What does Time mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
בָּעֵ֣ת time. 36
χρόνον time either long or short. 25
καιρῷ due measure. / a measure of time 19
בָּעֵ֥ת time. 15
עֵ֥ת time. 15
τότε then. 14
καιρὸν due measure. / a measure of time 13
καιρὸς due measure. / a measure of time 12
עֵ֣ת time. 10
בְּעֵ֣ת time. 8
הַיָּמִ֔ים day 7
בְּעֵ֥ת time. 7
עֵ֤ת time. 7
וְעֵ֣ת time. 7
כָּעֵ֣ת time. 7
הַיָּמִֽים day 6
בָּעֵ֤ת time. 6
καιροῦ due measure. / a measure of time 6
פַּ֣עַם stroke 6
לְעֵ֣ת time. 6
ποτε once i.e. formerly 5
בַּפַּ֣עַם stroke 5
וּבָעֵ֣ת time. 5
χρόνος time either long or short. 5
ἅμα at the same time 5
χρόνῳ time either long or short. 5
τρίτον the third. 5
δευτέρου the second 5
שֵׁנִית֙ second. 4
שֵׁנִ֔ית second. 4
χρόνου time either long or short. 4
שֵׁנִ֑ית second. 4
עֵ֖ת time. 4
δεύτερον the second 4
מֵעֵ֥ת time. 4
לְעֵ֣ת ׀ time. 3
מֵֽ֝עַתָּ֗ה now. 3
בַּיּ֣וֹם day 3
יָמִ֣ים day 3
כָּעֵ֥ת time. 3
מָחָר֙ tomorrow 3
לְעֵ֖ת time. 3
הָעֵ֣ת time. 3
בַּיּ֥וֹם day 3
χρόνων time either long or short. 3
πώποτε ever 3
שֵׁנִ֖ית second. 3
τῷ this 3
לָלֶ֔דֶת to bear 2
הַיּ֗וֹם day 2
מֵעַ֔תָּה now. 2
ποτέ once i.e. formerly 2
יְמֵ֥י day 2
יְמֵ֛י day 2
לְעֵ֪ת time. 2
בְּי֣וֹם day 2
לְי֣וֹם day 2
עֶת־ time. 2
ἧς who 2
לַמּוֹעֵֽד appointed place 2
עֵ֚ת time. 2
בַּפַּ֥עַם stroke 2
וְעֵ֥ת time. 2
לְעֶת־ time. 2
καιρόν due measure. / a measure of time 2
καιρός due measure. / a measure of time 2
בְּמוֹעֲדֽוֹ appointed place 2
בְּמֹ֣עֲד֔וֹ appointed place 2
ἐπὶ upon 2
בָּעֵ֨ת time. 2
מָחָ֖ר tomorrow 2
שֵׁנִ֥ית second. 2
עִדָּנָ֖א time. 2
בְּפַ֥עַם stroke 2
וּבְעֵ֤ת time. 2
רַ֭בַּת much 2
ה֣וּא he 2
פַּ֥עַם stroke 2
שִׁלְשׁ֗וֹם day before yesterday 1
אֶשְׁנֶ֖ה to repeat 1
בַּשְּׁבִעִ֔ית seventh. 1
עֵֽת time. 1
וּבְעֵ֣ת time. 1
וְ֭הִרְבָּה be or become great 1
וּמֵעֵת֙ time. 1
לָרֹ֛ב multitude 1
כְּעֵ֖ת time. 1
בָּרִאשֹׁנָ֑ה first 1
וַיִּשְׁנ֔וּ to repeat 1
רִאשׁ֥וֹן first 1
כָּעֵ֤ת ׀ time. 1
בָרִֽאשֹׁנָה֙ first 1
וְעֵ֖ת time. 1
בְעִתּ֑וֹ time. 1
؟ עִתֶּֽךָ time. 1
עֵ֗ת time. 1
עִתּ֗וֹ time. 1
בָּֽעֵת־ time. 1
עִתֵּךְ֙ time. 1
לְמַבָּרִ֥אשׁוֹנָ֖ה first 1
אַשְׁבִּ֛יר to break 1
הַעֵ֞ת time. 1
עֵ֛ת time. 1
שִׁלְשׁ֔וֹם day before yesterday 1
תְּמ֣וֹל before 1
בַּתְּחִלָּ֖ה beginning 1
בַּתְּחִלָּ֔ה beginning 1
כָעֵ֤ת time. 1
בַּתְּחִלָּֽה beginning 1
בָֽעֵת־ time. 1
כְּשָׁעָ֣ה brief time 1
וּכְעֵ֣ת time. 1
כָּעֵ֣ת ׀ time. 1
שְׁתֵּ֣י two. 1
בִּשְׁתַּ֛יִם two. 1
שָׁבְתָ֛ה to cease 1
שֵׁנִֽית second. 1
בְּעֵת֩ time. 1
וּמֵעֵ֗ת time. 1
שַׁלֵּ֖שׁוּ to do a third time 1
וּבְעֵת֙ time. 1
שְׁלִישִׁ֙תָה֙ third 1
בַּשְּׁלִשִׁית֒ third 1
שְׁלִשִׁ֔ים third 1
שִׁבְתּ֛וֹ cessation 1
שֵׁנִ֣ית second. 1
עִתָּ֑הּ time. 1
הָעֵ֗ת time. 1
בְקָר֖וֹב near. 1
וְצָבָ֣א that which goes forth 1
עֵ֭ת time. 1
שִׁלְשֹׁ֔ם day before yesterday 1
וְכָעֵ֕ת time. 1
עֵת֙ time. 1
קַדְמַ֖ת former time or situation 1
שִׁלְשׁ֑וֹם day before yesterday 1
לְעֵֽת־ time. 1
؟ מִקֶּ֜דֶם east 1
צָבָ֣א that which goes forth 1
שִׁלְשֽׁוֹם day before yesterday 1
שְׁנוּ֙ to repeat 1
וּבָעֵ֖ת time. 1
מֵעַתָּ֖ה now. 1
מֵעַתָּה֙ now. 1
פַּעֲמַ֖יִם stroke 1
הַפַּ֖עַם stroke 1
מֵֽעַתָּ֥ה now. 1
מֵ֝עַתָּ֗ה now. 1
לְפָנִ֖ים face. 1
פַעֲמָֽיִם stroke 1
שִׁלְשֹֽׁם day before yesterday 1
עֵ֑ת time. 1
לְעֵ֥ת time. 1
הַפָּ֑עַם stroke 1
וּלְעֵ֥ת time. 1
הָעֵת֙ time. 1
בְּעֵת֙ time. 1
הַעֵ֤ת time. 1
וְעֵת֙ time. 1
בְּעִתּ֔וֹ time. 1
עִתָּ֔הּ time. 1
בָּעֵת֩ time. 1
בְּעֵ֤ת time. 1
בְּעִתָּ֥הּ time. 1
בְּעֵ֛ת time. 1
בְּעֵ֥ת־ time. 1
בְּעֵ֧ת time. 1
וּבְעֵ֥ת time. 1
וַיְשַׁלֵּֽשׁוּ to do a third time 1
וּמִ֨קְצָתָ֔ם end 1
וְעֵֽת־ time. 1
וּבָעֵ֤ת time. 1
וּבָעֵ֨ת time. 1
עֵ֨ת time. 1
קָצִיר֙ harvest 1
עֵֽת־ time. 1
בְּעֵת־ time. 1
αἰῶνος for ever 1
מוֹעֵֽד appointed place 1
בַּעֲל֣וֹת to go up 1
זִמְנָ֞א a set time 1
בְּאַחֲרִ֣ית after part 1
וּֽבְאַחֲרִית֙ after part 1
אֶתְמ֣וֹל yesterday 1
מֵֽאֶתְמוּל֙ yesterday 1
בָּצִ֔יר vintage. 1
דּ֣וֹר period 1
וְהִנֵּ֧ה behold 1
יַהֲפֹ֥ךְ to turn 1
וְכִזְמַנָּ֑ם a set time 1
בִּזְמַנֵּיהֶ֗ם a set time 1
זְמָֽן a set time 1
זְמָ֣ן a set time 1
זִמְנָ֡א a set time 1
זִמְנָ֔א a set time 1
וְזִמְנָ֣א a set time 1
אַחַ֥ת one (number). 1
זִמְנָא֩ a set time 1
זָ֑רַע seed 1
בַחֹ֣דֶשׁ the new moon 1
מֵהָחֵ֤ל to profane 1
(כְּחֹ֣ם) heat 1
וָחֵ֗צִי half. 1
חֹ֣ק statute 1
בֶּחָרִ֥ישׁ ploughing 1
וּלְמִיָּמִ֗ים day 1
מִיָּמָיו֙ day 1
הַיָּמִ֤ים ׀ day 1
וּבַיּ֨וֹם day 1
הַיּ֔וֹם day 1
הַ֨יָּמִ֔ים day 1
؟ לְאָחֽוֹר the back side 1
אַחַ֖ת one (number). 1
מִיָּמִ֡ים day 1
τοῦ this 1
ἅπαξ once 1
ἄρτι just now 1
ἀσιτίας abstinence from food (whether voluntary or enforced). 1
δευτέρου» the second 1
δευτέρῳ the second 1
δήποτε now at length. 1
διηνεκὲς continuously 1
διηνεκές continuously 1
ἑκάστοτε at every time 1
ηὐκαίρουν to have opportunity. 1
εὔκαιρον seasonable 1
ἥξει to have come 1
νῦν at this time 1
τὸ this 1
who 1
אָ֖ז then 1
οὗ who 1
τοῦτο this. 1
τούτου this. 1
προθεσμίας set beforehand 1
τάχει quickness 1
τάχει› quickness 1
τρίτου the third. 1
φυλακῇ guard 1
χρόνους time either long or short. 1
χρονοτριβῆσαι to wear away time 1
ὥρα a certain definite time or season fixed by natural law and returning with the revolving year. / the daytime (bounded by the rising and setting of the sun) 1
ὥραν a certain definite time or season fixed by natural law and returning with the revolving year. / the daytime (bounded by the rising and setting of the sun) 1
מֵאָ֖ז then 1
אָ֥ז then 1
כְהַיּ֖וֹם day 1
מִימֵ֞י day 1
לַעֲל֣וֹת to go up 1
לַמּוֹעֵ֔ד appointed place 1
לְמוֹעֵ֣ד appointed place 1
לַמּוֹעֵ֛ד appointed place 1
הַמּוֹעֵ֖ד appointed place 1
לַמּוֹעֵ֥ד appointed place 1
לְמוֹעֵ֨ד appointed place 1
לְמוֹעֵ֥ד appointed place 1
מוֹעֵ֖ד appointed place 1
בְּמֹעֵ֛ד appointed place 1
לְמוֹעֵד֙ appointed place 1
לְמוֹעֵ֖ד appointed place 1
מוֹעֵ֣ד appointed place 1
לַמּוֹעֵ֣ד appointed place 1
לַמּוֹעֵ֞ד appointed place 1
לַמּוֹעֵ֕ד appointed place 1
הַמּוֹעֵֽד appointed place 1
מֶ֬ה what 1
בְּמוֹעֲד֑וֹ appointed place 1
מוֹעֵ֑ד appointed place 1
מָחָ֗ר tomorrow 1
מָחָ֑ר tomorrow 1
מִסְפַּ֣ר number 1
הִגִּ֧יעַ to touch 1
נִדָּתָ֑הּ impurity 1
בְּעִדָּנָ֡א time. 1
בְעִדָּנָ֡א time. 1
וְעִדָּֽן time. 1
עִדָּ֥ן time. 1
עִדָּֽן time. 1
מֵֽעוֹלָ֔ם long duration 1
עוֹלָ֖ם long duration 1
לַמּוֹעֵד֙ appointed place 1
מָ֖ה what 1
לְ֠מִיּוֹם day 1
בִּימֵ֣י day 1
כַּיָּמִים֙ day 1
וְהַיָּמִ֞ים day 1
יָמִ֨ים day 1
הַיָּמִ֑ים day 1
יָמִֽים day 1
כְּהַיּ֣וֹם day 1
יָמִ֑ים day 1
יְמֵֽי־ day 1
הַיּֽוֹם day 1
י֭וֹמוֹ day 1
מִיָּמִ֣ים day 1
יָמִ֥ים day 1
מִיָּמִ֑ים day 1
מִיָּמִים֙ day 1
בַּיּ֤וֹם day 1
בְּכֹ֥ל all 1
؟ יָמִֽים day 1
יְמֵי֙ day 1
כִּימֵ֥י day 1
בַיּוֹם֩ day 1
הַיּ֣וֹם day 1
מִיּ֣וֹם ׀ day 1
וְהַ֨יָּמִ֔ים day 1
יְמֵ֗י day 1
בְּי֬וֹם day 1
בְּי֪וֹם day 1
בְּי֥וֹם day 1
יֽוֹמַיָּה֩ day. 1
יָצֹ֥א to go out 1
לְיִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל the second name for Jacob given to him by God after his wrestling with the angel at Peniel. 1
תְּמוֹל֙ before 1

Definitions Related to Time

H6256


   1 Time.
      1a Time (of an event).
      1b Time (usual).
      1c experiences, fortunes.
      1d occurrence, occasion.
      

G5550


   1 Time either long or short.
   Additional Information: For synonyms see entry 2540, kairos.
   See entry 5853 for comparison of synonyms.
   

G2540


   1 due measure.
   2 a measure of Time, a larger or smaller portion of Time, hence:.
      2a a fixed and definite Time, the Time when things are brought to crisis, the decisive epoch waited for.
      2b opportune or seasonable Time.
      2c the right Time.
      2d a limited period of Time.
      2e to what Time brings, the state of the times, the things and events of Time.
      Additional Information: For synonyms see entry 5550, chronos.
      See entry 5853 for comparison of synonyms.
      

G5119


   1 then.
   2 at that Time.
   

H3117


   1 day, Time, year.
      1a day (as opposed to night).
      1b day (24 hour period).
         1b1 as defined by evening and morning in Genesis 1.
         1b2 as a division of Time.
            1b2a a working day, a day’s journey.
      1c days, lifetime (pl.
      ).
      1d Time, period (general).
      1e year.
      1f temporal references.
         1f1 today.
         1f2 yesterday.
         1f3 tomorrow.
         

H6471


   1 stroke, beat, foot, step, anvil, occurrence.
      1a foot, hoof-beat, footfall, footstep.
      1b anvil.
      1c occurrence, Time, stroke, beat.
         1c1 one Time, once, twice, thrice, as Time on Time, at this repetition, this once, now at length, now … now, at one Time … at another.
         

G5154


   1 the third.
   

G260


   1 at the same Time, at once, together prep.
   2 together with.
   Additional Information: adv.
   For synonyms see entry 3674, homou.
   See entry 5807 for comparison of synonyms.
   

G1208


   1 the second, the other of two.
   

H8145


   1 second.
      1a second (the ordinal number).
      1b again (a second Time).
      1c another, other (something as distinct from something else).
      

H5732


   1 Time.
      1a Time (of duration).
      1b year.
      

H4279


   1 tomorrow, in Time to come, in the future.
      1a tomorrow (as the day following the present day).
      1b in future Time.
      

H5079


   1 impurity, filthiness, menstruous, set apart.
      1a impurity.
         1a1 of ceremonial impurity.
         1a2 of menstruation.
      1b impure thing (fig.
      ).
         1b1 of idolatry, immorality.
         

G4218


   1 once i.e. formerly, aforetime, at some Time.
   

H4150


   1 appointed place, appointed Time, meeting.
      1a appointed Time.
         1a1 appointed Time (general).
         1a2 sacred season, set feast, appointed season.
      1b appointed meeting.
      1c appointed place.
      1d appointed sign or signal.
      1e tent of meeting.
      

H1755


   1 period, generation, habitation, dwelling.
      1a period, age, generation (period of Time).
      1b generation (those living during a period).
      1c generation (characterised by quality, condition, class of men).
      1d dwelling-place, habitation.
      

H1210


   1 vintage.
   

H7673


   1 to cease, desist, rest.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to cease.
         1a2 to rest, desist (from labour).
      1b (Niphal) to cease.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to cause to cease, put an end to.
         1c2 to exterminate, destroy.
         1c3 to cause to desist from.
         1c4 to remove.
         1c5 to cause to fail.
   2 (Qal) to keep or observe the sabbath.
   

H2490


   1 to profane, defile, pollute, desecrate, begin.
      1a (Niphal).
         1a1 to profane oneself, defile oneself, pollute oneself.
            1a1a ritually.
            1a1b sexually.
         1a2 to be polluted, be defiled.
      1b (Piel).
         1b1 to profane, make common, defile, pollute.
         1b2 to violate the honour of, dishonour.
         1b3 to violate (a covenant).
         1b4 to treat as common.
      1c (Pual) to profane (name of God).
      1d (Hiphil).
         1d1 to let be profaned.
         1d2 to begin.
      1e (Hophal) to be begun.
   2 to wound (fatally), bore through, pierce, bore.
      2a (Qal) to pierce.
      2b (Pual) to be slain.
      2c (Poel) to wound, pierce.
      2d (Poal) to be wounded.
   3 (Piel) to play the flute or pipe.
   

H7227


   1 much, many, great.
      1a much.
      1b many.
      1c abounding in.
      1d more numerous than.
      1e abundant, enough.
      1f great.
      1g strong.
      1h greater than adv.
      1i much, exceedingly.
   2 captain, chief.
   

H3318


   1 to go out, come out, exit, go forth.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to go or come out or forth, depart.
         1a2 to go forth (to a place).
         1a3 to go forward, proceed to (to or toward something).
         1a4 to come or go forth (with purpose or for result).
         1a5 to come out of.
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to cause to go or come out, bring out, lead out.
         1b2 to bring out of.
         1b3 to lead out.
         1b4 to deliver.
      1c (Hophal) to be brought out or forth.
      

G4455


   1 ever, at any Time.
   

H8027


   1 to do a third Time, do three times, divide in three parts.
      1a (Piel) to do a third Time, divide into three parts.
      1b (Pual) to be three years of age, be threefold.
      

G1909


   1 upon, on, at, by, before.
   2 of position, on, at, by, over, against.
   3 to, over, on, at, across, against.
   

H8138


   1 to repeat, do again, change, alter.
      1a (Qal) to change.
      1b (Niphal) to be repeated.
      1c (Piel) to change, alter.
      1d (Hithpael) to disguise oneself.
      

H3205


   1 to bear, bring forth, beget, gender, travail.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to bear, bring forth.
            1a1a of child birth.
            1a1b of distress (simile).
            1a1c of wicked (behaviour).
         1a2 to beget.
      1b (Niphal) to be born.
      1c (Piel).
         1c1 to cause or help to bring forth.
         1c2 to assist or tend as a midwife.
         1c3 midwife (participle).
      1d (Pual) to be born.
      1e (Hiphil). 1e1 to beget (a child). 1e2 to bear (fig.
         —of wicked bringing forth iniquity).
      1f (Hophal) day of birth, birthday (infinitive).
      1g (Hithpael) to declare one’s birth (pedigree).
      

H7665


   1 to break, break in pieces.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 break, break in or down, rend violently, wreck, crush, quench.
         1a2 to break, rupture (fig).
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to be broken, be maimed, be crippled, be wrecked.
         1b2 to be broken, be crushed (fig).
      1c (Piel) to shatter, break.
      1d (Hiphil) to cause to break out, bring to the birth.
      1e (Hophal) to be broken, be shattered.
      

H6635


   1 that which goes forth, army, war, warfare, host.
      1a army, host.
         1a1 host (of organised army).
         1a2 host (of angels).
         1a3 of sun, moon, and stars.
         1a4 of whole creation.
      1b war, warfare, service, go out to war.
      1c service.
      

H2706


   1 statute, ordinance, limit, something prescribed, due.
      1a prescribed task.
      1b prescribed portion.
      1c action prescribed (for oneself), resolve.
      1d prescribed due.
      1e prescribed limit, boundary.
      1f enactment, decree, ordinance.
         1f1 specific decree.
         1f2 law in general.
      1g enactments, statutes.
         1g1 conditions.
         1g2 enactments.
         1g3 decrees.
         1g4 civil enactments prescribed by God.
         

H259


   1 one (number).
      1a one (number).
      1b each, every.
      1c a certain.
      1d an (indefinite article).
      1e only, once, once for all.
      1f one … another, the one … the other, one after another, one by one.
      1g first.
      1h eleven (in combination), eleventh (ordinal).
      

H8543


   1 before, before that Time, beforetime, heretofore, of late, of old, these days, Time(s) past, yesterday, day before yesterday, recently, formerly.
      1a yesterday.
         1a1 recently, formerly (usual usage) (fig).
      1b as formerly, so more recently.
      1c from yesterday, already.
      

H6258


   1 now.
      1a now.
      1b in phrases.
      

G3739


   1 who, which, what, that.
   Additional Information: Wigram’s count is 1310 not 1393.
   

G2119


   1 to have opportunity.
   2 to have leisure.
   3 to do something.
   4 to give one’s Time to a thing.
   

G5551


   1 to wear away Time, spend Time.
   

G776


   1 abstinence from food (whether voluntary or enforced).
   

G2240


   1 to have come, have arrived, be present.
   2 metaph.
      2a to come to one, i.e. to seek an intimacy with one, become his follower: to come upon one (unexpectedly).
      2b to come upon one, of things endured.
      

G5610


   1 a certain definite Time or season fixed by natural law and returning with the revolving year.
      1a of the seasons of the year, spring, summer, autumn, winter.
   2 the daytime (bounded by the rising and setting of the sun), a day.
   3 a twelfth part of the day-Time, an hour, (the twelve hours of the day are reckoned from the rising to the setting of the sun).
   4 any definite Time, point of Time, moment.
   

H7235


   1 be or become great, be or become many, be or become much, be or become numerous.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to become many, become numerous, multiply (of people, animals, things).
         1a2 to be or grow great.
      1b (Piel) to make large, enlarge, increase, become many.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to make much, make many, have many.
            1c1a to multiply, increase.
            1c1b to make much to do, do much in respect of, transgress greatly.
            1c1c to increase greatly or exceedingly.
         1c2 to make great, enlarge, do much.
   2 (Qal) to shoot.
   

G5438


   1 guard, watch.
      1a a watching, keeping watch.
         1a1 to keep watch.
      1b persons keeping watch, a guard, sentinels.
      1c of the place where captives are kept, a prison.
      1d of the Time (of night) during which guard was kept, a watch i.e. a period of Time during which part of the guard was on duty, and at the end of which others relieved them.
      As the earlier Greeks divided the night commonly into three parts, so, previous to the exile, the Israelites also had three watches in a night; subsequently, however, after they became subject to the Romans, they adopted the Roman custom of dividing the night into four watches.
      

G1221


   1 now at length.
   2 at any Time.
   3 at last.
   4 just exactly.
   

G4287


   1 set beforehand, appointed or determined beforehand, prearranged.
   

G1336


   1 continuously, continuous.
   

G2121


   1 seasonable, timely, opportune.
   

G3568


   1 at this Time, the present, now.
   Additional Information: For synonyms see entries 737, arti; and 2235, ede.
   See entry 5815 for comparison of synonyms.
   

H2320


   1 the new moon, month, monthly.
      1a the first day of the month.
      1b the lunar month.
      

H2015


   1 to turn, overthrow, overturn.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to overturn, overthrow.
         1a2 to turn, turn about, turn over, turn around.
         1a3 to change, transform.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to turn oneself, turn, turn back.
         1b2 to change oneself.
         1b3 to be perverse.
         1b4 to be turned, be turned over, be changed, be turned against.
         1b5 to be reversed.
         1b6 to be overturned, be overthrown.
         1b7 to be upturned.
      1c (Hithpael).
         1c1 to transform oneself.
         1c2 to turn this way and that, turn every way.
      1d (Hophal) to turn on someone.
      

H2165


   1 a set Time, appointed Time, Time.
   

H5769


   1 long duration, antiquity, futurity, for ever, ever, everlasting, evermore, perpetual, old, ancient, world.
      1a ancient Time, long Time (of past).
      1b (of future).
         1b1 for ever, always.
         1b2 continuous existence, perpetual.
         1b3 everlasting, indefinite or unending future, eternity.
         

H2233


   1 seed, sowing, offspring.
      1a a sowing.
      1b seed.
      1c semen virile.
      1d offspring, descendants, posterity, children.
      1e of moral quality. 1e1 a practitioner of righteousness (fig.
         ).
      1f sowing Time (by meton).
      

H8147


   1 two.
      1a two (the cardinal number).
         1a1 two, both, double, twice.
      1b second (the ordinal number).
      1c in combination with other numbers.
      1d both (a dual number).
      

H7223


   1 first, primary, former.
      1a former (of Time).
         1a1 ancestors.
         1a2 former things.
      1b foremost (of location).
      1c first (in Time).
      1d first, chief (in degree) adv.
   2 first, before, formerly, at first.
   

H2166


   1 a set Time, Time, season.
   

H6924


   1 east, antiquity, front, that which is before, aforetime.
      1a front, from the front or east, in front, mount of the East.
      1b ancient Time, aforetime, ancient, from of old, earliest Time.
      1c anciently, of old (adverb).
      1d beginning.
      1e east adv.
   2 eastward, to or toward the East.
   

H7117


   1 end, part.
      1a end.
         1a1 of corners, of earth.
      1b from the end of.
      1c at the end of.
      

H7230


   1 multitude, abundance, greatness.
      1a multitude.
         1a1 abundance, abundantly.
         1a2 numerous.
      1b greatness.
      

H4557


   1 number, tale.
      1a number.
         1a1 number.
         1a2 innumerable (with negative).
         1a3 few, numerable (alone).
         1a4 by count, in number, according to number (with prep).
      1b recounting, relation.
      

H7105


   1 harvest, harvesting.
      1a process of harvesting.
      1b crop, what is harvested or reaped.
      1c Time of harvest.
   2 boughs, branches.
   

H865


   1 yesterday, recently, formerly.
      1a yesterday.
      1b formerly (fig.
      ).
      1c from yesterday, already (in phrase).
   2 (TWOT +) before, before that Time, before the Time, heretofore, of late, of old, these days, Time(s) past.
   

H2677


   1 half.
      1a half.
      1b middle.
      

H8160


   1 brief Time, moment.
   

H3478


   1 the second name for Jacob given to him by God after his wrestling with the angel at Peniel.
   2 the name of the descendants and the nation of the descendants of Jacob.
      2a the name of the nation until the death of Solomon and the split.
      2b the name used and given to the northern kingdom consisting of the 10 tribes under Jeroboam; the southern kingdom was known as Judah.
      2c the name of the nation after the return from exile.
      Additional Information: Israel = “God prevails”.
      

H6440


   1 face.
      1a face, faces.
      1b presence, person.
      1c face (of seraphim or cherubim).
      1d face (of animals).
      1e face, surface (of ground).
      1f as adv of loc/temp.
         1f1 before and behind, toward, in front of, forward, formerly, from beforetime, before.
      1g with prep.
         1g1 in front of, before, to the front of, in the presence of, in the face of, at the face or front of, from the presence of, from before, from before the face of.
         

H5927


   1 to go up, ascend, climb.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to go up, ascend.
         1a2 to meet, visit, follow, depart, withdraw, retreat.
         1a3 to go up, come up (of animals).
         1a4 to spring up, grow, shoot forth (of vegetation).
         1a5 to go up, go up over, rise (of natural phenomenon).
         1a6 to come up (before God).
         1a7 to go up, go up over, extend (of boundary).
         1a8 to excel, be superior to.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to be taken up, be brought up, be taken away.
         1b2 to take oneself away.
         1b3 to be exalted.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to bring up, cause to ascend or climb, cause to go up.
         1c2 to bring up, bring against, take away.
         1c3 to bring up, draw up, train.
         1c4 to cause to ascend.
         1c5 to rouse, stir up (mentally).
         1c6 to offer, bring up (of gifts).
         1c7 to exalt.
         1c8 to cause to ascend, offer.
      1d (Hophal).
         1d1 to be carried away, be led up.
         1d2 to be taken up into, be inserted in.
         1d3 to be offered.
      1e (Hithpael) to lift oneself.
      

H7637


   1 seventh.
      1a ordinal number.
      

H2527


   1 heat, hot.
   

H8032


   1 day before yesterday, three days ago.
      1a an idiom for ‘heretofore in times past’.
      

H7992


   1 third, one third, third part, third Time.
      1a ordinal number.
      

H3118


   1 day.
   2 day always refers to a twenty-four hour period when the word is modified by a definite or cardinal number.
   

H268


   1 the back side, the rear.
      1a backwards.
      1b hereafter (of Time).
      1c behind.
      

H227


   1 then, at that Time.
      1a temporal expressions.
         1a1 then (past).
         1a2 then, if … then (future).
         1a3 earlier.
      1b logical expressions.
         1b1 in that case.
         1b2 that (being so).
         

H8462


   1 beginning, first.
      1a the first Time.
      1b from the beginning, in the beginning (with prep).
      

H7138


   1 near.
      1a of place.
      1b of Time.
      1c of personal relationship.
         1c1 kinship.
         

H319


   1 after part, end.
      1a end, issue, event.
      1b latter Time (prophetic for future Time).
      1c posterity.
      1d last, hindermost.
      

H5060


   1 to touch, reach, strike.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to touch.
         1a2 to strike.
         1a3 to reach, extend to.
         1a4 to be stricken.
            1a4a stricken (participle).
      1b (Niphal) to be stricken, be defeated.
      1c (Piel) to strike.
      1d (Pual) to be stricken (by disease).
      1e (Hiphil) to cause to touch, reach, approach, arrive. 1e1 to cause to touch, apply. 1e2 to reach, extend, attain, arrive, come. 1e3 to approach (of Time). 1e4 to befall (of fate).
         

H7674


   1 cessation, a sitting still.
      1a meaning dubious.
      

H2758


   1 ploughing, ploughing Time.
   

G1539


   1 at every Time, always.
   

Frequency of Time (original languages)

