especially such thick and impassable forests as are common in warm countries, constitute the very worst ground along which a discomfited army can be compelled to retreat. Their orderly ranks are broken; the direction which each warrior for his own safety must take is uncertain; and while one tumultuous mass is making a pass for itself through intervening brushwood and closely matted jungle, and another is hurrying along a different path and encountering similar or perhaps greater impediments, the cool and deliberate pursuers, whether archers or sharp shooters, enjoy an immense advantage in being able to choose their own points of annoyance, and by flank or cross attacks to kill their retreating foes, with scarcely any risk to themselves, but with immense carnage to the routed army.
Several critics imagine that by עצ חדר , rendered "goodly trees,"
Leviticus 23:40 , the citron tree is intended. עצ עבת , rendered "thick trees" in the same verse, and in Nehemiah 8:15 ; Ezekiel 20:28 , is the myrtle, according to the rabbins, the Chaldee paraphrase, Syriac version, and Deodatus. The word אשל , translated "grove" in Genesis 21:33 , has been variously translated. Parkhurst renders it an oak, and says, that from this word may be derived the name of the famous asylum, opened by Romulus between two groves of oak at Rome. On the other hand, Celsius, Michaelis, and Dr. Geddes render it the tamarisk, which is a lofty and beautiful tree, and grows abundantly in Egypt and Arabia. The same word in 1 Samuel 22:6 ; 1 Samuel 31:13 , is rendered "a tree." It must be noted too, that in the first of these places, the common version is equally obscure and contradictory, by making ramah a proper name: it signifies hillock or bank. Of the trees that produced precious balsams there was one in particular that long flourished in Judea, having been supposed to have been an object of great attention to Solomon, which was afterward transplanted to Matarea, in Egypt, where it continued till about two hundred and fifty years ago, according to Maillet, who gives a description of it, drawn, it is supposed, from the Arabian authors, in which he says, "This shrub had two very differently coloured barks, the one red, the other perfectly green; that they tasted strongly like incense and turpentine, and when bruised between the fingers they smelt very nearly like cardamoms. This balsam, which was extremely precious and celebrated, and was used by the Coptic church in their chrism, was produced by a very low shrub; and it is said, that all those shrubs that produced balsams are every where low, and do not exceed two or three cubits in height."
Descriptions of the principal trees and shrubs mentioned in Holy Writ, the reader will find noticed in distinct articles under their several denominations.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Pine Tree
The pine appears in our translation three times, Nehemiah 8:15 ; Isaiah 41:19 ; Isaiah 60:13 . Nehemiah 8:15 , giving directions for observing the feast of tabernacles, says, "Fetch olive branches, pine branches, myrtle branches, and branches of thick trees, to make booths." The Hebrew phrase עצ שמן , means literally branches of oily or gummy plants. The LXX say cypress. Scheuchzer says the Turks call the cypress zemin. The author of "Scripture Illustrated" says," I should prefer the whole species called jasmin, on account of its verdure, its fragrance, and its flowers, which are highly esteemed. The word jasmin and jasemin of the Turks, resembles strongly the shemen of the Hebrew original here. The Persians also name this plant semen and simsyk." The authority, however, of the Septuagint must prevail. In Isaiah 41:19 ; Isaiah 60:13 , the Hebrew word is תדהר ; a tree, says Parkhurst, so called from the springiness or elasticity of its wood. Luther thought it the elm, which is a lofty and spreading tree; and Dr. Stock renders it the ash. After all, it may be thought advisable to retain the pine. La Roche, describing a valley near to Mount Lebanon, has this observation: "La continuelle verdure des pins et des chenes verds fait toujours sa beaute." [1]
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Mulberry Tree
There is somewhat sacred in the mulberry-tree, and holy Scripture seems to have pointed this out very strikingly, when directing the movement of the Lord's army to be, when the people heard the sound of a going in the mulberry-trees; for thereby they should know that the Lord went out before them. (2 Samuel 5:24.) The Psalmist speaks of the church passing through the valley of Baca (that is the mulberry-trees), meaning soul exercises with the sweet fruit of divine love. For when the Lord calls to trial, he gives to his people a grace suited to support. (Psalms 84:4-6.)
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Tree
1: δένδρον (Strong's #1186 — Noun Neuter — dendron — den'-dron ) "a living, growing tree" (cp. Eng., "rhododendron," lit., "rose tree"), known by the fruit it produces, Matthew 12:33 ; Luke 6:44 ; certain qualities are mentioned in the NT; "a good tree," Matthew 7:17,18 ; 12:33 ; Luke 6:43 ; "a corrupt tree" (ditto); in Jude 1:12 , metaphorically, of evil teachers, "autumn trees (AV, 'trees whose fruit withereth') without fruit, twice dead, plucked up by the roots," RV; in Luke 13:19 in some texts, "a great tree," AV (RV, "a tree"); for this and Matthew 13:32 see MUSTARD; in Luke 21:29 "the fig tree" is illustrative of Israel, "all the trees" indicating Gentile nations.
2: ξύλον (Strong's #3586 — Noun Neuter — xulon — xoo'-lon ) "wood, a piece of wood, anything made of wood" (see STAFF , STOCKS), is used, with the rendering "tree," (a) in Luke 23:31 , where "the green tree" refers either to Christ, figuratively of all His living power and excellencies, or to the life of the Jewish people while still inhabiting their land, in contrast to "the dry," a figure fulfilled in the horrors of the Roman massacre and devastation in A.D. 70 (cp. the Lord's parable in Luke 13:6-9 ; see Ezekiel 20:47 , and cp. Ezekiel 21:3 ); (b) of "the cross," the tree being the stauros, the upright pale or stake to which Romans nailed those who were thus to be executed, Acts 5:30 ; 10:39 ; 13:29 ; Galatians 3:13 ; 1 Peter 2:24 ; (c) of "the tree of life," Revelation 2:7 ; 22:2 (twice),14,19, RV, AV, "book." See WOOD.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Olives, Olive Tree
1: ἐλαία (Strong's #1636 — Noun Feminine — elaia — el-ah'-yah ) denotes (a) "an olive tree," Romans 11:17,24 ; Revelation 11:4 (plural); the Mount of Olives was so called from the numerous olive trees there, and indicates the importance attached to such; the Mount is mentioned in the NT in connection only with the Lord's life on earth, Matthew 21:1 ; 24:3 ; 26:30 ; Mark 11:1 ; 13:3 ; 14:26 ; Luke 19:37 ; 22:39 ; John 8:1 ; (b) "an olive," James 3:12 , RV (AV, "olive berries").
2: ἐλαιών (Strong's #1638 — Noun Masculine — elaion — el-ah-yone' ) "an olive grove" or "olive garden," the ending -- on, as in this class of noun, here indicates "a place set with trees of the kind designated by the primitive" (Thayer); hence it is applied to the Mount of Olives, Luke 19:29 ; 21:37 ; Acts 1:12 ("Olivet"): in the first two of these and in Mark 11:1 , some mss. have the form of the noun as in No. 1.
3: καλλιέλαιος (Strong's #2565 — Noun Feminine — kallielaios — kal-le-el'-ah-yos ) "the garden olive" (from kallos, "beauty," and No. 1), occurs in Romans 11:24 , "a good olive tree."
4: ἀγριέλαιος (Strong's #65 — Adjective — agrielaios — ag-ree-el'-ah-yos ) an adjective (from agrios, "growing in the fields, wild," and No. 1), denoting "of the wild olive," is used as a noun in Romans 11:17,24 , "a wild olive tree" (RV, in the latter verse).
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Bay-Tree
אזרה . It is mentioned only in Psalms 37:35-36 : "I have seen the ungodly in great power, and flourishing like a green bay-tree. Yet he passed away, and lo, he was not. Yea, I sought him, but he could not be found." Aben Ezra, Jarchi, Kimchi, Jerom, and some others say that the original may mean only a native tree; a tree growing in its native soil, not having suffered by transplantation. Such a tree spreads itself luxuriantly. The Septuagint and Vulgate render it cedars; but the high Dutch of Luther's Bible, the old Saxon, the French, the Spanish, the Italian of Diodati, and the version of Ainsworth, make it the laurel.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Balsam Tree
בעלאּ?שמין ; in Arabic, abuscham, that is, "father of scent," sweet-scented. According to Mr. Bruce, the balessan, balsam, or balm, is an evergreen shrub, or tree, which grows to about fourteen feet high, spontaneously and without culture in its native country, Azab, and all along the coast to Babelmandel. There were three kinds of balsam extracted from this tree. The first was called opobalsamum, and was most highly esteemed. It was that which flowed spontaneously, or by means of incision, from the trunk or branches of the tree in summer time. The second was carpobalsamum, made by expressing the fruit when in maturity. The third, and least esteemed of all, was hylobalsamum, made by a decoction of the buds and small young twigs. The great value set upon this drug in the east is traced to the earliest ages. The Ishmaelites, or Arabian carriers and merchants, trafficking with the Arabian commodities into Egypt, brought with them צרי as a part of their cargo, Genesis 37:25 ; Genesis 43:11 . Josephus, in the history of the antiquities of his country, says that a tree of this balsam was brought to Jerusalem by the queen of Saba, and given among other presents to Solomon, who, as we know from Scripture, was very studious of all sorts of plants, and skilful in the description and distinction of them. And here, indeed, it seems to have been cultivated and to have thriven; so that the place of its origin, through length of time, combined with other reasons, came to be forgotten. Notwithstanding the positive authority of Josephus, and the great probability that attends it, we cannot put it in competition with what we have been told in Scripture, as we have just now seen that the place where it grew, and was sold to merchants, was Gilead in Judea, more than 1730 years before Christ, or 1000 before the queen of Saba; so that in reading the verse, nothing can be plainer than that it had been transplanted into Judea, flourished, and had become an article of commerce in Gilead, long before the period he mentions. "A company of Ishmaelites came from Gilead with their camels bearing spicery and balm, and myrrh, going to carry it down to Egypt,"
Genesis 37:25 . Theophrastus, Dioscorides, Pliny, Strabo, Diodorus Siculus, Tacitus, Justin, Solinus, and Serapion, speaking of its costliness and medicinal virtues, all say that this balsam came from Judea. The words of Pliny are, "But to all other odours whatever, the balsam is preferred, produced in no other part but the land of Judea, and even there in two gardens only; both of them belonging to the king, one no more than twenty acres, the other still smaller." The whole valley of Jericho was once esteemed the most fruitful in Judea; and the obstinacy with which the Jews fought here to prevent the balsam trees from falling into the possession of the Romans, attests the importance which was attached to them. This tree Pliny describes as peculiar to the vale of Jericho, and as "more like a vine than a myrtle." It was esteemed so precious a rarity, that both Pompey and Titus carried a specimen to Rome in triumph; and the balsam, owing to its scarcity, sold for double its weight in silver, till its high price led to the practice of adulteration. Justin makes it the chief source of the national wealth. He describes the country in which it grew, as a valley like a garden, environed with continual hills, and, as it were, enclosed with a wall. "The space of the valley contains 200,000 acres, and is called Jericho. In that valley, there is wood as admirable for its fruitfulness as for its delight, for it is intermingled with palm trees and opobalsamum. The trees of the opobalsamum have a resemblance to fir trees; but they are lower, and are planted and husbanded after the manner of vines. On a set season of the year they sweat balsam. The darkness of the place is beside as wonderful as the fruitfulness of it; for although the sun shines no where hotter in the world, there is naturally a moderate and perpetual gloominess of the air." According to Mr. Buckingham, this description is most accurate. "Both the heat and the gloominess," he says, "were observed by us, though darkness would be an improper term to apply to this gloom."
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Fir Tree
ברוש , occurs 2 Samuel 6:5 ; 1 Kings 5:8 ; 1 Kings 5:10 ; 1 Kings 6:15 ; 1 Kings 6:34 ; 1 Kings 9:11 ; 2 Kings 19:23 ; 2 Chronicles 2:8 ; 2 Chronicles 3:5 ; Psalms 104:17 ; Isaiah 14:8 ; Isaiah 37:24 ; Isaiah 41:19 ; Isaiah 55:13 ; Isaiah 60:13 ; Ezekiel 27:5 ; Ezekiel 31:8 ; Hosea 14:8 ; Nahum 2:3 ; Zechariah 11:2 . The LXX render it so variously as to show that they knew not what particular tree is meant; the Vulgate, generally by abietes, the "fir-tree." Celsius asserts that it is the cedar; but Millar maintains that it is the fir. The fir tree is an evergreen, of beautiful appearance, whose lofty height, and dense foliage, afford a spacious shelter and shade. The trunk of the tree is very straight. The wood was anciently used for spears, musical instruments, furniture for houses, rafters in building, and for ships. In 2 Samuel 6:5 , it is mentioned that David played on instruments of fir wood; and Dr. Burney, in his "History of Music," observes, "This species of wood, so soft in its nature, and sonorous in its effects, seems to have been preferred by the ancients, as well as moderns, to every other kind for the construction of musical instruments, particularly the bellies of them, on which the tone of them chiefly depends. Those of the harp, lute, guitar, harpsichord, and violin, in present use, are always made of this wood."
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Olive Tree
וית , ελαια , Matthew 21:1 ; Romans 11:17 ; Romans 11:24 ; James 3:12 ; αγριελαιος , oleaster, the wild olive, Romans 11:17 ; Romans 11:24 . Tournefort mentions eighteen kinds of olives; but in the Scripture we only read of the cultivated and wild olive. The cultivated olive is of a moderate height, and thrives best in a sunny and warm soil. Its trunk is knotty; its bark is smooth, and of an ash colour; its wood is solid, and yellowish; its leaves are oblong, and almost like those of the willow, of a dark green colour on the upper side, and a whitish below. In the month of June it puts forth white flowers, growing in bunches, each of one piece, and widening toward the top, and dividing into four parts. After this flower succeeds the fruit, which is oblong and plump. It is first green, then pale, and, when quite ripe, becomes black. Within it is enclosed a hard stone, filled with oblong seeds. The wild olives were of a less kind. Canaan much abounded with olives. It seems almost every proprietor, whether kings or subjects, had their olive yards. The olive branch was, from most ancient times, used as the symbol of reconciliation and peace.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Almond Tree
לוז Arabic, lauz. Translated hazel, Genesis 30:37 ; שקד , rendered almond, Genesis 43:11 ; Exodus 25:33-34 ; Exodus 37:19-20 ; Numbers 17:8 ; Ecclesiastes 12:5 ; and Jeremiah 1:11 . The first name may be that of the tree; the other, that of the fruit, or nut. A tree resembling the peach tree in its leaves and blossoms, but the fruit is longer and more compressed, the outer green coat is thinner and drier when ripe, and the shell of the stone is not so rugged. This stone, or nut, contains a kernel, which is the only esculent part. The whole arrives at maturity in September, when the outer tough cover splits open and discharges the nut. From the circumstance of its blossoming the earliest of any of the trees, beginning as soon as the rigour of the winter is past, and before it is in leaf, it has its Hebrew name shakad, which comes from a verb signifying to make haste, to be in a hurry, or to awake early. To the forwardness of the almond tree there seems to be a reference in Jeremiah: "The word of the Lord came unto me, saying, Jeremiah, what seest thou? And I said, I see a rod of an almond tree. Then said the Lord unto me, Thou hast well seen: for I will hasten my word to perform it;" or rather, "I am hastening, or watching over my word to fulfil it," Jeremiah 1:11-12 . In this manner it is rendered by the Seventy; and by the Vulgate, Vigilabo ego super verbum meum. [1] This is the first vision with which the Prophet was honoured; and his attention is roused by a very significant emblem of that severe correction with which the Most High was hastening to visit his people for their iniquity: and from the species of tree to which the rod belonged, he is warned of its near approach. The idea which the appearance of the almond rod suggested to his mind, is confirmed by the exposition of God himself: "I am watching over, or on account of, my word to fulfil it;" and this double mode of instruction, first by emblem, and then by exposition, was certainly intended to make a deeper impression on the mind both of Jeremiah and of the people to whom he was sent.
It is probable that the rods which the princes of Israel bore, were scions of the almond tree, at once the ensign of their office, and the emblem of their vigilance. Such, we know from the testimony of Scripture, was the rod of Aaron; which renders it exceedingly probable, that the rods of the other chiefs were from the same tree.
The hoary head is beautifully compared by Solomon to the almond tree, covered in the earliest days of spring with its snow white flowers, before a single leaf has budded: "The almond tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail," Ecclesiastes 12:5 . Man has existed in this world but a few days, when old age begins to appear, sheds its snows upon his head, prematurely nips his hopes, darkens his earthly prospects, and hurries him into the grave.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Box Tree
תאשור , Isaiah 41:9 ; Isaiah 60:13 ; Ezekiel 27:6 ; 2 Esdras 14:24 , where the word appears to be used for tablets. Most of the ancient, and several of the modern, translators, render this word the buxus, or "box tree;" but from its being mentioned along with trees of the forest, some more stately tree must be intended, probably the cedar.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Palm Tree
תמר , Exodus 15:27 , &c. This tree, sometimes called the date tree, grows plentifully in the east. It rises to a great height. The stalks are generally full of rugged knots, which are the vestiges of the decayed leaves; for the trunk of this tree is not solid, like other trees, but its centre is filled with pith, round which is a tough bark full of strong fibres when young, which, as the tree grows old, hardens and becomes ligneous. To this bark the leaves are closely joined, which in the centre rise erect; but, after they are advanced above the vagina which surrounds them, they expand very wide on every side the stem; and, as the older leaves decay, the stalk advances in height. The leaves, when the tree has grown to a size for bearing fruit, are six or eight feet long, are very broad when spread out, and are used for covering the tops of houses, &c. The fruit, which is called date, grows below the leaves in clusters, and is of a sweet and agreeable taste. The learned Kaempfer, as a botanist, an antiquary, and a traveller, has exhausted the whole subject of palm trees. "The diligent natives," says Mr. Gibbon, "celebrated, either in verse or prose, the three hundred and sixty uses to which the trunk, the branches, the leaves, the juice, and the fruit, were skilfully applied." "The extensive importance of the date tree," says Dr. E. D. Clarke, "is one of the most curious subjects to which a traveller can direct his attention. A considerable part of the inhabitants of Egypt, of Arabia, and Persia, subsist almost entirely upon its fruit. They boast also of its medicinal virtues. Their camels feed upon the date stone. From the leaves they make couches, baskets, bags, mats, and brushes; from the branches, cages for their poultry, and fences for their gardens; from the fibres of the boughs, thread, ropes, and rigging; from the sap is prepared a spirituous liquor; and the body of the tree furnishes fuel.
It is even said that from one variety of the palm tree, the phoenix farinifera, meal has been extracted, which is found among the fibres of the trunk, and has been used for food."
In the temple of Solomon were pilasters made in the form of palm trees, 1 Kings 6:29 . It was under a tree of this kind that Deborah dwelt between Ramah and Bethel, Judges 4:5 . To the fair, flourishing, and fruitful condition of this tree, the psalmist very aptly compares the votary of virtue, Psalms 92:12-14 :—
The righteous shall flourish like a palm tree. Those that are planted in the house of Jehovah, In the courts of our God, shall flourish;
In old age they shall still put forth buds, They shall be full of sap and vigorous.
The palm tree is crowned at its top with a large tuft of spiring leaves about four feet long, which never fall off, but always continue in the same flourishing verdure. The tree, as Dr. Shaw was informed, is in its greatest vigour about thirty years after it is planted, and continues in full vigour seventy years longer; bearing all this while, every year, about three or four hundred pounds' weight of dates. The trunk of the tree is remarkably straight and lofty. Jeremiah, speaking of the idols that were carried in procession, says they were upright as the palm tree, Jeremiah 10:5 . And for erect stature and slenderness of form, the spouse, in Song of Solomon 7:7 , is compared to this tree:—
How framed, O my love, for delights! Lo, thy stature is like a palm tree, And thy bosom like clusters of dates.
On this passage Mr. Good observes, that "the very word tamar, here used for the palm tree, and whose radical meaning is ‘straight,' or ‘upright,' (whence it was afterward applied to pillars or columns, as well as to the palm,) was also a general name among the ladies of Palestine, and unquestionably adopted in honour of the stature they had already acquired, or gave a fair promise of attaining."
A branch of palm was a signal of victory, and was carried before conquerors in the triumphs. To this, allusion is made, Revelation 7:9 : and for this purpose were they borne before Christ in his way to Jerusalem, John 12:13 . From the inspissated sap of the tree, a kind of honey, or dispse, as it is called, is produced, little inferior to that of bees. The same juice, after fermentation, makes a sort of wine much used in the east. It is once mentioned as wine, Numbers 28:7 ; Exodus 29:40 ; and by it is intended the strong drink, Isaiah 5:11 ; Isaiah 24:9 . Theodoret and Chrysostom, on these places, both Syrians, and unexceptionable witnesses in what belongs to their own country, confirm this declaration. "This liquor," says Dr. Shaw, "which has a more luscious sweetness than honey, is of the consistence of a thin syrup, but quickly grows tart and ropy, acquiring an intoxicating quality, and giving by distillation an agreeable spirit, or araky, according to the general name of these people for all hot liquors, extracted by the alembic." Its Hebrew name is שכר , the σικερα of the Greeks; and from its sweetness, probably, the saccharum of the Romans. Jerom informs us that in Hebrew "any inebriating liquor is called sicera, whether made of grain, the juice of apples, honey, dates, or any other fruit."
This tree was formerly of great value and esteem among the Israelites, and so very much cultivated in Judea, that, in after times, it became the emblem of that country, as may be seen in a medal of the Emperor Vespasian upon the conquest of Judea. It represents a captive woman sitting under a palm tree, with this inscription, "Judea capta;" [1] and upon a Greek coin, likewise, of his son Titus, struck upon the like occasion, we see a shield suspended upon a palm tree, with a Victory writing upon it.
Pliny also calls Judea palmis inclyta, "renowned for palms." Jericho, in particular, was called "the city of palms," Deuteronomy 34:3 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 ; because, as Josephus, Strabo, and Pliny have remarked, it anciently abounded in palm trees. And so Dr. Shaw remarks, that, though these trees are not now either plentiful or fruitful in other parts of the holy land, yet there are several of them at Jericho, where there is the conveniency they require of being often watered; where, likewise, the climate is warm, and the soil sandy, such as they thrive and delight in. Tamar, a city built in the desert by Solomon, 1 Kings 9:18 ; Ezekiel 47:19 ; Ezekiel 48:28 , was probably so named from the palm trees growing about it; as it was afterward by the Romans called Palmyra, or rather Palmira, on the same account, from palma, "a palm tree."
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Apple Tree
תפוח , Proverbs 25:11 ; Song of Solomon 2:3 ; Song of Solomon 2:5 ; Song of Solomon 7:8 ; Song of Solomon 8:5 ; Joel 1:12 . As the best apples of Egypt, though ordinary, are brought thither by sea from Rhodes, and by land from Damascus, we may believe that Judea, an intermediate country between Egypt and Damascus, has none that are of any value. Can it be imagined, then, that the apple trees of which the Prophet Joel speaks, Joel 1:12 , and which he mentions among the things that gave joy to the inhabitants of Judea, were those that we call by that name? Our translators must surely have been mistaken here, since the apples which the inhabitants of Judea eat at this day are of foreign growth, and at the same time but very indifferent.
There are five places, beside this in Joel, in which the word occurs; and from them we learn that it was thought the noblest of the trees of the wood, and that its fruit was very sweet or pleasant, Song of Solomon 2:3 ; of the colour of gold, Proverbs 25:11 ; extremely fragrant, Song of Solomon 7:8 ; and proper for those to smell that were ready to faint, Song of Solomon 2:5 . We may be sure that the taphuach was very early known in the holy land, as it is mentioned in the book of Joshua as having given name to a city of Manasseh and one of Judah. Several interpreters and critics render פרי הדר , Leviticus 23:40 , branches, or fruit, of the beautiful tree; and understand it of the citron; and it is known that the Jews still make use of the fruit of this tree at their yearly feast of tabernacles.
Citron trees are very noble, being large, their leaves beautiful, ever continuing on the trees, of an exquisite smell, and affording a most delightful shade. It might well, therefore, be said, "As the citron tree is among the trees of the wood, so is my beloved among the sons." This is a delicate compliment, comparing the fine appearance of the prince, amid his escort, to the superior beauty with which the citron tree appears among the ordinary trees of the forest; and the compliment is heightened by an allusion to the refreshing shade and the exhilarating fruit.
The exhilarating effects of the fruit are mentioned Song of Solomon 2:5 , "Comfort me with citrons." Egmont and Heyman tell us of an Arabian who was in a great measure brought to himself, when overcome with wine, by the help of citrons and coffee.
To the manner of serving up these citrons in his court, Solomon seems to refer, when he says, "A word fitly spoken is like golden citrons in silver baskets;" whether, as Maimonides supposes, in baskets wrought with open work, or in salvers curiously chased, it nothing concerns us to determine; the meaning is, that an excellent saying, suitably expressed, is as the most acceptable gift in the fairest conveyance. So the rabbins say, that the tribute of the first ripe fruits was carried to the temple in silver baskets.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Pine Tree
Heb. tidhar . ( Isaiah 41:19 ; 60:13 ) What tree is intended is not certain: but the rendering "pine," seems least probable of any.
Shemen , ( Nehemiah 8:16 ) is probably the wild olive.
Webster's Dictionary - Rowan Tree
A european tree (Pyrus aucuparia) related to the apple, but with pinnate leaves and flat corymbs of small white flowers followed by little bright red berries. Called also roan tree, and mountain ash. The name is also applied to two American trees of similar habit (Pyrus Americana, and P. sambucifolia).
Webster's Dictionary - Locust Tree
A large North American tree of the genus Robinia (R. Pseudacacia), producing large slender racemes of white, fragrant, papilionaceous flowers, and often cultivated as an ornamental tree. In England it is called acacia.
Webster's Dictionary - Tree Burial
Disposal of the dead by placing the corpse among the branches of a tree or in a hollow trunk, a practice among many primitive peoples.
Webster's Dictionary - Wicken Tree
Same as Quicken tree.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Almond Tree
Almond Tree. Genesis 43:11. This tree resembles a peach tree, but is larger. In Palestine it blossoms in January, and in March has fruit. Its blossoms are pinkish-white. Its Hebrew name signifies to watch and hasten, and to this there is an allusion in Jeremiah 1:11-12. Aaron's rod was from an almond. Numbers 17:8. In Ecclesiastes 12:5 the hoary head is beautifully compared with the almond tree, either on account of its whiteness, beauty and winter blossoming, or the hastening on of decay. The golden bowls of the sacred candlestick were made "like almonds, with their knops and their flowers." Exodus 25:33-34.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chestnut Tree
Chestnut Tree. Genesis 30:37; Ezekiel 31:8, A. V., but the R. V. reads plane-tree in both places. The tree grows to a large size, with a mass of rich foliage. The stem is lofty, covered with a smooth bark, which annually falls off. The flowers are small, and come out a little before the leaves. This tree is a native of western Asia, but is found as far east as Cashmere.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Fig Tree
Fig, Fig Tree. This, Ficus carica, was a tree very common in Palestine. Deuteronomy 8:8. Mount Olivet was famous anciently for fig trees; and still some are to be found there. The first notice we have of this tree is when Adam and Eve endeavored to clothe themselves with leaves. Genesis 3:7. Whether the leaves they used were those of the ordinary fig tree may be questioned; but the practice of fastening leaves together for various utensils, as baskets, etc., is common in the East to the present day. Not only was the fresh fruit of the fig tree valued, but also cakes of figs are mentioned in Scripture; e.g., 1 Samuel 25:18; 1 Samuel 30:12, These were made either by simple compression, or by pounding them into a mass, sometimes together with dates. They were then cut into cakes, often similar to bricks, and hardened by keeping. Twice the fig tree is mentioned in the New Testament. Our Lord, shortly before his crucifixion, being hungry, sought fruit from a fig tree, and, finding none, condemned it. Matthew 21:18-20; Mark 11:12-14; Mark 11:20. It was early in the season, not the ordinary time for figs; but yet, as the fruit precedes the leaves, and there were leaves on this tree, figs might naturally have been expected on it; and, as there were then none, there was proof enough that the pretentious tree was worthless. The parable of the fig tree spared at the intercession of the dresser of the garden, Luke 13:6-9, is full of instruction. There is, it may be added, an expressive phrase in which the fig tree is introduced; when men axe said to sit under their own vine and their own fig tree, 1 Kings 4:26; Zechariah 3:10, a state of general peace and prosperity is indicated.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Fir Tree
Fir Tree. Probably the Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis), which is almost as large as the cedar, is now found on Lebanon, and was formerly doubtless abundant through Palestine. Hosea 14:8. Sometimes the cypress and juniper may have been included under this name, as well as other pines found here.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Sycamine Tree
Sycamine Tree. This must be carefully distinguished from the sycamore. It is mentioned but once, Luke 17:6; referring to the black mulberry tree.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Sycamore Tree
Sycamore Tree. The tree so called in Scripture is not the sycamore of this country, which is a species of maple. It rather belongs to the genus Ficus, and may be identified with the Ficus sycomoris, or sycamore fig. It to common both in Egypt and Syria. It is a tender tree, flourishing in sandy plains and warm valleys, but is not hardy enough for the mountain, and would be killed by a sharp frost. Psalms 78:47. It is lofty and wide-spreading, often planted by the wayside, over which its arms extend, just adapted to the purpose for which Zaccheus selected it. Luke 19:4. The sycamore yields several crops of figs in the year, which grow on short stems along the trunk and large branches. These figs are often small and insipid. Amos 7:14.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Palm-Tree
Exodus 15:27 . This tree is called in Hebrew tamar, from its straight upright, branchless growth, for which it seems more remarkable than any other tree; it sometimes rises to the height of a hundred feet.
The palm is one of the most beautiful trees of the vegetable kingdom. The stalks are generally full of rugged knots, which render it comparatively easy to climb to the top for the fruit, Song of Song of Solomon 7:7,8 . These projections are the vestiges of the decayed leaves; for the trunk is not solid like other trees, but its center is filled with pith, round which is a tough bark, full of strong fibers when young, which, as the tree grows old, hardens and becomes ligneous. To this bark the leaves are closely joined, which in the center rise erect, but after they are advanced above the sheath that surrounds them, they expand very wide on every side the stem, and as the older leaves decay, the stalk advances in height. With its ever verdant and graceful crown continually aspiring towards heaven, it is an apt image of the soul growing in grace, Psalm 92:12 . The leaves, when the tree has grown to a size for bearing fruit, are six to eight feet long, are very broad when spread out, and are used for covering the tops of houses, and similar purposes.
The fruit, from which the palm is often called the date-tree, grows below the leaves in clusters sometimes weighing over fifteen pounds, and is of a sweet and agreeable taste. The diligent natives, says Mr. Gibbon, celebrate, either in verse or prose, the three hundred and sixty uses to which the trunk, the branches or long leaf-stalks, the leaves, fibers, and fruit of the palm are skillfully applied. A considerable part of the inhabitants of Egypt, of Arabia, and Persia, subsist almost entirely on its fruit. They boast also of its medicinal virtues. Their camels feed upon the date stone. From the leaves they make couches, baskets, bags, mats, and brushes: from the branches or stalks, cages for their poultry, and fences for their gardens; from the fiber of the trunk, thread, ropes, and rigging; from the sap is prepared a spirituous liquor; and the body of the tree furnishes fuel: it is even said that from one variety of the palm-tree, the phoenix farinifera, meal has been extracted, which is found among the fibers of the trunk, and has been used for food.
Several parts of the Holy Land, no less than of Idumea, that lay contiguous to it, are described by the ancients to have abounded with date-trees. Judea particularly is typified in several coins of Vespasian by a desconsolate woman sitting under a palm-tree, with the inscription, JUDEA CAPTA. In Deuteronomy 34:3 , Jericho is called the "city of palm-trees;" and several of these trees are still found in that vicinity; but in general they are now rare in Palestine. Palm wreaths, and branches waved in the air or strown on the road, are associated not only with the honors paid to ancient conquerors in the Grecian games and in war, but with the triumphant entry of the King of Zion into Jerusalem, John 12:12-13 , and with his more glorious triumph with his people in heaven, Revelation 7:9 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Box-Tree
A well-known beautiful evergreen, growing in many parts of Europe and Asia. Its wood is highly prized by engravers. The word employed in Isaiah 60:13 , is thought by many to have been a species of cedar. It is used as an emblem of the abiding grace and prosperity of the church of God.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Palm Tree
PALM TREE ( tâmâr ). The date palm ( Phœnix dactylifera ) is a tree essential to existence in the deserts of Arabia, and was therefore held sacred among the Semites from the earliest historic times. It flourishes in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the oases of Arabia ( Exodus 15:27 , Numbers 33:9 ), but its cultivation has for long been much neglected in Palestine. It is still found in considerable numbers in the Maritime Plain, e.g . at the Bay of ‘Akka and at Gaza; and small scattered groups occur all over the land in the neighbourhood of springs. In the valleys east of the Dead Sea, many sterile, dwarfed palms occur. Both in the OT ( Deuteronomy 34:3 , Judges 1:16 ; 1 Kings 6:1-38 , 2 Chronicles 28:15 ) and in Josephus ( BJ IV. viii. 2 3), Jericho is famous for its vast groves of palms; to-day there are but few, and these quite modern trees. Not only are dates a staple diet in Arabia and an important article of export, but the plaited leaves furnish mats and baskets, the bark is made into ropes, and the seeds are ground up for cattle. From the dates is made a kind of syrup, date-honey or dibs , a valuable substitute for sugar. The method of fertilization of the female (pistillate) flowers by the pollen from the male (staminate) flowers was known in very ancient times, and nature was then, as now, assisted by shaking out the pollen over the female flowers. The palm tree is referred to ( Psalms 92:12 ) as a sign of prosperity and ( Song of Solomon 7:7-8 ) of beauty. Figures of palm trees were used to ornament the Temple ( Judges 3:13 ); at a later period they occur on Jewish coins and in the sculpture of the ancient Jewish synagogues, notably in the recently excavated synagogue at Tell Hûm (Capernaum). The sacredness of this tree thus persisted from the early Semite to late Jewish times. Palm branches were used at the rejoicings of the Feast of Tabernacles ( Leviticus 23:40 , Nehemiah 8:15 ), as they are among the modern Jews, who daily, during this feast, wave branches of palms in their synagogues. In 1Ma 13:51 we read of the bearing of palm branches as the sign of triumphant rejoicing an idea also implied in their use in John 12:13 and Revelation 7:9 . To-day these branches are used by the Moslems especially at funeral processions, and to decorate graves.
E. W. G. Masterman.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Pine Tree
PINE TREE . 1 . ‘çts-shemen , Nehemiah 8:15 , see Oil Tree. 2 . tidhâr . Isaiah 41:19 [1] ‘plane’] 60:13. From similarity to the Syr. daddâr (‘elm’), the tidhâr has been supposed to be the elm, but quite as probably may have been a kind of pine; of these the two common varieties known in Syria are the Aleppo or maritime ( Pinus halepensis ), and the stone ( P. pinea ) with its umbrella-like top.
E. W. G. Masterman.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Bay-Tree
The bay tree is the Laurel of North America and the south of Europe; an evergreen tree, a wreath from which has been from time immemorial the symbolical crown of poets and warriors. The word rendered "bay- tree" in Psalm 37:35 , seems to mean simply a native, green and vigorous.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Teil-Tree
The lime or linden. See OAK .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Mulberry-Tree
The word-translated mulberry-tree signifies literally weeping, and indicates some tree, which distils balsam or gum. The particular species is not known; though some think the popular, or aspen, may be intended, 2 Samuel 5:23-24 ; 1 Chronicles 14:14-15 .
King James Dictionary - Tree
TREE, n.
1. The general name of the largest of the vegetable kind, consisting of a firm woody stem springing from woody roots, and spreading above into branches which terminate in leaves. A tree differs from a shrub principally in size, many species of trees growing to the highth of fifty or sixty feet, and some species to seventy or eighty, and a few, particularly the pine, to a much greater highth. Trees are of various kinds as nuciferous, or nut-bearing trees bacciferous, or berry-bearing coniferous, or cone-bearing, &c. Some are forest-trees, and useful for timber or fuel others are fruit trees, and cultivated in gardens and orchards others are used chiefly for shade and ornament.
2. Something resembling a tree, consisting of a stem or stalk and branches as a genealogical tree. 3. In ship-building, pieces of timber are called chess-trees, cross-trees, roof-trees, tressel-trees, &c. 4. In Scripture, a cross. --Jesus, whom they slew and hanged on a tree. Acts 10
5. Wood.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Oil Tree
(Heb. ets shemen ). The Hebrew words occur in ( Nehemiah 8:15 ) (Authorized Version "pine branches"), (1 Kings 6:23 ) ("olive tree") and in (Isaiah 41:19 ) ("oil tree"). From the passage in Nehemiah, where the ets shemen is mentioned as distinct from the olive tree, if may perhaps be identified with the zackum tree of the Arabs, the Balanites aegyptiaca , a well-known and abundant shrub or small tree in the plain of Jordan. The zackum oil is held in high repute by the Arabs for its medicinal properties. [1]
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Palm Tree
(Heb. tamar ). Under this generic term many species are botanically included; but we have here only to do with the date palm, the Phoenix dactylifera of Linnaeus. While this tree was abundant generally in the Levant, it was regarded by the ancients as peculiarly characteristic of Palestine and the neighboring regions, though now it is rare. ("The palm tree frequently attains a height of eighty feet, but more commonly forty to fifty. It begins to bear fruit after it has been planted six or eight years, and continues to be productive for a century. Its trunk is straight, tall and unbroken, terminating in a crown of emerald-green plumes, like a diadem of gigantic ostrich-feathers; these leaves are frequently twenty feet in length, droop slightly at the ends, and whisper musically in the breeze. The palm is, in truth, a beautiful and most useful tree. Its fruit is the daily food of millions; its sap furnishes an agreeable wine; the fibres of the base of its leaves are woven into ropes and rigging; its tall stem supplies a valuable timber; its leaves are manufactured into brushes, mats, bags, couches and baskets. This one tree supplies almost all the wants of the Arab or Egyptian." --Bible Plants.) Many places are mentioned in the Bible as having connection with palm trees; Elim, where grew three score and ten palm trees, ( Exodus 15:27 ) and Elath. (2:8) Jericho was the city of "palm trees." (31:3) Hazezon-tamar, "the felling of the palm tree," is clear in its derivation. There is also Tamar, "the palm." (Ezekiel 47:19 ) Bethany means the "house of dates." The word Phoenicia, which occurs twice in the New Testament -- (Acts 11:19 ; 15:3 ) --is in all probability derived from the Greek word for a palm. The, striking appearance of the tree, its uprightness and beauty, would naturally suggest the giving of Its name occasionally to women. (Genesis 38:6 ; 2 Samuel 13:1 ; 14:27 ) There is in the Psalms, (Psalm 92:12 ) the familiar comparison, "The righteous shall flourish like the palm tree." which suggests a world of illustration whether respect be had to the orderly and regular aspect of the tree, its fruitfulness, the perpetual greenness of its foliage, or the height at which the foliage grows, as far as possible from earth and as near as possible to heaven. Perhaps no point is more worthy of mention, we wish to pursue the comparison, than the elasticity of the fibre of the palm and its determined growth upward even when loaded with weights. The passage in (Revelation 7:9 ) where the glorified of all nations are described as "clothed with white robes and palms in their hands," might seem to us a purely classical image; but palm branches were used by the Jews in token of victory and peace. (To these points of comparison may be added, its principle of growth: it is an endogen, and grows from within; its usefulness; the Syrians enumerating 360 different uses to which it may be put; and the statement that it bears its best fruit in old age. --ED.) It is curious that this tree, once so abundant in Judea, is now comparatively rare, except in the Philistine plain and in the old Phoenicia about Beyrout .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Apple Tree, Apple
(Heb. tappuach ). Mention of the apple tree occurs in the Authorized Version in ( Song of Solomon 2:3 ; 8:5 ) and Joel 1:12 The fruit of this tree is alluded to in ( Proverbs 25:11 ) and Song of Solomon 2:5 ; 7:8 It is a difficult matter to say what is the specific tree denoted by the Hebrew word tappuach . ("The apple proper is rare in Syria, and its fruit inferior.") Most modern writers maintain that it is either the quince or the citron; (others speak of the apricot, which is abundant and deliciously perfumed.) The quince had some plausible arguments in its favor. Its fragrance was held in high esteem by the ancients. The quince was sacred to Venus. On the other hand Dr Royle says,"The rich color, fragrant odor and handsome appearance of the citron, whether in flower or in fruit, are particularly suited to the passages of scripture mentioned above." But neither the quince nor the citron nor the apple appears fully to answer to all the scriptural allusions. The orange would answer all the demands of the scriptural passages, and orange trees are found in Palestine; but there does not appear sufficient evidence that this tree was known in the earlier times to the inhabitants of Palestine. The question of identification therefore, must still be left an open one.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Bay Tree
A species of laurel. Laurus nobilis . An evergreen, with leaves like our mountain laurel. ( Psalm 37:35 )
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Olive Tree
The church is compared to an olive tree upon many occasions, (Jeremiah 11:16; Psalms 52:8) —and the young converts in Zion to olive branches. (Psalms 128:3) And Paul in a beautiful figure, represents the state of conversion from nature to grace by the change from the olive tree which is wild, by nature, to that of a true olive tree, which is planted by grace. (Romans 11:17-36)
I must not dismiss this subject without first remarking the allusions made by men in general to the olive branch, as an emblem of peace. It is more than probable that this took its rise from the circumstance of Noah's dove in the ark, when from being sent forth to discover whether the waters of the flood had subsided at length returned with the olive-branch in her mouth. The raven he dismissed found means of subsistence in going to and fro, probably from the carcases of those drowned; but the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot until returning to the ark. It is so with God's people; hence they are said to come as "doves to their windows." And it is remarkable, that when the Psalmist saith, (Psalms 116:7) "Return unto thy rest, O my soul!" the original is, Return unto thy Noah, thy Christ; for he is the rest wherewith the Lord causeth the weary to rest. The olive branch in the mouth of the dove is a token of peace. God will no more destroy the earth by a flood. The ark is a type of Jesus, through whom and in whom God is at peace, in the blood of his cross. (See Isaiah 28:12)
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Fig, Fig Tree
The fig tree (Ficus carica ) is very common in Palestine. (8:8) Mount Olivet was famous for its fig trees in ancient times, and they are still found there. To "sit under one's own vine and one's own fig tree" became a proverbial expression among the Jews to denote peace and prosperity. ( 1 Kings 4:25 ; Micah 4:4 ; Zechariah 3:10 ) The fig is a pear-shaped fruit, and is much used by the Orientals for food. The young figs are especially prized for their sweetness and flavor. The fruit always appears before the leaves; so that when Christ saw leaves on the fig tree by the wayside, (Mark 11:13 ) he had a right to expect fruit. The usual summer crop of fruits is not gathered till May or June; but in the sunny ravines of Olivet fig trees could have ripe fruit some weeks earlier (Dr. Thomson), and it was not strange so early as Easter Christ might find the young eatable figs, although it was not the usual season for gathering the fruit.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Palm Tree
This beautiful tree is spoken of in Scripture with so much commendation, that it merits our attention; and the more so because the Lord Jesus, when describing the loveliness of his church, compares her stature to it, and speaks with a degree of fervour and delight while professing his determination to take hold of her. "I said I will go up to the palm tree, I will take hold of the boughs thereof: now also thy breasts shall be as the clusters of the vine, and the smell of thy nose like apples." (Song of Song of Solomon 7:7-8)
So very highly esteemed in the eastern world was the palm tree, that Jericho, where they chiefly grew, was called by the name, "The city of palm trees." (Deuteronomy 34:3) Engedi was also called Hazazon Tamar, or the village of palm trees, from the number of palm trees which grew there. The Jews called the palm tree Tamar. And not only in Judea, but in all places of the east where palms are found, the branches of it have always been celebrated as the tokens of triumph and victory; hence when the Lord Jesus entered Jerusalem, the multitude, as if overruled by a divine power, "took branches of palm trees, and went forth to meet him, and cried, Hosanna, blessed is the King of Israel, that cometh in the name of the Lord." (John 12:12-13) And hence also, as if to shew the same glorious testimony to the Lord Jesus, the redeemed in heaven are represented as "standing before the throne, and before the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palms their hands." (Revelation 7:9) I defy any man upon earth to shew the shadow of a reason wherefore the correspondence between Christ's appearance upon earth, in the day of his unequalled humility, and the day of his supreme power and glory, should have been thus set forth, but from the one certain and unquestionable truth of his almighty power and GODHEAD, and the divinity of his mission. What could have induced the whole multitude to have honoured Christ with those palm trees in the days of his flesh, when in the garb of a poor Jew, but the power of God overruling the whole mind of the people as the mind of one man? And wherefore the same display made in heaven, but to testify the approbation of God?
I cannot prevail upon myself to dismiss our attention to the palm tree before that I have first remarked some of the properties of it, by way of illustrating the beauty of our Lord's comparing his church to it. The Psalmist hath said, (Psalms 92:12) that "the righteous shall flourish like the palm tree; he shall grow like a cedar in Lebanon." And there will appear a striking allusion between the believer in Jesus and the palm tree of Engedi, if we consider a few of the leading particulars. The growth of the palm is very upright and tall; and, as we are told by naturalists, is to old age always in this state of progression. And surely the church of Jesus, and every individual of the church, is in constant tendency upward. Trees of the Lord's "right hand planting are trees of righteousness," always supposed to be looking upward to Jesus, and their branches extending in every direction according to the exercise of his grace in them, by living wholly upon him in his person, blood, and righteousness.
