What does Thomas mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
θωμᾶς one of the apostles. 8
θωμᾶν one of the apostles. 2
θωμᾷ one of the apostles. 1

Definitions Related to Thomas

G2381


   1 one of the apostles.
   Additional Information: Thomas = “a twin”.
   

Frequency of Thomas (original languages)

Frequency of Thomas (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Bisbane, Sir Thomas Makdougall
(1773-1860) Astronomer. Distinguished in nautical astronomy, drew up tables for computing time from the altitudes of celestial bodies, established the first important Australian observatory, and compiled the Brisbane Catalogue of 7385 stars.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Dwight, Thomas
Anatomist and teacher, born Boston, Massachusetts, 1843; died Nahant, Massachusetts, 1911. He became a Catholic in 1856, and graduated from the Harvard Medical School, 1867; after studying abroad, he was instructor in comparative anatomy at Harvard, 1872-1873, lectured also at Bowdoin, and succeeded Oliver Wendell Holmes as Parkman professor of anatomy at Harvard Medical School, 1883. In the Warren Museum of Anatomy at Harvard Dwight arranged a section of osteology, considered one of the best in existence, and he had an international reputation as an anatomist. Among his writings are: "Frozen Sections of a Child" (1872); "Clinical Atlas of Variations of the Bones of the Hands and Feet" (1907); "Thoughts of a Catholic Anatomist" (1911), a valuable work of Christian apologetics.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Malory, Thomas
Compiler of the "Morte d' Arthur," the earliest piece of literary English prose. Nothing is known of him except his name, his knighthood, and that his work was finished in 1469.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Messingham, Thomas
Hagiologist, born Ireland; died 1638. He was educated at the Irish College, Paris, of which he became a staff member. In 1620 he published offices of Sain Patrick, Saint Brigid, Saint Columba, and other Irish saints. The following year he was made rector of the Irish College. Appointed prothonotary Apostolic, he represented many Irish bishops. Messingham secured the affiliation of the college to the University of Paris, and in 1626 his rules for the Irish seminary were approved by the Archbishop of Paris. In 1624 he published at Paris his work on Irish saints, "Florilegium Insulae Sanctorum," containing a treatise on Saint Patrick's Purgatory. Between 1632,1638 he labored for the Irish Church in various capacities.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Linacre, Thomas
Physician, born Canterbury, England, c.1460;died London, England, 1524. After studying at Oxford, he spent 10 years in Italy specializing in the classics, and received his degree in medicine at Padua. On his return to England he ranked as the leading humanist, and in addition was physician to Henry VIII and Wolsey. He became a priest after 1520, and with his fortune established the Royal College of Physicians, London.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Moore, Thomas
Poet and biographer, called the "poet of the people of Ireland," born Dublin, Ireland, 1779; died Devizes, England, 1852. At an early age he exhibited great skill in rhyming, and at fifteen had poems published in the "Anthologia Hibernica." Graduated from Trinity College, Dublin, 1798, he went to London to study law, but literature attracted him more, and his early works met with immediate success. He accepted appointment as registrar of the Admiralty Court of Bermuda, 1803, but after four months appointed a deputy and traveled in the United States and Canada, returning to London the following year. His "Epistles, Odes, and Other Poems," treating of his travels, appeared in 1806; the first of his "Irish Melodies," the best loved of his works, in which he set words to the old national airs of Ireland, was published in 1817. Other poetical works are: "Corruption and Tolerance," a satire, 1808; "The Sceptic, a Philosophical Satire," 1809; "Intercepted Letters or the Two-penny Post Bag," a light satirical work, 1813; "Lalla Rookh," an oriental romance, 1819; the first of the "National Airs," 1818; and the "Loves of the Angels," an oriental poem, 1822. In this last year he turned his attention to prose writing and from then on figures mainly as a prose writer. His prose works include: "History of Captain Rock and his Ancestors," dealing with English misrule of Ireland; "Life of Sheridan," 1825; "Life of Byron," 1830; "Life of Lord Edward Fitzgerald," 1831; and "Travels of an Irish Gentleman in Search of a Religion," 1834.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - de Vere, Aubrey Thomas Hunt
Poet, born County Limerick, Ireland, 1814; died there, 1902. A personal disciple of Wordsworth, he wrote poems based on the legends of Greece and Ireland. He was graduated from Trinity College, Dublin. Later he visited Cambridge, Oxford, and Rome, and came under the influence of Newman. Largely through his study of Coleridge, and the conversion of Cardinal Manning, he became a Catholic, 1857. His chief works are: "The Waldenses" (a lyrical sketch); "Search after Proserpine" (recollections of Greece); "Poetical Works"; and "Essays."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Dongan, Thomas
Second Earl of Limerick, colonial governor of New York, born County Kildare, Ireland, 1634; died London, England, 1715. Under his supervision the representative assembly of New York Province passed an Acts 1683, entitled "A Charter of Liberties," which developed into the present state government and was subsequently adopted by England as the framework of her colonial policy. He established in New York City a college under the direction of the Jesuit Fathers.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mcmahon, Martin Thomas
Soldier, jurist, born Laprairie, Canada, 1838; died New York, 1906. He attended Saint John's College, Fordham, and practised law in California. During the Civil War he was aide to General McClellan, later major-general of Volunteers, and received the medal of honor for bravery. After the war he was corporation counsel of New York City, minister to Paraguay, senator, and judge of the Court of General Sessions.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fitz-Simons, Thomas
Statesman, born Ireland, 1741; died Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1811. He was in America as early as 1758, and took a prominent part in the Revolutionary movement; his election as one of the Provincial Deputies in July, 1774, is the first instance of a Catholic being named for a public office in Pennsylvania. He was a member of the Continental Congress, assisted in drawing up the Constitution of 1787 of which he was one of the signers, and was elected a member of the first Congress of the United States. Probably he was the first to suggest a protective tariff to help American industries. He was one of the founders of Georgetown College.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Thomas
THOMAS . One of the twelve Apostles. The earlier Evangelists mention only his name ( Matthew 10:3 = Mark 3:18 = Luke 6:15 ), but St. John has rescued him from oblivion. His question in the Upper Room ( John 14:5 ) proves him somewhat slow of understanding. He was querulous and gloomy, always disposed to look at the dark side. Thus, when Jesus on the evening of the Resurrection-day appeared to the Apostles in the room at Jerusalem where they were assembled with closed doors, Thomas was absent, buried in despair; and when he heard that they had seen the Lord, he would not believe it. He would not, he declared, be persuaded unless he saw and handled His pierced hands and side ( John 20:19-25 ). The next Sunday evening Jesus appeared as before, and gave Thomas the evidence he had craved. ‘My Lord and my God!’ cried the doubter, leaping from the depth of despair to the summit of faith ( John 20:26 ; John 20:29 ). His doubts were removed, and he was one of the seven who journeyed north to meet the Lord at the Lake of Galilee ( John 21:2 ). Despondent though he was, Thomas was no coward, and he had a great devotion to Jesus. It was he who, when tidings of Lazarus’ sickness were brought to Bethany beyond Jordan, and the rest, fearing the rage of the rulers, were disposed to let the Master venture alone into Judæa, put their cowardice to shame: ‘Let us also go, that we may die with him!’ ( John 11:16 .)
Thomas is not really a name but an epithet, meaning, like its Greek equivalent Didymus ( John 11:16 ; John 20:24 ; John 21:2 ), ‘the Twin.’ If, as Eusebius states, the Apostle’s name was Judas, he would be styled ‘the Twin’ to distinguish him from Judas the son of James and Judas Iscariot. Tradition credits him with the authorship of a Gospel (see Gospels [1], 6 ).
David Smith.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ceva, Thomas
(1648-1737) Jesuit mathematician, born Milan; died there. He was a prolific writer, and is best known for his geometrical theorem.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Campbell, Thomas
(1848-1925) Writer, born New York, New York, USA; died Monroe, New York, USA. Educated at Saint Francis Xavier's College, New York, he entered the Jesuit novitiate near Montreal, 1867, and after teaching at various colleges of the order, studied theology at Louvain, 1878-1882, where he was ordained. He was provincial of the Maryland-New York Province, 1888-1893, twice rector of Fordham University, 1885-1888,1896-1901, associate editor of "The Messenger of the Sacred Heart," 1901-1908, and editor of "America," 1910-1914. He was the author of "Pioneer Priests of North America," "Names of God," a translation from Lessius, "Pioneer Laymen of North America," "Various Discourses," a collection of sermons, and the important historical work, "The Jesuits."