Frequency of Time (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Time
TIME . The conception that we seem to gather of time from the Holy Scriptures is of a small block, as it were, cut out of boundless eternity. Of past eternity, if we may use such an expression, God is the only inhabitant; in future eternity angels and men are to share. And this ‘block’ of time is infinitesimally small. In God’s sight, in the Divine mind, ‘a thousand years are but as yesterday’ ( Psalms 90:4 ; cf. 2 Peter 3:8 ‘one day is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day’). Time has a beginning; it has also, if we accept the usual translation of Revelation 10:6 ‘there shall be time no longer,’ a stated end. The word ‘time’ in Biblical apocalyptic literature has another meaning ‘time’ stands for ‘a year’ both in Daniel ( Daniel 4:16 ; Daniel 4:23 ; Daniel 4:25 ; Daniel 4:32 ; Daniel 7:25 , where the plural ‘times’ seems to stand for two years) and in Revelation 12:14 (derived from Daniel 7:25 ).
When once the idea of time formed itself in the human mind, subdivisions of it would follow as a matter of course. The division between light and darkness, the rising, the zenith, and the setting of the sun and the moon, together with the phases of the latter, and the varying position of the most notable stars in the firmament, would all suggest modes of reckoning time, to say nothing of the circuit of the seasons as indicated by the growth and development of the fruits of the field and agricultural operations. Hence we find in Genesis 1:1-31 day and night as the first division of time, and, because light was believed to be a later creation than matter, one whole day is said to be made up of evening and morning; and the day is reckoned, as it still is by the Jews and, in principle, by the Church in her ecclesiastical feasts, from one disappearance of the sun to the next, the divisions between day and night being formed by that appearance and disappearance. In this same cosmogony we meet with a further use of the lights in the firmament of heaven; they are to be ‘for signs, and for seasons, and for days and years’ ( Genesis 1:14 ). The day would thus be an obvious division of time for intelligent beings to make from the very earliest ages. As time went on, subdivisions of this day would be made, derived from an observance of the sun in the heavens morning , noonday or midday, and evening ; and, by analogy, there would be a midnight . The only other expression we meet with is ‘between the two evenings’ ( Exodus 12:6 ), used most probably for the time between sunset and dark, though others take it as equivalent to ‘the time of the going down of the sun,’ i.e. any time in the afternoon: any shorter subdivisions of time were not known to the Jews till they were brought into contact with Western civilization and the Roman military arrangements. The only exception to this is the ‘steps’ on the dial of Ahaz ( 2 Kings 20:9-11 ). In the passages in Daniel where the word hour occurs in the EV [1] , the term is quite an indefinite one, the ‘one hour’ of Daniel 4:19 in AV [2] becoming ‘a while’ in RV [3] . The Aram [4] , word used in that book was used in the New Hebrew for the word ‘hour.’ In the Apocrypha the word ‘hour’ is quite indefinite. But in the NT we find the Western division of the day into twelve hours, reckoning from sunrise to sunset, quite established. ‘Are there not twelve hours in the day?’ said our Lord, in an appeal to the Jews ( John 11:9 ). Westcott holds that in St. John’s Gospel ( John 1:39 , John 4:6 ; John 4:52 , John 19:14 ) the modern mode of reckoning the hours from midnight to midnight is followed. The strongest passage in support of this view is John 19:14 . These twelve hours were divided into the four military watches of three hours each (cf. Matthew 14:25 ‘the fourth watch of the night’), as distinguished from the three watches which seem to have prevailed among the Jews (‘if he shall come in the second watch, and if in the third,’ Luke 12:38 ). The only other measure of time, quite indefinite and infinitesimal, is the ‘moment,’ common to OT, Apocr. [5] , and NT (‘we shall all be changed, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye,’ 1 Corinthians 15:52 ). To-morrow ( Exodus 8:23 ) and yesterday ( Exodus 5:14 ), and even yesternight ( Genesis 31:29 ), would soon take their place on either side of to-day. The Hebrew word meaning literally ‘the day before yesterday,’ is generally used vaguely of previous time, ‘heretofore.’
The next obvious division of time would be the month . The phases of the moon would be watched, and it would soon be noticed that these recurred at regular intervals. Each appearance of the new moon would be noted as the beginning of a new period. The first mention of the new moon in Biblical history is in 1 Samuel 20:5 , though ‘the beginnings of the months’ are mentioned in the ritual laws of Numbers 10:10 ; Numbers 28:11 . Of the two Heb. words for ‘month,’ one is identical with the word for ‘moon,’ the other means ‘newness.’ Though the actual period of each moon is rather more than 29 days, the actual time of its visibility could scarcely be more than 28 days. The first appearance of the new moon would be eagerly watched for and made a matter of rejoicing. We find, in fact, that a keen lookout was kept for it, and the ‘new moon’ feast was kept with great rejoicings, as well as, apparently in later times, a ‘full moon’ feast (‘Blow up the trumpet in the new moon, At the full moon, on our solemn feast day,’ Psalms 81:3 ).
Given this period of 28 days, together with the recurrent phases of the moon, it would naturally be subdivided, like the day itself, into four divisions or weeks of seven days each. The first occurrence of a week is in Genesis 29:27 , though the Creation is represented as having been completed, including the rest of the Almighty, in a period of seven days, and periods of seven days occur in the history of the Flood. Of the two Heb. names for ‘week’ one is derived from the number seven, and the other is identical with ‘Sabbath,’ the day which completes the Jewish week. The NT takes over the latter word, and makes a Greek noun of it, whilst to the Christian and to the Christian Church, the first day of the week becomes the important day, instead of the seventh, and is for Christians the day of gathering together ‘to break bread’ ( Acts 20:7 ), and of making collections for the needs of the faithful ( 1 Corinthians 16:2 ), and also wins for itself the name of ‘the Lord’s day’ ( Revelation 1:10 ). The word ‘week’ was given other applications. The seventh year completed a week of years and was a sabbath; seven times seven years formed seven sabbaths of years, i.e. forty-nine years, and was followed by the jubilee. From the constant occurrence of the tenth day of the month in the dating of events, it has been supposed that the month of 30 days was also subdivided into periods of ten days each (see, e.g. , Exodus 12:3 , Leviticus 16:29 , Joshua 4:19 , 2 Kings 25:1 etc.).
There are no names in the OT for the days of the week except for the seventh the Sabbath. In the Apocrypha ( Jdt 8:6 ) there is a name for Friday which is translated ‘the eve of the Sabbath’; so in Mark 15:42 ‘the day before the Sabbath.’ This day is also called the Preparation ( Matthew 27:62 , Mark 15:42 , Luke 23:54 , John 19:31 ). In Roman Catholic service-books Good Friday is still called ‘Feria Sexta in Parasceue’ ( i.e. the Preparation), and the following Saturday ‘Sabbatum Sanctum.’
Whilst these various divisions of time were being arrived at, there would be, concurrently with them, the obvious recurrence of the seasons in their due order. One of the promises represented as having been made by God to Noah immediately after the Flood was that seedtime ( i.e. spring), summer, harvest ( i.e. autumn), and winter should not cease ( Genesis 8:22 ). This is the earliest time in the world’s history to which a knowledge of the seasons is attributed in the Bible. Afterwards summer and winter are frequently mentioned. In AV [2] the word ‘spring,’ to mean that season, occurs only in Wis 2:7 , and ‘autumn’ not at all, though the word translated ‘winter’ in Amos 3:15 , Jeremiah 36:22 , might equally be rendered ‘autumn,’ as the time referred to is the border time between autumn and winter. It would in due course be noticed that the seasons recurred practically after a series of twelve moons or months; hence would come in the division of time into years of twelve lunar months. A year of 360 days is implied in the history of the Flood ( Genesis 6:1-22 ; Genesis 7:1-24 ; Genesis 8:1-22 ), but no satisfactory explanation has yet been given of the scheme of years and chronology in the genealogical account of antediluvian times ( Genesis 5:1-32 ).
The twelve months of the year would be given names. The Biblical names we find for them are:
1. Abib (Exodus 13:4 ), the month of the green ears of corn, about the same as our April, called in post-exilic times, in correspondence with its Bab. [7] name, Nisan ( Nehemiah 2:1 ). This was the month in which the Passover came.
2. Ziv (1 Kings 6:1 ), seemingly the bright month, called later Iyyar.
3. Sivan (Esther 8:9 ), another Bab. [7] name, occurring only in this one passage in the OT.
4. This month has no Biblical name, but was called in later times Tammuz, after the god of that name, in whose honour a fast was kept during the month, which is mentioned in Zechariah 8:19 as ‘the fast of the fourth month.’
5. This month also has no Biblical name, but was called later Ab.
6. Elul (Nehemiah 6:15 , 1Ma 14:27 ). The etymology of this name is unknown; it occurs in Assyrian.
7. Ethanim (1 Kings 8:2 ), the month of constant flowings, in later times called Tishri. This was the first month of the civil year.
8. Bul (1 Kings 6:38 ), a word of doubtful etymology, called later Marcheshvan.
9. Chislev (Nehemiah 1:1 , Zechariah 7:1 , 1Ma 1:54 etc.), a Bab. [7] word of uncertain derivation.
10. Tebeth (Esther 2:18 ), taken over from the Assyrian. It has been conjectured to mean ‘the month of sinking in,’ i.e . the muddy month.
11. Shebat (Zechariah 1:7 , 1Ma 16:14 ), taken from the Babylonian; of doubtful meaning, but, according to some, the month of destroying rain.
12. Adar (Ezra 6:15 , Esther 3:7 etc.), a Bab. [7] word, perhaps meaning darkened. In 2Ma 15:36 we are informed that the twelfth month ‘is called Adar in the Syrian tongue.’
The names given are, it will be seen, of rare occurrence, and only four of them are pre-exilic. Biblical writers are generally content to give the number of the month. Some of the months were notable for their ecclesiastical feasts. In the first came the Passover, on the 14th day; in the third, the Feast of Weeks (Pentecost); in the seventh, the Feast of Trumpets and the Feast of Tabernacles, as also the Fast of the Day of Atonement; in the ninth, the Feast of Dedication; and in the twelfth, the Feast of Purim.
Though at first all the months seem to have been reckoned of equal length, in later times they contained 30 and 29 days alternately. This rendered an intercalation in the Calendar necessary, to keep the Passover in the right season of the year; and this intercalary period was called the second Adar, and was inserted as required to bring Abib to its proper place in the year.
It remains to mention that in the Apocrypha we have traces of the Macedonian Calendar. In 2Ma 11:21 , a month is named Dioscorinthius , a name which does not occur elsewhere, and which is either a corruption of the text for Dystrus, a name for the twelfth month, which occurs in the Sinaitic text of Tob 2:12 , or the name of an intercalary month inserted at the end of the year. In 2Ma 11:30 Xanthicus , the name for the first month of the Macedonian year, occurs. It answers to the month Abib. These names, with other Macedonian names, are used by Josephus. In 3Ma 6:38 two Egyptian months, Pachon and Epiphi , occur, the former being omitted in some texts. They are the ninth and eleventh months of the Egyptian year.
Of epochs or eras there is but little trace. There were the periods of seven years and fifty years already mentioned, but they never occur in any chronological statement. 430 years is the time assigned to the sojourning in Egypt, both in OT and NT (Exodus 12:40 , Galatians 3:17 ), and the commencement of the building of Solomon’s Temple is dated 480 years after the Exodus. The chronology of the two kingdoms is reckoned by regnal years, though in some cases a regency period is counted as part of the length of the reign. Twice in Isaiah ( Isaiah 6:1 ; Isaiah 14:28 ) the date noted is that of the year of the death of a king, in another case the date is the invasion by the Tartan ( Isaiah 20:1 ); whilst in Amos ( Amos 1:1 ) a date is given as ‘two years before the earthquake,’ apparently a particularly severe one which happened during the reign of Uzziah, king of Judah ( Zechariah 14:5 ). The ‘seventy years’ of the Captivity is also a well-known period, as is the thousand years of the Apocalypse ( Revelation 20:1-15 ), with all the speculations it has given rise to. In later times the years were reckoned by the names of those who filled the office of high priest; in Luke 3:1 f., we have a careful combination of names of various offices held by various persons at the time of the commencement of the preaching of John the Baptist, to indicate the date.
Of instruments to measure time we hear of only one, the sun-dial of Ahaz ( 2 Kings 20:9-11 , Isaiah 38:8 ), but what shape or form this took we do not know.
H. A. Redpath.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Time
It is debatable whether the Bible contains enough information to formulate a full-scale doctrine of time; nonetheless, the significance of the biblical concept of time is unmistakably the way it uniformly presents God at work in guiding the course of history according to his saving plan. The Hebrew et [1], moed, iddan [2], zeman [3], yom [4] and Greek kairos [5], chronos [6], aion [7] are the main biblical time words depicting this divine work.
God as Lord over Time. Time is not fatalistic or capricious, but, according to Scripture, under God's personal direction and control. Time began at creation and becomes the agency through which God continues to unveil his divine purpose for it.
God is transcendent over time. He established the cycle of days and seasons by which time is known and reckoned (Genesis 1:14 ) and possesses the power to dissolve them according to his eternal purposes (Isaiah 60:19-20 ); moreover, he controls world history, determining in advance the times set for all nations and bringing them to pass (Daniel 2:21 ; Acts 17:26 ). But God is not limited by time (Psalm 90:4 ). It in no sense diminishes his person or work: the eternal God does not grow tired or weary (Isaiah 40:28 ) and his purposes prevail (Proverbs 16:4 ; Isaiah 46:10 ).
Furthermore, God imminently expresses concern for his creation. He reveals himself in history according to the times and dates set by his own authority (Acts 1:7 ) and will bring about in his own time the consummation of world history in Jesus' return (Ephesians 1:9-10 ; Psalm 95:7-86 ).
God as "the First and Last" (Isaiah 41:4 ; 44:6 ; 48:12 ), "the Beginning and End" (Revelation 21:6 ), "the one who is, was, and is to come" (Revelation 1:4,8 ), "King of the Ages" (1 Timothy 1:17 ; Revelation 15:3 ) further points out his lordship over time.
The New Testament presents Jesus as Lord over time. With the Father, he existed prior to the beginning of time, created all things, and sustains all things (John 1:1-3 ; Colossians 1:16-17 ; Hebrews 1:2-3 ). He is neither limited by time, nor adversely affected by it: "Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever" (Hebrews 13:8 ). He too is properly called "the Alpha and Omega, the First and Last, the Beginning and End" (Revelation 22:13 ).
Humanity as Subject to Time. In contrast to God and Jesus, humanity is limited by time in the cycle of birth, life, and death. Every person bears the marks of time in the aging process and ultimately dies (Job 14:5 ; Hebrews 9:27 ). The span of life is brief and passing (Psalm 144:4 ; James 4:14 ). Even our time on earth—the events/circumstances and length of lifeare in God's hands (Psalm 31:15 ; 139:16 ).
All people, moreover, will experience the passage of time in life after death. Because of sin, all people face spiritual death, which involves eternal separation from God (Romans 5:17-21 ; 6:23 ). Jesus' death and resurrection brings deliverance from sin and spiritual death, granting eternal life to all who believe (John 3:14-17,36 ; 1 John 5:10-13 ).
Time as Redemptive History. Throughout history God has been carrying out his plan for redeeming a fallen world. The course of time, in effect, appears as redemptive history.
It is true that biblical writers perceive history as cyclical, in that various predictable, recurring sequence of events are inherent to it: the ordliness and seasonal regularity of nature (Psalm 19:1-6 ; Nehemiah 9:9-25 ; Ecclesiastes 1:4-7 ), the cycle of life (Ecclesiastes 3:1-15 ) and its wearisomeness (Ecclesiastes 1:8-11 ), the rise and fall of kings and empires (Daniel 2:21 ), and the universal inclination toward evil (Judges 2:6-23 ; 2 Chronicles 36:15-16 ; Nehemiah 9:5-37 ; Romans 1:18-32 ).
But they do not perceive history as static. Chronological time is of greatest importance in both Testaments as a way of tracing God's redemptive interventions in history. The most outstanding Old Testament example of this is Israel's redemption from Egypt (104:19 ; Psalm 78:12-55 ; Hosea 11:1 ); in the New Testament it is the coming of Jesus as Messiah, Savior, and Lord (Acts 3:12-26 ; 10:34-43 ; 13:16-41 ). The revelatory nature of these divine in-breakings dispels any notion that time is merely cyclical, without purpose and value.
Time is meaningfully forward-moving. The covenants God made with Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, David, and Jeremiah illustrate that history reveals a progressive unveiling of God's redemptive plan for humanity. Prophetic fulfillment, according to God's appointed times, does so as well. The incarnation supremely exemplifies this: "But when the time had fully come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under law, to redeem those under law, that we might receive the full rights of sons" (Galatians 4:4-5 ; cf. Mark 1:15 ; Romans 16:25-26 ; Ephesians 1:10 ; 1 Timothy 2:6 ; 1 Peter 1:10-12 ). Jesus' death was not accidental, but a once for all atoning sacrifice (Romans 6:10 ; Hebrews 7:27 ; 9:26 ; 1 Timothy 6:14-156 ), occurring exactly when God had intended (Romans 5:6 ). In the same way, Jesus' second coming, the goal and end-point of redemptive history, will come to pass at God's appointed time (Mark 13:32 ; Acts 1:7 ; 3:21 ; 1618422703_13 ).
The Present as the Time of Salvation. The Bible unanimously declares that now is the time of salvation. In the Old Testament, on the basis of Israel's redemption from Egypt, every succeeding generation was to respond in loving obedience to the laws issued at Sinai by God their Savior (Deuteronomy 11 ; 1618422703_30 ). The injunction "it is time to seek the Lord" (Hosea 10:12 ) was to be Israel's perpetual desire.
In the New Testament, Jesus' coming as the Messiah inaugurated "the year of the Lord's favor" (Luke 4:19,21 ). The time interval between the incarnation and the second coming appears symbolically as a jubilee year (Luke 4:19 /Isa 4:19/61:1-2 ; cf. Leviticus 25:10 ), a time when salvation has been made available to all people through God's saving work in Jesus. Thus, "now is the time of God's favor, now is the day of salvation" (2 Corinthians 6:2 ); now is the appointed season to declare this divine mystery hidden from ages past (Colossians 1:26 ; Titus 1:3 ).
The present time holds a sense of urgency for unbelievers and believers. God now commands all people to repent for he has set a time when he will judge the world through Jesus (Acts 17:30-31 ). The time for repentance, however, is growing shorter (Revelation 2:21 ; 10:6 ). Believers are encouraged to make the most of every opportunity in serving God (Ephesians 5:16 ; Colossians 4:5 ) and to mature in faith "as long as it is called Today" to ward off encroaching apostasy (Hebrews 3:13 ).
The End-Times. The end-time period surrounding Jesus' second coming is variously called the last times, last hour, last days, day of the Lord, day of judgment, day of Gods wrath, time of punishment, end of the ages, end of all things. The temporal finality of these expressions highlights the firm New Testament belief that the present course of history will come to an end when Jesus returns. The certainty of the first advent guarantees the certainty of the second (Acts 1:7 ).
The start of the end-times takes two forms in the New Testament. On the one hand, the messianic age, inaugurated with Christ's first coming, appears as the beginning of the last days according to Peter's use of Joel 2:28 in explaining the charismatic phenomena accompanying the Spirit's outpouring at Pentecost ( Acts 2:17 ). Here the messianic age is equivalent to the end-times. It is a time of great salvation as well as of mounting evil growing to unprecedented proportions as the parousia nears. For this reason, the many antichrists, false teachers, and forms of ungodliness that have already appeared show without contradiction that it is the last hour (1 Timothy 4:1 ; 2 Timothy 3:1 ; 1 John 2:18 ).
On the other hand, although the end is near (Hebrews 10:37 ; James 5:8 ; Revelation 22:7,10 ), it has not yet arrived. Nor has the tumultuous period leading up to it. Because of the unique character of the end-times, it also has an identity not entirely the same as the messianic age. Its events include the fulfillment of the signs portending the end, Christ's return, the setting up of his eternal kingdom, and the last judgment. But even here the time periods partially overlap: the benefits derived from salvation in Christ promised to believers in the coming age (eternal life, perfect Christ-likeness, etc.), are, nonetheless, the property of believers to enjoy in part in this age.
Time and Eternity. The Bible does not specify if or in what sense time existed before creation or will exist after Jesus' return. Nor does it specify the relation between time and eternity either as unending time or timelessness.
But how God and humanity relate to time may parallel how time differs from eternity. On the one hand, God is eternal, having no beginning or end (Psalm 102:25-27 ; Isaiah 40:28 ; Romans 1:20 ); he is Lord over time. He is timeless in the sense that as Creator and Lord he is non- or supratemporal, standing outside of or above time (Psalm 90:2,4 ). Time is real for God. It becomes the means through which he makes known his enduring love to humankind. On the other, time and humanity are immortal in the sense that both have a starting point and continue on indefinitely. God promises unending life with him to those who believe in Jesus' redeeming work (John 3:16 ; 1 John 5:13 ) and unending separation from him to those who spurn it (Matthew 25:46 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:6-8 ).
H. Douglas Buckwalter
See also Day ; Fullness of Time ; Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times
Bibliography. J. Barr, Biblical Words for Time; O. Cullmann, Christ and Time; G. Delling, TDNT, 3:455-64; 9:581-93; J. Guhrt and H. -C. Hahn, NIDNTT, 3:826-50; C. F. H. Henry, EDT, pp. 1094-96; E. Jenni, IDB, 4:642-49; C. H. Pinnock, ISBE, 4:852-53; H. Sasse, TDNT, 1:197-209.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Time
1. The conception of time.-In all ages and among all peoples the idea of time tends to be expressed in the figure of a continually and evenly running stream. It is viewed, however, in sections; and each section brings with itself or takes up into itself all the events that happen. This conception is maintained consistently in the writings of the Apostolic Age. Time comes into being (διαγενομένου, Acts 27:9, ‘spent,’ lit. [1] ‘had come through’). It passes by (ὁ παρεληλυθὼς χρόνος, 1 Peter 4:3). It is generally looked at as a whole, but it is divisible into parts which differ quantitatively and may be measured-it is ‘much,’ or ‘little,’ or ‘Sufficient’ (for a given purpose). ‘sufficient’ (ἱκανὸς χρόνος, Luke 8:27; Luke 23:8, Acts 8:11; ἡμέραι ἱκαναί, Acts 9:23; Acts 9:43; Acts 18:18; ἱκανῶν ἐτῶν, Romans 15:23) as applied in measuring time is an expression of indefiniteness. The adequacy of the measure of time for the maturing of a definite plan is given in the idea of ‘fullness.’ Time accumulates as if in a reservoir and becomes sufficient for its end (πλήρωμα τοῦ χρόνου, Galatians 4:4; cf. Acts 7:23). Naturally the flow of time involves succession and order as between first and last. But all time future to any particular moment may be from the view of it at that moment ‘last.’ The Christian outlook on the future involves a great consummation and a radical world change. The period just preceding this consummation was especially designated ‘the last times’ (ἐπʼ ἐσχάτου τῶν χρόνων, 1 Peter 1:21; ἐσχάτη ἡμέρα, John 6:39-40; John 11:24; ἔσχαται ἡμέραι, Acts 2:17, 2 Timothy 3:1, James 5:3; 2 Peter 3:3; ἐσχάτη ὥρα, 1 John 2:18).
The relativity of length of time to the mind is indicated in the conception that to God’s mind human measures and standards of time have no inherent reality (‘One day is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day,’ 2 Peter 3:8). The notion shows a trace of philosophical influence in the thinking which culminates in the apocalyptical conception of the transiency of time and its contrast with eternity (‘There shall be time no longer,’ Revelation 10:6).
2. Season.-Time from the point of view of its special content or relation to a definite event or events is specifically denoted by the term καιρός (generally, ‘definite time’). The most accentuated usage of the term in this sense is the Apocalyptist’s καιρὸν καὶ καιροὺς καὶ ἥμισυ καιροῦ (Revelation 12:14), where the evident design is to indicate a period of known duration, like a year (or century). The term is more nearly synonymous with ‘season’ when it designates a time (the time during the year) for the appearance of certain events ([2] τοῦ θερισμοῦ, Matthew 13:30; καιρὸς σύκων, Mark 11:13 : cf. Luke 20:10; τοὺς καρποὺς ἐν τοῖς καιροῖς αὐτῶν, Matthew 21:41). More generally καιρός is any division of time which differs from all others by some characteristic, as, for instance, that it ought to be observed as more sacred (μῆνας καὶ καιρούς, Galatians 4:10); to be watched against because of the evil influences which it brings (καιροὶ χαλεποί, 2 Timothy 3:1); chosen by God for special revelation of His word (Titus 1:3); a period when certain special events develop, distinguished by the moral character of the Gentiles (καιροὶ ἐθνῶν, Luke 21:24); events have their own time (Luke 1:20), persons may have their own time for the full display of their peculiar character or the accomplishment of their work (e.g. the time of Jesus, ὁ καιρὸς ὁ ἐμός, ὁ καιρὸς ὁ ὑμέτερος, John 7:6; John 7:8). The term καιρός thus differs from χρόνος in designating ‘opportune’ or ‘fit’ time, a time associated with, and therefore distinguished by, some special event or feature. In the phrase πεπλήρωται ὁ καιρός (Mark 1:15) the more appropriate term would have been χρόνος, but since the intention of the writer is to show not the lapse of mere time, but the appearance of a new era, the word used expresses the idea more accurately.
3. The ages.-The largest measure of time known is the ‘age’ (αἰών, ‘aeon’). An ‘age,’ however, is not a definite period (though the ‘present age’ is estimated by some as 10,000 or 5,000 years in duration). It is rather a period of vast length. It so far transcends thought that it impresses the mind with the mystery of the whole notion of time. Hence the combination ‘eternal times’ (Romans 16:25) stretching back into the inconceivably remote past (practically the equivalent of the modern philosophical ‘species of eternity’).
The conception of the aeon is specially prominent in the apocalyptic system, which looks on all duration as divided into aeons. An aeon combines in itself the essential content of the Hebrew ‘olam and of the Greek αἰών. In the first the emphasis is laid on the mysterious aspect of time without measure and apart from all known conditions. In the second the conception is based on a cyclic return similar to that marked by the seasons of the year. The modern analogy may be found in the geologic period. On a still larger scale the aeon has its analogy in the Hindu kalpa. Of such ages there is an indefinite series. This is given in the plural (αἰῶνες, Galatians 1:5, Philippians 4:20, 1 Timothy 1:17, 2 Timothy 4:18, Hebrews 13:21; Hebrews 13 :1 Peter 4:11, Rev., passim). The series taken together constitutes all time (‘All the ages,’ Revised Version margin, εἰς πάντας τοὺς αἰῶνας, Judges 1:25).
Later Jewish thought singled out two aeons (ages) and largely limited itself to their contemplation. From the practical point of view these were the only ones that concerned living men. These two were the ‘present age’ (ὁ αἰὼν οὗτος, ὁ νῦν αἰών, ὁ ἐνεστώς αἰών, עוֹלָם הָרּה, Ephesians 1:21, Matthew 12:32, Galatians 1:4, 2 Timothy 4:10, Titus 2:12) and the ‘future age’ (ὁ αἰων ὁ μέλλων, ὁ αἰών ὁ ἐρχόμενος, עוֹלָם הַבָּא, Hebrews 6:5, Luke 20:35; Luke 18:30). The doctrine became prominent in the Apocalypses (cf. 4 Ezr 7:50). It fitted the apocalyptic scheme wonderfully. On one side it helped to define the older prophetic ‘latter days’ (as a distinct period when ideal conditions would prevail); at the same time it gave a background to the doctrine of the ‘Day of Jehovah. On the other side, by discovering an ideal moral character in the latter age, the doctrine infused comfort into the hearts of the faithful in the present evil days by promising a definite change with the beginning of the new era. Questions of the exact length of the age were raised and by some answered. The author of Ethiopic Enoch, xvi. 1, xviii. 16, xxi. 6, fixes the duration of the ‘evil [3] age’ as 10,000 years; the Assumption of Moses at 5,000. The apocalyptists consider that they are themselves living so near the end of the older age and the beginning of the new that it may be a question as to whether they will be still living when the crisis arrives and the one age yields to the other (4 Ezr_4:37; Ezr_5:50 ff; Ezra 6:20; Syr. Bar. xliv. 8ff.). These two ages (the present and the one to come) are successive. But this is not the case with all the aeons of the series. ‘Unto the ages of the ages.’ (εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων) suggests the inequality of some of the ages and the inclusion of the briefer within the longer ones (cf. G. B. Winer, Grammar of NT Greek9, Edinburgh, 1882, p. 36).
4. The era.-The NT writings contain no allusion to a uniform era. Undoubtedly each people of the period used its own era. The Romans dated events and documents from the founding of the city (a.u.c. = 752 b.c.); the Greeks went back to the beginning of the Olympiads (= 776 b.c.). The Jews, owing to the frequent vicissitudes experienced in their history, had changed their method of registering the relative dates of events. The Books of Kings and Chronicles use the very familiar device of synchronizing the regnal years of the kings of Israel and Judah respectively. Occasionally the deliverance from bondage in Egypt is used as a starting-point (1 Kings 6:1), or the building of the Temple of Solomon (9:10), or the beginning of the Babylonian Exile (Ezekiel 33:21; Ezekiel 40:1). The later Jewish usage settled down to reckoning all events from the creation of the world, which was supposed to have occurred in the 3761st year before the birth of Christ. But this computation is of post-Christian origin. In the Apocrypha, which may be regarded as the fair index of usage at the time, the Seleucid Era is frequently referred to. This was computed from the year of the seizure of Palestine by Seleucus after the battle of Gaza. It was also called the Era of the Greeks or Syro-Macedonians and (incorrectly) the Era of Alexander. By the Jews it was called the Year of Contracts (Tarik Dilkarnaim) from the fact that it was obligatory in the case of all legal documents. The beginning of the era was dated in the first year of the 117th Olympiad or 442 a.u.c., hence 312 b.c. (1 Maccabees 1:11; 1 Maccabees 6:16; 1 Maccabees 7:15; 1 Maccabees 10:1). The Era of Simon (1 Maccabees 13:42; 1 Maccabees 14:27) was proposed, but never extensively adopted.
In the New Testament events are associated with the reigns of contemporary rulers (‘In the days of Herod the king’ [4], ‘in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea ,’ etc. [5]). But in all cases the dating is approximate and intended to serve practical rather than scientific ends. With the exception of Luke 3:1-2, all such dating of events seems not to be intentionally chronological (cf. A. Harnack, The Acts of the Apostles, London, 1909, p. 6 f.).
The method of Matthew (Matthew 1:17) of giving a general intimation of date by the expedient of ‘generations’ is unique and highly artificial.
5. The year.-It has always been difficult to adjust with precision the limits of the year. In all the efforts to make the adjustment first the natural return of the seasons with their agricultural features calls for a definition that will harmonize with the apparent revolution of the sun around the earth in 365 + days. But the fact that this period approximately coincides with twelve lunar periods has tempted many peoples to settle down to a year of 354 days. In the Apostolic Age the problem had not as yet been solved fully. The usage of Palestine, inherited from early Canaanite and Babylonian antecedents, was still prevalent. The year began with the 1st of Nisan and was constituted of twelve months, with the periodical intercalation of a thirteenth to equalize difference. Intercalation was common all over the world, but the method of intercalating was different at different times, and probably not constant anywhere for any consecutive period of time. Among the Jews the Sanhedrin decided whether in any particular year a month should be intercalated. Among the Romans Plutarch testifies that 22 days were added every other year to the month of February (which, according to Varro, de Ling. Lat. vi. 55, was the last month of the year). But a more common way was the insertion of an additional month every three years, and as this left a troublesome margin it was corrected into three months every eight years and finally fixed as seven months in a cycle of nineteen years. This cycle was introduced into Athens by Meton the astronomer in 432, but found its way only gradually into general practice. Popularly the year must always have been viewed as divided into 12 months (Revelation 22:2).
6. The month.-Throughout the Apostolic Age the ancient way of fixing the month as the exact equivalent of a complete lunation was maintained. The month accordingly began with the appearance of the moon in its first phase, and ended with its reappearance in the same phase the next time. Within the New Testament months are mentioned generally, not with precise reference to their relations to one another in the calendar, but as an indication and a measure of time in the terms of the fraction of a year (Luke 1:24; Luke 1:36; Luke 1:56). In Acts it is probable that the usage is not meant to be minutely precise since the mention of months is invariably in threes (Acts 7:20; Acts 19:8; Acts 20:3; Acts 28:11, but once in twice three-six, Acts 18:11).
So far as the calendar is concerned, there are evidences of mixed usage. The predominance at different times of different influences (Roman, Macedonian, Egyptian, older Jewish) brought into use different names. The occurrence of Xanthicus in 2 Maccabees 11:30; 2 Maccabees 11:38 (the sixth month of the Macedonian calendar) shows clearly the existence of a Macedonian element in the mixed usage. The name ‘Dioscorinthius’ (mentioned earlier in the same account, 2 Maccabees 11:21) is also probably Macedonian and a modified form of the first month, Dius. It may, however, be a textual corruption for ‘Dystrus’ (the name of the fifth month), as H. A. Redpath, in Hastings’ Hastings’ Single-vol. Dictionary of the Bible , p. 937, suggests, supporting the suggestion with the Sinaitic text of Tobit 2:12, where Dystrus is mentioned. Otherwise Dioscorinthius is the name of an intercalary month. That an intercalary month must have had a place in the Macedonian calendar is to be assumed, though its name and place are unknown. Of the Egyptian calendar traces are found in the names ‘Pachon’ and ‘Epiphi’ in 3 Maccabees 6:38.
7. The feasts.-A popular and practically useful method of reckoning time within the year is that which relates events to well-known religious festivals. This method is especially useful where for some reason or other the names of months have become involved in confusion. In the nature of the case, of such festivals in the New Testament the Passover (‘the days of unleavened bread,’ ἡμέραι τῶν ἀζύμων, Acts 12:3; Acts 20:6, πάσχα, Acts 12:4) stands prominent. The Day of Pentecost (ἡμέρα τῆς πεντηκοστῆς, Acts 2:1; Acts 20:18) and the Day of Atonement (‘fast,’ νηστεία, Acts 27:9) are also used as landmarks. But in the allusion to the Feast of Dedication (ἐνκαίνια, John 10:22) the intention perhaps was not so much to give the exact time as to account for Jesus’ walking ‘in the temple in Solomon’s porch.’ Similarly the Feast of Tabernacles (σκηνοπηγία, John 7:2) is mentioned as explanatory of the course which Jesus had taken. In John 5:1 the purpose of the author would be defeated if he had meant to fix the time of the action (cf. also Luke 22:1, Mark 15:6, John 6:4; John 12:12).
8. The week.-Though peculiar to the Jewish people, the constitution of a unit of time by grouping together seven days was retained in the usage of the Christian Church. But no separate word was adopted to designate the week as such. In spite of the fact that the Greek language offered the tempting word ἑβδομάς (which came later into universal use) the period was generally known by its last day, the Sabbath (σάββατον, Luke 18:12), and in the plural (σάββατα), as shown in the name of the first day (μία τῶν σαββάτων, Matthew 28:1, Mark 16:2, Luke 24:1). In Acts 17:2, σάββατα τρία (rendered ‘weeks’ in Revised Version margin) is, in the light of St. Paul’s custom to use the Sabbath day as the time for preaching (Acts 18:4), correctly translated ‘three Sabbath days.’ The seven-day period required to mature the process of fulfilling a vow is evidently not viewed as a week in the modern sense of any period of seven consecutive days (Acts 21:27).
With the exception of the Sabbath (the seventh day) the days of the week are given no names, but are distinguished by ordinal numbers. The first day, however, acquired greater importance among Christians because of its association with the resurrection of the Lord (‘Lord’s day,’ κυριακὴ ἡμέρα, Revelation 1:10). And this ultimately came to be the name of the day (= Dominica). It was the day on which the Christians assembled together for the observance of their services (the ‘breaking of bread,’ mutual exhortation, taking up collections for the needs of their brethren, Acts 20:7, 1 Corinthians 16:2). But in the earlier period the day was called the ‘first of the week’ (μία τῶν σαββάτων, Acts 20:7). Other distinctions between the days of the week do not appear, with the exception of the fact that the day before the Sabbath was observed among the Jews as a season of preparation. Sometimes it was designated simply as the ‘eve of the Sabbath’ (προσάββατον, Judith 8:6, Mark 15:42); but in the NT oftener as the ‘Preparation [4]’ [παρασκευή, Matthew 27:62, Mark 15:42, Luke 23:54, John 19:14; John 19:42). It was scarcely as yet the fixed name of the day. This it became later as it was taken up by Christian usage, and persists to the present time as the proper name of Friday in modern Greek.
9. The day.-Jewish custom fixed the beginning of the day at sunset. Since that custom prevails to the present time among the Jews it is not likely that it was ever superseded among them. Nevertheless, the Roman way of reckoning from midnight was evidently prevalent at least in official circles. The testimony, however, is limited to the Fourth Gospel, and the point of view may be peculiar to the author (John 19:14; cf. also John 1:39, John 4:6). The day was divided into two sections of twelve hours, i.e. from midnight to midnight. These two sections might be viewed together as a twenty-four-hour unit (St. Paul spent a νυχθήμερον, ‘a night and a day,’ in the deep, 2 Corinthians 11:25). Of the night-day unit the day is the time for work (John 11:9) and the night is divided into four military watches of three hours each (Matthew 14:25; Matthew 24:43, Mark 6:48, Luke 12:38).
Related to each day stand the day preceding and the day following or the day after. The day preceding (‘yesterday,’ ἐχθές, John 4:52, Acts 7:28, Hebrews 13:8) is not so frequently mentioned as the day following (‘morrow,’ ἡ αὔριον, Acts 4:3; Acts 4:5; Acts 23:20; Acts 25:22; ἡ ἐπαύριον, Acts 10:9; Acts 14:20; Acts 20:7; ἡ ἐπιοῦσα, Time
Life in the present world is inseparably bound up with time. Time is part of God’s created order (Genesis 1:14; Hebrews 1:2). By contrast God, being the eternal one and the creator of all things, is not limited in any way by time. This means that his view of time is different from that of human beings (Isaiah 57:15; 1 Timothy 1:17; 1 Timothy 6:16; 2 Peter 3:8; see ETERNITY).
Nevertheless, God is able to use time to bring his purposes to fulfilment (Galatians 4:4), and he gives it to the people of his creation to use also (Ecclesiastes 5:18; Ecclesiastes 8:15). Men and women are therefore responsible to God for the way they use their time (1 Peter 1:15-17). (Concerning systems for reckoning time see DAY; MONTH.)
As a wise, powerful and loving Creator, God sees that everything happens at the right time to maintain the world for the benefit of his creatures (Luke 10:40-422; 2 Kings 4:16; Ecclesiastes 3:11; Acts 14:17). He controls history, often announcing in advance the precise time for his actions (Exodus 9:18; Isaiah 37:33-38; Romans 13:11-14). (Concerning the time element in the writings of the prophets see PROPHECY.) Jesus’ birth, ministry, death and resurrection all took place at the time God had appointed (Galatians 4:4; Mark 1:15; John 8:20; John 12:23; John 12:27; John 17:1). Christ’s return will also occur when God’s time has come (Mark 13:32; Acts 1:7; Revelation 14:15; see DAY OF THE LORD).
Because history is moving constantly towards its climax, Christians must use their time wisely (Psalms 90:12; Colossians 4:5). They should see time not merely as a period measured by a clock or a calendar, but as an opportunity given them to use. This does not mean that they have to create unnecessary pressure by squeezing as much as they can into their time, but that they should live and behave as befits God’s people (Ephesians 5:15-17; 1 Peter 4:1-3). The prospect of Christ’s return is an incentive not to hectic activity but to more Christlike conduct (Acts 17:26; 1 John 2:18; 1 John 2:28).
God wants people to use their time in worthwhile work, but his gift of the Sabbath shows that he also wants them to have time for rest (Exodus 23:12; cf. Genesis 2:2-3). People should not waste their time through laziness or worthless activities (Proverbs 10:4-5; Proverbs 12:11; Proverbs 18:9; 2 Thessalonians 3:11-12; 1 Timothy 5:13), but neither should they spend their time in constant activity that leaves no time for proper relaxation (Nehemiah 13:15-21; Ecclesiastes 2:21-23; Amos 8:5; cf. Mark 6:30-31; 1618422703_89; see WORK).
In their concern for time, people should not try to calculate when present life will end. Rather they should use the opportunity of the present life to accept God’s salvation and grow in Christian character (Acts 1:6-8; 2 Corinthians 6:1-2; Hebrews 3:13; Hebrews 4:7; Hebrews 5:12-14; Hebrews 10:25; cf. Luke 12:16-20; James 4:13-16).
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Time
Mode of duration marked by certain periods, chiefly by the motion and revolution of the sun. The general idea which times gives in every thing to which it is applied, is that of limited duration. Thus we cannot say of the Deity that he exists in time, because eternity, which he inhabits, is absolutely uniform, neither admitting limitation nor succession. Time is said to be redeemed or improved when it is properly filled up, or employed in the conscientious discharge of all the duties which devolve upon us, as it respects the Divine Being, ourselves, and our fellow-creatures. Time may be said to be lost when it is not devoted to some good, useful, or at least some innocent purpose; or when opportunities of improvement, business, or devotion, are neglected. Time is wasted by excessive sleep, unnecessary recreations, indolent habits, useless visits, idle reading, vain conversation, and all those actions which have no good end in them. We ought to improve the time, when we consider,
1. That it is short.
2. Swift.
3. Irrecoverable.
4. Uncertain.
5. That it is a talent committed to our trust.
and,
6. That the improvement of it is advantageous and interesting in every respect.
See Shower on Time and Eternity; Fox on Time; J. Edwards's Posthumous Sermons, ser. 24, 25, 26; Hale's Contemplations, p. 211; Hervey's Meditations; Young's Night Thoughts; Blair's Grave.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Time (2)