Moreover, the palm tree is very fruitful, and the fruit is both lovely to the eye and delicious to the taste. And such are the followers of the Lord Jesus. What more lovely than to behold a truly regenerated believer in Christ Jesus? and who more blessed in his day and generation? Like the lofty and luxuriant palm tree of Engedi, which forms both a shade to the traveller to protect him from the heat, and fruit to refresh him as he passeth by, so the church of Jesus becomes a blessedness in her Lord to every spiritual traveller, and affords shelter, and nourishment, and every delight.
There is one property yet, if possible, more striking in the palm tree, which serves to open to a spiritual. Improvement, in allusion to Christ and his church, of a very singular nature, and peculiar, as far as I have learned, to the palm; namely, that the chief source of life in this tree is in its top; or, as it is physically called, the brain of the tree. We are told by those who are acquainted with the nature of palm trees, that if by any means this top be cut off, the tree is for ever after barren. Now here the reader will instantly perceive the striking resemblance between the palm tree and the child of God. To be wholly in Jesus is found the source of life and fruitfulness; and were it possible for a believer to be separated from Christ, yea, but for a moment, everlasting barrenness would follow. How blessedly hath Jesus spoken to this point when he said, "From me is thy fruit found." (Hosea 14:8) And so again, (John 15:4) "Abide in me, and I in you; as the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine, no more can ye, except ye abide in me?"
We are told that the palm tree is all evergreen. On the top of the tree is a kind of tuft or coronet, which never falls off, but is continually the same in verdure. A beautiful representation this of the church in Jesus. Many parts of Scripture correspond in speaking of the real disciple of Christ as one whose "leaf shall never fade nor fall;" and certainly, in the unceasing spring and summer of his glorious head, into whom he is ingrafted, there are no wintery dispensations or change.
One property more merits regard in the resemblance of the palm tree to the Christian, namely, the great duration and continuance of the palm. Dr. Shaw, in his travels, relates that the commonly-received opinion of the inhabitants of those countries where palm trees mostly abound is, that for seventy or eighty years the palm will live, bearing fruit to a great extent, even of 300 lb. weight of dates every year. It need not be noticed, by way of shewing the striking similarity to our nature, that the Psalmist represents the age of man as three-score years and ten, and (saith the Psalmist) "by reason of strength sometimes to four-score years." (Psalms 90:10) What a lovely palm tree then is the real follower of the Lord Jesus, if thus living to extreme old age he still brings forth fruit to the praise of the Lord's grace, "some thirty fold, some sixty fold, some au hundred fold!" So speaks the Holy Ghost concerning the faithful: "Those that be planted in the house of the Lord shall flourish in the courts of our God; they shall still bring forth fruit in old age, they shall be fat and flourishing; to shew that the Lord is upright: he is my rock, and there is no unrighteousness in him." (Psalms 92:13-15)
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Almond Tree; Almond
This word is found in (Genesis 43:11 ; Exodus 25:33,34 ; 37:19,20 ; Numbers 17:8 ; Ecclesiastes 12:5 ; Jeremiah 1:11 ) in the text of the Authorized Version. It is invariably represented by the same Hebrew word, shaked meaning hasten. ( Jeremiah 1:11,12 ) The almond tree is a native of Asia and North Africa, but it is cultivated in the milder parts of Europe." It resembles the peach tree in form, blossom and fruit. It is in fact only another species of the same genus." The height of the tree is about 12 or 14 feet; the flowers are pink, and arranged for the most part in pairs, the leaves are long, ovate, with a serrated margin and an acute point. The covering of the fruit is down and succulent, enclosing the hard shell which contains the kernel. It is this but for which the tree is chiefly valued. It is curious to observe, in connection with the almond bowls of the golden candlestick, that, in the language of lapidaries, almonds are pieces of rock crystal, even now used in adorning branch candlesticks.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Palm Tree
PALM.—Palm trees, though frequently referred to in the OT, are mentioned in connexion with the life of Christ only once: viz. in the account of the triumphal entry into Jerusalem (John 12:13). The English name (Lat. palma) is due to the similarity of the leaves of some kinds to the open hand. The term in Greek (applied only to a genus) is φοίνιξ, which gave its name to a town in Crete (Acts 27:12). The word also means ‘a Phoenician,’ ‘a purple colour,’ and the fabulous phœnix. In Revelation 7:9 it is used of the leaf (or so-called branch), which is usually called βαΐον
The palm tree is amongst the foremost both in beauty and in utility. It grows with uniform trunk, straight like the mast of a ship. The trunk is in some kinds smooth, in others clearly annulated, in others rough with the roots of former fronds. At the top the leaves (or fronds) spring out in a spreading circle or crown, while beneath them the flowers and clusters of fruit are formed. The tree is endogenous, without bark and without branch. The leaves vary in length from three to ‘thirty feet. And along the stalk on either side long leaflets grow close, presenting in many kinds (pinnated) the shape of an enlarged feather, in others, including most of the fan-shaped palms, a rounder, broader form of palmate or webbed configuration, while in the bi-pinnate caryota and the mauritia they have a triangular (or fish-tailed or wedge-shaped) appearance. The fruit is often valuable, and by incision the juice is obtained that makes palm wine. Palm trees are tropical and semi-tropical. Some grow near wells, as the palms of Elim (Exodus 15:27), but this may be attributed to culture; others flourish in sandy deserts; some are found in mountainous regions, and many rear themselves erect on wind-swept ridges. Besides yielding food, drink, and oil, they afford house-building material, and many are highly serviceable for the various uses to which fibres are applicable.
Palms have been divided into five tribes, over a hundred genera, over a thousand species: but there is a limited number of main kinds. The palm of Palestine is the date-palm. This tree (phœnix dactylifera, date being a contraction of dactylus, ‘finger’) rises gracefully to a height of from fifty to ninety feet. It grows in various climates and latitudes, but its fruit fails both in Europe and in India. The female tree (for the phœnix, unlike most others, is not hermaphrodite) bears a cluster which may contain 200 dates, and it may continue to bear for two hundred years. These fruits, which are half sugar, are a chief article of food in Arabia and North Africa. From an incision near the top the fermenting sap flows so as to yield in one month twenty gallons of wine or toddy. The pinnated leaves, which are of a deep) green colour and from 9 to 12 feet in length, are used to make mats and baskets, and the fibres of their stalks make cordage. The leaves also make thatch, and the trunk is useful timber. This tree abounded in the valley of the Jordan, but Jericho was specially the city of palm trees (Deuteronomy 34:3). A group of palms, with their magnificent crowns, might afford ample shade. Accordingly, we find that early in the history of Israel Deborah dwelt under her palm tree (Judges 4:5), while in the time of our Lord many of the Essenes were said to live in palm groves. Fructification is artificial or accidental; and forests may be cultivated that in years of famine will support the population of a country.
The palm, being upright, green, fruitful, and imposing, was an emblem of the righteous in their prosperity (Psalms 92:12). In appreciation of the beauty of its form it was carved on the walls and doors of the Temple (1 Kings 6:29; 1 Kings 6:32, cf. Ezekiel 40:16; Ezekiel 41:18). Its leaves were borne as symbols of rejoicing at the Feast of Tabernacles (Leviticus 23:40) and also at the Maccabaean Feast of Dedication, of which the special feature was the illumination. This tall, firm, unbending tree, with its magnificent crown of fronds, with fruit and leaves that served for sustenance and ornament, was readily reckoned emblematic of moral qualities—rectitude, constancy, gracefulness, usefulness—such as are the constituents of success. The palm came to be regarded specially as the symbol of victory and triumph. It is in that sense that the name has acquired its metaphorical meaning. The winner (we say) carries off the palm. A period of exceptional prosperity is remembered as ‘palmy days’. ‘Another race hath been, and other palms are won’ (Wordsworth).
The carrying of palm leaves (τὰ βαΐα τῶν φοινίκων) by the people in honour Of the Messiah (John 12:13) was in accordance with the custom observed at feasts and on great public occasions. Jesus was saluted as a king proceeding to His coronation. The palms symbolized His triumph and the people’s joy. He allowed the homage of the multitude as the spontaneous expression of pure-minded loyalty. On the other hand, the Pharisees and officials regarded it as a challenge of their authority. The incident has been commemorated since the 5th cent. by the Greek and Latin Churches in the Palm Sunday (dominica palmarum, or feast of palm-leaves), immediately preceding Easter, at which palms are consecrated and a procession takes place.
The supreme expression of the palm as the symbol of triumphant homage is in the Apocalyptic vision, where the innumerable multitude who nave come through the great tribulation, and who serve God day and night, stand before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes and with palms in their hands (Revelation 7:9; Revelation 7:14).
Literature.—Artt. in Encyc. Brit.9 [1] , Chambers’s Encyc., the EBi [2] , and Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible ; Historiœ Palmarum by Martius; Griffiths’ Palms of British East India is a volume of illustrations.
R. Scott.

Sentence search

Ash - o'ren, "tremulous"), mentioned only Isaiah 44:14 (RSV, "fir Tree"). It is rendered "pine Tree" both in the LXX. There is a Tree called by the Arabs Aran , found still in the valleys of Arabia Petraea, whose leaf resembles that of the mountain ash. This may be the Tree meant. Our ash Tree is not known in Syria
Peepul Tree - A sacred Tree (Ficus religiosa) of the Buddhists, a kind of fig Tree which attains great size and venerable age. See Bo Tree
Til Tree - ...
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An ill-smelling lauraceous Tree (Ocotea foetens) of the Canary Islands; - sometimes disting. as Canary Island til Tree. of Teil Tree
Hazel - luz, (Genesis 30:37 ), a nutbearing Tree. The Hebrew word is rendered in the Vulgate by amygdalinus, "the almond-tree," which is probably correct. That Tree flourishes in Syria
Almond - ) The fruit of the almond Tree. ) The Tree that bears the fruit; almond Tree
Aytre - ) The dogwood Tree. ) The dogwood Tree
Teil - ) The lime Tree, or linden; - called also teil Tree
Quicken Tree - The European rowan Tree; - called also quickbeam, and quickenbeam. See Rowan Tree
bo Tree - The peepul Tree; esp. , the very ancient Tree standing at Anurajahpoora in Ceylon, grown from a slip of the Tree under which Gautama is said to have received the heavenly light and so to have become Buddha
Buttonwood - ) The Platanus occidentalis, or American plane Tree, a large Tree, producing rough balls, from which it is named; - called also buttonball Tree, and, in some parts of the United States, sycamore
Oil Tree - The Hebrew words occur in ( Nehemiah 8:15 ) (Authorized Version "pine branches"), (1 Kings 6:23 ) ("olive Tree") and in (Isaiah 41:19 ) ("oil Tree"). From the passage in Nehemiah, where the ets shemen is mentioned as distinct from the olive Tree, if may perhaps be identified with the zackum Tree of the Arabs, the Balanites aegyptiaca , a well-known and abundant shrub or small Tree in the plain of Jordan
Chesnut Tree - When the Assyrian is compared to a great Tree it is described as excelling in its beauty the branches of the chesnut Tree. It is identified with the 'Plane-tree' which grows in Palestine. It thrives best in a rich moist soil, and is a noble and beautiful Tree
Ourd Tree - A Tree (the Crescentia Cujete, or calabash Tree) of the West Indies and Central America
Bayberry - ) The fruit of Myrica cerifera (wax myrtle); the shrub itself; - called also candleberry Tree. ) The fruit of the bay Tree or Laurus nobilis. ) A Tree of the West Indies related to the myrtle (Pimenta acris)
Arbuscle - ) A dwarf Tree, one in size between a shrub and a Tree; a Treelike shrub
Bay Tree - ” While the bay Tree is native to Palestine, Psalm 37:35 gives no indication of referring to that Tree. The NRSV and TEV hardly come closer to a correct translation with cedar Tree. NAS, NIV, and REB come closer to the meaning of the Hebrew text when they speak of a Tree in its native soil
Sycamore - (ssihc' uh mohre) A combination “fig” and “mulberry” Tree (Ficus sycomorus) indicating the fig Tree in the Jordan valley that had leaves like our mulberry Tree. Its fruit was inferior to the fig Tree and had to be punctured to make the fruit edible. Amos was employed as “one who took care of sycamore-fig Trees” (Amos 7:14 NIV; compare Psalm 78:47 ). This Tree has no relation to the American sycamore Tree
Bombax - ) A genus of Trees, called also the silkcotton Tree; also, a Tree of the genus Bombax
Acajou - ) The mahogany Tree; also, its timber. ) The cashew Tree; also, its fruit
Thitsee - ) A black varnish obtained from the Tree. ) The varnish Tree of Burmah (Melanorrhoea usitatissima)
Laurel - Garlands of leaves from the laurel or bay Tree (Laurus nobilis) were used by the Greeks to honor the winners of the Pythian games. The leaves of the Tree were also used for medicine and seasoning. In Psalm 37:35 , the wicked are compared to a “green bay Tree” (KJV). NAS, REB, and NIV refer to a Tree in its native soil
Tamarisk - , "grove," "tree"); Arab. Seven species of this Tree are found in Palestine. It is a "very graceful Tree, with long feathery branches and tufts closely clad with the minutest of leaves, and surmounted in spring with spikes of beautiful pink blosoms, which seem to envelop the whole Tree in one gauzy sheet of colour" (Tristram's Nat
Chestnut Tree - Chestnut Tree. reads plane-tree in both places. The Tree grows to a large size, with a mass of rich foliage. This Tree is a native of western Asia, but is found as far east as Cashmere
Olive - oliva, from olea, an olive Tree Gr. See Oil ...
A plant or Tree of the genus Olea. The common olive Tree grows in warm climates and rises to the height of twenty or thirty feet, having an upright stem with numerous branches. This Tree is much cultivated in the south of Europe for its fruit, from which is expressed the olive oil, and which is used also for pickles
Pentastichous - ) Having, or arranged in, five vertical ranks, as the leaves of an apple Tree or a cherry Tree
Redbud - ) A small ornamental leguminous Tree of the American species of the genus Cercis. See Judas Tree, under Judas
Lemon - The fruit of a Tree belonging to the genus Citrus, which grows in warm climates. Lemon or lemon Tree, the Tree that produces lemons
Tree of Life - For the biblical writer the Tree of life was an important consideration only after Adam and Eve disobeyed. The implication is that they had access to all the Trees in the garden, including the Tree of life, but God gave an explicit command not to eat of the Tree of knowledge. Chief among the radical changes was that they no longer had access to the Tree of life (Genesis 3:22-24 ). ...
The “tree of life” appears in Proverbs four times (Proverbs 3:18 ; Proverbs 11:30 ; Proverbs 13:12 ; Proverbs 15:4 ) and in Revelation 2:7 ; Revelation 22:2 ,Revelation 22:2,22:14 . To lay hold of wisdom is to lay hold on “a Tree of life” (Proverbs 3:18 ). “The fruit of the righteous is a Tree of life” (Proverbs 11:30 NIV). Yet another proverb has this comparison: “a longing fulfilled is a Tree of life” ( Proverbs 13:12 NIV). The author of another proverb wrote, “The tongue that brings healing is a Tree of life” ( Proverbs 15:4 NIV). None of these proverbs seems to refer to “the Tree of life” mentioned in Genesis. See Adam and Eve ; Eden ; Tree of Knowledge
Tree - 1: δένδρον (Strong's #1186 — Noun Neuter — dendron — den'-dron ) "a living, growing Tree" (cp. , "rose Tree"), known by the fruit it produces, Matthew 12:33 ; Luke 6:44 ; certain qualities are mentioned in the NT; "a good Tree," Matthew 7:17,18 ; 12:33 ; Luke 6:43 ; "a corrupt Tree" (ditto); in Jude 1:12 , metaphorically, of evil teachers, "autumn Trees (AV, 'trees whose fruit withereth') without fruit, twice dead, plucked up by the roots," RV; in Luke 13:19 in some texts, "a great Tree," AV (RV, "a Tree"); for this and Matthew 13:32 see MUSTARD; in Luke 21:29 "the fig Tree" is illustrative of Israel, "all the Trees" indicating Gentile nations. ...
2: ξύλον (Strong's #3586 — Noun Neuter — xulon — xoo'-lon ) "wood, a piece of wood, anything made of wood" (see STAFF , STOCKS), is used, with the rendering "tree," (a) in Luke 23:31 , where "the green Tree" refers either to Christ, figuratively of all His living power and excellencies, or to the life of the Jewish people while still inhabiting their land, in contrast to "the dry," a figure fulfilled in the horrors of the Roman massacre and devastation in A. Ezekiel 21:3 ); (b) of "the cross," the Tree being the stauros, the upright pale or stake to which Romans nailed those who were thus to be executed, Acts 5:30 ; 10:39 ; 13:29 ; Galatians 3:13 ; 1 Peter 2:24 ; (c) of "the Tree of life," Revelation 2:7 ; 22:2 (twice),14,19, RV, AV, "book
Arborescent - ) Resembling a Tree; becoming woody in stalk; dendritic; having crystallizations disposed like the branches and twigs of a Tree
Zebrawood - ) The wood of an East Indian Tree of the genus Guettarda. ) The wood of a small West Indian myrtaceous Tree (Eugenia fragrans). ) A kind of cabinet wood having beautiful black, brown, and whitish stripes, the timber of a tropical American Tree (Connarus Guianensis)
Margosa - ) A large Tree of genus Melia (M. Azedarach is a much more showy Tree, and is cultivated in the Southern United States, where it is known as Pride of India, Pride of China, or bead Tree. Various parts of the Tree are considered anthelmintic
Tree of Knowledge - Reference to “the Tree of the knowledge of good and evil” is in a context concerned with the fall. In Genesis 3:3 the Tree is designated as “the Tree which is in the midst of the garden. ” Eating from the Tree brought the knowledge of good and evil ( Genesis 3:5 ,Genesis 3:5,3:22 ). One of many Trees in the garden, this Tree alone was forbidden to mankind under the penalty of death (Genesis 2:17 ). ...
The Tree of knowledge was Adam and Eve's opportunity to demonstrate obedience and loyalty to God, but the serpent used it to tempt Eve to eat and to become like God “knowing good and evil” (Genesis 3:5 ). When Adam joined Eve in eating the forbidden fruit, the result was shame, guilt, exclusion from the garden, and separation from the Tree of life and from God. The Bible's primary interest about the Tree of knowledge is not what kind of knowledge it represented—moral judgment, secular knowledge, sexual knowledge, universal knowledge, or some other kind—but how it served as God's test and Satan's temptation. See Adam and Eve ; Eden ; Tree of Life
Allon-Bachuth - Oak of weeping, a Tree near Bethel, at the spot where Deborah, Rebekah's nurse, was buried (Genesis 35:8 ). Large Trees, from their rarity in the plains of Palestine, were frequently designated as landmarks. This particular Tree was probably the same as the "palm Tree of Deborah" (Judges 4:5 )
Bay-Tree - The bay Tree is the Laurel of North America and the south of Europe; an evergreen Tree, a wreath from which has been from time immemorial the symbolical crown of poets and warriors. The word rendered "bay- Tree" in Psalm 37:35 , seems to mean simply a native, green and vigorous
Shea Tree - An African sapotaceous Tree (Bassia, / Butyrospermum, Parkii), from the seeds of which a substance resembling butter is obtained; the African butter Tree
Box Tree - Box Tree. A small evergreen Tree, either the same with or closely resembling the shrubby box of our gardens
Oak - Genesis 35:8 (c) Deborah, the nurse, was buried under an oak Tree, and from this we notice that usually the oak Tree is a type of the bitterness of sorrow because of death. Notice that in Joshua 24:26 that great leader made a covenant with the people under an oak Tree, and then died as we read in Joshua 24:29. Notice also that the prophet sat under an oak Tree in1Ki 13:14, and immediately thereafter he died, as recorded in1Ki 13:24. Absalom was caught by his head in an oak Tree, 2 Samuel 18:9. Saul and his sons were buried under an oak Tree, 1 Chronicles 10:12
Madeira Wood - (1):...
The mahogany Tree (Swietenia Mahogoni). ...
(2):...
A West Indian leguminous Tree (Lysiloma Latisiliqua) the wood of which is used for boat trimming
Fig - Fig, Fig Tree. This, Ficus carica, was a Tree very common in Palestine. Mount Olivet was famous anciently for fig Trees; and still some are to be found there. The first notice we have of this Tree is when Adam and Eve endeavored to clothe themselves with leaves. Whether the leaves they used were those of the ordinary fig Tree may be questioned; but the practice of fastening leaves together for various utensils, as baskets, etc. Not only was the fresh fruit of the fig Tree valued, but also cakes of figs are mentioned in Scripture; e. Twice the fig Tree is mentioned in the New Testament. Our Lord, shortly before his crucifixion, being hungry, sought fruit from a fig Tree, and, finding none, condemned it. It was early in the season, not the ordinary time for figs; but yet, as the fruit precedes the leaves, and there were leaves on this Tree, figs might naturally have been expected on it; and, as there were then none, there was proof enough that the pretentious Tree was worthless. The parable of the fig Tree spared at the intercession of the dresser of the garden, Luke 13:6-9, is full of instruction. There is, it may be added, an expressive phrase in which the fig Tree is introduced; when men axe said to sit under their own vine and their own fig Tree, 1 Kings 4:26; Zechariah 3:10, a state of general peace and prosperity is indicated
Fig Tree - Fig, Fig Tree. This, Ficus carica, was a Tree very common in Palestine. Mount Olivet was famous anciently for fig Trees; and still some are to be found there. The first notice we have of this Tree is when Adam and Eve endeavored to clothe themselves with leaves. Whether the leaves they used were those of the ordinary fig Tree may be questioned; but the practice of fastening leaves together for various utensils, as baskets, etc. Not only was the fresh fruit of the fig Tree valued, but also cakes of figs are mentioned in Scripture; e. Twice the fig Tree is mentioned in the New Testament. Our Lord, shortly before his crucifixion, being hungry, sought fruit from a fig Tree, and, finding none, condemned it. It was early in the season, not the ordinary time for figs; but yet, as the fruit precedes the leaves, and there were leaves on this Tree, figs might naturally have been expected on it; and, as there were then none, there was proof enough that the pretentious Tree was worthless. The parable of the fig Tree spared at the intercession of the dresser of the garden, Luke 13:6-9, is full of instruction. There is, it may be added, an expressive phrase in which the fig Tree is introduced; when men axe said to sit under their own vine and their own fig Tree, 1 Kings 4:26; Zechariah 3:10, a state of general peace and prosperity is indicated
Titi - ) A Tree of the southern United States (Cliftonia monophylla) having glossy leaves and racemes of fragrant white flowers succeeded by one-seeded drupes; - called also black titi, buckwheat Tree, and ironwood. ) Any related Tree of the genus Cyrilla, often disting
Leaves (2) - —The Tree is often used in NT as a symbol of the life of a man. Leaves are the indication of the existence of life in the Tree. The barren fig-tree was cursed by our Lord because it had leaves only (Matthew 21:19, Mark 11:13) and no fruit. See Fig-tree. ...
The putting forth of leaves by the fig-tree is referred to by our Lord as one of the indications that summer is nigh (Matthew 24:32, Mark 13:28)
Arbute - ) The strawberry Tree, a genus of evergreen shrubs, of the Heath family. It has a berry externally resembling the strawberry; the arbute Tree
Sycamine Tree - Sycamine Tree. It is mentioned but once, Luke 17:6; referring to the black mulberry Tree
Bay Tree - , a Tree not transplanted, but growing on its native soil, and therefore luxuriantly. If the psalmist intended by this word to denote any particular Tree, it may have been the evergreen bay laurel (Laurus nobilis), which is a native of Palestine. Instead of "like a green bay Tree" in the Authorized Version, the Revised Version has, "like a green Tree in its native soil
Gallows - 'ets, meaning "a Tree" (Esther 6:4 ), a post or gibbet. In Genesis 40:19 and Deuteronomy 21:22 the word is rendered "tree
Muskwood - ) The wood of a West Indian Tree of the Mahogany family (Moschoxylum Swartzii). ) The wood of an Australian Tree (Eurybia argophylla)
Algaroba - ) The Carob, a leguminous Tree of the Mediterranean region; also, its edible beans or pods, called St. ) The Honey mesquite (Prosopis juliflora), a small Tree found from California to Buenos Ayres; also, its sweet, pulpy pods. A valuable gum, resembling gum arabic, is collected from the Tree in Texas and Mexico
Carob - ) An evergreen leguminous Tree (Ceratania Siliqua) found in the countries bordering the Mediterranean; the St. John's bread; - called also carob Tree. ) One of the long, sweet, succulent, pods of the carob Tree, which are used as food for animals and sometimes eaten by man; - called also St
Toon - ) The reddish brown wood of an East Indian Tree (Cedrela Toona) closely resembling the Spanish cedar; also. the Tree itself
Trumpetwood - ) A tropical American Tree (Cecropia peltata) of the Breadfruit family, having hollow stems, which are used for wind instruments; - called also snakewood, and trumpet Tree
Uttatrap - ) The inspissated juice of a Tree of the genus Artocarpus (A. incisa, or breadfruit Tree), sometimes used in making birdlime, on account of its glutinous quality
Apple Tree - A Tree known in the Old Testament for its fruit, shade, beauty, and fragrance (Joel 1:12 ; Proverbs 25:11 ; Song of Song of Solomon 2:3 ,Song of Song of Solomon 2:5 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:8 ; Song of Song of Solomon 8:5 ). Some scholars doubt that the Hebrew text is referring to the apple Tree. They think the common apple Tree was only recently introduced to Palestine, and that the wild variety hardly matches the description given to the Tree and its fruit in the Bible. The citron, quince, and apricot have been proposed as the Tree spoken of in the Bible. When conditions for it are right, the apricot Tree can grow to a height of about thirty feet with spreading branches, which make it a good shade Tree. Hebrew tappuach “apple” does appear as a place name in the Bible and may indicate apple Trees were known as unusual occurrences in some Palestinian sites
Acacia - Exodus 25:5 , RSV probably the Acacia seyal (the gum-arabic Tree); called the "shittah" Tree (Isaiah 41:19 ). seyal) is like the hawthorn, a gnarled and thorny Tree
Tree - ‛Êts (עֵץ, Strong's #6086), “tree; wood; timber; stick; stalk. ...
In its first biblical appearance ‘ets is used as a collective noun representing all Trees bearing fruit ( Tree of the field. ” God forbids Israel to destroy the orchards around besieged cities: “When thou shalt besiege a city a long time, in making war against it to take it, thou shalt not destroy the Trees … : for thou mayest eat of them [1] …” (: “… The Tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the Tree of knowledge of good and evil. ”...
This word may be used of the genus “tree. 41:19
lists the olive “tree” and the box “tree” in the midst of a long list of various species of Trees. 16:21 should read: “You shall not plant for yourself an Asherah of any kind of wood” (NASB, “any kind of Tree”). …” This may also refer to a “pole” or “gallows”: “… Within three days shall Pharaoh lift up thy head from off thee, and shall hang thee on a Tree [3] …” ( Tree. This does not mean a particular genus or species of Tree but merely a large, mighty Tree: “For they shall be ashamed of the [4] [5] which ye have desired …” ( Tree. ” This noun is probably related to ‘ayil, “large Tree. The word does not represent a particular genus or species of Tree but, like the noun to which it is related, simply a “big Tree”: “Gaal spoke again and said, Look, men are coming down from the center of the land, and one company is coming from the direction of the Diviners’ oak [6]” ( Broadleaf - ) A Tree (Terminalia latifolia) of Jamaica, the wood of which is used for boards, scantling, shingles, etc; - sometimes called the almond Tree, from the shape of its fruit
Teak - ) A Tree of East Indies (Tectona grandis) which furnishes an extremely strong and durable timber highly valued for shipbuilding and other purposes; also, the timber of the Tree
Sheepberry - ) The edible fruit of a small North American Tree of the genus Viburnum (V. Lentago), having white flowers in flat cymes; also, the Tree itself
Lauraceous - ) Belonging to, or resembling, a natural order (Lauraceae) of Trees and shrubs having aromatic bark and foliage, and including the laurel, sassafras, cinnamon Tree, true camphor Tree, etc
Pear - ) The fleshy pome, or fruit, of a rosaceous Tree (Pyrus communis), cultivated in many varieties in temperate climates; also, the Tree which bears this fruit
Enip Tree - (1):...
Any Tree or shrub of the genus Genipa. ...
(2):...
The West Indian sapindaceous Tree Melicocca bijuga, which yields the honeyberry; also, the related Trees Exothea paniculata and E
Cypress - tirzah, "hardness"), mentioned only in Isaiah 44:14 (RSV, "holm Tree"). , the evergreen oak, which may possibly have been the Tree intended; but there is great probability that our Authorized Version is correct in rendering it "cypress. " This Tree grows abundantly on the mountains of Hermon. "Throughout the East it is used as a funereal Tree; and its dark, tall, waving plumes render it peculiarly appropriate among the tombs
Poplar - ) Any Tree of the genus Populus; also, the timber, which is soft, and capable of many uses. ) The timber of the tulip Tree; - called also white poplar
Heath - Supposed to be the Juniper, a low Tree found in desert and rocky places, and thus contrasted with a Tree growing by a water-course, Jeremiah 17:5-8 ; 48:6
Almond-Tree - This Tree resembles a peach-tree, but is larger. In Ecclesiastes 12:5 , the hoary head is beautifully compared with the almond-tree, both on account of its snowy whiteness and its winter blossoming
Holm Tree - The identity of the Tree of Isaiah 44:14 is disputed: cypress (NAS, NIV); ilex (REB); holm oak or Tree (NAS margin, NRSV); oak (TEV)
Pistacia - ) The name of a genus of Trees, including the Tree which bears the pistachio, the Mediterranean mastic Tree (Pistacia Lentiscus), and the species (P
Sapwood - ) The alburnum, or part of the wood of any exogenous Tree next to the bark, being that portion of the Tree through which the sap flows most freely; - distinguished from heartwood
Walnut - ) The fruit or nut of any Tree of the genus Juglans; also, the Tree, and its timber
Mulberry - ) The berry or fruit of any Tree of the genus Morus; also, the Tree itself
Linden - ) A handsome Tree (Tilia Europaea), having cymes of light yellow flowers, and large cordate leaves. The Tree is common in Europe
Almond, Almond Tree - The Tree and itsfruit are represented by the same word. It is derived from a root signifying 'to hasten,' which is appropriate, seeing it is the first Tree to break out into blossom, as a forerunner of spring. The meaning is confirmed by Jeremiah 1:11,12 where the prophet saw an almond Tree, and Jehovah said, "Thou hast well seen: for I will hasten my word to perform it. In Ecclesiastes 12:5 , when everything seems to be decaying instead of 'the almond Tree shall flourish,' it may be translated 'the almond Tree shall be despised;' others say, 'cause loathing;' others prefer to compare the almond Tree to the white head of an old man hastening to the grave
Piney - ) A term used in designating an East Indian Tree (the Vateria Indica or piney Tree, of the order Dipterocarpeae, which grows in Malabar, etc
Pine Tree - A Tree that grew on Mount Lebanon, but of what sort is uncertain. ets shemen , 'trees of oil,' Nehemiah 8:15 . See OIL Tree
Juneberry - ) The shrub or Tree which bears this fruit; - also called shad bush, and had Tree. ) The small applelike berry of American Trees of genus Amelanchier; - also called service berry
Locust Tree - A large North American Tree of the genus Robinia (R. Pseudacacia), producing large slender racemes of white, fragrant, papilionaceous flowers, and often cultivated as an ornamental Tree
Sycamore - sycomoros), a Tree which in its general character resembles the fig-tree, while its leaves resemble those of the mulberry; hence it is called the fig-mulberry (Ficus sycomorus). At Jericho, Zacchaeus climbed a sycomore-tree to see Jesus as he passed by (Luke 19:4 ). This Tree was easily destroyed by frost (Psalm 78:47 ), and therefore it is found mostly in the "vale" (1 Kings 10:27 ; 2 Chronicles 1:15 : in both passages the RSV has properly "lowland"), i. It is to be distinguished from our sycamore (the Acer pseudo-platanus), which is a species of maple often called a plane-tree
Diviner's Oak - Others translate as the diviner's oak (NAS), Soothsayers' terebinth (REB), soothsayers' Tree (NIV) or “oak Tree of the fortune tellers” (TEV). In this case the Tree formed part of a sanctuary. The terebinth was designated the diviner's or soothsayer's Tree since persons would go to the sanctuary seeking an oracle. The Tree is perhaps that associated with Abraham (Genesis 12:6 ), Jacob (Genesis 35:4 ), and Joshua (Joshua 24:26 )
Nuts - This is judged to be the fruit of the pistachio Tree (Pistacia vera). This word is considered to refer to the walnut Tree (Juglans regia). Josephus and others speak of the walnut Tree growing in Palestine
Lemon - It is produced by a tropical Tree of the genus Citrus, the common fruit known in commerce being that of the species C. ) The Tree which bears lemons; the lemon Tree
Balata - ) The bully Tree (Minusops globosa); also, its milky juice (balata gum), which when dried constitutes an elastic gum called chicle, or chicle gum. ) A West Indian sapotaceous Tree (Bumelia retusa)
Almond Tree - Almond Tree. This Tree resembles a peach Tree, but is larger. In Ecclesiastes 12:5 the hoary head is beautifully compared with the almond Tree, either on account of its whiteness, beauty and winter blossoming, or the hastening on of decay
Goodly Trees - This was probably the olive Tree (Nehemiah 8:15 ), although no special Tree is mentioned
Hamadryad - ) A Tree nymph whose life ended with that of the particular Tree, usually an oak, which had been her abode
Totara - ) A coniferous Tree (Podocarpus totara), next to the kauri the most valuable timber Tree of New Zeland
Zamang - ) An immense leguminous Tree (Pithecolobium Saman) of Venezuela. Also called rain Tree
Ithamar - (Exodus 6:23) His name signifies, island of the palm Tree, from Tamar, a palm Tree, on Ai, an island
Fir - ), a lofty Tree (Isaiah 55:13 ) growing on Lebanon (37:24). The true fir (abies) is not found in Palestine, but the pine Tree, of which there are four species, is common. The precise kind of Tree meant by the "green fir Tree" (Hosea 14:8 ) is uncertain. Some regard it as the sherbin Tree, a cypress resembling the cedar; others, the Aleppo or maritime pine (Pinus halepensis), which resembles the Scotch fir; while others think that the "stone-pine" (Pinus pinea) is probably meant
Baal Tamar - ("lord of a palm Tree". Deborah's palm Tree (Judges 4:4) was between Ramah and Bethel, in this neighborhood
Bay-Tree - It is mentioned only in Psalms 37:35-36 : "I have seen the ungodly in great power, and flourishing like a green bay-tree. " Aben Ezra, Jarchi, Kimchi, Jerom, and some others say that the original may mean only a native Tree; a Tree growing in its native soil, not having suffered by transplantation. Such a Tree spreads itself luxuriantly
Zatthu - Olive Tree
Bay-Tree - BAY-TREE ( ’ezrâch , Psalms 37:35 ) is probably a mistranslation for ‘a Tree in its native soil’ (RV Windfall - ) Anything blown down or off by the wind, as fruit from a Tree, or the Tree itself, or a portion of a forest prostrated by a violent wind, etc
Chestnut Tree - ) ( Genesis 30:37 ; Ezekiel 31:8 ) Probably the "palm Tree" (Platanus orientalis ) is intended. This Tree thrives best in low and rather moist situations in the north of Palestine, and resembles our sycamore or buttonwood ( Platanus occidentalis )
Tree - (ξύλον)...
‘Tree’ is used five times in the NT as a synonym for the Cross (Acts 5:30; Acts 10:39; Acts 13:29, Galatians 3:13; 1 Peter 2:24). 37; so in Acts 16:24); rarely a living Tree (as in Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14; Revelation 22:19); and never a cross. But in the Septuagint , where ξύλον is used for עַץ, ‘tree,’ the phrase ‘hang on a Tree’ occurs several times (Genesis 40:19, Deuteronomy 21:22, Joshua 10:26); and the dread saying, κατηραμένος ὑπὸ θεοῦ πᾶς κρεμάμενος ἐπὶ ξύλον (‘maledictus a Deo est qui pendet in ligno’), seems to have been applied very early in the Christian Church-apparently many years before the writing of the Epistle to the Galatians-with a deep theological meaning as well as a poignant pathos, to the death of Christ, whose Cross then came to be commonly known as ‘the Tree. Be that as it may, the Tree used for this gruesome purpose was no doubt a literal living Tree, not an artificial ‘gallows-tree. ’...
The Cross is called ‘a Tree’ in two addresses which are said to have been delivered by St. Peter (Acts 5:30; Acts 10:39), and 1 Peter 2:24 refers to Christ bearing our sins in His body upon the Tree. The theme ‘crux est arbor’ is a favourite one in mediaeval poetry, and ‘the Tree’ is a common synonym for ‘the Cross’ in modern hymnology. ...
In Judges 1:12 apostates are compared to autumn Trees without fruit. The writer of the Apocalypse refers to a conflagration among forest Trees (Revelation 8:7); also to Trees spared by hurricanes (Revelation 7:1; Revelation 7:3) and by locusts (Revelation 9:4). See also Tree of Life
Mulberry Tree - The word baka is supposed to be from a root signifying 'weeping,' and to refer to some Tree that distils an odoriferous gum; but what Tree is alluded to is unknown. David was to wait for some secret sign from God in the mulberry Trees before attacking the enemy. The true mulberry is supposed to be the Tree called in the A
Box Tree - The box Tree grows in Asia Minor and Persia but does not occur in Palestine. The Tree has been identified as the pine (NRSV) or cypress (TEV, NIV). “Box Tree”is based on early Greek and Latin translations. The Hebrew word means, “to be straight” and apparently refers to the tall, majestic cypress Trees
Chestnut Tree - It is one of the Trees of which, because of its strength and beauty, the Assyrian empire is likened (Ezekiel 31:8 ; RSV, "plane Trees"). It is probably the Oriental plane Tree (Platanus orientalis) that is intended. It is a characteristic of this Tree that it annually sheds its outer bark, becomes "naked. " The chestnut Tree proper is not a native of Palestine
Oil Tree - (Isaiah 41:19 ), but the Hebrew (ets shemen ) occurs also in 1 Kings 6:23 , where it is translated 'olive Tree;' and in Nehemiah 8:15 , where it is rendered 'pine branches:' 'olive branches' being mentioned in the same verse would seem to indicate that the 'tree of oil' is distinct from the olive Tree
Elm - ) A Tree of the genus Ulmus, of several species, much used as a shade Tree, particularly in America
Rafter - ) The original Tree from which a scion has been taken for grafting upon another Tree
Azedarach - ) A handsome Asiatic Tree (Melia azedarach), common in the southern United States; - called also, Pride of India, Pride of China, and Bead Tree
Pine Tree - This Tree is spoken of in Scripture by the Lord himself, as one of the Trees which the Lord would take to beautify his sanctuary, (Isaiah 60:13) No doubt, it is figuratively spoken in allusion to believers. See Cedar Tree...
Rafter - ) The original Tree from which a scion has been taken for grafting upon another Tree
Lote - ) A large Tree (Celtis australis), found in the south of Europe. Called also nettle Tree
Baca - A mulberry-tree
Tamar - Palm; palm-tree
Raft - ) A small shoot or scion of a Tree inserted in another Tree, the stock of which is to support and nourish it. The two unite and become one Tree, but the graft determines the kind of fruit. ) A branch or portion of a Tree growing from such a shoot. ) To insert (a graft) in a branch or stem of another Tree; to propagate by insertion in another stock; also, to insert a graft upon. ) To insert scions from one Tree, or kind of Tree, etc
Raft - ) A small shoot or scion of a Tree inserted in another Tree, the stock of which is to support and nourish it. The two unite and become one Tree, but the graft determines the kind of fruit. ) A branch or portion of a Tree growing from such a shoot. ) To insert (a graft) in a branch or stem of another Tree; to propagate by insertion in another stock; also, to insert a graft upon. ) To insert scions from one Tree, or kind of Tree, etc
Sandalwood - ) The highly perfumed yellowish heartwood of an East Indian and Polynesian Tree (Santalum album), and of several other Trees of the same genus, as the Hawaiian Santalum Freycinetianum and S. ) Any Tree of the genus Santalum, or a Tree which yields sandalwood
Orange - ) The fruit of a Tree of the genus Citrus (C. ) The Tree that bears oranges; the orange Tree
Fir Tree - KJV term for a Tree most often identified with the aleppo pine (NIV, REB, TEV). Others have identified the Tree with the juniper (NAS at Isaiah 41:19 and Isaiah 60:13 only) or cypress (NRSV, NAS elsewhere)
Stacte - The gum of the storax Tree which was combined with onycha, galbanum, and frankincense to make the incense to be burned in the tabernacle (Exodus 30:34 ). It is a small Tree plentiful in rocky places in most of Palestine
Mangostan - ) A Tree of the East Indies of the genus Garcinia (G. The Tree grows to the height of eighteen feet, and bears fruit also called mangosteen, of the size of a small apple, the pulp of which is very delicious food
Mulberry-Tree - The word-translated mulberry-tree signifies literally weeping, and indicates some Tree, which distils balsam or gum
Bito - of Bito Tree...
Turpentine Tree - TURPENTINE Tree
Caper Bush - of Caper Tree...
Bonduc - ) See Nicker Tree
Holm Tree - HOLM Tree
Tadmor - The palm-tree; bitterness
Leaves - See Tree of Life
Pipal Tree - Same as Peepul Tree
Pippul Tree - Same as Peepul Tree
Sapling - ) A young Tree
Quickbeam - ) See Quicken Tree
Platan - ) The plane Tree
Enip - of Genip Tree...
Chesteyn - ) The chestnut Tree
Timberling - ) A small Tree
Terebinth - ) The turpentine Tree
Acacia - See Shittim Tree
Wicken Tree - Same as Quicken Tree
Husks - The Greek word here used means the carob- beans, the fruit of a Tree of the same name. This fruit is common in all the countries bordering on the Mediterranean: it is suffered to ripen and grow dry on the Tree; the poor eat it, and cattle are fattened with it. The Tree, the Ceratonia Siliqua, is an evergreen of a middle size, full of branches, and abounding with round dark green leaves, an inch or two in diameter. The fruits are flat brownish pods, from six to eight inches long, and an inch or more broad: they resemble the pods of our locust-tree; and are composed of two husks, separated by membranes into several cells, and containing flat, shining seeds, and when ripe a sweetish, honey like kind of juice. The Tree is called by the Germans, Johannisbrodaum, that is, "John's-bread-tree," because John the Baptist was supposed to have lived on it fruit
Candlenut - ) The fruit of a euphorbiaceous Tree or shrub (Aleurites moluccana), native of some of the Pacific islands. ) The Tree itself
Osage Orange - An ornamental Tree of the genus Maclura (M. The Tree was first found in the country of the Osage Indians, and bears a hard and inedible fruit of an orangelike appearance
Popular - It is a beautiful and shady Tree, common in Palestine and its vicinity. According to some, however, the storax-tree is intended
Tamarisk - (ta' muh rihssk)A shrublike Tree (Tamarix syriaca ) common to the Sinai and southern Palestine with small white or pink flowers. Many varieties of the Tree exist. KJV translated, “grave” and “tree
Promises - Good old Spurstow says that some of the promises are like the almond Tree: they blossom hastily in the very earliest spring; but, saith he, there are others which resemble the mulberry Tree: they are very slow in putting forth their leaves. Then what is a man to do, if he has a mulberry Tree promise which is late in blossoming? Why, he is to wait till it does
Graff, to - The reference to the grafting of Trees in Romans 11 shows that the system was then practised. It speaks of Gentiles, the wild olive branches, being grafted into the good olive Tree; and this is said to be 'contrary to nature. ' Gentiles have now been grafted into the Tree of witness on earth, and of promise; but by-and-by the natural branches, Israel, will again be grafted into 'their own olive Tree
Shittah - of Shittah Tree...
Taanach-Shilo - Breaking down a fig-tree
Baal-Tamar - Master of the palm-tree
Treed - ) of Tree...
Dottard - ) An old, decayed Tree
Remmon - Greatness; elevation; a pomegranate-tree
Ithamar - Island of the palm-tree
Sapotaceous - ) Of or pertaining to a natural order (Sapotaceae) of (mostly tropical) Trees and shrubs, including the star apple, the Lucuma, or natural marmalade Tree, the gutta-percha Tree (Isonandra), and the India mahwa, as well as the sapodilla, or sapota, after which the order is named
Tree - Tree, n. A Tree differs from a shrub principally in size, many species of Trees growing to the highth of fifty or sixty feet, and some species to seventy or eighty, and a few, particularly the pine, to a much greater highth. Trees are of various kinds as nuciferous, or nut-bearing Trees bacciferous, or berry-bearing coniferous, or cone-bearing, &c. Some are forest-trees, and useful for timber or fuel others are fruit Trees, and cultivated in gardens and orchards others are used chiefly for shade and ornament. Something resembling a Tree, consisting of a stem or stalk and branches as a genealogical Tree. In ship-building, pieces of timber are called chess-trees, cross-trees, roof-trees, tressel-trees, &c. --Jesus, whom they slew and hanged on a Tree
Gentiles, the Fulness of the - This is spoken of in connection with the olive-tree as God's Tree of promise and privilege on the earth. Israel was that Tree, Jeremiah 11:16 ; but because of unbelief some (perhaps the most) of the branches were broken off, and some Gentiles were, contrary to nature, grafted into the good olive-tree
Buxeous - ) Belonging to the box Tree
Arboret - ) A small Tree or shrub
Pery - ) A pear Tree
Treeing - ) of Tree...
