What does Tiglath Pileser mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
פִּלְנְאֶ֖סֶר an Assyrian king who attacked Samaria or northern kingdom of Israel in the reign of Pekah. 2
פִּלְנֶ֙סֶר֙ an Assyrian king who attacked Samaria or northern kingdom of Israel in the reign of Pekah. 1
פְּלֶ֤סֶר an Assyrian king who attacked Samaria or northern kingdom of Israel in the reign of Pekah. 1
פִּלְאֶ֤סֶר an Assyrian king who attacked Samaria or northern kingdom of Israel in the reign of Pekah. 1

Definitions Related to Tiglath Pileser

H8407


   1 an Assyrian king who attacked Samaria or northern kingdom of Israel in the reign of Pekah.
   Additional Information: Tiglath-pileser or Tilgath-pilneser = “thou will uncover the wonderful bond”.
   

Frequency of Tiglath Pileser (original languages)

Frequency of Tiglath Pileser (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Tiglath-Pileser i.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Tiglath-Pileser
TIGLATH-PILESER [1]. This Assyrian ruler, the Tukulti-apil-çsharra of the monuments, was the third of the name. He began to reign about b.c. 745 (13th of Iyyar), and is supposed to have been a usurper. In the Babylonian chronological list he is called Pulu , the Pul of 2 Kings 15:19 , and the Poros of the Canon of Ptolemy. His reign was a very active and important one. Five months after his accession he marched into Babylonia to overthrow the power of the Aramæan tribes. In b.c. 744 he went to Namri to punish the tribes who harassed the Assyrian border. In b.c. 743 he defeated the forces of Sarduris ii. of Ararat at Arpad. Among those who gave tribute on this occasion were Rezin of Damascus, Hiram of Tyre, and Pisiris of Carchemish. Arpad, however, revolted again, and was for three years the objective of Tiglath-pileser’s expeditions (b.c. 742 740). In 739 he went to Ulluba in Mesopotamia, and the presence of his armies there enabled him, in b.c. 738, to make head against Syrian and Phœnician resistance. On this occasion he subjected Kullani, supposed to be the Calno of Isaiah 10:9 . Rost suggests that Azrian or Izrian (Azariah) of Judah played some part in this expedition, and among those who gave tribute was Menahem of Samaria ( 2 Kings 15:19 ). In b.c. 737 his objective was the Medes, in many of whose cities he set up bas-reliefs with the royal image. After this (b.c. 736) his forces were again directed against Mesopotamia, and reached the mountain of Nal. This led the way to the conquest of Ararat in b.c. 735. In b.c. 734 the Assyrian army invaded Pilishta (Philistia) according to Rost, the Mediterranean coastland S. of Joppa. Gaza was captured, and Hanun, the king, having fled, Tiglath-pileser mounted the throne and set up his image in the palace there. In b.c. 733 came the turn of Damascus and also of Israel, the immediate cause being affairs in Judah. Azariah had died, and after the short reign of his son Jotham, Jehoahaz or Ahaz came to the throne. Taking advantage of the change, Pekah of Israel made an alliance with Rezln of Damascus to attack Judah, and captured Elath ( 2 Kings 16:5 ff.). Feeling that Judah would be compelled to submit to the allied powers in the end, Ahaz turned to Assyria, sending the best of his own treasures and those of the Temple at Jerusalem to make a worthy present to the Assyrian king ( 2 Kings 16:8 ), who therefore came to his aid. Pekah and Rezln withdrew their forces from Judah, but, instead of uniting against the common foe, awaited the Assyrian king’s attack each in his own territory. Marching by the coast-route, Tiglath-pileser assured himself of the submission of his vassals in N. Phœnicia, and attacked N. Israel, capturing Ijon, Abel-beth-maacah, Janoah, Kedesh, Hazor, Gilead, Galilee, and all the land of Naphtali ( 2 Kings 15:29 ). These names are not preserved in the annals, though ‘the broad (land of) … -li’ may be, as Hommei suggests, the last named. Pekah saved his land from further harm by paying tribute, but things went harder with Rezin, his ally, who shut himself up in Damascus. The siege which followed ended, in 732, in the capture of the city; 591 towns, including Hadara, Rezin’s own city, were razed to the ground. An attack upon Samsi, queen of the Arabians, followed, the result being that a number of tribes Sabæans, Mas’æans, etc., hastened to propitiate the Assyrian king with gifts. Idi-bi’il, a N. Arabian prince, was made governor on the Musrian border. Meanwhile a number of Israelitish nobles, with Hoshea as