TIME.—1. The word ‘time’ is used in the Gospels in a variety of phrases more or less indefinite. Probably the most definite expression is ἐν στιγμῇ χρόνου, ‘in a moment of time’ (Luke 4:5). χρόνος is used of time in general (Luke 1:57; Luke 8:27, Mark 9:21, John 5:6), passing or having passed. In a similar sense we find ὥρα (Mark 6:35) rendered ‘day’ in Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 (see Day). More definite is ἀπὸ τότε, ‘from that time’ (Matthew 4:17; Matthew 16:21, Luke 16:16), and ἕως τοῦ νῦν, ‘until now’ (Matthew 24:21 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , Mark 13:19). The most important word, however, is καιρός, used invariably of a definite period or occasion. Three uses in this sense are noteworthy. (1) It is used to indicate the time of certain events in the ministry of Jesus (Matthew 11:25; Matthew 12:1; Matthew 14:1). (2) In a special sense we have the remarkable passage John 7:6; John 7:8 ‘My time is not yet come, but your time is always ready,’ where the contrast is used apparently to emphasize the peculiar character of Jesus’ mission and the hostility which it aroused in Jerusalem. (3) Most important is the use of καιρός to indicate the dawn of a new epoch—πεπλήρωται ὁ καιρός, ‘the time is fulfilled’ (cf. John 13:33, Luke 12:56, Matthew 16:3)—which the ministry of Jesus had inaugurated. This new era is contrasted with the past (Mark 1:15) and with the future (Mark 10:30, Luke 18:30; see artt. Day [1], Generation). In a similar sense of world-period or era we have καιροὶ ἐθνῶν, ‘the times of the Gentiles’ (Luke 21:24; but cf. עֵת גּוֹיַם, i.e. judgment-day, Ezekiel 30:3). καιρὸς is also used of a season of the year (Mark 11:13, Matthew 13:30; cf. Luke 12:42).
2. Various methods of reckoning time were in existence at the beginning of the Christian era, and this fact makes it extremely difficult to locate events with any certainty. The time of day was reckoned at the outset mainly by physical considerations, temperature, etc. (Genesis 3:8; Genesis 18:1, 1 Samuel 11:9, Job 24:15), or by the sun’s movements (Genesis 19:15; Genesis 32:24); the night in early Jewish history was reckoned by watches (see artt. Day, Hour, Night, Watch). The days of the week were numbered, not named.
The division of time into weeks was probably of Babylonian origin, and would be suggested by the moon’s phases, although there is no trace of this influence either in OT or NT. The word for ‘week’ in the Gospels is σάββατον (Luke 18:12). The use of the plural (Matthew 28:1, Mark 16:2, Luke 24:1) may have arisen from the Aram. Aramaic Sabbĕthâ, ‘the Sabbath’ (Heb. Shabbâth), which at an early date gave its name to the whole week.
Of the larger divisions of time, the month, so familiar in OT times, is hardly mentioned in the NT (Luke 1:26; Luke 1:36, John 4:25). The Jewish month was lunar. Hence the usual Hebrew name for ‘month’ (חֹדֶשׁ) is properly the ‘new moon.’ Three methods were employed to distinguish the month: (1) old Canaanite names, of which only four now survive; (2) numerals (Genesis 7:11, Exodus 19:1 etc.); (3) Babylonian names (see Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iv. 765).
The Jewish year, like the month, was originally lunar, consisting of 354 days. But as this fell so far short of the full solar year, difficulty would naturally arise in celebrating feasts at the same time in each year. To avoid this, it became necessary to add an extra month at least once in three years. This was done by adding a second Adar (the Bab. [2] name for the twelfth month), February–March, so contrived that the Passover, celebrated on the 14th Nisan (the first month), should always fall after the spring equinox. The exact method of doing this is somewhat obscure. But as a month in three years was hardly sufficient, a cycle of eight years was observed in which three months were intercalated, based on general observation of the seasons. This continued until some time after the Christian era, when a more perfect system, a cycle of nineteen years with seven months intercalated—the invention of an astronomer of Athens named Meton—was adopted. It seems unlikely that the Jews had any fixed chronological calendar in the time of Christ, but this is disputed (see Wieseler, Chronol. Synopsis of the Four Gospels, p. 401, etc.).
The method of reckoning years is a complicated and difficult subject. In accordance with Eastern ideas, that precision in reckoning events to which we moderns are accustomed was unknown. It was not considered necessary (cf. e.g. the loose phrases ‘in the days of Herod the king,’ Matthew 2:1; and ‘Herod being tetrarch of Galilee,’ Luke 3:1); nor was it easily attainable. For it was possible for a writer in NT times to employ various systems of reckoning, and it was also possible to employ any one system in various ways. In addition to the various eras in which it was common to reckon, viz. the Olympiad era beginning b.c. 776; the Seleucid, used in the Books of the Maccabees, beginning b.c. 312; the Actian beginning b.c. 31; there was also the Roman method of reckoning by consuls or emperors (Luke 3:1), and the Jewish by high priests. Further, the year began at a different time in different countries, e.g. the Roman year began on Jan. 1, but in a few cases the emperors dated their years from the date of their election as tribunes of the people on Dec. 10. The Jewish saercd year began about the vernal equinox, as did also, in all probability, the years of the Seleucid era. But in Asia Minor a year beginning in autumn was also observed in ordinary use. These and other considerations render it almost impossible to give the precise date of any event even in NT times (see art. Dates). The one date given with any apparent precision is in Luke 3:1 ‘in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar.’ This seems tolerably accurate, but the actual date intended depends on how St. Luke reckoned. He may have dated from the death of Augustus, Aug. 19, a.d. 14, counting that year as the first of Tiberius’ reign, or from the beginning of a.d. 15, which was also a method of reckoning. Or he may have reckoned from Dec. 10, a.d. 15, when Tiberius assumed tribunician authority. Or, as the tribunician authority was interrupted in the reign of Tiberius, St. Luke may have dated his reign from the time when he assumed tribunician power the second time. In addition, there is the question whether St. Luke would reckon according to the Roman year from Jan. 1, or, according to local methods prevalent in Syria, from the autumn equinox.
Literature.—Kaestner, de Aeris; Bilfinger, Die antiken Stundenangaben; Schwarz, Der Jüd. Kalender; Lewin, Fasti Sacri; Wieseler, Chron. Synopsis of the Four Gospels; Ideler, Handbuch der Chronologie; Schürer, HJP [3] i. 37, ii. App. iii. and iv.; W. M. Ramsay, Was Christ born at Bethlehem? v.–xi.; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iv. pp. 762b–766b, also specially Ext. Vol. 473b–484.
G. Gordon Stott.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Time, Meaning of
The chronological sequence of life and its significance in biblical teaching.
God and Time The biblical God is not governed by time because He is the Lord of time. God is in time in the sense that He is sovereignly present in all the events of time, confronting His people with His warnings and His promises. However, this is not the same as saying that God is caught up in time or governed by it. Humankind cannot bind Him to special sacred times; rather, He encounters humankind in each moment of their temporal existence, offering each new day as an opportunity for judgment in the event of their willful stubbornness or for redemption in the event of their repentance.
Both the Old and New Testaments speak of God as everlasting, but they do not participate in the abstract, philosophical notion that He lives in an eternity of splendid isolation. Western thinking borrowed that from the ancient Greeks. To the people of the Bible—Israelites and Jewish
Christians living out of the Hebraic heritage—it would have been impossible to even think of eternity as a timelessness before and after time. The Hebrew words that are translated “eternal” and “eternity,” along with the New Testament Greek equivalents, conceive only of endlessness or perpetuity, that is the absence of the temporal conditionedness marking every finite creature.
To say God is eternal from the biblical standpoint means that His existence brackets cosmic time. He was there at the beginning of all created things; He will be there when temporal reality ends; and He is present at every moment in between. This is the true meaning of eternity. Before, above, and beyond all creaturely existence, God is; yet He is intimately close in every temporal experience—not passively but actively—governing all His creatures and calling each person, to whom He has given the power of free choice, to obey and believe.
Because the Bible is no theological treatise, it never speculates about these facts. Rather, it presents them in passages whose immediate purpose is to call for true obedience and trusting faith. The poems in Isaiah 40-55 directly state God's creative presence at the beginning of all things ( Isaiah 48:12-13 ; compare Isaiah 41:4 ; Isaiah 44:6 ). These words are addressed to a people in Exile, despairing that their God has abandoned them. The prophet assured them that the God who created in the beginning can create redemption for them.
Temporality, on the other hand, is an inescapable aspect of mankind's creaturely existence. Created of dust (Genesis 2:7 ), human beings must sometime die. As there is no limit to the Creator's existence, there is a necessary and inescapable limit to human existence. Genesis teaches that this is intended to keep people from seizing immortality and becoming like God (Genesis 3:22 ), to limit a person's lifetime in order to restrain and order the penchant for self-exaltation and violence (Genesis 6:3 ; Genesis 11:6 ). The human creature may not lay hold on the unending existence that belongs only to the Creator. Rather than attempting to seize immortality, humanity is advised to “remember your creator in the days of your youth, before the days of trouble come” (Ecclesiastes 12:1 : 1 NRSV; compare Ecclesiastes 11:8 ). Measuring and qualifying time
Like all ancient peoples, the people of the Bible were aware of the passage of time. They learned to mark seasons and measure durations. To be sure, they knew nothing of modern man's clock-watching and tight scheduling. They experienced time much more holistically. No evidence indicates that the Israelites counted seconds, minutes, or even hours (the Jews of the New Testament learned to count hours from the Romans). All their time units were based on observation and experience. Thus the day was divided up into “watches” (compare Exodus 14:24 ; 1 Samuel 11:11 ), measured by observation of the sun's position in the sky. They counted years by the cycle of the seasons, but especially by observation of the sun's return in its annual orbit. Their months were not based on an arbitrary number like our 30 days but were counted from one new moon to the next, making it necessary to add extra “intercalary” days after twelve months to make the new year (365 days) begin on a new moon ;c5 month. (Because the Jews have continued this method, their years have a variable new beginning from September into October.) By far the most important unit of time was the day, the most basic unit of intuitive experience. Early on, the Israelites counted the day from morning till evening, or, counting the night in between, from one morning to the next. Because of the growing importance of the rising moon for festival observance, they later came to count the day from the evening, and this is the Jewish custom today. What is important for understanding the biblical view of time is the fact that days were not just counted, but were identified by their most significant event. Throughout the Scriptures we read of “day of rejoicing,” “day of trouble,” “day of salvation,” expressions that commemorate a given day's experiential quality. As a matter of fact, the Hebrew word y|#om, meaning “day,” is the fifth most frequently used word in the Old Testament. Though used for all sorts of common experiences, it came to be used for marking special days of God's revelatory appearance, whether to individual persons or to the nation. Most notably, there was a “day” of Israel's election (Deuteronomy 9:24 ; compare Ezekiel 16:4-5 ), a “day” when God brought His people out of Egypt (Judges 19:30 ; 1 Samuel 8:8 ; 2 Samuel 7:6 ; Isaiah 11:16 ; Jeremiah 7:22 ,Jeremiah 7:22,7:25 ), but also a “day” of restoration (Zechariah 8:9-12 ). There was also a “day” of judgment ( 1 Thessalonians 5:1-11 ). A final day when God would judge the world was “the day of the Lord” (Amos 5:18-19 ; Isaiah 13:6 ; Zephaniah 1:7 ).
When the plural of yom (day) is used, it may measure a significant period or sequence of days, such as the length of a king's reign ( 2 Samuel 2:11 NAS margin). Often the plural is synonymous with the word et , which means “time” or “situation” and refers to an ongoing period identified by its experiential quality. There were good and evil days or times; Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 provides a list of such times while warning that mankind is unable to discern God's intent in sending them. Usually a person's “days” weigh more heavily with evil than with good (compare Genesis 47:9 ; Job 7:1 ,Job 7:1,7:16 ; Psalm 144:4 , Ecclesiastes 2:23 ). Psalm 90:1 , which measures mankind's brief life (Psalm 90:9-10 ) against God's eternity (Psalm 90:2 ,Psalms 90:2,90:4 ), prays that God will do two things: (1) “teach us to count our days that we may gain a wise heart” (Psalm 90:12 NRSV) and (2) “make us glad as many days as you have afflicted us, and as many years as we have seen evil” ( Psalm 90:15 NRSV).
Time and history The habit of the people of the Bible to identify certain days by their dominant quality is not to be compared with the ancient Babylonian notion that the quality of every day and time is set by heavenly decree, fixed so firmly that even the gods are forced to submit to it. The Babylonians observed the heavenly constellations and made them the clock that brought good or evil. If a memorable calamity had occurred under a given constellation and when the planets were in a certain convergence, the recurrence of this heavenly configuration would be the inevitable omen of evil. Thus the Babylonians saw no organic, cause and effect, interconnection between human events. Because of their fatalism, they developed no true understanding of history and saw no ultimate purpose in human striving.
Egypt, another ancient neighbor to Israel, had little of this cosmic determinism; yet the Egyptian civilization was equally unable to understand and deal with history. Time in Egyptian thought was an endless, meaningless cycle of death and rebirth, a continual return to primordial reality. Everything new was only a new incarnation of its eternal model, just as each Pharaoh was a reincarnation of the divine. Here one finds no sharp delimitation of times, as in Babylonian civilization, yet historical event remained meaningless because only the eternal order was real.
This description, little understood by Bible readers, is an illuminating preface to the biblical understanding of time and history. The Bible teaches that people, man are free to act—but always they are called to act in accordance with God's revealed law. Preceding all responsible human acts, however, is God's saving act within history. The Israelites were unique in the ancient world in their belief that God had not made them with the land of Canaan, like the Egyptians with the Nile, but had brought them as strangers to settle in a land that was not theirs (Genesis 12:1-3 ) through a mighty act at the commencement of their existence as a people. Later, Israel became a people in the deliverance from Egypt.
God gave them His law from Sinai, and ever thereafter they strove imperfectly to be God's people and to keep His law. Because of their vacillating and backsliding, they lived constantly between the promise and the fulfillment. Their striving had historical significance because their God was present to blame their failure while urging them forward to a more perfect obedience. The people of the Bible were different because they were free in the presence of the eternal God to obey or disobey; and, in the event of their disobedience, they were free to repent and be saved (Ezekiel 33:11 ).
Biblical humanity saw themselves standing in a present moment of critical decision making, looking back upon the records of an imperfect obedience that spoke also of God's grace and forbearance, interpreting this as a warning and a renewed promise of grace for the future. Thus the past is a mirror of the future, showing the perils and opportunities that are yet to be. This arms mankind for a commitment here and now, once and again, to decide for God.
Christ's new time After a long age of waiting and sometimes of despair, the Jewish people who were heirs of the Old Testament promises heard the announcement that God had brought history to its fulfillment in His Messiah (Mark 1:15 ). This Messiah eventually died a cruel death on the cross, but when He arose to everlasting life, His followers went into all the world to announce, “See, now is the acceptable time; see, now is the day of salvation” (2 Corinthians 6:2 NRSV; compare 2 Corinthians 3:7-18 ). Just as Jesus had declined at the moment of His ascension to give His followers a clue to times and seasons (Acts 1:7 ), Paul refused to tell the church when the end would come, except to tell them that it would come suddenly and unexpectedly, like a thief in the night (Lamentations 1:12 ), and that God was presently acting to overcome the mystery of “the man of lawlessness,” which must first be destroyed. (2 Thessalonians 2:1-12 )
Some are troubled that the mystery of lawlessness is still at work and has delayed the “day of the Lord” for another two thousand years. In spite of this, we must affirm with Paul and with Christ Himself that God's new age has most certainly arrived. Mankind is still lost, but only insofar as the gospel, widely proclaimed to all the world, is ignored. We too should be warned off from calculating days and seasons, for the fullness of time has already appeared. In His Son God gave mankind the most perfect revelation of Himself (John 14:5-11 ). For each human person, nothing counts but the present moment—the moment of decision for Christ—which brings the history of divine salvation to a climax of meaning in the life of peoples and individuals. Deciding for Christ in the present moment is the decisive act in waiting for Him.
Sacred time Israel's neighbors were very religious. They believed that their gods could be contacted at holy places (the shrines) and at holy times (the religious festivals). The biblical God, as Creator of the world and Lord of history, cannot be tied down to special places and special times. Nevertheless, His ancient people did right when they built the Temple and set aside holy seasons for His worship. This was not intended to coerce God but to hallow His holy presence for prayer and thanksgiving. Every time that Israel met for worship, it praised God for that great day at the beginning of their history, when He delivered them from Egypt; it praised Him also for every day of divine intervention. To keep His sabbaths and holy festivals and to gather in His temple, was an act of celebration and recommitment.
The Temple is long since destroyed, yet Jews and Christians gather in holy places and at holy seasons to continue their praise and renew their prayers. There is nothing sacrosanct about our church buildings or about our holy days. They are made holy by our intention. It seems a departure from biblical religion when the liturgy designs to recreate the real, bodily presence of Christ. Yet Christ must be present if worship is to be valid. It is God's greatest saving deed on our behalf, the death and resurrection of Christ, that must come to pass in our hearts anew. Then we will speak and testify in “the great congregation” (see Psalm 22:25 NRSV), recreating in our worship the reality of Christ. All time belongs to God ( Genesis 1:1 ), but sacred times, especially set aside and devoutly observed, serve to show once again our participation in the great events of God's appearance. See History ; Time.
Simon J. DeVries
Holman Bible Dictionary - Fullness of Time
The traditional rendering of two similar Greek expressions in Galatians 4:4 and Ephesians 1:10 . The first refers to a past event, the sending of Christ to redeem those born under the law. While the sending of God's Son encompasses the whole of Christ's incarnate ministry, the New Testament specifically relates the sending to Christ's death as a saving event (John 3:17 ; Romans 8:3 ; 1 John 4:9-10 ). The sending of Christ in the fullness of time refers not so much to world conditions in the sense that the prevalence of Greek as a common spoken language, Roman roads, and the Roman enforced peace made the rapid spread of the gospel possible. Rather the emphasis is on God whose sending of Christ is not a “last ditch effort” but part of God's gracious plan from the beginning.
The reference to the fullness of time in Ephesians is more difficult. Some translations understand the time when all things are gathered together in Christ to lie in the future (NIV, TEV); others, in the past (REB). A major theme of Ephesians is that Christ has already broken down the dividing wall of hostility between Jew and Gentile (1 John 2:11-22 , especially 1John 2:14,1 John 2:21 ). Therefore, it seems likely that the crucial shift in time between the past with its hopelessness and hostility and the present age of reconciliation has already occurred.
Chris Church
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - End, End Time
See Day ; Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Understanding: no Time For
How is it, my dear,' inquired a schoolmistress of a little girl, 'that you do not understand this simple thing?' 'I do not know, indeed,' she answered, with a perplexed look; 'but I sometimes think I have so many things to learn that I have not the time to understand.'
Alas! there may be much hearing, much reading, much attendance at public services, and very small result, and all because the word was not the subject of thought, and was never embraced by the understanding. What is not understood is like meat undigested, more likely to be injurious than nourishing.
Webster's Dictionary - Benting Time
The season when pigeons are said to feed on bents, before peas are ripe.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Last Day, Last Time
See Eschatology ; Judgment Day .
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Money-Making: no Time For
A gentlemen of Boston (U. S.), an intimate friend of Professor Agassiz, once expressed his wonder that a man of such abilities as he (Agassiz) possessed should remain contented with such a moderate income. 'I have enough,' was Agassiz's reply. 'I have not time to make money. Life is not sufficiently long to enable a man to get rich, and do his duty to his fellow men at the same time.' Christian, have you time to serve your God and yet to give your whole soul to gaining wealth? The question is left for conscience to answer.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Old Time
The Lord referred to what was said to 'the ancients' by Moses. Matthew 5:21,33 . (The words are omitted from Matthew 5:27 by the editors.) Moses had been proclaimed 'from old time' in the synagogues. Acts 15:21 .
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Time
Daniel 12:7 (a) This is taken to mean one year. "Times" is taken to means two years. "Half a time" is taken to mean six months. (See also Revelation 12:14).
Revelation 10:6 (a) This passage does not mean that there will be an end to the clocks and that time will be no more. It refers to the fact that what must be done is to be done immediately. There can be no procrastination, no putting off until later, no indecision, every matter must be immediately attended to, without delay. It may be illustrated by the time of the departure of the train. If the train leaves at 9:00 o'clock, then there is no more time to get on board.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Fulness of the Time
FULNESS OF THE TIME (τὸ πλήρωμα τοῦ χρόνου).—An expression used by St. Paul (Galatians 4:4) to mark the opportuneness of the coming of Christ into the world, and the ripeness of the age for the great religious revolution He was to effect. It emphasizes the unique significance of the period as the culmination of a long course of events, by which the way had been providentially prepared for Christ’s appearance, and His introduction of a purer type of religion. The evidences of such a providential preparation are indeed remarkable. Along different lines of historical development a situation had been created at the very centre of the world’s life, that was singularly favourable to the planting and spread of a loftier faith. The main factors usually recognized as contributing to this result were: (1) the peculiar condition which the Jewish people had reached; (2) the dissemination of the Greek language, culture, and commercial activity; and (3) the unifying influence of Rome.
1. The peculiar condition of the Jewish people.—Centuries of chequered discipline had fixed in the Jewish mind the belief in one true and perfectly righteous God, and subsequently to the return from the Exile there had been no relapse into idolatry. Latterly, indeed, through the influence of the scribes and Pharisees, legalism and formality had crept in, and the externalization of religion had been carried far; yet in many classes of society there was a wistful straining after inner purity and a more living fellowship with God; and in spite of the soulless bondage of ceremonial observances, there was an amount of deep and reverent piety that kept the nation’s heart sounder than might appear on the surface. At all events, nowhere else in the world did there exist so vivid a conception of the Divine holiness or so high a recognized standard of morality; nowhere else, therefore, were there so many devout minds ready to receive a new spiritual revelation, or so well fitted to furnish heralds and apostles for its propagation.
Then there was the revival of the Messianic hope, which, kept alive by the pressure of repeated misfortunes, had, under the tightening grip of Roman domination, sprung up with passionate intensity. The political situation was galling, and the Jewish people, pining to be free from the foreign yoke, consoled themselves with the thought of a glorious future. It was a time of high-strung unrest and expectancy; yet although the prospect of political emancipation was to a large extent entertained, there were multitudes of earnest souls yearning for a higher form of deliverance, the dawn of a reign of righteousness and peace, in the benefits of which not Israel only, but the whole world, should share.
Outside Palestine, again, the influence of Jewish religious ideas had been widely extended by means of the Dispersion. Conscious of being raised above the manifold forms of heathen superstition around them, the colonies of Jews settled in the trading cities of foreign lands felt themselves impelled to aspire after a certain elevation of life; while the loftier moral teaching they maintained in their synagogues attracted considerable numbers of proselytes from paganism. Thus the conception of the Divine unity and righteousness was being spread over a large section of the heathen world. So far, therefore, both at home and abroad the Jewish people had fulfilled their mission in the moral and religious preparation of the world for the entrance of Christianity.
2. The dissemination of the Greek language, culture, and commercial activity.—Ever since the conquests of Alexander the Great, the Greek tongue had attained supremacy among the civilized nations, and had become the current medium for the exchange of thought. Even the OT had to be rendered into Greek, in the translation known as the Septuagint. Moreover, Greek learning, literature, and speculation exercised a pervasive influence far and near. A significant indication of this is to be found in the rise among the Jews of the Dispersion of a school of thinkers who had imbibed the Greek culture, and who, quickened by the intellectual alertness of the Greek mind, were drawn to take part in the literary productivity of the age. The aim of this Graeco-Jewish school was to make the purer religious faith and knowledge of Israel accessible to the world. With its chief seat at Alexandria, its leading representatives, such as Aristobulus and Philo, endeavoured to show that the Mosaic law, correctly understood, contained all that the best Greek philosophers had taught. Thus was brought about a mutual action and reaction of Jewish and Greek ideas, and a soil was being made ready for a more elevated spiritual teaching, based on the unity of the Godhead and the eternal obligation of righteousness.
At the same time the commercial enterprise of the Greeks was rapidly overcoming national exclusiveness, and producing a freer intercourse between men of different races. They were the cosmopolitans of the period—inquisitive, openminded, eager to enter into all vivid interests; and in the great trading cities in Asia Minor and along the Mediterranean shore they fostered the spirit of toleration and helped to secure full scope for the advocacy of all forms of belief.
But while thus stimulating intellectual receptiveness everywhere, the most important contribution of the Greeks in the preparation for Christianity was the universal prevalence they gained for their rich and expressive language, inasmuch as by this they supplied a common vehicle of intercourse, calculated to be of immense advantage in the announcement and promulgation of the Christian Evangel.
3. The unifying influence of Rome. That the entire known world was then embraced within Rome’s imperial sway was a momentous factor in the situation which had been reached. As the barriers of language had been demolished through the influence of the Greeks, so through the influence of the Romans the barriers of nationality had been broken down. The whole world was but one country; and from the Euphrates to the Atlantic there was settled government, order, and the rule of law under one sovereign sceptre. In the lull of national strifes which had thus come—the pax Romana—merchant and traveller moved safely from land to land, and by the splendid system of roads for which the Roman Empire was famed, the lines of communication were opened in all directions. In this way Rome had performed its distinctive part by bringing about a political condition of the world hitherto unexampled in history.
Thus the three great races of antiquity had contributed their share towards the fulfilment of a manifestly providential design, and the period had now arrived when their several lines of historical development converged to a meeting-point, producing a combination of circumstances which rendered issues of vast moment possible. As it has been aptly put, ‘the City of God is built at the confluence of three civilizations’ (Conybeare and Howson’s St. Paul, i. 2).
It is worthy of note also that the little country of Palestine, where the Founder of Christianity was to appear, lay at the very centre of the then known world; and in view of the fact that through the provision of a common language and free means of movement and intercourse the avenues of access were opened to every land, it becomes clear that the most signal facilities were afforded for the dissemination of a faith that was destined to wield a world-wide power.
In addition to this, account has to be taken of the decay of the old pagan religions, and the simultaneous influx of Oriental ideas. There was a strange intermingling of races and also of religious beliefs, with the result that men’s minds were unsettled, and a spirit of inquiry was awakened among those who had grown dissatisfied with the popular heathen cults.
Manifestly the age was ripe for a new revelation that would meet the deepest needs of the human soul; and in the situation created by the course of Jewish, Greek, and Roman history, the way for it had at length been prepared. Then Jesus Christ appeared. The ‘fulness of the time’ had come for the advent of the promised Saviour with His Gospel of life and grace for the regeneration of mankind.
Literature.—Ewald, Hist. of Israel (English translation), vols. v. and vi.; Hausrath, The Times of Jesus (English translation 1888), i.; Schürer, HJP [1] ii. iii.; Pressensé, Religions before Christ (1862); Conybeare and Howson, St. Paul (1858), i. 4–14; Lux Mundi, 129–178; Edersheim, Life and Times, i. 3–108; Farrar, St. Paul, i. 115 ff.; Gwatkin, art. ‘Roman Empire’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible; Wernle, Beginnings of Christianity (English translation 1903), i. 1–36.
G. M‘Hardy.
Webster's Dictionary - Time Signature
A sign at the beginning of a composition or movement, placed after the key signature, to indicate its time or meter. Also called rhythmical signature. It is in the form of a fraction, of which the denominator indicates the kind of note taken as time unit for the beat, and the numerator, the number of these to the measure.
Webster's Dictionary - Time-Honored
(a.) Honored for a long time; venerable, and worthy of honor, by reason of antiquity, or long continuance.
Webster's Dictionary - Time-Table
(1):
(n.) A tabular statement of the time at which, or within which, several things are to take place, as the recitations in a school, the departure and arrival of railroad trains or other public conveyances, the rise and fall of the tides, etc.
(2):
(n.) A plane surface divided in one direction with lines representing hours and minutes, and in the other with lines representing miles, and having diagonals (usually movable strings) representing the speed and position of various trains.
(3):
(n.) A table showing the notation, length, or duration of the several notes.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Time
A. Noun.
‛Êth (עֵת, Strong's #6256), “time; period of time; appointed time; proper time; season.” This word also appears in Phoenician, post-biblical Hebrew, Arabic (where the same radicals constitute a verb signifying “to appear”), and Akkadian (where these radicals form an adverb signifying “at the time when”). ‛Êth appears about 290 times in the Bible and in all periods.
Basically this noun connotes “time” conceived as an opportunity or season. First, the word signifies an appointed, fixed, and set time or period. This is what astrologers claimed to discern: “Then the king said to the wise men, which knew the times …” (Esth. 1:13). God alone, however, knows and reveals such “appointed times”: “… In the time of their visitation they shall be cast down, saith the Lord” (Jer. 8:12).
This noun also is used of the concept “proper or appropriate time.” This nuance is applied to the “time” God has appointed for one to die: “Be not over much wicked, neither be thou foolish: why shouldest thou die before thy time?” (Eccl. 7:17). It is used of the “appropriate or suitable time” for a given activity in life: “He hath made every thing beautiful in his time …” (Eccl. 3:11; cf. Ps. 104:27). Finally, the “appropriate time” for divine judgment is represented by ‛êth: “It is time for thee, Lord, to work: for they have made void thy law” (Ps. 119:126).
A third use connotes “season,” or a regular fixed period of time such as springtime: “And he said, I will certainly return unto thee according to the time of life; and, lo, Sarah thy wife shall have a son” (Gen. 18:10). Similarly, the word is used of the rainy “season” (Ezra 10:13), the harvest “time” (Jer. 50:16), the migratory “period” (Jer. 8:7), and the mating “season” (Gen. 31:10).
This noun also is applied to differing “extensions of time.” In its first biblical appearance, for example, ‛êth represents the “time” (period of the day) when the sun is setting: “And the dove came in to him in the evening [1] …” (Gen. 8:11). The word is used of special occasions such as the birth of a child (Mic. 5:3) and of periods during which certain conditions persist (Exod. 18:22; Dan. 12:11).
B. Verb.
‘Anah means “to be exercised.” The noun ‛êth may be derived from this verb which occurs only 3 times in Hebrew poetry (cf. Eccl. 1:13). It may be related to an Arabic root meaning “to be disquieted or disturbed about something,” an Ethiopic root and old South Arabic root meaning “to be concerned about.” In later Hebrew this root means “to worry.”
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Last Time or Days
This was spoken of by the apostle John as then existing. There were many antichrists, whereby it was known that the last time (lit. hour) had commenced. 1 John 2:18 . Apostasy from apostolic doctrine was a sign of the last time (it was not exactly the 'last days,' as in 2Timothy). No further revelation had to be made, and if this doctrine was refused, nothing but judgement could be the result: cf. 2 Timothy 3:1 ; 2 Peter 3:3 ; Jude 18 . The 'last days' of Hebrews 1:2 and 'last times' of 1 Peter 1:20 are changed by Editors of the Greek Testament to the 'end of these days;' these passages refer to the end of the period of the law when the Messiah appeared.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Neither at Any Time
* For NEITHER AT ANY TIME, Luke 15:29 , see NEVER
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Time
Besides the ordinary uses of this word, the Bible sometimes employs it to denote a year, as in Daniel 4:16 ; or a prophetic year, consisting of three hundred and sixty natural year, a day being taken for a year. Thus in Daniel 7:25 12:7 , the phrase "a time, times, and the dividing of a time" is supposed to mean three and a half prophetic years, or 1,260 natural years. This period is elsewhere paralleled by the expression, "forty-two months," each month including thirty years, Revelation 11:2-3 12:6,14 13:5 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Time, Paschal
In liturgy, season of joy after Easter, between Low and Trinity Sundays. In canon law, period during which every Catholic must receive Holy Communion. See Easter duty.
King James Dictionary - Time
TIME, n. L.tempus tempora, the falls of the head, also tempest, &c. See Tempest. Time is primarily equivalent to season to the Gr.wpa in its original sense, opportunity, occasion, a fall, an event, that which comes.
1. A particular portion or part of duration, whether past, present or future. The time was the time has been the time is the time will be. Lost time is never found again.
God, who at sundry times, and in divers manners, spoke in time past to the fathers by the prophets. Hebrews 1
2. A proper time a season. There is a time to every purpose. Ecclesiastes 3
The time of figs was not yet. Mark 11 .
3. Duration. The equal and uniform flux of time does not affect our senses.
Time is absolute or relative absolute time is considered without any relation to bodies or their motions. Relative time is the sensible measure of any portion of duration, by means of motion. Thus the diurnal revolution of the sun measures a space of time or duration. Hence,
4. A space or measured portion of duration. We were in Paris two months,and all that time enjoyed good health.
5. Life or duration, in reference to occupation. One man spends his time in idleness another devotes all his time to useful purposes. Believe me, your time is not your own it belongs to God, to religion, to mankind.
6. Age a part of duration distinct from other parts as ancient times modern times. The Spanish armada was defeated in the time of Queen Elizabeth. 7. Hour of travail. She was within one month of her time.
8. Repetition repeated performance, or mention with reference to repetition. The physician visits his patient three times in a day. 9. Repetition doubling addition of a number to itself as, to double cloth four times four times four amount to sixteen. 10. Measure of sounds in music as common time, and treble time. In concerts,it is all important, that the performers keep time, or exact time. 11. The state of things at a particular period as when we say, good times, or bad times, hard times,dull times for trade, &c. In this sense, the plural is generally used. 12. In grammar, tense. In time, in good season sufficiently early.
He arrived in time to see the exhibition.
1. A considerable space of duration process or continuation of duration. You must wait patiently you will in time recover your health and strength. At times, at distinct intervals of duration. At times he reads at other times, he rides.
The spirit began to move him at times. Judges 13 .
Time enough, in season early enough.
Stanley at Bosworth-field, came time enough to save his life.
To lose time, to delay.
1. To go too slow as, a watch or clock loses time. Apparent time, in astronomy, true solar time, regulated by the apparent motions of the sun.
Mean time, equated time, a mean or average of apparent time.
Siderial time, is that which is shown by the diurnal revolutions of the stars.
TIME, To adapt to the time or occasion to bring, begin or perform at the proper season or time as, the measure is well timed, or timed. No small part of political wisdom consists in knowing how to time propositions and measures.
Mercy is good, but kings mistake its timing.
1. To regulate as to time as, he timed the stroke. 2. To measure as in music or harmony.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Time
A — 1: χρόνος (Strong's #5550 — Noun Masculine — chronos — khron'-os ) denotes "a space of time," whether short, e.g., Matthew 2:7 ; Luke 4:5 , or long, e.g., Luke 8:27 ; 20:9 ; or a succession of "times," shorter, e.g., Acts 20:18 , or longer, e.g., Romans 16:25 , RV, "times eternal;" or duration of "time," e.g., Mark 2:19,2 nd part, RV, "while" (AV, "as long as"), lit., "for whatever time." For a fuller treatment see SEASON , A, No. 2.
A — 2: καιρός (Strong's #2540 — Noun Masculine — kairos — kahee-ros' ) primarily "due measure, due proportion," when used of "time," signified "a fixed or definite period, a season," sometimes an opportune or seasonable "time," e.g., Romans 5:6 , RV, "season;" Galatians 6:10 , "opportunity." In Mark 10:30 ; Luke 18:30 , "this time" (kairos), i.e., "in this lifetime," is contrasted with "the coming age." In 1 Thessalonians 5:1 , "the times and the seasons," "times" (chronos) refers to the duration of the interval previous to the Parousia of Christ and the length of "time" it will occupy (see COMING , No. 3), as well as other periods; "seasons" refers to the characteristics of these periods. See SEASON , A, No. 1, and the contrasts between chronos and kairos under SEASON, A, No. 2.
A — 3: ὥρα (Strong's #5610 — Noun Feminine — hora — ho'-rah ) primarily, "any time or period fixed by nature," is translated "time" in Matthew 14:15 ; Luke 14:17 ; Romans 13:11 , "high time;" in the following the RV renders it "hour," for AV, "time," Matthew 18:1 ; Luke 1:10 ; John 16:2,4,25 ; 1 John 2:18 (twice); Revelation 14:15 ; in Mark 6:35 , RV, "day;" in 1 Thessalonians 2:17 , RV, "a short (season)," lit., "(the season, AV, 'time') of an hour." See HOUR.
B — 1: πώποτε (Strong's #4455 — Adverb — popote — po'-pot-e ) "ever yet," is rendered "at any time" in John 1:18 ; 5:37 ; 1 John 4:12 . For Luke 15:29 see Note (14) below. See NEVER.
B — 2: ἤδη (Strong's #2235 — Adverb — ede — ay'-day ) "already, now," is translated "by this time" in John 11:39 . See ALREADY.
B — 3: πάλαι (Strong's #3819 — Adverb — palai — pal'-ahee ) "long ago, of old," is rendered "of old time" in Hebrews 1:1 (AV, "in time past"). See OLD.
Notes: (1) In Luke 9:51 ; Acts 8:1 , AV, hemera, "a day," is translated "time," in the former, plural, RV, "the days;" in Luke 23:7 (plural), RV "(in these) days," AV, "(at that) time." (2) In 1 Timothy 6:19 the phrase eis to mellon, lit., "unto the about-to-be," i.e., "for the impending (time)," is rendered "against the time to come." (3) In 1 Corinthians 16:12 , AV, nun, "now" (RV), is rendered "at this time;" in Acts 24:25 , the phrase to nun echon, lit., "the now having," is rendered "at this time" (the verb is adjectival); the phrase is more expressive than the simple "now." Cp. heos tou nun, "until now," Matthew 24:21 ; Mark 13:19 , RV, AV, "unto (this time)." (4) For polumeros, strangely rendered "at sundry times," in Hebrews 1:1 , AV, see PORTION , C. (5) For "long time," see LONG. (6) For "nothing ... at any time," see NOTHING , Note (3). (7) For proskairos, rendered "for a time" in Mark 4:17 , AV, see SEASON , WHILE. (8) In Matt., apo tote, "from that time," lit., "from then," occurs thrice, Matthew 4:17 ; 16:21 ; 26:16 ; in Luke 16:16 , RV (AV, "since that time"); in John 6:66 , AV, "from that time" translates ek toutou, lit., "from, or out of, this," RV, "upon this." (9) In Luke 4:27 , the preposition epi signifies "in the time of." (10) For genea, rendered "times" in Acts 14:16 , "time" in Acts 15:21 , see AGE , No. 2 (RV, "generations"). (11) For "at every time," 2 Peter 1:15 , RV, see ALWAYS , No. 2. (12) For "in time of need," Hebrews 4:16 , see CONVENIENT , and NEED, C, Note. (13) In Hebrews 2:1 , pote signifies "at any time;" in 1 Peter 3:5 , "in the old time;" in 2 Peter 1:21 , "in old time." See PAST. In the following where the AV has "sometimes" the RV has "once" in Ephesians 2:13 ; 5:8 ; "aforetime" in Titus 3:3 . (14) In Luke 15:29 , AV, oudepote, "never," is rendered "neither ... at any time" (RV, "never"). (15) For eukaireo, "to spend time," Acts 17:21 , see SPEND , No. 10. (16) For chronotribeo, "to spend time," see SPEND , No. 11. (17) For prolego, rendered "told ... in time past," in Galatians 5:21 , AV, see FOREWARN. (18) In Luke 12:1 , "in the mean time" is a rendering of the phrase en hois, lit., "in which (things or circumstances)." (19) In Revelation 5:11 there is no word representing "times:" see THOUSAND , Note (2). (20) In Galatians 4:2 prothesmios (in its feminine form, with hemera, "day," understood) is rendered "time appointed" (see APPOINT , No. 3 and Note, TERM).