Discodactyl - ) One of the Tree frogs
Almendron - ) The lofty Brazil-nut Tree
Zuche - ) A stump of a Tree
Thyine Wood - It is a cone bearing Tree and allied to the pine. This Tree was much prized by Greeks and Romans on account of the beauty of its wood for various ornamental purposes. By the Romans the Tree was called citrus , the wood citrum
Apple - ) The fleshy pome or fruit of a rosaceous Tree (Pyrus malus) cultivated in numberless varieties in the temperate zones. ) Any Tree genus Pyrus which has the stalk sunken into the base of the fruit; an apple Tree
Mastic - ) A low shrubby Tree of the genus Pistacia (P. Lentiscus), growing upon the islands and coasts of the Mediterranean, and producing a valuable resin; - called also, mastic Tree. ) A resin exuding from the mastic Tree, and obtained by incision
Elm - , a Tree common in Palestine, long-lived, and therefore often employed for landmarks and in designating places (Genesis 35:4 ; Judges 6:11,19 . (See TEIL Tree
Palmetto - In the United States, the name is applied especially to the Chamaerops, / Sabal, Palmetto, the cabbage Tree of Florida and the Carolinas. See Cabbage Tree, under Cabbage
Medlar - ) A Tree of the genus Mespilus (M. Germanica); also, the fruit of the Tree
Cypress - An evergreen Tree, resembling in form and size the Lombardy poplar. The cypress is thought to be intended in some of the passages where "fir-tree" occurs, 2 Samuel 6:5 , etc
Arboricole - ) Tree-inhabiting; - said of certain birds
Beechnut - ) The nut of the beech Tree
Shittim Wood - ) The wood of the shittah Tree
Duramen - ) The heartwood of an exogenous Tree
Yalah - ) The oil of the mahwa Tree
Tanghinia - ) The ordeal Tree
Daddock - ) The rotten body of a Tree
Onakie - ) An African timber Tree (Acacia Adansonii)
Lentisk - ) A Tree; the mastic
Fig Tree - The Bible supposes the presence of the fig-tree throughout all Palestine, and regards it as one of the characteristic products of the land (Deuteronomy 8), together with the vine, so that a land which has neither fig-tree nor vine is considered wretched (Numbers 20). The Tree loses its leaves during the winter, but these begin to grow again towards the end of March, or the beginning of April. The fig-tree figures in the New Testament in the symbolic action of Our Lord (Matthew 21; Mark 11), which is a reminder of the symbolic actions of the prophets of the Old Testament. Other references in the New Testament to the fig-tree and figs are in Matthew 7,24; John 1; James 3; Apocalypse 6. ...
The parable of the Barren Fig-tree is given in Luke 13, in connection with the call to repentance, inspired by recent misfortunes which should cause the nation of Israel to think, else destruction awaits them. The parable speaks of a fig-tree, planted in a vineyard. After a lapse of time which would allow the Tree to grow to the bearing stage, the owner comes three years in succession, but finds no fruit. Disappointed by continual failure which leaves no hope for the future, the owner orders the Tree cut down, but at the request of the vine dresser he consents to try again and to spare the Tree for another year. The vine dresser hopes that additional care may help the Tree to bear fruit. Like the fig-tree Israel receives special care from God; the mission of Christ is the last of those proofs of the Divine love for the nation, and if the people fail to respond and to heed the call, they are doomed to destruction
Banyan - ) A Tree of the same genus as the common fig, and called the Indian fig (Ficus Indica), whose branches send shoots to the ground, which take root and become additional trunks, until it may be the Tree covers some acres of ground and is able to shelter thousands of men
Baal-Tamar - (bay' uhl-tay' mahr) Place name meaning, “Baal of the palm Tree” or “lord of the palm Tree
Quebracho - ) A Chilian apocynaceous Tree (Aspidosperma Quebracho); also, its bark, which is used as a febrifuge, and for dyspn/a of the lung, or bronchial diseases; - called also white quebracho, to distinguish it from the red quebracho, a Mexican anacardiaceous Tree (Loxopterygium Lorentzii) whose bark is said to have similar properties
Para Rubber - The caoutchouc obtained from the South American euphorbiaceous Tree Hevea brasiliensis, hence called the Para rubber Tree, from the Brazilian river and seaport named Para; also, the similar product of other species of Hevea
Weeping Tree - (1):...
A Tree from which honeydew or other liquid secretions of insects drip in considerable quantities, esp. ...
(2):...
Any Tree having pendulous branches
Rowan Tree - A european Tree (Pyrus aucuparia) related to the apple, but with pinnate leaves and flat corymbs of small white flowers followed by little bright red berries. Called also roan Tree, and mountain ash. The name is also applied to two American Trees of similar habit (Pyrus Americana, and P
Laurus - ) A genus of Trees including, according to modern authors, only the true laurel (Laurus nobilis), and the larger L. Formerly the sassafras, the camphor Tree, the cinnamon Tree, and several other aromatic Trees and shrubs, were also referred to the genus Laurus
Shittim-Wood - Shittim-wood, from the shittah Tree, Isaiah 41:19, A, V. The only timber Tree of any size now found in the Arabian desert is the seyal (Acacia seyal)
Fig Tree - 1: συκῆ (Strong's #4808 — Noun Feminine — suke or sukea — soo-kay' ) "a fig Tree," is found in Matthew 21:19,20,21 ; 24:32 ; Mark 11:13,20,21 ; 13:28 ; Luke 13:6,7 ; 21:29 ; John 1:48,50 ; James 3:12 ; Revelation 6:13 (see sukon, above). ...
Note: A "fig Tree" with leaves must have young fruits already, or it will be barren for the season. The Tree in Mark 11:13 should have had fruit, unripe indeed, but existing. In some lands "fig Trees" bear the early fruit under the leaves and the later fruit above the leaves. The condemnation of this fig Tree lay in the absence of any sign of fruit
Beam Tree - A Tree (Pyrus aria) related to the apple
Amboyna Pine - The resiniferous Tree Agathis Dammara, of the Moluccas
Shittah Tree - KJV spelling of Shittim Tree (Isaiah 41:19 )
Dendriform - ) Resembling in structure a Tree or shrub
Platanus - ) A genus of Trees; the plane Tree
Date - The fruit of the palm-tree
Otaheite Apple - (1):...
A West Indian name for a myrtaceous Tree (Jambosa Malaccensis) which bears crimson berries. ...
(2):...
The fruit of a Polynesian anacardiaceous Tree (Spondias dulcis), also called vi-apple
Husks - HUSKS ( keratia , Luke 15:16 ) are almost certainly the pods of the carob Tree ( Ceratonia siliqua ), commonly called the locust Tree. This common Palestine Tree is distinguished by its beautiful dark glossy foliage
Pistachio - ) The small anacardiaceous Tree, of southern Europe and Asia Minor, which bears the pistachio nut. ) The nut of the Pistacia vera, a Tree of the order Anacardiaceae, containing a kernel of a pale greenish color, which has a pleasant taste, resembling that of the almond, and yields an oil of agreeable taste and odor; - called also pistachio nut. The Tree grows in Arabia, Persia, Syria, and Sicily
Although - Grant all this be it so allow all suppose that admit all that as, "although the fig Tree shall not blossom. That is, grant, admit or suppose what follows - "the fig Tree shall not blossom. " It is a transitive verb, and admits after it the definitive that - although that the fig Tree shall not blossom but this use of the verb, has been long obsolete
Salisburia - ) The ginkgo Tree (Ginkgo biloba, or Salisburia adiantifolia)
Arbuscular - ) Of or pertaining to a dwarf Tree; shrublike
Dendroidal - ) Resembling a shrub or Tree in form; Treelike
Pirie - ) A pear Tree
Frondent - ) Covered with leaves; leafy; as, a frondent Tree
Sapucaia - ) A Brazilian Tree
Whahoo - ) An American Tree, the winged elm
Resiniferous - ) Yielding resin; as, a resiniferous Tree or vessel
Treeful - ) The quantity or number which fills a Tree
Apple - Apple Tree, Apple (Heb. Apple Tree is named in the English Versions in Song of Solomon 2:3; Song of Solomon 8:5, and Joel 1:12, The fruit of this Tree is alluded to in Proverbs 25:11 and Song of Solomon 2:5; Song of Solomon 7:8. It is difficult to say what Tree is intended by the Hebrew word tappûach. The orange would answer all the requirements of the scriptural passages, and orange Trees are found in Palestine; but it is not certain that this Tree was known in the earlier times to the inhabitants of Palestine
Coffee - ) The "beans" or "berries" (pyrenes) obtained from the drupes of a small evergreen Tree of the genus Coffea, growing in Abyssinia, Arabia, Persia, and other warm regions of Asia and Africa, and also in tropical America. ) The coffee Tree
Tree - Tree . ‘Tree’ is used as a poetic name for the Cross in Acts 5:30 ; Acts 10:39 ; Acts 13:29 , 1 Peter 2:24 ; cf. For sacred Trees see High Place, 1 ; and Israel, ii. 1 (5); and, for the various Trees of the Bible, the artt
Stacte, - Hence stacte is doubtless a spice that oozes from a Tree in drops: it formed a part of the holy incense. ' It is probably the gum from the storax Tree, Styrax officinalis
Hemlock - ) An evergreen Tree common in North America (Abies, / Tsuga, Canadensis); hemlock spruce. ) The wood or timber of the hemlock Tree
Aloes - Or more properly, ALOE, and East Indian Tree, that grows about eight or ten feet high, and yields a rich perfume, Psalm 45:8 Proverbs 7:17 Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 . This Tree or wood was called by the Greeks Agallochon, and has been known to moderns by the names of Lign-aloe, aloe-wood, paradise-wood, eagle-wood, etc. The Tree is represented as large, with an erect trunk and lofty branches. The other or more common species is called garo in the East Indies, and is the wood of a Tree growing in the Moluccas, the Excoecaria Agallocha of Linnaeus. The leaves are like those of a pear-tree; and it has a milky juice, which, as the Tree grows old, hardens into a fragrant resin
Oak - It is probably that the first syllable, oak, was originally an adjective expressing some quality, as hard or strong, and by the disuse of Tree, oak became the name of the Tree. ...
A Tree of the genus Quercus, or rather the popular name of the genus itself, of which there are several species. As it was then a large Tree, it must now be nearly three hundred years old
Cassava Wood - A West Indian Tree (Turpinia occidentalis) of the family Staphyleaceae
Xylobalsamum - ) The dried twigs of a Syrian Tree (Balsamodendron Gileadense)
Cain, Apple of - Not an apple but is the strawberry-tree, Arbutus unedo
Coquilla Nut - The fruit of a Brazilian Tree (Attalea funifera of Martius
Cedrine - ) Of or pertaining to cedar or the cedar Tree
Agnus Castus - agnus castus); the chaste Tree
Saul - ) Same as Sal, the Tree
Apple of Cain - Not an apple but is the strawberry-tree, Arbutus unedo
Arbutus Unedo - Not an apple but is the strawberry-tree, Arbutus unedo
Pilled - Peeled, as a Tree of its bark, Genesis 30:37
Trees - They were not groves of Trees, as we understand a grove. The olive Tree represents a leader who was wise, kind, helpful and fruitful. The fig Tree represents an Israelite who was busy and useful in the service of his people. ...
Psalm 104:16 (b) It is quite evident that those who are the "planting of the Lord" and know the Holy Spirit are vigorous, active Christians as a Tree is filled with leaves and fruit when the sap is flowing. ...
Song of Solomon 2:3 (a) CHRIST is the apple Tree in this verse. The leaders are the Trees. ...
Isaiah 55:12 (b) These Trees represent the happy people of GOD and their leaders because of the restoration of Israel under the good hand of their GOD. As there are many kinds of Trees, and many sizes of Trees, so the verse indicates that all kinds of people in the nation of Israel will enjoy the presence of the Lord and His blessings. ...
Isaiah 61:3 (a) The people of GOD are called "trees of righteousness" when they are restored, and are again a growing, fruitful nation. ...
Ezekiel 47:7 (b) The river which represents the Holy Spirit, when operating freely, produces converts, saved people who become Trees of righteousness, planted by the river, and bearing fruit. ...
Mark 8:24 (a) In Oriental countries where the houses are made of branches of Trees, men go to the water courses, cut down branches of willows, and other Trees, and carry these home to be used for thatch. When he saw the mass of Trees going down the road, and could not see the legs of the carriers, he thought that the Trees were walking. ...
Mark 11:13 (b) The fig Tree always represents Israel in her national position. (The olive Tree represents Israel from the religious viewpoint. The fig Tree is Israel. Each type of a Tree represents a different truth as follows:...
Palm Tree - it represents the individual Christian life living for GOD in the midst of adverse conditions such as the palm Tree has in the desert. ...
Cedar Tree - it represents the collective Christian life, for cedars grow in forests and not as the palm Tree which dwells almost alone. ...
Fig Tree - it represents Israel from the political standpoint as a nation. ...
Olive Tree - it represents Israel from the religious standpoint as the people of GOD. ...
Willow Tree - it represents the sorrowing believer because of separation from loved ones, or from the homeland. ...
Oak Tree - it represents sorrow because of death. Deborah was buried under an oak Tree. Absalom died in an oak Tree. Saul was buried under an oak Tree. The bitterness of the oak Tree is compared to the bitterness of death. ...
Fir Tree - it represents the happy, radiant Christian life under every circumstance and throughout the year. ...
Myrtle Tree - it represents joyous experiences in the Christian life. ...
Pine Tree - it represents prosperity for those who walk with GOD, and believe Him. ...
Thorn Tree - it represents the disagreeable life filled with antagonisms, criticisms and hatreds
Juniper - In 1 Kings 19:4 , a Tree under which Elijah the prophet rested as he fled the wrath of Jezebel. ” See Broom Tree
Plane Tree - 'armon (Genesis 30:37 ; Ezekiel 31:8 ), rendered "chesnut" in the Authorized Version, but correctly "plane Tree" in the Revised Version and the LXX. This Tree is frequently found in Palestine, both on the coast and in the north
Cocoa Palm - A palm Tree producing the cocoanut (Cocos nucifera). The trunk is without branches, and has a tuft of leaves at the top, each being fifteen or twenty feet in length, and at the base of these the nuts hang in clusters; the cocoanut Tree
Allon - The word allon is held to signify a strong and hardy Tree, especially 'the oak,' as the word is translated in several passages. Place in Naphtali, Joshua 19:33 ; or perhaps it may read, 'from the oak at Zaanannim,' referring to some well-known old Tree
Aloe - An odoriferous Tree, called also "lign aloe. The aroma of the Tree proceeds from its resin, especially when decaying
Anacardium - ) A genus of plants including the cashew Tree
Achiote - ) Seeds of the annotto Tree; also, the coloring matter, annotto
Discodactylous - ) Having sucking disks on the toes, as the Tree frogs
Triumvir - ) One of Tree men united in public office or authority
Ablaqueate - ) To lay bare, as the roots of a Tree
Loppard - ) A Tree, the top of which has been lopped off
Kapia - ) The fossil resin of the kauri Tree of New Zealand
Tree of Life - Some writers have advanced the opinion that this Tree had some secret virtue, which was fitted to preserve life. Wisdom is compared to the Tree of life (Proverbs 3:18 ). The "tree of life" spoken of in the Book of Revelation (Revelation 2:7 ; 22:2,14 ) is an emblem of the joys of the celestial paradise
Balsam - Baka' is translated as balsam Trees in the modern versions ( 2 Samuel 5:23-24 ; 1 Chronicles 14:14-15 ; NAS, NIV, NRSV, and TEV). The KJV reads “mulberry Trees,” while REB has “aspens. ” Neither the balsam nor mulberry Tree has been known to grow around Jerusalem, making the identification of the Tree uncertain. Poplar and mastic Tree have also been suggested as translations
Hardbeam - ) A Tree of the genus Carpinus, of compact, horny texture; hornbeam
Devilwood - ) A kind of Tree (Osmanthus Americanus), allied to the European olive
Pimento - ) Allspice; - applied both to the Tree and its fruit
Unifollilate - ) Having only one leaflet, as the leaves of the orange Tree
Silverberry - ) A Tree or shrub (Elaeagnus argentea) with silvery foliage and fruit
Monkey-Bread - ) The fruit of the Adansonia digitata; also, the Tree
Oil Tree - OIL Tree ( ‘çts-shemen , 1 Kings 6:23 ] 1 Kings 6:31-33 [2] ‘olive Tree,’ mg. ‘trees of oil’ or ‘oily Trees,’ RV [3] ‘oil Tree,’ RVm Mustard Seed - This is mentioned as something very small to which the faith of the apostles did not rise; and the kingdom of God is spoken of as being like this small seed, which nevertheless grows into a Tree large enough for the birds to lodge in its branches. Various surmises have been made as to what Tree is alluded to. Its seeds are very small, and it grows to a Tree of some ten feet high, quite large enough for the smaller birds to lodge in its branches. In Matthew 13 it says that, "when it is grown, it is the greatest among herbs, " yet it "becometh a Tree. " This reads as if its normal class was that of a large herb, but by some mysterious means it became a Tree
Palm Tree - This Tree, sometimes called the date Tree, grows plentifully in the east. The stalks are generally full of rugged knots, which are the vestiges of the decayed leaves; for the trunk of this Tree is not solid, like other Trees, but its centre is filled with pith, round which is a tough bark full of strong fibres when young, which, as the Tree grows old, hardens and becomes ligneous. The leaves, when the Tree has grown to a size for bearing fruit, are six or eight feet long, are very broad when spread out, and are used for covering the tops of houses, &c. The learned Kaempfer, as a botanist, an antiquary, and a traveller, has exhausted the whole subject of palm Trees. " "The extensive importance of the date Tree," says Dr. From the leaves they make couches, baskets, bags, mats, and brushes; from the branches, cages for their poultry, and fences for their gardens; from the fibres of the boughs, thread, ropes, and rigging; from the sap is prepared a spirituous liquor; and the body of the Tree furnishes fuel. ...
It is even said that from one variety of the palm Tree, the phoenix farinifera, meal has been extracted, which is found among the fibres of the trunk, and has been used for food. "...
In the temple of Solomon were pilasters made in the form of palm Trees, 1 Kings 6:29 . It was under a Tree of this kind that Deborah dwelt between Ramah and Bethel, Judges 4:5 . To the fair, flourishing, and fruitful condition of this Tree, the psalmist very aptly compares the votary of virtue, Psalms 92:12-14 :—...
The righteous shall flourish like a palm Tree. ...
The palm Tree is crowned at its top with a large tuft of spiring leaves about four feet long, which never fall off, but always continue in the same flourishing verdure. The Tree, as Dr. The trunk of the Tree is remarkably straight and lofty. Jeremiah, speaking of the idols that were carried in procession, says they were upright as the palm Tree, Jeremiah 10:5 . And for erect stature and slenderness of form, the spouse, in Song of Solomon 7:7 , is compared to this Tree:—...
How framed, O my love, for delights! Lo, thy stature is like a palm Tree, And thy bosom like clusters of dates. Good observes, that "the very word tamar, here used for the palm Tree, and whose radical meaning is ‘straight,' or ‘upright,' (whence it was afterward applied to pillars or columns, as well as to the palm,) was also a general name among the ladies of Palestine, and unquestionably adopted in honour of the stature they had already acquired, or gave a fair promise of attaining. From the inspissated sap of the Tree, a kind of honey, or dispse, as it is called, is produced, little inferior to that of bees. "...
This Tree was formerly of great value and esteem among the Israelites, and so very much cultivated in Judea, that, in after times, it became the emblem of that country, as may be seen in a medal of the Emperor Vespasian upon the conquest of Judea. It represents a captive woman sitting under a palm Tree, with this inscription, "Judea capta;" [1] and upon a Greek coin, likewise, of his son Titus, struck upon the like occasion, we see a shield suspended upon a palm Tree, with a Victory writing upon it. " Jericho, in particular, was called "the city of palms," Deuteronomy 34:3 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 ; because, as Josephus, Strabo, and Pliny have remarked, it anciently abounded in palm Trees. Shaw remarks, that, though these Trees are not now either plentiful or fruitful in other parts of the holy land, yet there are several of them at Jericho, where there is the conveniency they require of being often watered; where, likewise, the climate is warm, and the soil sandy, such as they thrive and delight in. Tamar, a city built in the desert by Solomon, 1 Kings 9:18 ; Ezekiel 47:19 ; Ezekiel 48:28 , was probably so named from the palm Trees growing about it; as it was afterward by the Romans called Palmyra, or rather Palmira, on the same account, from palma, "a palm Tree
Corkwood - ) Any one of several Trees or shrubs having light or corky wood;...
(2):...
(n. ) In the United States, the Tree Leitneria floridana. ) In the West Indies: (1) Either of the cotton Trees Ochroma lagopus and Pariti tiliaceum. ) The Tree producing the aligator apple
Box Tree - Most of the ancient, and several of the modern, translators, render this word the buxus, or "box Tree;" but from its being mentioned along with Trees of the forest, some more stately Tree must be intended, probably the cedar
Locust - ) The locust Tree. See Locust Tree (definition, note, and phrases)
Baobab - ) A gigantic African Tree (Adansonia digitata), also naturalized in India
Birk - ) A birch Tree
Pine-Tree State - Maine; - a nickname alluding to the pine Tree in its coat of arms
Pneumophora - ) A division of holothurians having an internal gill, or respiratory Tree
Pulas - ) The East Indian leguminous Tree Butea frondosa
Twite - ) The European Tree sparrow
Bolling - ) A Tree from which the branches have been cut; a pollard
Citron - The fruit of the citron Tree, a large species of lemon
Sea Fir - A sertularian hydroid, especially Sertularia abietina, which branches like a miniature fir Tree
Topmost - ) Highest; uppermost; as, the topmost cliff; the topmost branch of a Tree
Trireme - ) An ancient galley or vessel with Tree banks, or tiers, of oars
Waddywood - ) An Australian Tree (Pittosporum bicolor); also, its wood, used in making waddies
Juniper - ) Any evergreen shrub or Tree, of the genus Juniperus and order Coniferae
Psarolite - ) A silicified stem of Tree fern, found in abundance in the Triassic sandstone
Crabstick - ) A stick, cane, or cudgel, made of the wood of the crab Tree
Copalm - ) The yellowish, fragrant balsam yielded by the sweet gum; also, the Tree itself
Coumaric - ) Relating to, derived from, or like, the Dipterix odorata, a Tree of Guiana
Coumarou - ) The Tree (Dipteryx odorata) which bears the tonka bean; also, the bean itself
Euonymin - ) A principle or mixture of principles derived from Euonymus atropurpureus, or spindle Tree
Fructed - ) Bearing fruit; - said of a Tree or plant so represented upon an escutcheon
Ularburong - ) A large East Indian nocturnal Tree snake (Dipsas dendrophila)
Megaphyton - ) An extinct genus of Tree ferns with large, two-ranked leaves, or fronds
Jupati Palm - A great Brazilian palm Tree (Raphia taedigera), used by the natives for many purposes
Rugru Palm - See Macaw Tree, under Macaw
Leverwood - ) The American hop hornbeam (Ostrya Virginica), a small Tree with very tough wood
Prayer: Success in - These lads to gain the fruit must shake the Tree, Good reader, mark the lesson writ for thee! If from the Tree of promis'd mercy thou Wouldst win the good which loadeth every bough, Then urge the promise well with pleading cries, Move heaven itself with vehemence of sighs; Soon shall celestial fruit thy toil repay: 'Tis ripe, and waits for him who loves to pray. What if thou fail at first, yet give not o'er, Bestir thyself to labour more and more; Enlist a brother's sympathetic knee, The Tree will drop its fruit when Iwo agree Entreat the Holy Ghost t give thee power, Then shall the fruit descend in joyful shower
Ash - A well known Tree, of which there are many species. This wood is valuable, for fuel, as well as for timber and the Tree, when it grows in an open field, often forms, with its branches, a beautiful oval figure and a thick shade. The wood of the ash Tree
Cypress - holm Tree. The Hebrew word indicates a Tree with hard-grained wood, not the cypress, but probably the Syrian juniper which grows wild upon Lebanon, is meant, as the cypress never does in the Holy Land. The latter Tree is a tall evergreen, the wood of which is heavy, aromatic, and remarkably durable
Zaanannim - The “plain of Zaanaim” (Judges 4:11 KJV) is literally translated, “great Tree in Zaanannim” (NIV) or “oak in Zaanannim” (NAS; note transliterations of REB, NRSV). This probably indicates a “sacred Tree” associated with a worship center
Tryphaena - ; TRYPHOSA (tree fee' nuh; Tree foh' ssuh) personal names meaning, “dainty” and “delicate
Gopher - A Tree from the wood of which Noah was directed to build the ark (Genesis 6:14 ). " Other versions have rendered it "pine" and "cedar;" but the weight of authority is in favour of understanding by it the cypress Tree, which grows abundantly in Chaldea and Armenia
Box-Tree - BOX-TREE ( teashshûr , Isaiah 41:19 ; Isaiah 60:13 , Ezekiel 27:6 ). Whether the teashshûr was the box-tree ( Buxus longifolia ) or the sherbin , mod
Oil Tree - Distinct from the zayit , "olive Tree. " The zackum is a small Tree abundant in the Jordan plain
Bito Tree - A small scrubby Tree (Balanites Aegyptiaca) growing in dry regions of tropical Africa and Asia
Basswood - See Bass, the lime Tree
Plain of Mamre - (See MAMRE; TEIL-TREE
Phoenix - ) A genus of palms including the date Tree
Frutex - ) A plant having a woody, durable stem, but less than a Tree; a shrub
Moutan - ) The Chinese Tree peony (Paeonia Mountan), a shrub with large flowers of various colors
Water Locust - A thorny leguminous Tree (Gleditschia monosperma) which grows in the swamps of the Mississippi valley
Olive, Olive Tree - This was the principal source of oil in the East, the Trees being extensively cultivated on the sides of the hills, and formed into 'olive yards. ...
Israel in general is called a green olive Tree, fair and of goodly fruit, Jeremiah 11:16 ; and a good olive Tree, with root and fatness; in contrast to the Gentiles who are compared to a wild olive Tree. The fact that the wild olive Tree needs grafting gives point to the passage in Romans 11:17-24 . God's two Jewish witnesses in a future day are called the two olive Trees and the two candlesticks standing before the God of the earth
Becuiba Nut - The nut of the Brazilian Tree Myristica Bicuhyba, which yields a medicinal balsam used for rheumatism
Cup Shake - A shake or fissure between the annual rings of a Tree, found oftenest near the roots
Blea - ) The part of a Tree which lies immediately under the bark; the alburnum or sapwood
Sapodilla - ) A tall, evergeen, tropical American Tree (Achras Sapota); also, its edible fruit, the sapodilla plum
Carambola - ) An East Indian Tree (Averrhoa Carambola), and its acid, juicy fruit; called also Coromandel gooseberry
Dryad - ) A wood nymph; a nymph whose life was bound up with that of her Tree
Discodactylia - ) A division of amphibians having suctorial disks on the toes, as the Tree frogs
Otoba Fat - A colorless buttery substance obtained from the fruit of Myristica otoba, a species of nutmeg Tree
Sabicu - ) The very hard wood of a leguminous West Indian Tree (Lysiloma Sabicu), valued for shipbuilding
Waxberry - See Bayberry, and Candleberry Tree
Nabk - ) The edible berries of the Zizyphys Lotus, a Tree of Northern Africa, and Southwestern Europe
Tamaric - ) A shrub or Tree supposed to be the tamarisk, or perhaps some kind of heath
Kousso - ) An Abyssinian rosaceous Tree (Brayera anthelmintica), the flowers of which are used as a vermifuge
Lotus Trees - LOTUS TreeS. ]'>[3] ‘shady Trees’), the haunt of Behemoth ( i. The Tree is probably = the Arab [4] , dâl , the ‘dom -tree,’ and must not he confused with the Egyptian water-lilies
Gallows - The Hebrew term translated “gallows” in Esther (Esther 2:23 ; Esther 7:9-10 ;Esther 7:9-10;9:25 ) is the word for Tree. It is frequently suggested that Tree should be understood as “stake” and that those executed by the Persians were impaled rather than hung
Husks - κερατιον , Luke 15:16 ; the husks of leguminous plants, so named from their resemblance to κερας , a horn; but Bochart thinks that the κερατια were the ceretonia, the husks or fruit of the carob Tree, a Tree very common in the Levant
Frankincense - The Tree which produces it is not known. What is here called the pure frankincense is, no doubt, the same with the mascula thura of Virgil, and signifies what is first obtained from the Tree
Shittah Tree - SHITTAH Tree ( shittâh , Isaiah 41:19 RV [1] ‘ acacia Tree’; shittim wood [2] Exodus 25:5 ; Exodus 25:10 ; Exodus 25:13 ; Exodus 26:15 ; Exodus 26:26 ; Exodus 27:1 ; Exodus 27:6 , Deuteronomy 10:3 , RV Glastonbury Thorn - A variety of hawthorn which originated from a Tree on Wearyall Hill Glastonbury, England, and which has the peculiarity of flowering both at Christmas time and in May; this is recorded in a letter written in 1535 to Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex. The Tree was cut down by a fanatical Parliamentarian soldier in 1653; but slips had previously been taken from it, and from these were derived many specimens which exist today; the Christmas blossoms are usually smaller than those in May. The legend is that the original Tree grew from the staff of Saint Joseph of Arimathea, who came to Glastonbury A
Myrtle - The well-known Tree bearing this name, the myrtus communis. Branches were to be taken from this Tree, among others, to make booths when the feast of tabernacles was kept. During the millennium, 'instead of the brier shall come up the myrtle Tree,' so that it seems to be a type of peace and blessing. In Zechariah 1:8,10,11 a man (that is, an angel of Jehovah) was seen standing among the myrtle Trees, when all the earth was sitting still and was at rest — emblem of the blessing of Jerusalem, for which the angel was interceding
Thorn, Glastonbury - A variety of hawthorn which originated from a Tree on Wearyall Hill Glastonbury, England, and which has the peculiarity of flowering both at Christmas time and in May; this is recorded in a letter written in 1535 to Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex. The Tree was cut down by a fanatical Parliamentarian soldier in 1653; but slips had previously been taken from it, and from these were derived many specimens which exist today; the Christmas blossoms are usually smaller than those in May. The legend is that the original Tree grew from the staff of Saint Joseph of Arimathea, who came to Glastonbury A
Fig Tree - I should not think it necessary to notice this article in our Concordance, but for the occasion that offers thereby of making an observation on the fig Tree which the Lord Jesus blighted near Bethany. It may be proper, for the better apprehension of the subject, to remark, that the fig Tree grew, in Palestine, not unfrequently in the roads, and highways, and hedges, beside those that were cultivated in. It is plain, that this fig Tree which Christ withered was of this kind; a hedge fruit, and, consequently, it was no man's property. Matthew's account of this transaction is, that when Jesus "saw this fig Tree in the way, he came to it, and found nothing but leaves only; and said unto it, Let no fruit grow on thee hence forward for ever: and presently the fig Tree withered away. " (Mark 11:13)...
It is very evident from hence, that the Lord Jesus had an object of much higher moment to set forth by this action, than the mere blighting a hedge fig Tree. For surely, the Lord did not expect fruit out of season; neither did he mean, as some have supposed, to shew anger, to a fig Tree. The whole stress of the subject, as it strikes me, is in the nature and quality of this fig Tree. Now the church is expressly compared by the Lord himself to a fig Tree of his own, and planted in his vineyard. ) The fruitless fig Tree of the hedge, and which at the command of Jesus withered away, according to my view of the subject, was intended by the Lord to represent the mere professors of the gospel, who to a traveller afford leaves, but no fruit. And he hath brought them in, and fenced them round, and they are "trees of his right hand planting. " (Isaiah 61:3)...
The instant withering of the barren fig Tree, at Christ's command, became the emblem of what must ultimately follow all the way-side productions in nature, void of grace, at the great day of the Lord. And our Lord's own comment upon the blasted Tree, seems very fully to justify this view of the subject. For when the disciples remarked to Jesus how soon the fig Tree was withered away, the Lord made this striking answer, "Have faith in God. " (John 15:5) If this be the right sense of the passage, and the Lord Jesus meant to teach his disciples thereby, that every hedge fig Tree hath no part in the church, no owner in Christ by his Father's gift or purchase, no union with him, and, consequently, no communion in his graces, but must in the hour of decision instantly wither away; then will this parable of the barren fig Tree form one testimony more to the numberless other testimonies with which the word of God abounds, that the children of the wicked one, and the children of the kingdom, are totally separate and dissimilar from everlasting, and so must continue to everlasting. The fig Tree of the hedge, never planted in the vineyard of Jesus, hath no fruit in him; and, consequently, always barren
Bullace - ) The bully Tree
Hawebake - ) Probably, the baked berry of the hawthorn Tree, that is, coarse fare
Arborization - ) The appearance or figure of a Tree or plant, as in minerals or fossils; a dendrite
Palmetto State - South California; - a nickname alluding to the State Arms, which contain a representation of a palmetto Tree
Ribbonwood - ) A malvaceous Tree (Hoheria populnea) of New Zealand, the bark of which is used for cordage
Arenga - ) A palm Tree (Saguerus saccharifer) which furnishes sago, wine, and fibers for ropes; the gomuti palm
Trigonal - ) Having three angles, or corners; triangular; as, a trigonal stem, one having Tree prominent longitudinal angles
Wagenboom - ) A south African proteaceous Tree (Protea grandiflora); also, its tough wood, used for making wagon wheels
Kawaka - ) a New Zealand Tree, the Cypress cedar (Libocedrus Doniana), having a valuable, fine-grained, reddish wood
Lign-Aloes - ) A fragrant Tree mentioned in the Bible
o'Ren - (pine Tree ), one of the sons of Jerahmeel, the first-born of Hezron
Sloe - ) A small, bitter, wild European plum, the fruit of the blackthorn (Prunus spinosa); also, the Tree itself
Garden of eden - The place in which the narrative of Adam, Eve and the sin of the Tree of Knowledge occurred
Planer Tree - A small-leaved North American Tree (Planera aquatica) related to the elm, but having a wingless, nutlike fruit
Dendritical - ) Pertaining to a dendrite, or to arborescent crystallization; having a form resembling a shrub or Tree; arborescent
Quandong - ) The edible drupaceous fruit of an Australian Tree (Fusanus acuminatus) of the Sandalwood family; - called also quandang
Disbud - ) To deprive of buds or shoots, as for training, or economizing the vital strength of a Tree
Treen - of Tree. ) Relating to, or drawn from, Trees
Durio - ) A fruit Tree (D
Erythrina - ) A genus of leguminous plants growing in the tropics; coral Tree; - so called from its red flowers
Abietic - ) Of or pertaining to the fir Tree or its products; as, abietic acid, called also sylvic acid
Tikoor - ) An East Indian Tree (Garcinia pedunculata) having a large yellow fleshy fruit with a pleasant acid flavor
Shrag - ) A twig of a Tree cut off. ) To trim, as Trees; to lop
Longan - ) A pulpy fruit related to the litchi, and produced by an evergreen East Indian Tree (Nephelium Longan)
Chestnut - KJV translation for plane Tree in Genesis 30:37
Terebinth - (teh' reh bihnth) A large, spreading Tree whose species is uncertain so that translations vary in reading the Hebrew elah into English (compare 2 Samuel 18:9 ; Isaiah 1:30 ; Isaiah 6:13 ). The Tree had religious connections as a place under which pagan gods were worshiped (Hosea 4:13 ; Ezekiel 6:13 ) which were at times taken up in Israel's religion (Genesis 35:4 ; Joshua 24:26 ; Judges 6:11 ; 1 Kings 13:14 )
Gallows - word for ‘tree’ (see margins). It is very doubtful if death by strangulation is intended ‘tree’ in all probability having here its frequent sense of ‘pole,’ on which, as was customary in Persia, the criminal was impaled (see Crimes and Punishments, § 10 )
Oil Tree - KJV translation of the Hebrew phrase “tree of oil” (Isaiah 41:19 ). The latter text distinguishes the “oil Tree” from the olive
Pomegranate - ) The fruit of the Tree Punica Granatum; also, the Tree itself (see Balaustine), which is native in the Orient, but is successfully cultivated in many warm countries, and as a house plant in colder climates
Cow Tree - A Tree (Galactodendron utile or Brosimum Galactodendron) of South America, which yields, on incision, a nourishing fluid, resembling milk
Bitterwood - ) A West Indian Tree (Picraena excelsa) from the wood of which the bitter drug Jamaica quassia is obtained
Anchovy Pear - A West Indian fruit like the mango in taste, sometimes pickled; also, the Tree (Grias cauliflora) bearing this fruit
Boomslange - ) A large South African Tree snake (Bucephalus Capensis)
Pachonta - ) A substance resembling gutta-percha, and used to adulterate it, obtained from the East Indian Tree Isonandra acuminata
Bough - The branch of a Tree applied to a branch of size, not to a small shoot
Euonymus - ) A genus of small European and American Trees; the spindle Tree
Three Hundred - 1: τριακόσιοι (Strong's #5145 — Adjective — triakosioi — Tree-ak-os'-ee-oy ) occurs in Mark 14:5 ; John 12:5
Grove - Also a "grove" could not be "set up under every green Tree" (2 Kings 17:10; 1 Kings 14:23; 1 Kings 18:19; Exodus 34:13). In Genesis 21:33 it is a different word, "Abraham planted a "grove" (eshowl ) in Beersheba," rather "a tamarisk Tree," a hardy evergreen fitted to be a memorial to his posterity that the well was theirs. The sacred Tree in Assyrian sculptures is similar, a symbol of the goddess of nature. The stone "pillar" (as the Hebrew for "image" ought to be translated, Exodus 34:13) was Baal's symbol; as the wooden pillar or Tree was Astarte's (2 Kings 18:4). Pliny states that Trees were the first temples. ...
Trees were also used for national assemblies (Judges 9:6; Judges 9:37), for burying the dead (Genesis 35:8; 1 Samuel 31:14). Some Trees are specially-noted: the tamarisk (eeshel ) under which Saul abode in Gibeah (1 Samuel 22:6); the terebinth in Shechem under which Joshua, after writing the law of God, set up (Joshua 24:26) a great stone as a witness; the palm Tree of Deborah (Judges 4:5); the terebinth of enchantments (Judges 9:37 margin, (See MEONENIM); of wanderers (Judges 6:11, (See ZAANAIM)); 1 Samuel 14:2, "a pomegranate Tree in Migron" (1 Samuel 10:3). ...
Tree worship, perhaps a distortion of the tradition of the Tree of life and the Tree of knowledge (Genesis 3), may be traced in Egypt, Arabia, Syria, Assyria, Persia, India, Thibet, Siam, China, Japan, Ceylon, the Philippine isles. The Etrurians worshipped a palm-tree
Cypress - ]'>[1] ‘ holm oak ’) stands for some Tree with very hard wood, the meaning of the root (in Arabic) being to be hard . This is the Quercus ilex , a Tree now rare W. ]'>[1] have ‘box Tree’ (wh
Terebinth - ]'>[2] , being substituted in Isaiah 6:13 for ‘tail Tree,’ in Hosea 4:13 for ‘ elm ,’ and in Sir 24:16 for ‘ turpentine Tree. The terebinth or turpentine Tree ( Sir 24:16 ) Pistacia terebinthus , the butm of the Arabs is one of the most imposing Trees in Palestine. Dwarfed Trees occur everywhere among the oak brushwood. The Tree has pinnate, lancet-shaped leaves and small reddish clusters like immature grape clusters; it is also often covered with curious red galls like pieces of coral
Husk - In Luke 15:16 , in the parable of the Prodigal Son, it designates the beans of the carob Tree, or Ceratonia siliqua. From the supposition, mistaken, however, that it was on the husks of this Tree that John the Baptist fed, it is called "St. John's bread" and "locust Tree. " This Tree is in "February covered with innumerable purple-red pendent blossoms, which ripen in April and May into large crops of pods from 6 to 10 inches long, flat, brown, narrow, and bent like a horn (whence the Greek name keratia, meaning 'little horns'), with a sweetish taste when still unripe
Almond Tree; Almond - ( Jeremiah 1:11,12 ) The almond Tree is a native of Asia and North Africa, but it is cultivated in the milder parts of Europe. " It resembles the peach Tree in form, blossom and fruit. " The height of the Tree is about 12 or 14 feet; the flowers are pink, and arranged for the most part in pairs, the leaves are long, ovate, with a serrated margin and an acute point. It is this but for which the Tree is chiefly valued
Blackwood - The East Indian black wood is from the Tree Dalbergia latifolia
Buxine - ) An alkaloid obtained from the Buxus sempervirens, or common box Tree
Caprification - ) The practice of hanging, upon the cultivated fig Tree, branches of the wild fig infested with minute hymenopterous insects
Antiar - ) A Virulent poison prepared in Java from the gum resin of one species of the upas Tree (Antiaris toxicaria)
Araroba - ) A fabaceous Tree of Brazil (Centrolobium robustum) having handsomely striped wood; - called also zebrawood
Bough - ) An arm or branch of a Tree, esp
Zethan - (zee' than) Personal name meaning, “olive Tree” or “olive merchant
Flea-Louse - That of the pear Tree is Psylla pyri
Cypress - ) A coniferous Tree of the genus Cupressus
Haematoxylon - Campechianum or logwood Tree, native in Yucatan
Whitebeam - ) The common beam Tree of England (Pyrus Aria); - so called from the white, woolly under surface of the leaves
Tampoe - ) The edible fruit of an East Indian Tree (Baccaurea Malayana) of the Spurge family
Witch-Hazel - ) An American shrub or small Tree (Hamamelis Virginica), which blossoms late in autumn
Juvia - ) A Brazilian name for the lofty myrtaceous Tree (Bertholetia excelsa) which produces the large seeds known as Brazil nuts
Oliver - ) An olive Tree
Laurestine - ) The Viburnum Tinus, an evergreen shrub or Tree of the south of Europe, which flowers during the winter mouths
Apple-Trees - Many suppose the citron- Tree to be here meant. The rich color, fragrant odor and handsome appearance of this Tree, both in flower and in fruit, agree well with the above passages
Fig - The fruit of the fig Tree, which is of a round or oblong shape, and a dark purplish color, with a pulp of a sweet taste. The fig Tree
Yellowwood - ) The wood of any one of several different kinds of Trees; also, any one of the Trees themselves. Among the Trees so called are the Cladrastis tinctoria, an American leguminous Tree; the several species of prickly ash (Xanthoxylum); the Australian Flindersia Oxleyana, a Tree related to the mahogany; certain South African species of Podocarpus, Trees related to the yew; the East Indian Podocarpus latifolia; and the true satinwood (Chloroxylon Swietenia). All these Old World Trees furnish valuable timber
Bethabara Wood - The Tree is unknown, but it is thought to be East Indian
Allnut - ) A round gall produced on the leaves and shoots of various species of the oak Tree
Offshoot - ; as, the offshoots of a Tree
Chokecherry - ) The astringent fruit of a species of wild cherry (Prunus Virginiana); also, the bush or Tree which bears such fruit
Shaddock - ) A Tree (Citrus decumana) and its fruit, which is a large species of orange; - called also forbidden fruit, and pompelmous
Paddlewood - ) The light elastic wood of the Aspidosperma excelsum, a Tree of Guiana having a fluted trunk readily split into planks
Ficus - ) A genus of Trees or shrubs, one species of which (F. Carica) produces the figs of commerce; the fig Tree
Uelderrose' - Opulus), bearing large bunches of white flowers; - called also snowball Tree
Ymnocladus - ) A genus of leguminous plants; the Kentucky coffee Tree
Whitewood - ) The soft and easily-worked wood of the tulip Tree (Liriodendron)
Clearwing - ) A lepidopterous insect with partially transparent wings, of the family Aegeriadae, of which the currant and peach-tree borers are examples
Pomegranate - A small Tree, the fruit of which has a thick shell, many seeds, and a red pullp
Stocks - See STAFF , Tree , WOOD
Hangbird - ) The Baltimore oriole (Icterus galbula); - so called because its nest is suspended from the limb of a Tree
Balaustine - ) The pomegranate Tree (Punica granatum)
Zetham - (zee' tham) Personal name meaning, “olive Tree
Pistache - ) The anacardiaceous Tree Pistacia vera, which yields the pistachio nut; also, the nut itself and the flavoring extract prepared from it
Fustic - ) The wood of the Maclura tinctoria, a Tree growing in the West Indies, used in dyeing yellow; - called also old fustic
Slash Pine - A kind of pine Tree (Pinus Cubensis) found in Southern Florida and the West Indies; - so called because it grows in "slashes
Raffia - ) A fibrous material used for tying plants, said to come from the leaves of a palm Tree of the genus Raphia
Xanthorhoea - See Grass Tree
Ramoon - ) A small West Indian Tree (Trophis Americana) of the Mulberry family, whose leaves and twigs are used as fodder for cattle
Hackmatack - ) The American larch (Larix Americana), a coniferous Tree with slender deciduous leaves; also, its heavy, close-grained timber
Silvics - ) Habit or behavior of a forest Tree. ) The science treating of the life of Trees in the forest
Magnoliaceous - ) Pertaining to a natural order (Magnoliaceae) of Trees of which the magnolia, the tulip Tree, and the star anise are examples
Sycamine - This is a different Tree from the sycamore, mentioned Luke 19:4 . Dioscorides says that this Tree is the mulberry, though he allows that some apprehend that it is the same with the sycamore. Grotius says the word συκαμινος has no connection with συκεη , the fig-tree, but is entirely Syrian, שקמין , in Hebrew, שקמים
Sycamore Tree - Sycamore Tree. The Tree so called in Scripture is not the sycamore of this country, which is a species of maple. It is a tender Tree, flourishing in sandy plains and warm valleys, but is not hardy enough for the mountain, and would be killed by a sharp frost
Tree (2) - TREE (ξύλον, Lat. Joshua 10:26) of employing a Tree in case of haste for the purpose of crucifixion*
The Fathers loved to contrast the first Tree whose fruit brought death into the world, and the second Tree whose ‘leaves are for the healing of the nations’ (Revelation 22:2). , after the ‘harrying of hell’ Hades says to Satan: ‘All that thou gainedst by the Tree of knowledge (διὰ τοῦ ξύλου τῆς γνώσεως), by the Tree of the Cross (διὰ τοῦ ξύλου τοῦ σταυροῦ) thou hast lost
Almond Tree - The first name may be that of the Tree; the other, that of the fruit, or nut. A Tree resembling the peach Tree in its leaves and blossoms, but the fruit is longer and more compressed, the outer green coat is thinner and drier when ripe, and the shell of the stone is not so rugged. From the circumstance of its blossoming the earliest of any of the Trees, beginning as soon as the rigour of the winter is past, and before it is in leaf, it has its Hebrew name shakad, which comes from a verb signifying to make haste, to be in a hurry, or to awake early. To the forwardness of the almond Tree there seems to be a reference in Jeremiah: "The word of the Lord came unto me, saying, Jeremiah, what seest thou? And I said, I see a rod of an almond Tree. ]'>[1] This is the first vision with which the Prophet was honoured; and his attention is roused by a very significant emblem of that severe correction with which the Most High was hastening to visit his people for their iniquity: and from the species of Tree to which the rod belonged, he is warned of its near approach. ...