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Thomas
Twin, one of the twelve (Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 , etc.). He was also called Didymus (John 11:16 ; 20:24 ), which is the Greek equivalent of the Hebrew name. All we know regarding him is recorded in the fourth Gospel (John 11:15,16 ; 14:4,5 ; 20:24,25,26-29 ). From the circumstance that in the lists of the apostles he is always mentioned along with Matthew, who was the son of Alphaeus (Mark 3:18 ), and that these two are always followed by James, who was also the son of Alphaeus, it has been supposed that these three, Matthew, Thomas, and James, were brothers.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Christians of st Thomas
A sort of Christians in a peninsula of India on this side the gulf; they inhabit chiefly at Cranganor, and the neighbouring country; these admit of no images, and receive only the cross, to which they pay a great veneration. They affirm, that the souls of the saints do not see God till after the day of judgment; they acknowledge but three sacraments, viz. baptism, orders, and the Eucharist; they make no use of holy oils in the administration of baptism, but after the ceremony, anoint the infant with an unction composed of oil and walnuts, without any benediction. In the Eucharist they consecrate with little cakes made of oil and salt, and instead of wine make use of water in which raisins have been infused. In the Asiatic Researches of the Society instituted in Bengal, may be found an enlarged account of the Christians of St. Thomas, which was laid before that society by F. Wrede, Esq.
See also Monthly Magazine for 1804, p. 60. and Dr. Kerr's Report to Lord Behtich, on the state of the Christians inhabiting the kingdom of Cochin and Travancore. Evang. Mag. 1807. p. 473.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Thomas
Hebrew, "twin;" Greek, Didymus . Coupled with Matthew in Matthew 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:15; but with Philip in Acts 1:13. Matthew modestly puts himself after Thomas in the second quaternion of the twelve; Mark and Luke give him his rightful place before Thomas. Thomas, after his doubts were removed (John 20:28), having attained eminent faith (for sometimes faith that has overcome doubt is hardier than that of those who never doubt), is promoted above Bartholomew and Matthew in Acts. John records three incidents throwing strong light on his character:
(1) (John 11:8; John 11:15-16) When Jesus, for Lazarus' sake, proposed to go into Judaea again the disciples remonstrated, "Master, the Jews of late have sought to stone Thee, and goest Thou there again?" On Jesus' reply that His day was not yet closed, and that He was going to awake Lazarus out of the death sleep, and that He was glad of his death "to the intent that they might believe," Thomas evinced his devoted love on the one hand, ready to follow Jesus unto death (compare Paul, Acts 21:13), on the other hand ignoring, with characteristic slowness to believe, Jesus' plain statement as to His going to raise Lazarus. He can see no hope of escape; his natural despondency anticipates death as the certain issue of the journey, still in self devoting affection he will brave all.
(2) (John 14:4-6) cf6 "Where I go ye know, and the way ye know;" Thomas saith, "Lord, we know not where Thou goest (yet Jesus had answered Peter's question, John 13:36), 'Lord, where goest Thou?' and plainly told the disciples He was going to cf6 'His Father's house', John 14:2, ascending to where He had been before, John 6:62), and how can we know the way?" Thomas still cannot raise his mind to the unseen future home where Jesus is going, or realize the way as through Jesus.
(3) (John 20:20; John 20:24-29) Thomas with morbid brooding over doubts had absented himself from the disciples' assembly on the first Lord's day, when "He showed unto them His hands and His side"; so he missed the immediate blessing (compare Hebrews 10:25). The disciples did not stand aloof from Thomas though he had stood aloof from them; they told him, "we have seen the Lord." But he said with an unreasonable demand for sense evidence which is alien to the very idea of faith, and at the same time with language that marks the vivid impression which his Lord's body nailed on the cross had made on his mind, "except I shall see in His hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into His side (one sense, seeing, is not enough; not even feeling also will satisfy him unless he feels with both hand and finger the spear mark as well as the nail marks) I will not and cannot believe" (oumee pisteusoo ).
A week of gloom to Thomas elapsed, the retribution in kind for his obstinate unbelief. Though Jesus might have cast him off yet He would not break the bruised reed; He condescends to Thomas' culpable weakness. On the next Lord's day, Thomas, laying aside his morbid isolation, attended the weekly assembly of disciples; though the doors were shut Jesus came and stood in the midst with His wonted salutation, cf6 "Peace be unto you"; then saith He to Thomas, with grave yet tender reproof (showing that He knew all that had passed in Thomas's mind and all he had said to his fellow disciples), cf6 "reach here thy finger, and behold My hands, and reach here thy hand, and thrust it into My side; and be ("become", ginou ) not faithless but believing". Thomas said unto Him, My Lord and my God!"
A refutation of Socinianism, because Thomas addresses these words to Jesus. The highest confession of faith in Jesus' Godhead thus far made; see Peter's (John 6:69; Matthew 16:16). As this forms the close of John's Gospel, before the supplementary chapter (John 21) was added, this ending recurs to the doctrine alleged in the Gospel's beginning, "the Word was God." Like Mary Magdalene (John 20:13) Thomas appropriates Jesus to himself, "my Lord and, my God." From the overwhelming proofs before him of Jesus' humanity Thomas believes in His Divinity. The resurrection of the Son of man proved that He was the Son of God (Romans 1:4).
All Christ's appearances in the 40 days were preparations for the believing without seeing (1 Peter 1:8). Jesus spoke for all our dispensation what He said to Thomas, "because thou hast seen Me thou hast believed; blessed are they that have not seen and yet have believed" (2 Corinthians 5:7). Thomas was permitted to doubt, that we might not doubt ("Αb eo dubitatum est, ne a nobis dubitaretur" ; Augustine). God's word, not demonstration, is the true ground of faith. Thomas is named next to Peter among the seven on the sea of Galilee, a proof that he was a fisherman like Peter (John 21:2). He appears for the last time among the disciples met after the ascension (Acts 1:13). The case of Thomas does not sanction but condemns skepticism, for if others were to demand the same tangible visible proofs as Thomas demanded miracles would have to be so continual as to cease to be miraculous, and sight would supersede faith. The unbelief of Thomas drew forth such an infallible proof of the identity between the crucified and the risen Lord that he who any longer disbelieves and is consequently condemned is left without excuse.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Thomas
It seems, from his name, that the apostle Thomas was a twin. The names Thomas and Didymus come from the words for ‘twin’ in the Aramaic and Greek languages respectively (Matthew 10:3; John 11:16).
Three incidents show that Thomas was a straightforward person who expressed his feelings openly. The first occurred when Jesus, after leaving Judea to escape the Jews’ attempt to kill him, decided to return. The disciples feared the dangers ahead and tried to dissuade him. When Jesus made it clear that he was determined to go, Thomas showed his courage and his pessimism by suggesting that they go with him so that they might die with him (John 10:39; John 11:7-8; John 11:16).
The second incident occurred as the time drew near for Jesus to return to the Father. He reminded his disciples that they knew where he was going, but Thomas, with characteristic bluntness, replied that they did not (John 14:1-5).
The third incident occurred soon after the resurrection, when Thomas refused to believe the report that Jesus was alive. Upon meeting Jesus himself, he readily repented of his doubts and confessed Jesus to be his Lord and his God (John 20:24-29).
Thomas was one of the eleven apostles to hear Jesus’ command to evangelize the world (Matthew 28:16-20; Acts 1:6-13). According to tradition, his chief contribution to this task was to take the gospel to India.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Thomas
One of the twelve apostles, called also DIDYMUS,a twin. He comes prominently before us on two significant occasions: once when he said to the Lord, "We know not whither thou goest, and how can we know the way?" The Lord replied, "I am the way, the truth, and the life." John 14:5,6 . Also when he said that he would not believe that the Lord had risen until he had ocular demonstration as to His wounds; but when he saw the Lord, he at once confessed Him as "My Lord and my God." John 20:19-29 . He was not with the other disciples when the Lord breathed into them, and said, "Receive ye the Holy Ghost;" and thus he may be taken as a type of the future remnant of the Jews, who will not believe till they see their Messiah. In contrast to which the Lord added a beautiful sentence respecting those of the present time: "Blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed."