Sentence search

Time - Time, n. Time is primarily equivalent to season to the Gr. The Time was the Time has been the Time is the Time will be. Lost Time is never found again. ...
God, who at sundry Times, and in divers manners, spoke in Time past to the fathers by the prophets. A proper Time a season. There is a Time to every purpose. Ecclesiastes 3 ...
The Time of figs was not yet. The equal and uniform flux of Time does not affect our senses. ...
Time is absolute or relative absolute Time is considered without any relation to bodies or their motions. Relative Time is the sensible measure of any portion of duration, by means of motion. Thus the diurnal revolution of the sun measures a space of Time or duration. We were in Paris two months,and all that Time enjoyed good health. One man spends his Time in idleness another devotes all his Time to useful purposes. Believe me, your Time is not your own it belongs to God, to religion, to mankind. Age a part of duration distinct from other parts as ancient Times modern Times. The Spanish armada was defeated in the Time of Queen Elizabeth. She was within one month of her Time. The physician visits his patient three Times in a day. Repetition doubling addition of a number to itself as, to double cloth four Times four Times four amount to sixteen. Measure of sounds in music as common Time, and treble Time. In concerts,it is all important, that the performers keep Time, or exact Time. The state of things at a particular period as when we say, good Times, or bad Times, hard Times,dull Times for trade, &c. In Time, in good season sufficiently early. ...
He arrived in Time to see the exhibition. You must wait patiently you will in Time recover your health and strength. At Times, at distinct intervals of duration. At Times he reads at other Times, he rides. ...
The spirit began to move him at Times. ...
Time enough, in season early enough. ...
Stanley at Bosworth-field, came Time enough to save his life. ...
To lose Time, to delay. To go too slow as, a watch or clock loses Time. Apparent Time, in astronomy, true solar Time, regulated by the apparent motions of the sun. ...
Mean Time, equated Time, a mean or average of apparent Time. ...
Siderial Time, is that which is shown by the diurnal revolutions of the stars. ...
Time, To adapt to the Time or occasion to bring, begin or perform at the proper season or Time as, the measure is well Timed, or Timed. No small part of political wisdom consists in knowing how to Time propositions and measures. To regulate as to Time as, he Timed the stroke
Aforetime - AFO'RETIME, adv. afore and Time. In Time past in a former Time
Chronic - ) Continuing for a long Time; lingering; habitual. ) Relating to Time; according to Time
When - At the Time. At what Time, interrogatively. Which Time. After the Time that. At what Time. ...
When as, at the Time when what Time
Meanwhile - ) The intervening Time; as, in the meantime (or mean Time). ) In the intervening Time; during the interval
Betimes - be and Time, that is, by the Time. Seasonably in good season or Time before it is late. To measure life learn thou betimes. Soon in a short Time. He tires betimes, that spurs too fast betimes
Time - A — 1: χρόνος (Strong's #5550 — Noun Masculine — chronos — khron'-os ) denotes "a space of Time," whether short, e. , Luke 8:27 ; 20:9 ; or a succession of "times," shorter, e. , Romans 16:25 , RV, "times eternal;" or duration of "time," e. , "for whatever Time. ...
A — 2: καιρός (Strong's #2540 — Noun Masculine — kairos — kahee-ros' ) primarily "due measure, due proportion," when used of "time," signified "a fixed or definite period, a season," sometimes an opportune or seasonable "time," e. " In Mark 10:30 ; Luke 18:30 , "this Time" (kairos), i. , "in this lifetime," is contrasted with "the coming age. " In 1 Thessalonians 5:1 , "the Times and the seasons," "times" (chronos) refers to the duration of the interval previous to the Parousia of Christ and the length of "time" it will occupy (see COMING , No. ...
A — 3: ὥρα (Strong's #5610 — Noun Feminine — hora — ho'-rah ) primarily, "any Time or period fixed by nature," is translated "time" in Matthew 14:15 ; Luke 14:17 ; Romans 13:11 , "high Time;" in the following the RV renders it "hour," for AV, "time," Matthew 18:1 ; Luke 1:10 ; John 16:2,4,25 ; 1 John 2:18 (twice); Revelation 14:15 ; in Mark 6:35 , RV, "day;" in 1 Thessalonians 2:17 , RV, "a short (season)," lit. , "(the season, AV, 'time') of an hour. ...
B — 1: πώποτε (Strong's #4455 — Adverb — popote — po'-pot-e ) "ever yet," is rendered "at any Time" in John 1:18 ; 5:37 ; 1 John 4:12 . ...
B — 2: ἤδη (Strong's #2235 — Adverb — ede — ay'-day ) "already, now," is translated "by this Time" in John 11:39 . ...
B — 3: πάλαι (Strong's #3819 — Adverb — palai — pal'-ahee ) "long ago, of old," is rendered "of old Time" in Hebrews 1:1 (AV, "in Time past"). ...
Notes: (1) In Luke 9:51 ; Acts 8:1 , AV, hemera, "a day," is translated "time," in the former, plural, RV, "the days;" in Luke 23:7 (plural), RV "(in these) days," AV, "(at that) Time. , "for the impending (time)," is rendered "against the Time to come. " (3) In 1 Corinthians 16:12 , AV, nun, "now" (RV), is rendered "at this Time;" in Acts 24:25 , the phrase to nun echon, lit. , "the now having," is rendered "at this Time" (the verb is adjectival); the phrase is more expressive than the simple "now. heos tou nun, "until now," Matthew 24:21 ; Mark 13:19 , RV, AV, "unto (this Time). " (4) For polumeros, strangely rendered "at sundry Times," in Hebrews 1:1 , AV, see PORTION , C. (5) For "long Time," see LONG. at any Time," see NOTHING , Note (3). (7) For proskairos, rendered "for a Time" in Mark 4:17 , AV, see SEASON , WHILE. , apo tote, "from that Time," lit. , "from then," occurs thrice, Matthew 4:17 ; 16:21 ; 26:16 ; in Luke 16:16 , RV (AV, "since that Time"); in John 6:66 , AV, "from that Time" translates ek toutou, lit. " (9) In Luke 4:27 , the preposition epi signifies "in the Time of. " (10) For genea, rendered "times" in Acts 14:16 , "time" in Acts 15:21 , see AGE , No. (11) For "at every Time," 2 Peter 1:15 , RV, see ALWAYS , No. (12) For "in Time of need," Hebrews 4:16 , see CONVENIENT , and NEED, C, Note. (13) In Hebrews 2:1 , pote signifies "at any Time;" in 1 Peter 3:5 , "in the old Time;" in 2 Peter 1:21 , "in old Time. In the following where the AV has "sometimes" the RV has "once" in Ephesians 2:13 ; 5:8 ; "aforetime" in Titus 3:3 . at any Time" (RV, "never"). (15) For eukaireo, "to spend Time," Acts 17:21 , see SPEND , No. (16) For chronotribeo, "to spend Time," see SPEND , No. in Time past," in Galatians 5:21 , AV, see FOREWARN. (18) In Luke 12:1 , "in the mean Time" is a rendering of the phrase en hois, lit. " (19) In Revelation 5:11 there is no word representing "times:" see THOUSAND , Note (2). (20) In Galatians 4:2 prothesmios (in its feminine form, with hemera, "day," understood) is rendered "time appointed" (see APPOINT , No
Hitherto - To this Time yet. In any Time, or every Time till now in Time preceding the present
Ever - ) At any Time; at any period or point of Time. ) At all Times; through all Time; always; forever
While - Time space of Time, or continued duration. ...
Worth while, worth the Time which it requires worth the Time and pains hence, worth the expense. During the Time that while I write, you sleep. At the same Time that. To while away, as Time, in English, is to loiter or more generally, to cause Time to pass away pleasantly, without irksomeness as, we while away Time in amusements or diversions
Therewhile - ) At that Time; at the same Time
Since - ) From a definite past Time until now; as, he went a month ago, and I have not seen him since. ) In the Time past, counting backward from the present; before this or now; ago. ) From the Time of; in or during the Time subsequent to; subsequently to; after; - usually with a past event or Time for the object
Timekeeper - ) A clock, watch, or other chronometer; a Timepiece. ) One appointed to mark and declare the Time of participants in races or other contests. ) A person who keeps, marks, regulates, or determines the Time. ) A person who keeps a record of the Time spent by workmen at their work. ) One who gives the Time for the departure of conveyances. ) One who marks the Time in musical performances
Opetide - ) The Time after harvest when the common fields are open to all kinds of stock. ) The Time between Epiphany and Ash Wednesday wherein marriages were formerly solemnized publicly in churches. ) Open Time; - applied to different things...
(4):...
(n. ) The early spring, or the Time when flowers begin opening
Heretofore - ) Up to this Time; hitherto; before; in Time past
Downlying - ) The Time of retiring to rest; Time of repose
Whensoever - ) At what Time soever; at whatever Time; whenever
Yore - ) In Time long past; in old Time; long since
Leisure - ) Freedom from occupation or business; vacant Time; Time free from employment. ) Time at one's command, free from engagement; convenient opportunity; hence, convenience; ease
Untimely - Happening before the usual Time as untimely frost. Happening before the natural Time premature as untimely death untimely fate. Before the natural Time. ...
What is untimely done
Time - ...
‛Êth (עֵת, Strong's #6256), “time; period of Time; appointed Time; proper Time; season. ” This word also appears in Phoenician, post-biblical Hebrew, Arabic (where the same radicals constitute a verb signifying “to appear”), and Akkadian (where these radicals form an adverb signifying “at the Time when”). ‛Êth appears about 290 Times in the Bible and in all periods. ...
Basically this noun connotes “time” conceived as an opportunity or season. First, the word signifies an appointed, fixed, and set Time or period. This is what astrologers claimed to discern: “Then the king said to the wise men, which knew the Times …” ( Times”: “… In the Time of their visitation they shall be cast down, saith the Lord” ( Time. ” This nuance is applied to the “time” God has appointed for one to die: “Be not over much wicked, neither be thou foolish: why shouldest thou die before thy Time?” ( Time” for a given activity in life: “He hath made every thing beautiful in his Time …” ( Time” for divine judgment is represented by ‛êth: “It is Time for thee, Lord, to work: for they have made void thy law” ( Time such as springtime: “And he said, I will certainly return unto thee according to the Time of life; and, lo, Sarah thy wife shall have a son” (Ezra 10:13), the harvest “time” ( Time. ” In its first biblical appearance, for example, ‛êth represents the “time” (period of the day) when the sun is setting: “And the dove came in to him in the evening [1] …” ( Times in Hebrew poetry (cf
Modern - ) A person of modern Times; - opposed to ancient. ) Of or pertaining to the present Time, or Time not long past; late; not ancient or remote in past Time; of recent period; as, modern days, ages, or Time; modern authors; modern fashions; modern taste; modern practice
Awhile - ) For a while; for some Time; for a short Time
Mistime - ) To Time wrongly; not to adapt to the Time
Yet - ) At the same Time; by continuance from a former state; still. ) Up to the present Time; thus far; hitherto; until now; - and with the negative, not yet, not up to the present Time; not as soon as now; as, Is it Time to go? Not yet. ) Before some future Time; before the end; eventually; in Time
Whensoever - At what Time soever at whatever Time
Antecedently - ) Previously; before in Time; at a Time preceding; as, antecedently to conversion
Overtime - ) Time beyond, or in excess of, a limit; esp. , extra working Time
Chronometry - ) The art of measuring Time; the measuring of Time by periods or divisions
While - ) During the Time that; as long as; whilst; at the same Time that; as, while I write, you sleep. ) That which requires Time; labor; pains. ) Space of Time, or continued duration, esp. when short; a Time; as, one while we thought him innocent
Already - ) Prior to some specified Time, either past, present, or future; by this Time; previously
Puppyhood - ) The Time or state of being a puppy; the Time of being young and undisciplined
Season - Season literally signifies that which comes or arrives and in this general sense, is synonymous with Time. A fit or suitable Time the convenient Time the usual or appointed Time as, the messenger arrived in season in good season. Any Time, as distinguished from others. A Time of some continuance, but not long
Overstay - ) To stay beyond the Time or the limits of; as, to overstay the appointed Time
Formerly - ) In Time past, either in Time immediately preceding or at any indefinite distance; of old; heretofore
Duration - ) The state or quality of lasting; continuance in Time; the portion of Time during which anything exists
Antedate - ) To anticipate; to make before the true Time. ) To precede in Time. ) To date before the true Time; to assign to an earlier date; thus, to antedate a deed or a bond is to give it a date anterior to the true Time of its execution
Noontide - See Tide, which signifies Time. The Time of noon mid-day
Elapse - ) To slip or glide away; to pass away silently, as Time; - used chiefly in reference to Time
Hereafter - ) In Time to come; in some future Time or state
Upsun - ) The Time during which the sun is up, or above the horizon; the Time between sunrise and sunset
Double-Quick - ) Double-quick Time, step, or march. ) Of, or performed in, the fastest Time or step in marching, next to the run; as, a double-quick step or march. ) To move, or cause to move, in double-quick Time
Then - ) At that Time (referring to a Time specified, either past or future). ) At another Time; later; again
Time - Life in the present world is inseparably bound up with Time. Time is part of God’s created order (Genesis 1:14; Hebrews 1:2). By contrast God, being the eternal one and the creator of all things, is not limited in any way by Time. This means that his view of Time is different from that of human beings (Isaiah 57:15; 1 Timothy 1:17; 1 Timothy 6:16; 2 Peter 3:8; see ETERNITY). ...
Nevertheless, God is able to use Time to bring his purposes to fulfilment (1 Peter 1:15-1793), and he gives it to the people of his creation to use also (Ecclesiastes 5:18; Ecclesiastes 8:15). Men and women are therefore responsible to God for the way they use their Time (1618422703_3). (Concerning systems for reckoning Time see DAY; MONTH. )...
As a wise, powerful and loving Creator, God sees that everything happens at the right Time to maintain the world for the benefit of his creatures (Deuteronomy 11:14; 2 Kings 4:16; Ecclesiastes 3:11; Acts 14:17). He controls history, often announcing in advance the precise Time for his actions (Exodus 9:18; Isaiah 37:33-38; Acts 17:26). (Concerning the Time element in the writings of the prophets see PROPHECY. ) Jesus’ birth, ministry, death and resurrection all took place at the Time God had appointed (Galatians 4:4; Mark 1:15; John 8:20; Proverbs 10:4-57; John 12:27; John 17:1). Christ’s return will also occur when God’s Time has come (Mark 13:32; Acts 1:7; Revelation 14:15; see DAY OF THE LORD). ...
Because history is moving constantly towards its climax, Christians must use their Time wisely (Psalms 90:12; Colossians 4:5). They should see Time not merely as a period measured by a clock or a calendar, but as an opportunity given them to use. This does not mean that they have to create unnecessary pressure by squeezing as much as they can into their Time, but that they should live and behave as befits God’s people (Ephesians 5:15-17; 1 Peter 4:1-3). ...
God wants people to use their Time in worthwhile work, but his gift of the Sabbath shows that he also wants them to have Time for rest (Exodus 23:12; cf. People should not waste their Time through laziness or worthless activities (1618422703_26; Proverbs 12:11; Proverbs 18:9; 2 Thessalonians 3:11-12; 1 Timothy 5:13), but neither should they spend their Time in constant activity that leaves no Time for proper relaxation (Nehemiah 13:15-21; Ecclesiastes 2:21-23; Amos 8:5; cf. ...
In their concern for Time, people should not try to calculate when present life will end
Zeitgeist - ) The spirit of the Time; the general intellectual and moral state or temper characteristic of any period of Time
Undern - ) The Time between; the Time between sunrise and noon; specifically, the third hour of the day, or nine o'clock in the morning, according to ancient reckoning; hence, mealtime, because formerly the principal meal was eaten at that hour; also, later, the afternoon; the Time between dinner and supper
Season - An indefinite but somewhat extended period of Time (Genesis 40:4 ; Joshua 24:7 ; Luke 4:13 ). A regularly scheduled, recurring Time (Exodus 13:10 ; Numbers 9:2 ; John 5:4 ). Time appointed by God (Psalm 104:27 ; Matthew 24:45 ). The proper Time for an action (Isaiah 50:4 ). See Time
Troat - ) The cry of a buck in rutting Time. ) To cry, as a buck in rutting Time
Hodi'Jah -
A Levite in the Time of Ezra and Nehemiah. ) ...
Another Levite at the same Time. (Nehemiah 10:13 ) ...
A layman; one of the "heads" of the people at the same Time
Temporary - ) Lasting for a Time only; existing or continuing for a limited Time; not permanent; as, the patient has obtained temporary relief
Future - ) Time to come; Time subsequent to the present (as, the future shall be as the present); collectively, events that are to happen in Time to come. ) That is to be or come hereafter; that will exist at any Time after the present; as, the next moment is future, to the present
Vintage - The Time of rejoicing when the grapes were gathered. As there were different elevations in the land, the grapes would not be all ripe at the same Time. In reference to the future Time of blessing for Israel it is said, "Your threshing shall reach unto the vintage, and the vintage shall reach unto the sowing Time
Delay - ) To move slowly; to stop for a Time; to linger; to tarry. ) To put off; to defer; to procrastinate; to prolong the Time of or before. ) To retard; to stop, detain, or hinder, for a Time; to retard the motion, or Time of arrival, of; as, the mail is delayed by a heavy fall of snow
Chronological - ) Relating to chronology; containing an account of events in the order of Time; according to the order of Time; as, chronological tables
Betimes - ) In a short Time; soon; speedily; forth with. ) In good season or Time; before it is late; seasonably; early
Cotemporary - ) One who lives at the same Time with another; a contemporary. ) Living or being at the same Time; contemporary
Alla Breve - With one breve, or four minims, to measure, and sung faster like four crotchets; in quick common Time; - indicated in the Time signature by /
Recurrent - ) Returning from Time to Time; recurring; as, recurrent pains
Timely - ) Being or occurring in good Time; sufficiently early; seasonable. ) Keeping Time or measure
Childhood - The state of a child, or the Time in which persons are children, including the Time from birth to puberty. But in a more restricted sense, the state or Time from infancy to puberty
Leisure - Freedom from occupation or business vacant Time Time free from employment. Convenience of Time
When - ) Which Time; then; - used elliptically as a noun. ) At what Time; - used interrogatively. ) At what Time; at, during, or after the Time that; at or just after, the moment that; - used relatively
Opportunity - Fit or convenient Time a Time favorable for the purpose suitable Time combined with other favorable circumstances. Suitableness of Time is the predominant signification, but it includes generally circumstances of place and other conveniences adapted to the end desired
Seasonable - ) Occurring in good Time, in due season, or in proper Time for the purpose; suitable to the season; opportune; Timely; as, a seasonable supply of rain
Relativism - Truth varies from people to people, Time to Time and there are no absolutes
Shelemi'ah -
One of the sons of Bani in the Time of Ezra. (Nehemiah 3:30 ) ...
A priest in the Time of Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 13:13 ) ...
The father of Jehueal, or Jucal, in the Time of Zedekiah. (1 Chronicles 26:14 ) ...
Another of the sons of Bani in the Time of Ezra. (Ezra 10:41 ) ...
Ancestor of Jehudi in the Time of Jehoiakim
Paspy - ) A kind of minuet, in triple Time, of French origin, popular in the reign of Queen Elizabeth and for some Time after; - called also passing measure, and passymeasure
Redowa - ) A Bohemian dance of two kinds, one in triple Time, like a waltz, the other in two-four Time, like a polka
Futurity - ) Future Time; Time to come; the future
Then - At that Time, referring to a Time specified, either past or future. At another Time as now and then, at one Time and another. That Time
Coeval - ) Of the same age; existing during the same period of Time, especially Time long and remote; - usually followed by with
Timeless - ) Done at an improper Time; unseasonable; untimely. ) Done or occurring before the proper Time; premature; immature; as, a Timeless grave
Early - ) Soon; in good season; seasonably; betimes; as, come early. ) In advance of the usual or appointed Time; in good season; prior in Time; among or near the first; - opposed to late; as, the early bird; an early spring; early fruit. ) Coming in the first part of a period of Time, or among the first of successive acts, events, etc
Reside - ) To dwell permanently or for a considerable Time; to have a settled abode for a Time; to abide continuosly; to have one's domicile of home; to remain for a long Time
Time - It is debatable whether the Bible contains enough information to formulate a full-scale doctrine of Time; nonetheless, the significance of the biblical concept of Time is unmistakably the way it uniformly presents God at work in guiding the course of history according to his saving plan. The Hebrew et [1], moed, iddan [2], zeman [3], yom [4] and Greek kairos [5], chronos [6], aion [7] are the main biblical Time words depicting this divine work. ...
God as Lord over Time. Time is not fatalistic or capricious, but, according to Scripture, under God's personal direction and control. Time began at creation and becomes the agency through which God continues to unveil his divine purpose for it. ...
God is transcendent over Time. He established the cycle of days and seasons by which Time is known and reckoned (Genesis 1:14 ) and possesses the power to dissolve them according to his eternal purposes (Isaiah 60:19-20 ); moreover, he controls world history, determining in advance the Times set for all nations and bringing them to pass (Daniel 2:21 ; Acts 17:26 ). But God is not limited by Time (Psalm 90:4 ). He reveals himself in history according to the Times and dates set by his own authority (Acts 1:7 ) and will bring about in his own Time the consummation of world history in Jesus' return (Ephesians 1:9-10 ; 1 Timothy 6:15 ). ...
God as "the First and Last" (Isaiah 41:4 ; 44:6 ; 48:12 ), "the Beginning and End" (Revelation 21:6 ), "the one who is, was, and is to come" (Revelation 1:4,8 ), "King of the Ages" (1 Timothy 1:17 ; Revelation 15:3 ) further points out his lordship over Time. ...
The New Testament presents Jesus as Lord over Time. With the Father, he existed prior to the beginning of Time, created all things, and sustains all things (John 1:1-3 ; Colossians 1:16-17 ; Hebrews 1:2-3 ). He is neither limited by Time, nor adversely affected by it: "Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever" (Hebrews 13:8 ). ...
Humanity as Subject to Time. In contrast to God and Jesus, humanity is limited by Time in the cycle of birth, life, and death. Every person bears the marks of Time in the aging process and ultimately dies (Job 14:5 ; Hebrews 9:27 ). Even our Time on earth—the events/circumstances and length of lifeare in God's hands (Psalm 31:15 ; 139:16 ). ...
All people, moreover, will experience the passage of Time in life after death. ...
Time as Redemptive History. The course of Time, in effect, appears as redemptive history. Chronological Time is of greatest importance in both Testaments as a way of tracing God's redemptive interventions in history. The revelatory nature of these divine in-breakings dispels any notion that Time is merely cyclical, without purpose and value. ...
Time is meaningfully forward-moving. Prophetic fulfillment, according to God's appointed Times, does so as well. The incarnation supremely exemplifies this: "But when the Time had fully come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under law, to redeem those under law, that we might receive the full rights of sons" (Galatians 4:4-5 ; cf. In the same way, Jesus' second coming, the goal and end-point of redemptive history, will come to pass at God's appointed Time (Mark 13:32 ; Acts 1:7 ; 3:21 ; 1 Timothy 6:14-15 ). ...
The Present as the Time of Salvation. The Bible unanimously declares that now is the Time of salvation. The injunction "it is Time to seek the Lord" (Hosea 10:12 ) was to be Israel's perpetual desire. The Time interval between the incarnation and the second coming appears symbolically as a jubilee year (Luke 4:19 /Isa 4:19/61:1-2 ; cf. Leviticus 25:10 ), a Time when salvation has been made available to all people through God's saving work in Jesus. Thus, "now is the Time of God's favor, now is the day of salvation" (2 Corinthians 6:2 ); now is the appointed season to declare this divine mystery hidden from ages past (Colossians 1:26 ; Titus 1:3 ). ...
The present Time holds a sense of urgency for unbelievers and believers. God now commands all people to repent for he has set a Time when he will judge the world through Jesus (1618422703_8 ). The Time for repentance, however, is growing shorter (Revelation 2:21 ; 10:6 ). ...
The End-Times. The end-time period surrounding Jesus' second coming is variously called the last Times, last hour, last days, day of the Lord, day of judgment, day of Gods wrath, Time of punishment, end of the ages, end of all things. ...
The start of the end-times takes two forms in the New Testament. Here the messianic age is equivalent to the end-times. It is a Time of great salvation as well as of mounting evil growing to unprecedented proportions as the parousia nears. Because of the unique character of the end-times, it also has an identity not entirely the same as the messianic age. But even here the Time periods partially overlap: the benefits derived from salvation in Christ promised to believers in the coming age (eternal life, perfect Christ-likeness, etc. ...
Time and Eternity. The Bible does not specify if or in what sense Time existed before creation or will exist after Jesus' return. Nor does it specify the relation between Time and eternity either as unending Time or Timelessness. ...
But how God and humanity relate to Time may parallel how Time differs from eternity. On the one hand, God is eternal, having no beginning or end (Psalm 102:25-27 ; Isaiah 40:28 ; Romans 1:20 ); he is Lord over Time. He is Timeless in the sense that as Creator and Lord he is non- or supratemporal, standing outside of or above Time (Psalm 90:2,4 ). Time is real for God. On the other, Time and humanity are immortal in the sense that both have a starting point and continue on indefinitely. Douglas Buckwalter...
See also Day ; Fullness of Time ; Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times ...
Bibliography. Barr, Biblical Words for Time; O. Cullmann, Christ and Time; G
Remaining - Continuing resting abiding for an indefinite Time being left after separation and removal of a part, or after loss or destruction, or after a part is passed, as of Time
Date - , which specifies the Time (as day, month, and year) when the writing or inscription was given, or executed, or made; as, the date of a letter, of a will, of a deed, of a coin. ) To note or fix the Time of, as of an event; to give the date of; as, to date the building of the pyramids. ) The point of Time at which a transaction or event takes place, or is appointed to take place; a given point of Time; epoch; as, the date of a battle. ) To note the Time of writing or executing; to express in an instrument the Time of its execution; as, to date a letter, a bond, a deed, or a charter
Opportunity - ) Fit or convenient Time; a Time or place favorable for executing a purpose; a suitable combination of conditions; suitable occasion; chance
Nine - Mark 15:34 (a) This Time was 3:00 o'clock in the afternoon, the Time of the evening sacrifice, prescribed by Moses. JESUS died at the Time of the evening sacrifice
Hour - , "hour," primarily denoted any Time or period, expecially a season. , Matthew 8:13 ; Acts 10:3,9 ; 23:23 ; Revelation 9:15 ; in 1 Corinthians 15:30 , "every hour" stands for "all the Time;" in some passages it expresses duration, e. , Matthew 20:12 ; 26:40 ; Luke 22:59 ; inexactly, in such phrases as "for a season," John 5:35 ; 2 Corinthians 7:8 ; "for an hour," Galatians 2:5 ; "for a short season," 1 Thessalonians 2:17 , RV (AV, "for a short Time," lit. , "for the Time of an hour"); (b) "a period more or less extended," e. , 1 John 2:18 , "it is the last hour," RV; (c) "a definite point of Time," e. , "at the hour of supper;" Acts 16:18 ; 22:13 ; Revelation 3:3 ; 11:13 ; 14:7 ; a point of Time when an appointed action is to begin, Revelation 14:15 ; in Romans 13:11 , "it is high Time," lit. , "it is already an hour," indicating that a point of Time has come later than would have been the case had responsibility been realized. In 1 Corinthians 4:11 , it indicates a point of Time previous to which certain circumstances have existed. ...
Notes: (1) In 1 Corinthians 8:7 , AV, "unto this hour," the phrase in the orginal is simply, "until now," as RV (2) In Revelation 8:1 , hemioron, "half an hour" (hemi, "half," and hora), is used with hos, "about," of a period of silence in Heaven after the opening of the 7th seal, a period corresponding to the Time customarily spent in silent worship in the Temple during the burning of incense
Childhood - ) The state of being a child; the Time in which persons are children; the condition or Time from infancy to puberty
Adjournment - ) The act of adjourning; the putting off till another day or Time specified, or without day. ) The Time or interval during which a public body adjourns its sittings or postpones business
Vogue - ) The way or fashion of people at any particular Time; temporary mode, custom, or practice; popular reception for the Time; - used now generally in the phrase in vogue
Time - The general idea which Times gives in every thing to which it is applied, is that of limited duration. Thus we cannot say of the Deity that he exists in Time, because eternity, which he inhabits, is absolutely uniform, neither admitting limitation nor succession. Time is said to be redeemed or improved when it is properly filled up, or employed in the conscientious discharge of all the duties which devolve upon us, as it respects the Divine Being, ourselves, and our fellow-creatures. Time may be said to be lost when it is not devoted to some good, useful, or at least some innocent purpose; or when opportunities of improvement, business, or devotion, are neglected. Time is wasted by excessive sleep, unnecessary recreations, indolent habits, useless visits, idle reading, vain conversation, and all those actions which have no good end in them. We ought to improve the Time, when we consider, ...
1. ...
See Shower on Time and Eternity; Fox on Time; J
Untimely - ) Not Timely; done or happening at an unnatural, unusual, or improper Time; unseasonable; premature; inopportune; as, untimely frosts; untimely remarks; an untimely death. ) Out of the natural or usual Time; inopportunely; prematurely; unseasonably
Hour - See Time. A space of Time equal to one twenty fourth part of the natural day, or duration of the diurnal revolution of the earth. Time a particular Time as the hour of death. The Time marked or indicated by a chronometer, clock or watch the particular Time of the day. ...
Hours, in the plural, certain prayers in the Romish church, to be repeated at stated Times of the day, as matins and vespers
Month - See Time
Week - See Time
Year - See Time
Kairos - See Time
Athach - Thy Time
Temps - ) Time
Noon - See Time
Past - ) Of or pertaining to a former Time or state; neither present nor future; gone by; elapsed; ended; spent; as, past troubles; past offences. ) A former Time or state; a state of things gone by. ) Beyond, in Time; after; as, past the hour
Era - ) A period of Time reckoned from some particular date or epoch; a succession of years dating from some important event; as, the era of Alexander; the era of Christ, or the Christian era (see under Christian). ) A fixed point of Time, usually an epoch, from which a series of years is reckoned. ) A period of Time in which a new order of things prevails; a signal stage of history; an epoch
Scripture - From Time to Time he raised up men to commit to writing in an infallible record the revelation he gave. The "Scripture," or collection of sacred writings, was thus enlarged from Time to Time as God saw necessary. The Old Testament canon in the Time of our Lord was precisely the same as that which we now possess under that name
Slow - ) Behind in Time; indicating a Time earlier than the true Time; as, the clock or watch is slow. ) Not happening in a short Time; gradual; late. ) Moving a short space in a relatively long Time; not swift; not quick in motion; not rapid; moderate; deliberate; as, a slow stream; a slow motion
Opportunity - A — 1: καιρός (Strong's #2540 — Noun Masculine — kairos — kahee-ros' ) primarily, "a due measure," is used of "a fixed and definite period, a Time, season," and is translated "opportunity" in Galatians 6:10 ; Hebrews 11:15 . See SEASON , Time , WHILE. ...
A — 2: εὐκαιρία (Strong's #2120 — Noun Feminine — eukairia — yoo-kahee-ree'-ah ) "a fitting Time, opportunity" (eu, "well," and No. ...
B — 1: εὐκαιρέω (Strong's #2119 — Verb — eukaireo — yoo-kahee-reh'-o ) "to have Time or leisure" (akin to A, No. 2), is translated "he shall have opportunity" in 1 Corinthians 16:12 , RV (AV, "convenient Time")
Once - One Time. One Time, though no more. At one former Time formerly. At the same point of Time not gradually. ...
At once, at the same Time as, they all moved at once hence, when it refers to two or more, the sense is together, as one
Continually - Very often in repeated succession from Time to Time
Infinity - The state or quality of being infinite, unlimited by space or Time, without end, without beginning or end. God is infinite in that He is not limited by space or Time
Volta - ) A turning; a Time; - chiefly used in phrases signifying that the part is to be repeated one, two, or more Times; as, una volta, once. Seconda volta, second Time, points to certain modifications in the close of a repeated strain
Fugacious - ) Flying, or disposed to fly; fleeing away; lasting but a short Time; volatile. ) Fleeting; lasting but a short Time; - applied particularly to organs or parts which are short-lived as compared with the life of the individual
Decumbiture - ) Aspect of the heavens at the Time of taking to one's sick bed, by which the prognostics of recovery or death were made. ) Confinement to a sick bed, or Time of taking to one's bed from sickness
Yesterday - : A recent Time; Time not long past
Moratory - , designating a law passed, as in a Time of financial panic, to postpone or delay for a period the Time at which notes, bills of exchange, and other obligations, shall mature or become due
Ab - See Time
Month - See Time
Morning - See Time
Sivan - See Time
Tebeth, - TEBETH , See Time
Watch - See Time
Week - See Time
Year - See Time
Hour - See Time
Marcheshvan - See Time
Night - See Time
Shebat - See Time
Week (2) - —See Time
Year (2) - —See Time
Calendar - See Time
Evening - See Time
Iyyar - See Time
Month (2) - —See Time
Day - See Time
Athaiah - The Lord's Time
Wintertide - ) Winter Time
Times - ) of Time...
Morningtide - ) Morning Time
Dioscorinthius - See Time
Secret Service - In the United States, in Time of peace the bureau of secret service is under the treasury department, and in Time of war it aids the war department in securing information concerning the movements of the enemy
Contemporary - ) One who lives at the same Time with another; as, Petrarch and Chaucer were contemporaries. ) Living, occuring, or existing, at the same Time; done in, or belonging to, the same Times; contemporaneous
Already - ...
Literally, a state of complete preparation but, by an easy deflection, the sense is, at this Time, or at a specified Time
Eli'Asaph -
Head of the tribe of Dan at the Time of the census in the wilderness of Sinai. ) ...
A levite, and "chief of the Gershonites" at the same Time
Time - "Times" is taken to means two years. "Half a Time" is taken to mean six months. ...
Revelation 10:6 (a) This passage does not mean that there will be an end to the clocks and that Time will be no more. It may be illustrated by the Time of the departure of the train. If the train leaves at 9:00 o'clock, then there is no more Time to get on board
Aforetime - 1: ποτέ (Strong's #4218 — particle — pote — pot-eh' ) signifies "once, at some Time," John 9:13 (cp. In all these the RV translates it "aforetime. " The AV varies it with "in Time past," "some Time," "sometimes," "in the old Time. " ...
2: πρότερον (Strong's #4386 — Adjective — proteron — prot'-er-on ) the comparative of pro, "before, aforetime," as being definitely antecedent to something else, is more emphatic than pote in this respect
Sometimes - * For SOMETIMES see Time ...
Ziv - Time
Othni - My Time; my hour
Athlai - My hour or Time
Untime - ) An unseasonable Time
Pachon - See Time
Chronometer - ) A portable Timekeeper, with a heavy compensation balance, and usually beating half seconds; - intended to keep Time with great accuracy for use an astronomical observations, in determining longitude, etc. ) An instrument for measuring Time; a Timekeeper
Prolong - ) To put off to a distant Time; to postpone. ) To lengthen in Time; to extend the duration of; to draw out; to continue; as, to prolong one's days
Originally - ) At first; at the origin; at the Time of formation or costruction; as, a book originally written by another hand. ) In the original Time, or in an original manner; primarily; from the beginning or origin; not by derivation, or imitation
Julian Calendar - An attempt made by Julius Caesar to adapt the calendar year to the Time actually required for the earth to make one complete revolution around the sun. He estimated that Time as 365. His calendar was inaccurate because the Time for the earth's journey is a little shorter than 365
Calendar, Julian - An attempt made by Julius Caesar to adapt the calendar year to the Time actually required for the earth to make one complete revolution around the sun. He estimated that Time as 365. His calendar was inaccurate because the Time for the earth's journey is a little shorter than 365
Futurely - ) In Time to come
Antecedaneous - ) Antecedent; preceding in Time
Athaliah - The Time of the Lord
Whenever - ) At whatever Time
Therebiforn - ) Before that Time; beforehand
Thenceforth - ) From that Time; thereafter
Timed - ) of Time...
Aforetime - ) In Time past; formerly
Lentamente - ) Slowly; in slow Time
Night - See Day and Night, Time
Aeon - ) An immeasurable or infinite space of Time; eternity; a long space of Time; an age
Day - ) A specified Time or period; Time, considered with reference to the existence or prominence of a person or thing; age; Time. ) The Time of light, or interval between one night and the next; the Time between sunrise and sunset, or from dawn to darkness; hence, the light; sunshine
Delay - To prolong the Time of acting, or proceeding to put off to defer. To retard to stop, detain or hinder for a Time to restrain motion, or render it slow as, the mail is delated by bad roads. DELAY, To linger to move slow or to stop for a Time. Hinderance for a Time
Henceforward - ) From this Time forward; henceforth
Ripely - ) Maturely; at the fit Time
Eventide - ) The Time of evening; evening
Playtime - ) Time for play or diversion
Eval - ) Relating to Time or duration
Henceforth - ) From this Time forward; henceforward
Thenceforward - ) From that Time onward; thenceforth
Timing - ) of Time...
Lifetime - ) The Time that life continues
Instant - Immediate without intervening Time present. A point in duration a moment a part of duration in which we perceive no succession, or a part that occupies the Time of a single thought. A particular Time
Leisure - 1: εὐκαιρέω (Strong's #2119 — Verb — eukaireo — yoo-kahee-reh'-o ) "to have leisure or opportunity" (eu, "well," kairos, "a Time or season"), is translated "they had . leisure" in Mark 6:31 ; in Acts 17:21 , "spent their Time" (RV, marg. convenient Time")
Ephemeral - ) Anything lasting but a day, or a brief Time; an ephemeral plant, insect, etc. ) Short-lived; existing or continuing for a short Time only
Loaf - ) To spend in idleness; - with away; as, to loaf Time away. ) To spend Time in idleness; to lounge or loiter about
Blindman's Holiday - The Time between daylight and candle light
Contemporariness - ) Existence at the same Time; contemporaneousness
Tishri - See Time, p
Battuta - ) The measuring of Time by beating
Antemosaic - ) Being before the Time of Moses
Anights - ) In the night Time; at night
Bedtime - ) The Time to go to bed
Epiphi - See Time
Ethanim - See Time
Polychronious - ) Enduring through a long Time; chronic
Dateless - ) Without date; having no fixed Time
Deuterogamist - ) One who marries the second Time
Recross - ) To cross a second Time
Timesaving - ) Saving Time; as, a Timesaving expedient
Worthwhile - ) Worth the Time or effort spent
Reassemblage - ) Assemblage a second Time or again
Recombination - ) Combination a second or additional Time
Waketime - ) Time during which one is awake
Reorder - ) To order a second Time
Metronomy - ) Measurement of Time by an instrument
Monochronic - ) Existing at the same Time; contemporaneous
Afterward - ) At a later or succeeding Time
Miniamin - Levite in the Time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:15 ). Priestly family in the Time of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:17 )
Frugal - ) Economical in the use or appropriation of resources; not wasteful or lavish; wise in the expenditure or application of force, materials, Time, etc. ; characterized by frugality; sparing; economical; saving; as, a frugal housekeeper; frugal of Time
Hymenae'us - Paul and Timothy; the first Time classed with Alexander, ( 1 Timothy 1:20 ) and the second Time classed with Philetus
Period - ) A portion of Time as limited and determined by some recurring phenomenon, as by the completion of a revolution of one of the heavenly bodies; a division of Time, as a series of years, months, or days, in which something is completed, and ready to recommence and go on in the same order; as, the period of the sun, or the earth, or a comet. ) A stated and recurring interval of Time; more generally, an interval of Time specified or left indefinite; a certain series of years, months, days, or the like; a Time; a cycle; an age; an epoch; as, the period of the Roman republic. ) One of the great divisions of geological Time; as, the Tertiary period; the Glacial period. ) The Time of the exacerbation and remission of a disease, or of the paroxysm and intermission
Before - ) Preceding in Time; earlier than; previously to; anterior to the Time when; - sometimes with the additional idea of purpose; in order that. ) An advance of; farther onward, in place or Time. ) In Time past; previously; already
Celebration - ) The act, process, or Time of celebrating
Antichronical - ) Deviating from the proper order of Time
Commorient - ) Dying together or at the same Time
Postremote - ) More remote in subsequent Time or order
Posteriorly - ) Subsequently in Time; also, behind in position
Refortification - ) A fortifying anew, or a second Time
Hereunto - ) Unto this; up to this Time; hereto
Henceforward - From this Time forward henceforth
Samson - His sun; his service; there the second Time
Connascent - ) Born together; produced at the same Time
Wrong-Timed - ) Done at an improper Time; ill-timed
Ritardando - ) Retarding; - a direction for slower Time; rallentado
Temporarily - ) In a temporary manner; for a Time
Yuletide - ) Christmas Time; Christmastide; the season of Christmas
Concreate - ) To create at the same Time
Longevous - ) Living a long Time; of great age
Tense - ) One of the forms which a verb takes by inflection or by adding auxiliary words, so as to indicate the Time of the action or event signified; the modification which verbs undergo for the indication of Time
Carnival - (Latin: carnem levare, taking away of flesh) A Time of feasting and revelry preceding the Lenten fast, chiefly observed in southern Europe; also, because in many places an occasion of immorality, a Time of prayer and of practises of mortification and penance in order to repair the offenses against the Divine law
Hireling - A labourer employed on hire for a limited Time (Job 7:1 ; 14:6 ; Mark 1:20 ). In the Time of our Lord a day's wage was a "penny" (q
Night - ) Figuratively:...
(1) the Time of distress (Isaiah 21:12). ...
(2) Death, the Time when life's day is over (John 9:4)
Azaziah - Father of Hoshea, prince of Ephraim, in David's Time. One of the overseers in the Time of Hezekiah
Hinterland - with reference to the so-called doctrine of the hinterland, sometimes advanced, that occupation of the coast supports a claim to an exclusive right to occupy, from Time to Time, the territory lying inland of the coast
Money-Making: no Time For - 'I have not Time to make money. Life is not sufficiently long to enable a man to get rich, and do his duty to his fellow men at the same Time. ' Christian, have you Time to serve your God and yet to give your whole soul to gaining wealth? The question is left for conscience to answer
Jehoiarib - The name of one of the twenty-four courses of priests; first in David’s Time ( 1 Chronicles 24:7 ), but seventeenth in the Time of Zerub. The clan is mentioned among those that dwelt in Jerusalem in the Time of Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 11:10 )
Against - ) In opposition to, whether the opposition is of sentiment or of action; on the other side; counter to; in contrariety to; hence, adverse to; as, against reason; against law; to run a race against Time. ) By of before the Time that; in preparation for; so as to be ready for the Time when
Eli'Ashib -
A priest in the Time of King David eleventh in the order of the "governors" of the sanctuary. (1 Chronicles 3:24 ) ...
High priest at Jerusalem at the Time of the rebuilding of the walls under Nehemiah. ) ...
A singer in the Time of Ezra who had married a foreign wife
Season - A — 1: καιρός (Strong's #2540 — Noun Masculine — kairos — kahee-ros' ) primarily, "due measure, fitness, proportion," is used in the NT to signify "a season, a Time, a period" possessed of certain characteristics, frequently rendered "time" or "times;" in the following the RV substitutes "season" for the AV "time," thus distinguishing the meaning from chronos (see No. , "its;" AV, "in due Times"); in the preceding clause chronos is used. , Revelation 12:12 ; the fulfillment of prophecy, Luke 1:20 ; Acts 3:19 ; 1 Peter 1:11 ; a Time suitable for a purpose, Luke 4:13 , lit. See ALWAYS , Note, OPPORTUNITY , Time , WHILE. words beginning with "chron," denotes "a space of Time," whether long or short: (a) it implies duration, whether longer, e. , Acts 1:21 , "(all the) Time;" Acts 13:18 ; 20:18 , RV, "(all the) Time" (AV, "at all seasons"); or shorter, e. , Luke 4:5 ; (b) it sometimes refers to the date of an occurrence, whether past, e. ...
Broadly speaking, chronos expresses the duration of a period, kairos stresses it as marked by certain features; thus in Acts 1:7 , "the Father has set within His own authority" both the Times (chronos), the lengths of the periods, and the "seasons" (kairos), epochs characterized by certain events; in 1 Thessalonians 5:1 , "times" refers to the length of the interval before the Parousia takes place (the presence of Christ with the saints when He comes to receive them to Himself at the Rapture), and to the length of Time the Parousia will occupy; "seasons" refers to the special features of the period before, during, and after the Parousia. Sometimes the distinction between the two words is not sharply defined as, e. , in 2 Timothy 4:6 , though even here the Apostle's "departure" signalizes the Time (kairos). Chronos is rendered "season" in Acts 19:22 , AV (RV, "a while"); 20:18 (RV, "all the Time," see above); Revelation 6:11 , AV (RV, "time"); so Revelation 20:3 . In Luke 23:8 it is used with hikanos in the plural, RV, "(of a long) Time," more lit. , "(for a sufficient number) of Times. ), an important rendering for the understanding of the passage (the word being akin to chronizo, "to take Time, to linger, delay," Matthew 24:48 ; Luke 12:45 ). See DELAY , B, Note,..., Time , WHILE. See TEMPORAL , Time , WHILE
Bartholomew Tide - Time of the festival of St
Antediluvial - ) Before the flood, or Deluge, in Noah's Time
Contemporaneously - ) At the same Time with some other event
Cracovienne - ) A lively Polish dance, in 2-4 Time
Chronography - ) A description or record of past Time; history
Senescent - ) Growing old; decaying with the lapse of Time
Emeto-Cathartic - ) Producing vomiting and purging at the same Time
Erewhiles - ) Some Time ago; a little while before; heretofore
Bourree - ) An old French dance tune in common Time
Antichronism - ) Deviation from the true order of Time; anachronism
Elul - See Time
Cotemporaneous - ) Living or being at the same Time; contemporaneous
Preremote - ) More remote in previous Time or prior order
Florification - ) The act, process, or Time of flowering; florescence
Senescence - ) The state of growing old; decay by Time
Eftsoons - ) Again; anew; a second Time; at once; speedily
Dilly-Dally - ) To loiter or trifle; to waste Time
Redisseize - ) To disseize anew, or a second Time
Delayed - Deferred detained hindered for a Time retarded
Short-Dated - ) Having little Time to run from the date
Otherwhiles - ) At another Time, or other Times; sometimes; /ccasionally
Tempo - ) The rate or degree of movement in Time
Rebaptize - ) To baptize again or a second Time
Revaccinate - ) To vaccinate a second Time or again
Umquhile - ) Some Time ago; formerly
Lambale - ) A feast at the Time of shearing lambs
Micronometer - ) An instrument for noting minute portions of Time
Tarriance - ) The act or Time of tarrying; delay; lateness
Dally - ) To waste Time in effeminate or voluptuous pleasures, or in idleness; to fool away Time; to delay unnecessarily; to tarry; to trifle
Embolism - ) Intercalation; the insertion of days, months, or years, in an account of Time, to produce regularity; as, the embolism of a lunar month in the Greek year. ) Intercalated Time
Evening - Ecclesiastes 11:6 (b) The evening Time in the life is the Time when the shadows fall, the day's work is ended, sorrows and weakness have come, and hope has faded. Sometimes the dark Times precede the bright Times. It may be taken also as a picture of the fact that our Time on earth is the evening Time, followed by the morning in glory, a morning without clouds
Coexistence - ) Existence at the same Time with another; - contemporary existence
Contemporaneous - ) Living, existing, or occurring at the same Time; contemporary
Erlind - ) A salmon returning from the sea the second Time
Premosaic - ) Relating to the Time before Moses; as, premosaic history
Protractive - ) Drawing out or lengthening in Time; prolonging; continuing; delaying
Asynchronous - ) Not simultaneous; not concurrent in Time; - opposed to synchronous
Provisionally - ) By way of provision for the Time being; temporarily
Foredate - ) To date before the true Time; to antendate
Theretofore - ) Up to that Time; before then; - correlative with heretofore
Ragtime - ) Time characterized by syncopation, as in many negro melodies
Readdress - ) To address a second Time; - often used reflexively
Readjourn - ) To adjourn a second Time; to adjourn again
Reliquidate - ) To liquidate anew; to adjust a second Time
Neither at Any Time - * For NEITHER AT ANY Time, Luke 15:29 , see NEVER ...
Lento - ) Slow; in slow Time; slowly; - rarely written lente
Lifetime - LI'FETIME, n. The Time that life continues duration of life
Time Signature - A sign at the beginning of a composition or movement, placed after the key signature, to indicate its Time or meter. It is in the form of a fraction, of which the denominator indicates the kind of note taken as Time unit for the beat, and the numerator, the number of these to the measure
Until - ) As far as; to the place or degree that; especially, up to the Time that; till. ) To; up to; till; before; - used of Time; as, he staid until evening; he will not come back until the end of the month
Decompound - ) To compound or mix with that is already compound; to compound a second Time. ) Compound of what is already compounded; compounded a second Time. ) Several Times compounded or divided, as a leaf or stem; decomposite
Lounge - ) To spend Time lazily, whether lolling or idly sauntering; to pass Time indolently; to stand, sit, or recline, in an indolent manner
de Bene Esse - Of well being; of formal sufficiency for the Time; conditionally; provisionally
Anachronize - ) To refer to, or put into, a wrong Time
Antepaschal - ) Pertaining to the Time before the Passover, or before Easter
Cachucha - ) An Andalusian dance in three-four Time, resembling the bolero
Allhallowtide - ) The Time at or near All Saints, or November 1st
Cockcrowing - ) The Time at which cocks first crow; the early morning
Primipara - ) A woman who bears a child for the first Time
Pantochronometer - ) An instrument combining a compass, sundial, and universal Time dial
Prolongate - ) To prolong; to extend in space or in Time
Afterward - In later or subsequent Time
Afterwards - In later or subsequent Time
Conterminant - ) Having the same limits; ending at the same Time; conterminous
Redigest - ) To digest, or reduce to form, a second Time
Transitory - ) Continuing only for a short Time; not enduring; fleeting; evanescent
Thenadays - ) At that Time; then; in those days; - correlative to nowadays
Recadency - ) A falling back or descending a second Time; a relapse
Trifallow - ) To plow the third Time before sowing, as land
Abib - See Time
Amraphel - King of Shinar, in the Time of Abram
Lager Wine - Wine which has been kept for some Time in the cellar
Locum Tenens - A substitute or deputy; one filling an office for a Time
Baalis - King of Ammon in Time of Gedaliah ( Jeremiah 40:14 )
Jorim - About Ahaz' Time
Vacation - ) Intermission of judicial proceedings; the space of Time between the end of one term and the beginning of the next; nonterm; recess. ) The Time when an office is vacant; esp. ), the Time when a see, or other spiritual dignity, is vacant
Era - The term era (not aera , as incorrectly written) is Spanish, signifying Time, as in the phrase, de era en era, "from Time to Time
Epoch - ) A period of Time, longer or shorter, remarkable for events of great subsequent influence; a memorable period; as, the epoch of maritime discovery, or of the Reformation. ) A fixed point of Time, established in history by the occurrence of some grand or remarkable event; a point of Time marked by an event of great subsequent influence; as, the epoch of the creation; the birth of Christ was the epoch which gave rise to the Christian era. ) A division of Time characterized by the prevalence of similar conditions of the earth; commonly a minor division or part of a period
Late - ) After the usual or proper Time, or the Time appointed; after delay; as, he arrived late; - opposed to early. ) Coming after the Time when due, or after the usual or proper Time; not early; slow; tardy; long delayed; as, a late spring
Week - There can be no doubt about the great antiquity of measuring Time by a period of seven days. The origin of this division of Time has given birth to much speculation. So far from the week being a division of Time without ground in nature, there was much to recommend its adoption. It is clear that if not in Paul's Time, yet very Soon after, the Roman world had adopted the hebdomadal division
Coexist - ) To exist at the same Time; - sometimes followed by with
Chronopher - ) An instrument signaling the correct Time to distant points by electricity
Ittah Kazin - ("time," or "people, of a judge"
Autochronograph - ) An instrument for the instantaneous self-recording or printing of Time
Circumduce - ) To declare elapsed, as the Time allowed for introducing evidence
Bera - King of Sodom at Time of Chedorlaomer’s invasion ( Genesis 14:2 )
Eorge Noble - A gold noble of the Time of Henry VIII
Primiparous - ) Belonging to a first birth; bearing young for the first Time
Photochronography - ) Art of recording or measuring intervals of Time by the photochronograph
Dawdler - ) One who wastes Time in trifling employments; an idler; a trifler
Dewfall - ) The falling of dew; the Time when dew begins to fall
Daybreak - ) The Time of the first appearance of light in the morning
Perpetual - ) Neverceasing; continuing forever or for an unlimited Time; unfailing; everlasting; continuous
re-Mark - ) To mark again, or a second Time; to mark anew
Timist - ) A Timeserver. ) A performer who keeps good Time
Misemploy - ) To employ amiss; as, to misemploy Time, advantages, talents, etc
Thryfallow - ) To plow for the third Time in summer; to trifallow
Hup'Pah - (protected ), a priest in the Time of David
Rephaim - Genesis 14:5 ; also some in the Time of Moses. In the Time of Joshua, some of their descendants dwelt in the land of Canaan, Joshua 12:4 17:15 , and we hear of them in David's Time, in the city of Gath, 1 Chronicles 20:4-6 . ...
THE VALLEY OF THE REPHAIM, OR GIANTS, was famous in Joshua's Time, Joshua 15:8 17:15 18:16 , and in the Time of David, who here defeated the Philistines, 2 Samuel 5:18,22 1 Chronicles 11:6 14:9