It is probable that the rods which the princes of Israel bore, were scions of the almond Tree, at once the ensign of their office, and the emblem of their vigilance. Such, we know from the testimony of Scripture, was the rod of Aaron; which renders it exceedingly probable, that the rods of the other chiefs were from the same Tree. ...
The hoary head is beautifully compared by Solomon to the almond Tree, covered in the earliest days of spring with its snow white flowers, before a single leaf has budded: "The almond Tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail," Ecclesiastes 12:5
Plum - ) The edible drupaceous fruit of the Prunus domestica, and of several other species of Prunus; also, the Tree itself, usually called plum Tree
Tamarind - ) A leguminous Tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the Tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches
Juniper - A Tree or shrub bearing berries of a bluish color, of a warm, pungent, sweet taste, yielding when fresh, by expression, a rich, sweet, aromatic juice. The wood of the Tree is of a reddish color, hard and durable, and is used in cabinet work and veneering
za-Ana'im - (removings ), The plain of, or more accurately, "the oak by Zaanaim," a Tree-probably a sacred Tree --mentioned as marking the spot near which Heber the Kenite was encamped when Sisera took refuge in his tent
Lign-Aloes - 'ahalim), a perfume derived from some Oriental Tree (Numbers 24:6 ), probably the agallochum or aloe-wood
Eve - Seduced by the Serpent to eat from the Tree of Knowledge
Sapan Wood - A dyewood yielded by Caesalpinia Sappan, a thorny leguminous Tree of Southern Asia and the neighboring islands
Rata - ) A New Zealand forest Tree (Metrosideros robusta), also, its hard dark red wood, used by the Maoris for paddles and war clubs
Prickwood - Called also spindle Tree
Sassafras - ) An American Tree of the Laurel family (Sassafras officinale); also, the bark of the roots, which has an aromatic smell and taste
Pignut - ) The bitter-flavored nut of a species of hickory (Carya glabra, / porcina); also, the Tree itself
Sequoiene - ) A hydrocarbon (C13H10) obtained in white fluorescent crystals, in the distillation products of the needles of the California "big Tree" (Sequoia gigantea)
Conifer - ) A Tree or shrub bearing cones; one of the order Coniferae, which includes the pine, cypress, and (according to some) the yew
Fringe Tree - A small oleaceous Tree (Chionanthus virginica), of the southern United States, having clusters of white flowers with slender petals
Tilley Seed - The seeds of a small Tree (Croton Pavana) common in the Malay Archipelago
Unfruitful - ) Not producing fruit or offspring; unproductive; infertile; barren; sterile; as, an unfruitful Tree or animal; unfruitful soil; an unfruitful life or effort
Mesophl/um - ) The middle bark of a Tree; the green layer of bark, usually soon covered by the outer or corky layer, and obliterated
Myall Wood - It is obtained from the small Tree Acacia homolophylla
Kapok - Eriodendron anfractuosum), a bombaceous Tree of the East and West Indies
Lanseh - ) The small, whitish brown fruit of an East Indian Tree (Lansium domesticum)
Chava - Seduced by the Serpent to eat from the Tree of Knowledge
Shittah Tree, Shittim - The woof of this Tree --perhaps the Acacia seyal is more definitely signified --was extensively employed in the construction of the tabernacle. (This Tree is sometimes three or four feet in diameter (Tristram). From the tangled thicket into which the stem of this Tree expands, Stanley well remarks that hence is to be traced the use of the plural form of the Heb. This acacia must not be confounded with the Tree ( Robinia pseudo-acacia ) popularly known by this name in England, which is a North American plant, and belongs to a different genus and suborder
Frangipanni - ) A perfume derived from, or imitating the odor of, the flower of the red jasmine, a West Indian Tree of the genus Plumeria
Coniferous - ) Pertaining to the order Coniferae, of which the pine Tree is the type
Ash - The particular Tree pointed out by the Hebrew word oren is not known
Fruitful - ) Full of fruit; producing fruit abundantly; bearing results; prolific; fertile; liberal; bountiful; as, a fruitful Tree, or season, or soil; a fruitful wife
Manchineel - ) A euphorbiaceous Tree (Hippomane Mancinella) of tropical America, having a poisonous and blistering milky juice, and poisonous acrid fruit somewhat resembling an apple
Jamaicine - ) An alkaloid said to be contained in the bark of Geoffroya inermis, a leguminous Tree growing in Jamaica and Surinam; - called also jamacina
Membranaceous - ) Thin and rather soft or pliable, as the leaves of the rose, peach Tree, and aspen poplar
Lilly-Pilly - ) An Australian myrtaceous Tree (Eugenia Smithii), having smooth ovate leaves, and panicles of small white flowers
Pine Tree - PINE Tree . ‘çts-shemen , Nehemiah 8:15 , see Oil Tree
Mulbury Trees - Mention of these is made only in ( 2 Samuel 5:23,24 ) and 1 Chronicles 14:14 We are quite unable to determine what kind of Tree is denoted by the Hebrew word. Some believe pear Trees are meant; others the aspen or poplar, whose leaves tremble and rustle with the slightest breeze, even when the breeze is not otherwise perceptible. It may have been to the rustling of these leaves that the "going in the Tree tops" refers
Tamarisk - ‘tree’; 1 Samuel 22:6 AV [2] ‘tree,’ mg. ]'>[2] ‘tree. Though mostly but shrubs, some species attain to the size of large Trees
Deborah - , had a tent pitched beneath, a noted Tree; a palm Tree it is called, and may have been at Baal-tamar, Judges 20:33, or not far distant from the Tree under which the first Deborah was buried
Terebinth - ), the Pistacia terebinthus of botanists; a Tree very common in the south and east of Palestine
Dryobalanops - Camphora, a lofty resinous Tree of Borneo and Sumatra, yielding Borneo camphor and camphor oil
Alongside - ) Along or by the side; side by side with; - often with of; as, bring the boat alongside; alongside of him; alongside of the Tree
Zachun - ) An oil pressed by the Arabs from the fruit of a small thorny Tree (Balanites Aegyptiaca), and sold to piligrims for a healing ointment
Mossback - ) A veteran partisan; one who is so conservative in opinion that he may be likened to a stone or old Tree covered with moss
Tree Burial - Disposal of the dead by placing the corpse among the branches of a Tree or in a hollow trunk, a practice among many primitive peoples
Sassy Bark - The bark of a West African leguminous Tree (Erythrophlaeum Guineense, used by the natives as an ordeal poison, and also medicinally; - called also mancona bark
Kumquat - ) A small Tree of the genus Citrus (C
Man (the Good): Beneficial Influence of - Alexander Von Humboldt thus writes of the cow-tree:: 'On the barren flank of a rock grows a Tree with coriaceous and dry leaves. Some empty their bowls under the Tree itself, others carry the juice borne to their children. ' ...
May not the earnest Christian ministering good on all sides be imaged in this marvelous Tree? He is in his own esteem full often a withered and dead Tree, but there is within him a living sap, which wells up with blessing t all around
Eden - In it God made to grow every Tree that was pleasant to the sight and good for food: in it also was the Tree of life and the Tree of knowledge of good and evil. The fall of Pharaoh, under the figure of an exalted Tree, is said to comfort the Trees of Eden, which is called the 'garden of God,' etc. The Trees of Eden having been planted by God, they are in this last passage used as a symbol for the various nations placed by God in the earth, Israel being the centre. Adam was put in the garden to dress and to keep it; but on his fall he was driven out and cherubim were placed to keep the way of the Tree of life
Eden - In it God made to grow every Tree that was pleasant to the sight and good for food: in it also was the Tree of life and the Tree of knowledge of good and evil. The fall of Pharaoh, under the figure of an exalted Tree, is said to comfort the Trees of Eden, which is called the 'garden of God,' etc. The Trees of Eden having been planted by God, they are in this last passage used as a symbol for the various nations placed by God in the earth, Israel being the centre. Adam was put in the garden to dress and to keep it; but on his fall he was driven out and cherubim were placed to keep the way of the Tree of life
Algarovilla - ) The agglutinated seeds and husks of the legumes of a South American Tree (Inga Marthae)
Arcinia - ) A genus of plants, including the mangosteen Tree (Garcinia Mangostana), found in the islands of the Indian Archipelago; - so called in honor of Dr
Bebeeru - ) A tropical South American Tree (Nectandra Rodioei), the bark of which yields the alkaloid bebeerine, and the wood of which is known as green heart
Beefwood - ) An Australian Tree (Casuarina), and its red wood, used for cabinetwork; also, the Trees Stenocarpus salignus of New South Wales, and Banksia compar of Queensland
Palo Blanco - ...
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A Mexican mimosaceous Tree (Lysiloma candida), the bark of which is used in tanning
Elcaja - ) An Arabian Tree (Trichilia emetica)
Porkwood - ) The coarse-grained brownish yellow wood of a small Tree (Pisonia obtusata) of Florida and the West Indies
Allammelech - (uhl lam' meh lehch) Place name meaning, “king's oak,” or “royal holy Tree
Wallaba - ) A leguminous Tree (Eperua falcata) of Demerara, with pinnate leaves and clusters of red flowers
Unbark - ) To deprive of the bark; to decorticate; to strip; as, to unbark a Tree
Lalo - ) The powdered leaves of the baobab Tree, used by the Africans to mix in their soup, as the southern negroes use powdered sassafras
Cassia - The bark of an odoriferous Tree, from which came one ingredient of the holy oil or ointment, Exodus 30:24 ; Psalm 45:8 ; Ezekiel 27:19
Box-Tree - The words of Ezekiel 27:6 literally translated are, "Thy benches they have made of ivory, the daughter of the ashur Tree," i. The ashur is the box-tree, and accordingly the Revised Version rightly reads "inlaid in box wood
Oil-Tree - 'etz shemen, rendered "olive Tree" in 1 Kings 6:23,31,32,33 (RSV, "olive wood") and "pine branches" in Nehemiah 8:15 (RSV, "branches of wild olive"), was some Tree distinct from the olive
Sycamine Tree - It is rendered by Luther "mulberry Tree" (q. It is of the order of the fig-tree
Chestnut Tree - A Tree, stately and wide spreading and growing near water, must be meant. The eastern plane Tree (not ours, which is a maple, Acer pseudoplatanus) fulfills the conditions; its root, 'aaram "to be naked," "to strip off the bark," corresponds; for it yearly sheds its bark
Blossom - ) The flower of a plant, or the essential organs of reproduction, with their appendages; florescence; bloom; the flowers of a plant, collectively; as, the blossoms and fruit of a Tree; an apple Tree in blossom
Aloe - A large Tree grown in India and China, producing resin and oil used in making perfumes. Balaam used the beauty of the aloe Tree to describe the beauty of Israel's camp as he blessed them (Numbers 24:6 )
Bochim - Some make the Word the plural of Baca, or Bocha, mulberry-tree; and so it might be a place of mulberries, and called Bochim, where the people received tidings from the angel, and wept. See Baca; see Mourning; see also Mulberry-tree
Trees - The "tree of knowledge of good and evil" bore the forbidden fruit, by eating of which Adam fatally increased his knowledgeof good by its loss, of sin and woe by actual experience, Genesis 2:9,17 . The "tree of life" may have been both an assurance and a means of imparting life, a seal of eternal holiness and bliss, if man had not sinned
Husks - This word in (Luke 16:16 ) describes really the fruit of a particular kind of Tree, viz. This Tree is very commonly met with in Syria and Egypt, it produces pods, shaped like a horn, varying in length from six to ten inches, and about a finger's breadth, or rather more; it is dark-brown, glossy, filled with seeds and has a sweetish taste
Ailantus - ) A genus of beautiful Trees, natives of the East Indies. The Tree imperfectly di/cious, and the staminate or male plant is very offensive when blossom
Pepperidge - ) A North American Tree (Nyssa multiflora) with very tough wood, handsome oval polished leaves, and very acid berries, - the sour gum, or common tupelo
Teil Tree - KJV term meaning, “lime” or “linden Tree,” used to translate a Hebrew term generally rendered oak or terebinth (Isaiah 6:13 )
Dahoon - An evergreen shrub or small Tree (Ilex cassine) of the southern United States, bearing red drupes and having soft, white, close-grained wood; - called also dahoon holly
Divi-Divi - ) A small Tree of tropical America (Caesalpinia coriaria), whose legumes contain a large proportion of tannic and gallic acid, and are used by tanners and dyers
Shroud - The 'shadowing shroud' signifies the shelter given by the spreading boughs of a great Tree: such as the one to which Assyria is compared
Trilling - ) One of Tree children born at the same birth
Teil Tree - (An old name for the lime-tree, the tilia), Isaiah 6:13 , the terebinth, or turpentine-tree, the Pistacia terebinthus of botanists. In Isaiah 61:3 it is rendered in the plural "trees;" Hosea 4:13 , "elm" (RSV, "terebinth"). " ...
This Tree "is seldom seen in clumps or groves, never in forests, but stands isolated and weird-like in some bare ravine or on a hill-side where nothing else towers above the low brushwood" (Tristram)
Mustard - Its "seed" is proverbial for smallness, therefore not the Salvador Ρersica (Arabic: khardal , mustard), which moreover none would sow in his "garden," and which is not an "herb" but a "tree" strictly so-called. The mustard (Sinapis nigra ) is an "herb" (not strictly a Tree), but so large that compared with the other "herbs" in the "garden" it is a "great Tree
Cherry - ) A Tree or shrub of the genus Prunus (Which also includes the plum) bearing a fleshy drupe with a bony stone;...
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(n. Padus, European Trees (bird cherry). ) The fruit of the cherry Tree, a drupe of various colors and flavors. ) The timber of the cherry Tree, esp
Um - ) See Gum Tree, below. ) A hive made of a section of a hollow gum Tree; hence, any roughly made hive; also, a vessel or bin made of a hollow log. ) A vegetable secretion of many Trees or plants that hardens when it exudes, but is soluble in water; as, gum arabic; gum tragacanth; the gum of the cherry Tree
Fig, Fig-Tree - There are several kinds of fig-trees, but the well-known Tree called the Ficus Carica is common in Palestine and very productive. It also agrees with the description of "sitting under the fig-tree" for repose, its branches and leaves giving protection from the heat of the sun. It was one of the Trees in the garden of Eden, of the leaves of which Adam and Eve made aprons. The Trees bear figs at different times, hence the expressions 'first-ripe figs,' and also 'untimely figs. The fruit is produced before the leaves; so that leaves being found, there should have been fruit on the fig-tree cursed by the Lord, although the ordinary fig-season had not arrived. This was typical of Israel which had been compared to a fig-tree, bringing forth its first-ripefigs, Hosea 9:10 ; but in the days ofthe Lord, Israel had plenty of leaves, professing to be God's favoured people, but producing no real fruit to Him
Apple Tree, Apple - Mention of the apple Tree occurs in the Authorized Version in ( Song of Solomon 2:3 ; 8:5 ) and Joel 1:12 The fruit of this Tree is alluded to in ( Proverbs 25:11 ) and Song of Solomon 2:5 ; 7:8 It is a difficult matter to say what is the specific Tree denoted by the Hebrew word tappuach . The orange would answer all the demands of the scriptural passages, and orange Trees are found in Palestine; but there does not appear sufficient evidence that this Tree was known in the earlier times to the inhabitants of Palestine
Pomegranate - The pomegranate Tree, Punicu granatum , derives its name from the Latin pomum granatum , "grained apple. " The Romans gave it the name of Punica, as the Tree was introduced from Carthage. It belongs to the natural order Myrtaceae (Myrtle), being, however, rather a tall bush than a Tree, The foliage is dark green, the flowers are crimson, the fruit, which is about the size of art orange, is red when which in Palestine is about the middle of October. , art "Rimmon") states that this Tree is a native of Asia and is to be traced from Syria through Persia, even to the mountains of northern India
Anacardiaceous - ) Belonging to, or resembling, a family, or order, of plants of which the cashew Tree is the type, and the species of sumac are well known examples
Daphne - ) A nymph of Diana, fabled to have been changed into a laurel Tree
Culverkey - ) A bunch of the keys or samaras of the ash Tree
Arboreous - ) Having the form, constitution, or habits, of a proper Tree, in distinction from a shrub. ) Pertaining to, or growing on, Trees; as, arboreous moss
Pichurim Bean - The seed of a Brazilian lauraceous Tree (Nectandra Puchury) of a taste and smell between those of nutmeg and of sassafras, - sometimes used medicinally
Khaya - ) A lofty West African Tree (Khaya Senegalensis), related to the mahogany, which it resembles in the quality of the wood
Long-Lived - ) Having a long life; having constitutional peculiarities which make long life probable; lasting long; as, a long-lived Tree; they are a longlived family; long-lived prejudices
Wormwood - ...
Tree-wormwood, a species of Artemisia, with woody stalks
Olive Olive-Tree - Olive, Olive-Tree. This Tree flourishes in Syria, in warm and sunny situations, on a rocky soil, at a height not greater than about 3000 feet above the level of the sea. The olive Tree lives to a great age. The high estimation in which the olive Tree was held is seen by its being placed first in Jotham's parable. And it is often mentioned as indicating plenty, prosperity, and strength; the allusion taking its force from the products, from the evergreen character, and the protracted existence of the Tree, e
Oak - The terebinth or turpentine Tree. , take their name hence; so for "teil Tree" (Isaiah 6:13; Isaiah 1:29), and for "elms" (Hosea 4:13), eelah ; allon is the "oaks"; also eelon is "the oak. of Lebanon, where the living Tree is no longer to be seen. The "tree" in Nebuchadnezzar's dream (Daniel 4) is 'ilan , any "strong Tree"
Box - buxus, the Tree, and pyxis, a box Gr. a box, and the Tree. A Tree or shrub, constituting the genus buxus, used for bordering flower-beds. A cylindrical hollow iron used in wheels, in which the axle-tree runs. To make a hole or cut in a Tree, to procure the sap as, to box a maple
Oak - and RSV, "among the oaks"); 61:3 ("trees"). The word properly means strongly, mighty, and hence a strong Tree. , "teil-tree;" RSV, "terebinth. ...
...
'Elan, only in Daniel 4:11,14,20 , rendered "tree" in Nebuchadnezzar's dream. "It covers the rocky hills of Palestine with a dense brushwood of Trees from 8 to 12 feet high, branching from the base, thickly covered with small evergreen rigid leaves, and bearing acorns copiously. 330, and no Tree now marks the grove of Mamre. The present oak is the noblest Tree in Southern Palestine, being 23 feet in girth, and the diameter of the foliage, which is unsymmetrical, being about 90 feet. " (See HEBRON; TEIL-TREE
Fig - The fig-tree is mentioned (Deuteronomy 8:8 ) as one of the valuable products of Palestine. Our Lord's cursing the fig-tree near Bethany (Mark 11:13 ) has occasioned much perplexity from the circumstance, as mentioned by the evangelist, that "the time of figs was not yet. " The explanation of the words, however, lies in the simple fact that the fruit of the fig-tree appears before the leaves, and hence that if the Tree produced leaves it ought also to have had fruit. "This Tree, so to speak, vaunted itself to be in advance of all the other Trees, challenged the passer-by that he should come and refresh himself with its fruit. ...
The fig-tree of Palestine (Ficus carica) produces two and sometimes three crops of figs in a year, (1) the bikkurah, or "early-ripe fig" (Micah 7:1 ; Isaiah 28:4 ; Hosea 9:10 , RSV), which is ripe about the end of June, dropping off as soon as it is ripe (Nahum 3:12 ); (2) the kermus, or "summer fig," then begins to be formed, and is ripe about August; and (3) the pag (plural "green figs," Song of Solomon 2:13 ; Gr
Palm Tree - While this Tree was abundant generally in the Levant, it was regarded by the ancients as peculiarly characteristic of Palestine and the neighboring regions, though now it is rare. ("The palm Tree frequently attains a height of eighty feet, but more commonly forty to fifty. The palm is, in truth, a beautiful and most useful Tree. This one Tree supplies almost all the wants of the Arab or Egyptian. ) Many places are mentioned in the Bible as having connection with palm Trees; Elim, where grew three score and ten palm Trees, ( Exodus 15:27 ) and Elath. (2:8) Jericho was the city of "palm Trees. " (31:3) Hazezon-tamar, "the felling of the palm Tree," is clear in its derivation. The, striking appearance of the Tree, its uprightness and beauty, would naturally suggest the giving of Its name occasionally to women. (Genesis 38:6 ; 2 Samuel 13:1 ; 14:27 ) There is in the Psalms, (Psalm 92:12 ) the familiar comparison, "The righteous shall flourish like the palm Tree. " which suggests a world of illustration whether respect be had to the orderly and regular aspect of the Tree, its fruitfulness, the perpetual greenness of its foliage, or the height at which the foliage grows, as far as possible from earth and as near as possible to heaven. ) It is curious that this Tree, once so abundant in Judea, is now comparatively rare, except in the Philistine plain and in the old Phoenicia about Beyrout
Tree of Life - -There are three sources for our knowledge of the idea of the Tree of life: the OT, Jewish apocalypses and Jewish theology, and ethnic legends. ...
(1) In the OT the Tree of life appears neither in Psalms nor in the Prophets, but only in Genesis and Proverbs. It has been maintained, however, that in Genesis 2:9 the Tree of life is a later addition, and was inserted only when the idea of the under world had suffered such a change that immortality became an object of desire (K. In any case, by reason of his sin man was not permitted to eat of the fruit of this Tree, which signified fullness of life. In Proverbs (Proverbs 3:18; Proverbs 11:30; Proverbs 13:12; Proverbs 15:4) wisdom, the fruit of the righteous, desire fulfilled, and a wholesome tongue are each a ‘tree of life. ...
(2) In Jewish apocalyptic three constant factors are associated with the Tree of life: it is in Paradise; the righteous have access to its fruit; it will be available only after the judgment. ...
(3) All Oriental religions which have risen above the nature stage have their legends of a Tree of life. In the Babylonian-Assyrian circle this Tree was date-palm, cedar, or vine (F. In the Zend-Avesta the Tree of life is the white Haoma-death-destroyer-similar to a grape vine, with plentiful buds and jasmine-like leaves; whoever eats of the fruit becomes immortal (SBE
Much that is fantastic and unreliable has been written by Assyriologists concerning the Tree of life. Two facts, however, stand out as incontestable: there was throughout the ancient world a worship of Trees, and man’s dependence on particular Trees for support of life offered the basis for a profound religious suggestion. ‘The Tree had always been the seat of Divine life and the intermediary between Divine and human nature. … In the holy Tree the Divine life is bringing itself closer to man’ (W. -The dependence of the idea of the Tree of life in Revelation (Revelation 2:7; Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14) upon earlier, especially Jewish, conceptions is evident. The legend has been traced to an Arabian or North African oasis, thence to Babylon, where the habitat of the Tree became a garden; thence the Hebrews derived it (G. In the prophet’s vision, on each side of the river grow all Trees bearing new fruits according to their months, which shall be for food, and their leaves for healing. The picture in the Revelation is of a city, in the midst of which is a garden; through this flows a river, on each bank of which is the Tree of life (a word used collectively)-a row of Trees bearing either twelve manner of fruits (Authorized Version , Revised Version ) or twelve crops (Revised Version margin). In the garden of God, then, grows the Tree of life
Chinquapin - ) A branching, nut-bearing Tree or shrub (Castanea pumila) of North America, from six to twenty feet high, allied to the chestnut
Arborescence - ) The state of being arborescent; the resemblance to a Tree in minerals, or crystallizations, or groups of crystals in that form; as, the arborescence produced by precipitating silver
Pine - The shemen , in Nehemiah 8:15 is rather the olive or oil Tree, as in Isaiah 41:19
Poonga Oil - It is pressed from the seeds of a leguminous Tree (Pongamia glabra)
Tonka Bean - The seed of a leguminous Tree (Dipteryx odorata), native of Guiana
Umbraculiform - ) Having the form of anything that serves to shade, as a Tree top, an umbrella, and the like; specifically (Bot
Ogeechee Lime - ...
(2):...
The Tree which bears this fruit
Sal - ) An East Indian timber Tree (Shorea robusta), much used for building purposes
Madro?a - ) A small evergreen Tree or shrub (Arbutus Menziesii), of California, having a smooth bark, thick shining leaves, and edible red berries, which are often called madro?a apples
Cottonwood - ) An American Tree of the genus Populus or poplar, having the seeds covered with abundant cottonlike hairs; esp
Doom Palm - A species of palm Tree (Hyphaene Thebaica), highly valued for the fibrous pulp of its fruit, which has the flavor of gingerbread, and is largely eaten in Egypt and Abyssinia
Mabolo - ) A kind of persimmon Tree (Diospyros discolor) from the Philippine Islands, now introduced into the East and West Indies
Laburnum - ) A small leguminous Tree (Cytisus Laburnum), native of the Alps
Wilding - ) A wild or uncultivated plant; especially, a wild apple Tree or crab apple; also, the fruit of such a plant
Hazel - The Hebrew term luz occurs only in ( Genesis 30:37 ) Authorities are divided between the hazel and the almond Tree as representing the luz
Olive - The fruit of the olive-tree. This Tree yielded oil which was highly valued
Willows - are mentioned in (Leviticus 23:40 ; Job 40:22 ; Psalm 137:2 ; Isaiah 44:4 ) With respect to the Tree upon which the captive Israelites hung their harps, there can be no doubt that the weeping willow Salix babylonica , is intended. This Tree grows abundantly on the banks of the Euphrates, in other parts of Asia as in Palestine
Papaw - ) A Tree of the genus Asimina (A. ) A Tree (Carica Papaya) of tropical America, belonging to the order Passifloreae
Pine - ) Any Tree of the coniferous genus Pinus. ) The wood of the pine Tree
Fir - As the term "cedar" is in all probability applicable to more than one Tree, so also "fir" in the Authorized Version represents probably one or other of the following Trees:
Pinus sylvestris , or Scotch fir; ...
Larch; ...
Cupressus sempervirens , or cypress, all which are at this day found in the Lebanon. The wood of the fir was used for ship-building, ( Ezekiel 27:5 ) for musical instruments, (2 Samuel 6:5 ) for beams and rafters of houses, (1 Kings 5:8,10 ; 2 Chronicles 2:8 ) It was a tall evergreen Tree of vigorous growth
Avocado - ) The pulpy fruit of Persea gratissima, a Tree of tropical America
Bast - of the lime Tree; hence, matting, cordage, etc
Arboreal - ) Of or pertaining to a Tree, or to Trees; of nature of Trees. ) Attached to, found in or upon, or frequenting, woods or Trees; as, arboreal animals
Seamark - ) Any elevated object on land which serves as a guide to mariners; a beacon; a landmark visible from the sea, as a hill, a Tree, a steeple, or the like
Distinguishable - ) Capable of being distinguished; separable; divisible; discernible; capable of recognition; as, a Tree at a distance is distinguishable from a shrub
Salix - ) A genus of Trees or shrubs including the willow, osier, and the like, growing usually in wet grounds. ) A Tree or shrub of any kind of willow
Kamala - ) The red dusty hairs of the capsules of an East Indian Tree (Mallotus Philippinensis) used for dyeing silk
Balm - An aromatic resin from the terebinth Tree and other plants; it is mixed with the olive oil which is blessed as the Holy Chrism
Balsam - An aromatic resin from the terebinth Tree and other plants; it is mixed with the olive oil which is blessed as the Holy Chrism
Barwood - ) A red wood of a leguminous Tree (Baphia nitida), from Angola and the Gaboon in Africa
Cocoa - ) A preparation made from the seeds of the chocolate Tree, and used in making, a beverage; also the beverage made from cocoa or cocoa shells
Tabor, Oak of - Other translations read plain (KJV), great Tree (NIV), or terebinth (REB) of Tabor
Cajuput - ) A highly stimulating volatile inflammable oil, distilled from the leaves of an East Indian Tree (Melaleuca cajuputi, etc
Neta revai - "fourth year fruits"); fruit produced by a Tree in its fourth year (following the three years of orlah) and which in the days of the Beit HaMikdash was eaten in Jerusalem...
Deodar - ) A kind of cedar (Cedrus Deodara), growing in India, highly valued for its size and beauty as well as for its timber, and also grown in England as an ornamental Tree
Citron - ) A citron Tree
Sequoia - ) A genus of coniferous Trees, consisting of two species, Sequoia Washingtoniana, syn. gigantea, the "big Tree" of California, and S
Trivet - ) A Tree-legged stool, table, or other support; especially, a stand to hold a kettle or similar vessel near the fire; a tripod
Pine Tree - ( Isaiah 41:19 ; 60:13 ) What Tree is intended is not certain: but the rendering "pine," seems least probable of any
Loquat - Also, the Tree itself
Tamar - A palm-tree, ...
1
Palm Tree - This beautiful Tree is spoken of in Scripture with so much commendation, that it merits our attention; and the more so because the Lord Jesus, when describing the loveliness of his church, compares her stature to it, and speaks with a degree of fervour and delight while professing his determination to take hold of her. "I said I will go up to the palm Tree, I will take hold of the boughs thereof: now also thy breasts shall be as the clusters of the vine, and the smell of thy nose like apples. " (Song of Song of Solomon 7:7-8)...
So very highly esteemed in the eastern world was the palm Tree, that Jericho, where they chiefly grew, was called by the name, "The city of palm Trees. " (Deuteronomy 34:3) Engedi was also called Hazazon Tamar, or the village of palm Trees, from the number of palm Trees which grew there. The Jews called the palm Tree Tamar. And not only in Judea, but in all places of the east where palms are found, the branches of it have always been celebrated as the tokens of triumph and victory; hence when the Lord Jesus entered Jerusalem, the multitude, as if overruled by a divine power, "took branches of palm Trees, and went forth to meet him, and cried, Hosanna, blessed is the King of Israel, that cometh in the name of the Lord. What could have induced the whole multitude to have honoured Christ with those palm Trees in the days of his flesh, when in the garb of a poor Jew, but the power of God overruling the whole mind of the people as the mind of one man? And wherefore the same display made in heaven, but to testify the approbation of God?...
I cannot prevail upon myself to dismiss our attention to the palm Tree before that I have first remarked some of the properties of it, by way of illustrating the beauty of our Lord's comparing his church to it. The Psalmist hath said, (Psalms 92:12) that "the righteous shall flourish like the palm Tree; he shall grow like a cedar in Lebanon. " And there will appear a striking allusion between the believer in Jesus and the palm Tree of Engedi, if we consider a few of the leading particulars. Trees of the Lord's "right hand planting are Trees of righteousness," always supposed to be looking upward to Jesus, and their branches extending in every direction according to the exercise of his grace in them, by living wholly upon him in his person, blood, and righteousness. ...
Moreover, the palm Tree is very fruitful, and the fruit is both lovely to the eye and delicious to the taste. What more lovely than to behold a truly regenerated believer in Christ Jesus? and who more blessed in his day and generation? Like the lofty and luxuriant palm Tree of Engedi, which forms both a shade to the traveller to protect him from the heat, and fruit to refresh him as he passeth by, so the church of Jesus becomes a blessedness in her Lord to every spiritual traveller, and affords shelter, and nourishment, and every delight. ...
There is one property yet, if possible, more striking in the palm Tree, which serves to open to a spiritual. Improvement, in allusion to Christ and his church, of a very singular nature, and peculiar, as far as I have learned, to the palm; namely, that the chief source of life in this Tree is in its top; or, as it is physically called, the brain of the Tree. We are told by those who are acquainted with the nature of palm Trees, that if by any means this top be cut off, the Tree is for ever after barren. Now here the reader will instantly perceive the striking resemblance between the palm Tree and the child of God. " (Hosea 14:8) And so again, (John 15:4) "Abide in me, and I in you; as the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine, no more can ye, except ye abide in me?"...
We are told that the palm Tree is all evergreen. On the top of the Tree is a kind of tuft or coronet, which never falls off, but is continually the same in verdure. ...
One property more merits regard in the resemblance of the palm Tree to the Christian, namely, the great duration and continuance of the palm. Shaw, in his travels, relates that the commonly-received opinion of the inhabitants of those countries where palm Trees mostly abound is, that for seventy or eighty years the palm will live, bearing fruit to a great extent, even of 300 lb. " (Psalms 90:10) What a lovely palm Tree then is the real follower of the Lord Jesus, if thus living to extreme old age he still brings forth fruit to the praise of the Lord's grace, "some thirty fold, some sixty fold, some au hundred fold!" So speaks the Holy Ghost concerning the faithful: "Those that be planted in the house of the Lord shall flourish in the courts of our God; they shall still bring forth fruit in old age, they shall be fat and flourishing; to shew that the Lord is upright: he is my rock, and there is no unrighteousness in him
Sycamine - —The sycamine-tree (συκάμινος) is mentioned in the Gospels only once, viz. This Tree, which is deciduous, has a dense foliage, and affords a most welcome shade during the heat of summer. In support of this view he appeals to the common Hebrew origin of the two names; but his main argument is that...
‘the mulberry is more easily plucked up by the roots than any other Tree of the same size in the country, and the thing is oftener done. It is not to be supposed,1 [3] he adds, ‘that He who spake as man never spoke would select this Tree, with its short, feeble roots, to illustrate the irresistible power of faith. The rooting up of the mulberry Tree was a common practice. When, therefore, He would figure forth ‘the irresistible power of faith,’ it need not surprise us that He selected the mulberry Tree, the uprooting of which was quite familiar to His hearers. True, it was more easily plucked up than any other Tree of the size. The law of gravitation is as clearly manifested in the fall of the leaf as in the majestic order of the planets, and the power of faith is as vividly illustrated in the figure of uprooting a mulberry Tree by the word of command, as in that of uprooting a sycomore, or even of moving a mountain
Palm Palm Tree - Palm, Palm Tree. Every part, therefore, of the Tree has its use. The names of many places show that palms were abundant: Elim, Elath, Hazezon-tamar—"felling of palm Tree"—Genesis 14:6; Bethany, "house of dates
Elon - (ee' lahn) Personal and place name meaning, “great Tree” or “tree of god. See 1 Samuel 10:3 ) or the “palm Tree of Deborah” (Judges 4:5 )
Fig, Fig Tree - The fig Tree (Ficus carica ) is very common in Palestine. (8:8) Mount Olivet was famous for its fig Trees in ancient times, and they are still found there. To "sit under one's own vine and one's own fig Tree" became a proverbial expression among the Jews to denote peace and prosperity. The fruit always appears before the leaves; so that when Christ saw leaves on the fig Tree by the wayside, (Mark 11:13 ) he had a right to expect fruit. The usual summer crop of fruits is not gathered till May or June; but in the sunny ravines of Olivet fig Trees could have ripe fruit some weeks earlier (Dr
Shagbark - ) The West Indian Pithecolobium micradenium, a legiminous Tree with a red coiled-up pod
Jesse Window - Favorite subject of the glass painters of 12th to 16th centuries, was the representation of the genealogical Tree springing from Jesse, father of David, with figures of David and others down to Christ
Phenice - Properly Phoenix a palm-tree (as in the RSV), a town with a harbour on the southern side of Crete (Acts 27:12 ), west of the Fair Havens
Bagworm - One species (Platoeceticus Gloveri) feeds on the orange Tree
Queensland Nut - The nut of an Australian Tree (Macadamia ternifolia)
Quercitin - ) A yellow crystalline substance, occurring quite widely distributed in the vegetable kingdom, as is apple-tree bark, horse-chestnut leaves, etc
Beacon - Israel should be so reduced in prosperity and in number as to become like a solitary 'tree bereft of branches,' margin
Ashen - ) Of or pertaining to the ash Tree
oa Powder - A bitter powder (also called araroba) found in the interspaces of the wood of a Brazilian Tree (Andira araroba) and used as a medicine
Macaranga Gum - A gum of a crimson color, obtained from a Tree (Macaranga Indica) that grows in the East Indies
Thornbird - It builds a very large and complex nest of twigs and thorns in a bush or Tree
Window, Jesse - Favorite subject of the glass painters of 12th to 16th centuries, was the representation of the genealogical Tree springing from Jesse, father of David, with figures of David and others down to Christ
Olive - This is one of the earliest Trees mentioned in Scripture, and has furnished, perhaps ever since he deluge the most universal emblem of peace, Genesis 8:11 . It is always classed among the most valuable Trees of Palestine, which is described as a land of oil olive, and honey, Deuteronomy 6:11 8:8 Habakkuk 3:17 . No Tree is more frequently mentioned in the Greek and Roman classics. The olive is never a very large or beautiful Tree, and seldom exceeds thirty feet in height: its leaves are dark green on the upper surface, and of a silvery hue on the under, and generally grow in pairs. A full-sized Tree in full bearing vigor is said to produce a thousand pounds of oil, Judges 9:8,9 2 Chronicles 2:10 . It is an evergreen Tree, and very longlived, an emblem of a fresh and enduring piety, Psalm 52:8 . The ancient Trees now in Gethsemane are believed by many to have sprung from the roots of those, which witnessed the agony of our Lord. The "wild olive-tree" is smaller than the cultivated, and inferior in all its parts and products. A graft upon it, from a good Tree, bore good fruit; while a graft from a "wild" olive upon a good Tree, remains "wild" as before
Orlah - (a) The prohibition of benefiting from the fruit of a Tree for the first three years after it is planted
Chico - ) In the Philippines, the sapodilla or its fruit; also, the marmalade Tree or its fruit
Urjun - ) A thin balsam or wood oil derived from the Diptcrocarpus laevis, an East Indian Tree
Thorny - ) Full of thorns or spines; rough with thorns; spiny; as, a thorny wood; a thorny Tree; a thorny crown
Chestnut - ) The edible nut of a forest Tree (Castanea vesca) of Europe and America. ) The Tree itself, or its light, coarse-grained timber, used for ornamental work, furniture, etc
Chestnut Tree - CHESTNUT Tree ( ‘armôn , Genesis 30:37 , Ezekiel 31:8 . The chestnut Tree is only an exotic in Palestine, but the plane (Arab. ]'>[3] dilb ) is one of the finest Trees of the land. It attains great development; a wonderful specimen, which has a small room or shop within its hollow trunk, is to be seen in one of the streets of Damascus
Shittah-Tree - (Isaiah 41:19 ; RSV, "acacia Tree"). A slightly different form of the Tree, equally common under the name of Seyal , Is the ancient 'shittah,' or, as more usually expressed in the plural form, the 'shittim,' of which the tabernacle was made
Nut - (1) Βotnim , pistachio Tree fruit. The Tree is from 15 to 30 ft. high, the male and female flowers grow on separate Trees
Algum - In scripture, a Tree or wood about which the learned are not agreed. ...
The thyinum is the citron Tree, from Mauritania, much esteemed by the ancients for its fragrance and beauty
Yew - ) Of or pertaining to yew Trees; made of the wood of a yew Tree; as, a yew whipstock. ) An evergreen Tree (Taxus baccata) of Europe, allied to the pines, but having a peculiar berrylike fruit instead of a cone
Wood, Gopher - Commentators as early as Saint Ambrose and Saint Augustine noticed, after Celsius, the close resemblance of the words gopher and kopher (pitch, hence any pitch-exuding Tree, especially cypress), and were of the opinion that a Tree of the pine or cypress family might be intended
Tall - High in stature long and comparatively slender applied to a person, or to a standing Tree, mast or pole. We say, a tall man or woman, a tall boy for his age a tall Tree, a tall pole, a tall mast but we never say, a tall house or a tall mountain
Sissoo - ) A leguminous Tree (Dalbergia Sissoo) of the northern parts of India; also, the dark brown compact and durable timber obtained from it
Redwood - ) An East Indian dyewood, obtained from Pterocarpus santalinus, Caesalpinia Sappan, and several other Trees. ) A gigantic coniferous Tree (Sequoia sempervirens) of California, and its light and durable reddish timber
Monesia - ) The bark, or a vegetable extract brought in solid cakes from South America and believed to be derived from the bark, of the Tree Chrysophyllum glycyphloeum
Ash - oren ), only in ( Isaiah 44:14 ) As the true ash is not a native of Palestine, some understand this to be a species of pine Tree
Fir Tree - The LXX render it so variously as to show that they knew not what particular Tree is meant; the Vulgate, generally by abietes, the "fir-tree. The fir Tree is an evergreen, of beautiful appearance, whose lofty height, and dense foliage, afford a spacious shelter and shade. The trunk of the Tree is very straight
Oak - There is, however, a second Hebrew word often translated "oak," which is supposed to denote the terebinth or turpentine-tree, called butm by the Arabs, Genesis 35:4 Judges 6:11,19 2 Samuel 18:9,14 . 13 , and "teil-tree" in Isaiah 6:13 , in which passages the true oak is also mentioned. ...
This Tree was found in all countries around the Mediterranean, and in Palestine grew to a large size. For many ages after Christ, a Tree of this kind near Heron was superstitiously venerated as one of those under which Abraham dwelt at Mamre. Under the welcome shade of oaks and other large Trees many public affairs were transacted; sacrifices were offered, courts were held, and kings were crowned, Joshua 24:26 Judges 6:11,19 9:6
Cacao - ) A small evergreen Tree (Theobroma Cacao) of South America and the West Indies
Anime - ) A resin exuding from a tropical American Tree (Hymenaea courbaril), and much used by varnish makers
Calabash - ) The fruit of the calabash Tree
Quillaia Bark - The bark of a rosaceous Tree (Quillaja Saponaria), native of Chili
Alcornoque - ) The bark of several Trees, esp. of Bowdichia virgilioides of Brazil, used as a remedy for consumption; of Byrsonima crassifolia, used in tanning; of Alchornea latifolia, used medicinally; or of Quercus ilex, the cork Tree
Approaching - ) The act of ingrafting a sprig or shoot of one Tree into another, without cutting it from the parent stock; - called, also, inarching and grafting by approach
Asaph, Saint - Local tradition at Tengenel, near Holywell, points out his ash-tree, well, and valley (Onen Asa, Fynnon Asa, Uanasa, Pantasa)
Oleaceous - ) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a natural order of plants (Oleaceae), mostly Trees and shrubs, of which the olive is the type. It includes also the ash, the lilac, the true jasmine, and fringe Tree
Tupelo - ) A North American Tree (Nyssa multiflora) of the Dogwood family, having brilliant, glossy foliage and acid red berries
Slim - ) Of small diameter or thickness in proportion to the height or length; slender; as, a slim person; a slim Tree
Palm-Tree - This Tree is called in Hebrew tamar, from its straight upright, branchless growth, for which it seems more remarkable than any other Tree; it sometimes rises to the height of a hundred feet. ...
The palm is one of the most beautiful Trees of the vegetable kingdom. These projections are the vestiges of the decayed leaves; for the trunk is not solid like other Trees, but its center is filled with pith, round which is a tough bark, full of strong fibers when young, which, as the Tree grows old, hardens and becomes ligneous. The leaves, when the Tree has grown to a size for bearing fruit, are six to eight feet long, are very broad when spread out, and are used for covering the tops of houses, and similar purposes. ...
The fruit, from which the palm is often called the date-tree, grows below the leaves in clusters sometimes weighing over fifteen pounds, and is of a sweet and agreeable taste. From the leaves they make couches, baskets, bags, mats, and brushes: from the branches or stalks, cages for their poultry, and fences for their gardens; from the fiber of the trunk, thread, ropes, and rigging; from the sap is prepared a spirituous liquor; and the body of the Tree furnishes fuel: it is even said that from one variety of the palm-tree, the phoenix farinifera, meal has been extracted, which is found among the fibers of the trunk, and has been used for food. ...
Several parts of the Holy Land, no less than of Idumea, that lay contiguous to it, are described by the ancients to have abounded with date-trees. Judea particularly is typified in several coins of Vespasian by a desconsolate woman sitting under a palm-tree, with the inscription, JUDEA CAPTA. In Deuteronomy 34:3 , Jericho is called the "city of palm-trees;" and several of these Trees are still found in that vicinity; but in general they are now rare in Palestine
Apricot - ) A fruit allied to the plum, of an orange color, oval shape, and delicious taste; also, the Tree (Prunus Armeniaca of Linnaeus) which bears this fruit
Blolly - ) A shrub or small Tree of southern Florida and the West Indies (Pisonia obtusata) with smooth oval leaves and a hard, 10-ribbed fruit
Arbor Vitae - (1):...
An evergreen Tree of the cypress tribe, genus Thuja. ...
(2):...