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Thomas
THOMAS.—One of the twelve Apostles. (For the name see Didymus). In the lists of the Twelve his name is always in the second group of four. In Mark 3:18, where the names are not in pairs, he is eighth; so in Luke 6:15, where he is coupled with Matthew. In Matthew 10:3 he is seventh, coming before Matthew. In Acts 1:13 he is sixth, and is coupled with Philip. No incident is recorded of him in the Synoptics or in Acts; but he comes into some prominence in the later scenes in the Fourth Gospel. When Jesus is about to return to Judaea because of the death of Lazarus, and the disciples are afraid of Jewish hostility, Thomas says, ‘Let us also go, that we may die with him’ (John 11:16). In the conversation after the Supper, Thomas interjects the remark, ‘Lord, we know not whither thou goest; and how can we know the way?’ (John 14:5); and thereby elicits the great saying, ‘I am the way, the truth, and the life’ (John 14:6). When Jesus appeared to the disciples on the evening of the Resurrection day, Thomas was absent, and was unable afterwards to accept the testimony, ‘We have seen the Lord.’ He must himself not only see the Master, but touch His body before he could believe (John 20:24-25). A week later Thomas is present when Jesus again appears; and then his doubts vanish, and he rises to the completest confession of faith recorded in the Gospels, ‘My Lord and my God’ (John 20:26-29). Thomas is mentioned also in John 21:2 as one of the group to whom Jesus appeared on the morning by the Lake-side.
Later traditions of Thomas, obviously of little value, are mentioned in Eusebius and in the Apocryphal Acts of Thomas. He is spoken of as a missionary to Parthia, or to India. Some traditions assign to him the honour of martyrdom; and his supposed grave was shown at Edessa in the 4th century.
The personality of Thomas has a clear and consistent expression in the incidents which the Fourth Gospel records. He belongs to the quiet, reflective group of the Apostolic company; and his temperament is that of a man who finds the best things too good to be true, and who usually imagines that the worst foreseen possibility will be realized. He requires direct personal evidence, and will not hastily accept the testimony even of his friends. Yet he is not lacking in devotion and love to his Lord. He will die with Him rather than desert His cause; and in his gloomiest days of unbelief he does not separate himself from the Apostolic company. Though not persuaded of the reality of the Resurrection, he keeps his old loyalty and love; and when the Master’s presence is utterly sure, he gladly accepts the highest that the revelation of Christ implies. His unbelief was never a failure to respond to the spiritual truth and love brought to him by his Master; at most it was an inability to accept unexpected and marvellous external manifestations of that truth. ‘In Thomas we have a man incredulous but tenacious; despondent but true; with little hope but much courage; sincere in love though perplexed in faith; neither rushing to the right conclusion as Peter might have done, nor rushing away from it into danger and dishonour as Peter did’ (T. T. Lynch).
The scepticism of Thomas has a real apologetic value. It goes to disprove the contention that the Apostles were credulous persons easily misled by their hopes, and so deluded into a mistaken belief that their dead Master had spoken to them. Thomas believed because the fact which was too good to hope for became too certain to reject.
Literature.—Among expository sermons on Thomas may be named F. W. Robertson, Serm. ii. 268; T. T. Lynch, Serm. for my Curates, 33; H. M. Butler, Univ. and other Serm. 43; A. B. Davidson, The Called of God, 317.
E. H. Titchmarsh.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Thomas
(thohm' uhss) Personal name from Hebrew meaning, “a twin.” One of the first twelve disciples of Jesus (Mark 3:18 ). The apocryphal book, The Acts of Thomas , uses the literal meaning of his name (“twin”) in making him the twin of Jesus Himself! His personality was complex, revealing a pessimism mixed with loyalty and faith (John 11:16 ). Thomas sought evidence of Jesus' resurrection (John 20:25 ), but when convinced of the miracle made an historic confession of faith (John 20:28 ). See Apocrypha, New Testament ; Didymus ; Disciples .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Howard, Thomas 15th Century
Born 1473; died 1554. Third duke of Norfolk. Uncle of Anne Boleyn. A tool of Henry VIII, he acquired rich monastic loot, and was created earl-marshal in 1533. He persecuted the Catholics, and his career as a military leader was marked with devastation. Accused of treason in 1544, his life was saved by Henry VIII's timely death, but he remained in prison till Mary's accession.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Howard, Thomas 16th Century
Born 1536; died 1572. Fourth duke of Norfolk. A Protestant. Married Mary Fitzalan, daughter of Henry, twelfth Earl of Arundel. He later planned to marry the imprisoned Mary Queen of Scots, but was executed for treason.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marshall, Thomas William
Controversialist, born 1818; died Surbiton, England, 1877. Brother of Arthur Featherstone Marshall. He was Anglican vicar of Swallowcliff, Wiltshire, but in 1845 became a Catholic. Among his writings were the sensational "Christianity in China," and "Christian Missions," exposing the weaknesses of the Anglican missions.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Hussey, Thomas
Ecclesiastic and diplomat, born Ballybogan, County Meath, Ireland, 1746; died Tramore, County Waterford, Ireland, 1803. He was educated at Salamanca and appointed chaplain to the Spanish embassy at London, 1767. Twenty-five years later, when Spain and France broke with England, he took care of the Spanish interests in England; subsequently he was entrusted by the British with diplomatic missions in Madrid and Ireland. In 1795 he was appointed first president of Maynooth College, and shortly after was consecrated Bishop of Waterford and Lismore.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - o'Hagan, Thomas
First Baron O'Hagan of Tullxhogue; born Belfast, Ireland, 1812; died 1885. After editing the "Newry Examiner," he made rapid progress at the Bar, and, 1868, was appointed Lord Chancellor of Ireland, the first Catholic to hold that office since the days of James II.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Murray, Thomas Edward
Knight of Saint Gregory and Knight of Malta; inventor; born Albany, New York, 1860; died Long Island, New York, 1929. At an early age he was an expert machinist and showed signs of inventive genius which culminated in his obtaining patents for 1100 inventions, more than any other inventori except Thomas Edison. Besides maintaining general supervision of his own corporations, he effected combinations of all the electric companies in Brooklyn and New York, which resulted in the formation of the New York Edison Company, the United Electric Light and Power Company, and the Brooklyn Edison Company. The designer of more electrical plants than any engineer in the country, he won the Longstreth Medal of Merit for his numerous inventions of safety appliances and high commendation from the War Department for his invention of an electric welding process for the manufacture of 9.4 inch mortar shells.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marshall, Thomas
Martyred 1539, Abbot of Saint Werburgh, Chester, England, and of Saint John's, Colchester, England. He was educated at Oxford, and received his degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1515. In 1534 he took the Oath of Supremacy, but later incurred the king's resentment by expressing admiration for the martyrs, Blessed John Fisher and Blessed Thomas More. After a trial for treasonable utterances, he was convicted and executed. Beatified, 1895.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Gospel of Thomas
See Apocrypha, New Testament ; Gnosticism .
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Thomas
A twin
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Allies, Thomas William
(1813-1903) Writer, born Midsomer Norton, Somersetshire, England. He was educated at Eton and Oxford, and took Anglican orders, 1838. In 1850 he became a Catholic, and served as secretary to the Catholic Poor-School Committee, 1853-90. He wrote "The See of Peter," "A Life's Decision," and his masterpiece, "The Formation of Christendom." In 1885 he was created Knight Commander of Saint Gregory and in 1893Pope Leo XIII awarded him the gold medal for merit.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Goldwell, Thomas
Bishop of Saint Asaph, Wales, last survivor of the ancient English hierarchy, born Kent, England, c.1501;died Rome, Italy, 1585. He was Cardinal Pole's secretary, and went into exile with him to Italy, in 1538. Nine years later he joined the Theatines, and under Queen Mary returned as Bishop of Saint Asaph; Mary's death frustrated his transfer to Oxford, and he went into exile again. He was the only English bishop present at the Council of Trent.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Thomas
One of the apostles of Christ. His history we have in the gospel. His other name Didymus signifies a twin. And it is remarkable that the Hebrew for twin is Tham.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Thomas
THE character of Thomas is an anatomy of melancholy. If "to say man is to say melancholy," then to say Thomas, called Didymus, is to say religious melancholy. Peter was of such an ardent and enthusiastical temperament that he was always speaking, whereas Thomas was too great a melancholian to speak much, and when he ever did speak it was always out of the depths of his hypochondriacal heart.