Tribulation - Trouble or pressure of a general sort; in some passages a particular Time of suffering associated with events of the end Time. Others (premillennialism) take such a reference to the great tribulation to refer to an end Time period. The last half, often called the Great Tribulation, is measured variously as three and a half years (Daniel 9:27 ), forty-two months (Revelation 11:2 ; Revelation 13:5 ), 1,260 days ( Revelation 11:3 ; Revelation 12:6 ), or “a Time, and Times, and half a Time” (Revelation 12:14 ). ...
Historic premillennialism sees the period as a future Time of intense trouble on earth prior to Christ's return, but holds the church will go through the tribulation
Late - Coming after the usual Time slow tardy long delayed as a late spring a late summer. After the usual Time, or the Time appointed after delay as, he arrived late. Of late, lately, in Time not long past, or near the present. ...
Too late, after the proper Time not in due Time
Epidemical - ) Common to, or affecting at the same Time, a large number in a community; - applied to a disease which, spreading widely, attacks many persons at the same Time; as, an epidemic disease; an epidemic catarrh, fever, etc
Fleece - The miracle of Gideon's fleece (Judges 6:37-40 ) consisted in the dew having fallen at one Time on the fleece without any on the floor, and at another Time in the fleece remaining dry while the ground was wet with dew
Premature - ) Mature or ripe before the proper Time; as, the premature fruits of a hotbed. ) Happening, arriving, existing, or performed before the proper or usual Time; adopted too soon; too early; untimely; as, a premature fall of snow; a premature birth; a premature opinion; premature decay
Rist - ) Ground corn; that which is ground at one Time; as much grain as is carried to the mill at one Time, or the meal it produces
Rist - ) Ground corn; that which is ground at one Time; as much grain as is carried to the mill at one Time, or the meal it produces
Conterminable - ) Having the same bounds; terminating at the same Time or place; conterminous
Chancellorship - ) The office of a chancellor; the Time during which one is chancellor
Erelong - ) Before the /apse of a long Time; soon; - usually separated, ere long
Diadrom - ) A complete course or vibration; Time of vibration, as of a pendulum
Prolonger - ) One who, or that which, causes an extension in Time or space
Daytime - ) The Time during which there is daylight, as distinguished from the night
Extemporary - ) Made for the occasion; for the Time being
Sandglass - ) An instrument for measuring Time by the running of sand
Previousness - ) The quality or state of being previous; priority or antecedence in Time
Wood-Sere - ) The Time when there no sap in the trees; the winter season
Misurato - ) Measured; - a direction to perform a passage in strict or measured Time
Safe-Pledge - ) A surety for the appearance of a person at a given Time
Longly - ) For a long Time; hence, wearisomely
Cock-Crowing - The third watch of the night, in the Time of Christ
Ass - ...
There are28 (4 x7) asses separately spoken of, and with these may be compared the28 (4 x7) 'times' connected with 'vain man' in Ecclesiastes 3:1-8. Balaam's ass ( Numbers 22:21), "a Time to speak. Achsah's ass ( Joshua 15:18), "a Time to get," when she lighted off her ass to make her request and get what she asked. Samson's ( Judges 15:15), "a Time to war. The Levite's ( Judges 19:28), "a Time to be silent," when "none answered," and he sent his desperate, silent message throughout Israel. Abigail's ( 1 Samuel 25:20), "a Time of peace," when she met David and made peace for Nahal. Her second ass ( 1 Samuel 25:42), "a Time to love," when she went to meet David and became his wife. Ahithophel's ( 2 Samuel 17:23), "a Time to die," when he saddled his ass and went and hanged himself. The "old prophet's" ass ( 1 Kings 13:23-24), "a Time to kill," when he found "the man of God" killed by the lion. The "man of God's" ass ( 1 Kings 13:29), "a Time to mourn," when the old prophet laid him thereon "to mourn and to bury him. The Shunamite's ass ( 2 Kings 4:24-37), "a Time to heal," when she rode to Elisha, who restored her son. Mephibosheth's ( 2 Samuel 19:26), "a Time to embrace," when he would go and salute David. Shimei's ( 1 Kings 2:40-46), "a Time to die. Jesse's ( 1 Samuel 16:20), "a Time to live" (21). Moses' ( Exodus 4:20-26), "a Time to kill," when he incurred the judgment of Genesis 17:14, and fulfilled the truth. Abraham's ( Genesis 22:3), "a Time to get and a Time to lose," when GOD demanded back the son He had given. The Saviour's ass ( Matthew 21:5, Matthew 21:9), "a Time to laugh," when the daughter of Jerusalem rejoiced. The asses of Jacob's sons ( Genesis 44:13), filling up the other "times
by-Election - ) An election held by itself, not at the Time of a general election
Chislev - See Time
Anteriority - ) The state of being anterior or preceding in Time or in situation; priority
Antecede - ) To go before in Time or place; to precede; to surpass
Ismachiah - A Levite in the Time of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:13 )
Cotidal - ) Marking an equality in the tides; having high tide at the same Time
Regularly - ) In a regular manner; in uniform order; methodically; in due order or Time
Amphicarpous - ) Producing fruit of two kinds, either as to form or Time of ripening
Reelection - ) Election a second Time, or anew; as, the reelection of a former chief
Scribism - ) The character and opinions of a Jewish scribe in the Time of Christ
Forepart - ) The part most advanced, or first in Time or in place; the beginning
Refashion - ) To fashion anew; to form or mold into shape a second Time
Therein - ) In that or this place, Time, or thing; in that particular or respect
Tautochronous - ) Occupying the same Time; pertaining to, or having the properties of, a tautochrone
Omnipresent - ) Present in all places at the same Time; ubiquitous; as, the omnipresent Jehovah
Metachronism - ) An error committed in chronology by placing an event after its real Time
Omnipresence - ) Presence in every place at the same Time; unbounded or universal presence; ubiquity
Othni - (1 Chronicles 26:7) From Let, Time, and the addition, my
Long-Breathed - ) Having the power of retaining the breath for a long Time; long-winded
Day of the Lord - The Time when God reveals His sovereignty over human powers and human existence. The day of the Lord rests on the Hebrew term, yom , “day,” the fifth most frequent noun used in the Old Testament and one used with a variety of meanings: Time of daylight from sunrise to sunset (Genesis 1:14 ; Genesis 3:8 ; Genesis 8:22 ; Amos 5:8 ); 24 -hour period (Genesis 1:5 ; Numbers 7:12 ,Numbers 7:12,7:18 ; Haggai 1:15 ); a general expression for “time” without specific limits (Genesis 2:4 ; Psalm 102:3 ; Isaiah 7:17 ); the period of a specific event (Isaiah 9:3 ; Jeremiah 32:31 ; Ezekiel 1:28 ). The “day of the Lord” then does not give a precise Time period. It may mean either the daylight hours, the 24-hour day, or a general Time period, perhaps characterized by a special event. Zechariah 14:7 even points to a Time when all Time is daylight, night with its darkness having vanished. ...
“Day of the Lord” does not in itself designate the Time perspective of the event, whether it is past, present, or future. The day of the Lord is thus a point in Time in which God displays His sovereign initiative to reveal His control of history, of Time, of His people, and of all people. ...
People who take a dispensational perspective on Scripture often seek to interpret each of the terms differently, so that the “day of Christ” is a day of blessing equated with the rapture, whereas the day of God is an inclusive term for all the events of end Time (2 Peter 3:12 ). In this view the day of the Lord includes the great tribulation, the following judgment on the nations, and the Time of worldwide blessing under the rule of the Messiah. ...
Many Bible students who do not take a dispensational viewpoint interpret the several expressions in the New Testament to refer to one major event: the end Time when Christ returns for the final judgment and establishes His eternal kingdom
Continual - Proceeding without interruption or cessation unceasing not intermitting used in reference to Time. Continual claim, in law, a claim that is made from Time to Time within every year or day, to land or other estate, the possession of which cannot be obtained without hazard
Larva - ) Any young insect from the Time that it hatches from the egg until it becomes a pupa, or chrysalis. During this Time it usually molts several Times, and may change its form or color each Time
Long - ...
A — 2: ἱκανός (Strong's #2425 — Adjective — hikanos — hik-an-os' ) "sufficient, much, long," is used with chronos, "time," in Luke 8:27 ; in Luke 20:9 ; 23:8 (AV, "season") the plural is used, lit. , "long Times;" Acts 8:11 ; 14:3 . ...
A — 3: πολύς (Strong's #4183 — Adjective — polus — pol-oos' ) "much," is used with chronos, "time," in Matthew 25:19 ; John 5:6 ; in Acts 27:21 , with asitia, AV, "long abstinence," RV, "long without food. ...
A — 5: πόσος (Strong's #4214 — pronoun — posos — pos'-os ) "how much," is used with chronos, in Mark 9:21 , "how long Time," RV (AV, "how long ago"). ...
A — 6: ὅσος (Strong's #3745 — pronoun — hosos — hos'-os ) "how much, so much," is used after the preposition epi (eph'), and as an adjective qualifying chronos, signifying "for so long Time," in Romans 7:1 ; 1 Corinthians 7:39 ; Galatians 4:1 ; see also B, No. ...
Notes: (1) In Acts 14:28 , AV, the adjective oligos, "little," with the negative ou, "not," and qualifying chronos, is rendered "long Time;" RV, "no little (time). , Mark 1:45 ; (b) of Time, e. , "unto much (time)," is rendered "a long while" in Acts 20:11 . (2) In 2 Peter 2:3 , AV, the adverb ekpalai, "from of old," RV (ek, "from," palai, "of old, formerly"), is translated "of a long Time
Avith - This would be early in the Time of Moab's sojourn among a branch of the Midianites. Moab was allied to Midian in the Mosaic age (Numbers 22:7), but in Gideon's Time Midian was destroyed
Harvest-Home - ) The gathering and bringing home of the harvest; the Time of harvest. ) A service of thanksgiving, at harvest Time, in the Church of England and in the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States
Night Watch - An ancient division of Time (Psalm 90:4 ; Psalm 119:148 ; Lamentations 2:19 ; Matthew 14:25 ). The fourth watch (Matthew 14:25 ; Mark 6:48 ) designates the Time just before dawn
Prior - ) Preceding in the order of Time; former; antecedent; anterior; previous; as, a prior discovery; prior obligation; - used elliptically in cases like the following: he lived alone [1] prior to his marriage
Photochronograph - ) An instrument for recording minute intervals of Time. A flash, coinciding in Time and duration with the signal, is thus produced and is photographed on a moving plate
Azarael, Azareel - One in the service of song in the Time of David. Danite ruler in the Time of David
Conveniency - ) A convenient or fit Time; opportunity; as, to do something at one's convenience. ) The state or quality of being convenient; fitness or suitableness, as of place, Time, etc
Immediately - Instantly at the present Time without delay, or the intervention of Time
Prospective - ) Looking forward in Time; acting with foresight; - opposed to retrospective. ) The scene before or around, in Time or in space; view; prospect
Lodging - Resting for a night residing for a Time. A place of rest for a night, or of residence for a Time temporary habitation apartment
Hour - It may refer to a measured length of Time or to an occasion or period (Matthew 20:9; Matthew 20:12; Matthew 24:44; Matthew 26:40; Matthew 26:45; Luke 22:53; John 4:21; John 5:28; John 7:30; John 12:27; for details see DAY; Time)
Term - ) The Time for which anything lasts; any limited Time; as, a term of five years; the term of life. ) A fixed period of Time; a prescribed duration...
(7):...
(n. ) The limitation of an estate; or rather, the whole Time for which an estate is granted, as for the term of a life or lives, or for a term of years. ) A space of Time granted to a debtor for discharging his obligation. ) The Time in which a court is held or is open for the trial of causes. ) In Scotland, the Time fixed for the payment of rents
Contraplex - ) Pertaining to the sending of two messages in opposite directions at the same Time
Helkai - Smooth-tongued, one of the chief priests in the Time of Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:15 )
Shiphtan - Judicial, an Ephraimite prince at the Time of the division of Canaan (Numbers 34:24 )
Shopworn - ) Somewhat worn or damaged by having been kept for a Time in a shop
Shoham - ” Levite in Time of David (1 Chronicles 24:27 )
Raca - ) A term of reproach used by the Jews of our Savior's Time, meaning "worthless
Pseudonym - ) A fictitious name assumed for the Time, as by an author; a pen name
Perdure - ) To last or endure for a long Time; to be perdurable or lasting
Twifallow - ) To plow, or fallow, a second Time (land that has been once fallowed)
Secundus - A believer of Thessalonica, and for a Time a companion of Paul
Cyclical - ) Of or pertaining to a cycle or circle; moving in cycles; as, cyclical Time
Equidiurnal - ) Pertaining to the Time of equal day and night; - applied to the equinoctial line
Festi-Val - ) A Time of feasting or celebration; an anniversary day of joy, civil or religious
Elcesaite - ) One of a sect of Asiatic Gnostics of the Time of the Emperor Trajan
Fleetness - ) Swiftness; rapidity; velocity; celerity; speed; as, the fleetness of a horse or of Time
Boyhood - ) The state of being a boy; the Time during which one is a boy
Foreadvise - ) To advise or counsel before the Time of action, or before the event
Antediluvians - (Latin: ante, before; diluvium, flood) ...
The people who lived before the Time of the Flood
Daytime - DA'YTIME, n. The Time of the sun's light on the earth as opposed to night
Henceforth - From this Time forward
Keitz - �end�) a particularly auspicious Time for Moshiach to bring the exile to an end...
Habaziniah - Ancestor of Jaazaniah, chief of the Rechabites in the Time of Jeremiah
Moonrise - ) The rising of the moon above the horizon; also, the Time of its rising
Saved - Preserved from evil injury or destruction kept frugally prevented spared taken in Time
Night - , Matthew 4:2 ; 12:40 ; 2 Timothy 1:3 ; Revelation 4:8 ; (b) of "the period of the absence of light," the Time in which something takes place, e. ); Acts 5:19 ; 9:25 ; (c) of "point of Time," e. ),30; Luke 12:20 ; Acts 27:23 ; (d) 27:23; (d) of "duration of Time," e. ; (b) of "death," as the Time when work ceases, John 9:4
Ambigu - ) An entertainment at which a medley of dishes is set on at the same Time
Sextolet - ) A double triplet; a group of six equal notes played in the Time of four
Prenotion - ) A notice or notion which precedes something else in Time; previous notion or thought; foreknowledge
Peridiastole - ) The almost inappreciable Time which elapses between the systole and the diastole of the heart
Rathe - ) Coming before others, or before the usual Time; early. ) Early; soon; betimes
Reissue - ) To issue a second Time
Cretacic - Of, pertaining to, or designating, the period of Time following the Jurassic and preceding the Eocene
Alop - ) A kind of lively dance, in 2-4 Time; also, the music to the dance
Reenactment - ) The enacting or passing of a law a second Time; the renewal of a law
Coexistent - ) Existing at the same Time with another
Elipheleh - Levite appointed as musician and door-keeper in the Time of David
Septimole - ) A group of seven notes to be played in the Time of four or six
Procrastination - ) The act or habit of procrastinating, or putting off to a future Time; delay; dilatoriness
Prochronism - ) The dating of an event before the Time it happened; an antedating; - opposed to metachronism
Sheep-Shearing - ) A feast at the Time of sheep-shearing
Whiles - ) sometimes; at Times. ) During the Time that; while. ) Meanwhile; meantime
Mugwort - ) A somewhat aromatic composite weed (Artemisia vulgaris), at one Time used medicinally; - called also motherwort
Long-Winded - ) Long-breathed; hence, tediously long in speaking; consuming much Time; as, a long-winded talker
Jemima - Dove, the eldest of Job's three daughters born after his Time of trial (Job 42:14 )
Eternity - This is largely because the only kind of existence they have so far experienced is that of a world where everything happens within a framework of Time and distance that can be measured. Human beings lives in a created order of which Time is a part (Hebrews 1:2). Even the words they use to speak of eternity come from a world governed by Time. This was a word that denoted a length of Time, without specifying its beginning or end. The writers used the word in relation to things that were very old or that would last for a very long Time (Psalms 24:7; Psalms 125:1; Habakkuk 3:6; Romans 16:25). Concerning the past, the word could mean ‘a long Time ago’ (Joshua 24:2; Luke 1:70); concerning the future, it could mean ‘endlessness’ (Daniel 2:44; 2 Peter 1:11). When they referred to immeasurable Time, the writers may have used such expressions as ‘to all ages’ or ‘from age to age’, which have been translated as ‘from everlasting to everlasting’ and ‘for ever and ever’ (Nehemiah 9:5; Psalms 21:4; Romans 1:25; Ephesians 3:21; Judges 1:25). Likewise eternity is not Time stretched out for ever, but is something of an entirely different order. God is not limited by Time, and therefore he sees Time differently from the way human beings see it (2 Peter 3:8). The rod has a beginning and an end, and represents Time. Time). Human beings, who live in Time, might be likened to an ant moving along the rod. God, from the viewpoint of eternity, sees the whole of Time as eternally present before him. (See also Time
Everlasting Punishment - The word “everlasting” immediately calls to mind end-of-time realities. Thus, to wrestle with the idea of “everlasting punishment” is to grapple with notions of Time, justice, evil, and the end of Time. ...
According to the early church's teaching (Hebrews 6:2 ), the eternal fate of creation and human beings is bound up with gospel preaching and thus with the end-of-time events of Jesus' death, resurrection and promised return. Such end-of-time trauma befalls the evil, angelic powers which oppose God (Matthew 24:41 ; Jude 1:6 ; Revelation 19:3 ) and those human beings who willfully continue in “sin”—a decision which demonstrates solidarity with the evil powers (Matthew 25:46 ; Mark 3:29 ; Jude 1:13 ; Romans 1:16-17 ). The gospel is a present, historical revelation of end-of-time righteousness and wrath (Revelation 14:11 ). This eternal judgment which begins with the preaching of the Gospel will be culminated and concluded at the end of Time. At the Time of Jesus' appearance, all evil will be destroyed and all humans who continued in opposition to God will receive their eternal sentencing (2 Thessalonians 1:9 )
Everlasting Punishment - The word “everlasting” immediately calls to mind end-of-time realities. Thus, to wrestle with the idea of “everlasting punishment” is to grapple with notions of Time, justice, evil, and the end of Time. According to the early church's teaching (Hebrews 6:2 ), the eternal fate of creation and human beings is bound up with gospel preaching and thus with the end-of-time events of Jesus' death, resurrection and promised return. Such end-of-time trauma befalls the evil, angelic powers which oppose God (Matthew 24:41 ; Jude 1:6 ; Revelation 19:3 ) and those human beings who willfully continue in “sin”—a decision which demonstrates solidarity with the evil powers (Matthew 25:46 ; Mark 3:29 ; Jude 1:13 ; Revelation 14:11 ). The gospel is a present, historical revelation of end-of-time righteousness and wrath (Romans 1:16-17 ). This eternal judgment which begins with the preaching of the Gospel will be culminated and concluded at the end of Time. At the Time of Jesus' appearance, all evil will be destroyed and all humans who continued in opposition to God will receive their eternal sentencing (2 Thessalonians 1:9 )
Eliashib -
A priest, head of one of the courses of the priests of the Time of David (1 Chronicles 24:12 ). ...
...
A high priest in the Time of Ezra and Nehemiah (Nehemiah 12:22,23 )
Postdate - ) To date after the real Time; as, to postdate a contract, that is, to date it later than the Time when it was in fact made
Adultery - It is a diriment impediment to marriage between two who, during the Time of a legitimate marriage, commit the crime pledging themselves to marriage later; or, who commit it during the Time of a legitimate marriage and one or the other brings about the death of one of the married parties
City of Palm Trees - Jericho itself lay in ruins from the Time of the conquest until the Time of Ahab
Irha-Heres - The prophecy here points to a Time when the Jews would so increase in number there as that the city would fall under their influence. This might be in the Time of the Ptolemies
Dial - An instrument for measuring Time, by the aid of the sun being a plate or plain surface, on which lines are drawn in such a manner, that the shadow of a wire, or of the upper edge of another plane, erected perpendicularly on the former, may show the true Time of the day. The edge of the plane, which shows the Time, is called the stile of the dial, and this must be parallel to the axis of the earth
Meal - ) The portion of food taken at a particular Time for the satisfaction of appetite; the quantity usually taken at one Time with the purpose of satisfying hunger; a repast; the act or Time of eating a meal; as, the traveler has not eaten a good meal for a week; there was silence during the meal. ; sometimes, any flour, esp
Cameronian - Richard Cameron, a Scotch Covenanter of the Time of Charles II
Bedsore - ) A sore on the back or hips caused by lying for a long Time in bed
Catechumenate - ) The state or condition of a catechumen or the Time during which one is a catechumen
Anew - ) Over again; another Time; in a new form; afresh; as, to arm anew; to create anew
Chronicler - ) A writer of a chronicle; a recorder of events in the order of Time; an historian
Shash'a-i - (noble ), one of the sons of Bani in the Time of Ezra
Birsha - King of Gomorrah at the Time of Chedorlaomer’s invasion ( Genesis 14:2 )
Evaporometer - ) An instrument for ascertaining the quantity of a fluid evaporated in a given Time; an atmometer
Postponement - ) The act of postponing; a deferring, or putting off, to a future Time; a temporary delay
Primariness - ) The quality or state of being primary, or first in Time, in act, or in intention
Polygyny - ) The state or practice of having several wives at the same Time; marriage to several wives
Rehear - ) To hear again; to try a second Time; as, to rehear a cause in Chancery
Allowglass - ) A heavy-armed foot soldier from Ireland and the Western Isles in the Time of Edward /...
Rallentando - ) Slackening; - a direction to perform a passage with a gradual decrease in Time and force; ritardando
Timepiece - ) A clock, watch, or other instrument, to measure or show the progress of Time; a chronometer
Repack - ) To pack a second Time or anew; as, to repack beef; to repack a trunk
Termless - ) Having no term or end; unlimited; boundless; unending; as, termless Time
Monandry - ) The possession by a woman of only one husband at the same Time; - contrasted with polyandry
Outsit - ) To remain sitting, or in session, longer than, or beyond the Time of; to outstay
Bichedei achilat pras - the Time period in which one can usually eat a portion of food of a specific size...
Coextend - ) To extend through the same space or Time with another; to extend to the same degree
Meah - An hundred, a tower in Jersalem on the east wall (Nehemiah 3:1 ) in the Time of Nehemiah
Jezreel, Day of - The Time predicted for the execution of vengeance for the deeds of blood committed there (Hosea 1:5 )
Colhozeh - A man of Judah in Nehemiah's Time (Nehemiah 3:15; Nehemiah 11:5); father of Shallum and Baruch
Belling - ) A bellowing, as of a deer in rutting Time
Allegretto - ) A movement in this Time
Sivan - (ssi' van) Third month (May-June) of the Hebrew calendar, Time of wheat harvest and Pentecost
Bul - See Time
Eliasib - A high priest in the Time of Neh
Saloop - ) An aromatic drink prepared from sassafras bark and other ingredients, at one Time much used in London
Polyandry - ) The possession by a woman of more than one husband at the same Time; - contrasted with monandry
Punctuality - ) The quality or state of being punctual; especially, adherence to the exact Time of an engagement; exactness
Bilgah - Priest in David's Time
Amok - A priestly family in the Time of Zerubbabel and of Joiakim ( Nehemiah 12:7 ; Nehemiah 12:20 )
Produce Race - A race to be run by the produce of horses named or described at the Time of entry
Time-Honored - ) Honored for a long Time; venerable, and worthy of honor, by reason of antiquity, or long continuance
Therewithal - ) With that or this; therewith; at the same Time
Momentary - ) Done in a moment; continuing only a moment; lasting a very short Time; as, a momentary pang
Jackaroo - ) To be a jackaroo; to pass one's Time as a jackaroo
After-Dinner - ) The Time just after dinner
Saraband - ) A slow Spanish dance of Saracenic origin, to an air in triple Time; also, the air itself
Lache - ) Neglect; negligence; remissness; neglect to do a thing at the proper Time; delay to assert a claim
Bakbuki'ah - (wasting of Jehovah ), a Levite in the Time of Nehemiah
Employ - To occupy the Time, attention and labor of to keep busy, or at work to use. We employ our hands in labor we employ our heads or faculties in study or thought the attention is employed, when the mind is fixed or occupied upon an object we employ Time, when we devote it to an object. A portion of Time should be daily employed in reading the scriptures, meditation and prayer a great portion of life is employed to little profit or to very bad purposes. To occupy to use to apply or devote to an object to pass in business as, to employ Time to employ an hour, a day or a week to employ one's life. To employ one's self, is to apply or devote one's Time and attention to busy one's self
Fulness -
Of Time (Galatians 4:4 ), the Time appointed by God, and foretold by the prophets, when Messiah should appear
Hillel - An influential rabbi and Talmudic scholar who flourished just prior to the Time of the ministry of Jesus. He and his colleague Shammai presided over the two most important rabbinic schools of their Time
Zuriel - Rock of God, chief of the family of the Merarites (Numbers 3:35 ) at the Time of the Exodus
Belated - ) Delayed beyond the usual Time; too late; overtaken by night; benighted
Anon - ) At another Time; then; again
Hitherto - ) Up to this Time; as yet; until now
Allhallown - ) Of or pertaining to the Time of Allhallows
Notar - "left over"); the prohibition against leaving sacrificial meat past the Time when it is permitted to be eaten...
Two-Step - ) A kind of round dance in march or polka Time; also, a piece of music for this dance
Pluviometer - ) An instrument for ascertaining the amount of rainfall at any place in a given Time; a rain gauge
Psychometry - ) The art of measuring the duration of mental processes, or of determining the Time relations of mental phenomena
Posteriority - ) The state of being later or subsequent; as, posteriority of Time, or of an event; - opposed to priority
Propinquity - ) Nearness in Time
Athaiah - (uh' thawee' uh) Leader of tribe of Judah who lived in Jerusalem in Time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:4 )
Gurbaal - Place in which, at the Time of Uzziah, Arabians dwelt, against whom God helped him
Barogram - ) A tracing, usually made by the barograph, showing graphically the variations of atmospheric pressure for a given Time
Couchee - ) A reception held at the Time of going to bed, as by a sovereign or great prince
Zebina - ” One who had a foreign wife during Ezra's Time (Ezra 10:43 )
up-to-Date - ) Extending to the present Time; having style, manners, knowledge, or other qualities that are abreast of the Times
Previous - ) Going before in Time; being or happening before something else; antecedent; prior; as, previous arrangements; a previous illness
Ortive - ) Of or relating to the Time or act of rising; eastern; as, the ortive amplitude of a planet
Retry - judicially) a second Time; as, to retry a case; to retry an accused person
Therewith - ) At the same Time; forthwith
Headtire - ) The manner of dressing the head, as at a particular Time and place
Amasiah - Son of Zichri, who willingly offered himself to the Lord in the Time of Jehoshaphat
Misimprove - ) To use for a bad purpose; to abuse; to misuse; as, to misimprove Time, talents, advantages, etc
Misspend - ) To spend amiss or for wrong purposes; to aquander; to waste; as, to misspend Time or money
Pelaliah - ” Ancestor of a priest in Ezra's Time (Nehemiah 11:12 )
Lodged - Placed at rest deposited infixed furnished with accommodations for a night or other short Time laid flat
ho'Ram - (mountainous ), king of Gezer at the Time of the conquest of the southwestern part of Palestine
Eli'Athah - (to whom God comes ), a musician in the temple in the Time of King David
ho'Ham - (whom Jehovah impels ), king of Hebron at the Time of the conquest of Canaan
ba'Alis, - king of the Ammonites at the Time of the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar
Bav'a-i - son of Henadad, ruler of the district of Keilah in the Time of Nehemiah
Now - At the present Time. At one Time at another Time. Now sometimes expresses or implies a connection between the subsequent and preceding proposition often it introduces an inference or an explanation of what precedes. Now sometimes refers to a particular Time past specified or understood, and may be defined, at that Time. Now and then, at one Time and another, indefinitely occasionally not often at intervals. The present Time or moment
Nativity of Christ - The birth of our Lord took place at the Time and place predicted by the prophets (Genesis 49:10 ; Isaiah 7:14 ; Jeremiah 31:15 ; Micah 5:2 ; Haggai 2:6-9 ; Daniel 9:24,25 ). We know, however, that it took place in the "fulness of the Time" (Galatians 4:4 ), i. , at the fittest Time in the world's history
Afore - Prior in Time before anterior prior Time being considered as in front of subsequent Time
Ages - Isaiah 26:4 (Margin) (a) Here we find that CHRIST is the One in whom men may safely trust in any age from infancy to death, or in any period of Time. CHRIST may be trusted in every situation, in every circumstance, and in any Time of day or night. ...
Ephesians 2:7 (b) Reference is made here to the various periods of Time which succeed each other in the course of history clear up into eternity
Accommodation of Scripture - Thus a prophecy is said to be fulfilled properly when a thing foretold comes to pass; and, by way of accommodation, when an event happens to any place or people similar to what fell out some Time before to another. Thus the words of Isaiah, spoken to those of his own Time, are said to be fulfilled in those who lived in our Saviour's, "Ye hypocrites, well did Esaias prophesy, " &c: which same words St. Paul afterwards accommodates to the Jews of his Time, Is
Centurist - ) An historian who distinguishes Time by centuries, esp
Caterwaul - ) To cry as cats in rutting Time; to make a harsh, offensive noise
Haziel - ” A leading Levite in the Time of David (1 Chronicles 23:9 )
Joshaphat - A priest in David’s Time ( 1 Chronicles 15:24 )
Tan'Humeth - (consolation ), the father of Seraiah in the Time of Gedaliah
Obil - A keeper of camels, an Ishmaelite who was "over the camels" in the Time of David (1 Chronicles 27:30 )
Armistice - ) A cessation of arms for a short Time, by convention; a temporary suspension of hostilities by agreement; a truce
Cloakroom - , may be deposited for a Time
Shi'Nab - God ), the king of Admah in the Time of Abraham
Post Note - A note issued by a bank, payable at some future specified Time, as distinguished from a note payable on demand
Quintole - ) A group of five notes to be played or sung in the Time of four of the same species
Commorancy - ) Residence temporarily, or for a short Time
Ismachiah - A Levite, set over the offerings, tithes, and dedicated things in the Time of king Hezekiah
Foremost - ) First in Time or place; most advanced; chief in rank or dignity; as, the foremost troops of an army
Essene - ) One of a sect among the Jews in the Time of our Savior, remarkable for their strictness and abstinence
Jacobian - ) Of or pertaining to a style of architecture and decoration in the Time of James the First, of England
Mouthful - ) As much as is usually put into the mouth at one Time
ib'ri - (Hebrew ), a Merarite Levite of the family of Jaaziah, ( 1 Chronicles 24:27 ) in the Time of David
Long-Suffering - ) Bearing injuries or provocation for a long Time; patient; not easily provoked
Hereafter - In Matthew 26:64 ‘Hereafter shall ye see the Son of Man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven,’ the meaning of ‘hereafter’ is ‘from this Time’ (RV Morning - Morning can refer to the Time before dawn (Mark 1:35 ; compare Genesis 44:3 ), to dawn (Genesis 19:15 ; Genesis 29:25 ; Judges 16:2 ), or to some Time after sunrise
Mehetabel - It seems a compound of three words—Mah-to-bel, How good is God! Perhaps this name was given at a Time of some remarkable providence, as we do not find the name any where else in Scripture for the name of a man; and this was at a Time of peculiar exercises of Israel
Catch Crop - Any crop grown between the rows of another crop or intermediate between two crops in ordinary rotation in point of Time
Unchancy - ) Happening at a bad Time; unseasonable; inconvenient
Jaaziah - (jay uh zi uh) A Levitical priest in the Time of David (1 Chronicles 24:26 )
Brevity - ) Shortness of duration; briefness of Time; as, the brevity of human life
Shiza - Member of tribe of Reuben in Time of David (1 Chronicles 11:42 )
Prompt-Note - ) A memorandum of a sale, and Time when payment is due, given to the purchaser at a sale of goods
Prolongation - ) The act of lengthening in space or in Time; extension; protraction
Frondescence - ) The Time at which each species of plants unfolds its leaves
Cononiah - Levite who had the care of the offerings, tithes, and dedicated things in the Time of Hezekiah
Water Clock - An instrument or machine serving to measure Time by the fall, or flow, of a certain quantity of water; a clepsydra
Parachronism - ) An error in chronology, by which the date of an event is set later than the Time of its occurrence
Trigamist - ) One who has been married three Times; also, one who has three husbands or three wives at the same Time
Temporizer - ) One who temporizes; one who yields to the Time, or complies with the prevailing opinions, fashions, or occasions; a trimmer
Whitsuntide - the first three days - Whitsunday, Whitsun Monday, and Whitsun Tuesday; the Time of Pentecost
After-Note - ) One of the small notes occur on the unaccented parts of the measure, taking their Time from the preceding note
it'Tah-ka'Zin - (time of the judge ), one of the landmarks of the boundary of Zebulun
Pithom - one of the cities that the Israelites built for Pharaoh in Egypt, during the Time of their servitude, Exodus 1:11
Ladykin - ) A little lady; - applied by the writers of Queen Elizabeth's Time, in the abbreviated form Lakin, to the Virgin Mary
Col-ho'Zeh - (all-seeing ), a man of the tribe of Judah in the Time of Nehemiah
Conani'ah - (made by Jehovah ), one of the chiefs of the Levites in the Time of Josiah
Azani'ah - (whom the Lord hears ), the father or immediate ancestor of Jeshua the Levite, in the Time of Nehemiah
Alway, Always - 1: ἀεί (Strong's #104 — Adverb — aei — ah-eye' ) has two meanings: (a) "perpetually, incessantly," Acts 7:51 ; 2 Corinthians 4:11 ; 6:10 ; Titus 1:12 ; Hebrews 3:10 ; (b) "invariably, at any and every Time," of successive occurrences, when some thing is to be repeated, according to the circumstances, 1 Peter 3:15 ; 2 Peter 1:12 . ...
2: ἑκάστοτε (Strong's #1539 — Adverb — hekastote — hek-as'-tot-eh ) from hekastos, "each," is used in 2 Peter 1:15 , RV, "at every Time" (AV, "always"). See Time. , through all Time, (dia, "through," pas, "all"). The phrase, which is used of the Time throughout which a thing is done, is sometimes rendered "continually," sometimes "always;" "always" or "alway" in Mark 5:5 ; Acts 10:2 ; 24:16 ; Romans 11:10 ; "continually" in Luke 24:53 ; Hebrews 9:6 ; 13:15 , the idea being that of a continuous practice carried on without being abandoned
Twelfth-Second - ) A unit for the measurement of small intervals of Time, such that 1012 (ten trillion) of these units make one second
Fast of esther - fast observed on the thirteenth of Adar in commemoration of Queen Esther�s fast at the Time of the miracle of Purim ...
Pedahzur - Rock of redemption, the father of Gamaliel and prince of Manasseh at the Time of the Exodus (Numbers 1:10 ; 2:20 )
Bondholder - ) A person who holds the bonds of a public or private corporation for the payment of money at a certain Time
Shi'Phi - (abundant ), a Simeonite, father of Ziza, a prince of the tribe in the Time of Hezekiah
Seudah shelishit - "the third meal"); the third of Shabbat's required three meals, held right before sunset, during the mystic Time of Shabbat's waning ...
Sce'va, - a Jew residing at Ephesus at the Time of St
Mikneiah - ” Levitic musician in David's Time (1Chronicles 15:18,1 Chronicles 15:21 )
Yahrtzeit - , �time of year�); the anniversary of someone�s passing, observed by the recitation of Kaddish, the study of mishnayot, etc
Proximity - ) The quality or state of being next in Time, place, causation, influence, etc
Questionist - ) A candidate for honors or degrees who is near the Time of his examination
Shecaniah - Priest in the Time of Hezekiah
Amphipneust - ) One of a tribe of Amphibia, which have both lungs and gills at the same Time, as the proteus and siren
During - ) In the Time of; as long as the action or existence of; as, during life; during the space of a year
Sea Pass - A document carried by neutral merchant vessels in Time of war, to show their nationality; a sea letter or passport
Demisemiquaver - ) A short note, equal in Time to the half of a semiquaver, or the thirty-second part of a whole note
Sithe - ) Time
zu'ri-el - (my rock is God ) son of Abihail, and chief of the Merarite Levites at the Time of the exodus
Bede-i'ah, - one of the sons of Bani, in the Time of Ezra, who had taken a foreign wife
Chub, - the name of a people in alliance with Egypt in the Time of Nebuchadnezzar, (Ezekiel 30:5 ) and probably of northern Africa
Sarah - Princess, the wife and at the same Time the half-sister of Abraham (Genesis 11:29 ; 20:12 ). This name was given to her at the Time that it was announced to Abraham that she should be the mother of the promised child. Her story is from her marriage identified with that of the patriarch till the Time of her death
Avim, or Avites - Descendants of Canaan, Genesis 10:17 , who occupied a portion of the coast of Palestine from Gaza towards the river of Egypt, but were expelled and almost destroyed by invading Philistines or Caphtorim, before the Time of Moses, Deuteronomy 2:23 . Some yet remained in the Time of Joshua, Joshua 13:3
Dally - To trifle to lose Time in idleness and trifles to amuse one's self with idle play. ...
DAL'LY, To delay to defer to put off to amuse till a proper opportunity as, to dally off the Time
Transient - ) Staying for a short Time; not regular or permanent; as, a transient guest; transient boarders. ) That which remains but for a brief Time
Velocity - ) Rate of motion; the relation of motion to Time, measured by the number of units of space passed over by a moving body or point in a unit of Time, usually the number of feet passed over in a second
Persia - The Persians became very famous from the Time of Cyrus, the founder of the Persian monarchy. Their ancient name was Elamites, and in the Time of the Roman emperors they went by the name of Parthians; but now Persians
Resident - ) One who resides or dwells in a place for some Time. ) Dwelling, or having an abode, in a place for a continued length of Time; residing on one's own estate; - opposed to nonresident; as, resident in the city or in the country
Bera - Gift, or son of evil, king of Sodom at the Time of the invasion of the four kings under Chedorlaomer (Genesis 14:2,8,17,21 )
Mahath - ...
...
Another Kohathite Levite, of the Time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:12 )
Shemiramoth - ...
...
A Levite in David's Time (1 Chronicles 15:18,20 )
Kareah - Bald, the father of Johanan and Jonathan, who for a Time were loyal to Gedaliah, the Babylonian governor of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 40:8,13,15,16 )
Chronology - ) The science which treats of measuring Time by regular divisions or periods, and which assigns to events or transactions their proper dates
Poco - ) A little; - used chiefly in phrases indicating the Time or movement; as, poco piu allegro, a little faster; poco largo, rather slow
Florence - ) An ancient gold coin of the Time of Edward III
Sometime, Sometimes - At one Time, once
Epiphragm - ) A membranaceous or calcareous septum with which some mollusks close the aperture of the shell during the Time of hibernation, or aestivation
Diplograph - ) An instrument used for double writing, as one for producing embossed writing for the blind and ordinary writing at the same Time
Gimzo - City captured by the Philistines in the Time of Ahaz
Tooth - Proverbs 25:19 (a) The unfaithfulness of a friend in Time of need hurts the soul, breaks the heart, and causes mental pain
Overslip - ) To slip or slide over; to pass easily or carelessly beyond; to omit; to neglect; as, to overslip Time or opportunity
Eusebius Renaudot - One of the greatest Orientalists of his Time, and the author of various works on philological subjects
Overdue - ) Due and more than due; delayed beyond the proper Time of arrival or payment, etc
Leisurely - ) Characterized by leisure; taking abundant Time; not hurried; as, a leisurely manner; a leisurely walk
Lingering - ) Drawn out in Time; remaining long; protracted; as, a lingering disease
Renaudot, Eusebius - One of the greatest Orientalists of his Time, and the author of various works on philological subjects
Cononi'ah - (appointed by the Lord ), a Levite, ruler of the offerings and tithes in the Time of Hezekiah
pa'Ial - (judge ), the son of Uzai who assisted in restoring the walls of Jerusalem in the Time of Nehemiah, ( Nehemiah 3:25 ) (B
pi'Ram - (like a wild ass; fleet ) the Amorite king of Jarmuth at the Time of Joshua's conquest of Canaan
Elish'Aphat - (whom God judges ), son of Zichri; one of the captains of hundreds in the Time of Jehoiada
Mortgage - Before the Time specified for payment, that is, between the Time of contract and the Time limited for payment, the estate is conditional, and the mortgagee is called tenant in mortgage but on failure of payment at the Time limited, the estate becomes absolute in the mortgagee. But in this case, courts of equity interpose,and if the estate is of more value than the debt, they will on application grant a reasonable Time for the mortgager to redeem the estate. To grant an estate in fee as security for money lent or contracted to be paid at a certain Time, on condition that if the debt shall be discharged according to the contract, the grant shall be void, otherwise to remain in full force
Second, Secondarily, Secondly - 1: δεύτερος (Strong's #1208 — Adjective — deuteros — dyoo'-ter-os ) denotes "second in order" with or without the idea of Time, e. , Matthew 22:26,39 ; 2 Corinthians 1:15 ; Revelation 2:11 ; in Revelation 14:8 , RV only ("a second angel"); it is used in the neuter, deuteron, adverbially, signifying a "second" Time, e. , "the second Time"); used with ek ("of") idiomatically, the preposition signifying "for (the second Time)," Mark 14:72 ; John 9:24 and Acts 11:9 , RV (AV, "again"); Hebrews 9:28 ; in 1 Corinthians 12:28 , AV, "secondarily," RV, "secondly
Continuance - Applied to Time, duration a state of lasting as the continuance of rain or fair weather for a day or week. Progression of Time. After issue or demurrer joined, as well as in some of the previous stages of proceeding, a day is continually given, and entered upon record, for the parties to appear on from Time to Time
ha'Math - ( Genesis 10:18 ) Nothing appears of the power of Hamath until the Time of David. In the Assyrian inscriptions of the Time of Ahab (B. , and from this Time it ceased to be a place of much importance. Jerome's Time, and its present name, Hamah , is but slightly altered from the ancient form
Hecatomb - ) A sacrifice of a hundred oxen or cattle at the same Time; hence, the sacrifice or slaughter of any large number of victims
Antecedence - ) The act or state of going before in Time; precedence
in Petto - (Italian: in the breast, secretly) ...
Refers to the creation of a cardinal, whose name for the Time of being the pope does not disclose
Christian Evidences - Time-honored name for advanced courses in Christian doctrine, giving proofs from Scripture, tradition, history, and reason of the truth of the Christian religion
Mikloth -
An officer under Dodai, in the Time of David and Solomon (1 Chronicles 27:4 )
Temporal - A term often used for secular, as a distinction from spiritual or ecclesiastical; likewise for any thing belonging to Time in contrast with eternity
Chronoscope - ) An instrument for measuring minute intervals of Time; used in determining the velocity of projectiles, the duration of short-lived luminous phenomena, etc
Exclusionist - , one of the anti-popish politicians of the Time of Charles II
Criticalness - ) The state or quality of being critical, or of occurring at a critical Time
Pastime - ) That which amuses, and serves to make Time pass agreeably; sport; amusement; diversion
Beulah - The land of Palestine shall be called Beulah, which signifies 'married,' when the set Time comes for Jehovah to bless Israel
Egg-Glass - ) A small sandglass, running about three minutes, for marking Time in boiling eggs; also, a small glass for holding an egg, at table
Uniparous - ) Producing but one egg or young at a Time
Thence - ) From that Time; thenceforth; thereafter
Abner - Commander of Saul's army and for a Time enemy of David, afterwards reconciled, but treacherously slain by David's commander Joab, David bewailed his death
Evidences, Christian - Time-honored name for advanced courses in Christian doctrine, giving proofs from Scripture, tradition, history, and reason of the truth of the Christian religion
Ishma'Iah - (Jehovah hears ), son of Obadiah; the ruler of the tribe of Zebulun in the Time of King David
Liturgy, Ethiopic - The basic text is that of Egypt, but numerous additions were made from Time to Time till the 16th century, fewer till the 20th century
Enos - In his Time "men began to call upon the name of the Lord" (Genesis 4:26 ), meaning either (1) then began men to call themselves by the name of the Lord (marg. , to distinguish themselves thereby from idolaters; or (2) then men in some public and earnest way began to call upon the Lord, indicating a Time of spiritual revival
Everlasting - negatives the end either of a space of Time or of unmeasured Time, and is used chiefly where something future is spoken of, aidios excludes interruption and lays stress upon permanence and unchangeableness" (Cremer)
Noon - I has been supposed that the ninth hour, among the Romans, was the Time of eating the chief meal this hour was three o'clock, P. The middle of the day the Time when the sun is in the meridian twelve o'clock
Hazarsusah - ("horse village"); belonging to Simeon, in southern Judah (Joshua 19:5; 1 Chronicles 4:31); possibly made a depot for horses in the trade with Egypt in Solomon's Time; the name may be changed from some ancient name, as the import of horses was prohibited, and not practiced until David's and Solomon's Time
Watch - A division of Time in which soldiers or others were on duty to guard something. See Time
Polygamy - ) The having of a plurality of wives or husbands at the same Time; usually, the marriage of a man to more than one woman, or the practice of having several wives, at the same Time; - opposed to monogamy; as, the nations of the East practiced polygamy
Ethiopic Liturgy - The basic text is that of Egypt, but numerous additions were made from Time to Time till the 16th century, fewer till the 20th century
Moment - ) A minute portion of Time; a point of Time; an instant; as, at thet very moment
Year - ) The Time of the apparent revolution of the sun trough the ecliptic; the period occupied by the earth in making its revolution around the sun, called the astronomical year; also, a period more or less nearly agreeing with this, adopted by various nations as a measure of Time, and called the civil year; as, the common lunar year of 354 days, still in use among the Mohammedans; the year of 360 days, etc. ) The Time in which any planet completes a revolution about the sun; as, the year of Jupiter or of Saturn
Earthquake - (Zechariah 14:5 ) From (Zechariah 14:4 ) we are led to infer that a great convulsion took place at this Time in the Mount of Olives, the mountain being split so as to leave a valley between its summit. An earthquake occurred at the Time of our Saviour's crucifixion. (Matthew 27:51-54 ) Earthquakes are not unfrequently accompanied by fissures of the earth's surface; instances of this are recorded in connection with the destruction of Korah and his company, (Numbers 16:32 ) and at the Time of our Lord's death, (Matthew 27:51 ) the former may be paralleled by a similar occurrence at Oppido in Calabria A
Ethkazin - (ehth kay' zihn) Place name perhaps meaning, “time of the chieftain
Havayah - �being�); the Tetragrammaton, G d�s Divine Name of the four Hebrew letters yud-hei-vav-hei, expressing His transcendence of Time and space ...
Andante - ) A movement or piece in andante Time
Anterior - ) Before in Time; antecedent
Directoire Style - A style of dress prevalent at the Time of the French Directory, characterized by great extravagance of design and imitating the Greek and Roman costumes
Sea Letter - The customary certificate of national character which neutral merchant vessels are bound to carry in Time of war; a passport for a vessel and cargo
Dracontic - ) Belonging to that space of Time in which the moon performs one revolution, from ascending node to ascending node
Diplex - ) Pertaining to the sending of two messages in the same direction at the same Time
Rosalia - ) A form of melody in which a phrase or passage is successively repeated, each Time a step or half step higher; a melodic sequence
Ongorism - ) An affected elegance or euphuism of style, for which the Spanish poet Gongora y Argote (1561-1627), among others of his Time, was noted
Unseconded - ) Not exemplified a second Time
Mattan - Priest of Baal, slain in the Time of Jehoiada
Kist - ) A stated payment, especially a payment of rent for land; hence, the Time for such payment
Amasha'i - (burdensome ), son of Azareel, a priest in the Time of Nehemiah, ( Nehemiah 11:13 ) apparently the same as MAASIAI
an'na - (grace ), a "prophetess" in Jerusalem at the Time of our Lord's Presentation in the temple
Rapture - The catching up of believers by Christ at the Time of His return. Those of varying millennial views about end Time events all hold firmly to the biblical truth of such a rapture. This approach places the church in heaven during the Time of tribulation on earth. The church remains on earth for the first half of the tribulation, but escapes the last half which is seen to be the Time of intense or great tribulation. While that Time will be one of wrath upon the world system, the church will be protected from divine wrath although experiencing tribulation
Heliacal - ) Emerging from the light of the sun, or passing into it; rising or setting at the same, or nearly the same, Time as the sun
Heyday - ) An expression of frolic and exultation, and sometimes of wonder. ) The Time of triumph and exultation; hence, joy, high spirits, frolicsomeness; wildness
Noadiah - A Levite in Time of Ezra ( Ezra 8:33 ); called in 1Es 8:68 Moeth
Imnah - A Levite in the Time of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:14 )
Semibreve - ) A note of half the Time or duration of the breve; - now usually called a whole note
Chalkstone - Idol-altars are compared to soft limestone, which will soon be reduced to powder when God's set Time has arrived to bless Israel
Augustus - In Acts 25:21,25 the Augustus or Caesar at that Time wasNero
Metronome - It is set in motion by clockwork, and serves to measure Time in music
Abishai - the son of Zeruiah, David's sister, who was one of the most valiant men of his Time, and one of the principal generals in David's armies
Baalis - King of the Ammonites in the Time of the captivity
Pil'ta-i, - (my deliverances ), the representative of the priestly house of Moadiah or Maadiah, in the Time of Joiakim the son of Jeshua
Bun'ni -
One of the Levites in the Time of Nehemiah
Novice - The institution of a Time of trial to prepare the religious candidate for his future career is a very ancient one dating from at least the 5th century. No specific length of Time for the novitiate is required by canon law; hence it varies with different orders
Sheepshearers - The Time of shearing sheep was a festive Time of parties and inviting friends (1 Samuel 25:1 ; 2 Samuel 13:1 )
Novitiate - The institution of a Time of trial to prepare the religious candidate for his future career is a very ancient one dating from at least the 5th century. No specific length of Time for the novitiate is required by canon law; hence it varies with different orders
Dilligence - The shortness of our Time; the importance of our work; the pleasure which arises from discharging duty; the uncertainty of the Time of our dissolution; the consciousness we do not labour in vain; together with the example of Christ and all good men, should excite us to the most unwearied diligence in the cause of God, of truth, and our own souls
Periodical - ) Happening, by revolution, at a stated Time; returning regularly, after a certain period of Time; acting, happening, or appearing, at fixed intervals; recurring; as, periodical epidemics
Passport - ) A license granted in Time of war for the removal of persons and effects from a hostile country; a safe-conduct. ) A document carried by neutral merchant vessels in Time of war, to certify their nationality and protect them from belligerents; a sea letter
Dispensation, Dispensationalism - In the Scofield Reference Bible a dispensation is "a period of Time during which man is tested in respect of obedience to some specific revelation of the will of God" Dispensationalism says that God uses different means of administering His will and grace to His people. These different means coincide with different periods of Time
Vacancy - ) Unemployed Time; interval of leisure; Time of intermission; vacation
Protract - ) To draw out or lengthen in Time or (rarely) in space; to continue; to prolong; as, to protract an argument; to protract a war. ) To put off to a distant Time; to delay; to defer; as, to protract a decision or duty
Morne - ) The first or early part of the day, variously understood as the earliest hours of light, the Time near sunrise; the Time from midnight to noon, from rising to noon, etc
Pharaoh - Josephus says, that all the kings of Egypt, from Minaeus, the founder of Memphis, who lived several ages before Abraham, always had the name of Pharaoh, down to the Time of Solomon, for more than three thousand three hundred years. He adds, that, in the Egyptian language, the word Pharaoh means king, and that these princes did not assume the name until they ascended the throne, at which Time they quitted their former name
Zeboim - Jerom speak of Zeboim as of a city remaining in their Time, upon the western shores of the Dead Sea. Consequently, after the Time of Lot this city must have been rebuilt near the place where it had stood before
Adria - Paul's Time it was extended to all that portion of the Mediterranean between Crete and Sicily. Thus Ptolemy says that Sicily was bounded on the east by the Adriatic, and Crete in a similar manner on the west; and Strabo says that the Ionian Gulf was a part of what, in his Time, was called the Adriatic Sea
Second - That immediately follows the first the mext following the first in order of place or Time the ordinal of two. And he slept and dreamed the second Time
Incense - It is used inmany Churches at the present Time. It is more of a Scriptural usagethan a Roman use, and while there is no canon or enactment forbiddingits use, yet in the present state of our Church life it is notlikely to become a very popular restoration for some Time to come
Clepsydra - ) A water clock; a contrivance for measuring Time by the graduated flow of a liquid, as of water, through a small aperture
Oded - ...
...
A prophet in the Time of Ahaz and Pekah (2 Chronicles 28:9-15 )
Meraiah - ” Head of a priestly family in the Time of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:12 )
Sifri - a treatise on the derivation of Torah law from the exegesis of the verses of Numbers and Deuteronomy, written during the Time of the Mishnah by Rav...
Carmagnole - ) A popular or Red Rebublican song and dance, of the Time of the first French Revolution
Kallai - ” A chief priest who returned from Exile during the Time of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:20 )
Malluchi - (mawl' lyoo ki) Family of priests in the Time of Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:14 )
Evensong - ) A song for the evening; the evening service or form of worship (in the Church of England including vespers and compline); also, the Time of evensong
Piecework - ) Work done by the piece or job; work paid for at a rate based on the amount of work done, rather than on the Time employed
Priority - ) The quality or state of being prior or antecedent in Time, or of preceding something else; as, priority of application
Altar, Privileged - One to which the apostolic see has attached a plenary indulgence applicable only to the souls in purgatory, and gained every Time mass is offered upon it
Adar - Time of Festival of Purim established in Esther (Esther 9:21 )