The Treelike disposition of the gray and white nerve tissues in the cerebellum, as seen in a vertical section
Pippin - ) An apple from a Tree raised from the seed and not grafted; a seedling apple
Sandarac - ) A white or yellow resin obtained from a Barbary Tree (Callitris quadrivalvis or Thuya articulata), and pulverized for pounce; - probably so called from a resemblance to the mineral
Bay Tree - Psalm 37:35 reads in the margin, 'tree that groweth in his own soil,' a striking emblem of the wicked spreading himself in his own earthly soil
Enipap - ) The edible fruit of a West Indian Tree (Genipa Americana) of the order Rubiaceae
Turpentine - ) A semifluid or fluid oleoresin, primarily the exudation of the terebinth, or turpentine, Tree (Pistacia Terebinthus), a native of the Mediterranean region. It is also obtained from many coniferous Trees, especially species of pine, larch, and fir
Elparan - (ehl pay' ruhn) Place name meaning, “tree of Paran
Arrack - Arrack is often distilled from a fermented mixture of rice, molasses, and palm wine of the cocoanut Tree or the date palm, etc
Cherimoyer - ) A small downy-leaved Tree (Anona Cherimolia), with fragrant flowers
Cinnamon - ) The inner bark of the shoots of Cinnamomum Zeylanicum, a Tree growing in Ceylon
Pineapple - ) A tropical plant (Ananassa sativa); also, its fruit; - so called from the resemblance of the latter, in shape and external appearance, to the cone of the pine Tree
Harefoot - ) A Tree (Ochroma Laqopus) of the West Indies, having the stamens united somewhat in the form of a hare's foot
Cortex - ) Bark, as of a Tree; hence, an outer covering
Twig - Ezekiel 17:4 (b) This is typical, because of their position in the top of the Tree, of the kings, nobles, and the rulers of Israel
Baca - We meet with this word but once in Scripture, and that is in the book of Psalms, (Psalms 84:6) The meaning of it seems to be weeping; though some consider it as referring to the mulberry Tree
Thirty, Thirtyfold - 1: τριάκοντα (Strong's #5144 — Adjective — triakonta — Tree-ak'-on-tah ) is usually rendered "thirty," e
Tree - Each type of Tree represents a different truth. Trees are also used to represent positions of great power, or of lesser power. Trees represent GOD's people in some cases, while they represent Satan's product in other cases. ...
Genesis 2:17 (c) It has been suggested that this Tree represents human reasonings, searchings and conclusions about GOD's matters. ...
Exodus 15:25 (c) Perhaps this Tree represents the Lord JESUS CHRIST who certainly does sweeten the bitter things of life, and make the sorrows of earth a blessing to the soul. ...
Exodus 15:27 (c) Strangely enough, these Trees may, and possibly do, represent the seventy persons who came down to Egypt from the land of Israel. The finest Tree will not grow in the best of soil unless there is water available. ...
Proverbs 11:30 (a) The Tree represents a fruitful life lived for the glory of GOD and the blessing of men. ...
Proverbs 15:4 (a) Good talk and wise words certainly do bring the blessings that a Tree of life would bring. He is like the dry Tree in that there would be no fruit in his life that might produce posterity. ...
Isaiah 66:17 (b) Probably this Tree represents some particular wicked religion which permits abominations and wicked practices. The Trees here represent people. ...
Daniel 4:10 (a) This Tree is King Nebuchadnezzar. The roots, however, remain in the earth, and are even now producing a new Tree. The individual must be born again to become a good Tree, which will bring forth good fruit. The Tree itself must be made before the fruit can be right. ...
Matthew 13:32 (a) Mustard does not grow on Trees. There is no such things as a mustard Tree. Therefore, this Tree is an unnatural thing, and it represents the great, unnatural religious system, which consists of many denominations having a multitude of beliefs, many of them grotesque, and even wicked
Reign - Judges 9:8 (a) It is not a natural thing for one Tree to rule over another Tree, and certainly not for a bramble to rule over a big Tree
Sin: Insidious Nature of - In the gardens of Hampton Court you will see many Trees entirely vanquished and well nigh strangled by huge coils of ivy, which are wound about them like the snakes around the unhappy Laocoon: there is no untwisting the folds, they are too giant-like, and fast fixed, and every hour the rootlets of the climber are sucking the life out of the unhappy Tree. Yet there was a day when the ivy was a tiny aspirant, only asking a little aid in climbing; had it been denied then, the Tree had never become its victim, but by degrees the humble weak-S ling grew in strength and arrogance, and at last it assumed the mastery, and the tall Tree became the prey of the creeping, insinuating destroyer
Jesuit's Bark - A bark yielded by the cinchona Tree, a native of South America and a genus of the evergreen Tree belonging to the madder family
Sycomore - This is the sycomore fig ( Ficûs sycamorus ), a Tree often 50 feet high, with an enormous trunk. This Tree must not be confused with the ‘sycamore’ ( Acer pseudo-platanus ) of our home lands, which is a species of maple
Bark, Jesuit's - A bark yielded by the cinchona Tree, a native of South America and a genus of the evergreen Tree belonging to the madder family
Bark, Peruvian - A bark yielded by the cinchona Tree, a native of South America and a genus of the evergreen Tree belonging to the madder family
Almug Tree - Shaw supposes that the almug Tree was the cypress; and he observes that the wood of this Tree is still used in Italy and other places for violins, harpsichords, and other stringed instruments
Branch - When Christ is represented as a slender twig, shooting out from the trunk of an old Tree lopped to the very root and decayed, and becoming itself a mighty Tree, reference is made,...
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Lop - ) To cut off as the top or extreme part of anything; to sho/ - by cutting off the extremities; to cut off, or remove as superfluous parts; as, to lop a Tree or its branches. ) That which is lopped from anything, as branches from a Tree
Wound - A breach of the skin and flesh of an animal, or of the bark and wood of a Tree, or of the bark and substance of other plants, caused by violence or external force. WOUND, To hurt by violence as, to wound the head or the arm to wound a Tree
Poplar - This is the rendering of the Hebrew word libneh , which occurs in ( Genesis 30:37 ) and Hose 4:13 Several authorities are in favor of the rendering of the Authorized Version and think that "white poplar" (Populus alba ) is the Tree denoted: others understand the "storax Tree" ( Styrax officinale , Linn. Both poplars and storax or styrax Trees are common in Palestine, and either would suit the passages where the Hebrew term occurs
Candleberry Tree - A shrub (the Myrica cerifera, or wax-bearing myrtle), common in North America, the little nuts of which are covered with a greenish white wax, which was formerly, used for hardening candles; - also called bayberry Tree, bayberry, or candleberry
Sea Cocoa - It was found floating in the Indian Ocean before the Tree was known, and called sea cocoanut, and double cocoanut
Box-Tree - What Tree is referred to under the name teashshur is not known: the ancient versions translate it 'cedar, fir, poplar,' etc
Citrange - It is more acid and has a more pronounced aroma than the orange; the Tree is hardier
Wrightine - ) A rare alkaloid found in the bark of an East Indian apocynaceous Tree (Wrightia antidysenterica), and extracted as a bitter white crystalline substance
Monkey's Puzzle - A lofty coniferous Chilian Tree (Araucaria imbricata), the branches of which are so crowded and intertwisted "as to puzzle a monkey to climb
Jacamar - They are allied to the kingfishers, but climb on Tree trunks like nuthatches, and feed upon insects
Tamarack - It is a small Tree with fine-grained wood
Olive (Tree) - Judges 9:8 (b) In this parable probably this Tree represents some delightful, refreshing person who might be called to be the leader of the people. You will note that other Trees represent other kinds of people in this same parable. ...
Zechariah 4:3 (a) Plainly the passage indicates that these two olive Trees are types of the Holy Spirit of GOD and the Word of GOD. Some think that these two Trees represent Moses and Elijah, Moses the lawgiver, and Elijah the grace giver. Others think that these two Trees represent two angelic beings, who stand guard over the believer to protect and preserve him, and make him a radiant conqueror. Israel was in that plan as a green Tree, and after Pentecost the Gentiles were brought into that same plan. ...
The olive Tree represents Israel from a religious aspect, while the fig Tree represents Israel from the political aspect. The Lord did not curse an olive Tree, for the religion of Israel had GOD's approval. It is the fig Tree that buds, and is a type of the restoration of Israel from the political standpoint. ...
Revelation 11:4 (a) The two olive Trees in this passage certainly represent the two witnesses
Fig Tree - This Tree was very common in Palestine. Accordingly, we read, in the Old Testament, of Juda and Israel dwelling, or sitting securely, every man under his fig Tree, 1 Kings 4:25 ; Micah 4:4 ; Zechariah 3:10 ; 1Ma_14:12 . And, in the New Testament, we find Nathanael under a fig Tree, probably for the purposes of devotional retirement, John 1:49-51 . Hasselquist, in his journey from Nazareth to Tiberias, says, "We refreshed ourselves under the shade of a fig Tree, where a shepherd and his herd had their rendezvous; but without either house or hut. " The fruit which it bears is produced from the trunk and large branches, and not from the smaller shoots, as in most other Trees. Milton is of opinion that the banian Tree was that with the leaves of which our first parents made themselves aprons. Therefore, we must look for another of the fig kind, that better answers the purpose referred to by Moses, Genesis 3:7 ; and as the fruit of the banana Tree, is often, by the most ancient authors, called a fig, may we not suppose this to have been the fig Tree of paradise? Pliny, describing this Tree, says that its leaves were the greatest and most shady of all others; and as the leaves of these are often six feet long, and about two broad, are thin, smooth, and very flexible, they may be deemed more proper than any other for the covering spoken of, especially since they may be easily joined together with the numerous threadlike filaments, which may, without labour, be peeled from the body of the Tree. " Farther, "It frequently falls out in Barbary," says he; "and we need not doubt of the like in this hotter climate of Judea, that, according to the quality of the preceding season, some of the more forward and vigorous Trees will now and then yield a few ripe figs six weeks or more before the full season. Something like this may be alluded to by the Prophet Hosea, when he says, ‘I saw your fathers as בכורה , the first ripe, in the fig Tree, at her first time,' Hosea 9:10 . The account of our Saviour's denunciation against the barren fig Tree, Matthew 21:19 ; Mark 11:13 , has occasioned some of the boldest cavils of infidelity; and the vindication of it has exercised the ingenuity of several of the most learned critics and commentators. The whole difficulty arises from the circumstance of his disappointment in not finding fruit on the Tree, when it is expressly said, that "the time of figs was not yet. " While it was supposed that this expression signified, that the time for such Trees to bring forth fruit was not yet come, it looked very unaccountable that Christ should reckon a Tree barren, though it had leaves, and curse it as such, when he knew that the time of bearing figs was not come; and that he should come to seek figs on this Tree, when he knew that figs were not used to be ripe so soon in the year. Mark says, that "the time or season of figs was not yet," he evidently means that the time of gathering ripe figs was not yet past; and, if so, it was natural to expect figs upon all those Trees that were not barren; whereas, after the time of gathering figs, no one would expect to find them on a fig Tree, and its having none then would be no sign of barrenness. Mark, by saying, "For the time of figs was not yet," does not design to give a reason for "his finding nothing but leaves;" but he gives a reason for what he said in the clause before: "He came, if haply he might find any thereon;" and it was a good reason for our Saviour's coming and seeking figs on the Tree, because the time for their being gathered was not come. Matthew informs us that the Tree was "in the way," that is, in the common road, and therefore, probably, no particular person's property; but if it was, being barren, the timber might be as serviceable to the owner as before. In the blasting of this barren fig Tree, the distant appearance of which was so fair and promising, he delivered one more awful lesson to a degenerate nation, of whose hypocritical exterior and flattering but delusive pretensions it was a just and striking emblem
Olive-Tree - It is mentioned among the most notable Trees of Palestine, where it was cultivated long before the time of the Hebrews (Deuteronomy 6:11 ; 8:8 ). It is mentioned in the first Old Testament parable, that of Jotham (Judges 9:9 ), and is named among the blessings of the "good land," and is at the present day the one characteristic Tree of Palestine. The oldest olive-trees in the country are those which are enclosed in the Garden of Gethsemane. The two "witnesses" mentioned in Revelation 11:4 are spoken of as "two olive Trees standing before the God of the earth. ) The "olive-tree, wild by nature" (Romans 11:24 ), is the shoot or cutting of the good olive-tree which, left ungrafted, grows up to be a "wild olive. Thus the Gentiles, being a "wild olive," but now "graffed in," yield fruit, but only through the sap of the Tree into which they have been graffed
Rambutan - ) A Malayan fruit produced by the Tree Nephelium lappaceum, and closely related to the litchi nut
Blackthorn - ) A spreading thorny shrub or small Tree (Prunus spinosa), with blackish bark, and bearing little black plums, which are called sloes; the sloe
Zin - A low palm-tree, the south-eastern corner of the desert et-Tih, the wilderness of Paran, between the Gulf of Akabah and the head of the Wady Guraiyeh (Numbers 13:21 )
Arnotto - ) A red or yellowish-red dyeing material, prepared from the pulp surrounding the seeds of a Tree (Bixa orellana) belonging to the tropical regions of America
Heartwood - ) The hard, central part of the trunk of a Tree, consisting of the old and matured wood, and usually differing in color from the outer layers
Quercitron - ) The yellow inner bark of the Quercus tinctoria, the American black oak, yellow oak, dyer's oak, or quercitron oak, a large forest Tree growing from Maine to eastern Texas
Espalier - ) A railing or trellis upon which fruit Trees or shrubs are trained, as upon a wall; a Tree or row of Trees so trained
Benjamin - A Tree, the Laurus Benzoin, a native of America, called also spicebush
Galbanum - It is not known from what plant or Tree it was obtained
Winter's Bark - The aromatic bark of Tree (Drimys, / Drymis, Winteri) of the Magnolia family, which is found in Southern Chili
Persimmon - ) An American Tree (Diospyros Virginiana) and its fruit, found from New York southward
Frond - ) The organ formed by the combination or union into one body of stem and leaf, and often bearing the fructification; as, the frond of a fern or of a lichen or seaweed; also, the peculiar leaf of a palm Tree
Fruitless - ) Lacking, or not bearing, fruit; barren; destitute of offspring; as, a fruitless Tree or shrub; a fruitless marriage
pi?on - ) The edible seed of several species of pine; also, the Tree producing such seeds, as Pinus Pinea of Southern Europe, and P
Winterkill - ) To die as the result of exposure to the cold of winter; as, the Tree winterkills easily
Tender - 1: ἁπαλός (Strong's #527 — Adjective — hapalos — ap-al-os' ) "soft, tender," is used of the branch of a Tree, Matthew 24:32 ; Mark 13:28
Bruise - 1: συντρίβω (Strong's #4937 — Verb — suntribo — soon-tree'-bo ) see BREAK , A, No
Tamarisk - ) Any shrub or Tree of the genus Tamarix, the species of which are European and Asiatic
Wike - ) A temporary mark or boundary, as a bough of a Tree set up in marking out or dividing anything, as tithes, swaths to be mowed in common ground, etc
Fig-Tree - FIG-TREE (in NT συκῆ, in OT תּאנִה tĕ’çnâh; the Carica, L. The fig is the principal shade and fruit-tree of Palestine, growing in all parts, in many places spontaneously. Besides this general symbolism, two characteristics of the Tree, appealing respectively to the eye and to the palate, have led to further comparisons. ...
(a) The fig-tree is conspicuous in early spring by the expanding of the tips of its twigs into little green knobs called פַנִים paggim (Gr. This phenomenon of ‘all the Trees’ (Luke 21:29) is particularly noticeable in the fig-tree because of its early and conspicuous verdure. In the same connexion may be mentioned the phenomenon of the dropping of great quantities of the immature fruit in consequence of imperfect fertilization, so that the scattered paggim covering the ground under the fig-trees become to the author of Revelation 6:13 a symbol of the stars fallen to earth from the firmament, ‘as a fig-tree casteth her unripe figs when she is shaken of a great wind. ’...
(b) The fig-tree has two (not three) successive crops of fruit each year. ...
This phenomenon of successive fruitage in the fig-tree is doubtless the source of the description of the fruit-trees of the New Jerusalem (Ezekiel 47:12, Revelation 22:2 ‘the Tree of life’) as ‘bearing fruit every month. Hence the saying, ‘Whoso sees a fig-tree in his dreams, his learning shall be safe from forgetfulness’ (Berakhoth, 57). The capacity of the Tree for prolongation of its bearing season leads in fact to certain representations which easily pass over into exaggerations and misunderstandings important to avoid. It is asserted that neglected relics of the autumn crop sometimes cling to the branches of the fig-tree throughout the winter; but Post (l. 304) declaring that ‘Jesus might expect to find such winter figs (the paggîm) on a Tree already in leaf at the season of Passover, that is before the time of the ripening of figs. ’ In the sense that the rudimentary fruit-buds would be discoverable under the leaves, upon examination (unless the Tree had become sterile by reversion to the wild type, as sometimes occurs), this statement is true; the present writer has found such dry tasteless ‘figs’ at ‘Ain Far‘a near Jerusalem, on March 1, the size of an olive, though the Tree was leafless. Apart from the question whether a Tree could be properly rebuked for the absence of a quite exceptional product, the alleged phenomena, whether of neglected relics of the autumn harvest, or use of the unripe fruit, have neither of them any real bearing on the difficulty that Jesus should approach a wayside fig-tree, with the intention of staying His hunger, when, as so frankly stated in the record itself, ‘it was not the season of figs. The Gospel references to the fig-tree include both parables and incidents, and make allusion to phenomena both of its leafage and its fruitage. As questions arise to how great an extent the incidents may not be symbolic, parables becoming concrete in process of repetition, or even pure symbols, it is best to consider first the two instances in which the fig-tree is made the subject of undoubted parable by our Lord. ...
(a) The parable of the Fig-Tree (Mark 13:28-29 = Matthew 24:32-33, paraphrased and interpreted Luke 21:29-31) is based on the early verdure of the Tree. The meaning is: As you judge by the softening, burgeoning twigs of the fig-tree that the harvest season is approaching, so read the signs of the times. , the additions ‘and all the Trees,’ ‘the kingdom of God,’ and other changes). ...
(b) The parable of the Barren Fig-Tree (Luke 13:6-9) stands in the same eschatological context as the warning to read the signs of the times (Luke 12:35 to Luke 13:9 paralleled by Mark 13:33-36; Mark 13:12-13), and forms its climax. ) to say that the fig-tree stands for the individual. Not merely is the girdled fig-tree an OT emblem of the punishment of Israel (Joel 1:7, cf. ‘Fig-tree,’ col. The cursing of the fig-tree (Mark 11:12-14; Mark 11:20-25 = Matthew 21:18-22). —Parabolic symbolism is so slightly concealed under the narrative features of this story that the majority of critics are disposed to regard it as a mere endowment of the Lukan parable of the Barren Fig-tree with concrete form, just as the parable of the Good Samaritan, and others, were long treated as instances of historical fact. ...
(b) The withering of the Tree (Mark 11:20-25), a sequel of the next day after the cursing (Mark 11:12-14), occupies a different position in Matthew 21:19-22, taking place ‘on the spot. Weiss, who says: The cursing of the fig-tree was ‘of course’ meant by Jesus symbolically, the concrete fulfilment given it by God being without intention on Jesus’ part. Adapted along with Matthew 6:14-15 to give the moral lesson of the withering of the fig-tree, both fall to a lower plane, scarcely above that of mere thaumaturgy. The symbolism of the cursing is lost in the mere wonder of withering a Tree, a needless miracle of display. ...
(c) Even after recognition of the unhistorical character of the addition Matthew 11:20-25, the incident of the cursing is still encumbered with inherent improbabilities, of which the most formidable is the imputation of hunger as the motive of Jesus’ approach to the Tree. It is not enough to admit that the curse must be explained, if at all, by the discovery, made upon close inspection, that the Tree was empty, not only of those supposititious edible products which could not be reasonably expected, but of even the rudiments of a crop in the season, and to suggest that when Jesus arrived ‘immediately the disappointment of unsatisfied hunger was lost in the moral lesson which flashed across His mind’ (Post, l. Relics of the last season’s crop, if sought at all, would be sought on a Tree whose still leafless branches left them in plain sight, no
Mustard - Christ compares the kingdom of heaven to "a grain of mustard seed, which a man took and sowed in the earth, which indeed," said he, "is the least of all seeds; but when it is grown is the greatest among herbs, and becometh a Tree so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereof," Matthew 13:31-32 . "This expression will not appear strange," says Sir Thomas Browne, "if we recollect that the mustard seed, though it be not simply and in itself the smallest of seeds, yet may be very well believed to be the smallest of such as are apt to grow unto a ligneous substance, and become a kind of Tree. And he quotes upon this occasion what is recorded in the Jewish story, of a mustard Tree that was to be climbed like a fig Tree. Of this arborescent or Treelike vegetable, he gives a print; and Linnaeus mentions a species whose branches were real wood, which he names sinapi erucoides. But whatever kind of Tree our Lord meant, it is clear, from the fact that he never takes his illustrations from any objects but such as were familiar, and often present in the scene around him, that he spoke of one which the Jews well knew to have minute seeds, and yet to be of so large growth as to afford shelter for the birds of the air
Thyine Wood - The Tree Thuia articulata , in appearance like a cypress, about 25 feet high, was the source of this wood
Baal-Tamar - Lord of palm Trees, a place in the tribe of Benjamin near Gibeah of Saul (Judges 20:33 ). Probably the palm Tree of Deborah (Judges 4:5 ) is alluded to in the name
Baca - (bay' cuh) Place name meaning, “Balsam Tree” or “weeping
Cinnamon - The bark of the Cinnamon Tree, a well-known aromatic product, which formed one of the ingredients of the holy anointing oil
Dudgeon - ) The root of the box Tree, of which hafts for daggers were made
Shittah Tree - ) A Tree that furnished the precious wood of which the ark, tables, altars, boards, etc
Uaiacum - ) A genus of small, crooked Trees, growing in tropical America. ) The heart wood or the resin of the Guaiacum offinale or lignum-vitae, a large Tree of the West Indies and Central America
Wampee - ) A Tree (Cookia punctata) of the Orange family, growing in China and the East Indies; also, its fruit, which is about the size of a large grape, and has a hard rind and a peculiar flavor
Oleaster - ) The wild olive Tree (Olea Europea, var
Liriodendron - ) A genus of large and very beautiful Trees of North America, having smooth, shining leaves, and handsome, tuliplike flowers; tulip Tree; whitewood; - called also canoewood
Lancewood - Also, the Tree which produces this wood, Duguetia Quitarensis (a native of Guiana and Cuba), and several other Trees of the same family (Anonaseae)
Kauri - ) A lofty coniferous Tree of New Zealand Agathis, / Dammara, australis), furnishing valuable timber and yielding one kind of dammar resin
Unfruitful - Not producing fruit barren as an unfruitful Tree
ad'am - [1] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every Tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the Tree of the knowledge of good and evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. ) The prohibition to taste the fruit of this Tree was enforced by the menace of death. There was also another Tree which was called "the Tree of life. She took of the fruit of the forbidden Tree and gave it to her husband. Though the curse of Adam's rebellion of necessity fell upon him, yet the very prohibition to eat of the Tree of life after his transgression was probably a manifestation of divine mercy, because the greatest malediction of all would have been to have the gift of indestructible life super-added to a state of wretchedness and sin
ad'am - [1] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every Tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the Tree of the knowledge of good and evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. ) The prohibition to taste the fruit of this Tree was enforced by the menace of death. There was also another Tree which was called "the Tree of life. She took of the fruit of the forbidden Tree and gave it to her husband. Though the curse of Adam's rebellion of necessity fell upon him, yet the very prohibition to eat of the Tree of life after his transgression was probably a manifestation of divine mercy, because the greatest malediction of all would have been to have the gift of indestructible life super-added to a state of wretchedness and sin
ad'am - [1] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every Tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the Tree of the knowledge of good and evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. ) The prohibition to taste the fruit of this Tree was enforced by the menace of death. There was also another Tree which was called "the Tree of life. She took of the fruit of the forbidden Tree and gave it to her husband. Though the curse of Adam's rebellion of necessity fell upon him, yet the very prohibition to eat of the Tree of life after his transgression was probably a manifestation of divine mercy, because the greatest malediction of all would have been to have the gift of indestructible life super-added to a state of wretchedness and sin
Coral - , "high-priced" or valuable things, or, as some suppose, "that which grows high," like a Tree (Job 28:18 ; Ezekiel 27:16 ), according to the Rabbins, red coral, which was in use for ornaments. It is of numberless shapes as it grows, but usually is branched like a Tree
Leaf - Of a Tree. The barren fig-tree had nothing but leaves (Matthew 21:19 ; Mark 11:13 )
Apple - In the Bible (Genesis 3) it is identified as the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge eaten by Adam and Eve. The Tree, in Hebrew thap-puakk, is referred to in Canticle of Canticles, 2,8, whence such place-names as Tappuah or Taphua (Joshua 12,15) or Beth-tappuah (Joshua 15)
Oak - Robinson contends that the oak is generally intended, and that it is a very common Tree in the East. Oaks grow to a large size, reach an old age and are every way worthy the venerable associations connected with the Tree. aegilops , are well worthy of the name of mighty Trees; though it is equally true that over a greater part of the country the oaks of Palestine are at present merely bushes
Grafting - When the sapling is about seven years old it is cut down to the stem, and a shoot from a good Tree is grafted upon it. No Tree under cultivation is allowed to grow ungrafted; the fruit in such case being inferior. Paul compares the coming in of the Gentiles to the grafting of a wild olive branch upon a good olive Tree: a process ‘contrary to nature. 238) says that Columelia’s statement that olive Trees are rejuvenated and strengthened in this way (see Comm. ’ ‘The ungrafted Tree,’ they say, ‘is the natural or wild olive,’ following Tristram, Nat. ) When grafted with a shoot of the nobler Tree it gives rise to the true olive. 154), is really a witness on the other side, quite plainly holding that the wild olive is the ungrafted Tree ( LB Fig, Fig-Tree - In James the ordinary words συκῆ, ‘fig-tree,’ and σῦκον, ‘fig,’ are used, but in Rev. ...
The meaning of James 3:12 is clear: a Tree is known by its fruits; a fig-tree cannot bring forth olives, neither can an olive-tree bring forth figs; a man’s ‘works’ are, in short, an infallible index to his ‘faith’ (James 2:18). The Seer beholds the stars of heaven falling to the earth ‘as a fig-tree casteth her unripe figs, when she is shaken of a great gale,’ In the ordinary way these winter figs (ὄλυνθοι) did not ripen, so here the judgment predicted is not about to cut off prematurely those who if spared would develop into matured and useful fruit, but those who are ‘without hope and without God in the world’-in short, the ‘cumberers of the ground. ’...
The fig-tree is native to Palestine and is found either cultivated or wild all over the country. Those which are wild are usually barren or at all events boar no edible fruit, and they are known as ‘male’ fig-trees. There are many varieties of fig-trees cultivated, some of which yield a sharp, bitter fruit, and others a sweet, mellow one. It is noticeable that in the description of the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 8:8) fig-trees are mentioned as one of its leading natural characteristics. The bark is smooth, and the size and thickness of the leaves readily explain the point of the Jewish proverb-‘to sit under one’s own vine and one’s own fig-tree’ (1 Kings 4:25, Micah 4:4, Zechariah 3:10). As a matter of fact, its foliage affords better shade and protection than any other Tree in Palestine. It is one of the earliest Trees to shoot, and its first fruit-buds appear before its leases (cf. The time the Tree comes into leaf and fruiting varies according to the situation, and is later in the hill-country than in the plains
Husks - Husks were the pods of the carob-tree, which is also known as the locust-tree (Ceratonia siliqua). This Tree, which is common in Palestine, belongs to the order Leguminosae, and is an evergreen
Almond - In form, blossoms, and fruit it resembles the peach Tree. "The almond Tree bears its blossoms in the midst of winter, on a naked, leafless stem, and these blossoms (reddish or flesh-coloured in the beginning) seem at the time of their fall exactly like white snow-flakes. " In Jeremiah 1:11 "I see a rod of an almond Tree [1]. , as a present to Joseph, probably because this Tree was not a native of Egypt
Myrtle - חדס , Nehemiah 8:15 ; Isaiah 41:19 ; Isaiah 55:13 :...
Zechariah 1:8-10 ; a shrub, sometimes growing to a small Tree, very common in Judea. " The myrtle is mentioned in Scripture among lofty Trees, not as comparing with them in size, but as contributing with them to the beauty and richness of the scenery. Thus Isaiah 41:19 , intending to describe a scene of varied excellence: "I will plant in the wilderness the cedar, and the shittah Tree, and the myrtle, and the oil Tree;" that is, I will adorn the dreary and barren waste with Trees famed for their stature and the grandeur of their appearance, the beauty of their form, and also the fragrance of their odour. The apocryphal Baruch, 5:8, speaking of the return from Babylon, expresses the protection afforded by God to the people by the same image: "Even the woods and every sweet-smelling Tree shall overshadow Israel by the commandment of God
Catalpa - ) A genus of American and East Indian Trees, of which the best know species are the Catalpa bignonioides, a large, ornamental North American Tree, with spotted white flowers and long cylindrical pods, and the C
Triplet - ) A group of three notes sung or played in the Tree of two
Whippletree - ) The cornel Tree. ) The pivoted or swinging bar to which the traces, or tugs, of a harness are fastened, and by which a carriage, a plow, or other implement or vehicle, is drawn; a whiffletree; a swingletree; a singletree. See Singletree
Shrub - ) A woody plant of less size than a Tree, and usually with several stems from the same root
Gath - So Gathrimmon, the press of the pomegranate, from Garb, a press; and Rimmon, a pomegranate Tree
Mahaled - ) A cherry Tree (Prunus Mahaleb) of Southern Europe
Meon'Enim - or other great Tree
Cedar - A Tree
Bdellium - Bdellium is an odoriferous exudation from a Tree which is perhaps the Borassus flabelliformis , Lin
Pillar, Plain of the, - or rather "oak of the pillar" (that being the real signification of the Hebrew word elon ), a Tree which stood near Shechem and at which the men of Shechem and the house of Millo assembled to crown Abimelech the son of Gideon
Fig - The fig Tree is common in Palestine and the East, and flourishes with the greatest luxuriance in those barren and stony situations where little else will grow. Its large size, and its abundance of five-lobed leaves, render it a pleasant shade Tree; and its fruit furnished a wholesome food, very much used in all the lands of the Bible. There is also a long dark-colored kermouse, that sometimes hangs upon the Trees all winter. ...
The fruit of the fig Tree is one of the delicacies of the East, and is very often spoken of in Scripture. It is a peculiarity of the fig Tree that its fruit begins to appear before the leaves, and without any show of blossoms. It has, indeed, small and hidden blossoms, but the passage in Habakkuk 3:17 , should read, according to the original Hebrew, "Although the fig Tree should not bear," instead of "blossom. ...
The barren fig Tree which was withered at our Savior's word, as an awful warning to unfruitful professors of religion, seems to have spent itself in leaves. It stood by the wayside, free to all; and as the time for stripping the Trees of their fruit had not come, Mark 11:14 , it was reasonable to expect to find it covered with figs in various stages of growth
Cashew - ) A Tree (Anacardium occidentale) of the same family which the sumac
Sycamine Tree - (Luke 19:4 ) The sycamine is the mulberry Tree (Morus ). Both black and white mulberry Trees are common in Syria and Palestine
Date - This was a common Tree in Palestine (Joel 1:12 ; Nehemiah 8:15 )
Turpentine Tree - It is the Pistacia terebinthus , terebinth Tree, common in Palestine and the East
Alder - ) A Tree, usually growing in moist land, and belonging to the genus Alnus. the species of alder are usually shrubs or small Trees
Satinwood - ) The hard, lemon-colored, fragrant wood of an East Indian Tree (Chloroxylon Swietenia)
Mammee - ) A fruit Tree of tropical America, belonging to the genus Mammea (M
Moringa - ) A genus of Trees of Southern India and Northern Africa. One species (Moringa pterygosperma) is the horse-radish Tree, and its seeds, as well as those of M
Letterwood - ) The beautiful and highly elastic wood of a Tree of the genus Brosimum (B
Ebony - The wood of a Tree of no great size, growing in India and Africa; it is black, hard, heavy, and fine-grained, and receives a beautiful polish
Adam - They were placed in the Garden of Eden, but were banished from there after eating from the forbidden Tree of Knowledge
Mulberry Tree - The LXX, in Chronicles, render the word by απιων , "pear Trees;" so Aquila and the Vulgate, both in Samuel and Chronicles, "purorum. " Others translate it the "mulberry Tree:" More probably it is the large shrub which the Arabs still call "baca;" and which gave name to the valley where it abounded. Of this valley Celsius remarks, that it was "rugged and embarrassed with bushes and stones, which could not be passed through without labour and tears;" referring to Psalms 84:7 ; and the "rough valley," Deuteronomy 21:4 ; and he quotes from a manuscript of Abu'l Fideli a description of the Tree which grew there, and mentions it as bearing a fruit of an acrid taste
Balm - In another place the mastic Tree (Pistacia lentiscus ) seems to be referred to ( Genesis 43:11 ). A yellow aromatic resin was extracted from the mastic Tree by cutting the branches
Climb - To creep up by little and little, or step by step to mount or ascend, by means of the hands and feet to rise on any fixed object, by seizing it with the hands and lifting the body, and by thrusting with the feet as, to climb a Tree or a precipice. And he ran before and climbed up into a sycamore Tree
Tall - ) High in stature; having a considerable, or an unusual, extension upward; long and comparatively slender; having the diameter or lateral extent small in proportion to the height; as, a tall person, Tree, or mast
Cranberry - ) The high cranberry or cranberry Tree is a species of Viburnum (V
Arbor - ) A kind of latticework formed of, or covered with, vines, branches of Trees, or other plants, for shade; a bower. ) A Tree, as distinguished from a shrub
Burl - ) An overgrown knot, or an excrescence, on a Tree; also, veneer made from such excrescences
Aboard - ...
Aboard main tack, an order to draw a corner of the main-sail down to the chess-tree
Hawthorn - ) A thorny shrub or Tree (the Crataegus oxyacantha), having deeply lobed, shining leaves, small, roselike, fragrant flowers, and a fruit called haw
Poplar - Others, from Septuagint and the Arabic lubnah , make the libnah the storax or styrax , Styrax officinale , a small Tree with scented white blossoms and fragrant gum
Holly - ) A Tree or shrub of the genus Ilex
Lignum-Vitae - ) A Tree (Guaiacum officinale) found in the warm latitudes of America, from which the guaiacum of medicine is procured
Logwood - ) The heartwood of a Tree (Haematoxylon Campechianum), a native of South America, It is a red, heavy wood, containing a crystalline substance called haematoxylin, and is used largely in dyeing
Truncheon - ) A stout stem, as of a Tree, with the branches lopped off, to produce rapid growth
Gopher - Gopher may probably be a general name for such Trees as abound with resinous inflammable juices, as the cedar, cypress, fir-tree, pine, etc
Sycamore - Although it may be admitted that the sycamine is properly, and in ( Luke 17:6 ) the mulberry, and the sycamore the mulberry, or sycamore-fig ( Ficus sycomorus ), yet the latter is the Tree generally referred to in the Old Testament and called by the Septuagint sycamine, as ( 1 Kings 10:27 ; 1 Chronicles 27:28 ; Psalm 78:47 ; Amos 7:14 ) The Sycamore or fig-mulberry, is in Egypt and Palestine a Tree of great importance and very extensive use. It attains the size of a walnut Tree has wide-spreading branches and affords a delightful shade. (Amos 7:14 ) So great was the value of these Trees that David appointed for them in his kingdom a special overseer, as he did for the olives (1 Chronicles 27:28 ) and it is mentioned as one of the heaviest of Egypt's calamities that her sycamore were destroyed by hailstones
Heath - " The LXX and Vulgate render oror, "the tamarisk;" and this is strengthened by the affinity of the Hebrew name of this Tree with the Turkish oeroer . Taylor and Parkhurst render it "a blasted Tree stripped of its foliage. " If it be a particular Tree, the tamarisk is as likely as any
Ash - The word is translated fir (NAS), pine (NIV), cedar (NRSV, REB), and laurel Tree (TEV)
Booth - A hut made of the branches of a Tree
Bicipital - ) Dividing into two parts at one extremity; having two heads or two supports; as, a bicipital Tree
Deadness - ; dullness; inertness; languor; coldness; vapidness; indifference; as, the deadness of a limb, a body, or a Tree; the deadness of an eye; deadness of the affections; the deadness of beer or cider; deadness to the world, and the like
Hemlock - Hosea 10:4 (a) This Tree is bitter and poisonous and causes damage to those who drink the extract from it
Uava - ) A tropical Tree, or its fruit, of the genus Psidium
Mahwa Tree - An East Indian sapotaceous Tree (Bassia latifolia, and also B. It is one of the butter Trees
Lac - ) A resinous substance produced mainly on the banyan Tree, but to some extent on other Trees, by the Coccus lacca, a scale-shaped insect, the female of which fixes herself on the bark, and exudes from the margin of her body this resinous substance
Cassia - The bark of a Tree like the cinnamon, and one of the ingredients of the holy anointing oil
Fir Tree - Fir Tree
Oldness - Old age an advanced state of life or existence as the oldness of a man, of an elephant or a Tree
Willow - A Tree of the genus Salix
Almug - A kind of Tree or wood, which Hiram brought from Ophir for the use of Solomon in making pillars for the temple and his own house, and also musical instruments, 1 Kings 10:11 2 Chronicles 2:8 . It was more probably the Tree, which furnishes what is now commonly called Brazil wood, which is also a native of the East Indies, Siam, the Molucca islands, and Japan, and has several species
Thyine Wood - (ξύλον θύϊνον, the Tree being ἡ θυία or θύα, rarely τὸ θύον)...
Thyine wood is mentioned among the precious wares of the Apocalyptic Babylon, i. ‘All thyine wood’ refers, not to different species of the Tree, but to the variety of objects made of this precious wood in the luxurious Imperial city
Apple - ) The color was golden, the odor fragrant, the Tree green and shady. Probably the citron Tree, of which the foliage is perennial, and the blossoms and golden fruit most fragrant
Balm, or More Properly, Balsam - The gum or inspissated juice which exudes from the balsam-tree, the Opobalsamum, which was anciently frequent in Judea, and particularly in Gilead, Jeremiah 8:22 ; 46:11 . The true balsam-tree is an evergreen, a native of Southern Arabia and Abyssinia, and is about fourteen feet high
Grove - eshel , a tamarisk, or perhaps any large Tree. Abraham planted a memorial Tree in Beer-sheba, and called there on the name of Jehovah. The same word is translated 'tree' in the A. The word 'grove' naturally suggests a row of Trees, but that this cannot be the meaning is evident from groves being set up 'under every green Tree. ...
On the whole it seems most probable that they were wooden symbols of a goddess, in the form of images or pillars, or mere stems of Trees inserted in the earth
David, Root of - "As the Prophet foresaw, the stump of the old Tree of the House of David sent forth a new David to rule the nations
Pods - The pods of Luke 15:16 (NAS, NIV, REB, NRSV; husks, KJV; bean pods, TEV) were likely the pods of the carob Tree which served as a common feed for livestock
Frog - The edible frog and the little green Tree-frog are both common all over the Holy Land
Bay Tree - Psalm 37:35 (a) This Tree is a type of the prosperous sinner whose business grows to tremendous proportions and whose interests enter into many departments of life, all of which are successful
Algum - This is the name of a kind of wood, or Tree, large quantities of which were brought by the fleet of Solomon from Ophir, of which he made pillars for the house of the Lord, and for his own palace; also musical instruments
Lateral - ) Of or pertaining to the sides; as, the lateral walls of a house; the lateral branches of a Tree
Mora - ) A leguminous Tree of Guiana and Trinidad (Dimorphandra excelsa); also, its timber, used in shipbuilding and making furniture
Root of David - "As the Prophet foresaw, the stump of the old Tree of the House of David sent forth a new David to rule the nations
Wood - See STAFF , STOCKS , Tree
Fig (Tree) - Gideon was the fig Tree. Their fruit Trees would abound in fruit, and their fields would be fertile and productive. The efforts of the olive Trees to become fine fruitful Trees would fail, and there would be no oil for the use of the owner. ...
Matthew 21:19 (b) Here as usual the fig Tree is a type of the nation of Israel in its political aspect. The Lord cursed the fig Tree, but not an olive Tree. The olive Tree represents Israel from the religious viewpoint. Paul tells in his epistle that the believers are grafted into the olive Tree, not into the fig Tree. The cursing of the fig Tree was really not a curse. ...
Matthew 24:32 (a) The budding of this Tree refers to the beginning of the restoration of the nation of Israel as a political power. ...
Luke 13:6 (a) This fig Tree represents Israel as a political nation. All the efforts He put forth, plus those of His disciples, are represented in this parable by the efforts made to fertilize the Tree
Cedar - Εrez , from 'aΙraz , "coiled" or "compressed," a deeply rooted Tree. Moreover the deodara cedar (the Tree of God, Psalms 104:16, the sacred Tree of the Hindus, of which they construct their temples) has the durability wanting in our modern cedar of Lebanon. ...
The Nineveh inscriptions state that the palaces were in part constructed of cedar; this proves on microscopic examination to be yew; so that by "cedar of Lebanon" the wood of more than one Tree is meant, the pine cedar, Scotch fir, yew, deodara. Cedar was also used in purification, probably the oxycedrus abounding in Egypt, Arabia, and the wady Mousa; indeed, the greater cedar not being found there, the Tree meant in the laws of purification must have been a distinct one (Leviticus 14:4; Numbers 19:6). In a hollow of Lebanon, where no other Trees are near, about 400 cedars of Lebanon stand alone, 3,000 feet below the summit and 6,400 above the sea. But God in retributive justice "consumed the glory of the Assyrian's forest" figuratively; fulfilling His threat, "the rest of the Trees of his forest shall be few that a child may write them" (Isaiah 10:18-19)
Tree - We meet with the names of a great variety of Trees in Scripture, but if we may give credit to ancient writers, there was nothing in the Hebrew language less determined than the special names of Trees. I do not take upon me to say that in numberless instances the names and Trees are not figurative, for I rather think they are. It has been thought so by some writers, and there is reason for the opinion; and when we consider how God the Holy Ghost, from the description of the garden of Eden, in the very opening of the Bible, to the closing the canon of Scripture, in the description of the Paradise of God, makes use of the several names of "the Tree of life, and the Tree of knowledge of good and evil," which were evidently symbolical and sacramental, I cannot but pause over the several elegantly and highly finished representations which the whole Book of God abounds with, more or less, from beginning to end, and accept them as such. Hence, in this point of view, are the "trees of the garden and of the forest, the Trees of righteousness, and of the Lord's right hand planting;" but chiefly and above all in beholding that most striking and lovely representation of Jesus, under the similitude of the Tree of life. And it is not the least of the beauty of this similitude, that this Tree of life is said to be in the midst of the street, and on either side of the river. Hail! thou everlasting and eternal Tree of life! Cause me to sit down under thy shadow with great delight this side the river, until thou shalt bring me home to the everlasting rest and enjoyment of thy fulness, in the paradise of God above
Incense - This gum is said to distil from incisions made in the Tree during the heat of summer. What the form of the Tree is which yields it, we do not certainly know. Pliny one while says, it is like a pear Tree, another, that it is like a mastic Tree; then, that it is like the laurel; and, in fine, that it is a kind of turpentine Tree
Bel - ) A thorny rutaceous Tree (Aegle marmelos) of India, and its aromatic, orange-like fruit; - called also Bengal quince, golden apple, wood apple
Oak - Sometimes, evidently, the terebinth, elm, or teil Tree is intended; at others, the oak
Frankincense - (Old French: franc encens, incense of high quality) ...
The fragrant resin of an Arabian Tree, Boswellia serrata, procured by slitting the bark, from which it exudes and hardens on exposure to the air
Gerah - A bean, probably of the carob Tree, the smallest weight, and also the smallest piece of money, among the Hebrews, equal to the twentieth part of a shekel (Exodus 30:13 ; Leviticus 27:25 ; Numbers 3:47 )
Tree of the Knowledge of Good And Evil - Stood in the midst of the garden of Eden, beside the Tree of life (Genesis 23,3 )
Sawyer - ) A Tree which has fallen into a stream so that its branches project above the surface, rising and falling with a rocking or swaying motion in the current
Dammara - It is obtained from certain resin Trees indigenous to the East Indies, esp. ) A large Tree of the order Coniferae, indigenous to the East Indies and Australasia; - called also Agathis
Chicle Gum - A gumlike substance obtained from the bully Tree (Mimusops globosa) and sometimes also from the naseberry or sapodilla (Sapota zapotilla)
Fruitful - Very productive producing fruit in abundance as fruitful soil a fruitful Tree a fruitful season
Talipot - ) A beautiful tropical palm Tree (Corypha umbraculifera), a native of Ceylon and the Malabar coast
Fir - An evergreen Tree, of beautiful appearance, whose lofty height and dense foliage afford a spacious shelter and shade
Pheni'ce - The name was no doubt derived from the Greek word for the palm Tree, which Theophrastus says was indigenous in the island
Cypress - The Hebrew word points to some Tree with a hard grain, and this is all that can be positively said of it
Aloes - 1: ἀλόη (Strong's #250 — Noun Feminine — aloe — al'-o-ay' ) "an aromatic Tree," the soft, bitter wood of which was used by Orientals for the purposes of fumigation and embalming, John 19:39 (see also Numbers 24:6 ; Psalm 45:8 ; Proverbs 7:17 )
Thyine - 1: θύϊνος (Strong's #2367 — Adjective — thuinos — thoo'-ee-nos ) is akin to thuia, or thua, an African aromatic and coniferous Tree; in Revelation 18:12 it describes a wood which formed part of the merchandise of Babylon; it was valued by Greeks and Romans for tables, being hard, durable and fragrant (AV marg
Willows - This Tree is frequently found "on the coast, overhanging wells and pools. There is a conspicuous Tree of this species over a pond in the plain of Acre, and others on the Phoenician plain. Some are of opinion that the Tree intended is the tamarisk or poplar
Olives, Olive Tree - 1: ἐλαία (Strong's #1636 — Noun Feminine — elaia — el-ah'-yah ) denotes (a) "an olive Tree," Romans 11:17,24 ; Revelation 11:4 (plural); the Mount of Olives was so called from the numerous olive Trees there, and indicates the importance attached to such; the Mount is mentioned in the NT in connection only with the Lord's life on earth, Matthew 21:1 ; 24:3 ; 26:30 ; Mark 11:1 ; 13:3 ; 14:26 ; Luke 19:37 ; 22:39 ; John 8:1 ; (b) "an olive," James 3:12 , RV (AV, "olive berries"). ...
