What does Tirhakah mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
תִּרְהָ֤קָה king of Ethiopia and Egypt in the time of Sennacherib. 2

Definitions Related to Tirhakah

H8640


   1 king of Ethiopia and Egypt in the time of Sennacherib.
   Additional Information: Tirhakah = “he searched out the pious: he searched out the waiter”.
   

Frequency of Tirhakah (original languages)

Frequency of Tirhakah (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Tirhakah
TIRHAKAH , king of Cush ( 2 Kings 19:9 , Isaiah 37:9 ), marched out from Egypt against Sennacherib shortly before the mysterious destruction of the Assyrian army│(? b.c. 701). Herodotus preserves a version of the same event. Tirhakah was the third of the Ethiopian (25th) Dyn., and reigned as king of Ethiopia and Egypt from about b.c. 691 665; towards the end of his reign (670 665) until his death he was engaged in constant struggles with the Assyrians, who endeavoured to establish their power in Egypt by means of the native princes as against the Ethiopian. Tirhakah was quite unable to resist the attacks of Esarhaddon and Ashurbanipal; even Thebes was sacked, but the Assyrians were equally unable to hold the country they bad won. The chronology of the reign is not clear: Tirhakah was not king at the time of Sennacherib’s expedition, but he may have commanded the army opposing it. Winckler places the later Assyrian attacks in 675 668.
F. Ll. Griffith.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Tirhakah
The last king of Egypt of the Ethiopian (the fifteenth) dynasty. He was the brother-in-law of So (q.v.). He probably ascended the throne about B.C. 692, having been previously king of Ethiopia (2 Kings 19:9 ; Isaiah 37:9 ), which with Egypt now formed one nation. He was a great warrior, and but little is known of him. The Assyrian armies under Esarhaddon, and again under Assur-bani-pal, invaded Egypt and defeated Tirhakah, who afterwards retired into Ethiopia, where he died, after reigning twenty-six years.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Tirhakah
(tuhr hay' kuh) Egyptian pharaoh of the twenty-fifth dynasty (689-664 B.C.) who supported Hezekiah's revolt against the Assyrian king Sennacherib (2 Kings 19:8-9 ; Isaiah 37:9 ).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Tirhakah
Isaiah 37:9. (See HEZEKIAH; SO; ESARHADDON.) The Tehrak of the Egyptian monuments, who reigned over Egypt from 690 or 695 B.C. to 667 B.C.; probably king of Ethiopia before he took the title "king of Egypt." Third king of Manetho's 25th or Ethiopian dynasty. Naturally he helped Hezekiah of Judah against their common enemy Sennacherib, who threatened, Egypt. Herodotus (2:141) and Josephus (Ant. 10:1-3) represent Sennacherib to have advanced to Pelusium; here Tirhakah, the ally of Sethos, the king priest of Lower Egypt, and of Hezekiah, forced Sennacherib to retire, His acquisition of the throne of Egypt seems subsequent to his accession to the Ethiopian throne, and to the diversion which he made in favor of Hezekiah against Sennacherib. He extended his conquests to the pillars of Hercules (Strabo xv. 472), the temple at Medineet Haboo is inscribed with his deeds.
But Memphite jealousy hid his share in Sennacherib's overthrow (at the time of his second invasion of Judah), and attributed Setho's deliverance to divinely sent mice, which gnawed the enemy's bowstrings. The Ethiopian influence and authority over Egypt appear in the large proportion of Ethiopians in Shishak's and Zerah's armies (2 Chronicles 12:3; 2 Chronicles 16:8); also in Pharaoh Necho's (Jeremiah 46:9). Isaiah (Isaiah 17:12-18;Isaiah 17:7) announces Sennacherib's overthrow, and desires the Ethiopian ambassadors, now in Jerusalem, having arrived from Meroe, the island between "the river of Ethiopia," the Nile, and the Astaboras, in "vessels of bulrushes"' or pitchcovered papyrus canoes, to bring word to their own nation (not "woe," but "ho!" calling the Ethiopians' attention to his prophetic announcement of the fall of Judah's and their common foe; Vulgate translated "the land of the clanging sound of wings," i.e. the land of armies with clashing arms; Vitringa supports KJV Ethiopia "shadowing," i.e. protecting the Hebrew "with wings"; Kenaphaim, related to the name of the idol Kneph, represented with wings: Psalms 91:4).
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Tirhakah
Inquirer; examiner; dull observer
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Tirhakah
King of Ethiopia. 2 Kings 19:9 ; Isaiah 37:9 . See EGYPT.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Tirhakah
Tirhakah (tir'ha-kah), exalted? King of Ethiopia and upper Egypt. 2 Kings 19:9; Isaiah 37:9. In legends he was one of the greatest conquerors of antiquity. His triumphs westward are said to have reached the Pillars of Hercules. When Sennacherib heard of his coming he demanded the immediate surrender of Jerusalem. 2 Kings 19:9; 2 Kings 19:16. Tirhakah reigned, probably, 28 years. The dates are uncertain, but perhaps his rule extended from b.c. 695 to 667.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Tirhakah
King of Ethiopia, or Cuch, and of Egypt. This prince, at the head of a powerful army, attempted to relieve Hezekiah, when attacked by Sennarcherib, 2 Kings 19:9 , but the Assyrian army was routed before he came up, Isaiah 37:19 , B. C. 712. He is undoubtedly the Tarcus of Manetho, and the Tearcho of Strabo, the third and last king of the twenty-fifth or Ethiopian dynasty. It is supposed that he is the Pharaoh intended in Isaiah 30:2 ; and that Isaiah 19:1-25 depicts the anarchy which succeeded his reign. He was a powerful monarch, ruling both Upper and lower Egypt, and extending his conquests far into Asia and towards the "pillars of Hercules" in the west. His name and victories are recorded on an ancient temple at Medinet Abou, in upper Egypt; whence also the representation above given of his head was copied by Rosselini.