Top-Chain - ) A chain for slinging the lower yards, in Time of action, to prevent their falling, if the ropes by which they are hung are shot away
Trigamy - ) The act of marrying, or the state of being married, three Times; also, the offense of having three husbands or three wives at the same Time
Recency - ) The state or quality of being recent; newness; new state; late origin; lateness in Time; freshness; as, the recency of a transaction, of a wound, etc
Varsovienne - ) Music for such a dance or having its slow triple Time characteristic strong accent beginning every second measure
Jovinianist - ) An adherent to the doctrines of Jovinian, a monk of the fourth century, who denied the virginity of Mary, and opposed the asceticism of his Time
Abi'Dan - (father of the judge ), chief of the tribe of Benjamin at the Time of the Exodus
Jeshua - His name occurs in the prophecies of the Time, Haggai 1:1 2:2 Zechariah 3:1-10 6:11-15
Phichol - Apparently the title borne by the "captain of the host" of the king of Gerar, in the Time of Abraham and Isaac, Genesis 21:22 ; 26:26
Peleg - He was called Peleg, division, because in his Time the earth was divided, Genesis 10:25 ; 11:16
Mor'Asthite, the, - It occurs twice -- (Jeremiah 26:18 ; Micah 1:1 ) --each Time as the description of the prophet Micah
Salutation - "Eastern modes of salutation are not unfrequently so prolonged as to become wearisome and a positive waste of Time. I have often listened to these prolonged salutations in the house, the street, and the highway, and not unfrequently I have experienced their tedious monotony, and I have bitterly lamented useless waste of Time" (Porter, Through Samaria, etc. The work on which the disciples were sent forth was one of urgency, which left no Time for empty compliments and prolonged greetings (Luke 10:4 )
Rend - Sometimes we start on a project which we think will be useful, and then find out we are wasting our Time. We saw this exemplified in the fact that we helped China in her distress; we also helped Japan at the Time of the earthquake; and we helped Russia in the Time of the war
Fast - It is the leaving of the duty of preparing and eating the meal, so that there may be Time for serving others, for prayer for others, and for enriching the soul from GOD's Word. That Time may well be used once in a while for more profitable service and devotion. Fasting eliminates the loss of that Time, so that the person may devote himself fully to the things of GOD, both for his own blessing, and the blessing of others
Nathan - a prophet of the Lord, who appeared in Israel in the Time of King David, and had a great share in the confidence of this prince. His country is unknown, as also the Time in which he began to prophesy. The first Time we find him mentioned, is when David designed to build the temple, 2 Samuel 7:3 , &c
Calendar, Gregorian - The Church's calendar depends on the calendar in use at the present Time, which is known as the Gregorian, from Pope Gregory XIII, by whose decree it was brought to its present form. As the length of the year depends on the Time of the earth's journey around the sun, and as that journey is not completed in exactly 365 days, Julius Cresar made each fourth year a "leap year" by inserting an additional day in February. In Pope Gregory's Time, 1582, it amounted to 10 days; he therefore dropped these from the calendar and ordered that the leap year should be observed in the year 1600, but not in 1700,1800, and 1900, and that thereafter century years would be leap years only when they are divisible by 400. Protestant countries for a Time refused to use the Gregorian Calendar
Gregorian Calendar - The Church's calendar depends on the calendar in use at the present Time, which is known as the Gregorian, from Pope Gregory XIII, by whose decree it was brought to its present form. As the length of the year depends on the Time of the earth's journey around the sun, and as that journey is not completed in exactly 365 days, Julius Cresar made each fourth year a "leap year" by inserting an additional day in February. In Pope Gregory's Time, 1582, it amounted to 10 days; he therefore dropped these from the calendar and ordered that the leap year should be observed in the year 1600, but not in 1700,1800, and 1900, and that thereafter century years would be leap years only when they are divisible by 400. Protestant countries for a Time refused to use the Gregorian Calendar
Antediluvian - ) Of or relating to the period before the Deluge in Noah's Time; hence, antiquated; as, an antediluvian vehicle
Field Mass - Name for the Holy Sacrifice when celebrated in the open air, as in Time of war, or in peace on special occasions with the permission of the bishop
Eliathah - To whom God will come, one of the foureen sons of the Levite Heman, and musician of the temple in the Time of David (1 Chronicles 25:4 )
Avot - ) A kind of difficult dance; a dance tune, the air of which has two brisk and lively, yet dignified, strains in common Time, each played twice over
Mass, Field - Name for the Holy Sacrifice when celebrated in the open air, as in Time of war, or in peace on special occasions with the permission of the bishop
Bank Discount - A sum equal to the interest at a given rate on the principal (face) of a bill or note from the Time of discounting until it becomes due
Beth-Marcaboth - A city of Simeon in the southern plains, near Ziklag, deserted in David’s Time; site unknown
Jeconias - One of the captains over thousands in the Time of Josiah ( 1E Esther 1:9 ); called in 2 Chronicles 35:9 Conaniah
Hemiprotein - ) An insoluble, proteid substance, described by Schutzenberger, formed when albumin is heated for some Time with dilute sulphuric acid
Quiddle - ) To spend Time in trifling employments, or to attend to useful subjects in an indifferent or superficial manner; to dawdle
Trenchmore - Also, music in triple Time appropriate to the dance
Ancilla Dei - (Latin: handmaid of God) Title given in early Christian inscriptions to a deceased woman, but from the Time of Gregory the Great, 7th century, only applied to nuns
Provisional - ) Of the nature of a provision; serving as a provision for the Time being; - used of partial or temporary arrangements; as, a provisional government; a provisional treaty
Ammishaddai - A Danite, father of Ahiezer, who was captain of the tribe in the Time of Moses
Mammalia - The young are nourished for a Time by milk, or an analogous fluid, secreted by the mammary glands of the mother
ze'Bul - (habitation ), chief man (Authorized Version "ruler") of the city of Shechem at the Time of the contest between Abimelech and the native Canaanites
Livelong - ) Whole; entire; long in passing; - used of Time, as day or night, in adverbial phrases, and usually with a sense of tediousness
Ziph - A city of Judah, four miles south-east of Hebron; near it were wild fastness in which David for a long Time lay hid, 1 Samuel 23:14,15
Emim - A gigantic and warlike race, who in the Time of Abraham occupied the country beyond the Jordan, afterwards possessed by the Moabites, Genesis 14:5 Deuteronomy 2:10
Longsuffering - Bearing injuries or provocation for a long Time patient not easily provoked
Lasting - Continuing in Time enduring remaining
Geshem or Gashmu - An Arabian, who opposed the work of the Lord in the Time of Nehemiah, by ridicule and plots, Nehemiah 2:19 ; 6:1-9 ; about 445 B
Halo'Hesh - Shallum, son of Halohesh was "ruler of the half part of Jerusalem" at the Time of the repair of the wall by Nehemiah
Jar'ha, - the Egyptian servant of Sheshan, about the Time of Eli, to whom his master gave his daughter and heir in marriage; (1 Chronicles 2:34,35 ) (B
Week - There can be no doubt about the great antiquity of measuring Time by a period of seven days. (Genesis 8:10 ; 29:27 ) The origin of this division of Time is a matter which has given birth to much speculation. That the week rests on a theological ground may be cheerfully acknowledged by both sides; but nothing is determined by such acknowledgment as to the original cause of adopting this division of Time. So far from the week being a division of Time without ground in nature, there was much to recommend its adoption. It is clear that if not in Paul's Time, yet very soon after, the whole Roman world had adopted the hebdomadal division
Fasting - However, this verse indicates that there was a revelation given to Daniel as a result of this Time of fasting. Fasting is the laying aside of food for a period of Time when the believer is seeking to know God in a deeper experience. Fasting relates to a Time of confession (Psalm 69:10 ). Fasting can be a Time of seeking a deeper prayer experience and drawing near to God in prevailing prayer (Ezra 8:23 ; Joel 2:12 ). When the early church wanted to know the mind of God, there was a Time of prayer and fasting
Heaven: to be Shut Out of at Last - On one occasion the burden of the Lord pressed upon his servant with more than ordinary severity, and anxious to deliver it and clear his soul, he detained his hearers a little beyond the Time, and consequently had to hurry to the chapel. He called to him, quickening his pace at the same Time, but his cry was not heard, the attendant retreated inside and the minister came up 'just in Time' to see the door put to, and rear it fastened from within. The circumstance made an impression upon him at the Time which he could never afterwards forget, and he was led to ask himself the question, 'Shall it be so at the last? Shall I come up to the gate of heaven only in Time to be too late, to find the last ransomed one admitted, and the door everlastingly shut?' ...
...
Season - ) To fit for any use by Time or habit; to habituate; to accustom; to inure; to ripen; to mature; as, to season one to a climate. ) A period of Time not very long; a while; a Time. ) Hence, a period of Time, especially as regards its fitness for anything contemplated or done; a suitable or convenient Time; proper conjuncture; as, the season for planting; the season for rest
Zealot - But in AD 6 the Romans replaced Archelaus with a governor sent out from Rome, and Judea for the first Time came under direct Roman rule (cf. One of the twelve apostles was possibly at some Time a member of the Zealots (Luke 6:15; Acts 1:13). From Time to Time other anti-Roman extremists joined them. During this Time Rome had systematically conquered Galilee, Perea and Judea
Day - (Sabbath)...
Jeremiah 17:21 (b) This Time of rest was a picture of the real and true rest which the believer has in JESUS CHRIST. ...
All of these days represent an unspecified length of Time in which certain conditions exist as described by the word that is used. The expression "day of the Lord" refers particularly to the Time when the Lord JESUS is ruling and reigning, exercising His authority. "...
Ecclesiastes 7:1 (c) This probably refers to the Time when the blessings of life have accumulated and the rewards for faithful service are given the Christian. ...
Isaiah 7:17 (c) Probably this refers to Times when the wicked prosper, the sun is shining, the birds are singing, and there seem to be no signs of sorrow. ...
1 Thessalonians 5:4 (b) By this is indicated the Time when our Lord shall return to earth as the Sun of Righteousness to scatter the clouds of unbelief and the dark shadows of sin
Age - ) The Time of life at which some particular power or capacity is understood to become vested; as, the age of consent; the age of discretion. ) A particular period of Time in history, as distinguished from others; as, the golden age, the age of Pericles. ) That part of the duration of a being or a thing which is between its beginning and any given Time; as, what is the present age of a man, or of the earth?...
(6):...
(n. ) The whole duration of a being, whether animal, vegetable, or other kind; lifetime. ) Mature age; especially, the Time of life at which one attains full personal rights and capacities; as, to come of age; he (or she) is of age. ) A long Time
Age - ) The Time of life at which some particular power or capacity is understood to become vested; as, the age of consent; the age of discretion. ) A particular period of Time in history, as distinguished from others; as, the golden age, the age of Pericles. ) That part of the duration of a being or a thing which is between its beginning and any given Time; as, what is the present age of a man, or of the earth?...
(6):...
(n. ) The whole duration of a being, whether animal, vegetable, or other kind; lifetime. ) Mature age; especially, the Time of life at which one attains full personal rights and capacities; as, to come of age; he (or she) is of age. ) A long Time
Last - ) Being after all the others, similarly classed or considered, in Time, place, or order of succession; following all the rest; final; hindmost; farthest; as, the last year of a century; the last man in a line of soldiers; the last page in a book; his last chance. ) To continue in Time; to endure; to remain in existence. ) At a Time or on an occasion which is the latest of all those spoken of or which have occurred; the last Time; as, I saw him last in New York. ) At a Time next preceding the present Time
Year - A — 1: ἔτος (Strong's #2094 — Noun Neuter — etos — et'-os ) is used (a) to mark a point of Time at or from which events take place, e. , Luke 3:1 (dates were frequently reckoned from the Time when a monarch began to reign); in Galatians 3:17 the Time of the giving of the Law is stated as 430 "years" after the covenant of promise given to Abraham; there is no real discrepancy between this and Exodus 12:40 ; the Apostle is not concerned with the exact duration of the interval; it certainly was not less than 430 "years;" the point of the argument is that the period was very considerable; Galatians 1:18 ; 2:1 mark events in Paul's life; as to the former the point is that three "years" elapsed before he saw any of the Apostles; in Galatians 2:1 the 14 "years" may date either from his conversion or from his visit to Peter mentioned in Galatians 1:18 ; the latter seems the more natural (for a full discussion of the subject see Notes on Galatians by Hogg and Vine, pp. ); (b) to mark a space of Time, e. , Matthew 9:20 ; Luke 12:19 ; 13:11 ; John 2:20 ; Acts 7:6 , where the 400 "years" mark not merely the Time that Israel was in bondage in Egypt, but the Time that they sojourned or were strangers there (the RV puts a comma after the word "evil"); the Genevan Version renders Genesis 15:13 "thy posterity shall inhabit a strange land for 400 years;" Hebrews 3:17 ; Revelation 20:2-7 ; (c) to date an event from one's birth, e. ...
A — 2: ἐνιαυτός (Strong's #1763 — Noun Masculine — eniautos — en-ee-ow-tos' ) originally "a cycle of Time," is used (a) of a particular Time marked by an event, e. , Luke 4:19 ; John 11:49,51 ; 18:13 ; Galatians 4:10 ; Revelation 9:15 ; (b) to mark a space of Time, Acts 11:26 ; 18:11 ; James 4:13 ; 5:17 ; (c) of that which takes place every year, Hebrews 9:7 ; with kata Time (2) - TIME. The word ‘time’ is used in the Gospels in a variety of phrases more or less indefinite. Probably the most definite expression is ἐν στιγμῇ χρόνου, ‘in a moment of Time’ (Luke 4:5). χρόνος is used of Time in general (Luke 1:57; Luke 8:27, Mark 9:21, John 5:6), passing or having passed. More definite is ἀπὸ τότε, ‘from that Time’ (Matthew 4:17; Matthew 16:21, Luke 16:16), and ἕως τοῦ νῦν, ‘until now’ (Matthew 24:21 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , Mark 13:19). (1) It is used to indicate the Time of certain events in the ministry of Jesus (Matthew 11:25; Matthew 12:1; Matthew 14:1). (2) In a special sense we have the remarkable passage John 7:6; John 7:8 ‘My Time is not yet come, but your Time is always ready,’ where the contrast is used apparently to emphasize the peculiar character of Jesus’ mission and the hostility which it aroused in Jerusalem. (3) Most important is the use of καιρός to indicate the dawn of a new epoch—πεπλήρωται ὁ καιρός, ‘the Time is fulfilled’ (cf. In a similar sense of world-period or era we have καιροὶ ἐθνῶν, ‘the Times of the Gentiles’ (Luke 21:24; but cf. Various methods of reckoning Time were in existence at the beginning of the Christian era, and this fact makes it extremely difficult to locate events with any certainty. The Time of day was reckoned at the outset mainly by physical considerations, temperature, etc. ...
The division of Time into weeks was probably of Babylonian origin, and would be suggested by the moon’s phases, although there is no trace of this influence either in OT or NT. ...
Of the larger divisions of Time, the month, so familiar in OT Times, is hardly mentioned in the NT (Luke 1:26; Luke 1:36, John 4:25). But as this fell so far short of the full solar year, difficulty would naturally arise in celebrating feasts at the same Time in each year. This continued until some Time after the Christian era, when a more perfect system, a cycle of nineteen years with seven months intercalated—the invention of an astronomer of Athens named Meton—was adopted. It seems unlikely that the Jews had any fixed chronological calendar in the Time of Christ, but this is disputed (see Wieseler, Chronol. For it was possible for a writer in NT Times to employ various systems of reckoning, and it was also possible to employ any one system in various ways. Further, the year began at a different Time in different countries, e. These and other considerations render it almost impossible to give the precise date of any event even in NT Times (see art. Luke may have dated his reign from the Time when he assumed tribunician power the second Time
Cherubic Hymn - (Cherubikon) Hymn sung by the choir in Greek and other Oriental liturgies at the Time of "the great entrance," when the Bread and Wine are brought to the altar
Cherubikon - (Cherubikon) Hymn sung by the choir in Greek and other Oriental liturgies at the Time of "the great entrance," when the Bread and Wine are brought to the altar
Tat'na-i - (gift ), satrap of the province west of the Euphrates in the Time of Darius Hystaspes
Telem -
A porter of the temple in the Time of (Ezra 10:24 )
Hymn, Cherubic - (Cherubikon) Hymn sung by the choir in Greek and other Oriental liturgies at the Time of "the great entrance," when the Bread and Wine are brought to the altar
Eder - A Levite of Merari's family in the Time of David (1 Chronicles 23:23)
Mahath - Son of Amasai, a Kohathite, in the Time of Hezekiah
Schottische - ) A Scotch round dance in 2-4 Time, similar to the polka, only slower; also, the music for such a dance; - not to be confounded with the Ecossaise
Revolving - ) Making a revolution or revolutions; rotating; - used also figuratively of Time, seasons, etc
Manductor - ) A conductor; an officer in the ancient church who gave the signal for the choir to sing, and who beat Time with the hand, and regulated the music
Rhodes - It was at one Time a place of great renown
Deus Tuorum Militum - Hymn for Vespers for the Common of One Martyr, out of Paschal Time; Ambrosian school, 6th century
Othni - A lion of Jehovah, a son of Shemaiah, and one of the temple porters in the Time of David (1 Chronicles 26:7 )
Regem-Melech - Friend of the king, one of the two messengers sent by the exiled Jews to Jerusalem in the Time of Darius (Zechariah 7:2 ) to make inquiries at the temple
Baalis - King of the Ammonites at the Time of the Babylonian captivity (Jeremiah 40:14 )
Saltarello - ) A popular Italian dance in quick 3-4 or 6-8 Time, running mostly in triplets, but with a hop step at the beginning of each measure
o God, of Those That Fought Thy Fight - Hymn for Vespers for the Common of One Martyr, out of Paschal Time; Ambrosian school, 6th century
Shed'Eur - (darter of light ), the father of Elizur, chief of the tribe of Reuben at the Time of the exodus
Shmurah matzah - �matzah that has been watched�); matzah prepared under exacting supervision from the Time the wheat is harvested through the end of the baking to guard against the minutest moisture ...
Bishlam - at the Time of the return from captivity under Zerub
Presto - ) Quickly; rapidly; - a direction for a quick, lively movement or performance; quicker than allegro, or any rate of Time except prestissimo
Farandole - ) A rapid dance in six-eight Time in which a large number join hands and dance in various figures, sometimes moving from room to room
Apportion - ) To divide and assign in just proportion; to divide and distribute proportionally; to portion out; to allot; as, to apportion undivided rights; to apportion Time among various employments
Exalted - ...
Time never fails to bring every exalted reputation to a strict scrutiny
Outing - ) A feast given by an apprentice when he is out of his Time
Visualize - ) To form a mental image of something not present before the eye at the Time
Cushan - Perhaps Ethiopia, as in the margin, Habakkuk 3:7 ; or it may refer to Chushan-rishathaim, the first recorded oppressor in the Time of the judges
Largo - ) A movement or piece in largo Time
Monocular - ) Adapted to be used with only one eye at a Time; as, a monocular microscope
Minnith - A town of the Ammonites in the Time of Jephthah, Judges 11:33 , four miles northeast of Heshbon
pa'gi-el - (God allots ) the son of Ocran and chief of the tribe of Asher at the Time of the exodus
e'Nan - Ahira ben-Enan was "prince" of the tribe of Naphtali at the Time of the numbering of Israel in the wilderness of Sinai
Jehizki'ah - (Jehovah strengthens ), son of Shallum, one of the heads of the tribe of Ephraim in the Time of Ahaz
ha'zi-el - (union of God ), a Levite in the Time of David, of the family of Shi-mei or Shimi, the younger branch of the (Gershonites
Joch'Ebed - (whose glory is Jehovah ), the wife and at the same Time the aunt of Amram and the mother of Moses and Aaron
Penny - This word in the English version is misleading at the present Time. The penny shown to Christ was a Roman denarius, bearing the likeness and name of Tiberius Cæsar, who was emperor of Rome at that Time
Joan, Popess - Name given to a legendary character who appeared in histery from Time to Time as a female pope
Hivites - At the Time of Jacob's return to Canaan, Hamor the Hivite was the "prince of the land" (Genesis 24:2-28 ). A remnant of them still existed in the Time of Solomon (1 Kings 9:20 )
Easter - Originally a Saxon word (Eostre), denoting a goddess of the Saxons, in honour of whom sacrifices were offered about the Time of the Passover. Hence the name came to be given to the festival of the Resurrection of Christ, which occured at the Time of the Passover
Session - ) Hence, also, the Time, period, or term during which a court, council, legislature, etc. , meets daily for business; or, the space of Time between the first meeting and the prorogation or adjournment; thus, a session of Parliaments is opened with a speech from the throne, and closed by prorogation
Theu'Das - (God-given ), the name of an insurgent mentioned in Gamaliel's speech before the Jewish council, ( Acts 6:35-39 ) at the Time of the arraignment of the apostles. Josephus speaks of a Theudas who played a similar part in the Time of Claudius, about A
Hours, Scriptural - In both Greek and Roman Times the idea of an hour as the twenty-fourth part of a day, appears occasionally in scientific works but never in popular literature, or common life. In the Time of Our Lord there were only three divisions of Time which the people were used to note, the third, sixth, and ninth hours; the sixth being midday, was better marked than the others; the third was the modern 9 A
Dial - ) The graduated face of a Timepiece, on which the Time of day is shown by pointers or hands. ) An instrument, formerly much used for showing the Time of day from the shadow of a style or gnomon on a graduated arc or surface; esp
Decapolis - Other cities joined the league from Time to Time
Jeiel - Levite, musician and door-keeper in the Time of David. A chief of the Levites in the Time of Josiah
Serug - 1:6, section 8) says Serug means "provocation," and that idolatry began in his Time, but confined to pictures, and that the religion of mankind up to his Time was Scythic, after Serug and the building of the Babel tower it was Hellenic or Greek
Consumption - The act of consuming waste destruction by burning, eating, devouring, scattering, dissipation, slow decay, or by passing away, as Time as the consumption of fuel, of food, of commodities or estate, of Time, &c
Eternity - Isaiah 57 ...
We speak of eternal duration preceding the present Time. We also speak of endless or everlasting duration in future, and dating from present Time or the present state of things
Sink - There was none to help in the Time of need, and there seemed to be no bottom to the depths of sorrow. This figure is used to describe his feelings at the Time of his deep distress
Eternal Creation - Faith clearly teaches that this world did not exist from all eternity, but was created in Time, i. ,a measurable span of Time has elapsed since the world came into being
Mortality - ) The whole sum or number of deaths in a given Time or a given community; also, the proportion of deaths to population, or to a specific number of the population; death rate; as, a Time of great, or low, mortality; the mortality among the settlers was alarming
Restitution - In Acts 3:21 , the Time of the "restitution of all things," is the Time when Christ shall appear in his glory, and establish his kingdom as foretold in the Scriptures
Occupation - That which engages the Time and attention employment business. He devotes to study all the Time that his other occupations will permit
Time - Besides the ordinary uses of this word, the Bible sometimes employs it to denote a year, as in Daniel 4:16 ; or a prophetic year, consisting of three hundred and sixty natural year, a day being taken for a year. Thus in Daniel 7:25 12:7 , the phrase "a Time, Times, and the dividing of a Time" is supposed to mean three and a half prophetic years, or 1,260 natural years
Scriptural Hours - In both Greek and Roman Times the idea of an hour as the twenty-fourth part of a day, appears occasionally in scientific works but never in popular literature, or common life. In the Time of Our Lord there were only three divisions of Time which the people were used to note, the third, sixth, and ninth hours; the sixth being midday, was better marked than the others; the third was the modern 9 A
Robbery, - From the Time of Ishmael to the present day the Bedouin has been a "wild man," and a robber by trade. (Genesis 16:12 ) The Mosaic law on the subject of theft is contained in (Exodus 2:2 ) There seems no reason to suppose that the law underwent any alteration in Solomon's Time
Meshelemiah - He was a temple gate-keeper in the Time of David
Cenozoic - ) Belonging to the most recent division of geological Time, including the tertiary, or Age of mammals, and the Quaternary, or Age of man
o Glorious King of Martyr Hosts - Hymn for Lauds for the Common of many martyrs in Paschal Time; Ambrosian school, 6th century
Shelu'mi-el - (friend of God ), the son of Zurishaddai, and prince of the tribe of Simeon at the Time of the exodus
Chronicles - The words of the days, (1 Kings 14:19 ; 1 Chronicles 27:24 ), the daily or yearly records of the transactions of the kingdom; events recorded in the order of Time
Aul - ) The Anglicized form of Gallia, which in the Time of the Romans included France and Upper Italy (Transalpine and Cisalpine Gaul)
Ancient of Days - The everlasting Jehovah, as contrasted with the ephemeral transitoriness of the four successive world powers, stable as they seemed for a Time
Pastorale - ) A composition in a soft, rural style, generally in 6-8 or 12-8 Time
Dawdle - ) To waste Time in trifling employment; to trifle; to saunter
Alphabet, Cyrillic - The special alphabet accredited to Saint Cyril, Apostle of the Slavs, in order to express the sounds of the Slavonic language as spoken by the Bulgars and Moravians of his Time
Eternity - ) Infinite duration, without beginning in the past or end in the future; also, duration without end in the future; endless Time
Angels of the Churches - Mentioned in the Apocalypse; though interpreted by Origen as meaning the guardian angels of the seven churches of Asia, they are usually considered as referring to the bishops at the Time
Parousia - ” The term is often referred to as the Time of Christ’s return; hence, the Parousia, 2 Thessalonians 2:1
Decorous - ) Suitable to a character, or to the Time, place, and occasion; marked with decorum; becoming; proper; seemly; befitting; as, a decorous speech; decorous behavior; a decorous dress for a judge
Reveille - ) The beat of drum, or bugle blast, about break of day, to give notice that it is Time for the soldiers to rise, and for the sentinels to forbear challenging
Shortly - ) In a short or brief Time or manner; soon; quickly
Eugene Bore - Noted linguist, being at one Time professor of Armenian
Ahi'Moth - (brother of death ), a Levite apparently in the Time of David
Ishi'ah - (whom Jehovah lends ), the fifth of the five sons of Izrahiah, one of the heads of the tribe of Issachar in the Time of David
Affricate - ) A combination of a stop, or explosive, with an immediately following fricative or spirant of corresponding organic position, as pf in german Pfeffer, pepper, z (= ts) in German Zeit, Time
Widowhood - ) The state of being a widow; the Time during which a woman is widow; also, rarely, the state of being a widower
Saga - ) A Scandinavian legend, or heroic or mythic tradition, among the Norsemen and kindred people; a northern European popular historical or religious tale of olden Time
Elul - It included the Time from the new moon of September to that of October
With the Fair Sun of Easter Morn - Hymn for Lauds for the Common of Apostles and Evangelists, in Paschal Time; Ambrosian school, 4th or 5th century
Rex Gloriose Martyrum - Hymn for Lauds for the Common of many martyrs in Paschal Time; Ambrosian school, 6th century
Tetrarch - In Time, this word came to denote any petty king or sovereign
Unoccupied - Not employed or taken up as Time unoccupied
Plagues of Egypt - Exodus 8:5, etc, These ten plagues were doubtless spread over a long Time, and probably they followed, as much as possible, the order of the seasons; for some of them were not only distinctively Egyptian, but really only an aggravation of yearly maladies. The second came three months later, at the Time of the greatest inundation, in September, and was an attack on a native worship. The fifth was in December or January; the sixth, shortly after; the seventh, at the Time when hailstorms occur now in Egypt, from the middle of February to early March. During this Time the Israelites had frequent opportunities to gather, and thus were prepared for their exodus
Fullness of Time - The sending of Christ in the fullness of Time refers not so much to world conditions in the sense that the prevalence of Greek as a common spoken language, Roman roads, and the Roman enforced peace made the rapid spread of the gospel possible. ...
The reference to the fullness of Time in Ephesians is more difficult. Some translations understand the Time when all things are gathered together in Christ to lie in the future (NIV, TEV); others, in the past (REB). Therefore, it seems likely that the crucial shift in Time between the past with its hopelessness and hostility and the present age of reconciliation has already occurred
Man of Sin - Antichrist, as described by Paul in 2Thessalonians; interpreted by founders of Protestantism as descriptive of the pope, and so explained by Protestant writers of the Time on the, Continent and in England
Amraphel - King of Shinar in the Time of Abraham
Hophra - 591-572) in the Time of Zedekiah, king of Judah (Jeremiah 37:5 44:30 ; Ezekiel 29:6,7 )
Tebeth - (Esther 2:16 ), a word probably of Persian origin, denoting the cold Time of the year; used by the later Jews as denoting the tenth month of the year
Avocation - ) Pursuits; duties; affairs which occupy one's Time; usual employment; vocation
Pluralism - ) The state of a pluralist; the holding of more than one ecclesiastical living at a Time
Redeliver - ) To deliver or liberate a second Time or again
Sin, Man of - Antichrist, as described by Paul in 2Thessalonians; interpreted by founders of Protestantism as descriptive of the pope, and so explained by Protestant writers of the Time on the, Continent and in England
Shaalbim - A town of God, long held by the Amorites, Joshua 19:42 ; Judges 1:35 , but in the Time of Solomon the headquarters of one of his commissaries, 1 Kings 4:9
ha'Mor - (an ass ), a Hivite who at the Time of the entrance of Jacob on Palestine was prince of the land and city of Shechem
Curtain - A piece of cloth or other material, sometimes arranged so that it can be drawn up or sideways, hung either for decoration or to cover, conceal, or shut off something. At a later Time in Israelite history, two curtain were used to close off the holy place and the holy of holies in the Temple. The curtain separating the holy of holies and the holy place was torn from top to bottom at the Time of Jesus' death signifying the access that all people had to God from that Time forward (Matthew 27:51 )
Duty, Easter - The prescribed Time for fulfilling the Easter duty extends: from the first Sunday of Lent to Trinity Sunday, in the United States; from Ash Wednesday to Low Sunday, in England; from Ash Wednesday to the octave of Saint Peter and Saint Paul (July 6,), in Ireland; from the first Sunday of Lent to the octave of the Ascension, in Scotland, or in some places to Low Sunday. One may follow the direction of his priest judging it proper for him to abstain for some Time, but the precept binds even after the Time has expired and is not fulfilled by an unworthy communion
Summer - —This term stands in the Gospels for the Time of heat as distinguished from χειμών, the season of cold and rain-storms. Scripture has no special words for ‘spring’ and ‘autumn’; and while the Arab speaks of er-rabîʿa, ‘the Time of fresh pasture,’ and el-kharîf, ‘the Time of gathering’ of grapes and other fruits, they are hardly regarded as distinct seasons
Consume - So in English we say, it takes up Time, that is, it consumes Time. To spend to cause to pass away, as Time as, to consume the day in idleness
Evening - Genesis 1 ...
The precise Time when evening begins, or when it ends, is not ascertained by usage. But in customary language, the evening extends to bed-time, whatever that Time may be
Easter Duty - The prescribed Time for fulfilling the Easter duty extends: from the first Sunday of Lent to Trinity Sunday, in the United States; from Ash Wednesday to Low Sunday, in England; from Ash Wednesday to the octave of Saint Peter and Saint Paul (July 6,), in Ireland; from the first Sunday of Lent to the octave of the Ascension, in Scotland, or in some places to Low Sunday. One may follow the direction of his priest judging it proper for him to abstain for some Time, but the precept binds even after the Time has expired and is not fulfilled by an unworthy communion
Rephaim - There were some of the Rephaim beyond Jordan, at Ashteroth Karnaim, in the Time of Abraham, when Chedorlaomer made war against them, Genesis 14:5 . Also in the Time of Joshua there were some of their descendants in the land of Canaan, Joshua 17; Joshua 15. Lastly, we hear of them still in David's Time, in the city of Gath, 1 Chronicles 20:4-6
Length - Space of Time duration, indefinitely as a great length of Time. What length of Time will this enterprise require for its accomplishment? 5
Until - To used of Time. Preceding a sentence or clause, to that is, to the event mentioned, or the Time of it as, until this hour until this year. The only difference is, that it is followed sometimes by a single word denoting Time, and in other cases by a verb denoting an event, or a word denoting place or degree
Convenient, Conveniently - , "well-timed" (eu, "well," kairos, "a Time, season"), hence signifies "timely, opportune, convenient;" it is said of a certain day, Mark 6:21 ; elsewhere, Hebrews 4:16 , "in Time of need. eukairia, "opportunity," Matthew 26:16 ; Luke 22:6 ; eukaireo, "to have opportunity," Mark 6:31 ; Acts 17:21 ("they spent their Time," marg
Bisbane, Sir Thomas Makdougall - Distinguished in nautical astronomy, drew up tables for computing Time from the altitudes of celestial bodies, established the first important Australian observatory, and compiled the Brisbane Catalogue of 7385 stars
Kelaiah - ” One of the Levites who divorced his foreign wife during the Time of Ezra
Electro-Chronograph - ) An instrument for obtaining an accurate record of the Time at which any observed phenomenon occurs, or of its duration
Proleptical - ) Anticipating the usual Time; - applied to a periodical disease whose paroxysms return at an earlier hour at every repetition
Pilgrimage - ) A tedious and wearisome Time
Forearm - ) To arm or prepare for attack or resistance before the Time of need
Following - Coming or going after or behind pursuing attending imitating succeeding in Time resulting from as an effect or an inference adhering to obeying, observing using, practicing proceeding in the same course
Advent - Advent is also a Christian Time of preparation preceding Christmas
Loiter - ) To be slow in moving; to delay; to linger; to be dilatory; to spend Time idly; to saunter; to lag behind
Year - The space or period of Time in which the sun moves through the twelve signs of the ecliptic, or whole circle, and returns to the same point. The Time in which any planet completes a revolution as the year of Jupiter or of Saturn. The Time in which the fixed states make a revolution, is called the great year. Years, in the plural, is sometimes equivalent to age or old age as a man in years. ...
Sidereal year, the Time in which the sun, departing from any fixed star, returns to the same. ...
Anomalistical year, the Time that elapses from the suns leaving its apogee, till it returns to it, which Isaiah 365 days, 6 hours, 14 minutes. ...
Civil year, the year which nay nation has contrived for the computation of Time
Bethel - There he built an altar, and there he later returned after a Time in Egypt (Genesis 12:8; Genesis 13:3). From that Time on, God was, to Jacob, ‘the God of Bethel’. ...
Bethel, along with other towns and villages of central Canaan, fell to Israel at the Time of Joshua’s conquest. Bethel was an important religious and administrative centre in the Time of Samuel and a school for prophets was established there. The school was still functioning in the Time of Elijah and Elisha (1 Samuel 7:16; 1 Samuel 10:3; 2 Kings 2:3; 2 Kings 2:23). It still existed in the Time of Christ, though it is not mentioned in the New Testament
Naomi - She had migrated to Moab in a Time of famine, and returned to Bethlehem after her husband's death
Meronothite - A name given to Jehdeiah, the herdsman of the royal asses in the Time of David and Solomon (1 Chronicles 27:30 ), probably as one being a native of some unknown town called Meronoth
Isshijah - Israelite who had married a foreign wife, threatening Israel's total allegiance to Yahweh in Time of Ezra (Ezra 10:31 )
Christen - ) To use for the first Time
Noemi - She had migrated to Moab in a Time of famine, and returned to Bethlehem after her husband's death
Moadiah - ” Priestly clan in the Time of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:17 ), perhaps to be identified with Maadiah (Nehemiah 12:5 )
Ephes-Dammim - The place in Judah where the Philistines were encamped at the Time when David slew Goliath ( 1 Samuel 17:1 )
Critically - ) At a crisis; at a critical Time; in a situation, place, or condition of decisive consequence; as, a fortification critically situated
Jochebed - The wife and at the same Time the aunt of Amram and the mother of Moses and Aaron
Age of Reason - That Time of life at which one begins to distinguish clearly between right and wrong, to have a sense of obligation, and to incur moral responsibility; it is generally about the age of seven
Convalescency - ) The recovery of heath and strength after disease; the state of a body renewing its vigor after sickness or weakness; the Time between the subsidence of a disease and complete restoration to health
Entr'Acte - ) The interval of Time which occurs between the performance of any two acts of a drama
Eternal Gifts of Christ the King - Hymn for Matins for the Common of Apostles and Evangelists, out of Paschal Time
Aeterna Christi Munera - Hymn for Matins for the Common of Apostles and Evangelists, out of Paschal Time
Sing, o Sons of the Church Sounding the Martyr's p - Hymn for Vespers for the Common of many martyrs, out of Paschal Time
Sanctorum Merit is Inclyta Gaudia - Hymn for Vespers for the Common of many martyrs, out of Paschal Time
Rezon - The founder of a dynasty in Syria-Damascus in the Time of David, and a great annoyance to Solomon, 1 Kings 11:23-25
Reason, Age of - That Time of life at which one begins to distinguish clearly between right and wrong, to have a sense of obligation, and to incur moral responsibility; it is generally about the age of seven
Kissing the Stole - The stole represents the yoke of Christ, andthe Priest in recognition of that yoke and of his vows, kisses thestole each Time he puts it on to show his willingness to submit tothat yoke
Dispensation - From that Time to the Time of David and the prophets. The period from that, to the Time of Christ, finishes the Old Testament dispensation. From Christ to the end of Time, the Gospel dispensation. The rites and ceremonies under this dispensation are preferable to those in former Times, and that in this respect: they are fewer, clearer, and much more easy. This dispensation is not confined to one family, or to one nation, or to a few ages of men, but it spreads through all the nations of the earth, and reaches to the end of Time
Aquila - ...
Aquila and Priscilla were living in Rome at the Time of an outbreak of anti-Jewish feeling when the Emperor expelled all Jews from the city. Possibly at this Time they became Christians (Acts 18:1-3). At this Time the church in Ephesus used the house of Aquila and Priscilla as a meeting place (1 Corinthians 16:19). ...
Some Time after this, when Jews were allowed back in Rome, Aquila and Priscilla returned to live there for a Time
Tah'Panhes, Tehaph'Nehes, Tahap'Anes, - a city of Egypt, mentioned in the Time of the prophets Jeremiah and Ezekiel. " (Jeremiah 43:7 ) The Jews in Jeremiah's Time remained here
Elim - Here they probably remained some considerable Time. The form of expression in Exodus 16:1 seems to imply that the people proceeded in detachments or companies from Elim, and only for the first Time were assembled as a complete host when they reached the wilderness of Sin (q
Year - The Jews reckoned the year in two ways, (1) according to a sacred calendar, in which the year began about the Time of the vernal equinox, with the month Abib; and (2) according to a civil calendar, in which the year began about the Time of the autumnal equinox, with the month Nisan
Arrive - In present usage: To come in progress by water, or by traveling on land; to reach by water or by land; - followed by at (formerly sometimes by to), also by in and from. ) To come; said of Time; as, the Time arrived
Perizzites - Thus, in the Time of Abraham and Lot, the Canaanite and Perizzite were in the land, Genesis 13:7 ; Joshua 17:15 . There still remained some of this people as late as the Time of Ezra 9:1
Urijah - A high-priest in the Time of king Ahaz. A faithful prophet, from Kirjathjearim in Judah, in the Time of Jehoiakim
Shallum - The husband of Huldah the prophetess in the Time of Josiah, 2 Kings 22:14 . ...
Others of the Time are alluded to in Numbers 26:49 1 Chronicles 2:40 9:17,19,31 Ezra 2:42 7:2 10:24,42 Nehemiah 3:12 7:45
hi'Vites - ( Genesis 10:17 ; 1 Chronicles 1:15 ) We first encounter the actual people of the Hivites at the Time of Jacob's return to Canaan. (Joshua 9:7 ; 11:19 ) The main body of the Hivites were at this Time living in the northern confines of western Palestine-- "under Hermon, in the land of Mizpeh," (Joshua 11:3 ) --"in Mount Lebanon, from Mount Baal Hermon to the entering in of Hamath
Bethshan (Bethshean) - The town was still hostile to Israel in the Time of Saul (1 Samuel 31:10-12), but by the Time of Solomon it was firmly under Israelite control (1 Kings 4:12)
Reseize - ) To seize again, or a second Time
Rapture - org]'>[1]There is much debate over the Time of the rapture
Hermogenes - Mercury-born, at one Time Paul's fellow-labourer in Asia Minor, who, however, afterwards abandoned him, along with one Phygellus, probably on account of the perils by which they were beset (2 Timothy 1:15 )
Altrices - ) Nursers, - a term applied to those birds whose young are hatched in a very immature and helpless condition, so as to require the care of their parents for some Time; - opposed to praecoces
Bellasis, Edward - From that Time to his death he was one of the most devoted Catholic laymen in England, and was prominently associated with all Catholic activities
Shabbetha'i - (sabbatical ) a Levite in the Time of Ezra
Maaziah - Ancestor of a division of priests serving in David's Time (1 Chronicles 24:18 )
Zabdiel - An overseer in Jerusalem during the Time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:14 )
R. israel of ruzhin - known as the "Holy Ruzhiner"; 1796-1850; great-grandson of Rabbi DovBer of Mezeritch; one of the leading chassidic rebbes of his Time; a close associate of Rabbi Menachem Mendel of Lubavitch, third Chabad rebbe ...
Valued-Policy Law - A law requiring insurance companies to pay to the insured, in case of total loss, the full amount of the insurance, regardless of the actual value of the property at the Time of the loss
Presently - ) At present; at this Time; now
Rustication - ) The act of rusticating, or the state of being rusticated; specifically, the punishment of a student for some offense, by compelling him to leave the institution for a Time
Alas - ...
An exclamation expressive of sorrow, grief, pity, concern, or apprehension of evil sometimes followed by day or while alas the day, like alack a day or alas the while, expressing an unhappy Time
Hellenic - ) The dialect, formed with slight variations from the Attic, which prevailed among Greek writers after the Time of Alexander
Matelotte - ) An old dance of sailors, in double Time, and somewhat like a hornpipe
Landwehr - ) That part of the army, in Germany and Austria, which has completed the usual military service and is exempt from duty in Time of peace, except that it is called out occasionally for drill
el-Tolad - (God's kindred ), one of the cities in the south of Judah, ( Joshua 15:30 ) allotted to Simeon, (Joshua 19:4 ) and in possession of that tribe until the Time of David
Due - So in 1 Timothy 2:6 , "the testimony to be borne in its own (AV, 'due') Times (seasons);" 1 Timothy 6:15 , "in its own (idios) Times (seasons);" similarly in Titus 1:3 . , "according to Time"), and "in due Time," 1 Peter 5:6 , there is no word representing "due" in the original, and the phrases are, lit. , "in season," "in Time. " ...
(2) For the phrase "born out of due Time," in 1 Corinthians 15:8 , see BEGET , B, No
Always - ) At all Times; ever; perpetually; throughout all Time; continually; as, God is always the same. ) Constancy during a certain period, or regularly at stated intervals; invariably; uniformly; - opposed to sometimes or occasionally
Arbitrage - ) A traffic in bills of exchange (see Arbitration of Exchange); also, a traffic in stocks which bear differing values at the same Time in different markets
Reinsurance - ) Insurance a second Time or again; renewed insurance
Equinox - ) The Time when the sun enters one of the equinoctial points, that is, about March 21 and September 22
Jehde'Iah -
The representative of the Bene-Shubael, in the Time of David
Light Year - The distance over which light can travel in a year's Time; - used as a unit in expressing stellar distances. It is more than 63,000 Times as great as the distance from the earth to the sun
Wherein - In which in which thing, Time, respect, book, &c
Baalis - King of the children of Ammon, at the Time of Nebuchadnezzar's destruction of Jerusalem
Michah - (mi' kuh) Abbreviated form of the personal name Micaiah, KJV used for the leader of a family of Levites in David's Time (1 Chronicles 23:20 ; 1 Chronicles 24:24-25 )
Allemande - ) A dance in moderate twofold Time, invented by the French in the reign of Louis XIV
Nabal - 1 Samuel 25:25 (c) We take this to be a type of the foolish man who is so in love with his sins that he has no Time for GOD's message, GOD's messenger, nor GOD's ministry
Pousse-Cafe - ) A drink served after coffee at dinner, usually one of several liqueurs, or cordials, of different specific gravities poured so as to remain separate in layers; hence, such a drink of cordials served at any Time
Adagio - ) A piece of music in adagio Time; a slow movement; as, an adagio of Haydn
Elizabethan - ) Pertaining to Queen Elizabeth or her Times, esp. ) One who lived in England in the Time of Queen Elizabeth
Sequestrator - ) One who sequesters property, or takes the possession of it for a Time, to satisfy a demand out of its rents or profits
Eschynite - It was so called by Berzelius on account of the inability of chemical science, at the Time of its discovery, to separate some of its constituents
Excommunication - , an ecclesiastical censure whereby the person against whom it is pronounced is, for the Time, cast out of the communication of the church; exclusion from fellowship in things spiritual
Fandango - ) A lively dance, in 3-8 or 6-8 Time, much practiced in Spain and Spanish America
Economist - ) One who economizes, or manages domestic or other concerns with frugality; one who expends money, Time, or labor, judiciously, and without waste
Redemptioner - ) Formerly, one who, wishing to emigrate from Europe to America, sold his services for a stipulated Time to pay the expenses of his passage
Naturalistic Evolution - The theory that the universe is many billions of years old and that after a long period of Time, all galaxies, stars, planets, and life on earth evolved
Withal - ) Together with this; likewise; at the same Time; in addition; also
a Cappella - (1):...
A Time indication, equivalent to alla breve
Miscarry - ) To bring forth young before the proper Time
Chedorlao'Mer, - (handful of sheaves ), a king of Elam, in the Time of Abraham, who with three other chiefs made war upon the kings of Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zeboim and Zoar, and reduced them to servitude
Sodom - the capital of Pentapolis, which for some Time was the residence of Lot, the nephew of Abraham
Lock Step - A mode of marching by a body of men going one after another as closely as possible, in which the leg of each moves at the same Time with the corresponding leg of the person before him
Luncheon - ) A portion of food taken at any Time except at a regular meal; an informal or light repast, as between breakfast and dinner
Barab'Bas - (son of Abba ), a robber, ( John 18:40 ) who had committed murder in an insurrection, (Mark 15:7 ; Luke 28:18 ) in Jerusalem and was lying in prison the Time of the trial of Jesus before Pilate
Year, - the highest ordinary division of Time.
A year of 360 days appears to have been in use in Noah's Time. ...
The year used by the Hebrews from the Time of the exodus may: be said to have been then instituted, since a current month, Abib, on the 14th day of which the first Passover was kept, was then made the first month of the year. Probably the Hebrews determined their new year's day by the observation of heliacal or other star-risings or settings known to mark the right Time of the solar year. It follows, from the determination of the proper new moon of the first month, whether by observation of a stellar phenomenon or of the forwardness of the crops, that the method of intercalation can only have been that in use after the captivity, --the addition of a thirteenth month whenever the twelfth ended too long before the equinox for the offering of the first-fruits to be made at the Time fixed. It has been supposed that the institution at the Time of the exodus was a change of commencement, not the introduction of a new year, and that thenceforward the year had two beginnings, respectively at about the vernal and the autumnal equinox. " The former properly means the Time of cutting fruits, the latter that, of gathering fruits; they are therefore originally rather summer and autumn than summer and winter
Anachronism - ) A misplacing or error in the order of Time; an error in chronology by which events are misplaced in regard to each other, esp
Sail - Isaiah 33:23 (b) It indicates that Zion had failed to take advantage of GOD's provisions to make progress over the sea of life and the ocean of Time
Baal Tamar - The battle at Baal Tamar was prior to her Time, 1406 B
Sages - Sages, the: refers to the great body of teachers who taught and expounded the traditional laws and traditions of Israel from the Time of Ezra to the completion of the Talmudic/Midrashic literature (approx
Polka - It is performed by two persons in common Time
Attalus - He was one of the kings to whom the Roman Senate is said to have written in support of the Jews in the Time of Simon the Maccabee ( 1Ma 15:22 )
Achim - The name may express the parents' faith that God would in His own Time establish Messiah's throne, as Isaiah 9:7 foretold
Abyss - ) Infinite Time; a vast intellectual or moral depth
Tact - ) The stroke in beating Time
Monogamy - ) Single marriage; marriage with but one person, husband or wife, at the same Time; - opposed to polygamy
Vintage - The Time of gathering the crop of grapes
Rome - ) ...
Beneath this city are extensive galleries, called "catacombs," which were used from about the Time of the apostles (one of the inscriptions found in them bears the date A. 71) for some three hundred years as places of refuge in the Time of persecution, and also of worship and burial. These give an interesting insight into the history of the church at Rome down to the Time of Constantine
Alexandria - Many Jews from Alexandria were in Jerusalem, where they had a synagogue (Acts 6:9 ), at the Time of Stephen's martyrdom. At one Time it is said that as many as 10,000 Jews resided in this city. It was, however, not all translated at one Time
Bell - ) To call or bellow, as the deer in rutting Time; to make a bellowing sound; to roar. ) The strikes of the bell which mark the Time; or the Time so designated
Cock - Cocks and hens were probably unknown in Palestine until from two to three centuries before Christ’s Time. The ‘ cock-crowing ’ was the name of the 3rd watch of the night, just before the dawn, in the Time of our Lord. During this Time the cocks crow at irregular intervals
Month - A space or period of Time constituting a division of the year. Month originally signified the Time of one revolution of the moon, a lunation, or the period from one change or conjunction of the moon with the sun to another, a period of 27 days, 7 hours, 43 minutes and 5 seconds. But we also apply the term to the space of Time in which the sun passes through one sign, or a twelfth part of the zodiac
Hour - Such a mode of dividing Time was not originally employed among the Hebrews. In our Lord's Time, the day, that is, the space between sunrise and sunset, was commonly distributed into twelve hours, John 11:9; these, therefore, varied in length according to the season of the year. In Acts 23:23 the hours of the night were reckoned from sunset; consequently the Time named would nearly correspond with our 9 p
Annas - He is called high priest in conjunction with Caiaphas, when John the Baptist entered upon the exercise of his mission; though Calmet thinks that at that Time he did not, strictly speaking, possess or officiate in that character, Luke 3:2 . On the contrary, Macknight and some others are of opinion, that at this Time Caiaphas was only the deputy of Annas. This was an instance of good fortune which, till that Time, had happened to no person
Onesimus - Paul was there in prison the first Time. A little Time after, he sent him back to Rome to St. And we see that after this Onesimus was employed to carry such epistles as the Apostle wrote at that Time
Yet - At this Time so soon. Is it Time to go? Not yet. It is prefixed to words denoting extension of Time or continuance
Caesare'a - In Strabo's Time there was on this point of the coast merely a town called "Strato's Tower," with a landing-place, whereas in the Time of Tacitus Caesarea is spoken of as being the head of Judea. Caesarea continued to be a city of some importance even in the Time of the Crusades, and the name still lingers on the site (Kaisariyeh ), which is a complete desolation, many of the building-stones having been carried to other towns
Gemariah -
The son of Shaphan, and one of the Levites of the temple in the Time of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:10 ; 2 Kings 22:12 ). ...
...
The son of Hilkiah, who accompanied Shaphan with the tribute-money from Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar, and was the bearer at the same Time of a letter from Jeremiah to the Jewish captives at Babylon (Jeremiah 29:3,4 )
Dragon Well - A Jerusalem landmark in the Time of Nehemiah which can no longer be identified with certainty (Nehemiah 2:13 ). The Dragon Well has been identified with the Gihon spring, the main water source during the Time of Hezekiah, the Siloam pool which was fed by the Gihon, the En-rogel spring located 210 meters south of the confluence of the Hinnom and Kidron valleys, or with a spring along the east side of the Tyropoeon Valley which has since dried up
Next - Nearest in Time as the next day or hour the next day before or after Easter. At the Time or turn nearest or immediately succeeding
Moment - The sense of an instant of Time is from falling or rushing, which accords well with that of meet. The most minute and indivisible part of Time an instant
Uckewallists - A sect which derived its denomination from Uke-Wallies, a native of Friesland, who published his sentiments in 1637. His argument was this, that the period of Time which extended from the birth of Christ to the descent of the Holy Ghost was a Time of deep ignorance, during which the Jews were destitute of divine light; and that, of consequence, the sins and enormities which were committed during this interval were in a great measure excusable, and could not merit the severest displays of the divine justice