It was already the last week of his Master's life before we have Thomas so much as once opening his mouth. And the occasion of his first melancholy utterance was this: Lazarus was sick unto death in Bethany. And when Jesus heard that His friend was so sick, He said to His disciples, "Let us go into Judea again." "Master," they answered, "the Jews of late have been seeking opportunity to stone Thee to death, and goest Thou thither again?" And it was when Thomas saw that his Master was walking straight into the jaws of certain destruction that he said, in sad abandonment of all his remaining hope, "Let us also go, that we may die with Him," Thomas felt sure in his foreboding heart that his Master would never leave Judea alive; Thomas loved his Master more than life, and therefore he determined to die with Him. And, indeed, that determination was not very difficult for Thomas to take. Life had not yielded much to Thomas. And its best promises, more and more delayed, and more and more deluding him, were taking less and less hold of Thomas's heart as the years went on. We see now that the disciples of Jesus of Nazareth had the very best cause for high hope and full assurance. But at that time, and especially that week, Thomas had only too good ground for all his anxiety, and despondency, and melancholy. And a whole lifetime of melancholy, constitutional and circumstantial, had by this time settled down on Thomas, and had taken absolute and tyrannical possession of him. The disciples were all sick at heart with hope deferred; as also with the terrible questionings that would sometimes arise in their hearts, and would not be silenced; all kinds of questionings about their more and more mysterious Master; and about His more and more mysterious, and more and more stumbling, sayings, both about Himself and about themselves. And then His certainly impending death, and the unaccountable delay and disappearance of His promised kingdom: all that doubt, and fear, and despondency, and despair, met in Thomas's melancholy heart till it all took absolute possession of him. And till he sometimes said to himself that it would be the best thing that could happen to him if he could but die at once and be done for ever with all these difficulties and delays and bitter and unbearable disappointments. The discipleship-life, at its very best, had never been very satisfying to Thomas's heart; and, of late, it had been becoming absolutely unbearable to this melancholy and morose man. "Let us go," he said, "that we may die with Him."
The next time that Thomas speaks is when Jesus and His disciples are still in the upper room where the last passover had just been celebrated and the Lord's Supper instituted. "In My Father's house are many mansions: I go to prepare a place for you. And whither I go ye know, and the way ye know." The other disciples may know whither their Master is going, and they may know the way, but Thomas knows neither. The other disciples, as a matter of fact, know quite as little, and even less, about this whole matter than Thomas knows: only they think they know, when they do not: they have not knowledge enough to know that they know nothing. 'His Father's house?' said Thomas to himself. 'What does He mean? Why does He not speak plainly?' Thomas must understand his Master's meaning. Thomas is one of those unhappy men who cannot he put off with mere words. Thomas must see to the bottom before be can pretend to believe. Thomas was the first of those disciples, and a primate among them, in whose restless minds doubt, like a shoot, springs round the stock of truth.
At the same time, Thomas in his melancholy candour and saddened plainness of speech was but ministering an opportunity to his Master to utter one of His most golden oracles. Jesus saith unto Thomas, "I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father but by Me." We cannot much regret that restless and realistic melancholy of Thomas since it has procured for us such a satisfying and ennobling utterance as that. "All His disciples minister to Him," says Newman; "and as in other ways, so also in giving occasion for the words of grace which proceed from His mouth."
Ten days pass. But what days! The betrayal, the arrest, the trial, the crucifixion, the burial, and the resurrection of Thomas's Master. What days and nights of trial, and that not for faith and hope only, but for reason herself to keep her seat! All the faith and all the trust of the disciples have not only fallen into a deep doubt during those terrible days and nights: all their faith and all their trust have been actually crucitied and laid dead and buried, and that without a spark of hope. For as yet the disciples knew not the Scripture, that their Master must rise again from the dead. "Then the same day at evening, being the first day of the week, came Jesus and stood in the midst, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you. And when He had so said, He showed them His hands and His side. Then were the disciples glad when they saw the Lord." But Thomas was not with them when Jesus came. Where was Thomas that glorious Sabbath evening? Why was he not with the rest? How shall we account for the absence of Thomas? It could not have been by accident. He must have been told that the ten astounded, overwhelmed, and enraptured disciples were to be all together that wonderful night; astounded, overwhelmed, and enraptured with the events of the morning. What conceivable cause, then, could have kept Thomas away? Whatever it was that kept Thomas away, he was terribly punished for his absence. For he thereby lost the first and best sight of his risen Master, and His first and best benediction of peace. He not only lost that benediction, but the joy of the other disciples who bad received it filled the cup of Thomas's misery full. The first appearance of their risen Master, that had lifted all the other disciples up to heaven, was the last blow to cast Thomas down to hell. The darkness, the bitterness, the sullenness, the pride, that had its seat so deep down in Thomas's heart, all burst out in the presence of his brethren's joy. Thomas would have none of their joy. Thomas would not believe it. They were dreaming. They were deluded. They were mad. And the pride, and jealousy, and bitterness of his heart, full drove Thomas into a deeper rage and a deeper rebellion. "Except I shall see in His hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into His side, I will not believe." We all understand Thomas's misery. We have all been possessed by it. It is the jealousy and the rage of a guilty conscience. It is the jealousy and the rage of a disappointed and a revengeful heart. When any good comes to others that we should have been sharers in, when we are absent through our own fault, and when those who were present come to tell us about all that we have lost, we have all been like Thomas. We said, I do not believe it. It was not all that you say it was. You are exalting yourselves over me. You are boasting yourselves beyond the truth. And if the truth cannot be hid from us, or denied by us, we hate them, and the thing we have lost, all the more. Thomas is told us for our learning. We see ourselves in Thomas as in a glass. Thomas, in all his melancholy and resentment, is ourselves. Unbelief, and obstinacy, and loss of oppportunity, and then increased unbelief, is no strange thing to ourselves.
And after eight days the disciples were again within, and this time Thomas was with them. It had taken the disciples all their might all these eight days to prevail with and to persuade Thomas. And all of us who know what it is to wage a war with our own wounded pride, and with nothing but our own sullenness, and stubbornness, and mulishness to oppose to the pleadings of truth and love, we know something of what Thomas came through before he consented to accompany the other disciples to the upper room at the end of those eight days. "Then came Jesus, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace be unto you. Then saith He to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold My hands; and reach hither thy hand and thrust it into My side, and be not faithless but believing." How Thomas would hate himself when his own scornful, unbelieving, contemptuous words came back to him from his Master's gracious lips! How utterly odious his own words would sound as his Master repeated them. And worst of all when his risen Master humbled Himself to meet Thomas's unbelieving words and to satisfy them! Thomas would have killed himself with shame and self-condemnation, had it not been given him at that grandest moment of his whole life to say, "My Lord and my God!" Jesus saith unto him, "Thomas, because thou hast seen Me, thou hast believed; blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed!"
Now, my brethren, do you clearly understand and accept this peculiar blessedness of believing without seeing? Do you clearly see and fully accept the blessedness of a strong and an easy acting faith in the things of Christ? Faith is always easy where love and hope are strong. What we live for and hope to see, what we love with our whole heart, what we pray for night and day, what our whole future is anchored upon, that we easily believe, that we are ready to welcome. In that case our faith is to us nothing less than the substance of the thing hoped for; it is the evidence of the thing not seen as yet. What with Thomas's temperament of melancholy; what with his not having hid in his heart the things that our Lord had so often said about His coming death for sin and His resurrection for salvation; and then his hot jealousy and ill-will at the joyful news of the disciples; with all that Thomas's heart was in a state most deadly to faith. Had Thomas's heart been tender, had he had seven devils cast out of his heart like Mary Magdalene, he also would have gone out to the sepulchre while it was yet dark, and would have been the first of all the disciples to see his risen Lord. But, as it was, he was the last to see Him, and ran a close risk of never seeing Him in this world. Now, how is it with you in this same matter? Are you hard to convince? Are you slow of faith? Is your heart so set upon this world that you have no eyes or ears for the world to come? Are you able to dispense with Jesus Christ day after day till He dies out of your heart, and imagination, and whole life, altogether? Unbelief grows by what it feeds upon, just like faith and love. To him who has no faith in God, in Christ, in the Holy Scriptures, in the unseen world, and in the world to come, from him is even taken away the little faith that he had, till he has none at all. You know men in whom that awful catastrophe has taken place. You know it, in measure, in yourself. Your faith is all but dead. You do not wait for Christ's coming, either to judge the world, or to take you to Himself, or to sanctify you, and comfort you, and answer your prayers. And then you are uneasy, and unhappy, and jealous, and angry, when you hear that He has been manifesting Himself in all these ways to them that believe. But you were not waiting for Him. You neither expected Him nor wished for Him: and He never comes to the like of you till He comes at last and too late. You will be horrified when it is told you what your whole life, and your whole heart, and all your desires and hopes say when words are put upon them. They all say, 'I will not believe till the last trump awakens me, and the graves are opened, and the great white throne is set.'