leader, revolted, and Pekah fled, but seems to have been murdered. Hoshea thereupon mounted the throne, and bought the recognition of the Assyrian king, who had continued to ravage Syria. Mitinti of Ashkelon, seeing the fate of Rezin of Damascus, seems to have gone mad. He was succeeded by his son Rûkipti, who tried to atone for his father’s disaffection by sending tribute and gifts. Metenna of Tyre likewise became tributary. After the fall of the capital, Damascus became an Assyrian province. According to 2 Kings 16:9 , the people were taken captive to Kir, and Rezln was slain. It was in Damascus that Ahaz made homage to the conqueror, and seeing there an altar which took his fancy, had one made like it. Tiglath-pileser, confident, seemingly, of his hold upon Palestine, did not again invade the country. Its States remained for many years more or less tributary to Assyria, according as that power seemed strong or weak. In b.c. 731 Tiglath-pileser was attracted by events in Babylonia. Ukin-zçr, a Chald¿an prince, having seized the Babylonian throne, the Assyrian king besieged him in his capital Sapia, which he captured in b.c. 729, taking Ukin-zçr prisoner. In b.c. 728 Tiglath-pileser became king of Babylon, but beyond ‘grasping the hand of Bel’ (Merodach) as its ruler, took part in no further Important event. He probably died when making an expedition against a city whose name is lost; and Shalmaneser iv. mounted the throne (25th of Tebeth, b.c. 727). When at home, Tiglath-pileser resided in Nineveh or in Caiah, where he restored the central palace in Hittite style, decorating it with bas-reliefs and the annals of his reign. This building was partly destroyed by Esarhaddon.
T. G. Pinches.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Tiglath-Pileser Iii.
Or Tilgath-Pil-neser, the Assyrian throne-name of Pul (q.v.). He appears in the Assyrian records as gaining, in the fifth year of his reign (about B.C. 741), a victory over Azariah (= Uzziah in 2Chr.26:1), king of Judah, whose achievements are described in 2 Chronicles 26:6-15 . He is first mentioned in Scripture, however, as gaining a victory over Pekah, king of Israel, and Rezin of Damascus, who were confederates. He put Rezin to death, and punished Pekah by taking a considerable portion of his kingdom, and carrying off (B.C. 734) a vast number of its inhabitants into captivity (2 Kings 15:29 ; 16:5-9 ; 1 Chronicles 5:6,26 ), the Reubenites, the Gadites, and half the tribe of Manasseh whom he settled in Gozan. In the Assyrian annals it is further related that, before he returned from Syria, he held a court at Damascus, and received submission and tribute from the neighbouring kings, among whom were Pekah of Samaria and "Yahu-khazi [1], king of Judah" (Compare 2 Kings 16:10-16 ). He was the founder of what is called "the second Assyrian empire," an empire meant to embrace the whole world, the centre of which should be Nineveh. He died B.C. 728, and was succeeded by a general of his army, Ulula, who assumed the name Shalmaneser IV.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Tiglath-Pileser
(tihg' lath-pih lee' zuhr) Personal name meaning, “My trust is the son of Esarra (the temple of Asshur).” King of Assyria from 745 to 727 B.C. (2 Kings 16:7 ), also known as Tilgath-Pilneser (1 Chronicles 5:6 ; 2 Chronicles 28:20 ) and Pul (2 Kings 15:19 ; 1 Chronicles 5:26 ). See Assyria, History and Religion of .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Tiglath Pileser
Related to Αtargatis (Syriac), Dargeto , "great fish," tutelary god of the first Assyrian dynasty. 2 Kings 16:7; less correctly in 1 Chronicles 5:26, and 2 Chronicles 28:20, Tilgath Pilneser. G. Rawlinson identifies Tiglath Pileser with Tiglathi-nin, "be worship given to Nin" or Hercules (the same as Pal-zira, i.e. son of Zira, from whom Calah is called Bitzirah, because he had a temple at Zira or Calah). Oppert explains it, "let there be adoration to the son of the zodiac," i.e. to Nin or Hercules. The earlier Tiglath Pileser reigned about 1130 B.C. Two cylinders in the British Museum mention him. Tiglath Pileser the second (745-728 B.C) founded a new dynasty succeeded Pul and preceded Shalmaneser; six years before Tiglath Pileser's accession (751 B.C.) we find him exacting tribute from a Merodach Baladan who ruled in southern Babylonia on the shores of the Persian gulf, a district of marsh lands for many centuries a refuge for Assyrian rebels. (Transactions of the Society of Biblical Archaeology 6:16.)