Ethelhard - He was elected to the see at a Time when Offa, King of the Mercians, was attempting to weaken Canterbury's influence and had succeeded in securing the pallium for the incumbent of the See of Lichfield. Ethelhard encountered many difficulties, being for a Time obliged to flee from his see, but when Cenwulf succeeded in Mercia, they worked together for the restoration of the rights of Canterbury, the dispute being ended by Ethelhard's visit to Rome in 801
Pul - He came into the land of Israel in the Time of Manahem, king of the ten tribes, 2 Kings 15:19 , &c, and invaded the kingdom on the other side of Jordan. This is the first Time that we find any mention made of the kingdom of Assyria since the days of Nimrod; and Pul is the first monarch of that nation who invaded Israel, and began their transportation out of their own country
Legion - The number of men in it differed at various Times. Originally a legion consisted of about 3000; but in the Time of Augustus it contained about 6000: there were also cavalry attached, to the amount of one-tenth of the infantry. The word legion came in the course of Time to express indefinitely a large number; so it is used in Matthew 26:53; Mark 5:9; Mark 5:15; Luke 8:30; and so we frequently now use it
Goshen - The descendants of Jacob lived there for about four hundred years, and during that Time they multiplied enormously. Goshen was largely protected from the plagues that fell on other parts of Egypt during the Time of Moses’ conflict with Pharaoh (Exodus 8:22; Exodus 9:26)
Altar Protector - (altar-cover, vespebale, or stragulum) A cover of cloth, baize, or velvet, of any color, though usually green or red, used on the altar outside the Time of sacred functions, to prevent staining or soiling of the altar-cloth
Aztec - ) Of or relating to one of the early races in Mexico that inhabited the great plateau of that country at the Time of the Spanish conquest in 1519
Advanced - ) Far on in life or Time
Altar Cover - (altar-cover, vespebale, or stragulum) A cover of cloth, baize, or velvet, of any color, though usually green or red, used on the altar outside the Time of sacred functions, to prevent staining or soiling of the altar-cloth
Old Time - ) Moses had been proclaimed 'from old Time' in the synagogues
Emma - ) A bud spore; one of the small spores or buds in the reproduction of certain Protozoa, which separate one at a Time from the parent cell
Pre - A prefix denoting priority (of Time, place, or rank); as, precede, to go before; precursor, a forerunner; prefix, to fix or place before; preeminent eminent before or above others. Pre- is sometimes used intensively, as in prepotent, very potent
Stragulum - (altar-cover, vespebale, or stragulum) A cover of cloth, baize, or velvet, of any color, though usually green or red, used on the altar outside the Time of sacred functions, to prevent staining or soiling of the altar-cloth
Vespebale - (altar-cover, vespebale, or stragulum) A cover of cloth, baize, or velvet, of any color, though usually green or red, used on the altar outside the Time of sacred functions, to prevent staining or soiling of the altar-cloth
Ephron - A Hittite, dwelling at Hebron in the Time of Abraham, Genesis 23:1 - 20
o'Ded - ) ...
A prophet of Jehovah in Samaria, at the Time of Pekah's invasion of Judah
Ever, Everlasting - ‛Ôlâm (עֹלָם, Strong's #5769), “eternity; remotest Time; perpetuity. It appears about 440 Times in biblical Hebrew and in all periods. 3:11 we read that God had bound man to Time and given him the capacity to live “above Time” (i. , to remember yesterday, plan for tomorrow, and consider abstract principles); yet He has not given him divine knowledge: “He hath made every thing beautiful in his Time: also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end. ”...
Second, the word signifies “remotest Time” or “remote Time. 16:36, God is described as blessed “from everlasting to everlasting” (KJV, “for ever and ever”), or from the most distant past Time to the most distant future Time. In other passages, the word means “from (in) olden Times”: “… Mighty men which were of old, men of renown” ( Time”: “I have long Time holden my peace; I have been still, and refrained myself. …” This word may include all the Time between the ancient beginning and the present: “The prophets that have been before me and before thee of old prophesied …” ( Times. This construction then sets forth an extension into the indefinite future, beginning from the Time of the speaker
Cycle - ) An orderly list for a given Time; a calendar. ) An age; a long period of Time. ) An interval of Time in which a certain succession of events or phenomena is completed, and then returns again and again, uniformly and continually in the same order; a periodical space of Time marked by the recurrence of something peculiar; as, the cycle of the seasons, or of the year
Lectures, Morning - The occasion of these lectures seems to be this: During the troublesome Time of Charles I. most of the citizens having some near relation or friend in the army of the earl of Essex, so many bills were sent up to the pulpit every Lord's Day for their preservation, that the minister had neither Time to read them, nor to recommend their cases to God in prayer; it was, therefore, agreed by some London divines to separate an hour for this purpose every morning, one half to be spent in prayer, and the other in a suitable exhortation to the people. It appears that these lectures were held every morning for one month only; and from the preface to the volume, dated 1689, the Time was afterwards contracted to a fortnight. It was kept up long afterwards at several places in the summer, a week at each place; but latterly the Time was exchanged for the evening
Benbadad - was either son or grandson of Rezon, and in his Time Damascus was supreme in Syria. From 1 Kings 20:34 it would appear that he continued to make war upon Israel in Omri's Time, and forced him to make "streets" in Samaria for Syrian residents. Some Time after the death of Ahab, Benhadad renewed the war with Israel, attacked Samaria a second Time, and pressed the siege so closely that there was a Terrible famine in the city
Bena'Iah - (1 Chronicles 27:14 ) ...
A Levite in the Time of David, who "played with a psaltry on Alamoth. " (1 Chronicles 15:18,20 ; 16:5 ) ...
A priest in the Time of David, appointed to blow the trumpet before the ark. (2 Chronicles 20:14 ) ...
A Levite in the Time of Hezekiah. (1 Chronicles 4:36 ) ...
Four laymen in the Time of Ezra who had taken strange wives
Courant - ) A piece of music in triple Time; also, a lively dance; a coranto
Mite - A coin of Palestine in the Time of our Lord
Dower - A widow's life portion, granted by law, in the estate of her deceased husband, usually one-third interest in all the real estate which he possessed at any Time during their married life; the term is sometimes erroneously confounded with dowry
Konversations-Lexikon - An encyclopedia of general knowledge published by Karl Herder (Freiburg, 1853-1857) for the purpose of making the Catholic German public independent of anti-Catholic publications of the same nature whose arbitrary and incorrect statements at the Time went practically unchallenged
Kyrgyzstan, Apostolic Administration of - Founded as the Mission "Sui Iuris" of Kyrgyzstan on December 22, 1997; at the Time there were almost no Catholics at all in the country
Paradise - ) It came in course of Time to be used as a name for the world of happiness and rest hereafter (Luke 23:43 ; 2 co 12:4 ; Revelation 2:7 )
Drown - Drowning was a mode of capital punishment in use among the Syrians, and was known to the Jews in the Time of our Lord
Ahiezer - "
The chief of the tribe of Dan at the Time of the Exodus (Numbers 1:12 ; 2:25 ; 10:25 )
Ammishaddai - People of the Almighty, the father of Ahiezer, who was chief of the Danites at the Time of the Exodus (Numbers 1:12 ; 2:25 )
Rogelim - Tell Barsina lacks evidence of occupation in David's Time
Now Let the Earth With Joy Resound - Hymn for Vespers and Lauds for the Common of Apostles and Evangelists out of Paschal Time
Bonnet - A conical-shaped cap placed on the head of the priest at the Time of investiture
Chub - The name of a people in alliance with Egypt in the Time of Nebuchadnezzar
Continued - ) Having extension of Time, space, order of events, exertion of energy, etc
Eubulus - Paul at the Time of the second imprisonment ( 2 Timothy 4:21 )
Trefle - ) A species of Time; - so called from its resemblance in form to a trefoil
Demurrage - ) The detention of a vessel by the freighter beyond the Time allowed in her charter party for loading, unloading, or sailing
Hence - ) From this Time; in the future; as, a week hence
Episcopate - ) The Time of a bishop's rule
Dwell - ) To abide as a permanent resident, or for a Time; to live in a place; to reside
Ahohite - In Time of David and Solomon military figures of this clan or place became military leaders
Lamentations - the Book of: The book of Tanach authored by Jeremiah, lamenting the destruction of the Holy Temple, the suffering the Jews experienced at that Time, and the ensuing exile
Exsultet Orbis Gaudiis - Hymn for Vespers and Lauds for the Common of Apostles and Evangelists out of Paschal Time
Ahi-e'Zer - ...
The Benjamite chief of a body of archers in the Time of David
Lunation - ) The period of a synodic revolution of the moon, or the Time from one new moon to the next; varying in length, at different Times, from about 29/ to 29/ days, the average length being 29 d
el'Nathan, - (Jeremiah 26:22 ; 36:12,25 ) ...
The name of three persons, apparently Levites, in the Time of Ezra
Mal'Chus - (king or kingdom ), the name of the servant of the high priest whose right ear Peter cut off at the Time of the Saviour's apprehension in the garden
Mna'Son - ( Acts 21:16 ) It is most likely that his residence at this Time was not Caesarea, but Jerusalem
Eliz'Aphan -
A Levite, son of Uzziel, chief of the house of the Kohathites at the Time of the census in the wilderness of Sinai
Day And Night - Time. By a species of synecdoche, ‘day’ is often employed generally as an equivalent for ‘time’; cf. ‘The day of salvation’ (2 Corinthians 6:2) is the Time when salvation is possible; ‘the day of visitation’ (1 Peter 2:12), the Time when God visits mankind with His grace, though some would make it equivalent to the day of judgment; ‘the evil day’ (Ephesians 6:13), the Time of Satan’s assaults. Sometimes ‘days’ is followed by the genitive either of a person or a thing. ‘The days of David’ (Acts 7:45) are the years of his reign; ‘the days of Noah’ (1 Peter 3:20), the Time when he was a preacher of righteousness to the disobedient world. With the genitive of a thing, ‘days’ refers to the Time of its occurrence, as ‘in the days of the taxing’ (Acts 5:37), ‘in the days of the voice’ (Revelation 10:7). ‘day’ is used as a mystical symbol for a certain period of Time. As to the length of that Time the interpreters of apocalyptic have widely differed. the corresponding 42 months of Revelation 13:5 and the ‘time and Times and half a Time,’ i
Shemiramoth - Temple Levitical musician in David's Time (1Chronicles 15:18,1 Chronicles 15:20 ; 1 Chronicles 16:5 )
Holy Ghost, Novena to the - One, in preparation for the feast of Pentecost, for the reconciliation of non-Catholics, is usually made publicly in all parochial churches; the second may be made at any other Time of the year
Mattena'i - ) ...
A priest, son of Joiarib, in the Time of Joiakim
Cruets - For the greater convenience of the Priest in celebratingthe Holy Communion, vessels of glass or precious metal, calledcruets, are placed on the credence to hold the wine and water,and from which at the proper Time in the service, the chalice issupplied
Kadmonites - Orientals, the name of a Canaanitish tribe which inhabited the north-eastern part of Palestine in the Time of Abraham (Genesis 15:19 )
Chronograph - ) An instrument for measuring or recording intervals of Time, upon a revolving drum or strip of paper moved by clockwork
Mahath - A Levite in the Time of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:13 )
Novena to the Holy Ghost - One, in preparation for the feast of Pentecost, for the reconciliation of non-Catholics, is usually made publicly in all parochial churches; the second may be made at any other Time of the year
un'ni -
One of the Levite doorkeepers in the Time of David
Sherebi'ah - (heat of Jehovah ) a Levite in the Time of Ezra
Shehecheyanu - blessing (�who has granted us life, sustained us, and enabled us to reach this season�) recited at the advent of festivals, at a fortuitous occasion, when eating new fruit, wearing new clothing, or performing a mitzvah for the first Time that season
Shemit'ic Languages, - The Jews in their earlier history spoke the Hebrew, but in Christ's Time they spoke the Aramaic, sometimes called the Syro-Chaldaic
Sanhedrin - The Sanhedrin was a council of 71 individuals, around the Time of Christ that was comprised of Pharisees and Sadducees who governed the Jewish nation while under the rule of Rome
Cosmosphere - ) An apparatus for showing the position of the earth, at any given Time, with respect to the fixed stars
Assignation - ) An appointment of Time and place for meeting or interview; - used chiefly of love interviews, and now commonly in a bad sense
Baca - ” A valley in Psalm 84:6 which reflects a poetic play on words describing a person forced to go through a Time of weeping who found God turned tears into a well, providing water
Hosah - A Levite and doorkeeper in the Time of David
Self-Contradiction - ) The act of contradicting one's self or itself; repugnancy in conceptions or in terms; a proposition consisting of two members, one of which contradicts the other; as, to be and not to be at the same Time is a self-contradiction
Eocene - ) Pertaining to the first in Time of the three subdivisions into which the Tertiary formation is divided by geologists, and alluding to the approximation in its life to that of the present era; as, Eocene deposits
Pluperfect - ) More than perfect; past perfect; - said of the tense which denotes that an action or event was completed at or before the Time of another past action or event
Stones, Precious - ) Josephus' nomenclature for the stones in the high priest's breast-plate is confirmed by the Vulgate of Jerome, at a Time when the breast-plate was still open for inspection in the Temple of Concord, situated in the Forum
c s - An abbreviation for Centimeter, Gram, Second. - applied to a system of units much employed in physical science, based upon the centimeter as the unit of length, the gram as the unit of weight or mass, and the second as the unit of Time
Barely - ) But just; without any excess; with nothing to spare ( of quantity, Time, etc
Idler - ) One who idles; one who spends his Time in inaction; a lazy person; a sluggard
Forepart - The part first in Time as the forepart of the day or week
Joiarib - Nehemiah 11:5 , one of ‘the chiefs of the province that dwelt in Jerusalem’ in Nehemiah’s Time
Elymas - He was for a Time smitten with blindness
Vintage - ) The act or Time of gathering the crop of grapes, or making the wine for a season
Temporize - ) To comply with the Time or occasion; to humor, or yield to, the current of opinion or circumstances; also, to trim, as between two parties
Nadir - ) The lowest point; the Time of greatest depression
a'Dria - In Paul's Time it included the whole sea between Greece and Italy, reaching south from Crete to Sicily
Abilene - It was governed by Lysanias in the Time of John the Baptist
Epaphras - He was for a Time an inmate of Paul's house of imprisonment at Rome
Bil'Gah -
A priest in the Time of David; the head of the fifteenth course for the temple service
Kad'Monites - (Orientals ) , The, a people named in ( Genesis 15:19 ) only; one of the nations who at that Time occupied the land (Canaan) promised to the descendants of Abram
Last - , Mark 9:35 ; (c) of Time, relating either to persons or things, e. 11); 2:8; 22:13; in eschatological phrases as follows: (a) "the last day," a comprehensive term including both the Time of the resurrection of the redeemed, John 6:39,40,44,54 ; 11:24 , and the ulterior Time of the judgment of the unregenerate, at the Great White Throne, John 12:48 ; (b) "the last days," Acts 2:17 , a period relative to the supernatural manifestation of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost and the resumption of the Divine interpositions in the affairs of the world at the end of the present age, before "the great and notable Day of the Lord," which will usher in the messianic kingdom; (c) in 2 Timothy 3:1 , "the last days" refers to the close of the present age of world conditions; (d) in James 5:3 , the phrase "in the last days" (RV) refers both to the period preceding the Roman overthrow of the city and the land in A. 70, and to the closing part of the age in consummating acts of gentile persecution including "the Time of Jacob's trouble" (cp. verses James 5:7,8 ); (e) in 1 Peter 1:5 , "the last Time" refers to the Time of the Lord's second advent; (f) in 1 John 2:18 , "the last hour" (RV) and, in Jude 1:18 , "the last Time" signify the present age previous to the Second Advent. ...
Notes: (1) In Hebrews 1:2 , RV, "at the end of these days" (AV, "in these last days"), the reference is to the close of the period of the testimony of the prophets under the Law, terminating with the presence of Christ and His redemptive sacrifice and its effects, the perfect tense "hath spoken" indicating the continued effects of the message embodied in the risen Christ; so in 1 Peter 1:20 , RV, "at the end of the Times" (AV, "in these last Times"). ...
Note: In Philippians 4:10 the particle pote, "sometime," used after ede, "now, already," to signify "now at length," is so rendered in the RV, AV, "(now) at the last
Legitimation - Illegitimacy is removed if the parents marry, provided they were entitled to marriage at the Time of the conception or birth or at some intermediate Time, and this removal extends to children already deceased, and to their descendants
Document - The beginning of written documents is at the end of the Time of the Judges, for the people at that Time were generally acquainted with the art of writing, reading, and were settled in prosperity
Meshullam -
One of the chief Gadites in Bashan in the Time of Jotham (1 Chronicles 5:13 ). ...
...
One of the leading Levites in the Time of (Ezra 8:16 )
Timothy, Second Epistle to - Was probably written a year or so after the first, and from Rome, where Paul was for a second Time a prisoner, and was sent to Timothy by the hands of Tychicus. He was anticipating that "the Time of his departure was at hand" (2 Timothy 4:6 ), and he exhorts his "son Timothy" to all diligence and steadfastness, and to patience under persecution (1:6-15), and to a faithful discharge of all the duties of his office (4:1-5), with all the solemnity of one who was about to appear before the Judge of quick and dead
Felix - (fee' lihx) The procurator of Judea at the Time Paul the apostle visited Jerusalem for the last Time and was arrested there (Acts 23:24 )
Current - ) General course; ordinary procedure; progressive and connected movement; as, the current of Time, of events, of opinion, etc. ) Now passing, as Time; as, the current month
Breath - ) Time to breathe; respite; pause. ) A single respiration, or the Time of making it; a single act; an instant
Night - That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the horizon, or the Time from sunset to sunrise. The Time after the close of life death
Forth - Forward onward in Time in advance as from that day forth from that Time forth
a'Mos - ( Amos 1:1 ; 7:14,15 ) He travelled from Judah into the northern kingdom of Israel or Ephraim, and there exercised his ministry, apparently not for any long Time. 808 for he lived in the reigns of Uzziah king of Judah and Jeroboam king of Israel; but his ministry probably took place at an earlier date, perhaps about the middle of Jeroboam's reign Nothing is known of the Time or manner of his death
id'do - (timely or lovely ). (1 Chronicles 6:21 ) ...
Son of Zechariah, ruler of the tribe of Manasseh east of Jordan in the Time of David. (Zechariah 1:1,7 ) ...
The chief of those who assembled at Casiphia at the Time of the second caravan from Babylon
Med'Eba - " At the Time of the conquest Medeba belonged to the Amorites, apparently one of the towns taken from Moab by them. In the Time of Ahaz Medeba was a sanctuary of Moab. (Isaiah 15:2 ) It has retained its name down, our own Times, and lies four miles southeast of Heshbon, on it rounded but rocky hill
Dial - The introduction by Ahaz of a device for measuring the Time may be regarded as a result of his intercourse with the Assyrians ( 2 Kings 16:10 ff. Time
an'Akim - Though the war-like appearance of the Anakim had struck the Israelites with terror in the Time of Moses, (Numbers 13:28 ; 9:2) they were nevertheless dispossessed by Joshua, (Joshua 11:21,22 ) and their chief city, Hebron, became the possession of Caleb. (Joshua 15:14 ; Judges 1:20 ) After this Time they vanish from history
Darkness - The darkness "over all the land," (Matthew 27:45 ) attending the crucifixion has been attributed to an eclipse, but was undoubtedly miraculous, as no eclipse of the sun could have taken place at that Time, the moon being at the full at the Time of the passover
Relay - ) A supply of anything arranged beforehand for affording relief from Time to Time, or at successive stages; provision for successive relief. ) To lay again; to lay a second Time; as, to relay a pavement
Order, Crosier - In a short Time the society spread to France, the Netherlands, Germany, and England. During the 16th century the houses in England were destroyed; at the Time of the Reformation all but two of the Dutch houses were despoiled; and during the French Revolution the order was expelled from France and Belgium. His successor retracted this edict (1840) and from that Time the order commenced to flourish again
Fathers, Crosier - In a short Time the society spread to France, the Netherlands, Germany, and England. During the 16th century the houses in England were destroyed; at the Time of the Reformation all but two of the Dutch houses were despoiled; and during the French Revolution the order was expelled from France and Belgium. His successor retracted this edict (1840) and from that Time the order commenced to flourish again
Precious, Preciousness - ...
5: βαρύτιμος (Strong's #927 — Adjective — barutimos — bar-oo'-tim-os ) "of great value, exceeding precious" (barus, "weighty," Time, value), is used in Matthew 26:7 . ...
6: ἰσότιμος (Strong's #2472 — Adjective — isotimos — ee-sot'-ee-mos ) "of equal value, held in equal honor" (isos, "equal," and Time), is used in 2 Peter 1:1 , "a like precious (faith)," RV (marg. ...
Note: In 1 Peter 2:7 , AV, the noun Time, is translated "precious" (RV, "preciousness")
Jehoiarib - The Talmud view is not favored by Nehemiah 10:2-8, which enumerates 21 courses, of Nehemiah's Time: Nehemiah 12:1-7; Nehemiah 12:19, also enumerates 22 courses of Zerubbabel's Time, among them Jehoiarib, of whose course Mattenai was chief in Jehoiakim's days. Hervey infers that Jehoiarib did return from Babylon, but later than Zerubbabel's Time, and that his name was added to the list subsequently
Menahem, - He and Shallum planned to seize the throne about the same Time ( 2 Kings 15:13 f. War raged for a brief Time with unusual ferocity, resulting in the defeat of Shallum. The assessment of sixty shekels each shows that there were sixty thousand proprietors in Israel at this Time
Idle - Affording leisure vacant not occupied as idle Time idle hours. ...
I'DLE, To lose or spend Time in inaction, or without being employed in business. ...
To idle away, in a transitive sense, to spend in idleness as, to idle away Time
Till - ) As far as; up to the place or degree that; especially, up to the Time that; that is, to the Time specified in the sentence or clause following; until. ) A deposit of clay, sand, and gravel, without lamination, formed in a glacier valley by means of the waters derived from the melting glaciers; - sometimes applied to alluvium of an upper river terrace, when not laminated, and appearing as if formed in the same manner. ) To; unto; up to; as far as; until; - now used only in respect to Time, but formerly, also, of place, degree, etc
Nethan'e-el -
The son of Zuar and prince of the tribe of Issachar at the Time of the exodus. ) ...
A priest of the family of Pashur, in the Time of Ezra, who married a foreign wife. ) ...
The representative of the priestly family of Jedaiah in the Time of Joiakim
Time - The conception of Time. -In all ages and among all peoples the idea of Time tends to be expressed in the figure of a continually and evenly running stream. Time comes into being (διαγενομένου, Acts 27:9, ‘spent,’ lit. ‘sufficient’ (ἱκανὸς χρόνος, Luke 8:27; Luke 23:8, Acts 8:11; ἡμέραι ἱκαναί, Acts 9:23; Acts 9:43; Acts 18:18; ἱκανῶν ἐτῶν, Romans 15:23) as applied in measuring Time is an expression of indefiniteness. The adequacy of the measure of Time for the maturing of a definite plan is given in the idea of ‘fullness. ’ Time accumulates as if in a reservoir and becomes sufficient for its end (πλήρωμα τοῦ χρόνου, Galatians 4:4; cf. Naturally the flow of Time involves succession and order as between first and last. But all Time future to any particular moment may be from the view of it at that moment ‘last. The period just preceding this consummation was especially designated ‘the last Times’ (ἐπʼ ἐσχάτου τῶν χρόνων, 1 Peter 1:21; ἐσχάτη ἡμέρα, John 6:39-40; John 11:24; ἔσχαται ἡμέραι, Acts 2:17, 2 Timothy 3:1, James 5:3; 2 Peter 3:3; ἐσχάτη ὥρα, 1 John 2:18). ...
The relativity of length of Time to the mind is indicated in the conception that to God’s mind human measures and standards of Time have no inherent reality (‘One day is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day,’ 2 Peter 3:8). The notion shows a trace of philosophical influence in the thinking which culminates in the apocalyptical conception of the transiency of Time and its contrast with eternity (‘There shall be Time no longer,’ Revelation 10:6). -Time from the point of view of its special content or relation to a definite event or events is specifically denoted by the term καιρός (generally, ‘definite Time’). The term is more nearly synonymous with ‘season’ when it designates a Time (the Time during the year) for the appearance of certain events ([2] τοῦ θερισμοῦ, Matthew 13:30; καιρὸς σύκων, Mark 11:13 : cf. More generally καιρός is any division of Time which differs from all others by some characteristic, as, for instance, that it ought to be observed as more sacred (μῆνας καὶ καιρούς, Galatians 4:10); to be watched against because of the evil influences which it brings (καιροὶ χαλεποί, 2 Timothy 3:1); chosen by God for special revelation of His word (Luke 3:1-2,); a period when certain special events develop, distinguished by the moral character of the Gentiles (καιροὶ ἐθνῶν, Luke 21:24); events have their own Time (Luke 1:20), persons may have their own Time for the full display of their peculiar character or the accomplishment of their work (e. the Time of Jesus, ὁ καιρὸς ὁ ἐμός, ὁ καιρὸς ὁ ὑμέτερος, John 7:6; John 7:8). The term καιρός thus differs from χρόνος in designating ‘opportune’ or ‘fit’ Time, a Time associated with, and therefore distinguished by, some special event or feature. In the phrase πεπλήρωται ὁ καιρός (Mark 1:15) the more appropriate term would have been χρόνος, but since the intention of the writer is to show not the lapse of mere Time, but the appearance of a new era, the word used expresses the idea more accurately. -The largest measure of Time known is the ‘age’ (αἰών, ‘aeon’). It so far transcends thought that it impresses the mind with the mystery of the whole notion of Time. Hence the combination ‘eternal Times’ (Romans 16:25) stretching back into the inconceivably remote past (practically the equivalent of the modern philosophical ‘species of eternity’). In the first the emphasis is laid on the mysterious aspect of Time without measure and apart from all known conditions. The series taken together constitutes all Time (‘All the ages,’ Revised Version margin, εἰς πάντας τοὺς αἰῶνας, Judges 1:25). On one side it helped to define the older prophetic ‘latter days’ (as a distinct period when ideal conditions would prevail); at the same Time it gave a background to the doctrine of the ‘Day of Jehovah. In the Apocrypha, which may be regarded as the fair index of usage at the Time, the Seleucid Era is frequently referred to. Intercalation was common all over the world, but the method of intercalating was different at different Times, and probably not constant anywhere for any consecutive period of Time. The month accordingly began with the appearance of the moon in its first phase, and ended with its reappearance in the same phase the next Time. Within the New Testament months are mentioned generally, not with precise reference to their relations to one another in the calendar, but as an indication and a measure of Time in the terms of the fraction of a year (Luke 1:24; Luke 1:36; Luke 1:56). The predominance at different Times of different influences (Roman, Macedonian, Egyptian, older Jewish) brought into use different names. -A popular and practically useful method of reckoning Time within the year is that which relates events to well-known religious festivals. But in the allusion to the Feast of Dedication (ἐνκαίνια, John 10:22) the intention perhaps was not so much to give the exact Time as to account for Jesus’ walking ‘in the temple in Solomon’s porch. In John 5:1 the purpose of the author would be defeated if he had meant to fix the Time of the action (cf. -Though peculiar to the Jewish people, the constitution of a unit of Time by grouping together seven days was retained in the usage of the Christian Church. Paul’s custom to use the Sabbath day as the Time for preaching (Acts 18:4), correctly translated ‘three Sabbath days. Sometimes it was designated simply as the ‘eve of the Sabbath’ (προσάββατον, Judith 8:6, Mark 15:42); but in the NT oftener as the ‘Preparation [6]’ [παρασκευή, Matthew 27:62, Mark 15:42, Luke 23:54, John 19:14; John 19:42). This it became later as it was taken up by Christian usage, and persists to the present Time as the proper name of Friday in modern Greek. Since that custom prevails to the present Time among the Jews it is not likely that it was ever superseded among them. Of the night-day unit the day is the Time for work (John 11:9) and the night is divided into four military watches of three hours each (Matthew 14:25; Matthew 24:43, Mark 6:48, Luke 12:38)
Merari - , under David (1 Chronicles 15:1-6; 1 Chronicles 23:5-6; 1 Chronicles 23:21-23; 1 Chronicles 26:10; 1 Chronicles 26:19); in Nehemiah's Time also (Nehemiah 11:15-16). Hervey (Smith's Dictionary) supposes Jeduthun the patronymic title of the house, Ethan the head in David's Time, and that Jeduthnn was brother of an ancestor of Ethan before Hashabiah (1 Chronicles 6:45; 1 Chronicles 25:3; 1 Chronicles 25:19) and son of Hilkiah or Amaziah. Thus, the "sons of Ethan" are distinct from "sons of Jeduthun," and the difficulty is explained how in David's Time there could be sons of "sons of Jeduthun" above 30 years of age for they filled offices (1 Chronicles 26:10; 1 Chronicles 16:38), at the same Time that Jeduthun is said to be" chief of the singers
Fort, Fortification - From this Time until the Roman Period (the Time of Christ), cities were almost always surrounded by walls. In the Time of Solomon, however, well-dressed ashlars (carefully trimmed limestone blocks) began to be used in the construction of unique fortification systems. Similar, but smaller four-chambered gates were used later in the Time of Ahab and Jeroboam II, attached to offsets-insets solid walls. A glacis was sometimes built against the outside wall for added protection against the battering ram. A glacis was a sloping embankment of beaten earth, clay, gravel and stones, sometimes covered with plaster
Seventy Weeks - The Time spoken of in Daniel 9:24-27 , usually understood as seventy weeks of years or 490 years. The 49 years are associated with rebuilding Jerusalem in “times of trouble” (Daniel 9:25 NIV). The 434 years relate to the intervening Time before a cutting off of the Anointed One ( Daniel 9:26 ). At that Time, sacrifices under the Old Covenant ceased. ...
The dispensational approach makes the 70 weeks a prophetic framework for end Time events, rather than a prophecy of what took place in the work of Christ at His first coming
Hour (Figurative) - The present Time of trial is like the dark and gloomy night, but ‘salvation’ draws nigh; already, therefore, it is ‘the hour to awake out of sleep. ), and may be defined as the fixed Time, in distinction from καιρός, the fit Time (‘the boast of heraldry, the pomp of power … await alike th’ inevitable hour’). This is defined (Revelation 13:14-17) as a Time of seduction to the worship of the Beast (the Imperial cult); but in 1 John 2:18 the sign of this ‘last hour’ is already seen in the rise of Antichrist, yea, of ‘many antichrists,’ i
Age - That part of the duration of a being, which is between its beginning and any given Time as, what is the present age of a man, or of the earth? Jesus began to be about thirty years of age. The Time of life for conceiving children, or perhaps the usual Time of such an event. A particular period of Time, as distinguished from others as, the golden age, the age of iron, the age of heroes or of chivalry
Lodge - To set, lay or deposit for keeping or preservation, for a longer or shorter Time. The word usually denotes a short residence, but for no definite Time. The memory can lodge a greater store of images, than the senses can present at one Time. To rest or dwell for a Time, as for a night, a week, a month
Undivided Church - What it aimed to do wasto retain its ancient heritage, but at the same Time to free theold Church from certain grave abuses, to purify the old religionfrom many harmful superstitions which had sprung up during theMiddle Ages. " In all the work ofReformation, covering a long period of Time, the appeal wasconstantly made to the primitive standards of the Undivided Church;to Holy Scripture as interpreted by the teaching and customs of thePrimitive Church, the writings of the Fathers and the decisionsof the General Councils. The reasonableness of this appeal will appearwhen we consider that it is this early age of Christianity, the agenearest to the Time of the Apostles, which best preserved thepersonal instructions of the Twelve, which was most likely to be inaccord with the Will of our Lord and which maintained the Church'sunity unimpaired. It was during this Time, because the Church wasone and undivided, that the Canon of Scripture was established,that it was possible to hold the Ecumenical Councils which defined"the Faith once delivered to the Saints," and gave us the Creeds asthe "Rule of Faith
Imnah - A Levite in the Time of King Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:14 )
Kirk - It was the name applied to the Church of Scotland at the Time of the Western Assembly and is also used to distinguish the Established Church of Scotland from the Catholic, Anglican, and Reformed churches
Zabdiel - A prominent official in Nehemiah’s Time ( Nehemiah 11:14 )
Mount of Corruption - , "mount of offence"), the name given to a part of the Mount of Olives, so called because idol temples were there erected in the Time of Solomon, temples to the Zidonian Ashtoreth and to the "abominations" of Moab and Ammon
Caesar - The name of all the Roman emperors from the Time of Julius Caesar to the fall of the Roman empire
Batch - ) The quantity of bread baked at one Time
Unni - Levitical harpist in David's Time (1Chronicles 15:18,1 Chronicles 15:20 )
Lort Monday - First Monday after the feast of the Epiphany, upon which alms were formerly offered to God for the good of the Church and to obtain a blessing on the land which was ploughed at that Time
Postexilic - Time in Israel's history between the return from Exile in Babylon in 538 B
Higgaion - The Selah (a pause in the music) follows to give Time for meditation
Sin - Those who give themselves up to the service of sin, enter the palace of pleasure by wide portals of marble, which conceal the low wicket behind which leads into the fields, where they are in a short Time sent to feed swine
Ay - ) Always; ever; continually; for an indefinite Time
Continuous - ) Without break, cessation, or interruption; without intervening space or Time; uninterrupted; unbroken; continual; unceasing; constant; continued; protracted; extended; as, a continuous line of railroad; a continuous current of electricity
Conaniah - A Levite who had charge of the tithes and offerings in the Time of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:12-13 )
Punctual - ) Appearing or done at, or adhering exactly to, a regular or an appointed Time; precise; prompt; as, a punctual man; a punctual payment
Expiring - ) Pertaining to, or uttered at, the Time of dying; as, expiring words; expiring groans
Peaceful - ) Possessing or enjoying peace; not disturbed by war, tumult, agitation, anxiety, or commotion; quiet; tranquil; as, a peaceful Time; a peaceful country; a peaceful end
Semidiurnal - ) Pertaining to, or traversed in, six hours, or in half the Time between the rising and setting of a heavenly body; as, a semidiurnal arc
Executory - ) Designed to be executed or carried into effect in Time to come, or to take effect on a future contingency; as, an executory devise, reminder, or estate; an executory contract
Employment - ) That which engages or occupies; that which consumes Time or attention; office or post of business; service; as, agricultural employments; mechanical employments; public employments; in the employment of government
Timer - ) A Timekeeper; especially, a watch by which small intervals of Time can be measured; a kind of stop watch
Trice - ) A very short Time; an instant; a moment; - now used only in the phrase in a trice
Ananiah - Village where tribe of Benjamin dwelt in Time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:32 )
Haggai - The prophet, who lived after the Babylonish captivity, and at the Time of building the second temple
Matin - ) Time of morning service; the first canonical hour in the Roman Catholic Church
Ay - ) Always; ever; continually; for an indefinite Time
Thenceforth - From that Time
Shamgar - Son of Anath, the third judge of Israel, after Ehud and shortly before Barak, in a Time of great insecurity and distress, Judges 3:31 5:6
he'Zir -
A priest in the Time of David, leader of the seventeenth monthly course in the service
Jehozadak - Jehovah-justified, the son of the high priest Seraiah at the Time of the Babylonian exile (1 Chronicles 6:14,15 )
Cle'Ophas, - ( John 19:25 ) He was probably dead before Jesus' ministry began, for his wife and children constantly appear with Joseph's family in the Time of our Lord's ministry
e'li, e'li, Lama Sabachthani - , is the Syro-Chaldaic (the common language in use by the Jews in the Time of Christ) of the first words of the twenty-second Psalm; they mean "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?"
General Chronology - (Greek: chronos, Time) The science of Time measurement. Mathematical chronology determines units to be employed in measuring Time; historical chronology fixes in the general course of Time the position of any particular occurrence or its date. The first requisite is the era, a fixed point of Time. The Julian system of Time measurement was inaccurate and by the 16th century was 10 days in arrear
Cetacea - Like ordinary mammals they breathe by means of lungs, and bring forth living young which they suckle for some Time
Argob - This was very fertile, and contained at one Time sixty walled towns, which were taken by Jair the son of Manasseh, and called after him, Deuteronomy 1:4,13,14 1 Kings 4:13
Oxford, England - Prior to that Time it formed part of the diocese of Lincoln, and upon the restoration of the Catholic hierarchy, was included in the diocese of Birmingham
Armour-Bearer - An officer selected by kings and generals because of his bravery, not only to bear their armour, but also to stand by them in the Time of danger
Pethahiah -
The chief of one of the priestly courses (the nineteenth) in the Time of David (1 Chronicles 24:16 )
Adria - (Acts 27:27 ; RSV, "the sea of Adria"), the Adriatic Sea, including in Paul's Time the whole of the Mediterranean lying between Crete and Sicily
Gibeah-Haaraloth - , those who were under twenty years old at the Time of the sentence at Kadesh, had already been circumcised
Enos - The period following his birth is identified as the Time when people began to worship Yahweh
Shimri - Levite in Time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:13 )
Bout - ) As much of an action as is performed at one Time; a going and returning, as of workmen in reaping, mowing, etc
Assist - ) To give support to in some undertaking or effort, or in Time of distress; to help; to aid; to succor
Free Silver - , the free coinage of silver at a fixed ratio with gold, as at the ratio of 16 to 1, which ratio for some Time represented nearly or exactly the ratio of the market values of gold and silver respectively
Parhelion - ) A mock sun appearing in the form of a bright light, sometimes near the sun, and tinged with colors like the rainbow, and sometimes opposite to the sun. Often several mock suns appear at the same Time
Cock - Mentioned only in connection with the denial of Peter, Matthew 26:34,74,75 ; and with the 'cock crowing,' a division of Time at which the Lord may come, Mark 13:35 : this corresponds to the third watch of the night, and would be about 3 o'clock, A
Hoary - ) remote in Time past; as, hoary antiquity
Apprenticeship - ) The Time an apprentice is serving (sometimes seven years, as from the age of fourteen to twenty-one)
Urus - It appears to have still existed in the Time of Julius Caesar
Recast - ) To compute, or cast up, a second Time
Access - ...
(2) In canon law, a right at some future Time to a certain benefice which is in abeyance through lack of age or other condition
Jebus - This people were very warlike, and held Jerusalem till David's Time, Joshua 15:65; 2 Samuel 5:6 , &c
Outgo - 1: προέρχομαι (Strong's #4281 — Verb — proerchomai — pro-er'-khom-ahee ) "to go forward, go in advance, outgo," is used of Time in Mark 6:33 , "outwent," of the people who in their eagerness reached a spot earlier than Christ and His disciples
Reship - ) To ship again; to put on board of a vessel a second Time; to send on a second voyage; as, to reship bonded merchandise
Pahath-Moab - ” A family of returned Exiles likely descended from the Hebrew governor of Moab in the Time of David (2 Samuel 8:2 ; Ezra 2:6 ; Ezra 8:4 ; Ezra 10:30 ; Nehemiah 7:11 ; Nehemiah 10:14 )
Rehum - An officer of the king of Persia, in Samaria, during the rebuilding of the temple; by an insidious letter to the king he procured an edict for the discontinuance of this work for a Time, probably two years or more preceding 520 B
ha'Did - ( Ezra 2:33 ; Nehemiah 7:37 ; 11:34 ) In the Time of Eusebius a town called Aditha or Adatha existed to the east of Diospolis (Lydda)
e'Vil-Mero'Dach - He reigned but a short Time, having ascended the throne on the death of Nebuchadnezzar in B
Jasho'be-am - His distinguishing exploit was that he slew 300 (or 800,) (2 Samuel 23:8 ) men at one Time
el'Asah -
A priest in the Time of Ezra who had married a Gentile wife
Congregation - ” It occurs 149 Times in the Old Testament, most frequently in the Book of Numbers. ...
The most frequent reference is to the “congregation of Israel” (9 Times), “the congregation of the sons of Israel” (26 Times), “the congregation” (24 Times), or “all of the congregation” (30 Times). ” The noun mô‛êd appears in the Old Testament 223 Times, of which 160 Times are in the Pentateuch. The historical books are next in the frequency of usage (27 Times). ...
The word mô‛êd keeps its basic meaning of “appointed,” but varies as to what is agreed upon or appointed according to the context: the Time, the place, or the meeting itself. The usage of the verb in Amos 3:3 is illuminating: “Can two walk together, except they be agreed?” Whether they have agreed on a Time or a place of meeting, or on the meeting itself, is ambiguous. First, the festivals came to be known as the “appointed Times” or the set feasts. ...
In both meanings of mô‛êd—“fixed Time” and “fixed place”—a common denominator is the “meeting” of two or more parties at a certain place and Time—hence the usage of mô‛êd as “meeting. ” However, in view of the similarity in meaning between “appointed place” or “appointed Time” and “meeting,” translators have a real difficulty in giving a proper translation in each context. 1:15) could be read: “He has called an appointed Time against me” (NASB) or “He summoned an army against me” (NIV). The phrase occurs 139 Times— mainly in Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers, rarely in Deuteronomy. The fact that the tent was called the “tent of meeting” signifies that Israel’s God was among His people and that He was to be approached at a certain Time and place that were “fixed” (ya’ad) in the Pentateuch. ...
Of the three meanings, the appointed “time” is most basic. ” The “meeting” itself is generally associated with “time” or “place. ”...
The Septuagint has the following translations of mô‛êd: kairos (timew), eortel (“feast; festival”). The English translators give these senses: “congregation” (KJV, RSV, NASB, NIV); “appointed Time” (NASB); “appointed feast” (RSV, NASB); “set Time” (RSV, NASB, NIV)
Between - ) In intermediate relation to, in respect to Time, quantity, or degree; as, between nine and ten o'clock. ) Intermediate Time or space; interval
Mount Carmel - There was an altar on it long before the prophet Elias's Time, and he, and Eliseus after him, resided there. The Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel preserves the tradition that from the days of Elias and Eliseus there had always been a succession of hermits on Carmel, and that in the Time of the Crusades they had organized themselves like the Western religious orders
Hilkiah - He was a Levite who lived before the Time of David the king. Levite and Temple servant who lived during the Time of David (1 Chronicles 26:11 )
Carmel, Mount - There was an altar on it long before the prophet Elias's Time, and he, and Eliseus after him, resided there. The Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel preserves the tradition that from the days of Elias and Eliseus there had always been a succession of hermits on Carmel, and that in the Time of the Crusades they had organized themselves like the Western religious orders
Moloch - He was the consuming and destroying and also at the same Time the purifying fire. Solomon (1 Kings 11:7 ) erected a high place for this idol on the Mount of Olives, and from that Time till the days of Josiah his worship continued (2 Kings 23:10,13 )
Sun - The sun was darkened at the Time of Jesus’ crucifixion, and will be darkened again at the Time of his return to judge the world (Matthew 27:45; Mark 13:24-27)
Handicap - ) A race, for horses or men, or any contest of agility, strength, or skill, in which there is an allowance of Time, distance, weight, or other advantage, to equalize the chances of the competitors. ) An allowance of a certain amount of Time or distance in starting, granted in a race to the competitor possessing inferior advantages; or an additional weight or other hindrance imposed upon the one possessing superior advantages, in order to equalize, as much as possible, the chances of success; as, the handicap was five seconds, or ten pounds, and the like
Nethanel - A priest in the Time of David ( 1 Chronicles 15:24 ). A priest in Time of Joiakim ( Nehemiah 12:21 )
Crotchet - ) A Time note, with a stem, having one fourth the value of a semibreve, one half that of a minim, and twice that of a quaver; a quarter note. ) To play music in measured Time
Breath - Respite pause Time to breathe as,let me take breath give me some breath. An instant the Time of a single respiration a single act
Asaph - A leader of the choir in David's Time, and once called a 'seer. A Korhite, whose posterity were porters in the tabernacle in the Time of David
Goiim - Possibly in Genesis 14:1 the reference may be to the Umman-manda , or ‘hordes’ of northern peoples, who from Time to Time invaded Assyria (so Sayce)
Kindle - ...
James 3:5 (b) This represents the beginning of a great Time of trouble caused by some little word or thoughtless expression which separates friends and begins a Time of strife between hearts
Millennium - In the study of end Time doctrines (eschatology) the millennium is the period of Time of Christ's rulership
Calah - This city was at one Time the capital of the empire, and was the residence of Sardanapalus and his successors down to the Time of Sargon, who built a new capital, the modern Khorsabad
Amariah - Chief priest in the Time of Jehoshaphat king of Judah. One of the Levites in the Time of Hezekiah
Loammi - Because of the sin of Israel they for a Time are ostensibly not God's people. " This will be when God's set Time arrives for bringing them again into blessing
Last Time or Days - There were many antichrists, whereby it was known that the last Time (lit. Apostasy from apostolic doctrine was a sign of the last Time (it was not exactly the 'last days,' as in 2Timothy). The 'last days' of Hebrews 1:2 and 'last Times' of 1 Peter 1:20 are changed by Editors of the Greek Testament to the 'end of these days;' these passages refer to the end of the period of the law when the Messiah appeared
Just - ) Precisely; exactly; - in place, Time, or degree; neither more nor less than is stated. ) Barely; merely; scarcely; only; by a very small space or Time; as, he just missed the train; just too late
Achish - The first Time he was in some danger, from being recognized as one who had distinguished himself against the Philistines; he therefore feigned madness. The second Time Achish treated David kindly, gave him Ziklag, and took him to the campaign against Saul, but was persuaded by his officers to send him home again
Organs - Musical instruments have been used in the worship of Godfrom the Time when, after the passage of the Red Sea, Moses andMiriam sang their song of praise accompanied by timbrels. Soon afterCharlemagne's Time organs became common
Elam - The region is also named Susiana or Susis from its capital Susa, called Shushah in Daniel 8:2, where Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1:1) waited on king Artaxerxes, and where Ahasuerus (Xerxes) held his court in Esther's (Esther 1:2; Esther 2:5) Time. From Darius Hystaspes' Time to Alexander the Great it was the Persian king's court residence. Chedorlaomer who invaded Palestine in Abraham's Time (Genesis 14) was king of Elam, and then lord paramount over Amraphel, king of Shinar (Babylonia) on its confines. The two races remained separate to the Time Of Strabo (compare Ezra 4:9). Occasionally, for a Time, it maintained its complete independence. It was a province of Babylonia from Nebuchadnezzar's Time (Daniel 8:2). A Korhite Levite, one of the sons of Asaph in David's Time (1 Chronicles 26:3)
Pharaoh - Pharaoh, Genesis 12:15 , in the Time of Abraham, B. ...
Very probably there was another Pharaoh reigning at the Time when Moses fled into Midian, and who died before Moses at the age of eighty returned from Midian into Egypt, Exodus 2:11-23 4:19 Acts 7:23 . Pharaoh, in the Time of David, 1 Kings 11:18-22 ; B. From this Time onward the proper name of the Egyptian kings are mentioned in Scripture. Zerah, king of Egypt and Ethiopia in the Time of Asa, B. Tirhakah, king of Ethiopia and Egypt, in the Time of Hezekiah, B. Pharaoh Necho, in the Time of Josiah, B
Wedding Guests, Bridegroom And the - The parable was provoked by the question of the disciples of John the Baptist and some of the scribes and Pharisees asking "Why do we and the Pharisees fast often, but thy disciples do not fast?" Jesus replies in a similitude, asking if the companions of the bridal-chamber, whose special task it was to provide for the merrymaking at the feast, could be expected at the same Time to mourn and fast. The disciples of the Baptist are reminded that their master had referred to Christ as the Bridegroom, and all the questioners are taught that the Time of the visible presence of Jesus among His disciples should be for them a Time of rejoicing and not of mourning and fasting; but when His visible presence is withdrawn, then they shall lament and be made sorrowful and then fasting and mourning shall be consistently their portion. Some explain it tropologically: as long as the Spouse is with us we are not able to mourn; but when by sin He departs then is the Time for tears and fasting. This parable does stand against the spirit of the Pharisees who esteemed too highly external works and it shows to all that a new Time had come and another spirit reigned in the Kingdom
Fast - To abstain from food, beyond the usual Time to omit to take the usual meals, for a Time as, to fast a day or a week. Abstinence from food properly a total abstinence, but it is used also for an abstinence from particular kinds of food, for a certain Time. The Time of fasting, whether a day, week or longer Time
Long - ) Occurring or coming after an extended interval; distant in Time; far away. ) Drawn out or extended in Time; continued through a considerable tine, or to a great length; as, a long series of events; a long debate; a long drama; a long history; a long book. ) To a great extent in Time; during a long Time. ) Through an extent of Time, more or less; - only in question; as, how long will you be gone?...
(15):...
(prep
Caisson Disease - A disease frequently induced by remaining for some Time in an atmosphere of high pressure, as in caissons, diving bells, etc
Smallpox - The cutaneous eruption is at first a collection of papules which become vesicles (first flat, subsequently umbilicated) and then pustules, and finally thick crusts which slough after a certain Time, often leaving a pit, or scar
Cud - ) That portion of food which is brought up into the mouth by ruminating animals from their first stomach, to be chewed a second Time
Christo Profusum Sanguinem - Hymn for Matins for the common of many martyrs, in Paschal Time
Raish lakish - He was inspired by Rabbi Johanan to return to the path of Torah, and became Rabbi Johanan's brother-in-law and student�and with Time, his colleague
Wood-Offering - It would seem that in the Time of Nehemiah arrangements were made, probably on account of the comparative scarcity of wood, by which certain districts were required, as chosen by lot, to furnish wood to keep the altar fire perpetually burning (Leviticus 6:13 )
Adam, the City of - At this city the flow of the water was arrested and rose up "upon an heap" at the Time of the Israelites' passing over (Joshua 3:16 )
Azmaveth - ...
...
An overseer over the royal treasury in the Time of David and Solomon (1 Chronicles 27:25 )
Kneading-Trough - The dough in the vessels at the Time of the Exodus was still unleavened, because the people were compelled to withdraw in haste
Comminution - ) Gradual diminution by the removal of small particles at a Time; a lessening; a wearing away
Nahath - A Levite in the Time of Heze kiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:13 )
the'Bez - (conspicuous ), a place memorable for the death of the brave Abimelech, ( Judges 9:50 ) was known to Eusebius and Jerome, in whose Time it was situated "in the district of Neapolis," 13Roman miles therefrom, on the road to Scythopolis
Sha'Veh Kiriatha'im - (plain of the double city ), mentioned ( Genesis 14:5 ) as the residence of the Emim at the Time of Chedorlaomer's incursion
Tryphe'na - We know nothing more of these two sister workers of the apostolic Time
Philipists - He had strenuously opposed the Ubiquists, who arose in his Time; and, the dispute growing still hotter after his death, the university of Wittemburg, who espoused Meiancthon's opinion, were called by the Flaccians, who attacked it, Philipists
Acephali - ) A class of levelers in the Time of K
Agitator - ) One of a body of men appointed by the army, in Cromwell's Time, to look after their interests; - called also adjutators
Ratting - ) The low sport of setting a dog upon rats confined in a pit to see how many he will kill in a given Time
Abode - Stay continuance in a place residence for a longer or shorter Time
Adar - See Time
Again - ]'>[1] either ‘a second Time,’ as Philippians 4:16 , ‘ye sent once and again’; or ‘back,’ as in Matthew 11:4 ‘go and show John again those things which ye do hear’ ( i
Instantly - Immediately without any intervening Time at the moment
Equate - ) To make equal; to reduce to an average; to make such an allowance or correction in as will reduce to a common standard of comparison; to reduce to mean Time or motion; as, to equate payments; to equate lines of railroad for grades or curves; equated distances
Expense - ) That which is expended, laid out, or consumed; cost; outlay; charge; - sometimes with the notion of loss or damage to those on whom the expense falls; as, the expenses of war; an expense of Time
Ascended Master - An astral plane is another dimension of reality beyond our world and is outside of Time and space
Waywode - It was assumed for a Time by the rulers of Moldavia and Wallachia, who were afterwards called hospodars, and has also been given to some inferior Turkish officers
Uniformitarian - ) Of, pertaining to, or designating, the view or doctrine that existing causes, acting in the same manner and with essentially the same intensity as at the present Time, are sufficient to account for all geological changes
Prevent - ) To come before the usual Time
Precede - ) To go before in order of Time; to occur first with relation to anything