Now, from Thomas and his Lord that night let us learn this also, and take it away. Let us act upon the faith we have. Let us frequent the places where He is said to manifest Himself. Let us feed our faith on the strong meat of His word. And, since here also acts produce habits, and habits character; let us act faith continually on faith's great objects and operations. And, especially, on our glorified Redeemer. To Thomas He was crucified yesterday. But to us He is risen, and exalted, and is soon to come again. That the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of gold that perisheth, might be found unto praise, and honour, and glory at the appearing of Jesus Christ. Whom having not seen, ye love: in whom, though now ye see Him not, yet believing, ye rejoice with joy unspeakable and full of glory.
For all thy rankling doubts so sore,Love thou thy Saviour still,Him for thy Lord and God adore,And ever do His will.Though vexing thoughts may seem to last,Let not thy soul be quite o'ercast;Soon will He show thee all His wounds and say,Long have I known thy name: know thou My face alway.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Arundell, Thomas 1560
(1560-1639) First Lord Arundell of Wardour, Wiltshire, England. Soldier. He was imprisoned in 1580 for refusing to attend Protestant services. As a patriotic Englishman he contributed liberally to the defense of England against the Armada. He went abroad and was distinguished for valor in imperial service against the Turks in Hungary, 1595. In 1605 he was created baron by James I for his loyalty.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Arundell, Thomas 1584
(1584-1643) Second Lord Arundell of Wardour. Son of Thomas Arundell, died Oxford, England. He fought for Charles I against the Parliament, in 1642, and was wounded in battle. His wife, Lady Blanche Arundell (1583-1649), was the daughter of Edward, Earl of Worcester. During the absence of her husband, in the spring of 1643, she defended Wardour Castle for eight days with 25 men against a Parliamentary force of 1300. She refused the proffered terms of quarter for women and children only, and succeeded in obtaining mercy for all.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Anstey, Thomas Chisholm
(1816-73) Lawyer and politician, born London; died Bombay, India. After his conversion he championed Catholic interests in Parliament, where he represented Youghal, Ireland. Later he became attorney-general of Hong Kong but was suspended on account of radical reforms he inaugurated. A judge at Bombay, he was forced to resign for denouncing commercial abuses in the Bengal government; later he practised law in Bombay with great success. He wrote pamphlets on legal and political subjects.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Aubrey Thomas Hunt de Vere
Poet, born County Limerick, Ireland, 1814; died there, 1902. A personal disciple of Wordsworth, he wrote poems based on the legends of Greece and Ireland. He was graduated from Trinity College, Dublin. Later he visited Cambridge, Oxford, and Rome, and came under the influence of Newman. Largely through his study of Coleridge, and the conversion of Cardinal Manning, he became a Catholic, 1857. His chief works are: "The Waldenses" (a lyrical sketch); "Search after Proserpine" (recollections of Greece); "Poetical Works"; and "Essays."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - a Kempis, Thomas
Profile Author of the Imitation of Christ. A Canon Regular, his principal occupation was copying works of piety, particularly the Bible.
Born 1380 at Kempen, Germany
Died 1471 at Mount Saint Agnee, Zwolle, Switzerland of natural causes
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Esser, Thomas
Baptismal name: Herman Joseph Esser. Bishop, born Burtscheid, Germany, April 7, 1850; died Rome, Italy, 1926. After a classical course at Aix-la-Chapelle he studied at the University of Bonn and from there went to Würzburg. In 1871 he entered the theological seminary of Cologne, was ordained priest 1873, and appointed curate at Euskirchen. He was imprisoned three times for not producing the document of his appointment and for fulfilling his "official clerical duties." Unable to continue as a priest in his own country, he moved to Rome to complete his studies. In 1877 he went to Vienna and received the Dominican habit as Father Thomas. Appointed to the chair for the study of Saint Thomas at Maynooth College, he was recalled, 1891, to lecture on canon law at the University of Freiburg, Switzerland. Summoned to Rome, 1894, to edit the new Index Librorum Prohibitorum, he became professor of canon law at the University of Saint Thomas. He was subsequently appointed a member of the Roman Curia, and on June 18, 1917 was created titular Bishop of Sinide. He contributed to over 30 German, Italian, and English publications, and preached retreats in many lands, including the United States.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ewing, Thomas
Jurist and statesman, born West Liberty, Virgina, 1789; died Lancaster, Ohio, 1871. In 1831 he was elected United States senator from Ohio, under President Harrison was appointed secretary of the treasury (1841), and under President Taylor secretary of the interior. During the Civil War he unreservedly supported the government and sent to Lincoln the telegram "There can be no contraband of war between neutral points," which secured the freeing of the English envoys Mason and Slidell, and averted war between England and the United States. Stricken while arguing a case (1869) he was baptised in the court room, and received into the Catholic Church in the following year. His law partner and main support in political life was his eldest son Philemon (1820-1896). His other sons, Hugh Boyle (1826-1905) and Charles (1835-1883), rendered distinguished service with the Union Armv during the Civil War. His daughter Eleanore Boyle (1824-1888), married William Tecumseh Sherman, subsequently the famous general, who had been adopted in childhood by her father. Friendship with Father De Smet led her to take a special interest in the Catholic Indians.
Webster's Dictionary - Thomas Phosphate
Alt. of slag
Webster's Dictionary - Thomas Process
Same as Basic process, above.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Thomas
Thomas (tŏm'as), twin. Also called Didymus, a Greek term meaning twin. Matthew 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:15; Acts 1:13. There can be little doubt that this apostle was a native of Galilee. John 21:2. In the character of Thomas we observe a desire for a sufficient evidence of facts. John 14:6; John 20:24-25. He was of a thoughtful mind; his affection for his Master was warm and disinterested, John 11:16; and his faith was not, as some have characterized it, inconsiderate, running easily from one extreme to the other. He had doubted the resurrection, and described the kind of proof he required; but, when the Lord appeared, and showed by his address to him that he knew his thoughts, then the apostle naturally desired nothing more. His reason was convinced: it was his Lord and his God. John 20:26-29. There is nothing in Thomas' behavior to surprise those accustomed to analyze the workings of the human mind. The Scripture is afterwards silent as to this apostle. According to earliest tradition, he preached in Parthia, and was buried at Edessa: later histories say that he went to India, and was martyred there; and the Syrian Christians in that country claim him as the founder of their church.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Thomas
the Apostle, otherwise called Didymus, which in Greek signifies a twin, Matthew 10:3 ; Luke 6:15 . We know no particulars of his life till A.D. 33, John 11:16 ; John 14:5-6 ; John 20:24-29 ; John 21:1-13 . Ancient tradition says, that in the distribution which the Apostles made of the several parts of the world, wherein they were to preach the Gospel, the country of the Parthians fell to the share of St. Thomas. It is added, that he preached to the Medes, Persians, Carmanians, Hircanians, Bactrians, &c. Several of the fathers inform us that he also preached in the East Indies, &c.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Ceva
(1648-1737) Jesuit mathematician, born Milan; died there. He was a prolific writer, and is best known for his geometrical theorem.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Burke
(1830-1882) Dominican orator, born Galway, Ireland; died Tallaght. After his ordination he founded the novitiate of the Irish Dominican province at Tallaght. His first notable sermon was on "Church Music," preached in 1859, and thereafter his preaching attracted throngs. He met with very great success while preaching and lecturing in the United States, 1871. Returning to Ireland he preached continually, despite his impaired health, until death.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Campbell
(1848-1925) Writer, born New York, New York, USA; died Monroe, New York, USA. Educated at Saint Francis Xavier's College, New York, he entered the Jesuit novitiate near Montreal, 1867, and after teaching at various colleges of the order, studied theology at Louvain, 1878-1882, where he was ordained. He was provincial of the Maryland-New York Province, 1888-1893, twice rector of Fordham University, 1885-1888,1896-1901, associate editor of "The Messenger of the Sacred Heart," 1901-1908, and editor of "America," 1910-1914. He was the author of "Pioneer Priests of North America," "Names of God," a translation from Lessius, "Pioneer Laymen of North America," "Various Discourses," a collection of sermons, and the important historical work, "The Jesuits."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saint Thomas Christians