2: ἐλαιών (Strong's #1638 — Noun Masculine — elaion — el-ah-yone' ) "an olive grove" or "olive garden," the ending -- on, as in this class of noun, here indicates "a place set with Trees of the kind designated by the primitive" (Thayer); hence it is applied to the Mount of Olives, Luke 19:29 ; 21:37 ; Acts 1:12 ("Olivet"): in the first two of these and in Mark 11:1 , some mss. 1), occurs in Romans 11:24 , "a good olive Tree. 1), denoting "of the wild olive," is used as a noun in Romans 11:17,24 , "a wild olive Tree" (RV, in the latter verse)
Marah - The beneficial effect of the Tree cast into the bitter water by God's direction is probably the cause why now this fountain is less bitter than others in the neighborhood. The cross is spiritually the Tree which, when cast into life's bitterest waters, sweetens and heals them (Philippians 3:8; Acts 20:24; Acts 16:23-25; Acts 5:41; Romans 5:3)
Cinnamon - ’ The finest cinnamon of commerce is now obtained from Ceylon; it is the fragrant and aromatic inner rind of the stem and boughs of a Tree which grows to a height of 30ft. Oil of cinnamon, which is used in the composition of incense, is got from the boiled fruit of the Tree
Algum Trees, Almug Trees - By comparing 1 Kings 10:11 with 2 Chronicles 9:10,11 , it is clear that the two names refer to the same Tree; it came from the same place, Ophir, and was used for the same purposes, namely, pillars or props, terraces or stairs, harps and psalteries. 2 Chronicles 2:8 presents a difficulty, for it seems to say that algum Trees came from Lebanon, and the same Trees could scarcely be indigenous to places so dissimilar as Lebanon and Ophir. In the last passage the several Trees sent by Huram may be named together without meaning that they were all cut from Lebanon. Josephus describes this wood as peculiar pine, not like those called pine in his days: to the sight it was like the wood of the fig Tree, but whiter and more shining
Lotus - ) The lotus of the lotuseaters, probably a Tree found in Northern Africa, Sicily, Portugal, and Spain (Zizyphus Lotus), the fruit of which is mildly sweet. ) The lote, or nettle Tree
Phenice - A town and harbor, more properly Phœnix (from the Greek word for the palm Tree which was indigenous to Crete)
Sta-Cte - Some identify the nataf with the gum of the storer Tree ( Styraz officinale ), but all that is positively known is that it signifies an odorous distillation from some plant
Baytree - Rather "an indigenous Tree," not transplanted yet, "flourishing" with the vigor of its native soil
Bleeding - ) A running or issuing of blood, as from the nose or a wound; a hemorrhage; the operation of letting blood, as in surgery; a drawing or running of sap from a Tree or plant
Staff, Staves - See STOCKS , Tree , WOOD
Balsam - ) A species of Tree (Abies balsamea)
Cassia - Bark of an oriental Tree (Cinnamomum cassia Blume) related to cinnamon
Quince - ) a quince Tree or shrub
Prohibit - ) To forbid by authority; to interdict; as, God prohibited Adam from eating of the fruit of a certain Tree; we prohibit a person from doing a thing, and also the doing of the thing; as, the law prohibits men from stealing, or it prohibits stealing
Ash (Tree) - Isaiah 44:14 (b) This Tree represents the established works of men which become their idols
Ash - ) The tough, elastic wood of the ash Tree. ) A genus of Trees of the Olive family, having opposite pinnate leaves, many of the species furnishing valuable timber, as the European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) and the white ash (F
Fall, the - The fall is that event in the Garden of Eden where Adam and Eve disobeyed the command of God and ate of The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil (Genesis 2:1-25; Gen 3:1-24)
Shekel - The lulab is a frequent symbol, namely, branches of the three Trees in Leviticus 23:40, the palm, the myrtle, and the willow, carried at the feast of tabernacles. Also the citron fruit, and a palm Tree between two baskets of fruit
Mahogany - ) A large Tree of the genus Swietenia (S
Tacamahaca - ) Any Tree yielding tacamahac resin, especially, in North America, the balsam poplar, or balm of Gilead (Populus balsamifera). ) A bitter balsamic resin obtained from tropical American Trees of the genus Elaphrium (E. Tacamahaca), and also from East Indian Trees of the genus Calophyllum; also, the resinous exhudation of the balsam poplar
Ash - ) The tough, elastic wood of the ash Tree. ) A genus of Trees of the Olive family, having opposite pinnate leaves, many of the species furnishing valuable timber, as the European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) and the white ash (F
Liquidambar - ) The balsamic juice which is obtained from these Trees by incision. The liquid balsam of the Oriental Tree is liquid storax. ) A genus consisting of two species of tall Trees having star-shaped leaves, and woody burlike fruit
Thyine-Wood - Revelation 18:12 , the wood of the Thyia or Thuja Articulata of Linnaeus, an aromatic evergreen Tree, resembling the cedar, and found in Libya, near Mount Atlas
Olive - ]'>[1] , zeit ‘oil,’ and zeitûn ‘olive Tree’). This Tree ( Olea europea ) is the first-named ‘king of the Trees’ ( Judges 9:8-9 ), and is, in Palestine at any rate, by far the most important. A large proportion of the fuel consumed to-day consists of the roots of ancient olive Trees. The peculiar grey-green foliage with its silver sheen, and the wonderful twisted and often hollow trunks of the Tree, are very characteristic of Palestine scenery. In some parts, notably at Nâblus , a large proportion of the Trees are invaded by parasitic mistletoe. ...
The olive Tree, grown from a slip taken from below the grafted branches of a selected fruitful olive, has to be grafted when three years old, but it does not bear fruit for some three or four years more, and not plentifully until it is about seventeen or eighteen years old; it may then, when well cared for, continue bearing for many years. When, after some years, the stem becomes too hollow from rotting of the wood, and the crop fails, it is sometimes cut sharp off at the root, and new shoots are allowed to spring up, which, after re-grafting, become a fruitful Tree. 1905) that it is a custom in Syria to graft a branch of wild olive into the stem of a cultivated Tree (cf. How this can be of any benefit to the Tree it is difficult to see. ...
In most neglected olive groves numerous little bushes of the ‘wild olive’ may be seen, which, though very unlike the cultivated Tree having a shorter, smaller, and greener leaf and a stirrer, more prickly stem are nevertheless derived from it. As a rule the wild olive is but a shrub, but it may grow into a Tree and have small but useless ‘berries. ’ Where groves of wild olives are found in Palestine, they are probably always the descendants of cultivated Trees long ago destroyed. ...
The young wild olive Trees, scattered over the mountains in Galilee, are gathered by the fellahîn and sold for olive plantations. They are beaten from the Trees with a long pole ( Deuteronomy 24:20 ) and collected in baskets
Fruit - In his original creation God commanded the land to produce "vegetation: seed-bearing plants and Trees on the land that bear fruit with seed in it, according to their various kinds" (Genesis 1:11 ). Scripture refers to a number of the Near East plants, Trees/bushes, and spices to teach or enhance a spiritual lesson (e. , the grain seeds sown, Matthew 13:1-9 ; the fig Tree cursed, Matthew 21:18-22 ; the grape vine likened to God's people, Jeremiah 2:21 ; John 15:1-7 ). To make the spiritual point that God's disobedient people needed his mercy and saving power to heal them, Jeremiah effectively refers to the healing effect of the balm or gum oil of a well-known bush/small Tree growing in Gilead. ...
Spices and unguents, the fruit of exotic plants, Trees, and small bushes in the Middle East, frequently played an important role in enhancing one's social position or indicating one's respect, adoration, and devotion, particularly to God. Examples include myrrh (aromatic gum of the Tree/bush of Arabia, Ethiopia, and Somalia), cinnamon (of the cinnamon Tree), and olive oil for the sacred oil for the tabernacle (Exodus 30:22-33 ); the fragrant spices of gum resin (the aromatic myrrh gum), onycha (made from mollusk shells), galbanum (resin from plant roots), and frankincense (resin from a small Tree/bush from Ubar, Oman) for the sacred fragrant tabernacle incense (Exodus 30:34-38 ); frankincense and myrrh given by the magi in their worship of Jesus (Matthew 2:11 ); the nard (perfume made from a Middle East plant) Mary poured out in worship on the feet of Jesus (John 12:3 ); the seventy-five-pound mixture of myrrh and aloes (aromatic resin of a Near Eastern Tree) Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus used in wrapping up the body of Jesus (John 19:39-40 ) and the spices and perfumes the women took to the tomb to anoint the body of Jesus (Mark 16:1 ; Luke 23:56-24:1 ). John the Baptist and Jesus teach that the disciple is to produce fruit (good works) as evidence of true repentance (Matthew 3:8 ; Luke 3:8 ), and they explain that a good Tree (the repentant individual) cannot produce bad fruit, that is, a life filled with wicked Acts, and a bad Tree (an unrepentant person) cannot produce good fruit, that is, a life of godly works (Matthew 3:10 ; 7:16-20 ; Luke 3:9 ; 6:43 ). Thus, with the enablement of the Holy Spirit, the Christian can flourish "like a Tree planted by streams of water, which yields its fruit in season" (Psalm 1:3 )
Manna -
A sweet exudate, called in Arabic mann or mann es-sama (manna of heaven), which exudes in drops from the Tamarix Mannifera, the tarfa Tree.
A similar substance yielded by other shrubs, or, according to Niebuhr, by a species of oak Tree
Almond - A large, nut-bearing Tree and the nuts it bears. Noted as the first Tree to bloom (January) and for its pretty white or pink blossoms
Cinnamon - ...
Clove-cinnamon, is the bark of a Tree growing in Brazil, which is often substituted for real cloves. ...
White-cinnamon, or Winters bark, is the bark of a Tree, growing in the West Indies, of a sharp biting taste, like pepper
Peck - ) To make, by striking with the beak or a pointed instrument; as, to peck a hole in a Tree. ) To strike with the beak; to thrust the beak into; as, a bird pecks a Tree
Tiller - ) A sprout or young Tree that springs from a root or stump. ) A young timber Tree
Thorn - A Tree or shrub armed with spines or sharp ligneous shoots as the black thorn white thorn, &c. A sharp ligneous or woody shoot from the stem of a Tree or shrub a sharp process from the woody part of a plant a spine
Rod - This word is used sometimes for the branches of a Tree: "And Jacob took him rods of green poplar, and of the hazel and chesnut Tree,"...
Genesis 30:37 ; sometimes for a staff or wand: "And thou shalt take this rod in thine hand, wherewith thou shalt do signs, And Moses took the rod of God in his hand," Exodus 4:17 ; Exodus 4:20 ; or for a shepherd's crook: "And concerning the tithe of the herd, or of the flock, even of whatsoever passeth under the rod; the tenth shall be holy unto the Lord," Leviticus 27:32 ; or for a rod, properly so called, which God makes use of to correct men: "If he commit iniquity, I will chasten him with the rod of men, and with the stripes of the children of men," 2 Samuel 7:14 . This is the rod that budded and blossomed like an almond Tree, Numbers 17
Fig - The saying ‘to sit under one’s own vine and fig Tree’ indicated the enjoyment of long-lasting peace, contentment and prosperity. On the other hand ‘to lay waste one’s vines and fig Trees’ indicated devastation and ruin (1 Kings 4:25; 2 Kings 18:31; Mark 11:12-1447; Joel 1:7; Joel 1:12; Micah 4:4). The cultivation of fig Trees required years of patient labour, and the failure of a harvest was a major calamity (Proverbs 27:18; Luke 13:7; cf. ...
Healthy fig Trees bore fruit for about ten months of the year, though they lost their leaves and grew new ones according to the season (Matthew 24:32). Jesus on one occasion was disappointed when he found that a fig Tree that should have had fruit on it (even though the season for picking the fruit had not yet arrived) had no fruit at all. He saw the fruitless Tree as symbolic of Israel, a nation that was useless to God
Grove - In Genesis 21:33 , a Tree planted in Beersheba by Abraham
Candelabrum - , the Candelabrum of Rheims and the Virgin's Tree of Milan, made in imitation of the candlestick of the Jewish Temple
Borneol - It is said to occur in the camphor Tree of Borneo and Sumatra (Dryobalanops camphora), but the natural borneol is rarely found in European or American commerce, being in great request by the Chinese
Hickory - ) An American Tree of the genus Carya, of which there are several species
Husks - Greek keratia ("horns"), the horn-like pods of the carob Tree, abounding in Syria and Egypt, Ceratonia siliqua (Luke 15:16)
Benzoin - ) A resinous substance, dry and brittle, obtained from the Styrax benzoin, a Tree of Sumatra, Java, etc
Alight - ) To descend and settle, lodge, rest, or stop; as, a flying bird alights on a Tree; snow alights on a roof
Twig - ) A small shoot or branch of a Tree or other plant, of no definite length or size
Peach - ) A well-known high-flavored juicy fruit, containing one or two seeds in a hard almond-like endocarp or stone; also, the Tree which bears it (Prunus, / Amygdalus Persica)
Sycamine Tree - The sycamine is the mulberry Tree (morus ) cultivated for supplying food for the silkworm caterpillars
Roost - ) To sit, rest, or sleep, as fowls on a pole, limb of a Tree, etc
Bush - " ( Exodus 3:2,3,4 ; 33:16) It is quite impossible to say what kind of thorn bush is intended; but it was probably the acacia a small variety of the shittim Tree found in the Sinai region
Olive - The olive Tree grows freely almost everywhere on the shores of the Mediterranean, but it was peculiarly abundant in Palestine. Certain districts may be specified where at various times this Tree been very luxuriant. The cultivation of the olive Tree had the closest connection with the domestic life of the Israelites (2 Chronicles 2:10 ) their trade, (Ezekiel 27:17 ; Hosea 12:1 ) and even their Public ceremonies and religious worship. In Solomon's temple the cherubim were "of olive Tree," (1 Kings 6:23 ) as also the doors, vs. " (Habakkuk 3:17 ) As to the growth of the Tree, it thrives best in warm and sunny situations. In general appearance it resembles the apple Tree; in leaves and sterns, the willow. Olive Trees were so abundant in Galilee that at the siege of Jotapata by Vespasian the Roman army were driven from the ascent of the walls by hot olive oil poured upon them and scalding them underneath their armor
Mulberry Trees - Mulberry Trees. The "going" in the Tree-tops, which was to be the sign that God went out before the host, 2 Samuel 5:23-24, may have been the rustle of these leaves, which are proverbial for then- readiness to tremble before the slightest breeze
Fatness - The gentile believer had become a sharer in the spiritual life and blessing bestowed by Divine covenant upon Abraham and his descendants as set forth under the figure of "the root of (not 'and') the fatness of the olive Tree
Diklah - coast of Arabia; Diklah equates to Dakalah, an important city in the Yemen; it means a fruit-abounding palm Tree
Allon - " The word denotes some remarkable Tree which stood near Zaanannim, and which served as a landmark
Poplar - libneh, "white", (Genesis 30:37 ; Hosea 4:13 ), in all probability the storax Tree (Styrax officinalis) or white poplar, distinguished by its white blossoms and pale leaves
Lurk - See the lurking gold upon the fatal Tree
Pollard - ) A Tree having its top cut off at some height above the ground, that may throw out branches. ) To lop the tops of, as Trees; to poll; as, to pollard willows
Foliage - ) Leaves, collectively, as produced or arranged by nature; leafage; as, a Tree or forest of beautiful foliage
Divaricate - ) Forking and diverging; widely diverging; as the branches of a Tree, or as lines of sculpture, or color markings on animals, etc
Forester - ) A forest Tree
Henna - ) A thorny Tree or shrub of the genus Lawsonia (L
Hemlock - A Tree of the genus Pinus, an evergreen
Absalom - Ambitious to attain the throne, he afterwards plotted against David; pursued by the royal forces, he was caught by his hair to the branches of a Tree and there slain
Thyine-Wood - The Tree grows to the height of 30 feet, or even more, and resembles the cypress in its boughs, leaves, and fruit
Landmark - ) A mark to designate the boundary of land; any , mark or fixed object (as a marked Tree, a stone, a ditch, or a heap of stones) by which the limits of a farm, a town, or other portion of territory may be known and preserved
Pine - In Nehemiah 8:15 , denotes some Tree of a resinous nature
Ebony, - The black is the heart of a Tree called Diospyros ebenum
Aloes, Lign Aloes - This Tree sometimes grows to the height of 120 feet, being 12 feet in girth
Thorn - This word has been interpreted as denoting the Zizyphus spina Christi, or the jujube-tree. It is supposed by some that the crown of thorns placed in wanton cruelty by the Roman soldiers on our Saviour's brow before his crucifixion was plaited of branches of this Tree. It is sometimes called the lotus-tree
Fir (Tree) - The fir Tree is a type of the happy life of a believer. ...
Zechariah 11:2 (b) The comparison here is between the size of the little fir Tree and the great cedar Tree
Oak - The religious veneration paid to this Tree by the original natives of our island in the time of the Druids, is well known to every reader of British history. It should appear that the Patriarch Abraham resided under an oak, or a grove of oaks, which our translators render the plain of Mamre; and that he planted a grove of this Tree, Genesis 13:18 . In fact, since in hot countries nothing is more desirable than shade, nothing more refreshing than the shade of a Tree, we may easily suppose the inhabitants would resort for such enjoyment to...
Where'er the oak's thick branches spread ...
A deeper, darker shade. Jacob buried idolatrous images under an oak, Genesis 35:4 ; and Deborah, Rebekah's nurse, was buried under one of these Trees, Genesis 35:8
Sycamore or Sycamine - Luke 17:6 , a curious Tree, which seems to partake of the nature of both the mulberry and the fig, the former in its leaf, and the latter in its fruit. It was upon a Tree of this sort that Zaccheus got up, to see our Savior pass through Jericho, Luke 19:4 . This sycamore is of the height of a beech, and bears its fruit in a manner quite different from other Trees. The Tree is always green, and bears fruit several times in the year, for I have seen some sycamores which had fruit has the figure and smell of real figs, but is inferior to them in the taste, having a disgustful sweetness. This sort of Tree is pretty common in Egypt. " ...
The sycamore has a very large trunk, which breaks up onto five or six stout branches not many feet above the ground; it is planted by the roadside, and often where two ways meet; and sends its enormous roots deeply into the ground in every direction, so that few Trees can compare with it in steadfast firmness. From 1 Kings 10:27 1 Chronicles 27:28 2 Chronicles 1:15 , it is evident that this Tree was quite common it Palestine, as well as in Egypt; and from its being joined with the vines in Psalm 78:47 , as well as from the circumstance of David's appointing a particular officer to superintend the plantations of them, it seems to have been as much valued in ancient as in modern times
Cedar - A noble evergreen-tree greatly celebrated in the Scriptures, Psalm 92:12 Ezekiel 31:3-6 . These Trees are remarkably thick and tall; some among them are from thirty-five to forty feet in girth, and ninety feet in height. The cedar-tree shoots out branches at ten of twelve feet from the ground, large and almost horizontal; its leaves are an inch long, slender and straight, growing in tufts. The Tree bears a small cone, like that of the pine. This celebrated Tree is not peculiar to mount Lebanon, but grows also upon mounts Amanus and Taurus in Asia Minor, and in other parts of the Levant, but does not elsewhere reach the size and height of those on Lebanon. Every thing about this Tree has a strong balsamic odor; and hence the whole grove is so pleasant and fragrant, that it is delightful to walk in it, Song of Song of Solomon 4:11 Hosea 14:6 . ...
Of the forests of cedars which once covered Lebanon, comparatively few are now left, Isaiah 2:13 10:19 ; though there are still many scattered Trees in various parts, resembling the genuine cedar. The largest and most ancient Trees, generally thought to be the only ones, are found in a grove, lying a little off from the road which crosses mount Lebanon from Baalbek to Tripole, at some distance below the summit of the mountain on the western side, at the foot indeed of the highest summit or ridge of Lebanon. This grove consists of a few very old Trees, perhaps as old as the time of Christ, intermingled with 400 or 500 younger ones
Earnest of the Spirit: the Pledge of Heaven - In the early times when land was sold, the owner cut a turf from the greensward and cast it into the cap of the purchase as a token that it was his; or he tore off the branch of a Tree and put it into the new owner's hand to show that he was entitled to all the products of the soil; and when the purchaser of a house received seizing or possession, the key of the door or a bundle of thatch plucked from the roof; signified that the building was yielded up to him. The Spirit's work of comfort and sanctification is a part of heaven's covenant blessings, a turf from the soil of Canaan, a twig from the Tree of life, the key to mansions in the skies
Myrrh - The Balsamodendron myrrha, of the natural order Terebinthaceæ, is the Tree found in Arabia and Africa, from which myrrh is chiefly procured. The best was that which flowed spontaneously from the Tree
Leaf, Leaves - The foliage of plants or Trees. God's providential care for the righteous is pictured by the image of a well-watered Tree whose leaves do not wither (Psalm 1:3 ; compare Jeremiah 17:8 ). Ezekiel's vision of the new Jerusalem included Trees whose leaves never wither and whose leaves have healing power (Ezekiel 47:12 ; compare Revelation 22:2 ). A Tree lacking fruit with withered leaves (Jeremiah 8:13 ) symbolizes a people found lacking when God judges (compare Matthew 21:19 ; Mark 11:13 )
Dragon - These prolongations aid them in making long leaps from Tree to Tree
Fork - ) The place where a division or a union occurs; the angle or opening between two branches or limbs; as, the fork of a river, a Tree, or a road. ) To divide into two or more branches; as, a road, a Tree, or a stream forks
Hollow - ) Having an empty space or cavity, natural or artificial, within a solid substance; not solid; excavated in the interior; as, a hollow Tree; a hollow sphere. ) A cavity, natural or artificial; an unfilled space within anything; a hole, a cavern; an excavation; as the hollow of the hand or of a Tree
Hollow - Containing an empty space, natural or artificial, within a solid substance not solid as a hollow Tree a hollow rock a hollow sphere. A place excavated as the hollow of a Tree. ...
Trees rudely hollowed did the waves sustain
Olive - ) A Tree (Olea Europaea) with small oblong or elliptical leaves, axillary clusters of flowers, and oval, one-seeded drupes. The Tree has been cultivated for its fruit for thousands of years, and its branches are the emblems of peace
Lime - ) The linden Tree. ) A fruit allied to the lemon, but much smaller; also, the Tree which bears it
Setim-Wood - It is the wood of the shittah-tree (Isaiah 41; cf. The seyal is a gnarled and thorny Tree, flourishing in the driest situations and scattered more or less abundantly over the whole of the Sinaitic peninsula, and in the ravines which open on the Dead Sea, forming quite a characteristic feature of the desert landscape
Shittim-Wood - It is the wood of the shittah-tree (Isaiah 41; cf. The seyal is a gnarled and thorny Tree, flourishing in the driest situations and scattered more or less abundantly over the whole of the Sinaitic peninsula, and in the ravines which open on the Dead Sea, forming quite a characteristic feature of the desert landscape
Grafting - γράφειν, ‘to write,’ and means a slip of a cultivated Tree inserted into a wild one, so called because of its resemblance to a pencil. Jeremiah 11:16) in likening Israel to an olive Tree (cf. The olive, like most fruit Trees, requires a graft from a cultivated Tree if the fruit is to be of any value. A graft from a wild Tree inserted into a cultivated stock would of course be useless, and such a process is never performed; hence the point of St
Sycamine - sykaminos is, strictly speaking, the black mulberry ( Morus nigra the tût shâmî of the Syrians), and it is probably this Tree that is referred to in Luke 17:6 and in 1Ma 6:34
Pine Tree - tidhar, mentioned along with the fir-tree in Isaiah 41:19 ; 60:13
Bdellium - It was probably an aromatic gum like balsam which exuded from a particular Tree (Borassus flabelliformis) still found in Arabia, Media, and India
Mustard Seed - It takes only two texts, less than 70 words, to tell how the seed, least of all seeds, "becometh a Tree, so that the birds of the air corne, and dwell in the branches thereof
Filler - ) Any standing Tree or standard higher than the surrounding coppice in the form of forest known as coppice under standards
Ax - Tool or weapon generally with wooden handle and edged metal head, in art associated with ...
Saint Bartholomew, Apostle, probably by analogy for knife with which he was slain; ...
Saint Boniface, who used it to cut down a Tree dedicated to Thor; ...
Saint Matthew, Apostle, by analogy for sword with which possibly he was killed; ...
Saint Matthew of Beauvais, beheaded; ...
Saint Olaf of Norway, who carried an ax in battle
Allspice - ) The berry of the pimento (Eugenia pimenta), a Tree of the West Indies; a spice of a mildly pungent taste, and agreeably aromatic; Jamaica pepper; pimento
Alactin - ) A white waxy substance found in the sap of the South American cow Tree (Galactodendron)
Forcing - Causing to ripen before the natural season, as fruit or causing to produce ripe fruit prematurely, as a Tree
Abroad - ) At large; widely; broadly; over a wide space; as, a Tree spreads its branches abroad
Litchi - ) A genus of East Indian sapindaceous Trees consisting of a single species (Litchi Chinensis, syn. ) The fruit of a Tree native to China (Nephelium Litchi)
Seed, Mustard - It takes only two texts, less than 70 words, to tell how the seed, least of all seeds, "becometh a Tree, so that the birds of the air corne, and dwell in the branches thereof
Frankincense (2) - It is a fragrant gum or resin, the produce of the Tree Serrata, of the natural order Amyridaceae, from which it is obtained by slitting the bark. The Tree itself is a native of Central and Southern India, whence the gum, which requires no further preparation than being allowed to harden, is exported to Europe, the yellowish or inferior quality in larger quantities than the white. It seems clear that no such Tree existed in Palestine, but that the frankincense used there was imported through Arabia (cf
Curse, the - Thorns and briers were the proof of a curse, Isaiah 32:13 ; but a time is coming when "instead of the thorn shall come up the fir Tree, and instead of the brier shall come up the myrtle Tree. In a higher sense Christ has redeemed Jewish believers from the curse of the law, being made a curse for them, for cursed is every one that hangeth upon a Tree
Honey - Wild bee honey was often found in hollow Trees and clefts in the rocks, Deuteronomy 32:13 Psalm 81:16 ; and on this John the Baptist fed, Matthew 3:4 . It was described to him as a juice dropping from the leaves and twigs of a Tree called Gharrab, of the size of an olive Tree, with leaves like those of the popular, but somewhat broader. The honey collects on the leaves like dew, and is gathered from them, or from the ground under the Tree
Olive Tree - The church is compared to an olive Tree upon many occasions, (Jeremiah 11:16; Psalms 52:8) —and the young converts in Zion to olive branches. (Psalms 128:3) And Paul in a beautiful figure, represents the state of conversion from nature to grace by the change from the olive Tree which is wild, by nature, to that of a true olive Tree, which is planted by grace
Sycamore - שקמות , שקמים , 1 Kings 10:27 ; 1 Chronicles 27:28 ; 2 Chronicles 1:15 ; Psalms 78:47 ; Isaiah 9:9 ; Amos 8:14 ; συκομορεα , Luke 19:4 ; a large Tree, according to the description of Theophrastus, Dioscorides, and Galen, resembling the mulberry-tree in the leaf, and the fig in its fruit; hence its name, compounded of συκεν , fig, and μορος , mulberry; and some have fancied that it was originally produced by ingrafting the one Tree upon the other. The Trees are very common in Palestine, Arabia, and Egypt; grow large, and to a great height; and though their grain is coarse, are much used in building. " The wood of this Tree is very durable. From its value in furnishing wood for various uses, from the grateful shade which its wide-spreading branches afforded, and on account of the fruit, which Mallet says the Egyptians hold in the highest estimation, we perceive the loss which the ancient inhabitants of Egypt must have felt when their vines were destroyed with hail, and their sycamore Trees with frost," Psalms 78:47 . Norden, "is of the height of a beech, and bears its fruit in a manner quite different from other Trees; it has them on the trunk itself, which shoots out little sprigs, in form of grape stalks, at the end of which grow the fruit close to one another, almost like clusters of grapes. The Tree is always green, and bears fruit several times in the year, without observing any certain seasons; for I have seen some sycamores that have given fruit two months after others. This sort of Tree is pretty common in Egypt; the people, for the greater part, live upon its fruit, and think themselves well regaled when they have a piece of bread, a couple of sycamore figs, and a pitcher of water. " There might be many of these Trees in Judea. David appointed a particular officer, whose sole duty it was to watch over the plantations of sycamore and olive-trees, 1 Chronicles 28:28; and being joined with the olive, the high estimation in which it was held is intimated; for the olive is considered as one of the most precious gifts which the God of nature has bestowed on the oriental nations. " As the sycamore is a large spreading Tree, sometimes shooting up to a considerable height, we see the reason why Zaccheus climbed up into a sycamore Tree to get a sight of our Saviour. This incident also furnishes a proof that the sycamore was still common in Palestine; for this Tree stood to protect the traveller by the side of the highway
Palm - The palm Tree gives shade and fruit, and hence is emblematic of God's protection and grace
Fig - 1: σῦκον (Strong's #4810 — Noun Neuter — sukon — soo'-kon ) denotes "the ripe fruit of a suke, a fig-tree" (see below; cp
Cypress - A large, coniferous, evergreen Tree; the wood very durable, hard, and fragrant
Myrrh - It is imported from Egypt, but chiefly from the southern or eastern parts of Arabia from what species of Tree or plant it is procured, is unknown
Marah - There was at Marah a spring of bitter water, sweetened subsequently by the casting in of a Tree which "the Lord showed" to Moses
Marah - God answered the leader's prayer by telling him to cast a Tree into the water which became sweet and drinkable
Fray - verb is found in Zechariah 1:21 and 1Ma 14:12 (‘every man sat under his vine and his fig Tree, and there was none to fray them’); and ‘fray away’ occurs in Deuteronomy 28:26 , Jeremiah 7:33 , Sir 22:20 (‘whoso casteth a stone at the birds frayeth them away’)
Poplar, - The poplar affords a grateful shade from the heat of the sun and was therefore one of the Trees chosen under which the Israelites burnt incense. Some judge the Hebrew word libneh to refer to the 'storax Tree' (the styrax officinale ) which also grows in Palestine
Cinnamon - The cinnamon of the present day is the inner bark of an aromatic Tree called canella zeylanica
Landmark - A mark to designate the boundary of land any mark or fixed object as a marked Tree, a stone, a ditch, or a heap of stones, by which the limits of a farm, a town or other portion of territory may be known and preserved
Cinnamon - Cinnamon comes from the bark of a large Tree belonging to the laurel family
Palm - ...
(tree)...
Exodus 15:27 (c) The seventy Trees probably represent the seventy descendants of Jacob who came with Jacob into Egypt ( Genesis 46:27). These Trees were in association with the twelve wells of water, and this is to teach us that the Word of GOD and the Spirit of GOD will sustain the people of GOD on their journey to their Homeland. ...
1 Kings 6:29 (b) This Tree is usually a type of the individual Christian life. The Tree grows in the desert in very unhappy surroundings and unfavorable conditions. The Tree sends its roots down quite a long way to find an underground supply of water. Solomon had these palm Trees carved in the wood of the temple to ever remind Israel that each one individually was to be responsible for his own individual Christian life. ...
Psalm 92:12 (b) The palm Tree in this passage is a type of the life that GOD expects from the Christian. He should, however, if it is possible, associate with other believers, for the cedar Trees grow in forests, each one helping the other
Balm - ...
This word occurs in the Authorized Version (Genesis 37:25 ; 43:11 ; Jeremiah 8:22 ; 46:11 ; 51:8 ; Ezekiel 27:17 ) as the rendering of the Hebrew word Tsori_ or _tseri , which denotes the gum of a Tree growing in Gilead (q. There is an Arab tradition that the Tree yielding this balm was brought by the queen of Sheba as a present to Solomon, and that he planted it in his gardens at Jericho
Palm Tree - " The finest specimens of this Tree grew at Jericho (Deuteronomy 34:3 ) and Engedi and along the banks of the Jordan. Branches of the palm Tree were carried at the feast of Tabernacles (Leviticus 23:40 )
Apple - It is enumerated among the most valuable Trees of Palestine (Joel 1:12 ), and frequently referred to in Canticles, and noted for its beauty (2:3,5; 8:5). There is nothing to show that it was the "tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Tristram has suggested that the apricot has better claims than any other fruit-tree to be the apple of Scripture
Trees - The two kinds of Tree most often mentioned in the Bible are the fruit bearing Trees, the fig and the olive (Deuteronomy 8:8; Mark 11:1; Mark 11:3; see FIG; OLIVE). The Tree most valued for making buildings and furniture was the cedar. ...
Among the other Trees mentioned in the Bible are algum (2 Chronicles 2:8; 2 Chronicles 9:10), cypress (2 Chronicles 2:8), plane (Isaiah 60:13), myrtle (Isaiah 41:19; Nehemiah 8:15), balsam (2 Samuel 5:23), oak (Judges 6:11; 2 Samuel 18:9), willow (Job 40:22; Psalms 137:2), sycamine (Luke 17:6), broom (1 Kings 19:4), lotus (Job 40:22) and palm (Exodus 15:27; Psalms 92:12)
Frankincense, - It is obtained by successive incisions in the bark of a Tree called Arbor thuris . There can be little doubt that the Tree which produces the Indian frankincense is the Boswellia serrata of Roxburgh, or Boswellia thurifera of Colebrooke, and bears some resemblance when young to the mountain ash
Ashtoreth - Ashtoreh is the goddess, asherah "the grove," the image or the symbol of the goddess, of wood; asher , yashar , "to be straight," a straight stem of a Tree living, or fixed upright (1 Kings 18:19; 2 Kings 21:7; 2 Kings 23:6; 2 Kings 23:13-14; 2 Kings 23:15; Judges 6:25; Judges 6:30). The stone pillar was the symbol of Baal, as the sacred Tree was the symbol of Ashtoreh; stone marking his strength as the male, the Tree her fruitfulness (Deuteronomy 16:21). The sacred Tree constantly accompanies the gods in the Assyrian monuments
Palm Tree - PALM Tree ( tâmâr ). The date palm ( Phœnix dactylifera ) is a Tree essential to existence in the deserts of Arabia, and was therefore held sacred among the Semites from the earliest historic times. 2 3), Jericho is famous for its vast groves of palms; to-day there are but few, and these quite modern Trees. The palm Tree is referred to ( Psalms 92:12 ) as a sign of prosperity and ( Song of Solomon 7:7-8 ) of beauty. Figures of palm Trees were used to ornament the Temple ( 1 Kings 6:1-38 ); at a later period they occur on Jewish coins and in the sculpture of the ancient Jewish synagogues, notably in the recently excavated synagogue at Tell Hûm (Capernaum). The sacredness of this Tree thus persisted from the early Semite to late Jewish times
Luz - A nut-bearing Tree, the almond
Stacte - Others regard it as the gum of the storax Tree, or rather shrub, the Styrax officinale
Vine of Sodom - Among the many conjectures as to this Tree, the most probable is that it is the 'osher of the Arabs, which abounds in the region of the Dead Sea
Luz - (luhz) Place name meaning “almond Tree
Bdellium - Bdellium is the fragrant yellow resin of the Tree Balsamodendron mukul , growing in N
Beam - A Tree roughly trimmed serving as support of the flat roof of an Eastern house ( 2 Kings 6:2 ; 2 Kings 6:5 , Ezra 6:11 RV Coma - ) A tuft or bunch, - as the assemblage of branches forming the head of a Tree; or a cluster of bracts when empty and terminating the inflorescence of a plant; or a tuft of long hairs on certain seeds
Scrabble - ) To scrape, paw, or scratch with the hands; to proceed by clawing with the hands and feet; to scramble; as, to scrabble up a cliff or a Tree
Marah - One of the early stations of the Israelites, so called because the waters there were bitter, but which were made sweet by casting in a Tree
Rubiaceous - Among them are the coffee Tree, the Trees yielding peruvian bark and quinine, the madder, the quaker ladies, and the Trees bearing the edible fruits called genipap and Sierre Leone peach, besides many plants noted for the beauty or the fragrance of their blossoms
Ruthwell Cross - A portion of Cynewulf's poem, Dream of the Rood, in which the Tree of the Cross is conceived of as telling its own story, is engraved upon it, and is said to be the earliest piece of written English extant
Waver - A name given to a sapling or young timber Tree in England
Branch - ...
Isaiah 4:2 (a) The prosperity of Israel in the day of the Lord is compared to the beautiful growth and rich fruit of the branch of a fruit Tree. ...
Isaiah 11:1 (a) The Lord JESUS is compared to a branch of the Tree, and Jesse is the trunk of the Tree, for Jesse was in the direct line of CHRIST, one of His ancestors. The Tree is largely gone, and only a small branch remains. The Lord will plant that branch so that it may become a Tree again. ...
Jeremiah 23:5 (b) Again CHRIST Himself is compared to a branch, David being the Tree, and the Lord JESUS springing out of the line of David. This branch has all the characteristics of the Tree (the Father) in being perfectly sinless, perfectly righteous in every thought, word and deed. GOD Himself is the Tree and the Lord JESUS is the branch. It is beautifully illustrated in the picture of the branch and the Tree
Path - 1: τρίβος (Strong's #5147 — Noun Feminine — tribos — Tree'-bos ) "a beaten track" (akin to tribo, "to rub, wear down"), "a path," is used in Matthew 3:3 ; Mark 1:3 ; Luke 3:4
Cork - ) The outer layer of the bark of the cork Tree (Quercus Suber), of which stoppers for bottles and casks are made
Adansonia - ) A genus of great Trees related to the Bombax. Gregorii, the sour gourd or cream-of-tartar Tree of Australia
Apple - The fruit of the apple Tree, pyrus malus, from which cider is made
Bark - The rind or exterior covering of a Tree, corresponding to the skin of an animal
Brazil Wood - The best is the heartwood of Caesalpinia echinata, a leguminous Tree; but other Trees also yield it
Bard - ) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a Tree; the rind
Bdellium - Some believe this bdellium was a precious stone; some think it of vegetable origin, a kind of gum exuding from a Tree
Luz - Luz (lŭz), almond Tree
Cinnamon - It is the inner bark of a Tree growing about twenty feet high, and being peeled off in thin strips curls as it is found in market
Wood - A large and thick collection of Trees a forest. The substance of Trees the hard substance which composes the body of a Tree and its branches, and which is covered by the bark. Trees cut or sawed for the fire
Sycomore - —The sycomore Tree (συκομορέα, Luke 19:4 only), of which mention is made in the story of Zacchaeus, is the Ficus sycomorus. συκάμινος, though that denotes a quite different Tree (see Sycamine). The Tree is very easily climbed, and its lower branches are a favourite perch for children
Apple - It is true that the Tree in size and foliage would answer to the reference in Song of Solomon 8:5 , Joel 1:12 ; the fruit too in its sweetness ( Song of Solomon 2:3 ) and its smell ( Song of Solomon 7:8 ) is very appropriate. The Tree is one of the most beautiful in the land, and when loaded with its golden fruit might well suggest the expression ‘apples of gold in pictures of silver’ ( Proverbs 25:11 ). Unfortunately there is considerable doubt whether this Tree, a native of China, was known in Palestine much before the Christian era
Cedar - The cedar is a large and noble evergreen Tree. The Tree is much celebrated in Scripture. But the travellers who have visited the place within these two or three centuries, and who describe Trees of vast size, inform us that their number is diminished greatly; so that, as Isaiah says, "a child may number them," Isaiah 10:19 . The Tree bears a small cone like that of the pine
Mustard - is mentioned in (Matthew 13:31 ; 17:20 ; Mark 4:31 ; Luke 13:19 ; 17:6 ) It is generally agreed that the mustard Tree of Scripture is the black mustard (Sinapis nigru ). The objection commonly made against any sinapis being the plant of the parable is that the reed grew into "a Tree," in which the fowls of the air are said to come and lodge. It is an error, for which the language of Scripture is not accountable, to assert that the passage implies that birds "built their nests" in the Tree: the Greek word has no such meaning; the word merely means "to settle or rest upon" anything for a longer or shorter time; nor is there any occasion to suppose that the expression "fowls of the air" denotes any other than the smaller insessorial kinds--linnets, finches, etc
Grove - In 1 Samuel 22:6,31:13 the Authorized Version renders this word by "tree. " In all these passages the Revised Version renders by "tamarisk Tree
Providence: Rightly Places us - The fish of the sea might say, 'How could I display the wisdom of God if I could sing, or mount a Tree, like a bird;' but a dolphin in a Tree would be a very grotesque affair, and there would be no wisdom of God to admire in trouts singing in the groves; but when the fish cuts the wave with agile fin, all who have observed it say how wonderfully it is adapted to its habitat, how exactly its every bone is fitted for its mode of life
Lodge - The Tree with its many branches represents an unnatural growth in which wicked spirits feel at home in the various divisions of the great apostate religious world. The mustard seed never should produce a Tree
Sycamore - ) The size of a walnut Tree; the leaves heart shaped, downy underneath and fragrant; the fruit growing in clusters on little sprigs from the trunk. The Tree is always green, and bears fruit often throughout the year, so that it is of much value to the poor. The destruction of sycamore Trees by hailstones was among Egypt's heavy losses (margin Psalms 78:47). David had an overseer over his sycamore Trees (1 Chronicles 26:28; compare also 1 Kings 10:27)
Palm, Palm Tree, - This is a lofty Tree without lateral branches, witha large tuft of leafy branches clustering at the top several feet long. There were many representations of palm-trees in the decorations of the temple, as there will also be in the future temple. The palm-tree is used as an emblem of fertility in Psalm 92:12 ; some Trees will bear yearly more than a hundred-weight of dates and for a period of about seventy years. ...
CITY OF PALM-TREES
Creeper - ) A plant that clings by rootlets, or by tendrils, to the ground, or to Trees, etc. ) A spurlike device strapped to the boot, which enables one to climb a Tree or pole; - called often telegraph creepers. Americana) inhabits America; - called also Tree creeper and creeptree
Timber - ) That sort of wood which is proper for buildings or for tools, utensils, furniture, carriages, fences, ships, and the like; - usually said of felled Trees, but sometimes of those standing. ) To light on a Tree. ) The body, stem, or trunk of a Tree
the - The fig Tree putteth forth her green figs the almond Tree shall flourish the grasshopper shall be a burden
Camphor - ) A gum resembling ordinary camphor, obtained from a Tree (Dryobalanops camphora) growing in Sumatra and Borneo; - called also Malay camphor, camphor of Borneo, or borneol
Heart: Must be Renewed - A man may beat down the bitter fruit from an evil Tree until he is weary; whilst the root abides in strength and vigor, the beating down of the present fruit will not hinder it from bringing forth more
Caoutchouc - the euphorbiaceous Tree Siphonia elastica or Hevea caoutchouc), Asia, and Africa
Caper - ) A plant of the genus Capparis; - called also caper bush, caper Tree
Willow - A Tree usually found where water is plentiful, particularly along the Jordan River. In Babylonian captivity the Jews hung their harps on willow Trees because they did not feel like singing about Jerusalem in a foreign land (Psalm 137:1-4 )
Obscene Object - Some recent interpreters have suggested a stylized palm Tree as a symbol of fertility
Fir, Fir-Tree, - It will be produced instead of the thornin the millennium, and Israel, when she returns in blessing, will say, "I am like a green fir-tree
Cassia - It is the inner bark of a Tree resembling the cinnamon (q
Gallows - The word is ets, frequently translated 'tree' and 'wood,' and gives no idea of the form of the gallows
Aloes, Lign-Aloes - The passages where aloes are mentioned clearly show that it was a highly odoriferous Tree or wood, but it cannot be identified with certainty
Maple - ) A Tree of the genus Acer, including about fifty species
Isa'Iah, - Rabbinical tradition says that Isaiah, when 90 years old, was sawn asunder in the trunk of a carob Tree by order of Manasseh, to which it is supposed that reference is made in (Hebrews 11:37 )
Mamre - He gave his name to the town where he dwelt, afterwards Hebron, in the suburbs of which was a large terebinth-tree, or grove, (see Genesis 13:18 18:1
Pillar, Plain of the - The ‘pillar’ refers to the sacred stone, originally a fetish, which was often found in holy places along with the sacred Tree (see preced
Willing - No spouts of blood run wiling from a Tree
Fall - It tells how the first man and woman, living in childlike innocence and happiness in the Garden of Eden, were tempted by the subtle serpent to doubt the goodness of their Creator, and aim at the possession of forbidden knowledge by tasting the fruit of the one Tree of which they had been expressly charged not to eat. Finally, lest the man should use his newly-acquired insight to secure the boon of immortality by partaking of the Tree of life, he was expelled from the garden, which appears to be conceived as still existing, though barred to human approach by the cherubim and the flaming sword. The chief difficulty arises in connexion with the two Trees on which the destiny of mankind is made to turn. In Genesis 2:9 the Tree of life and the Tree of the knowledge of good and evil grow together in the midst of the garden; in Genesis 2:17 the second alone is made the test of man’s obedience. 3 (down to Genesis 2:22 ) knows of only one central Tree, and that obviously (though it is never so named) the Tree of knowledge. The Tree of life plays no real part in the story except in Genesis 3:22 ; Genesis 3:24 ; and its introduction there creates embarrassment; for if this Tree also was forbidden, the writer’s silence regarding the prohibition is inexplicable, and if it was not forbidden, can we suppose that the Divine prerogative of immortality was placed within man’s reach during the period of his probation? The hypothesis of a twofold recension of the Paradise story, while relieving this difficulty, would be of interest as showing that the narrative had undergone a development in Hebrew literature; but it does not materially aid the exegesis of the passage. The main narrative, which is complete, is that which speaks of the Tree of knowledge; the other, if it be present at all, is too fragmentary to throw light on the fundamental ideas embodied in the story. It is true that no complete Babylonian parallel has yet been discovered; the utmost that can be claimed is that particular elements or motives of the Biblical story seem to be reflected in some of the Babylonian legends, and still more in the religious symbolism displayed on the monuments (tree of life, serpent, cherubim, etc. To eat of the Tree would make man like God, knowing good and evil; and God does not wish man to be like Himself. ...