Probably an usurper, for he makes no mention of his father or ancestors; and Berosus (Eusebius Chronicles Can. 1:4) and Herodotus (1:95) state that in the latter half of the eighth century B.C. there was a change of dynasty from that which ruled for 520 years to the dynasty which came in not long before Shalmaneser, probably at the time of the era of Nabonassar, 747 B.C. Sylla's friend, Alex. Polyhistor, who had access to Berosus' writings makes Beletaras (another form of Pal-tzira or Pileser) a gardener of the royal palace originally. Afterward, he gained the sovereignty in an extraordinary way and fixed it in his own family. Conquered Rezin of Damascus and Pekah of Israel at Ahaz' solid citation. (See REZIN; PEKAH.) The Assyrian inscriptions mention that Menahem of Samaria (probably about 743 B.C.) paid him tribute, Jahuhazi (Ahaz) also, and that he set Hoshea on the Israelite throne at Pekah's death.
He relates that about the fifth year of his reign (741 B.C.) he warred in southern Syria and defeated a large army under Azariah (Uzziah) king of Judah, whose army Scripture states to be 307,500 (2 Chronicles 26:6-15). Again, that from his 12th to his 14th year (734 to 732 B.C.) he warred with Pekah and Rezin confederated, and that he besieged Rezin's capital for two years, at the end of which he took and slew him and punished Pekah by depriving him of a large portion of his dominions, and carrying off vast numbers into captivity. Accurately agreeing with 2 Kings 15:29; 2 Kings 16:9-16; 1 Chronicles 5:6,26: "in the days of Pekah ... came Tiglath Pileser ... and took Ijon, Abel-beth-maachah, Janoah, Kedesh, Hazor, Gilead, Galilee, all the land of Naphtali (compare Isaiah 7; Isaiah 8; Isaiah 9:1, this stroke fell at first 'lightly,' 'afterward more grievously'), and carried them captive to Assyria. The king of Assyria hearkend unto Ahaz; went up against Damascus and took it, carried the people captive to Kir, and slew Rezin."