A body of Christians in India who claim spiritual descent from the Apostle Saint Thomas, Bishop of Mylapore, who was martyred in 68, according to strong local tradition and collateral evidence. Various witnesses have recorded that from earliest times a body of Christians dwelt in India and its environs, and, though Saint Thomas is for the first time mentioned in documents c.550,it is highly probable that he was their spiritual father. Little is known of their first prelates; John the Persian called himself bishop of all churches in Persia and Great India at the Council of Nice in 325, but there is no evidence that he ever visited India. Up to 496 it is certain that all the bishops were Catholic; from then the prelates came from Babylon, but for a long time the Thomas Christians were deprived of bishops, and when finally that patriarchate sent them priests and prelates, these must have been Nestorians, whom the people, in their anxiety for a hierarchy, unquestionably accepted, doubtless unaware that the Nestorian heresy existed. When the Portuguese missionaries arrived in 1500 they considered the Saint Thomas Christians Nestorians (despite protestations to the contrary not voiced until three centuries later), and, laboring to reclaim them, a Synod was held in 1599, at Dampier (Udiamparur), where Saint Thomas priests and laymen promised submission to Rome. But in 1653, schism once more tore them away, only 400 of 200,000 remaining faithful. These were for the most part retrieved by the Carmelties sent from Rome in 1657 for that purpose.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Esser
Baptismal name: Herman Joseph Esser. Bishop, born Burtscheid, Germany, April 7, 1850; died Rome, Italy, 1926. After a classical course at Aix-la-Chapelle he studied at the University of Bonn and from there went to Würzburg. In 1871 he entered the theological seminary of Cologne, was ordained priest 1873, and appointed curate at Euskirchen. He was imprisoned three times for not producing the document of his appointment and for fulfilling his "official clerical duties." Unable to continue as a priest in his own country, he moved to Rome to complete his studies. In 1877 he went to Vienna and received the Dominican habit as Father Thomas. Appointed to the chair for the study of Saint Thomas at Maynooth College, he was recalled, 1891, to lecture on canon law at the University of Freiburg, Switzerland. Summoned to Rome, 1894, to edit the new Index Librorum Prohibitorum, he became professor of canon law at the University of Saint Thomas. He was subsequently appointed a member of the Roman Curia, and on June 18, 1917 was created titular Bishop of Sinide. He contributed to over 30 German, Italian, and English publications, and preached retreats in many lands, including the United States.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Goldwell
Bishop of Saint Asaph, Wales, last survivor of the ancient English hierarchy, born Kent, England, c.1501;died Rome, Italy, 1585. He was Cardinal Pole's secretary, and went into exile with him to Italy, in 1538. Nine years later he joined the Theatines, and under Queen Mary returned as Bishop of Saint Asaph; Mary's death frustrated his transfer to Oxford, and he went into exile again. He was the only English bishop present at the Council of Trent.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Howard 15th Century
Born 1473; died 1554. Third duke of Norfolk. Uncle of Anne Boleyn. A tool of Henry VIII, he acquired rich monastic loot, and was created earl-marshal in 1533. He persecuted the Catholics, and his career as a military leader was marked with devastation. Accused of treason in 1544, his life was saved by Henry VIII's timely death, but he remained in prison till Mary's accession.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Howard 16th Century
Born 1536; died 1572. Fourth duke of Norfolk. A Protestant. Married Mary Fitzalan, daughter of Henry, twelfth Earl of Arundel. He later planned to marry the imprisoned Mary Queen of Scots, but was executed for treason.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Malory, Sir
Compiler of the "Morte d' Arthur," the earliest piece of literary English prose. Nothing is known of him except his name, his knighthood, and that his work was finished in 1469.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Marshall 19th Century
Controversialist, born 1818; died Surbiton, England, 1877. Brother of Arthur Featherstone Marshall. He was Anglican vicar of Swallowcliff, Wiltshire, but in 1845 became a Catholic. Among his writings were the sensational "Christianity in China," and "Christian Missions," exposing the weaknesses of the Anglican missions.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Seminary, Saint Thomas Theological
Denver, Colorado. Founded in 1908. Conducted by Vincentians.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saint Thomas Theological Seminary
Denver, Colorado. Founded in 1908. Conducted by Vincentians.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Hussey
Ecclesiastic and diplomat, born Ballybogan, County Meath, Ireland, 1746; died Tramore, County Waterford, Ireland, 1803. He was educated at Salamanca and appointed chaplain to the Spanish embassy at London, 1767. Twenty-five years later, when Spain and France broke with England, he took care of the Spanish interests in England; subsequently he was entrusted by the British with diplomatic missions in Madrid and Ireland. In 1795 he was appointed first president of Maynooth College, and shortly after was consecrated Bishop of Waterford and Lismore.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas o'Hagan
First Baron O'Hagan of Tullxhogue; born Belfast, Ireland, 1812; died 1885. After editing the "Newry Examiner," he made rapid progress at the Bar, and, 1868, was appointed Lord Chancellor of Ireland, the first Catholic to hold that office since the days of James II.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saint Thomas, Virgin Islands, Diocese of
Founded on April 30, 1960 as the Territorial Prelature of Virgin Islands. Elevated to the diocese of Saint Thomas on April 20, 1977. Suffragen of the archdiocese of Washington. See also
Catholic-Hierarchy.Org
diocese of Saint Thomas
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Hecker, Isaac Thomas
Founder of the Paulists, born New York, 1819; died there, 1888. Owing to family reverses, Hecker began to work as a baker's assistant before completing his education. Although his parents also neglected his religious instruction, he was naturally studious and thoughtful. He read Kant, but found him over-exalting human reason. Luther and Calvin, by their doctrines of man's utter depravity and moral helplessness, repelled him, and he finally entered the Catholic Church, 1844. In 1845 he joined the Redemptorists in Belgium, and in 1851 returned with four companions to the American mission. A misunderstanding between them and their European brothers having arisen, Hecker went to Rome to obtain an authoritative solution, and there received his exeat from the congregation. With the approval, however, of Pius IX, he returned to New York to found with his companions a new institute, the Paulists, to conduct missions, especially for Protestants and for others who are not even Christians. He met with great success and in addition became an apostle of the Catholic press. His Congregation of Missionaries of Saint Paul the Apostle, the only community of men of United States origin, has prospered and has widely influenced Catholic life, especially in devotion to the liturgy and preaching.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Messingham
Hagiologist, born Ireland; died 1638. He was educated at the Irish College, Paris, of which he became a staff member. In 1620 he published offices of Sain Patrick, Saint Brigid, Saint Columba, and other Irish saints. The following year he was made rector of the Irish College. Appointed prothonotary Apostolic, he represented many Irish bishops. Messingham secured the affiliation of the college to the University of Paris, and in 1626 his rules for the Irish seminary were approved by the Archbishop of Paris. In 1624 he published at Paris his work on Irish saints, "Florilegium Insulae Sanctorum," containing a treatise on Saint Patrick's Purgatory. Between 1632,1638 he labored for the Irish Church in various capacities.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Buston
Jesuit philologist. Born 1549; died 1619. Wrote a grammar of the language spoken in Canara, a district on the Malabar coast of India, and various instructions in Christianity (written in Portuguese) which are the earliest writings known to have been printed in Hindustan.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Sanchez
Jesuit theologian. Born in 1550 Cordova, Spain; died in May 19, 1610 in Granada. Author of an exhaustive treatise on marriage and of works on moral theology, he was unjustly accused of immoral teachings, especially concerning "mental reservation." His life was an example of holiness.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sanchez, Thomas
Jesuit theologian. Born in 1550 Cordova, Spain; died in May 19, 1610 in Granada. Author of an exhaustive treatise on marriage and of works on moral theology, he was unjustly accused of immoral teachings, especially concerning "mental reservation." His life was an example of holiness.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Ewing
Jurist and statesman, born West Liberty, Virgina, 1789; died Lancaster, Ohio, 1871. In 1831 he was elected United States senator from Ohio, under President Harrison was appointed secretary of the treasury (1841), and under President Taylor secretary of the interior. During the Civil War he unreservedly supported the government and sent to Lincoln the telegram "There can be no contraband of war between neutral points," which secured the freeing of the English envoys Mason and Slidell, and averted war between England and the United States. Stricken while arguing a case (1869) he was baptised in the court room, and received into the Catholic Church in the following year. His law partner and main support in political life was his eldest son Philemon (1820-1896). His other sons, Hugh Boyle (1826-1905) and Charles (1835-1883), rendered distinguished service with the Union Armv during the Civil War. His daughter Eleanore Boyle (1824-1888), married William Tecumseh Sherman, subsequently the famous general, who had been adopted in childhood by her father. Friendship with Father De Smet led her to take a special interest in the Catholic Indians.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Murray