(3) What, then, is meant by the ‘knowledge of good and evil,’ which was acquired by eating of the Tree? Does it mean simply an enlargement of experience such as the transition from childhood to maturity naturally brings with it, and of which the feeling of shame (Genesis 3:7 ) is the significant index? Or is it, as has generally been held, the experimental knowledge of moral distinctions, the awaking of the conscience, the faculty of discerning between right and wrong? It is very difficult to say which of these interpretations expresses the thought in the mind of the writer. On the other hand, there is nothing to show that it refers to the moral sense; and the fact that neither of the ways in which the newly acquired faculty manifests itself (the perception of sex, and insight into the mystic virtue of the Tree of life, Genesis 3:22 ) is a distinctively ethical cognition, rather favours the opinion that the knowledge referred to is the power to discern the secret meanings of things and utilize them for human ends, regardless of the will and purpose of God the knowledge, in short, which is the principle of a godless civilization
Handsome - ) Agreeable to the eye or to correct taste; having a pleasing appearance or expression; attractive; having symmetry and dignity; comely; - expressing more than pretty, and less than beautiful; as, a handsome man or woman; a handsome garment, house, Tree, horse
Hoham - He was one of five kings shut in cave, used to show Israel's superiority over the kings by the symbol of Israel's captains putting their feet on the kings' necks, and then killed and hung on a Tree (Joshua 10:15-26 )
Chrism, Holy - It is olive oil in which a small quantity of balm or balsam has been mixed; this is a perfumed resin from the terebinth Tree and other oriental and tropical plants
Clove - ) A very pungent aromatic spice, the unexpanded flower bud of the clove Tree (Eugenia, / Caryophullus, aromatica), a native of the Molucca Isles
Zaccheus - Because of his short stature he had to climb a Tree to catch a glimpse of the Lord
Holy Chrism - It is olive oil in which a small quantity of balm or balsam has been mixed; this is a perfumed resin from the terebinth Tree and other oriental and tropical plants
Plash - ) The branch of a Tree partly cut or bent, and bound to, or intertwined with, other branches
Girdle - In America, to make a circular incision, like a belt, through the bark and alburnum of a Tree to kill it
Glutton - It is a carnivorous animal, and in order to catch its prey, it climbs a Tree and from that darts down upon a deer or other animal
Herb - A plant or vegetable with a soft or succulent stalk or stem, which dies to the root every year, and is thus distinguished from a Tree and a shrub, which have ligneous or hard woody stems
Vine of Sodom - Many suggestions have been made as to what Tree this refers to
Accursed - In the Jewish idiom, accursed and crucified were synonymous among them, every one was accounted accursed who died on a Tree
When - ) While; whereas; although; - used in the manner of a conjunction to introduce a dependent adverbial sentence or clause, having a causal, conditional, or adversative relation to the principal proposition; as, he chose to turn highwayman when he might have continued an honest man; he removed the Tree when it was the best in the grounds
Tea - ) The prepared leaves of a shrub, or small Tree (Thea, / Camellia, Chinensis)
Deborah - a prophetess, wife of Lapidoth, judged the Israelites, and dwelt under a palm Tree between Ramah and Bethel, Judges 4:4-5
Algum - It is probable that this Tree is the red sandle wood, which is a native of India and Ceylon
Censer - ...
2: λιβανωτός (Strong's #3031 — Noun Masculine — libanotos — lib-an-o-tos' ) denotes "frankincense," the gum of the libanos, "the frankincense Tree;" in a secondary sense, "a vessel in which to burn incense," Revelation 8:3,5
Kangaroo - The Tree kangaroos, belonging to the genus Dendrolagus, live in Trees; the rock kangaroos, of the genus Petrogale, inhabit rocky situations; and the brush kangaroos, of the genus Halmaturus, inhabit wooded districts
Lid - ) The top of an ovary which opens transversely, as in the fruit of the purslane and the Tree which yields Brazil nuts
Frankincense - It is obtained by successive incisions in the bark of a Tree called Arbor thuris
Zin - Zin (zĭn), a low palm Tree
Stacte - Some think the gum called storax is intended; but it is generally understood to be the purest king of myrrh; and as the Hebrew properly signifies a drop, it would seem to refer to myrrh as distilling, dropping form the Tree of its own accord, without incision. So Pliny, speaking of the Trees whence myrrh is produced, says, "Before any incision is made, they exude of their own accord what is called Stacte, to which no kind of myrrh is preferable
Rod - An offshoot from the trunk of a Tree, Genesis 30:37 Isaiah 11:1 Ezekiel 37:15-22
Mustard - Others suppose a Tree is meant, called Salvadora Persica
Young - Being in the first part of growth as a young plant a young Tree
ma'Rah - (bitterness ), a place which lay in the wilderness of Shur or Etham, three days journey distant, ( Exodus 15:23 ; Numbers 33:8 ) from the place at which the Israelites crossed the Red Sea, and where was a spring of bitter water, sweetened subsequently by the casting in of a Tree which "the Lord showed" to Moses
Spice, Spices - In the other places, with the exception perhaps of (Song of Solomon 1:13 ; 6:2 ) the words refer more generally to sweet aromatic odors, the principal of which was that of the balsam or balm of Gilead; the Tree which yields this substance is now generally admitted to be the Balsam-odendron opobalsamum . The balm of Gilead Tree grows in some parts of Arabia and Africa, and is seldom more than fifteen feet high, with straggling branches and scanty foliage
Reen - When they were free to read the Scriptures and to worship in their temple (all of which is compared to a green Tree), what would they be like when they had no temple, and their enemies came in like a flood, and they had no Scriptures from which to read. This time is compared to the season of a dry Tree
Palm - ) Any endogenous Tree of the order Palmae or Palmaceae; a palm Tree
Board - It was once a Tree in the woods and of no value as a dwelling place for GOD. The Tree had to die
Spices - ) The balm of Gilead Tree is not more than 15 ft. ...
The nekoth , "spicery" Genesis 37:25, is the storax or gum of the styrax Tree (Speaker's Commentary)
Crush - To overwhelm by pressure to beat or force down, by an incumbent weight, with breaking or bruising as, the man was crushed by the fall of a Tree. A violent collision, or rushing together, which breaks or bruises the bodies or a fall that breaks or bruises into a confused mass as the crush of a large Tree, or of a building
Pine Tree - Nehemiah 8:15 , giving directions for observing the feast of tabernacles, says, "Fetch olive branches, pine branches, myrtle branches, and branches of thick Trees, to make booths. In Isaiah 41:19 ; Isaiah 60:13 , the Hebrew word is תדהר ; a Tree, says Parkhurst, so called from the springiness or elasticity of its wood. Luther thought it the elm, which is a lofty and spreading Tree; and Dr
Palm - The name of many species of plants, but particularly of the date-tree or great palm, a native of Asia and Africa. The palm was adopted as an emblem of victory, it is said, because the Tree is so elastic as when pressed, to rise and recover its correct position
Pomegranate - Tree and fruit ( Exodus 28:33 f. The pomegranate ( Punica granatum ) is one of the familiar fruit Trees of the OT; it is usually a shrub, hut may attain the height of a Tree ( 1 Samuel 14:2 ); it was much admired for its beauty ( Song of Solomon 4:3 ; Song of Solomon 6:11 ), and its flower was copied in ornamentation ( Exodus 28:33 , 1 Kings 7:13 ). Its dark green leaves and brilliant scarlet blossom make it a peculiarly attractive object, especially when growing in orchards ( Song of Solomon 4:13 ), mixed with Trees of other shades of green; its buds develop with the tender grapes ( Song of Solomon 7:12 ), and the round, reddish fruit, with its hrilliant crimson, juicy seeds, ripens at the time of the vintage
Timber - We apply the word to standing Trees which are suitable for the uses above mentioned, as a forest contains excellent timber or to the beams, rafters, scantling, boards, planks, &c. hewed or sawed from such Trees. Of all the species of Trees useful as timber, in our climate, the white oak and the white pine hold the first place in importance. The body or stem of a Tree. ...
TIM'BER, To light on a Tree
Olive - ...
The old olive sends out young suckers which spring up round the parent Tree, and which in after ages, when the parent's strength fails, shelter it on every side from the blast. It is the characteristic Tree of Judea on Roman coins, Deuteronomy 8:8. The two witnesses for God (antitypes to Elijah and Moses, Zerubbabel and Joshua, the civil ruler and the priest: Malachi 4:5-6; Matthew 17:11; Acts 3:21; Judges 1:6) are "the two olive Trees," channels of the oil (the Holy Spirit in them) feeding the church (Revelation 11:3-4; Zechariah 4:11-12). The Tree was shaken to get the remnant left after the general gathering (by "beating," Deuteronomy 24:20), Isaiah 24:13; image of Israel's "remnant according to the election of grace. The Tree poetically is made to cast off its own blossom, to mark that the sinner brings on his own ruin (Isaiah 3:11; Jeremiah 6:19)
Adam - ...
Adam and Eve were permitted to eat of all the Trees of the garden except the Tree of the knowledge of good and evil: of the which if they ate, in the same day they should die. Eve, being beguiled by Satan, ate of that Tree; and at her suggestion, though not deceived as Eve was, Adam also took of it. When questioned by God, Adam laid the blame on Eve, ungratefully saying, "the woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the Tree, and I did eat. They were driven from the garden, and Cherubim with a flaming sword prevented them re-entering, lest they should eat of the Tree of life and live for ever in their sin
Adam - ...
Adam and Eve were permitted to eat of all the Trees of the garden except the Tree of the knowledge of good and evil: of the which if they ate, in the same day they should die. Eve, being beguiled by Satan, ate of that Tree; and at her suggestion, though not deceived as Eve was, Adam also took of it. When questioned by God, Adam laid the blame on Eve, ungratefully saying, "the woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the Tree, and I did eat. They were driven from the garden, and Cherubim with a flaming sword prevented them re-entering, lest they should eat of the Tree of life and live for ever in their sin
Cedar Tree - The cedar Tree of Lebanon, forms an interesting object in holy Scripture, and merits attention. The Tree itself seems, for majesty and beauty, to take place of every other among the Trees of the forest. The Tree itself is an evergreen, and sheds forth a gummy substance, which is said to contain many salutary qualities. Taught by such an infallible Teacher methinks I would never read of the Cedar of Lebanon, without connecting with it some sweet resemblance to be discovered in his people, which he saith himself are the branch of his planting, and which are so, that they might be called Trees of righteousness, "the planting of the Lord, that he might be glorified. And in how many ways do they bear resemblance to the glory of Lebanon, when made comely, from the comliness Jesus puts upon them! Is there any Tree of the wood so graceful, or so lovely, as the Cedar of Lebanon? Neither is there any lily among the thorns so fair, and white, and fragrant, as Jesus's love is among the daughters. (Song of Song of Solomon 2:2) Do any Trees out-top the Cedar of Lebanon, spread wider, or cast their branches with more luxuriancy farther than this fair one? Neither do any grow more upright, extend their usefulness in equal direction for general good, as the disciples of the Lord. And as the Cedar of Lebanon is deep-rooted, ever-green, and ever-fragrant, so believers in Christ are deep-rooted in him, always flourishing in him, however unprofitable in themselves; and as the prophet describes the church, "their branches shall spread, and their beauty be as the olive Tree, and their smell like Lebanon
Diameter - ) The length of a straight line through the center of an object from side to side; width; thickness; as, the diameter of a Tree or rock
Heath - "Its gloomy, stunted appearance, with its scale-like leaves pressed close to its gnarled stem, and cropped close by the wild goats, as it clings to the rocks about Petra, gives great force to the contrast suggested by the prophet, between him that trusteth in man, naked and destitute, and the man that trusteth in the Lord, flourishing as a Tree planted by the waters" (Tristram, Natural History of the Bible)
Corruptions: Overcome by Grace - My gardeners were removing a large Tree which grew near a wall, and as it would weaken the wall to stub up the roots, it was agreed that the stump should remain in the ground
Canoe - ) A boat used by rude nations, formed of trunk of a Tree, excavated, by cutting of burning, into a suitable shape
Heath - Hebrew aroer , arar ; Arabic dnax ; the Juniper sabina or Juniper savin with small scale-like leaves, close to the stem, a gloomy looking bush on a sterile soil, symbolizing "the man that trusteth in man and maketh flesh his arm, and whose heart departeth from the Lord" (Jeremiah 17:6); the Hebrew means "naked"; such is he whose defense is other than Jehovah, a shrub in a barren soil, contrasted with the "tree spreading out her roots by the river," i
Bergamot - ) A Tree of the Orange family (Citrus bergamia), having a roundish or pear-shaped fruit, from the rind of which an essential oil of delicious odor is extracted, much prized as a perfume
Birch - ) A Tree of several species, constituting the genus Betula; as, the white or common birch (B
Broom Tree - Although KJV, NAS identify the bush as the juniper, modern scholars agree that the bush intended by the Hebrew writer was the broom Tree—Retama raetam (NIV, REB, NRSV)
Zacchaeus - A chief of the tax-collectors, who, in his anxiety to see Jesus, climbed a Tree; he was agreeably surprised to hear that Jesus wished to abide at his house
Shin - ) To climb a mast, Tree, rope, or the like, by embracing it alternately with the arms and legs, without help of steps, spurs, or the like; - used with up; as, to shin up a mast
Abroad - Widely with expansion as a Tree spreads its branches abroad
Stacte - the purest myrrh, that drops as a tear spontaneously from the Tree
Dwarf - When it is applied to plants, it is more generally used in composition as a dwarf-tree dwarf-elder
Sycamore, - This is a Tree large enough for a man to rest in its branches, as Zacchaeus did. ' David had a special overseer of such Trees
Cinnamon - קנמון , an agreeable aromatic; the inward bark of the cahella, a small Tree of the height of the willow
Stock - The trunk of a Tree, Job 14:8 , or a reproachful name for the idols carved out of it, Jeremiah 2:27 ; Hosea 4:12
Israel - ...
Some types which represent Israel in various aspects:...
Adulterers, Hosea 7:4 (a)...
Bride, Isaiah 62:5 (a)...
Brood, Luke 13:34 (b)...
Cake not turned, Hosea 7:8 (a)...
Caldron, Ezekiel 11:3 (a)...
Calves of the stall, Malachi 4:2 (a)...
Cedar Trees, Numbers 24:6 (b)...
Chickens, Matthew 23:37 (a)...
Dust, Genesis 13:16 (a)...
Fig Tree, Matthew 24:32 (b)...
Great Lion, Numbers 23:24 (b)...
Heifer (backsliding). Hosea 4:16 (a)...
Jonah, Jonah 1:17 (c)...
Lign aloes, Numbers 24:6 (a)...
Olive Tree, Romans 11:17 (b)...
Sand, Genesis 22:17 (a)...
Seething pot, Jeremiah 1:13 (a)...
Sheep of His hand, Psalm 95:7 (a)...
Sheep of His pasture, Psalm 100:3 (a)...
Silly dove, Hosea 7:11 (a). ...
Spring of water, Isaiah 58:11 (a)...
Stars, Genesis 22:17 (a)...
Trees, Psalm 104:16 (b)...
Unicorn, Numbers 24:8 (a)...
Vine, Ezekiel 15:6 (a)...
Virgin, 2 Kings 19:21 (b)...
Watered garden, Isaiah 58:11 (a)...
Deb'Orah - (Genesis 35:8 ) Deborah accompanied Rebekah from the house of Bethuel, (Genesis 24:59 ) and is only mentioned by name on the occasion of her burial under the oak Tree of Bethel, which was called in her honor Allon-bachuth. ) She lived under the palm Tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in Mount Ephraim, (Judges 4:5 ) which, as palm Trees were rare in Palestine, "is mentioned as a well-known and solitary landmark
Asherah - Deuteronomy 16:21 prohibited the planting of a Tree as an “Asherah. Drawings of plain and carved poles, staffs, a cross, a double ax, a Tree, a Tree stump, a headdress for a priest, and several wooden images could be illustrations of an Asherah. According to 1 Kings 14:23 , the people “built for themselves high places, and pillars, and Asherim (plural) on every hill and under every green Tree
Hind - There is a difficulty and incoherence here which the learned Bochart removes by altering a little the punctuation of the original; and it then reads, "Naphtali is a spreading Tree, shooting forth beautiful branches. " This, indeed, renders the simile uniform; but another critic has remarked that "the allusion to a Tree seems to be purposely reserved by the venerable patriarch for his son Joseph, who is compared to the boughs of a Tree; and the repetition of the idea in reference to Naphtali is every way unlikely. Beside," he adds, "the word rendered ‘let loose,' imports an active motion, not like that of the branches of a Tree, which, however freely they wave, are yet attached to the parent stock; but an emission, a dismission, or sending forth to a distance: in the present case, a roaming, roaming at liberty. The passage may be thus versified:—...
"Hark! his voice in thunder breaks, And the lofty mountain quakes; Mighty Trees the tempests tear, ...
And lay the spreading forests bare!" ...
Apple Tree - Can it be imagined, then, that the apple Trees of which the Prophet Joel speaks, Joel 1:12 , and which he mentions among the things that gave joy to the inhabitants of Judea, were those that we call by that name? Our translators must surely have been mistaken here, since the apples which the inhabitants of Judea eat at this day are of foreign growth, and at the same time but very indifferent. ...
There are five places, beside this in Joel, in which the word occurs; and from them we learn that it was thought the noblest of the Trees of the wood, and that its fruit was very sweet or pleasant, Song of Solomon 2:3 ; of the colour of gold, Proverbs 25:11 ; extremely fragrant, Song of Solomon 7:8 ; and proper for those to smell that were ready to faint, Song of Solomon 2:5 . Several interpreters and critics render פרי הדר , Leviticus 23:40 , branches, or fruit, of the beautiful Tree; and understand it of the citron; and it is known that the Jews still make use of the fruit of this Tree at their yearly feast of tabernacles. ...
Citron Trees are very noble, being large, their leaves beautiful, ever continuing on the Trees, of an exquisite smell, and affording a most delightful shade. It might well, therefore, be said, "As the citron Tree is among the Trees of the wood, so is my beloved among the sons. " This is a delicate compliment, comparing the fine appearance of the prince, amid his escort, to the superior beauty with which the citron Tree appears among the ordinary Trees of the forest; and the compliment is heightened by an allusion to the refreshing shade and the exhilarating fruit
Bruise - ) To injure, as by a blow or collision, without laceration; to contuse; as, to bruise one's finger with a hammer; to bruise the bark of a Tree with a stone; to bruise an apple by letting it fall
Cedar - A Tree grown especially in Lebanon and valued as building material (probably Cedrus libani )
Asherah - Its symbol was the stem of a Tree deprived of its boughs, and rudely shaped into an image, and planted in the ground
Husk - it is κεράτιον, which is the fruit, not the husk, of the carob Tree
Corruptions: Vitality of - The yew Tree appears to renew itself out of its own decay the decayed wood at the centre of an old yew is gradually formed into rich vegetable mould, and fresh verdure spring: from it
Mole - Of the Tree lizard, Dendrosaura , tribe
Gleaning - The process of gathering grain or produce left in a field by reapers or on a vine or Tree by pickers
Night Hawk - " The "oriental owl" (Hasselquist), "the nightjar," appearing only in twilight, and passing and repassing round a Tree to catch large insects; hence regarded with superstitious awe
Appellative - Thus, Tree is the name of all plants of a particular class; plant and vegetable are names of things that grow out of the earth
Bearer - ) A Tree or plant yielding fruit; as, a good bearer
Cabbage - ) The terminal bud of certain palm Trees, used, like, cabbage, for food. See Cabbage Tree, below
Ascend - ) To go or move upward upon or along; to climb; to mount; to go up the top of; as, to ascend a hill, a ladder, a Tree, a river, a throne
Mast - A mast is a single stick, formed from the trunk of a Tree, or it consists of many pieces of timber united by iron bands. The fruit of the oak and beech, or other forest Trees nuts acorns
Almond - The fruit of the almond Tree an ovate, compressed nut, perforated in the pores
Blossom - The flower or corol of a plant a general term, applicable to every species of Tree or plant, but more generally used than flower or bloom, when we have reference to the fruit which is to succeed
Marah - But if Christ be in our appointments, whatever they are, like the Tree the Lord shewed to Moses, which when cast into the waters of Marah made them sweet, then will all be sanctified and sweetened to our use, and the divine glory
Bole - ) The trunk or stem of a Tree, or that which is like it
Almug - This Tree was imported by Solomon from Ophir ( 1 Kings 10:11-12 ) and from Lebanon ( 2 Chronicles 2:8 ) for staircases, balustrades, and musical instruments
Thorn - ) Any shrub or small Tree which bears thorns; especially, any species of the genus Crataegus, as the hawthorn, whitethorn, cockspur thorn
Nature - Paul says, to ingraft a good olive Tree into a wild olive is contrary to nature, Romans 11:24 ; the customary order of nature is thereby in some measure inverted
Mulberry Tree - There is somewhat sacred in the mulberry-tree, and holy Scripture seems to have pointed this out very strikingly, when directing the movement of the Lord's army to be, when the people heard the sound of a going in the mulberry-trees; for thereby they should know that the Lord went out before them. ) The Psalmist speaks of the church passing through the valley of Baca (that is the mulberry-trees), meaning soul exercises with the sweet fruit of divine love
Balm - Hasselquist has given a description of the true balsam Tree of Mecca
Willow - A very common Tree, which grows in marshy places, Job 40:22 Isaiah 44:4 , with a leaf much like that of the olive. God commanded the Hebrews to take branches of the handsomest Trees, particularly of the willows of the brook, and to bear them in their hands before the Lord, as a token of rejoicing, at the feast of Tabernacles, Leviticus 23:40
Branch - This arose from the Israelite expectation that the Messiah was to come from the ‘tree’ of David’s dynasty (Jeremiah 23:5; Jeremiah 33:15; cf
Fall - God prohibited the taking of the fruit from the Tree of knowledge of good and evil (Matthew 2:17 ). Some Bible students understand the Tree to hold (1) all knowledge—that is the complete range of experience. Others claim the Tree provides (2) knowledge of a moral nature. ...
The Tree's purpose within the narrative provides a clue toward a more satisfactory explanation. The Tree was the object and symbol of God's authority. The Tree reminded Adam and Eve that their freedom was not absolute but had to be exercised in dependence upon God. ...
The serpent began the conversation with a question that obviously distorted or at least extended God's order not to eat of the Tree (Genesis 3:1 ). She then told of God's prohibition of that one Tree in the middle of the garden. Perhaps anxiety over doubting God's character moved her then to add to God's own words; she extended the instruction to include touching the Tree, thereby making her own law. ...
The woman stood before the Tree. He was guilty of following the woman's sinful advice and eating of the forbidden Tree (Genesis 3:17 ). In these circumstances, access to the Tree of life is inappropriate. Numerous questions regarding the conditional nature of the Tree of life are left unanswered here (Ezekiel 47:12 ; Revelation 2:7 ; Revelation 22:2 ,Revelation 22:2,22:14 ,Revelation 22:14,22:19 ). Guardian cherubim protected the garden and the Tree (Genesis 3:22-24 ) and, thus, graciously protected people from entering into an infinite period of struggle
Fruit - the product of the earth, as Trees, plants, &c. The fruit of the righteous, that is, the counsel, example, instruction, and reproof of the righteous, is a Tree of life, is a means of much good, both temporal and eternal; and that not only to himself, but to others also, Proverbs 11:30 . The fruits of the Spirit are those gracious habits which the Holy Spirit of God produces in those in whom he dwelleth and worketh, with those acts which flow from them, as naturally as the Tree produces its fruit. Uncircumcised fruit, or impure, of which there is mention in Leviticus 19:23 , is the fruit for the first three years of a Tree newly planted; it was reputed unclean, and no one was permitted to eat of it in all that time. ) It was serviceable to the Trees themselves, which grew the better and faster; being early stripped of those fruits which otherwise would have derived to themselves, and drawn away, much of the strength from the root and Tree
Palm Tree - —Palm Trees, though frequently referred to in the OT, are mentioned in connexion with the life of Christ only once: viz. In Revelation 7:9 it is used of the leaf (or so-called branch), which is usually called βαΐον...
The palm Tree is amongst the foremost both in beauty and in utility. The Tree is endogenous, without bark and without branch. Palm Trees are tropical and semi-tropical. This Tree (phœnix dactylifera, date being a contraction of dactylus, ‘finger’) rises gracefully to a height of from fifty to ninety feet. The female Tree (for the phœnix, unlike most others, is not hermaphrodite) bears a cluster which may contain 200 dates, and it may continue to bear for two hundred years. This Tree abounded in the valley of the Jordan, but Jericho was specially the city of palm Trees (Deuteronomy 34:3). Accordingly, we find that early in the history of Israel Deborah dwelt under her palm Tree (Judges 4:5), while in the time of our Lord many of the Essenes were said to live in palm groves. This tall, firm, unbending Tree, with its magnificent crown of fronds, with fruit and leaves that served for sustenance and ornament, was readily reckoned emblematic of moral qualities—rectitude, constancy, gracefulness, usefulness—such as are the constituents of success
Cherub/Cherubim - They were put in Eden "to guard the way of the Tree of life," (Genesis 3:24)
Thyine Wood - It was the Callitris quadrivalvis of botanists, of the cone-bearing order of Trees, and of the cypress tribe of this order. The wood of this Tree was reckoned very valuable, and was used for making articles of furniture by the Greeks and Romans
Ashes - , tries to feed his soul with what is at once humiliating and unsatisfying, on an idol which ought to have been reduced to ashes, like the rest of the Tree of which it is made (Isaiah 44:20)
Heaven: Its Variety - We cannot stay to read the catalogue now, but heavenly joys shall be like the Tree of life in the New Jerusalem, which, brings forth twelve manner of fruits, and yields her fruit ever month
Pomegranate - It belongs to the myrtle family of Trees. The withering of the pomegranate Tree is mentioned among the judgments of God (Joel 1:12 )
Sap - ) The sapwood, or alburnum, of a Tree
Gourd - This plant, Ricinus communis , often attains in the East the dimensions of a considerable Tree
Cinnamon - kinamon, the Cinnamomum zeylanicum of botanists, a Tree of the Laurel family, which grows only in India on the Malabar coast, in Ceylon, and China
Church - Some types of the Church:...
Body, John 15:5 (a)...
Branches, Ephesians 1:23 (a)...
Bride, Revelation 21:9 (a)...
Building, Ephesians 2:21 (a)...
Candlestick, Revelation 1:20 (a)...
Eve, Genesis 3:20 (c)...
Family, Ephesians 3:15 (a)...
Household, Ephesians 2:19 (b)...
Jewels, Malachi 3:17 (b)...
Light, Ephesians 5:8 (a)...
Loaf, 1 Corinthians 10:17 (margin) (a)...
Lump, 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a)...
Olive Tree, Romans 11:17 (a)...
Queen, Psalm 45:9 (b)...
Rib, Genesis 2:21 (c)...
Seed, Matthew 13:38 (a)...
Sheep, John 10:11 (a)...
Stones, 1 Peter 2:5 (a)...
Temple, Ephesians 2:21 (a)...
Virgin, 2 Corinthians 11:2 (a)...
Wife, Revelation 21:9 (b)...
Crotch - ) The angle formed by the parting of two legs or branches; a fork; the point where a trunk divides; as, the crotch of a Tree
Decay - ) To pass gradually from a sound, prosperous, or perfect state, to one of imperfection, adversity, or dissolution; to waste away; to decline; to fail; to become weak, corrupt, or disintegrated; to rot; to perish; as, a Tree decays; fortunes decay; hopes decay
Leaf, Leaves -
Leaf of a Tree
Marah - The well was sweetened for the use of the distressed Hebrews by the miraculous efficacy imparted to the branches of a certain Tree which Moses threw in, Exodus 15:23-25
Upright - Erect perpendicular to the plane of the horizon as an upright Tree an upright post
Olive - Olive Trees, both wild and cultivated, were among the most common Trees of Palestine (Deuteronomy 8:8; Judges 15:5; 1 Chronicles 27:28; Luke 22:39). The Trees grew to about six metres in height, and although their timber was of no use in building construction, it could be used to make furniture and ornamental articles (1 Kings 6:23; 1 Kings 6:31). The Israelites used branches of olive Trees to help make shelters for the Feast of Tabernacles (Nehemiah 8:15). ...
Mostly, however, people grew olive Trees for their fruit, which could be crushed to produce oil (Exodus 27:20; Leviticus 2:4; 2 Kings 18:32; Micah 6:15; see OIL). Farmers harvested the olives by shaking or beating the Tree so that the fruit fell to the ground. To obtain higher quality fruit and larger harvests, they sometimes grafted branches from good quality Trees on to wild Trees. To graft branches from wild Trees on to good Trees was ‘contrary to nature’ (Romans 11:17-24). ...
In the symbols and pictures of the Bible, the olive Tree had a variety of meanings
Turtle, Turtle-Dove - In the valley of the Jordan, an allied species, the palm-dove (so named because it builds its nest in the palm Tree), or Egyptian turtle-- Turtur aegyptiacus , Temm. It is not improbable that the palm-dove may in some measure have supplied the sacrifice in the wilderness, for it is found in amazing numbers wherever the palm Tree occurs, whether wild or cultivated
Bearing - ) The act, power, or time of producing or giving birth; as, a Tree in full bearing; a Tree past bearing
Balsam Tree - Bruce, the balessan, balsam, or balm, is an evergreen shrub, or Tree, which grows to about fourteen feet high, spontaneously and without culture in its native country, Azab, and all along the coast to Babelmandel. There were three kinds of balsam extracted from this Tree. It was that which flowed spontaneously, or by means of incision, from the trunk or branches of the Tree in summer time. Josephus, in the history of the antiquities of his country, says that a Tree of this balsam was brought to Jerusalem by the queen of Saba, and given among other presents to Solomon, who, as we know from Scripture, was very studious of all sorts of plants, and skilful in the description and distinction of them. " The whole valley of Jericho was once esteemed the most fruitful in Judea; and the obstinacy with which the Jews fought here to prevent the balsam Trees from falling into the possession of the Romans, attests the importance which was attached to them. This Tree Pliny describes as peculiar to the vale of Jericho, and as "more like a vine than a myrtle. In that valley, there is wood as admirable for its fruitfulness as for its delight, for it is intermingled with palm Trees and opobalsamum. The Trees of the opobalsamum have a resemblance to fir Trees; but they are lower, and are planted and husbanded after the manner of vines
Thistle - It is supposed to be a variety of the wild plum-tree, but by some it is regarded as the common thistle, of which there are many varieties in Palestine
Freely - Of every Tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat
Graft - Olives were frequently caused to multiply by removing shoots from the base of a cultivated Tree (compare Psalm 128:3 ) and grafting them onto the trunks of wild olive Trees
Willow - Most of the references are to a Tree growing beside water, and apply well to the willow, of which two varieties, Salix fragilis and S
Mamre - , "the oak of rest", where there is a Tree called "Abraham's oak," about a mile and a half west of Hebron
Axe - Hebrew kardom , "sharp"; large, for telling Trees (Judges 9:48; Jeremiah 46:22); garzen , "cutting", as "hatchet" from "hack," securis from seco ; barzel ,"iron " garzen sometimes means the "adze. But KJV is good sense and good Hebrew; the "axe" is meant as the instrument to cut down the Tree in the forest
Graces: Should be Seasonable - It is said in praise of the Tree planted by the rivers of water, that it bringeth forth its fruit in ifs season; good men should aim to have seasonable virtues
Brier - In Isaiah 55:13 "instead of the brier (sirpad ) shall come up the myrtle Tree
Coral - Its Tree-like growth is implied by its name ramoth , from raam "to be high"; others from the Sanskrit ramye , "pleasant
Daughter - ...
The daughters of a Tree are its boughs (Genesis 49:22 )
Bdellium - " A gum exuding from a Tree (the Borassus flabelliformis) in Arabia, India, and Babylonia, white and transparent, according to some; but this is hardly precious enough to be ranked with the gold and precious stones of Havilah
Elah - (ee' lah) Personal and place name meaning, “oak,” “mighty Tree,” or “terebinth
Rod, Staff - Rod designates a straight, slender stick growing on (Jeremiah 1:11 ) or cut from (Genesis 30:37-41 ) a Tree
Bethphage - This may also be the place where the fig Tree was cursed (Matthew 21:18-22 ; Mark 11:12-14 , Mark 11:20-26 )
Frankincense - It is a sweet-smelling gum, obtained as a milky exudation from various species of Boswellia , the frankincense Tree, an ally of the terebinth
Guilds, Religious - The Church encouraged these associations, but it was the members of the guild who personally administered its affairs, such as alms-giving, assistance to those setting out on pilgrimages, repairing churches, and the establishment of Tree schools
Crucify - To nail to a cross to put to death by nailing the hands and feet to a cross or gibbet, sometimes anciently, by fastening a criminal to a Tree, with cords
Gnaw - The rats gnaw a board or plank a worm gnaws the wood of a Tree or the plank of a ship
Upright - ) In an erect position or posture; perpendicular; vertical, or nearly vertical; pointing upward; as, an upright Tree
Branch - A branch is a descendant from a Tree the parent, Isaiah 11:1; or it signifies one united to or dependent upon another
Cake - Something in the form of a cake, rather flat than high, but roundish as a cake on a Tree
Lime - The linden Tree
Religious Guilds - The Church encouraged these associations, but it was the members of the guild who personally administered its affairs, such as alms-giving, assistance to those setting out on pilgrimages, repairing churches, and the establishment of Tree schools
Cedar - cedrus), a Tree very frequently mentioned in Scripture. Hiram supplied Solomon with cedar Trees from Lebanon for various purposes connected with the construction of the temple and the king's palace (2 Samuel 5:11 ; 7:2,7 ; 1 Kings 5:6,8,10 ; 6:9,10,15,16,18,20 ; 7:2,3,7,11,12 ; 9:11 , etc. (See BOX-TREE
Rimmon - Others from Hebrew rimmon , a "pomegranate," sacred to Venus; the fertilizing principle in nature; Tree worship anciently having prevailed, a perverted relic of the tradition of Eden's Tree of life
Box - ) A Tree or shrub, flourishing in different parts of the world. The wood of the Tree varieties, being very hard and smooth, is extensively used in the arts, as by turners, engravers, mathematical instrument makers, etc
Almond Tree - (Jeremiah 1:11-12; Hebrew "I see a rod of the wakeful Tree (the emblem of wakefulness) . In Ecclesiastes 12:5, instead of "the almond Tree shall flourish," Gesenius translates "(the old man) loathes (through want of appetite) even the (sweet) almond;" for the blossom is pink, not white, the color of the old man's hair
Branch - The shoot of a Tree or other plant a limb a bough shooting from the stem, or from another branch or bough. ...
An arm of a Tree sprouting from the stem
Andrew - Peter Chrysologus says that he was crucified upon a Tree; and the spurious Hippolytus assures us that it was an olive Tree
Shade - Hence when we say, let us resort to the shade of a Tree, we have no reference to its form but when we speak of measuring a pyramid or other object by its shadow, we have reference to its extent. To shelter or screen from light by intercepting its rays and when applied to the rays of the sun, it segnifies to shelter from light and heat as, a large Tree shades the plants under its branches shaded vegetables rarely come to perfection
Eden, Garden of - Within the enclosure were many Trees useful for food; also the Tree of life, whose fruit conferred immortality, and the Tree of knowledge, which gave power to discriminate between things profitable and things hurtful, or, between right and wrong. When the first man and woman yielded to the tempter and ate of the Tree of knowledge, they were expelled, and precluded from re-entering the garden. In support of the last-named view a cuneiform tablet is quoted which speaks of a Tree or shrub planted near Eridu by the gods
Nathanael - He was led by Philip to Jesus, He went doubting, with the words on bis lips, "Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?" Jesus, however, at once convinces him that he is the Messiah by the exhibition of his knowledge, declaring that he had seen Nathanael under the fig Tree before ever Philip had called him
Pange Lingua Gloriosi [Lauream] - ...
The eighth verse reads:...
Faithful Cross! above all other,...
One and only noble Tree!...
None in foliage, none in blossom,...
None in fruit thy peers may be;...
Sweetest Wood and Sweetest Iron!...
Sweetest Weight is hung on thee
Husk - The pods of the Carob Tree (Ceratonia siliqua ) are probably intended (so NAS margin)
Branch - ...
The "abominable branch" is a Tree on which a malefactor has been hanged (Isaiah 14:19 )
Sever - , "to reduce to inactivity" (see ABOLISH , where all the ocurrences are given), is rendered "ye are severed (from Christ)" in Galatians 5:4 , RV; the aorist tense indicates that point of time at which there was an acceptance of the Judaistic doctrines; to those who accepted these Christ would be of no profit, they were as branches severed from the Tree
Mar - To injure by cutting off a part, or by wounding and making defective as, to mar a Tree by incision. I pray you, mar no more Trees by writing songs in their barks
Propagate - ) To cause to continue or multiply by generation, or successive production; - applied to animals and plants; as, to propagate a breed of horses or sheep; to propagate a species of fruit Tree
Fig (Leaves) - The fig Tree produces beautiful, large, soft, velvety leaves which are very attractive and lovely to feel
Aarons Rod - The rod has sometimes been identified as a branch of the almond Tree; and both Jewish and Christian fancy has been busy with it
Shittim Wood, Shittah Tree - It is called the SHITTAH Tree(after the Hebrew, which is shittah in the singular) in Isaiah 41:19
Oak - ) Any Tree or shrub of the genus Quercus. Many of the oaks form forest Trees of grand proportions and live many centuries
Natural - ' The Israelites are called the natural branches of the olive Tree which God planted on earth
Nathanael - He appears to have been a pious Jew who waited for the Messiah: and upon Jesus saying to him, "Before Philip called thee, I saw thee under the fig Tree," Nathanael, convinced, by some circumstance not explained, of his omniscience, exclaimed, "Master, thou art the Son of God, and the King of Israel
Lichen - The species are very widely distributed, and form irregular spots or patches, usually of a greenish or yellowish color, upon rocks, Trees, and various bodies, to which they adhere with great tenacity. They are often improperly called rock moss or Tree moss
Bdellium - Commonly supposed to mean the aromatic gum of a Tree growing near the Persian gulf, etc
Lop - To cut off, as the top or extreme part of any thing to shorten by cutting off the extremities as, to lop a Tree or its branches. to cut partly off and bend down as, to lop the Trees or saplings of a hedge. that which is cut from Trees
Zaccheus - Just, from the Hebrew Zaccai, Nehemiah 7:14 , a worthy tax-gatherer at Jericho, who in order to see Christ took a position in a sycamore-tree, by which He was about to pass
Sing, my Tongue, the Glorious Battle - ...
The eighth verse reads:...
Faithful Cross! above all other,...
One and only noble Tree!...
None in foliage, none in blossom,...
None in fruit thy peers may be;...
Sweetest Wood and Sweetest Iron!...
Sweetest Weight is hung on thee
Yea - Yea, hath God said, ye shall not eat of every Tree in the garden? Genesis 3
Zacchaeus - Being short of stature, he had climbed up into a ‘fig-mulberry’ Tree to see Jesus; our Lord called him down and invited Himself to his house
Bass - ) The linden or lime Tree, sometimes wrongly called whitewood; also, its bark, which is used for making mats
Gath-Rimmon - (gath-rihm' muhn) Place name meaning, “winepress on the pomegranate Tree
Carve - ) To make or shape by cutting, sculpturing, or engraving; to form; as, to carve a name on a Tree
Incense - The incense used in the Jewish offerings was a mixture of sweet spices, stacte, onycha, galbanum, and the gum of the frankincense Tree
Rob - ) To deprive of, or withhold from, unjustly or injuriously; to defraud; as, to rob one of his rest, or of his good name; a Tree robs the plants near it of sunlight
Nathanael - " He answered, "Whence knowest thou me?" The Lord told him that he had seen him under the fig Tree, where probably he had been in some exercise of soul Godward: we may gather this from Psalm 32:2,5 , as one in whom is no guile is one who confesses his transgressions to the Lord
Cypress - תדזה , Isaiah 44:14 ; and κυπαρισσοσ , Sir_24:13 ; Sir_50:10 ; a large evergreen Tree. The cypress, however, was more frequently used, and more fit for the purpose which the prophet mentions, than either of these Trees
Thickness - The extent of a body from side to side, or from surface to surface as the thickness of a Tree the thickness of a board the thickness of the hand the thickness of a layer of earth. Closeness of the parts the state of being crowded or near as the thickness of Trees in a forest the thickness of a wood
Plant - ) To set in the ground for growth, as a young Tree, or a vegetable with roots. ) A bush, or young Tree; a sapling; hence, a stick or staff
Crab - ) A cudgel made of the wood of the crab Tree; a crabstick
Brier - ...
...
Ezekiel 28:24 , Sallon' , properly a "prickle," such as is found on the shoots of the palm Tree
Life: Explains Religion - Bright thought, I would go down by the river, and walk until I could gather a bunch of elder-flowers, for the Tree was then in bloom
Fir - It was a Tree of large growth ( 2 Kings 19:23 , Ezekiel 31:8 ); evergreen ( Hosea 14:8 ); a chief element in the glory of Lebanon ( Isaiah 60:13 ); associated with cedars ( Psalms 104:16-17 , Isaiah 14:8 , Zechariah 11:2 )
Man: Perversion of His Faculties - Being altogether blind the new guide dashed against a stone at one moment, and the next came violently against a Tree, and at last drowned both itself and the head in the river of death
Ascend - ASCEND', To go or move upwards upon, as to ascend a hill or ladder or to climb, as to ascend a Tree
Blaze - To set a white mark on a Tree, by paring off a part of the bark
Pomegranates, Rimmon - This Tree and its fruit are often referred to, though it is rather a shrub. It is named among the vines and fig Trees as of the products of Palestine
Adam - Adam and Eve were tempted by the devil, disguised as a serpent, to disobey God by eating of the Tree of knowledge
Cast Down - ”The word is used to describe the “throwing” or “casting” of anything tangible: Moses “threw” a Tree into water to sweeten it ( Trees “shed” or “cast off” wilted blossoms (Job 15:33)
Bush - A branch of a Tree fixed or hung out as a tavern sign
Limb - ) A part of a Tree which extends from the trunk and separates into branches and twigs; a large branch
Willow - ) Any Tree or shrub of the genus Salix, including many species, most of which are characterized often used as an emblem of sorrow, desolation, or desertion
Limb - The branch of a Tree applied only to a branch of some size, and not to a small twig
Bartholomew - Like Jacob, he wrestled alone with God in prayer under the fig Tree. Nathanael bored his whole soul before God under the fig Tree in simplicity and sincerity. " "Because I said unto thee, I saw thee under the fig Tree, believest thou? thou shalt see greater things than these: hereafter (from this time forth, Greek) ye (not merely thou alone, but all My disciples) shall see heaven open, and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of man," the true ladder between earth and heaven, of which that in Jacob's dream was the type (Genesis 28:12), and upon which angels delight to minister
Mulberry - The plural form of the Hebrew bekaim is rendered "mulberry Trees" in 2 Samuel 5:23,24 and 1 Chronicles 14:14,15 . The Tree here alluded to was probably the aspen or trembling poplar. By "the sound of a going in the tops of the mulberry Trees" we are to understand a rustling among the Trees like the marching of an army
Bramble - Not our English trailing blackberries; but the Ρaliurus rhamnus aculeatus , a lowly stunted Tree with drooping jagged branches, from which project sharp stiff thorns, affording no shade, but only scratching those who touched it; fit emblem of the self important, petty, but mischievous speaker (answering to Abimelech) in Jotham's parable (Judges 9:8-20), the oldest fable extant
Frankincense - It was probably a resin from the Indian Tree known to botanists by the name of Boswellia serrata or thurifera, which grows to the height of forty feet
Affliction: Noble Piety Nourished Amid - Lowland Trees may lean to this side and that, though it is but a meadow breeze that bends them, or a bank of cowslips from which their trunks lean aslope. Thrust a rod from its last shoot down the stem, it shall point to the centre of the earth as long as the Tree lives
Gilead, Balm of - The Tree yielding this medicinal oil was probably the Balsamodendron opobalsamum of botanists, and the Amyris opobalsamum of Linnaeus
Altitude - ) Space extended upward; height; the perpendicular elevation of an object above its foundation, above the ground, or above a given level, or of one object above another; as, the altitude of a mountain, or of a bird above the top of a Tree
Moreh - An oak Tree at the site is mentioned several times as being the focal point
Project - ) To shoot forward; to extend beyond something else; to be prominent; to jut; as, the cornice projects; branches project from the Tree
Barren - Not producing the usual fruit applied to Tree,&c. In the States west of the Allegheny, a word used to denote a tract of land, rising a few feet above the level of a plain, and producing Trees and grass
Mustard (Tree) - The birds in this church Tree represent evil spirits ruling in church councils
Cedar - The palm Tree in this verse represents the individual testimony
Graven Image - The gods made of a Tree were also doubtless wrought, at least rudely, in the form of some living or imaginary creature
Paradise - The name is also given to 'the third heaven,' to which Paul was caught up, 2 Corinthians 12:4 ; and to the paradise of God, where there is the Tree of life (type of Christ), of which the overcomer in the church at Ephesus would have authority to eat
Thorns, Thistles - ...