Hagarenes - A people dwelling to the east of Palestine, with whom the tribes of Reuben made war in the Time of Saul
Tautochrone - ) A curved line, such that a heavy body, descending along it by the action of gravity, will always arrive at the lowest point in the same Time, wherever in the curve it may begin to fall; as, an inverted cycloid with its base horizontal is a tautochrone
Mohawk - ) One of certain ruffians who infested the streets of London in the Time of Addison, and took the name from the Mohawk Indians
Furlough - ) Leave of abserice; especially, leave given to an offcer or soldier to be absent from service for a certain Time; also, the document granting leave of absence
Mutual - ) Possessed, experienced, or done by two or more persons or things at the same Time; common; joint; as, mutual happiness; a mutual effort
Narcissus - Two men of this name are mentioned in Roman histories of that Time; one, executed three or four years before Paul wrote, was a favorite of the emperor Claudius; the other, of Nero his successor
Therein - In that or this place, Time or thing
e'Der - (Joshua 15:21 ) No trace of it has been discovered in modern Times. ...
A Levite of the family of Merari, in the Time of David
Well-Nigh - , "a Time (of forty years) was fulfilled (to him)" (see FULFILL , A, No
Ancient of Days - ANCIENT OF DAYS occurs 3 Times in Daniel ( Daniel 7:9 ; Daniel 7:13 ; Daniel 7:22 ) as a title of God in His capacity as Judge of the world. The picture is no doubt suggested by the contrast between the Eternal God ( Psalms 55:19 ) and the new-fangled deities which were from Time to Time introduced ( Judges 5:8 , Deuteronomy 32:17 ), rather than, as Hippolytus (quoted by Behrmann, Das Buch Daniel , p. In the troublous Times which are represented by the Book of Daniel, it was at once a comfort and a warning to remember that above the fleeting phases of life there sat One who remained eternally the same ( Psalms 90:1-3 ; Psalms 102:24-27 ). At the same Time it is worth remembering that the phrase in itself has no mystical significance, but, by an idiom common in Hebrew as in other languages, is merely a paraphrase for ‘an old man
Italy - This word varied in sense from Time to Time. It first signified only the Southern (the Greek) part of the peninsula; later it included all the country south of the Lombard plain; and finally, before the Time of Christ, it had come to bear the meaning which it has now
Freedom of Worship - But such freedom of worship is not unlimited, and the most tolerant gov- ernments have from "time to Time suppressed practises indulged in under the name of religion. It is difficult for us now to see the justification of such measures, but it is probably true that at one Time in Europe to have had any large number of Protestants in a Catholic country, or vice versa, would have endangered the civilpeace
Luke - He accompanied him to Philippi, but did not there share his imprisonment, nor did he accompany him further after his release in his missionary journey at this Time (Acts 17:1 ). On Paul's third visit to Philippi (20:5,6) we again meet with Luke, who probably had spent all the intervening Time in that city, a period of seven or eight years. From this Time Luke was Paul's constant companion during his journey to Jerusalem ((20:6-21:18)
Space - A — 1: διάστημα (Strong's #1292 — Noun Neuter — diastema — dee-as'-tay-mah ) "an interval, space" (akin to B), is used of Time in Acts 5:7 . ...
Notes: (1) In Acts 15:33 ; Revelation 2:21 , AV, chronos, "time" (RV), is translated "space. " (2) In Acts 19:8,10 , epi, "for or during" (of Time), is translated "for the space of;" in Acts 19:34 , "about the space of
First - Preceding all others in the order of Time. Before any thing else in the order of Time. ...
First or last, at one Time or another at the beginning or end
Tempest - tempestas tempus, Time, season. The primary sense of tempus, Time, is a falling, or that which falls, comes or happens, from some verb which signifies to fall or come suddenly, or rather to drive, to rush. Time is properly a coming, a season, that which presents itself, or is present
Worship, Freedom of - But such freedom of worship is not unlimited, and the most tolerant gov- ernments have from "time to Time suppressed practises indulged in under the name of religion. It is difficult for us now to see the justification of such measures, but it is probably true that at one Time in Europe to have had any large number of Protestants in a Catholic country, or vice versa, would have endangered the civilpeace
Day - The artificial day is the Time of the sun's continuance above the horizon, which is unequal according to different seasons, on account of the obliquity of the equator. ...
The word day is also often put for an indeterminate period, for the Time of Christ's coming in the flesh, and of his second coming to judgment, Isaiah 2:12 Ezekiel 13:5 John 11:24 1 Thessalonians 5:2 . The prophetic "day" usually is to be understood as one year, and the prophetic "year" or "time" as 360 days, Ezekiel 4:6
Ben-ha'Dad - , King of Damascus, which in his Time was supreme in Syria. Some Time after the death of Ahab, Benhadad renewed the war with Israel, attacked Samaria a second Time, and pressed the siege so closely that there was a terrible famine in the city
Fig Tree - Something like this may be alluded to by the Prophet Hosea, when he says, ‘I saw your fathers as בכורה , the first ripe, in the fig tree, at her first Time,' Hosea 9:10 . The whole difficulty arises from the circumstance of his disappointment in not finding fruit on the tree, when it is expressly said, that "the Time of figs was not yet. " While it was supposed that this expression signified, that the Time for such trees to bring forth fruit was not yet come, it looked very unaccountable that Christ should reckon a tree barren, though it had leaves, and curse it as such, when he knew that the Time of bearing figs was not come; and that he should come to seek figs on this tree, when he knew that figs were not used to be ripe so soon in the year. But the expression does not signify the Time of the coming forth of figs, but the Time of the gathering in of ripe figs, as is plain from the parallel expressions. Thus, "the Time of the fruit,"...
Matthew 21:34 , most plainly signifies the Time of gathering in ripe fruits, since the servants were sent to receive those fruits for their master's use. Luke express the same by the word Time, or season: "At the season he sent a servant," &c; that is, at the season or Time of gathering in ripe fruit, Mark 12:2 ; Luke 20:10 . In like manner, if any one should say in our language, the season of fruit, the season of apples, the season of figs, every one would understand him to speak of the season or Time of gathering in these fruits. Mark says, that "the Time or season of figs was not yet," he evidently means that the Time of gathering ripe figs was not yet past; and, if so, it was natural to expect figs upon all those trees that were not barren; whereas, after the Time of gathering figs, no one would expect to find them on a fig tree, and its having none then would be no sign of barrenness. Mark, by saying, "For the Time of figs was not yet," does not design to give a reason for "his finding nothing but leaves;" but he gives a reason for what he said in the clause before: "He came, if haply he might find any thereon;" and it was a good reason for our Saviour's coming and seeking figs on the tree, because the Time for their being gathered was not come
Time - Time . The conception that we seem to gather of Time from the Holy Scriptures is of a small block, as it were, cut out of boundless eternity. And this ‘block’ of Time is infinitesimally small. Time has a beginning; it has also, if we accept the usual translation of Revelation 10:6 ‘there shall be Time no longer,’ a stated end. The word ‘time’ in Biblical apocalyptic literature has another meaning ‘time’ stands for ‘a year’ both in Daniel ( Daniel 4:16 ; Genesis 6:1-222 ; Daniel 4:25 ; Daniel 4:32 ; Daniel 7:25 , where the plural ‘times’ seems to stand for two years) and in Revelation 12:14 (derived from Daniel 7:25 ). ...
When once the idea of Time formed itself in the human mind, subdivisions of it would follow as a matter of course. The division between light and darkness, the rising, the zenith, and the setting of the sun and the moon, together with the phases of the latter, and the varying position of the most notable stars in the firmament, would all suggest modes of reckoning Time, to say nothing of the circuit of the seasons as indicated by the growth and development of the fruits of the field and agricultural operations. Hence we find in Genesis 1:1-31 day and night as the first division of Time, and, because light was believed to be a later creation than matter, one whole day is said to be made up of evening and morning; and the day is reckoned, as it still is by the Jews and, in principle, by the Church in her ecclesiastical feasts, from one disappearance of the sun to the next, the divisions between day and night being formed by that appearance and disappearance. The day would thus be an obvious division of Time for intelligent beings to make from the very earliest ages. As Time went on, subdivisions of this day would be made, derived from an observance of the sun in the heavens morning , noonday or midday, and evening ; and, by analogy, there would be a midnight . The only other expression we meet with is ‘between the two evenings’ ( Exodus 12:6 ), used most probably for the Time between sunset and dark, though others take it as equivalent to ‘the Time of the going down of the sun,’ i. any Time in the afternoon: any shorter subdivisions of Time were not known to the Jews till they were brought into contact with Western civilization and the Roman military arrangements. The only other measure of Time, quite indefinite and infinitesimal, is the ‘moment,’ common to OT, Apocr. The Hebrew word meaning literally ‘the day before yesterday,’ is generally used vaguely of previous Time, ‘heretofore. ’...
The next obvious division of Time would be the month . ’ Though the actual period of each moon is rather more than 29 days, the actual Time of its visibility could scarcely be more than 28 days. We find, in fact, that a keen lookout was kept for it, and the ‘new moon’ feast was kept with great rejoicings, as well as, apparently in later Times, a ‘full moon’ feast (‘Blow up the trumpet in the new moon, At the full moon, on our solemn feast day,’ Psalms 81:3 ). The seventh year completed a week of years and was a sabbath; seven Times seven years formed seven sabbaths of years, i. ’...
Whilst these various divisions of Time were being arrived at, there would be, concurrently with them, the obvious recurrence of the seasons in their due order. One of the promises represented as having been made by God to Noah immediately after the Flood was that seedtime ( i. This is the earliest Time in the world’s history to which a knowledge of the seasons is attributed in the Bible. ]'>[2] the word ‘spring,’ to mean that season, occurs only in Wis 2:7 , and ‘autumn’ not at all, though the word translated ‘winter’ in Amos 3:15 , Jeremiah 36:22 , might equally be rendered ‘autumn,’ as the Time referred to is the border Time between autumn and winter. It would in due course be noticed that the seasons recurred practically after a series of twelve moons or months; hence would come in the division of Time into years of twelve lunar months. A year of 360 days is implied in the history of the Flood ( 1618422703_83 ; Genesis 7:1-24 ; Genesis 8:1-22 ), but no satisfactory explanation has yet been given of the scheme of years and chronology in the genealogical account of antediluvian Times ( Mark 15:42 ). Abib (Exodus 13:4 ), the month of the green ears of corn, about the same as our April, called in post-exilic Times, in correspondence with its Bab. This month has no Biblical name, but was called in later Times Tammuz, after the god of that name, in whose honour a fast was kept during the month, which is mentioned in Zechariah 8:19 as ‘the fast of the fourth month. Ethanim (1 Kings 8:2 ), the month of constant flowings, in later Times called Tishri. ...
Though at first all the months seem to have been reckoned of equal length, in later Times they contained 30 and 29 days alternately. 430 years is the Time assigned to the sojourning in Egypt, both in OT and NT (Exodus 12:40 , Galatians 3:17 ), and the commencement of the building of Solomon’s Temple is dated 480 years after the Exodus. In later Times the years were reckoned by the names of those who filled the office of high priest; in Luke 3:1 f. , we have a careful combination of names of various offices held by various persons at the Time of the commencement of the preaching of John the Baptist, to indicate the date. ...
Of instruments to measure Time we hear of only one, the sun-dial of Ahaz ( 2 Kings 20:9-11 , Isaiah 38:8 ), but what shape or form this took we do not know
Canaanite - a member of any of the tribes who inhabited Canaan at the Time of the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt
Hobaiah - ” Clan of priests in Time of Zerrubbabel who did not have family records to prove their descent from pure priestly lines and were excluded from the priesthood (Ezra 2:61 ; Nehemiah 7:63 )
Dissenters - (Latin: dissentio, disagree) ...
A more or less contemptuous term restricted to Protestants, (also to Catholics at one Time, 1791) who disagree or dissent in matters of doctrine and usage accepted by the Established Church of England
Martinmas - Until recently in many parts of England it was the usual Time for hiring servants and fairs were often held on this date
Oph'ni - (mouldy ), a town of Benjamin, mentioned in ( Joshua 18:24 ) the same as the Gophna of Josephus a place which at the Time of Vespasian's invasion was apparently so important as to be second only to Jerusalem
Hul'Dah - (weasel ), a prophetess, whose husband, Shallum, was keeper of the wardrobe in the Time of King Josiah
Shelemiah - ...
...
A priest in the Time of (Nehemiah 13:13 )
Succot - �booths�); festival of seven days (eight in the Diaspora) beginning on 15 Tishrei, taking its name from the temporary dwelling (sukkah) in which one lives during this period; this festival is marked for its special joy (�zeman simchateinu���time of our rejoicing�) and by the mitzvah of the four species ...
Refugees - Since that Time, however, it has been extended to all such as leave their country in Times of distress
Uriel - ...
...
The chief of the Kohathites at the Time when the ark was brought up to Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 15:5,11 )
Ave Mary - (1):...
A particular Time (as in Italy, at the ringing of the bells about half an hour after sunset, and also at early dawn), when the people repeat the Ave Maria
Cordelier - ) A member of a French political club of the Time of the first Revolution, of which Danton and Marat were members, and which met in an old Cordelier convent in Paris
Church of Scotland - Established by law in that kingdom, is presbyterian, which has existed (with some interruptions during the reign of the Stuarts) ever since the Time of John Knox, when the voice of the people prevailed against the influence of the crown in getting it established
Oded - (oh' deed) Personal name of uncertain meaning, perhaps “counter,” “restorer,” or “timekeeper. Prophet in the Time of Anaz who urged the Israelites to release the people of Judah they had taken as prisoners of war (2 Chronicles 28:8-15 )
Standard - A flag or banner usually used by the military to identify groups of soldiers or a central flag to rally all the soldiers at one Time (Numbers 1:52 ; Numbers 2:2 ; Numbers 10:14 ,Numbers 10:14,10:18 )
Addison's Disease - A morbid condition causing a peculiar brownish discoloration of the skin, and thought, at one Time, to be due to disease of the suprarenal capsules (two flat triangular bodies covering the upper part of the kidneys), but now known not to be dependent upon this causes exclusively
Planisphere - ) The representation of the circles of the sphere upon a plane; especially, a representation of the celestial sphere upon a plane with adjustable circles, or other appendages, for showing the position of the heavens, the Time of rising and setting of stars, etc
Edition - ) The whole number of copies of a work printed and published at one Time; as, the first edition was soon sold
Shaharaim - He must have been in Moab a long Time
Endless - ) Without end; having no end or conclusion; perpetual; interminable; - applied to length, and to duration; as, an endless line; endless Time; endless bliss; endless praise; endless clamor
Zattu - He seems to be the same as the “Zatthu” who signed the covenant in Nehemiah's Time (Ezra 10:14 )
Diaspora - Biblically, it refers to the dispersion of the Jews outside of Israel from the Time of the Babylonian Captivity until now
Uranus - ) The son or husband of Gaia (Earth), and father of Chronos (Time) and the Titans
Repass - ) To pass again; to pass or travel over in the opposite direction; to pass a second Time; as, to repass a bridge or a river; to repass the sea
Medan - There is a place also called by this name and some have thought, that it is the same as is called in our Lord's Time Magdala
Magenta - ) An aniline dye obtained as an amorphous substance having a green bronze surface color, which dissolves to a shade of red; also, the color; - so called from Magenta, in Italy, in allusion to the battle fought there about the Time the dye was discovered
Maturity - ) Arrival of the Time fixed for payment; a becoming due; termination of the period a note, etc
Bay-Tree - The bay tree is the Laurel of North America and the south of Europe; an evergreen tree, a wreath from which has been from Time immemorial the symbolical crown of poets and warriors
Sunday, Passion - It is a Time for special reflection on the Passion and Death of Christ
Man'Aen - (comforter ) is mentioned in ( Acts 13:1 ) as one of the teachers and prophets in the church at Antioch at the Time of the appointment of Saul and Barnabas as missionaries to the heathen
ca'Lah - If this be regarded as ascertained, Calah must be considered to have been at one Time (about B
de'Uel, - (invocation of God ), father of Eliasaph, the "captain" of the tribe of Gad at the Time of the numbering of the people at Sinai
Jehucal - He was one of the two persons whom Zedekiah sent to request the prophet Jeremiah to pray for the kingdom (Jeremiah 37:3 ) during the Time of its final siege by Nebuchadnezzar
Old - ), is used (a) of persons belonging to a former age, "(to) them of old Time," Matthew 5:21,33 , RV; in some mss. 27; the RV rendering is right; not ancient teachers are in view; what was said to them of old Time was "to be both recognized in its significance and estimated in its temporary limitations, Christ intending His words to be regarded not as an abrogation, but a deepening and fulfilling" (Cremer); of prophets, Luke 9:8,19 ; (b) of Time long gone by, Acts 15:21 ; (c) of days gone by in a person's experience, Acts 15:7 , "a good while ago," lit. , of what characterized and conditioned the Time previous to conversion in a believer's experience, RV, "they are become new," i. While sometimes any difference seems almost indistinguishable, yet "it is evident that wherever an emphasis is desired to be laid on the reaching back to a beginning, whatever that beginning may be, archaios will be preferred (e. ...
C — 1: πάλαι (Strong's #3819 — Adverb — palai — pal'-ahee ) denotes "long ago, of old," Hebrews 1:1 , RV, "of old Time" (AV, "in Time past"); in Jude 1:4 , "of old;" it is used as an adjective in 2 Peter 1:9 , "(his) old (sins)," lit. ...
C — 2: ἔκπαλαι (Strong's #1597 — Adverb — ekpalai — ek'-pal-ahee ) "from of old, for a long Time" (ek, "from," and No. 1), occurs in 2 Peter 2:3 , RV, "from of old" (AV, "of a long Time"); 2 Peter 3:5 . ...
Note: In 1 Peter 3:5 , AV, the particle pote, "once, formerly, ever, sometime," is translated "in the old Time" (RV, "aforetime"); in 2 Peter 1:21 , "in old Time" (RV, "ever"), AV marg. , "at any Time. 2, denotes, in the Active Voice, "to make or declare old," Hebrews 8:13 (1st part); in the Passive Voice, "to become old," of things worn out by Time and use, Luke 12:33 ; Hebrews 1:11 , "shall wax old," lit
Infinite - God is not limited by Time: God existed before the creation (Genesis 1:1 ); the ordering of Time is part of God's creative activity (Genesis 1:5 )
Mule - They are not mentioned, however, till the Time of David, for the word rendered "mules" (RSV correctly, "hot springs") in Genesis 36:24 (yemim) properly denotes the warm springs of Callirhoe, on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. Perhaps they had by that Time ceased to be used in Palestine
Morning - The morning Times seem to represent the happy Times of life when there are no griefs, sorrows nor troubles. It is the Time when everything is going well. " It is probably the Time referred to by Isaiah when he said, "The morning cometh, and also the night
Hoshea - The ruler of Ephraim in David's Time. Soon after this he submitted to Shalmaneser, the Assyrian king, who a second Time invaded the land to punish Hoshea, because of his withholding tribute which he had promised to pay
Merchant - " In the East, in ancient Times, merchants travelled about with their merchandise from place to place (Genesis 37:25 ; Job 6:18 ), and carried on their trade mainly by bartering (Genesis 37:28 ; 39:1 ). After the Hebrews became settled in Palestine they began to engage in commercial pursuits, which gradually expanded (49:13; Deuteronomy 33:18 ; Judges 5:17 ), till in the Time of Solomon they are found in the chief marts of the world (1 Kings 9:26 ; 10:11,26,28 ; 22:48 ; 2 Chronicles 1:16 ; 9:10,21 ). After Solomon's Time their trade with foreign nations began to decline
Business - ) That which busies one, or that which engages the Time, attention, or labor of any one, as his principal concern or interest, whether for a longer or shorter Time; constant employment; regular occupation; as, the business of life; business before pleasure
Mattaniah - Tabernacle musician-prophet in David's Time (1 Chronicles 25:4 ). Levitic leader of the Temple choir in Zerubbabel's Time (Nehemiah 11:17 ,Nehemiah 11:17,11:22 )
Mer'Ari, Mer'Arites - ( Genesis 46:8,11 ) At the Time of the exodus and the numbering in the wilderness, the Merarites consisted of two families, the Mahlites and the Mushites, Mahli and Mushi being either the two sons of the son and grandson of Merari. (1 Chronicles 6:19,47 ) Their chief at that Time was Zuriel
Bag - The money collected in the temple in the Time of Joash, for its reparation, seems, in like manner, to have been told up in bags of equal value; and these were probably delivered sealed to those who paid the workmen, 2 Kings 12:10 . In the east, in the present day, a bag of money passes, for some Time at least, currently from hand to hand, under the authority of a banker's seal, without any examination of its contents
Cypress - Peter's church at Rome, which had lasted from the Time of Constantine to that of Pope Eugene IV, that is to say, eleven hundred years, were of cypress, and had in that Time suffered no decay
Limitation - ) A certain precinct within which friars were allowed to beg, or exercise their functions; also, the Time during which they were permitted to exercise their functions in such a district. ) A limited Time within or during which something is to be done
Lease - ) Any tenure by grant or permission; the Time for which such a tenure holds good; allotted Time. ) To grant to another by lease the possession of, as of lands, tenements, and hereditaments; to let; to demise; as, a landowner leases a farm to a tenant; - sometimes with out
Pontus - Many Jews resided there, and from Time to Time "went up to Jerusalem unto the feast," Acts 2:9
Appeal - The principle, of appeal was recognized by the Mosaic law in the establishment of a central court under the presidency of the judge or ruler for the Time being, before which all cased too difficult for the local court were to be tried. (17:8,9) According to the above regulation, the appeal lay in the Time of the Judges to the judge, (Judges 4:5 ) and under the monarchy to the king
Already - 1: ἤδη (Strong's #2235 — Adverb — ede — ay'-day ) is always used of Time in the NT and means "now, at (or by) this Time," sometimes in the sense of "already," i
Hour - An appointed Time for meeting or for religious festival, a brief moment of Time, one twelfth of the day or of the night, and in the Gospel of John the significant period of Jesus' saving mission on earth from His triumphal entry until His death and resurrection. ...
Biblical Hebrew has no word for hour, only an expression for an appointed meeting Time (1 Samuel 9:24 RSV). The New Testament term hora can refer to a general Time of day, a “late hour” ( Matthew 14:15 NRSV), to a brief moment of Time ( Revelation 18:17 ; compare John 5:35 ), or to the Time of an expected momentous event (Matthew 8:13 ; Mark 13:11 ). It also designates a period of Time, somewhat flexible in duration, one twelfth of the daylight hours and one twelfth of the night, a day being divided into the two periods (or watches) of light and darkness beginning at sunrise, making the seventh hour (John 6:39-40,67 ) about one p. ”...
In His conversation with the woman at Sychar (John 4:1-42 ) Jesus referred again to a coming “hour” (John 4:21 ,John 4:21,4:23 ), a Time when Jerusalem and Gerizim, the holy sites of Jews and Samaritans, respectively, would lose their significance, for worship—would be “in Spirit and truth. This is the first Time the reader has been asked to understand Jesus' “hour” in terms of death. Jesus' brothers challenged Him to make a public appearance in Jerusalem, but He refused because His “time [1] is not yet at hand” (John 7:6 ). After some “Greeks” sought an audience with Him, Jesus announced for the first Time, “The hour is come, that the Son of man should be glorified” (John 12:23 ). He then interpreted this “hour” as the Time of his being “lifted up” in death (John 12:32-34 ; compare John 3:14-15 ). Without trivializing the reality of Jesus' suffering and death, the Gospel of John presents that event as the “hour” of Jesus' “glory,” the Time of His “exaltation/lifting up. ” See Glory ; John ; Time
Decapolis - ” A group of Greek cities referred to in Matthew 4:25 ; Mark 5:20 ; Mark 7:31 , originally ten in number but including more cities at a later Time. Thus the number varied from Time to Time. They were established after the Time of Alexander the Great and were predominantly Greek in culture and influence
Harvest - Crops that had been planted were harvested at various Times. Significant events were connected with harvest Times (Exodus 34:18-20 ; Deuteronomy 16:13-16 ; Joshua 3:15 ; 1 Samuel 16:13 ). Harvest Time became the occasion for joyful festivals (Exodus 34:22 ; Isaiah 9:3 ). The “time of harvest” sometimes represented the day of destruction (Jeremiah 51:33 ; Joel 3:13 ). “The harvest is past” meant the appointed Time was gone (Jeremiah 8:20 ). The rhythm of harvest Time (sowing and reaping) provided an illustration of a spiritual truth (Galatians 6:7-8 )
This - This is a definitive, or definitive adjective, denoting something that is present or near in place or Time, or something just mentioned. By this, is used elliptically for by this Time as, by this the mail has arrived. This is used with words denoting Time past as, I have taken no snuff for this month and often with plural words. In this case, this, in the singular, refers to the whole term of Time, or period this period of forty years. It is sometimes opposed to other
Coinage - ) Coins; the aggregate coin of a Time or place
Neve, Felix Jean Baptiste Joseph - Professor of Greek and Latin literature at the University of Louvain for 36 years, and at the same Time gave a course of studies in the Sanskrit language and literature
Adria - Paul's Time it included the whole sea lying between Italy and Greece, and extending on the south from Crete to Sicily, within which the island of Malta or Melita lies
Telas'Ear - (Assyrian hill ) is mentioned in ( 2 Kings 19:12 ) and in Isai 37:12 As a city inhabited by "the children of Eden," --which had been conquered and was held in the Time of Sennacherib, by the Assyrians
Hadar - ...
...
One of the Edomitish kings ( Genesis 36:39 ) about the Time of Saul
Mephaath - In Jeremiah's Time the town was in Moabite hands (Jeremiah 48:21 )
Shemari'ah - ) ...
One of the family of Harim, a lay man of Israel who put away his foreign wife in the Time of Ezra
Titus, Epistle to - It was written about the same Time and under similar circumstances with the other two i
Necrology - Formed of dread, and discourse, or enumeration; a book anciently kept in churches and monasteries, wherein were registered the benefactors of the same, the Time of their deaths, and the days of their commemoration; as also the deaths of the priors, abbots, religious canons, &c
Brooch - At a later Time brooches were bow shaped and made of bronze or iron
Othniel ben kenaz - At that Time, the Israelites lacked leadership and fell prey to the Aramite king, Cushan-Rishathaim
Zarephath - City belonging to Zidon, where Elijah stayed with a widow during part of a Time of drought and famine, being sustained by the miraculous increase of the widow's meal and oil
Dataria - The name is derived from the word datum, given or dated (with the indications of the Time and place of granting the gift or favor)
Primacy - ) The state or condition of being prime or first, as in Time, place, rank, etc
Refit - ) To fit out or supply a second Time
Doze - ) To pass or spend in drowsiness; as, to doze away one's Time
Anticipate - (Latin: ante, before; capio, take) ...
To read the Divine Office, in private but not in choir, before the Time usually assigned for it; e
Uncleanness - It demanded separation from the camp for a Time, and in many cases an offering must be brought before there could be restoration
Tupian - Agriculture, pottery, and stone working were practiced by them at the Time of the conquest
Tarantella - ) A rapid and delirious sort of Neapolitan dance in 6-8 Time, which moves in whirling triplets; - so called from a popular notion of its being a remedy against the poisonous bite of the tarantula
Remembrancer - ) A term applied in England to several officers, having various functions, their duty originally being to bring certain matters to the attention of the proper persons at the proper Time
Usance - ) The Time, fixed variously by the usage between different countries, when a bill of exchange is payable; as, a bill drawn on London at one usance, or at double usance
Repay - ) To pay anew, or a second Time, as a debt
Moon-Culminating - ) Culminating, or coming to the meredian, at or about the same Time with the moon; - said of a star or stars, esp
Mastabah - (1):...
A type of tomb, of the Time of the Memphite dynasties, comprising an oblong structure with sloping sides (sometimes containing a decorated chamber, sometimes of solid masonry), and connected with a mummy chamber in the rock beneath
Heth - Ephron, who was an inhabitant of that city, was of the race of Heth; and in the Time of Abraham the whole city were of the family of Heth
Discerning of Spirits - This gift was especially necessary at the Time when the word of God was not fully written
Again - ) Another Time; once more; anew
Adria - In the apostle's Time it is supposed to have denoted the whole breadth of the Mediterranean sea, from Crete to Sicily
Madman'Nah - ( Joshua 15:31 ) In the Time of Eusebius and Jerome it was called Menois, and was not far from Gaza
Elha'Nan -
A distinguished warrior in the Time of King David, who performed a memorable exploit against the Philistines
he'na - (troubling ), a city the Assyrian kings had reduced shortly before the Time of Sennacherib
Then - 1: τότε (Strong's #5119 — Adverb — tote — tot'-eh ) a demonstrative adverb of Time, denoting "at that Time," is used (a) of concurrent events, e. , Matthew 2:17 ; Galatians 4:8 , "at that Time;" Galatians 4:29 , "then;" 2 Peter 3:6 , "(the world) that then was," lit. , Matthew 2:7 ; Luke 11:26 ; 16:16 , "[1] that Time;" John 11:14 ; Acts 17:14 ; (c) of things future, e. , Matthew 7:23 ; 24:30 (twice),40; eight Times in ch. It occurs 90 Times in Matthew, more than in all the rest of the NT together. ...
2: εἶτα (Strong's #1534 — Adverb — eita — i'-tah ) denotes sequence (a) "of Time, then, next," Mark 4:17 , RV, "then;" Mark 4:28 , in some texts; Mark 8:25 , RV, "then" (AV, "after that"); Luke 8:12 ; John 13:5 ; 19:27 ; 20:27 ; in some texts in 1 Corinthians 12:28 ; 1 Corinthians 15:5,7,24 ; 1 Timothy 2:13 ; 3:10 ; James 1:15 ; (b) In argument, Hebrews 12:9 , "furthermore. (2) For conjunctions (ara, "so;" de, "but;" gar "for;" kai, "and;" te, "and"), sometimes translated "then," see +, p
Coincidence - ) The condition or fact of happening at the same Time; as, the coincidence of the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson
Castle-Guard - ) A feudal tenure, obliging the tenant to perform service within the realm, without limitation of Time
Cultivation - ) Bestowal of Time or attention for self-improvement or for the benefit of others; fostering care
Francis Patrizi - His most important works are interpretations of the Scriptures and Gospel commentaries in Latin, intended to refute the rationalistic errors of that Time
Dials, Mass - They are said to have been used mainly to tell the Time of Mass because of the clearly marked line indicating Terce, or 9 a
Sometime, Sometimes - SOMETIME, SOMETIMES . ]'>[1] , and except in Sir 37:14 (‘For a man’s mind is sometime wont to tell him,’ etc. ), where the meaning is ‘occasionally,’ as now, both forms are used in the sense of ‘once upon a Time
Gaonim - During this period, many decrees were passed, thousands of responsa were sent to Jews throughout the civilized world of the Time, and many important books were compiled
Elealeh - It is not again mentioned till the Time of (Isaiah 15:4 ; 16:9 ) and (Jeremiah 48:34 )
Hem - These borders or fringes were in process of Time enlarged so as to attract special notice (Matthew 23:5 )
Jochebed - Her name includes the divine name Yahweh, evidence that the name Yahweh was known before the Time of Moses
Coincide - ) To occur at the same Time; to be contemporaneous; as, the fall of Granada coincided with the discovery of America
Rekem - One of five Midianite kings whom Israel defeated in Moses' Time (Numbers 31:8 ; Joshua 13:21 )
Nativity - Time, place and manner of birth as, to calculate ones nativity
Mass Dials - They are said to have been used mainly to tell the Time of Mass because of the clearly marked line indicating Terce, or 9 a
Tola - Ancestor of the Tolaites, 22,600 men of valor in David's Time
Rabmag - ) Probably Magis not Magus or Magusu ("the Magi") of the Behistun inscription; the Magi had no standing in Neriglissar's Time at Babylon
Carnival - ) Any merrymaking, feasting, or masquerading, especially when overstepping the bounds of decorum; a Time of riotous excess
Ovulist - ) A believer in the theory (called encasement theory), current during the last century, that the egg was the real animal germ, and that at the Time of fecundation the spermatozoa simply gave the impetus which caused the unfolding of the egg, in which all generations were inclosed one within the other
Poundal - ) A unit of force based upon the pound, foot, and second, being the force which, acting on a pound avoirdupois for one second, causes it to acquire by the of that Time a velocity of one foot per second
Pyrrhic - ) An ancient Greek martial dance, to the accompaniment of the flute, its Time being very quick
Dialing - ) The art of constructing dials; the science which treats of measuring Time by dials
Ravage - ) Desolation by violence; violent ruin or destruction; devastation; havoc; waste; as, the ravage of a lion; the ravages of fire or tempest; the ravages of an army, or of Time
Argenteuil, France - The original monastic foundation was a changed into a nunnery by Charlemagne, and the repentant Heloise, beloved of Abelard, was for a Time abbess
Harod - Identified with Ain Jalud , 32 33' N, 35 21' E ; connected with which is a large pool, at which many might drink at the same Time
Brachystochrone - ) A curve, in which a body, starting from a given point, and descending solely by the force of gravity, will reach another given point in a shorter Time than it could by any other path. This curve of quickest descent, as it is sometimes called, is, in a vacuum, the same as the cycloid
Epizootic - ) Of the nature of a disease which attacks many animals at the same Time; - corresponding to epidemic diseases among men
Dissipation - ) A trifle which wastes Time or distracts attention
Precocious - ) Ripe or mature before the proper or natural Time; early or prematurely ripe or developed; as, precocious trees
Occupation - ) That which occupies or engages the Time and attention; the principal business of one's life; vocation; employment; calling; trade
Gold - Until long after the Time of David gold was not coined, but was sold by weight as a precious article of commerce
ar - In Jerome's Time it was called Areopolis
Live Long - 1: μακροχρόνιος (Strong's #3118 — Adjective — makrochronios — mak-rokh-ron'-ee-os ) an adjective denoting "of long duration, long-lived" (makros, "long," chronos, "time"), is used in Ephesians 6:3 , "(that thou mayest) live long," lit
Sozomen, Salaminius Hermias - Born in Bethelia, Palestine; died c447 His history (323-439), a continuation of the work of Eusebius, suffers in comparison with that of Socrates, appearing at the same Time
Salaminius Hermias Sozomen - Born in Bethelia, Palestine; died c447 His history (323-439), a continuation of the work of Eusebius, suffers in comparison with that of Socrates, appearing at the same Time
Onion - Onions have been from Time immemorial a favorite article of food among the Egyptians, The onions of Egypt are much milder in flavor and less pungent than those of this country
Farthing - Two names of coins in the New Testament are rendered in the Authorized Version by this word:
Quadrans , ( Matthew 5:26 ; Mark 12:42 ) a coin current in the Time of our Lord, equivalent to three-eights of a cent; ...
The assarion , equal to one cent and a half, ( Matthew 10:29 ; Luke 12:6 )
Half - , "the half," Mark 6:23 ; "half (a Time)," Revelation 12:14 ; "a half," Revelation 11:9,11 , RV
Assize - ) The Time or place of holding the court of assize; - generally in the plural, assizes. ) An assembly of knights and other substantial men, with a bailiff or justice, in a certain place and at a certain Time, for public business. ) Anything fixed or reduced to a certainty in point of Time, number, quantity, quality, weight, measure, etc
After - ) Next; later in Time; subsequent; succeeding; as, an after period of life. ) Later in Time; subsequent; as, after supper, after three days. ) Subsequently in Time or place; behind; afterward; as, he follows after
Quick - Speedy done or occurring in a short Time as a quick return of profits. Moving with rapidity or celerity as quick Time in music. Soon in a short Time without delay
Foreknowledge - God is eternal, and his knowledge is not related to a sequence of events that he must experience in a world of Time and space (Isaiah 57:15; Jeremiah 23:24; see ETERNITY; Time). We accept the perfect purposes of a sovereign God and at the same Time acknowledge the free will of responsible human beings (Luke 22:22; Acts 2:23; see also ELECTION)
Ockenheim, Jean d' - After receiving Holy-Orders, he held the post of court chapel-master under three French kings, 1453-1495, at the same Time acting by royal appointment as treasurer of Saint Martin's Church at Tours. In the annals of music he is considered an excellent contrapuntist and originator of the art which, through his pupils, was diversified among schools of music since his Time; his innovation of allowing free voice entry on any interval was effective in developing the a capella style
Okeghem, Jean d' - After receiving Holy-Orders, he held the post of court chapel-master under three French kings, 1453-1495, at the same Time acting by royal appointment as treasurer of Saint Martin's Church at Tours. In the annals of music he is considered an excellent contrapuntist and originator of the art which, through his pupils, was diversified among schools of music since his Time; his innovation of allowing free voice entry on any interval was effective in developing the a capella style
Jean d'Ockenheim - After receiving Holy-Orders, he held the post of court chapel-master under three French kings, 1453-1495, at the same Time acting by royal appointment as treasurer of Saint Martin's Church at Tours. In the annals of music he is considered an excellent contrapuntist and originator of the art which, through his pupils, was diversified among schools of music since his Time; his innovation of allowing free voice entry on any interval was effective in developing the a capella style
Jean d'Okeghem - After receiving Holy-Orders, he held the post of court chapel-master under three French kings, 1453-1495, at the same Time acting by royal appointment as treasurer of Saint Martin's Church at Tours. In the annals of music he is considered an excellent contrapuntist and originator of the art which, through his pupils, was diversified among schools of music since his Time; his innovation of allowing free voice entry on any interval was effective in developing the a capella style
Delay - ...
A — 2: χρονίζω (Strong's #5549 — Verb — chronizo — khron-id'-zo ) from chronos, "time," lit. means "to while away Time," i
Eternal Things And Fleeting - So do the things of Time appear to be all-important, far-reaching and enduring, and eternal things are not always of equal weight to the soul with those nearer at hand. Yet, despite all our instinctive judgments may suggest to the contrary, nothing earthly can ever be lasting, nothing in Time can be worth considering compared with eternity
Inconsistency - I did see a man once trying to walk on both sides of the street at one Time, but he was undoubtedly drunk; and when we see a man labouring day by day to walk on both sides of the street, morally: in the shady side of sin and the sunny side of holiness, or reeling in the evening, at one Time towards the bright lights of virtue, and anon staggering back to sin in dark places, where no lamp is shining: we say of him, 'He is morally intoxicated,' and wisdom adds, 'He is mad, and if the Great Physician heal him not, his madness will bring him to destruction
Sitting - ) The act or Time of sitting, as to a portrait painter, photographer, etc. ) The Time during which one sits while doing something, as reading a book, playing a game, etc
Again - A second Time once more. For to which of the angels said he at any Time, thou art my son, this day have I begotten thee? and again, I will be to him a father, and he shall be to me a son? and again, let all the angels of God worship him
Famine - One of God's 'four sore judgements' which He in past Times brought upon the earth, and which He has foretold will again be sent as a punishment. The most severe famines recorded in scripture are the two of seven years' duration, one in the Time of Joseph, and the other in the days of Elisha. ' When judgements are falling on them, they will seek for some word from God for guidance and comfort; but will not find it: God will for a Time leave them in darkness and perplexity
Due - ) Such as (a thing) ought to be; fulfilling obligation; proper; lawful; regular; appointed; sufficient; exact; as, due process of law; due service; in due Time. ) Appointed or required to arrive at a given Time; as, the steamer was due yesterday
Dimension - ) The manifoldness with which the fundamental units of Time, length, and mass are involved in determining the units of other physical quantities. ) The degree of manifoldness of a quantity; as, Time is quantity having one dimension; volume has three dimensions, relative to extension
Tribulation - Besides the application of this term to any Time of distress, and its special reference to this dispensation, respecting which it is said, "In the world ye shall have tribulation," John 16:33 — the Lord spoke of a distinct period of distress, such as never had been, or should be again. In Revelation 7:14 a great multitude is referred to that have come out of the great tribulation, but these are from the nations, hence this tribulation is not the same as that which will fall specially on the Jews, though both may take place at the same Time
Alexandria, Peter of, Saint - He suffered in the Decian persecution and was at one Time head of the famous catechetical school at Alexandria. When during the Diocletian persecution Peter left Alexandria for concealment, the Meletian schism broke out among his own clergy, and he had this to contend with at a Time when it was all he could do to comfort and guide the captive Christians
Ahijah - He is thought to be the person who spoke twice to Solomon from God, once while he was building the temple, 1 Kings 6:11 , at which Time he promised him the divine protection; and again, 1 Kings 11:11 , after him falling into his irregularities, with great threatenings and reproaches. Ahijah, in all probability, did not long survive the delivery of this last prophecy; but we are not informed of the Time and manner of his death
Eli'el - (1 Chronicles 12:11 ) ...
A Kohathite Levite at the Time of transportation of the ark from the house of Obed-edom to Jerusalem. ) ...
A Levite in the Time of Hezekiah; one of the overseers of the offerings made in the temple
Jeho-i'Achin - ( 2 Kings 24:10,11 ) In a very short Time Jehoiachin surrendered at discretion; and he, and the queen-mother, and all his servants, captains and officers, came out and gave themselves up to Nebuchadnezzar, who carried them, with the harem and the eunuchs, to Babylon. The Time of his death is uncertain
Eclipse of the Sun - (Joel 2:10,31 ; 3:15 ; Amos 8:9 ; Micah 3:6 ; Zechariah 14:6 ) Some of these notices probably refer to eclipses that occurred about the Time of the respective compositions: thus the date of Amos coincides with a total eclipse which occurred Feb. The darkness that overspread the world at the crucifixion cannot with reason be attributed to an eclipse, as the moon was at the full at the Time of the passover
Eliab - Son of Helon, and leader of the tribe of Zebulun at the Time of the census being taken at Sinai. Levite musician and doorkeeper in the Time of David
Hamath - In the Time of David its leaders were friendly with Israel (2 Samuel 8:9-10), and in the Time of Solomon it was controlled by Israel (2 Chronicles 8:3-4). This gap, or pass, marked Israel’s ideal northern boundary (Joshua 13:5; Amos 6:14), but only in Times of unusual growth and prosperity was it the actual boundary (2 Kings 14:25)
Night - The sinner is living in the dark and so the sacrifice is constantly being offered for him in order that he may be saved any Time that he will came to the altar to find the Saviour. There is no Time in the sinner's life when he may not come and find the Saviour ready to save him. ...
Job 35:10 (c) This describes the terrible dark Times which Job experienced when he lost all his possessions and only GOD remained. ...
Psalm 16:7 (c) This type represents the dark Times in David's life when the shadows fell across his path, and he was constantly in fear for his life. ...
Psalm 30:5 (c) This probably represents the whole period of this life as contrasted with the Time of the coming of the Lord which is the morning hour. It also represents the dark Times of some specific sorrow. ...
Psalm 42:8 (c) This represents a Time of perplexity in which victory is given while the difficulty still remains. It is the Time when our precious Lord rules and reigns, and all sin and wickedness has been put away. The saved man enters into the morning Time of blessing, while the unsaved man enters into the night of sorrow and suffering. ...
Jeremiah 14:8 (b) Israel is going through a Time of darkness and despair while scattered over the earth. ...
Revelation 21:25 (a) In Heaven where the Lord is the light, there are no Times of darkness, no seasons of sorrow or perplexity, no hidden Times when the sun goes down and sin comes up
Damper - (b) A contrivance, as in a pianoforte, to deaden vibrations; or, as in other pieces of mechanism, to check some action at a particular Time
Legal Interest - (Latin: inter, between; esse, to be) ...
The price or rate of premium per unit of Time that is paid by a borrower for the use of what he borrows; specifically, a rate per cent of money paid for the use of money; also the money so paid
Interest, Legal - (Latin: inter, between; esse, to be) ...
The price or rate of premium per unit of Time that is paid by a borrower for the use of what he borrows; specifically, a rate per cent of money paid for the use of money; also the money so paid
Lumen Christi - (Latin: Light of Christ) ...
Versicle chanted by the deacon on Holy Saturday as he lights the triple candle; sung three Times, each Time in a higher pitch, with the response "Deo Gratias
Christi, Lumen - (Latin: Light of Christ) ...
Versicle chanted by the deacon on Holy Saturday as he lights the triple candle; sung three Times, each Time in a higher pitch, with the response "Deo Gratias
Christ's Coat Without Seam - The term is derived from the garment worn by Our Lord at the Time of His Crucifixion for which rather than divide it the Roman soldiers cast lots
League, Converts - An organization founded in New York in 1895 with the object of familiarizing converts to the Church with Catholic associates and of aiding for a Time those who on account of change of faith suffer pecuniary or social disadvantage
Shebuel -
One of the descendants of Gershom, who had charge of the temple treasures in the Time of David (1 Chronicles 23:16 ; 26:24 )
Hierapolis - This church was founded at the same Time as that of Colosse
Fish Gate - The gate was rebuilt during the Time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:3 ; Nehemiah 12:39 )
Tongues, Confusion of - Till this Time "the whole earth was of one language and of one speech
Sychar - Liar or drunkard (see Isaiah 28:1,7 ), has been from the Time of the Crusaders usually identified with Sychem or Shechem (John 4:5 )
Hagar - She became Abraham’s concubine due to Sarah’s childlessness at that point in Time
Beryllians - He taught that Christ did not exist before Mary; but that a spirit issuing from God himself, and therefore superior to all human souls, as being a portion of the divine nature, was united to him at the Time of his birth
Ancestor - ) One from whom a person is descended, whether on the father's or mother's side, at any distance of Time; a progenitor; a fore father
Chronicle - ) An historical register or account of facts or events disposed in the order of Time
Beguile - ) To cause the Time of to pass without notice; to relieve the tedium or weariness of; to while away; to divert
Gabbai - ” Member of tribe of Benjamin who settled in Jerusalem in Time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:8 )
Perizzites - They dwelled in the land as early as Abraham's Time (Genesis 13:7 )
Dung Gate - A Jerusalem landmark in the Time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 2:13 ; Nehemiah 3:13-14 ; Nehemiah 12:31 )
Town Clerk, - the title ascribed in our version to the magistrate at Ephesus who appeased the mob in the theatre at the Time of the tumult excited by Demetrius and his fellow craftsmen
Jehdeiah - In 1 Chronicles 26:24; 1 Chronicles 23:16, Shubael or Shebuel perhaps represents the family, for Jehdeiah was head of the family in David's Time
Church, Greek or Eastern - This church has been divided from the Roman even since the Time of the emperor Phocas
Procrastination (2) - In Nebuchadnezzar's image, the lower the members, the coarser the metal: the farther off the Time, the more unfit
Hammelech - Jehoiakim at this Time (the fifth year of his reign) had no grown up son
Nebo - It was the place where the aged Moses went to view the promised land and where, a short Time later, he died (Deuteronomy 32:49-50; Deuteronomy 34:1; Deuteronomy 34:5-6; see ABARIM)
Self-Conceit: Its Danger - Quinctilian said of some in his Time that they might have become excellent scholars had they not been so persuaded of their scholarship already
Temper: Important - Many men are so rash, and impetuous, and at the same Time so suddenly angry and excited, that their otherwise most valuable abilities arc rendered useless for any good purpose
Chronology - The science of computing and adjusting the periods of Time, referring each event to the proper year
Costume - ) Such an arrangement of accessories, as in a picture, statue, poem, or play, as is appropriate to the Time, place, or other circumstances represented or described
Bunni - His son Hasabiah was one of the Levites living in Jerusalem in Time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:15 )
Nahath - Overseer in Hezekiah's Time (2 Chronicles 31:13 )
Jahath - A Merarite Levite in the Time of Josiah ( 2 Chronicles 34:12 )
Methuselah - The name is interpreted by Holzinger as ‘man of the javelin’ a fitting name for a Time when the earth was full of violence
Missing - For a Time caught up to God, as once ...
Moses was in the mount, and missing long
Separation - Term used for period when a person is ritually unclean during menstruation (Leviticus 12:2 ,Leviticus 12:2,12:5 ; Leviticus 15:20 ,Leviticus 15:20,15:25-26 ) or for Time of refraining from certain activities because of a vow (Numbers 6:1 )
Yehudah hanassi - " One of the last Mishnaic sages, he recorded, edited, and organized statements of earlier sages, forming the Mishnah, setting the Oral Law in writing for the first Time
Yehudah the prince - " One of the last Mishnaic sages, he recorded, edited, and organized statements of earlier sages, forming the Mishnah, setting the Oral Law in writing for the first Time
Posterior - ) Later in Time; hence, later in the order of proceeding or moving; coming after; - opposed to prior
Panorama - ) A picture representing scenes too extended to be beheld at once, and so exhibited a part at a Time, by being unrolled, and made to pass continuously before the spectator
Twinkling - ) The Time of a wink; a moment; an instant
Pluralize - ) To hold more than one benefice at the same Time
Postpone - ) To defer to a future or later Time; to put off; also, to cause to be deferred or put off; to delay; to adjourn; as, to postpone the consideration of a bill to the following day, or indefinitely
Epact - The system of epacts is based on the Metonic Lunar Cycle, and it is employed to determine the Time of the ecclesiastical new moon
Amana Society - It is the only one of similar settlements which has thrived for any length of Time, owing, as its members believe, to religious motives
Aged - Old having lived long having lived almost the usual Time allotted to that species of being applied to animals or plants as, an aged man, or an aged oak
Albert the Great, Saint - His study of the natural sciences was in advance of his Time
Ash (Tree) - It may be a great, solid, substantial business, in which a man's money, fame and fortune leave him no Time for GOD
Antilegomena - ) Certain books of the New Testament which were for a Time not universally received, but which are now considered canonical
Appoggiatura - ) A passing tone preceding an essential tone, and borrowing the Time it occupies from that; a short auxiliary or grace note one degree above or below the principal note unless it be of the same harmony; - generally indicated by a note of smaller size, as in the illustration above
Downwards - ) From a remote Time; from an ancestor or predecessor; from one to another in a descending line
Alternation - ) The reciprocal succession of things in Time or place; the act of following and being followed by turns; alternate succession, performance, or occurrence; as, the alternation of day and night, cold and heat, summer and winter, hope and fear
Abdi - An Israelite with a foreign wife in the Time of Ezra (Ezra 10:26 )
Asperges - During the paschal Time "Viai aquam" is sung instead of "Asperges"
Forecast - To adjust contrive or appoint beforehand The Time so well forecast
Judah the prince, rabbi - " One of the last Mishnaic sages, he recorded, edited, and organized statements of earlier sages, forming the Mishnah, setting the Oral Law in writing for the first Time
Omnipresence - It is the quality of being present in all places at all Times (Jeremiah 23:23. He is not bound by Time and space
Common Grace - It is common grace that "restrains" the wrath of God until a later Time
Tax Certificate - The certificate issued to the purchaser of land at a tax sale certifying to the sale and the payment of the consideration thereof, and entitling the purchaser upon certain conditions and at a certain Time thereafter to a deed or instrument of conveyance (called a tax deed) of the land, to be executed by the proper officer
Venire Facias - ...
(2):...
A judicial writ or precept directed to the sheriff, requiring him to cause a certain number of qualified persons to appear in court at a specified Time, to serve as jurors in said court
Abridgment - ) That which abridges or cuts short; hence, an entertainment that makes the Time pass quickly
Protestation - ) Formerly, a declaration in common-law pleading, by which the party interposes an oblique allegation or denial of some fact, protesting that it does or does not exist, and at the same Time avoiding a direct affirmation or denial
Precedency - ) The act or state of preceding or going before in order of Time; priority; as, one event has precedence of another
Tryst - ) An appointment to meet; also, an appointed place or Time of meeting; as, to keep tryst; to break tryst
Aged - ) Old; having lived long; having lived almost to or beyond the usual Time allotted to that species of being; as, an aged man; an aged oak
Juncture - ) A point of Time; esp
This - ) As a demonstrative pronoun, this denotes something that is present or near in place or Time, or something just mentioned, or that is just about to be mentioned
Leek - ) To make sport; to gibe; to sneer; to spend