Knight of Saint Gregory and Knight of Malta; inventor; born Albany, New York, 1860; died Long Island, New York, 1929. At an early age he was an expert machinist and showed signs of inventive genius which culminated in his obtaining patents for 1100 inventions, more than any other inventori except Thomas Edison. Besides maintaining general supervision of his own corporations, he effected combinations of all the electric companies in Brooklyn and New York, which resulted in the formation of the New York Edison Company, the United Electric Light and Power Company, and the Brooklyn Edison Company. The designer of more electrical plants than any engineer in the country, he won the Longstreth Medal of Merit for his numerous inventions of safety appliances and high commendation from the War Department for his invention of an electric welding process for the manufacture of 9.4 inch mortar shells.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Marshall 16th Century
Martyred 1539, Abbot of Saint Werburgh, Chester, England, and of Saint John's, Colchester, England. He was educated at Oxford, and received his degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1515. In 1534 he took the Oath of Supremacy, but later incurred the king's resentment by expressing admiration for the martyrs, Blessed John Fisher and Blessed Thomas More. After a trial for treasonable utterances, he was convicted and executed. Beatified, 1895.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Linacre
Physician, born Canterbury, England, c.1460;died London, England, 1524. After studying at Oxford, he spent 10 years in Italy specializing in the classics, and received his degree in medicine at Padua. On his return to England he ranked as the leading humanist, and in addition was physician to Henry VIII and Wolsey. He became a priest after 1520, and with his fortune established the Royal College of Physicians, London.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Young
Physicist. Born 1773; died 1829. Discovered the principle of interference afterwards discovered by Fresnel. Provoked the revival of undulatory optics by his memorable discoveries. Justly called "the founder of physiological optics."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Young, Thomas
Physicist. Born 1773; died 1829. Discovered the principle of interference afterwards discovered by Fresnel. Provoked the revival of undulatory optics by his memorable discoveries. Justly called "the founder of physiological optics."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Moore
Poet and biographer, called the "poet of the people of Ireland," born Dublin, Ireland, 1779; died Devizes, England, 1852. At an early age he exhibited great skill in rhyming, and at fifteen had poems published in the "Anthologia Hibernica." Graduated from Trinity College, Dublin, 1798, he went to London to study law, but literature attracted him more, and his early works met with immediate success. He accepted appointment as registrar of the Admiralty Court of Bermuda, 1803, but after four months appointed a deputy and traveled in the United States and Canada, returning to London the following year. His "Epistles, Odes, and Other Poems," treating of his travels, appeared in 1806; the first of his "Irish Melodies," the best loved of his works, in which he set words to the old national airs of Ireland, was published in 1817. Other poetical works are: "Corruption and Tolerance," a satire, 1808; "The Sceptic, a Philosophical Satire," 1809; "Intercepted Letters or the Two-penny Post Bag," a light satirical work, 1813; "Lalla Rookh," an oriental romance, 1819; the first of the "National Airs," 1818; and the "Loves of the Angels," an oriental poem, 1822. In this last year he turned his attention to prose writing and from then on figures mainly as a prose writer. His prose works include: "History of Captain Rock and his Ancestors," dealing with English misrule of Ireland; "Life of Sheridan," 1825; "Life of Byron," 1830; "Life of Lord Edward Fitzgerald," 1831; and "Travels of an Irish Gentleman in Search of a Religion," 1834.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Bridgett
Priest, author, born Derby, England, 1829; died Clapham, 1899. Educated at Saint John's College, Cambridge, as a member of the Church of England, he left without a degree rather than take the Oath of Supremacy. In 1850 he became a Catholic and joined the Redemptorists. For 40 years he was an active missionary and founded the Confraternity of the Holy Family at Limerick, Ireland. His writings include "Spirit and Truth," "Our Lady's Dowry," "The History of the Holy Eucharist in Great Britain," which contains the most eloquent plea for Catholic ceremonial ever written, "The Life of Blessed John Fisher," "The True Story of the Catholic Hierarchy deposed by Queen Elizabeth," "Blunders and Forgeries," "Life of Blessed Thomas More," "Lyra Hieratica," and "Sonnets and Epigrams."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Copley
Real name: Thomas Copley. Jesuit missionary, born Madrid, Spain, 1595; died Maryland, 1652. In 1637 he took charge of the Maryland mission, but eight years later he was sent to England in chains. After much suffering he was released and returned to his missionary work.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - University of Saint Thomas
Saint Paul, Minnesota. Founded in 1885 as a seminary, and named for Saint Thomas Aquinas. Conducted by the priests of the Congregation of the Holy Cross. Consists of a preparatory school, known as Saint Thomas Military Academy; schools of arts and sciences, commerce, education, and law; graduate and summer schools. During World War II it served as a training base for naval officers. It became co-educational in 1977. In 1991 the college was elevated to university status. They maintain a web site.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saint Thomas, University of
Saint Paul, Minnesota. Founded in 1885 as a seminary, and named for Saint Thomas Aquinas. Conducted by the priests of the Congregation of the Holy Cross. Consists of a preparatory school, known as Saint Thomas Military Academy; schools of arts and sciences, commerce, education, and law; graduate and summer schools. During World War II it served as a training base for naval officers. It became co-educational in 1977. In 1991 the college was elevated to university status. They maintain a web site.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saint Thomas, College of
Scranton, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1888. Conducted by the Christian Brothers. Consists of a preparatory school; college of arts and sciences, special and education courses; summer school.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Fitz-Simons
Statesman, born Ireland, 1741; died Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1811. He was in America as early as 1758, and took a prominent part in the Revolutionary movement; his election as one of the Provincial Deputies in July, 1774, is the first instance of a Catholic being named for a public office in Pennsylvania. He was a member of the Continental Congress, assisted in drawing up the Constitution of 1787 of which he was one of the signers, and was elected a member of the first Congress of the United States. Probably he was the first to suggest a protective tariff to help American industries. He was one of the founders of Georgetown College.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Thomas
The apostle, Matthew 10:3 , called in Greek Didymus, that is, a twin, John 20:24 , was probably a Galilean, as well as the other apostles; but the place of his birth, and the circumstances of his calling, are unknown, Luke 6:13-15 . He appears to have been of an impulsive character, sincerely devoted to Christ, ready to act upon his convictions, and perhaps slow to be convinced, as he at first doubted our Lord's resurrection, John 11:16 ; 14:5-6 ; 20:19-29 . Several of the fathers inform us that he preached in the Indies; and others say that he preached in Cush, or Ethiopia, near the Caspian sea.
There are nominal Christians in the East Indies, who bear the name of St. Thomas, because they report that this apostle preached the gospel there. They dwell in a peninsula of the Indus, on this side the gulf.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thomas Sadler
Writer; born in 1604; died c.1680at Dieulward, Flanders. He became a Catholic when 17 years of age, and joined the Benedictine Order, being professed in 1622. He spent many years in London, where he edited several spiritual works, among them The Daily Exercise of the Devout Rosarists and A Guide to Heaven. The Childe's Catechism is also attributed to him.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sadler, Thomas v f
Writer; born in 1604; died c.1680at Dieulward, Flanders. He became a Catholic when 17 years of age, and joined the Benedictine Order, being professed in 1622. He spent many years in London, where he edited several spiritual works, among them The Daily Exercise of the Devout Rosarists and A Guide to Heaven. The Childe's Catechism is also attributed to him.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Thomas (st.) the Apostle
The Twenty-first Day of December isobserved in memory of St. Thomas, who was called by our Lord to bean Apostle. We find very little in Holy Scripture concerning St.Thomas, but there are four sayings of his recorded which areindicative of his character. They are as follows:
1. "Lord we know not whither Thou goest, and how can we know theway?"—St. John 14:5.
2. "Let us also go, that we may die with Him."—St. John 11:16.
3. "Except I shall see in His hands the print of the nails and putmy fingers in the print of the nails and thrust my hand into Hisside, I will not believe."—St. John 20:25.