"Tiglath Pileser carried away the Reubenites, the Gadites, and half of Manasseh, and brought them unto Halah and Habor and Hara, and to the river Gozan." Probably it was an Assyrian altar which Ahaz copied, as a formal recognition of the gods of the sovereign nation (which required subject kings to set up in their capital "the laws of Asshur"), and a token of submission: the visit of Ahaz to Damascus (where "he saw the altar") "to meet king Tiglath Pileser" accords with Tiglath Pileser's inscription that before quitting Syria he held his court at Damascus, and there received submission and tribute from the neighbouring sovereigns, among whom he mentions Pekah and Jahu-Khaz (Ahaz) of Judah. Tiglath Pileser took Sippara (Sepharvaim) in Babylonia. He warred successfully in Media, Armenia, and upper Mesopotamia; but it was only on the western frontier that he made permanent additions to the empire, namely, Damascus, Syria, and Gilead. His mimerous slabs indicate that he probably built a palace at the S.E. corner of Calah (Nimrud). They bear traces of intentional defacement, and Esarhaddon used them as building materials in his palace at Calah. Sargon supplanted Tiglath Pileser's dynasty, which accounts for the hostility evinced in the injury done to the palace of Tiglath Pileser.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Tiglath-Pileser
That binds or takes away captivity
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Tiglath-Pileser
Tiglath-pileser (tĭg'lath-pĭ-lç'zer). The second Assyrian king mentioned in the Scriptures as having come into contact with the Israelites, and the second of the name. He invaded Samaria, 2 Kings 15:29, and after some years destroyed Damascus, taking many captives. 1 Chronicles 5:26. The occasion of the first attack was probably the refusal of Pekah to pay tribute; of the second, the call of Ahaz upon him for assistance against Pekah and Rezin, the king of Syria, Tiglath-pileser at Damascus met Ahaz, who became his vassal. 2 Kings 16:10. He reigned b.c. 747-730.

Sentence search

Janoah - A place in northern Galilee, the land of Naphtali, taken by Tiglath Pileser (2 Kings 15:29)
Rezin - But Ahaz invited Tiglath Pileser to his help, who took Damascus and slew Rezin, fulfilling Isaiah's prophecy. " Tiglath Pileser having reduced Syria to be tributary before treated Rezin as a rebel, and carried away the Syrians captive to (See KIR
Tiglath Pileser - Rawlinson identifies Tiglath Pileser with Tiglathi-nin, "be worship given to Nin" or Hercules (the same as Pal-zira, i. The earlier Tiglath Pileser reigned about 1130 B. Tiglath Pileser the second (745-728 B. C) founded a new dynasty succeeded Pul and preceded Shalmaneser; six years before Tiglath Pileser's accession (751 B. came Tiglath Pileser . "...
"Tiglath Pileser carried away the Reubenites, the Gadites, and half of Manasseh, and brought them unto Halah and Habor and Hara, and to the river Gozan. " Probably it was an Assyrian altar which Ahaz copied, as a formal recognition of the gods of the sovereign nation (which required subject kings to set up in their capital "the laws of Asshur"), and a token of submission: the visit of Ahaz to Damascus (where "he saw the altar") "to meet king Tiglath Pileser" accords with Tiglath Pileser's inscription that before quitting Syria he held his court at Damascus, and there received submission and tribute from the neighbouring sovereigns, among whom he mentions Pekah and Jahu-Khaz (Ahaz) of Judah. Tiglath Pileser took Sippara (Sepharvaim) in Babylonia. Sargon supplanted Tiglath Pileser's dynasty, which accounts for the hostility evinced in the injury done to the palace of Tiglath Pileser
Tig'Lath-Pile'Ser - " Here he overran the whole district to the east of Jordan, carrying into captivity "the Reubenites, the Gadites and the half tribe of Manasseh," (1 Chronicles 5:26 ) Before returning into his own land, Tiglath Pileser had an interview with Ahaz at Damascus
Ijon - Taken also by Tiglath Pileser (2 Kings 15:29)
Huzzab - The "Zab" is named in the inscription of Tiglath Pileser I in the 12th century B
Hara - Pul and Tiglath Pileser carried the men of Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh away to Hara while most were taken to Habor
Jareb - " Judah under Ahaz applied to Tiglath Pileser for aid against Syria and Israel (2 Kings 16:7-8; 2 Chronicles 28:16-21)
Cabul - Tiglath Pileser carried the inhabitants captive to Assyria (2 Kings 15:29)
Shalman - The Assyrian canon agrees with Scripture in making Shalman king directly after Tiglath Pileser
Pekah - But Ahaz at their second inroad applied to Tiglath Pileser, who slew Rezin and carried away the people of Gilead (including the whole territory of Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh 1 Chronicles 5:26), Galilee, and Naphtali (2 Kings 15:29). In the Assyrian inscription Menahem is mentioned as the king of Israel whom Tiglath Pileser subdued; possibly a mistake of the engraver, confusing Pekah with the king whom Pal reduced to be tributary
Dial - Ahaz' intimacy with Tiglath Pileser would naturally lead the "princes of Babylon to inquire of the wonder done in the land," which shows that the miracle of the recession of the shadow on the dial was local, perhaps produced by divinely ordered refraction, a cloud denser than the air being interposed between the gnomon and the "degrees" or "dial
Nergal - Tiglath Pileser (1150 B
Kedesh - Taken by Tiglath Pileser (2 Kings 15:29)
Abel-Beth-Maacha - Tiglath Pileser sent away its inhabitants captive to Assyria
Menahem - Tiglath Pileser II, the first monarch of the new dynasty, mentions Menahem in another inscription
Hittites - ...