Sentence search

Tirhakah - Tirhakah , king of Cush ( 2 Kings 19:9 , Isaiah 37:9 ), marched out from Egypt against Sennacherib shortly before the mysterious destruction of the Assyrian army│(? b. Tirhakah was the third of the Ethiopian (25th) Dyn. Tirhakah was quite unable to resist the attacks of Esarhaddon and Ashurbanipal; even Thebes was sacked, but the Assyrians were equally unable to hold the country they bad won. The chronology of the reign is not clear: Tirhakah was not king at the time of Sennacherib’s expedition, but he may have commanded the army opposing it
Tirhakah - Tirhakah (tir'ha-kah), exalted? King of Ethiopia and upper Egypt. Tirhakah reigned, probably, 28 years
So - Tirhakah or Tehrak, the third and last of the dynasty, is thought to have put So to death. Smith's deciphering) married the sister of Tirhakah who helped Hezekiah against Sennacherib; at Sabaku's death Tirhakah succeeded, Sabaku's son being set aside
Tir'Hakah, - Possibly Tirhakah ruled over Ethiopia before becoming king of Egypt
Tirhakah - The Assyrian armies under Esarhaddon, and again under Assur-bani-pal, invaded Egypt and defeated Tirhakah, who afterwards retired into Ethiopia, where he died, after reigning twenty-six years
Esar-Haddon - He made war with the Philistines, and took Azoth, by Tartan, his general: he attacked Egypt, Cush, and Edom, Isaiah 20, 34; designing, probably, to avenge the affront Sennacherib his father had received from Tirhakah, king of Cush, and the king of Egypt, who had been Hezekiah's confederates
Esarhaddon - Southward he claimed authority over Egypt and Ethiopia; having driven the Ethiopian Tirhakah out of Egypt. , marching from Asshur (Kileh Sherghat) to Tyre, besieged Bahal its king who was in league with Tirhakah, thence he marched to Aphek at the foot of Lebanon, then to Raphia S. Though distressed on the way by want of water, he at last drove Tirhakah out of Egypt
Ethiopia - Ethiopia had sent her ambassadors to Jerusalem where they now were (Isaiah 18:2), Tirhakah their king shortly afterward being the ally whose diversion in that city's favor saved it from Sennacherib (Isaiah 36:37). of Palestine, and Tirhakah the Ethiopian who advanced toward Judah against Sennacherib, were doubtless rulers of Upper Egypt and Ethiopia combined. Tirhakah's name is found only on a Theban temple, and his connection with Ethiopia is marked by several monuments there being ascribed to him. Tirhakah was third of the 25th dynasty of Egypt, an Ethiopian dynasty
Pharaoh - Tirhakah, king of Ethiopia and Egypt, in the time of Hezekiah, B. See Tirhakah
Pharaoh - Tirhakah is not entitled Pharaoh as in Egyptian documents, but is more accurately described as king of Cush ( 2 Kings 19:9 ). In the time of Sennacherib and Hezekiah, Tirhakah or some earlier king of the Ethiopian Dynasty would be on the throne
Tirhakah - 10:1-3) represent Sennacherib to have advanced to Pelusium; here Tirhakah, the ally of Sethos, the king priest of Lower Egypt, and of Hezekiah, forced Sennacherib to retire, His acquisition of the throne of Egypt seems subsequent to his accession to the Ethiopian throne, and to the diversion which he made in favor of Hezekiah against Sennacherib
Cush - Within this period falls the attempt of Tirhakah, king of Cush, to defeat Sennacherib of Assyria in Palestine ( 2 Kings 19:9 )
Memphis - At a later period, Tahrak (Tirhakah) ruled at Memphis; Necho, Hophra, and the other kings of the 26th Dynasty were buried at their ancestral city Sais, although their government was centred in Memphis