In the millennium, "instead of the thorn shall come up the myrtle Tree
Abstraction - Thus, when the mind considers the form of a Tree by itself, or the color of the leaves as separate from their size or figure, the act is called abstraction
Wood - ) The fibrous material which makes up the greater part of the stems and branches of Trees and shrubby plants, and is found to a less extent in herbaceous stems. ) Trees cut or sawed for the fire or other uses. ) The substance of Trees and the like; the hard fibrous substance which composes the body of a Tree and its branches, and which is covered by the bark; timber. ) A large and thick collection of Trees; a forest or grove; - frequently used in the plural
Peel - ) To strip or tear off; to remove by stripping, as the skin of an animal, the bark of a Tree, etc
Gourd - ...
See Palm Tree
Pillar - 40-41: “And for the entering of the oracle he made doors of olive Tree: the lintel [1] and side posts were a fifth part of the wall” (1 Kings 6:31)
Eden - The Bible begins with a beautiful picture of Eden, the paradise of innocence on earth, and closes with an equally beautiful picture of the more glorious paradise of the future, with its river of life and Tree of life
Enos - The eastern people make the following additions to his history:—that Seth, his father, declared him sovereign prince and high priest of mankind, next after himself; that Enos was the first who ordained public alms for the poor, established public tribunals for the administration of justice, and planted, or rather cultivated, the palm Tree
Myrrh - מור , Exodus 30:23 ; Esther 2:19 ; Psalms 45:8 ; Proverbs 7:17 ; Song of Solomon 1:13 ; Song of Solomon 3:6 ; Song of Solomon 4:6 ; Song of Solomon 4:14 ; Song of Solomon 5:1 ; Song of Solomon 5:5 ; Song of Solomon 5:13 ; σμυρνα , Sir_24:15 ; Matthew 2:11 ; Mark 15:23 ; John 19:39 ; a precious kind of gum issuing by incision, and sometimes spontaneously, from the trunk and larger branches of a Tree growing in Egypt, Arabia, and Abyssinia
Grove - [1] It is also probable that there was a connection between this symbol or image, whatever it was, and the sacred symbolic Tree, the representation of which occurs so frequently on Assyrian sculptures. It was thought wrong to shut up the gods within walls, and hence Trees were the first temples; and from the earliest times groves are mentioned in connection with religious worship
Ziph - Tristram says: "How far the forest of Ziph," see 1 Samuel 23:14-15, "extended it is not easy to say, but there are traces of it in an occasional Tree, and there seems no reason, from the nature of the soil, why the woods may not have stretched nearly to the barren, sandy marl which overlies the limestone for a few miles west of the Dead Sea
Deborah - A prophetess, and wife of Lapidoth, judged the Israelites, and dwelt under a palm-tree between Ramah and Bethel, Judges 4:4,5
Luz - (almond Tree )
Zacchae'us - (pure ), a tax-collector near Jericho, who, being short in stature climbed up into a sycamore Tree in order to obtain a sight of Jesus as he passed through that place
ta'Mar - (palm Tree ). ) ...
A spot on the southeastern frontier of Judah, named in (Ezekiel 47:19 ; 48:28 ) only, evidently called from a palm Tree
Plane Tree - The Hebrews were very partial to Trees; and it is not to be wondered at, for those Trees which formed shades, by their long growing and wide spreading branches, must have been highly grateful in sheltering them from the heat. The plane Tree is supposed to have been the chesnut spoken of Genesis 30:37. (Ezekiel 31:8) But when the reader hath pondered over these beauties of nature, I beg him to observe how, in a yet far higher degree, the Holy Ghost is pleased to make use of them in setting forth the glories of grace, when describing the Lord Jesus under the similitude of the wide spreading branches of the Trees of the wood, to represent the shelter he affords to his people. Jesus is all this, and infinitely more; for like the wide spreading branches of some rich and fruitful Tree of the desert, he forms every thing that is lovely to our view, and both shelters from the heat, and refresheth our thirst by his fruit in this desert of our nature, when from under his shadow "we revive as the corn, and grow as the vine, and his scent is more fragrant than the wine of Lebanon
Cherubim - at the East of the Garden of Eden He caused to dwell in a tabernacle the cherubim, and the flaming sword which turned itself to keep the way of the Tree of Life. " This was not simply to keep fallen human beings out; the presence of the "cherubim" suggests that redeemed men, restored to God on God's conditions, would have access to the Tree of Life
Axe - He sees the men of old times ‘as men that lifted up axes upon a thicket of Trees’ (Psalms 74:5). Thoroughly as these powers had done their part, yet more drastic was to be the work of the future (‘every Tree,’ Matthew 3:10). ’ And when the Carpenter laid aside the axe of the workshop in Nazareth, the wood-cutter, ‘thoroughly furnished unto every good work, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed,’ was already prepared for going up against the Trees. He would save the Tree of humanity, even ‘as a Tree whose stock remaineth when they are felled’ (Isaiah 6:13)
Fig - Mount Olivet is still famed for its figtrees as of old. "To sit under one's own vine and figtree" was the proverb for peace and prosperity; so under Solomon (1 Kings 4:25); type of the true Solomon, Prince of peace, and of His coming millennial reign (Micah 4:4; Zechariah 3:10); men will be safe in the open field as in the house. The difficulty in Mark 11:12 is solved thus: the leaves on the "one" figtree, when all others were bore, caught Jesus' eye "afar off"; as the fruit precedes the leaves, naturally He might have expected, for satisfying His hunger, figs from a Tree with such a precocious show of leaf, even though the season of figs was not yet come. ...
Thomson (The Land and the Book) says that in a sheltered spot figs of an early kind may occasionally be found ripe as soon as the beginning of April, the time of Christ's cursing the fig Tree. In Matthew 21:19 it is "one fig Tree," standing out an exception to all the rest. Fig Trees overhanging the road from Jerusalem to Bethany still grow out of the rocks of the mountain which, the Lord said, faith could remove to the distant sea (Matthew 21:21). On Olivet too was spoken the parable of the budding fig Tree, the sign of coming summer (Luke 21:29-30)
Adam (1) - Even in His humiliation He exercised unlimited sway over man's bodily diseases and even death itself, over vegetable nature (the fig Tree), the dumb animal kingdom (the ass's colt), the inorganic world, the restless sea, and the invisible world of demons; compare Psalm...
8. Any fruit Tree (some have supposed, from Egyptian representations still extant, the pomegranate) would suffice as a test of obedience or disobedience, by the eating of which the knowledge of evil as well as of good would result. The Tree of knowledge suggested to man the possibility of evil, which in the absence of lust might not occur. Satan's antitrinity, the lust of the flesh ("the woman saw that the Tree was good for food"), the lust of the eye ("and that it was pleasant to the eyes"), and the pride of life (and a "tree to be desired to make one wise") seduced man: 1 John 2:16; compare ACHAN; Joshua 7:21. As this Tree was the sacramental pledge of God's requirement, so the Tree of life was the pledge of God's promised blessing. ...
ArchbishopWhately thought the Tree of life acted medicinally, and that Adam and Eve ate of it; and that hence arose his longevity and that of the patriarchs, so that it was long before human life sank to its present average. Indeed it is only sacramentally, and in inseparable connection with faith and obedience, when tested first as to the Tree of knowledge, that the Tree of life could give man true immortal life. The temporary exclusion from the Tree of life was a merciful provision for fallen man, (for immortality in a lost state is a curse), until that, through Christ, he should have it restored (Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14; Revelation 2:7). ...
The cherubim were not outside the garden, blocking up access to it (as Genesis 3:24 is often explained), but "keeping the way to the Tree of life," doing what man had failed to do (Genesis 2:15)
Plants in the Bible - By plants we include all plant life such as wild and cultivated Trees, shrubs, and herbs. This is often referred to as bulrush, but the Tree bulrush (Scirpus lacustris ) is a sedge with slender stems, which also occurs in lakes and pools. Cassia and cinnamon are traditionally identified with the Far Eastern Trees Cinnamomum cassia and C. ...
Mustard ( Brassica nigra ) well known for its hot-flavored seeds is referred to by Jesus for having small seeds which grow into a Tree (Matthew 13:31-32 ). ...
Frankincense and Myrrh are resins produced by certain Trees that grow in dry country in southern Arabia and northern Africa. sacra , which is a shrub or small Tree growing on both sides of the Red Sea. In the Old Testament, aloes refers to an expensive fragrant timber obtained from a tropical Indian eaglewood Tree (Aquilaria agallocha ). ...
Fruits Olive Trees ( Olea europaea ) are small rounded orchard Trees with narrow gray-green leaves and small cream-colored flowers in May. ...
The common fig Tree ( Ficus carica ) has a short stout trunk and thick branches and twigs bearing coarsely lobed rough leaves (Genesis 3:7 ). Jesus referred to figs and fig Trees several times (Matthew 7:16 ; Luke 21:29-31 ). ...
Another kind of fig Tree, the sycomore ( Ficus sycomorus ) grew in Egypt and in the warmer areas of the Holy Land. This large Tree usually has low-growing branches such as would have enabled the short Zacchaeus to climb one to see Jesus passing along the streets of Jericho (Luke 19:4 ). This very tall Tree with a rough unbranched trunk bearing a terminal tuft of huge feather leaves, fruits best in hot conditions of the Dead Sea oases. Hence, Jericho was known as the city of palm Trees (Judges 1:16 ). The wandering Israelites reached Elim where there were seventy palm Trees (Exodus 15:27 ). Te psalmist considered it to be such a fine Tree that he compared the righteous flourishing to one (Psalm 92:12 ). The only probable reference to it is (as “sycamine”) when Jesus spoke of believers having enough faith to destroy one (Luke 17:6 )—perhaps because old Trees are stout, gnarled, and long-lived. ...
The most important biblical nut was the almond ( Prunus dulcis ), which is a small Tree with delightful whitish flowers in early spring before the leaves have sprouted. ...
The walnut Tree ( Juglans regia ) originated in the Caspian region and may not have been commonly planted in the Eastern Mediterranean region until after the biblical period. The Tree grows to a considerable size. The pistache nuts referred to in the Bible (Genesis 43:11 NIV) would be from the native terebinth Trees ( Pistachia terebinthus, P. One is a small shrubby Tree, while the other is as large as an oak
Zacchaeus - " Being short of stature, he hastened on before the multitude who were thronging about Christ as he passed through Jericho on his way to Jerusalem, and climbed up a sycamore Tree that he might be able to see him
Blaze - ) A spot made on Trees by chipping off a piece of the bark, usually as a surveyor's mark. ) To designate by blazing; to mark out, as by blazed Trees; as, to blaze a line or path. ) To mark (a Tree) by chipping off a piece of the bark
Bleed - ) To lose sap, gum, or juice; as, a Tree or a vine bleeds when tapped or wounded
Martin of Tours, Saint - Emblems: Tree, armor, cloak, beggar
Mustard - Although it is not properly’ a Tree’ ( Luke 13:19 ), it quite accords with Oriental use to describe as such a great plant like this
Libnah - (lihb' nuh) Place name meaning “white” or “storax Tree
Migron - In 1 Samuel 14:2 Samaul, whose army was encamped south of the Wady es-Suwçnît , is said to have dwelt in ‘the uttermost part of Geba (so read) under the pomegranate Tree which is in Migron
Scrub - ) A low, straggling Tree of inferior quality
Book - Like the Latin liber, book signifies primarily bark and beech, the Tree being probably named from its bark
Silk - The Βombyx mori , the caterpillar of a sluggish moth, feeding on the mulberry Tree, produces the oval-yellow cocoon of silk wound around its own body
Shroud - ) The branching top of a Tree; foliage
Scarlet - This color was obtained from the Coccus Ilicis of Linnaeus, a small insect found on the leaves of a species of oak, the Quercus Cocciferus, in Spain and the countries on the eastern part of the Mediterranean, which was used by the ancients for dyeing a beautiful crimson or deep scarlet color, and was supposed by them to be the berry of a plant or Tree
Tours, Martin of, Saint - Emblems: Tree, armor, cloak, beggar
Large - Big of great size bulky as a large body a large horse or ox a large mountain a large Tree a large ship
Balm - The so-called ‘Balm of Gilead’ of commerce, and the substance sold by the monks of Jericho to-day, this latter a product of the zakkûm Tree, are neither of them serious claimants to be the genuine article
Sap - The alburnum of a Tree the exterior part of the wood, next to the bark
Kin, Kindred, Kinship - The idea that the race has a life of its own, of which individual lives are only parts, is expressed even more clearly by picturing the race as a Tree, of which the ancestor is the root or stem and the descendants the branches’ (W. Paul’s figure of the olive-tree, Romans 11:17 etc
Cedar - Several cone-bearing, evergreen Trees appear to be included under this title. But ordinarily, the cedar of Lebanon (the still famous Tree of that name, Cedrus Libani) is meant. This Tree, there is reason to believe, once quite covered the mountains of Lebanon between the heights of 3000 and 7000 feet. Jessup has visited and described eleven distinct groves of cedars on those mountains, including, altogether, several thousand Trees. The name of Lamartine, carved on one of the giant Trees 109 years ago, is fresh and legible today
Mustard - The passages concerned clearly suggest, not a perennial shrub, but an annual sown among and comparable with other garden herbs; and if the expression ‘tree’ be a difficulty (‘great’ in Luke 13:19 is of weak authority, cf. He meant that the tiny seed became to all intents a Tree. the fig-tree favoured by being put in the choice and carefully protected place usually devoted to vines, Luke 13:6)
Shape - ) Character or construction of a thing as determining its external appearance; outward aspect; make; figure; form; guise; as, the shape of a Tree; the shape of the head; an elegant shape
Michmash - It lay on the line of march of an invading army from the north, on the north side of the steep and precipitous Wady es-Suweinit ("valley of the little thorn-tree" or "the acacia"), and now bears the name of Mukhmas
Abarim - Its top is marked by a pistachio Tree overshadowing a heap of stones
Trials: of Young Believers - But this destruction occurring in the spring of the year, when the vegetable power of the plant is in its greatest vigor, an effect is produced somewhat analogous to that of heading down a fruit Tree
Mortal - The fruit ...
Of that forbidden Tree whose mortal taste ...
Brought death into the world, and all our woe-- ...
3
Absalom - ...
He was fit for neither Heaven nor earth, and so he died between the two of them on the Tree
Cherub, Cherubim - They were placed at Eden to keep the Tree of life after the fall of man
Hole - A cell a den a cave or cavern in the earth an excavation in a rock or Tree a pit, &c
Shittah - Many acacia Trees grow on Sinai; they grow to the size of a mulberry Tree
Wattle - ) The Trees from which the bark is obtained. ) The astringent bark of several Australian Trees of the genus Acacia, used in tanning; - called also wattle bark. ) In Australasia, any Tree of the genus Acacia; - so called from the wattles, or hurdles, which the early settlers made of the long, pliable branches or of the split stems of the slender species
Pass On, Pass Away - 40:31; 41:1); a Tree appears “to be renewed” when it sprouts again (Job 14:7)
Branch - ...
4: βαΐον (Strong's #902 — Noun Neuter — baion — bah-ee'-on ) of Egyptian origin, frequent in the papyri writings, denotes "a branch of the palm Tree," John 12:13
Learn - Now learn a parable of the fig Tree
Simon Stock, Saint - 1165;died Bordeaux, France, c1265 According to tradition, from the age of 12 he lived as a hermit in the hollow trunk of an oak Tree, whence he was called Simon Stock
Stock, Simon, Saint - 1165;died Bordeaux, France, c1265 According to tradition, from the age of 12 he lived as a hermit in the hollow trunk of an oak Tree, whence he was called Simon Stock
Dionysia - He was the god of Tree-life, but especially of the life of the vine and its produce
Balm - The Trees resembled fig Trees (or grape vines), but were lower, being but 12 to 15 feet high. It is now called the BALM OF GILEAD , or Meccabalsam , the Tree or shrub being indigenous in the mountains around Mecca
Manna - The manna of the Sinaitic peninsula is an exudation from the "manna-tamarisk" Tree (Tamarix mannifera), the el-tarfah of the Arabs. This Tree is found at the present day in certain well-watered valleys in the peninsula of Sinai
Grow - Thus, a plant grows from a seed to a shrub or Tree, and a human being grows from a fetus to a man. ...
To grow up, ...
To grow together, To close and adhere to become united by growth as flesh or the bark of a Tree severed
Aloes - The substance so named is the result of disease occurring in the wood of the Tree. To obtain it, the Tree has to be split, as it is found in the centre
Gourd - " This plant rises with a strong herbaceous stalk to the height of ten or twelve feet; and is furnished with very large leaves, not unlike those of the plane Tree. ' It has the form of a Tree. Another Tree of this species, which had not had so much water, had not grown more in a whole year. This Tree is called at Aleppo, palma Christi
Leaf - As the leaf reveals the kind of Tree that it is on, so the life of the individual reveals whether or not he belongs to JESUS CHRIST. ...
A live Tree may have no leaves on it because of the conditions that exist. The believer is represented as GOD's Tree, planted in GOD's Word, and permeated by the Spirit of GOD
Death - ...
“Death” is the natural end of human life on this earth; it is an aspect of God’s judgment on man: “But of the Tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die” ( Tree: his body shall not remain all night upon the Tree …” ( Frankincense - (λίβανος)...
Frankincense, which is mentioned (Revelation 18:13) as part of the vast merchandise of Imperial Rome, is a gum-resin yielded by certain species of Trees of the genus Boswellia. To obtain the frankincense a deep incision is made in the trunk of the Tree, and below the incision a narrow strip of bark is peeled off
Dry - 1, "to dry, dry up, make dry, wither," is translated "dried" (of physical infirmity), in Mark 5:29 ; of a Tree, in the AV of Mark 11:20 (RV, "withered away"); of water, in Revelation 16:12
Eunuch - Part of Isaiah's vision of the messianic era was a picture of the eunuch no longer complaining of being “a dry Tree”, one without hope of descendants, because God would reward the faithful eunuch with a lasting monument and name in the Temple which would be far better than sons or daughters (Isaiah 56:4-5)
Nigh - ...
When the fig-tree putteth forth leaves, ye know that summer is nigh
Mulberry Trees - 2 Samuel 5:23-24; Septuagint translated "pear Trees"; Royle "the gnat Tree," Arabic shajrat al bak, a kind of poplar, or the aspen trembling at the slightest breath. "Angels tread light, and He that can walk upon the clouds can, when He pleases, walk on the tops of the Trees
Crop - ) The top, end, or highest part of anything, especially of a plant or Tree
Pomegranate - Jesus sweetens all, as the bitter waters at Marah were sweetened by the Tree cast into them
Empty - ) Producing nothing; unfruitful; - said of a plant or Tree; as, an empty vine
Bud - BUD, To inoculate a plant to insert the bud of a plant under the bark of another Tree, for the purpose of raising, upon any stock, a species of fruit different from that of the stock
Plough - The two latter parts, and even all three, are sometimes formed of a single branch of a Tree with two limbs projecting in opposite directions
Pomegranate - The Tree grows wild in Persia and Syria, as generally in the south of Europe and north of Africa
Shadow - Shade within defined limits obscurity or deprivation of light, apparent on a plane and represtnting the form of the body which intercepts the rays of light as the shadow of a man, of a Tree or a tower
Top - The highest part of any thing the upper end, edge or extremity as the top of a Tree the top of a spire the top of a house the top of a mountain
Cross - But after the celebrated vision of Constantine, he ordered his friends to make a cross of gold and gems, such as he had seen, and "the towering eagles resigned the flags unto the cross," and "the Tree of cursing and shame" "sat upon the sceptres and was engraved and signed on the foreheads of kings
Mustard - attractive to birds, Luke 13:19 Tree']'>[1]
Paulus, Saint Called Thebaeus - The palm-tree at the mouth of his cave supplied him with food and clothing (Vita Pauli , c
God: Vague Conceptions of - After thus trying to gratify their curiosity they returned into the village, and sitting down together they began to give their ideas on what the elephant was like: the man who had seized his trunk said he thought the elephant was like the body of the plantain Tree; the man who had felt his ear said he thought he was like the fan with which the Hindoos clean the rice; the man who had felt his tail said he thought he must be like a snake, and the man who had seized his leg, thought he must be like a pillar. An old blind man of some judgment was present, who was greatly perplexed how to reconcile these jarring notions, respecting the form of the elephant; but he at length said, 'You have all been to examine this animal, it is true, and what you report cannot be false: I suppose, therefore, that that which was like the plaintain Tree must be his trunk; that which was like a fan must be his ear; that which was like a snake must be his tail, and that which was like a pillar must be his body
Branch - One such set of ideas has to do with limbs, secondary stems, or new growth on vines, bushes, and Trees. "...
When olive Trees, indigenous to Israel, are cut down, new Trees grow from the shoots that sprout from the base and root system. It was not uncommon for the prophets to depict the Messiah as a new shoot or branch growing from David's stock, even though that "tree" would be cut off. That was not the case with Israel, the cultivated olive Tree; the branches broken off were replaced by wild olive shoots, in other words, Gentile believers
Grass - The first is rendered ξυλον , or δενδρον , Tree: to express the second, the LXX have adopted χορτος , as their common way to translate one Hebrew word by one Greek word, though not quite proper, rather than by a circumlocution. Under the name herb is comprehended every sort of plant which has not, like Trees and shrubs, a perennial stalk. That many, if not all, sorts of shrubs were included by the Hebrews under the denomination, Tree, is evident from Jotham's apologue of the Trees choosing a king, Judges 9:7 , where the bramble is mentioned as one
Knot - ) A portion of a branch of a Tree that forms a mass of woody fiber running at an angle with the grain of the main stock and making a hard place in the timber. A loose knot is generally the remains of a dead branch of a Tree covered by later woody growth
Nativity of Christ, Feast of the - The Christmas Tree, of which the first known mention was made in 1605 at Strasbourg, was introduced into France and England in 1840
Christmas - The Christmas Tree, of which the first known mention was made in 1605 at Strasbourg, was introduced into France and England in 1840
Absalom - David retired from Jerusalem; Absalom followed him; and in the battle, which ensued, the troops of the latter were defeated, and he himself, being caught by his head in a Tree, was found and slain by Joab
Summer - ...
Matthew 24:32 (b) This is a picture of those blessed days that will exist when Israel will be restored as a nation, and like the fig Tree will again bear fruit for GOD
Elah - On the west side of the valley, near Shochoh, there is a very large and ancient Tree of this kind known as the 'terebinth of Wady Sur,' 55 feet in height, its trunk 17 feet in circumference, and the breadth of its shade no less than 75 feet
Sincerity - But such deceive themselves, for a Tree is known by its fruits; and true godly sincerity will evidence itself by serious inquiry, impartial examination, desire of instruction, unprejudiced judgment, devotedness of spirit, and uniformity of conduct
Bush - ) A thicket, or place abounding in Trees or shrubs; a wild forest. ) A shrub cut off, or a shrublike branch of a Tree; as, bushes to support pea vines
Buck - ) The beech Tree
Nail - ...
Colossians 2:14 (a) We have revealed to us in this picture the act of GOD in putting our sins on JESUS, so that He bore them "in His own body on the Tree
Arm - The branch of a Tree, or the slender part of a machine, projecting from a trunk or axis
Body - The main part the bulk as the body of a Tree the body of a coach, of a ship, &c
Tamar - Her name signifies palm-tree
Aloes - Either he must have referred to the Tree from mere hearsay, or some other plant of the same name may at that time have grown in the Jordan valley, or, as seems most probable, the Heb
Gourd - This plant varies considerably n size, being in India a Tree, but in England seldom attaining a greater height than three or four feet
Cherub - The first mention of cherubs is in Genesis 3:24 , where the figure is not described, but their office was, with a flaming sword, to keep or guard the way of the Tree of life
Shake - To cause to move with quick vibrations to move rapidly one way and the other to agitate as, the wind shakes a Tree an earthquake shakes the hills or the earth
Hair - Ecclesiastes 12:5, "the almond Tree shall flourish. the wakeful) Tree blossoming in winter, i
Zerubbabel - As a descendant of David, Zerubbabel was like a new ‘branch’ springing from the ‘tree’ of David’s dynasty, a ‘tree’ that Babylon had earlier ‘cut down’ (Zechariah 6:11-13; cf
Parable - ...
Fig Tree leafing, Matthew 24:32-34 . ...
Tree and its fruit, Luke 6:43-45 . ...
Barren fig Tree, Luke 13:6-9
the Man Who Took a Rain of Mustard Seed And Sowed it in His Field - As a child He had often sown the least of all seeds in Joseph's garden, and had watched that mustard seed springing up till it became a great Tree. And with what delight would He see the birds of the air building their nests in the branches of His own high mustard Tree. And as He grew in wisdom and in stature, He would come to read in that same mustard Tree yet another parable about His Father's house and His Father's business. Or, as we sometimes say, in our book-learned way, He would see in that mustard Tree another illustration of that Sacramental Principle which was ever present with Him. ...
Now it was not so much the great size of the mustard Tree that took such a hold of our Lord's imagination. ...
To begin with, the kingdom of heaven in Old Testament times was like a grain of mustard seed in its original smallness, and then in the great Tree that it ultimately became. Our own Oxford, and Cambridge, and Edinburgh, and Aberdeen, and many more such like schools of the prophets, are all so many great Trees that have their long roots struck away back into Samuel's little mustard seed. Let them have a great faith in Him, and in His wisdom, and His love, and in His faithfulness, who is continually, both in nature and in grace, folding up the greatest Trees in the smallest seeds. Despise it not, for a great Tree is in it. A great, a fragrant, and a fruitful Tree, under which you will one day sit rejoicing in the shelter of it, and in the sweet fruitfulness of it
Sin: One the Souls Ruin (2) - ...
Presently, an old elder Tree said, Flowers, shake off your caterpillars!' ...
'Why?' said a dozen altogether: for they were like some children, who always say 'Why,' when they are told to do anything: bad children those! ...
The elder said, 'If you don't, they'll eat you up alive
Shadow - ) Shade within defined limits; obscurity or deprivation of light, apparent on a surface, and representing the form of the body which intercepts the rays of light; as, the shadow of a man, of a Tree, or of a tower
Cedar - The beautiful tall Tree that was extensively used by Solomon in building the temple and his palaces. Special reference is made to it in scripture, as "the Trees of the Lord are full of sap; the cedars of Lebanon which he hath planted. It cannot be considered as one of the Trees of Palestine proper, but is constantly connected in scripture with Lebanon, where it still grows in a group of some 300, a few being very old, and with no others near: the neighbouring people regard them with reverence
Stork, - It makes its nest in the fir Trees. This agrees with the stork; it is a large bird, and selects a Tree that is high and yet one that will well support its nest. White storks prefer the habitations of man, where they roam about the streets, devouring the offal
Shake - ; as, to shake fruit down from a Tree
Branch - ) A shoot or secondary stem growing from the main stem, or from a principal limb or bough of a Tree or other plant
Behind - On the side opposite to that which fronts a person on the other side as behind a bed behind a hill behind a house, Tree, or rock
Fruit - In a more limited sense, the produce of a Tree or other plant the last production for the propagation or multiplication of its kind the seed of plants, or the part that contains the seeds as wheat, rye, oats, apples, quinces, pears, cherries, acorns, melons, &c
Tongue - ...
Proverbs 15:4 (a) It is like a Tree because it adds to the joys of life
Voluntary - ) Done by design or intention; intentional; purposed; intended; not accidental; as, if a man kills another by lopping a Tree, it is not voluntary manslaughter
Thistles And Thorns - The plant of which the thorny crown of the Savior was made, with the design to mock rather than to torture him, is supposed to have been the Zizyphus Spina Christi, a common Tree with dark and glossy leaves, having many small and sharp spines on its round and pliant branches, Matthew 27:29 John 19:2-3
Myrrh - , mor, from a root meaning "bitter," is a gum resin from a shrubby Tree, which grows in Yemen and neighboring regions of Africa; the fruit is smooth and somewhat larger than a pea
Fruit (2) - In its natural sense the word ‘fruit’ is used: (a) in reference to grain-crops (Matthew 13:8, Mark 4:7, Luke 8:8; Luke 12:17); (b) physiologically, of the fruit of the womb (Luke 1:42); (c) of the fruit of (α) Trees generally (Matthew 3:10, Luke 3:9); (β) the fig-tree (Matthew 21:9, Mark 11:14, Luke 1:36); (γ) the vine (Matthew 21:41, Mark 12:2, Luke 20:10). Other references to fruits under their specific names, without the use of the word ‘fruit’: (a) grapes (Matthew 7:16, Luke 6:44); (b) figs (Matthew 7:16, Mark 11:13, Luke 6:44); (c) husks (Luke 15:16, probably the fruit of the carob or locust-tree); (d) mulberry (Luke 17:16; (e) olives (Matthew 21:1). ...
In the Museum of the Vatican there is a little glass relic, taken from the Catacombs; it was made as an ornament to be worn round the neck of a woman, and was found in her grave; it represents Christ bringing again the fruit of the Tree of Life. ...
But, as in agriculture and horticulture the farmer and the gardener are co-operators with God in the production of the fruits of the earth and the fruit of the Trees, so, in many ways, the Gospels lay upon us the injunctions of our duty. Just as the gardener prunes and purges a Tree so that it may bring forth more fruit, so there are afflictions in this life which are only God’s way of increasing our fruitfulness. ...
(5) We are the Trees which are known by their fruit (Matthew 7:20). A Tree which is true to its nature and to its destiny brings forth its appropriate fruit
Live - ...
The “tree of life” is the Tree which gives one eternal, everlasting “life. ” Therefore, it is the Tree whose fruit brings “life”: “And out of the ground made the Lord God to grow every Tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the Tree of life also in the midst of the garden …” ( Adam - He was placed after his creation in the Garden of Eden, to cultivate it, and to enjoy its fruits under this one prohibition: "Of the Tree of the knowledge of good and evil thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die. They were expelled from Eden, and at the east of the garden God placed a flame, which turned every way, to prevent access to the Tree of life (Genesis 3 )
Oak - ]'>[2] ‘teil Tree’]; ’çlâh elsewhere always tr. ]'>[7] ‘oaks’] Isaiah 61:3 ‘trees. ...
Oaks have always been relatively plentiful in Palestine-Even to-day, in spite of the most reckless destruction, groves of oaks survive on Carmel, Tabor, around Banias, and in ancient Bashan; while whole miles of country are covered with shrub-like oaks produced from the roots of Trees destroyed every few years for fuel. cerris ), a comparatively insignificant Tree, especially noticeable for the variety of galls which grow on it. Oak wood is used for tanning skin bottles and also as fuel, while the acorn cups of the Valonia oak and the galls of the various oak Trees are both important articles of commerce in N
Cross, Crucify - ...
As for the Chi, or X, which Constantine declared he had seen in a vision leading him to champion the Christian faith, that letter was the initial of the word "Christ" and had nothing to do with "the Cross" (for xulon, "a timber beam, a Tree," as used for the stauros, see under Tree)
Thorn - " Celsius says that the same word, and of the same original in Arabic, is the" black thorn," or "sloe Tree," the prunus spinosa of Linnaeus. Meninski says that serbin, in the Persic language, is the name of a Tree bearing thorns. Perhaps it is the rhamnus paliurus, a deciduous plant or Tree, a native of Palestine, Spain, and Italy. There is every appearance that this is the Tree which furnished the crown of thorns which was put on the head of our Lord
Eve - ...
Her first error was in harboring mentally for a moment the possibility insinuated by the serpent, of God not having her truest interests at heart ("hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every Tree?"), and of the "other" professing friend being more concerned for her good than God. In her reply to Satan she attenuates God's gracious permission ("of every Tree of the garden thou mayest FREELY eat"; "we may eat of every Tree"), she exaggerates the one simple prohibition ("thou shalt not eat of it," and "thou shalt surely (she leaves out the "surely") die "; "ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die"), and omits the certainty of the penalty
Palmtree - ) Jericho was "the city of palmtrees" (Deuteronomy 34:3; Judges 1:16; Judges 3:13; 2 Chronicles 28:15). BETHANY means "house of dates"; thence the multitude took the palm branches to honor Christ (Acts 20:23-24), and from Olivet the people under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8:15) took palms, the Tree named in instituting the feast of tabernacles (Leviticus 23:40). The walls, doors, bases and posts of the temples of Solomon and Ezekiel (Ezekiel 40:16; Ezekiel 40:22; Ezekiel 40:26; Ezekiel 40:31; Ezekiel 40:34; Ezekiel 40:37; Ezekiel 41:18-20; Ezekiel 41:25-26; 1 Kings 6:29; 1 Kings 6:32-35; 1 Kings 7:36) were decorated with palmtrees in relief. "The righteous shall flourish like the palmtree" (Psalms 92:12); full of the "oil" of grace ever "fresh" (Psalms 92:10), looking calmly down on the world below and bearing its precious fruit for generations. The tabernacle is alluded to, the meeting place between God and His people; the oil-fed candlestick had the form of a Tree with flowers and fruits. "...
The palm was carried with willows and thick Trees (rabbinically called lulab ) in the hand at the feast of tabernacles, the thanksgiving for the ingathered fruits, and the commemoration of Israel's 40 years' sojourn in tabernacles in the wilderness. the male stamens and female pistils are on different Trees. Once the prevalent fruit Tree, it now is nowhere in Palestine except in the Philistine plain
Paradise - The same region is mentioned in Revelation 2:7 , where the "tree of life," the figurative antitype of that in Eden, held out to the overcomer, is spoken of as being in "the Paradise of God" (RV), marg
Deborah - She became a "mother in Israel" (Judges 4:6,14 ; 5:7 ), and "the children of Israel came up to her for judgment" as she sat in her tent under the palm Tree "between Ramah and Bethel
Myrrh - ) This was the gum or viscid white liquid which flows from a Tree resembling the acacia, found in Africa and Arabia, the Balsamodendron myrrha of botanists
Myrrh - It grew in Arabia around Saba; the gum resin exudes in drops which harden on the bark, and the flow is increased by incision into the Tree
Manna - In the materia medica, the juice of a certain Tree of the ash-kind, the Fraxinus ornus, or flowering ash a native of Sicily, Calabria,and other parts of the south of Europe
Pad - ) A cushion used as a saddle without a Tree or frame
Become - To pass from one state to another to enter into some state or condition, by a change from another state or condition, or by assuming or receiving new properties or qualities, additional matter, or a new character as, a cion becomes a Tree
Splendor - When used of the olive Tree ( Trees (cf
Jabesh-Gilead - In gratitude for this deliverance, forty years after this, the men of Jabesh-Gilead took down the bodies of Saul and of his three sons from the walls of Beth-shan, and after burning them, buried the bones under a Tree near the city (1 Samuel 31:11-13 )
Haply - , Mark 11:13 , of Christ and the fig Tree (not "if perchance," but marking a correspondence in point of fact)
Third, Thirdly - 1: τρίτος (Strong's #5154 — Adjective — tritos — Tree'-tos ) is used (a) as a noun, e
Cherubim - ...
After the rebellion against God in the garden of Eden, God sent cherubim to guard the Tree of life (Genesis 3:24)
Birth - Therefore, when the Israelites said to the Tree, “You are my father,” and to the stone, “You gave me birth,” they turned away from their true parent (the Tree and stone pillar were symbols in the worship of idols)
Shechem - ’ It was evidently a place of sanctity: there was a great oak (or terebinth) here no doubt a sacred Tree where Jacob hid his teraphim ( Genesis 35:4 ), and under which Joshua gave his parting address to the elders ( Joshua 24:1-33 ). A great stone under the Tree was traditionally connected with the latter event ( Joshua 24:26 )
Oil - The supply of grace comes not from a dead reservoir of oil, but through living "olive Trees. " The Lord Jesus has the fullness of grace from the double olive Tree of the Holy Spirit, so as to be at once our priest and king; He is the Tree, ministers the branches, "emptying the golden oil out of themselves" for the supply of the church and to the glory of the Author of grace
Brook - ‘It probably preserves the true etymology of קדרון, which seems to be an archaic (? Canaanite) plural of קדד “the Dark [3]”; for, though no name from this root is applied to any Tree in Bib. , some Tree resembling a cedar was called by a similar name in at least the later language (see exx
Targum - And Abraham lifted up his eyes after these [1] and looked, and behold a ram caught in a Tree by his horns. Then Abraham lifted up his eyes and looked, and behold a ram, which had been created between the evenings of the foundation of the world, was caught in the entanglement of a Tree by his horns
Life - A Tree is not destitute of life in winter, when the functions of its organs are suspended nor man during a swoon or syncope nor strictly birds, quadrupeds or serpents during their torpitude in winter. For the Tree of the field is man's life
Plane - ) Any Tree of the genus Platanus
Pomegranate - רמון , Numbers 13:23 ; Numbers 20:5 ; 1 Samuel 14:2 , &c, a low Tree growing very common in Palestine, and in other parts of the east
Codex - ...
The word comes directly from the Latin meaning “tree trunk,” possibly describing a stack of wooden tablets, each coated with wax on one side for writing and held together by leather thongs inserted in holes bored along one side
Incense - A dry, aromatic gum, exuding from a Tree which grows in Arabia and India
Oil - These many uses for oil made the culture of the olive-tree an extensive and lucrative business, 1 Chronicles 27:28 Ezekiel 27:17 Hosea 12:1
Mark, the Gospel of - ...
The stories of the cleansing of the Temple and the cursing of the fig Tree appear as isolated incidents in Matthew's Gospel, connected by chronological sequence (1618450344_37 ). Along the way to Jerusalem Jesus indicated to His disciples that He was hungry and approached a fig Tree to harvest its fruit. The Tree was full of leaves, giving every indication of life; but it possessed no fruit. Mark recorded that Jesus “answered” the Tree and announced, May “no man eat fruit of thee hereafter for ever” (Mark 11:14 ). Israel, the fig Tree, was supposed to provide a “house of prayer for all the nations” (Mark 11:17 , NIV). In essence, when Jesus “answered” the fig Tree, he pronounced a curse on the Jewish religious leadership and demonstrated His divine displeasure by cleansing the Temple. It should have come as no surprise, then, for Peter and the disciples, during their return trip, to find the cursed fig Tree dead (Mark 11:21 )
Locust - A swarm of locusts was among the plagues of Egypt; they covered the whole land, so that the earth was darkened, and devoured every green herb of the earth, and the fruit of every Tree which the hail had left, Exodus 10:4-19 . These were no sooner hatched, in June, than each of the broods collected itself into a compact body of a furlong or more square, and marching afterwards in a direct line towards the sea, they let nothing escape them; eating up every thing that was green and juicy, not only the lesser kinds of vegetables, but the vine likewise, the fig-tree, the pomegranate, the palm, and the apple-tree, even all the Trees of the field, Joel 1:12 ; in doing which, kept their ranks like men of war, climbing over, as they advanced, every Tree or wall that was in their way; nay, they entered into our very houses and bedchambers like thieves. A day or two after one of these broods was in motion, others were already hatched to march and glean after them, gnawing off the very bark and the young branches of such Trees as had before escaped with the loss only of their fruit and foliage
Candlestick, Seven-Branched - Both the shaft and the branches bore ornaments (cups, bowls, and lilies) in the shape of almond-tree blossoms; on the top of each branch rested a lamp of gold, probably of the ordinary pattern used in ancient times
Bay - ) The laurel Tree (Laurus nobilis). ) A tract covered with bay Trees
Arm - ) A branch of a Tree
Service - ...
(10):...
A name given to several Trees and shrubs of the genus Pyrus, as Pyrus domestica and P. torminalis of Europe, the various species of mountain ash or rowan Tree, and the American shad bush (see Shad bush, under Shad)
Jabesh (1) - ...
In gratitude the inhabitants, when he and his three sons were slain by the Philistines (1 Samuel 31:8; 1 Samuel 31:13), took down by night their corpses from the walls of Bethshan, where they had been exposed; then burnt the bodies and buried the bones under a Tree, and kept a funeral fast seven days
Heart - ) The nearest the middle or center; the part most hidden and within; the inmost or most essential part of any body or system; the source of life and motion in any organization; the chief or vital portion; the center of activity, or of energetic or efficient action; as, the heart of a country, of a Tree, etc
Poll - ) To remove the poll or head of; hence, to remove the top or end of; to clip; to lop; to shear; as, to poll the head; to poll a Tree
Size - ) Extent of superficies or volume; bulk; bigness; magnitude; as, the size of a Tree or of a mast; the size of a ship or of a rock
Jericho - It was also called the City of Palm-trees. Riha lies almost desert; and even that "one solitary palm Tree" which Dr
Age - The whole duration of a being, whether animal, vegetable, or other kind as, the usual age of man is seventy years the age of a horse may be twenty or thirty years the age of a Tree may be four hundred years
Could - The Tree could not grow for want of water
Pomegranate - The Tree and the fruit
Tap - ) To pierce so as to let out, or draw off, a fluid; as, to tap a cask, a Tree, a tumor, etc
Tie - ) To form, as a knot, by interlacing or complicating a cord; also, to interlace, or form a knot in; as, to tie a cord to a Tree; to knit; to knot
Trim - ) To make ready or right by cutting or shortening; to clip or lop; to curtail; as, to trim the hair; to trim a Tree
Age of Man - ) In the thousand years of the millennium apparently no one will die but the wicked, and one at a hundred years of age will be called a child: the days of God's people will be as the days of a Tree, and they will, when the curse is removed, long enjoy the work of their hands
Certain - So again, when it is said in the gospel, a certain man had two sons, (Luke 15:11) a Certain man had a fig Tree planted in his vineyard, (Luke 13:6) a certain man made a great supper, and bade many, (Luke 14:6) all these, and the like, directly refer to the Lord
Mandrake - Bochart, Calmet, and Sir Thomas Browne, suppose the citron intended; Celsius is persuaded that it is the fruit of the lote Tree; Hiller, that cherries are spoken of; and Ludolf maintains that it is the fruit which the Syrians call mauz, resembling in figure and taste the Indian fig; but the generality of interpreters and commentators understand by dudaim, mandrakes, a species of melon; and it is so rendered in the Septuagint, and in both the ...
Targums, in Genesis 30:14
Camphire - Kid - Nothing could exceed the kindness of these good people; a kid was killed, and a quantity of fresh milk was brought and presented in straw baskets made of the leaves of the doom Tree, seared over with wax, a manufacture in which the natives of these islands particularly excel
Lodge - , to sleep at night; as, to lodge in York Street. ) To come to a rest; to stop and remain; as, the bullet lodged in the bark of a Tree
Old - Advanced far in years or life having lived beyond the middle period, or rather towards the end of life, or towards the end of the ordinary term of living applied to animals or plants as an old man an old age an old camel or horse an old Tree
Seven-Branched Candlestick - Both the shaft and the branches bore ornaments (cups, bowls, and lilies) in the shape of almond-tree blossoms; on the top of each branch rested a lamp of gold, probably of the ordinary pattern used in ancient times
Ride - Strong as the axle-tree on which heaven rides
Voluntary - If a man kills another by lopping a Tree, here is no voluntary murder
Druids - As soon as the druids were informed of the fortunate discovery, they prepared every thing ready for the sacrifice under the oak, to which they fastened two white bulls by the horns; then the arch-druid, attended by a prodigious number of people, ascended the Tree, dressed in white; and, with a consecrated golden knife, or pruning hook, cropped the misletoe, which he received in his robe, amidst the rapturous exclamations of the people. Having secured this sacred plant, he descended the Tree; the bulls were sacrificed; and the Deity invoked to bless his own gift, and render it efficacious in those distempers in which it should be administered
Deborah - She held court at “the palm Tree of Deborah,” in the southern part of the territory of Ephraim, between Ramah and Bethel (Judges 4:4-5 )
Cedar - The finest of the Trees of Lebanon, the principal constituent of its ‘glory’ ( Isaiah 35:2 ; Isaiah 60:13 ); it was noted for its strength ( Psalms 29:5 ), its height ( 2 Kings 19:23 ) and its majesty ( 1 Kings 4:33 , 2 Kings 14:9 , Zechariah 11:1-2 ). Though but a dwarf in comparison with the Indian cedar, it is the most magnificent Tree in Syria; it attains a height of from 80 to 100 feet, and spreads out its branches horizontally so as to give a beautiful shade ( Ezekiel 31:3 ); it is evergreen, and has characteristic egg-shaped cones. The most famous of these is that at Kadisha , where there are upwards of 400 Trees, some of great age. The reference in Numbers 24:6 to ‘cedar Trees beside the waters’ can hardly apply to the Lebanon cedar, which flourishes best on bare mountain slopes
Moreh, - Sitting in the shelter of a sacred Tree, the priest or seer delivered his direction or’ oracles
Sparrow - The English Tree-sparrow (Passer montanus , Linn
Disciple - ...
A — 2: μαθήτρια (Strong's #3102 — Noun Feminine — mathetria — math-ay'-tree-ah ) "a female disciple," is said of Tabitha, Acts 9:36
Balm - " A balsamic oil, the modern "balsam of Jericho," is extracted from the kernels of the zuckum thorn bush, a kind of elaeagnus , in the region about the Dead Sea; but this cannot be the Tree. One of the far famed Trees graced Vespasian's triumph, A
Hanging - The Israelites,