Two or three centuries later the Assyrian inscription of Tiglath Pileser (1125 B
Assur - Under Tiglath Pileser the Assyrian empire included Media, Syria, and N. Ahaz' idolatrous altar set up from a pattern at Damascus, where lie had just given his submission to Tiglath Pileser, may have been required as a token of allegiance, for the inscriptions say that wherever they established their supremacy they set up "the laws of Asshur," and "altars to the great gods. Tiglath Pileser I. which had lain under the four grainer stones of the great temple of Assyria at Kileh Sherghat for 3000 years, and which relate the five successive campaigns of Tiglath Pileser I. Tiglath Pileser I. But as it is impossible to identify Tiglath Pileser's predecessor Asshut-lush with Pul, and as Assyria was then in a depressed state through internal troubles, Pul was probably monarch at Babylon (Berosus, the Babylonian historian, calls him "king of the Chaldoeans") while Asshur-lush reigned at Nineveh. ...
In the disturbed 10 years before Tiglath Pileser's accession, he probably deprived Assyria of her western province and invaded Palestine from the Assyrian direction, and so was loosely designated "king of Assyria" instead of "Babylon. " Tiglath Pileser II. (Tiglath Pileser's successor), and father of Sennacherib, and grandfather of Esarhaddon. At this time Tiglath Pileser II
Kir - From Kir the Syrians migrated originally; and to it they were removed from Damascus by Tiglath Pileser (2 Kings 16:9)
Zebulun - It is thought these tribes were the first carried into captivity beyond the Euphrates by Pul and Tiglath Pileser, kings of Assyria, 1 Chronicles 5:26
Hoshea (2) - " Tiglath Pileser had carried off the golden calf from Dan, and Shahnaneser from Bethel, in his first invasion (2 Kings 15:29; Hosea 10:14)
Nineveh - By a revolution Nin pala Zira ascends the throne, "the king of the commencement" as the Tiglath Pileser cylinder calls him. Then Asshurdahil, Mutaggil Nebo, Asshur-ris-ilim (conqueror of a Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon), Tiglath Pileser I (subdued Meshech), Asshur-belkala; a blank of two centuries follows when David's and Solomon's extensive dominion has place. Then Tiglath Pileser II, probably Pul, usurps the throne by revolution, for he does not mention his father as others do, 744 B. ...
Ahaz enlisted him as ally against Samaria and Damascus; Tiglath Pileser conquered them and received tribute from Jahu-khazi or Ahaz. Tiglath Pileser built a new palace at Nimrud
Nahum (2) - Tiglath Pileser and Shalmaneser had carried away Israel. Judah was harassed by Syria, and oppressed by Ahaz's payments to Tiglath Pileser (2 Chronicles 28; Isaiah 8-9)
Calf Worship - Tiglath Pileser carried away the calf at Daniel Shalmaneser, 10 years later, carried away that at Bethel (2 Kings 15:29; 2 Kings 17:6)
Alliances - Ahaz' appeal to Tiglath Pileser for help against Pekah of Israel and Rezin of Syria opened the way to Assyrian and Babylonian predominance (2 Kings 16)
Captivity - First in the reign of Pekah of Israel, when Tiglath Pileser, king of Assyria, carried away the people. As Pul his predecessor is named with Tiglath Pileser as having carried away Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh to Halah, Habor, Hara, and the river Gozan (1 Chronicles 5:25-26), probably Tiglath Pileser carried (740 B
Ammon - Ammon seized on the cities of Gad from which Tiglath Pileser had carried the Israelites (Jeremiah 49:1-6; Zephaniah 2:8-9)
Naphtali - " Tiglath Pileser swept away its people to Assyria; Benhadad of Syria had previously smitten all Naphtali (1 Kings 15:20; 2 Kings 15:29)
Immanuel - ...