Pharaoh - Some kings of Egypt are mentioned in scripture without this title, as Shishak, Necho, Hophra, So, and Tirhakah, the last two of whom were Ethiopians
Ethiopia - The most influential of these Ethiopian pharaohs was Taharqa (biblical Tirhakah), who rendered aid to Hezekiah of Judah during the Assyrian invasion of Sennacherib in 701 B
Cush - Tirhakah ( 2 Kings 19:9 ) was one of the last of the pharaohs from Cush
Ethiopia - The last of these, Tahraku (Tirhakah Sennacherib - (See Tirhakah
Alliances - Hezekiah was tempted to lean on Egypt against the Assyrian Sennacherib (Isaiah 30:2), and Tirhakah of Ethiopia did make a diversion in his favor (2 Kings 19:9)
Egypt - The third of them was Tirhakah (2 Kings 19:9 ). 674 it was conquered by the Assyrians, who divided it into twenty satrapies, and Tirhakah was driven back to his ancestral dominions
No - It records also Tirhakah the Ethiopian's exploits
Egypt - ...
Another king of this dynasty was Tirhakah or Taharka (the Tehrak of the monuments) who came into collision with Assyria in the 14th year of Hezekiah. Tirhakah was afterwards defeated by Sennacherib and again at the conquest of Egypt by Esar-haddon
Egypt - The most important of these pharaohs was Taharqa, the biblical Tirhakah who rendered aid to Hezekiah (2 Kings 19:9 ; Isaiah 37:9 )
Chronology - The Apis tablets of Egypt prove the synchronism of Josiah and Pharaoh Necho; also they demonstrate that of Hezekiah and Tirhakah
Egypt - Tehrak or Tirhakah fought Sennacherib in support of Hezekiah
Kings, the Books of - The Egyptian king Psinaches' patronage of Hadad the Edomite (1 Kings 11:19-20): Solomon's alliance with his successor Psusennes who reigned 35 years; Shishak's (Sesonchis I) accession toward the close of Solomon's reign (1 Kings 11:40); his conquest of Judea under Rehoboam, represented on a monument still at Karnak which mentions "the king of Judah," the time of the Ethiopian dynasty of So (Sabak) and Tirhakah, of the 25th dynasty; the rise and speedy fall of Syrian power, Assyria overshadowing it; the account of Mesha harmonizing with the (See DIBON stone; Assyria's struggles with Egypt and Babylon's' sudden supremacy under Nebuchadnezzar over both Assyria and Egypt: all these notices in Kings accord with independent pagan history and inscriptions
Hezekiah - See Tirhakah'S coming forth to encounter Sennacherib created a diversion in favor of Judaea. In the former invasion Sennacherib in his first, expedition inflicted a decisive blow on the united forces of Egypt and Ethiopia at Altagu (possibly the Eltekon of Joshua 15:59); but now he was forced to raise the siege of Pelusium by Tirhakah, and send an imperious letter to Hezekiah by Rabshakeh, whose sneers at his religious reforms in removing the high places (2 Kings 18:22-32) and flattering promises in fluent Hebrew to the people favor the idea that he was a renegade Jew
Egypt - Solomon married a Pharaoh's daughter; Tirhakah helped Hezekiah; So made a treaty with Hoshea; Pharaoh Necho was unwilling to war with Josiah; and Pharaoh Hophra (Apries) raised the Chaldaean siege of Jerusalem as Zedekiah's ally
Egypt - Tahrak (Tirhakah) was particularly active in this endeavour, but as soon as Esarhaddon was free to invade Egypt the Assyrian king had no difficulty in taking Memphis, capturing most of the royal family, and driving Tahrak southward ( c -->