Just two years after Pekah of Israel was slain by Hoshea, and Rezin of Damascus by Tiglath Pileser king of Assyria
Damascus - In the reign of Ahaz, it was taken by Tiglath Pileser, who slew its last king, Rezin, and added its provinces to the Assyrian empire
Reuben - ) Finally going a whoring after the gods of the people of the land whom God destroyed before them, Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh were first cut short by Hazael (2 Kings 10:32-33), then carried off by Pul and Tiglath Pileser, and placed about the river Khabour "in Halah, Habor, Hara, and the river Gozan" (1 Chronicles 5:26)
Gad (1) - Gad finally was carried captive by Tiglath Pileser, and Ammon seized their land and cities (2 Kings 15:29; 1 Chronicles 5:26; Jeremiah 49:1)
Manasseh (1) - ...
But because of apostasy from the God of their fathers to the gods of the people whom He destroyed before them, Manasseh was first cut short by the Syrian Hazael (2 Kings 10:32), then God stirred up the spirit of Pul and of Tiglath Pileser of Assyria to carry the eastern half of Manasseh, Reuben, and Gad captives to Halah, Habor, Hara, and the river Gozan (1 Chronicles 5:25-26)
Damascus - ) The successive invasions of Pul and Tiglath Pileser suggested the thought of combining Syria, Israel, and Judah as a joint power against Assyria
Ahaz - What mock humility in one who scrupled not to use God's brazen altar to divine with, and had substituted for God's altar in God's worship the pattern, which pleased his aesthetic tastes, of the idol altar at Damascus (2 Kings 16:11-15); perhaps the adoption of this pattern, an Assyrian one, was meant as a token of vassalage to Assyria, by adopting some of their religious usage's and idolatries; indeed Tiglath Pileser expressly records in the Assyrian monuments that he held his court at Damascus, and there received submission and tribute of both Pekah of Samaria and Ahaz of Judah. The feeble Ahaz, retributively" brought low," even as he had "made naked" (stripped of the true defense, Jehovah, Exodus 32:25, by sin) Judah, sought deliverance by becoming Tiglath Pileser's vassal (1 Kings 16:7-10)
Medes - , Kir a Median city was held by Tiglath Pileser (2 Kings 16:9)
Galilee - Tiglath Pileser carried away captive its Israelite population to Assyria; then Esarhaddon colonized it with pagan (2 Kings 15:29; 2 Kings 17:24; Ezra 4:2; Ezra 4:10)
Nebuchadnezzar - " This restoration is also stated to have taken place five hundred and four years after its first erection in that form by Tiglath Pileser I
Samaria - Through the depopulations by Pul and Tiglath Pileser (1 Chronicles 5:26; 2 Kings 15:29) the extent of Samaria was much limited
Kings, the Books of - The names of Omri, Mesha, Jehu, Menahem, Hoshea, Hezekiah, are deciphered in inscriptions of campaigns of Tiglath Pileser, Sargon, Sennacherib, and Esarhaddon
Hezekiah - ...
Hezekiah bore for a time the yoke of tribute imposed by the Assyrian Tiglath Pileser on Ahaz (2 Kings 16:7); but having spent much on the Philistine war, trusting in the aid of Egypt, be now ventured to withhold payment from Assyria
Jerusalem - (See AHAZ as to his mutilation of the temple, in vassalage to Tiglath Pileser