4. "My Lord and my God."—St. John 20:28.
From these sayings we see in St. Thomas, (1) the spirit of inquiry,(2) bravery in the face of danger, (3) his doubt and unbelief, and(4) strong conviction and the triumph of faith. An ancient writerdeclared that "by this doubting of St. Thomas we are more confirmedin our belief than by the faith of the other Apostles." It is uponthis fact that the Collect for the Day is founded. St. Thomas issaid to have carried the Gospel to the Parthians, Medes, Persiansand Chaldeans, among whom he founded the Church. It is believed,also, that he preached the Gospel in India. He suffered martyrdom,having been put to death by the Brahmins at Taprobane, now calledSumatra. In ecclesiastical art, St. Thomas is represented ashandling our Lord's wounds; or in reference to his martyrdom, witha lance or spear; also, holding a carpenter's square.
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Thomas Edessenus
Thomas (8) Edessenus appears in the Life of Mar Abas. The latter, originally Magian by religion, was converted to Christianity, learnt Syriac at Nisibis, and Greek at Edessa from Thomas a Jacobite, whom he afterwards took with him to Alexandria and there with his help translated the Scriptures ( or , the books) from Greek into Syriac (Gregory Bar-hebr. Chr. Eccl. ii. 22, t. iii. col. 189). Amrus ( ap. Assem. iii. 75) gives a similar history of their relations; but only ascribes to them the translation of the works of Theodore of Mopsuestia. He relates how they went to Constantinople, and finding their lives in peril in consequence of their refusal to "anathematize the Three Fathers," fled to Nisibis. There Mar Abas became a teacher, and an eloquent assailant of Zoroastrianism. Gregory says that he was at one time taught by John Grammaticus, the Tritheite; but the facts alleged by Amrus lead us to conclude that he lapsed early into Nestorianism. He was elected catholicus of the Chaldeans in 536, and persecuted by the Magians. Chosroes called on him to return to his original faith or to conform to Christian orthodoxy. Refusing to do either, he was exiled, and venturing to return to his see without the king's permission, was cast into prison, and died there, 552. Among his disciples Amrus (Assem. ii. 411) reckons "Thomas of Edessa," no doubt his former teacher drawn by him from the opposing sect into Nestorianism. Of their joint work, the version of Theodore's liturgy survives (Brit. Mus. 7181, Rich., R.-F. Catal. p. 59—see also Rénaudot, Liturg. Or. t. i. p. 616); and the liturgy of Nestorius ( ib. p. 626), still in use in the Nestorian churches, is probably their version mentioned by Ebedjesu ( Catal. Assem. iii. 36), who also says they translated the O.T. ( ib. 75), and adds a list of the writings of Mar Abas.
[1]
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Thomas Apameensis, Bishop of Apamea
Thomas (9) Apameensis , bp. of Apamea, the metropolis of Syria Secunda; one of the bishops sent to invite pope Vigilius to the second council of Constantinople. He himself attended it. Two contemporary historians, Procopius and Evagrius (the latter praises Thomas as a "man most mighty in word and in deed"), record his tact and courage when a great peril threatened his city. In 540 Chosroes, at the head of his Persians, after burning Antioch, was reported to be marching on Apamea. The panic-stricken people entreated their bishop to strengthen them to meet their fate by displaying a piece of the true cross, a cubit in length, which was treasured in their church in a casket richly decorated with gold and gems, and usually shewn to the faithful but once a year. Thomas fixed a day for its exhibition, to which the people of the neighbouring towns also eagerly repaired; among them the parents of Evagrius, bringing with them the future historian, who vividly describes the crowds pressing to see, and seeking to kiss, the sacred wood. The bishop (as both narrators relate) took it out of the casket, and raising it up in both hands proceeded round the church, according to usage. "A flame of fire shining, but not consuming," around and above the relic, moved as he moved, lighting up the roof. This was repeated several times. The people greeted with joy this visible token of divine protection, and drew from it confident hopes of deliverance. As Chosroes approached, the bishop met him, and assured him that no resistance was contemplated by the citizens, on whose behalf he engaged that the king with a limited guard should be admitted within the gates. Chosroes accordingly, leaving his army in camp, entered with 200 men. In violation of a compact he had recently entered into with the emperor (to receive 5,000 pounds of gold paid down and 500 annually, and make no further demands), he exacted from the bishop more than 10,000 pounds of silver, and all the gold and silver ornaments in the church treasury. Thomas produced last of all the casket that enshrined the cross, and, shewing its contents to the king, said, "This alone is left; take the gold and gems—I grudge them not; only leave us the precious wood of salvation." The king granted his petition. Thomas conciliated Chosroes by assiduously courting his favour. It would be unfair to judge him hardly under circumstances of such great responsibility and peril, though he shews politic suppleness and tact rather than the higher virtues of a prelate and patriot.
[1]

Sentence search

Did'Ymus - (the twin ), a surname of the apostle Thomas. ( John 11:16 ; 20:24 ; 21:2 ) [1]
Didymus - ” An alternative name for the apostle Thomas (John 11:16 ). See Thomas
Norfolk, Dukes of - ...
John Howard
Thomas Howard
Thomas Howard
Henry Howard
Henry Fitzalan Howard
Henry Fitzalan Howard
Alan of Tewkesbury - A supporter of Saint Thomas Becket in his struggle with Henry II, he was removed from Canterbury to Tewkesbury. He wrote the life of Saint Thomas
Tewkesbury, Alan of - A supporter of Saint Thomas Becket in his struggle with Henry II, he was removed from Canterbury to Tewkesbury. He wrote the life of Saint Thomas
English Martyrs - ...
Abbot, Austin (alias John Rivers), priest
Abbot, Henry, Blessed
Abbot, John, layman, 1597
Abel, Thomas, Blessed
Ackridge, John, priest, 1585
Ackridge, Thomas, Franciscan, 1583
Adams, John, Venerable
Adams, Richard, priest
Ailworth (Aylword) William, layman, 1580
Aldham (Adelham), Placid, Benedictine, 1679
Alfield, Thomas, Blessed
Allen, John, priest, 1538
Allison, William, priest, 1681
Almond, John, Saint
Almond, John, Cistercian, 1585
Amias, John, Blessed
Anderton, Robert, Blessed
Andleby, William, Blessed
Arden, Edward, layman, 1584
Arrowsmith, Edmund, Saint
Arrowsmith, Thurstan, layman, 1583
Ash, Anthony, layman
Ashby (Asleby), George, monk, 1537
Ashby, Thomas, Venerable
Ashley, Ralph, Blessed
Ashton, Roger, Venerable
Aske, Robert, layman, 1537
Atkins, William, Jesuit, 1681
Atkinson, James, layman, 1595
Atkinson, Nicholas, priest, 1610
Atkinson, Thomas, Blessed
Bailey, Lawrence, Venerable
Baldwin (Bawden), William, priest, 1588
Bales, Christopher, Blessed
Bales, Alexander, layman
Bamber, Edward, Blessed
Bannersley, William, priest
Barkworth, Mark, Blessed
Barlow, Ambrose Edward, Saint
Barnes, Ralph, monk, 1537
Barrow, William
Barton, Elizabeth
Battie, Anthony
Bayle, Ralph, bishop, 1559
Beche, John, Blessed
Bedal, Thomas, priest, 1568-1590
Bedingfeld, Thomas, Venerable, Jesuit, 1678
Beesley, George, Blessed
Belohiam, Thomas, Venerable, O. , 1537-1538
Bell, Arthur, Blessed
Bell, James, Blessed
Belser, Thomas, priest
Belson, Thomas, Venerable, layman, 1589
Bentney (alias Bennet), William, Jesuit, 1692
Bere, Richard, Blessed
Berisford, Humphrey, layman, 1588
Bickerdyke, Robert, Venerable, layman, 1595
Bigod, Sir Francis, 1537
Bird, James, Blessed
Bird, Robert, priest, 1540
Bird, William, priest, 1540
Birkett, Richard, priest, 1680
Bishop, Thomas, layman, 1569-1570
Blackburne, William, priest, 1586
Blake, Alexander, Venerable, layman, 1590
Blenkinsop, Thomas, layman, 1593
Blonham, Laurence, monk, 1537
Blount, Thomas, priest, 1647
Bocking, Edward, Benedictine, 1537
Bodey, John, Blessed
Bolbet, Richard, layman, 1589
Bonner, Edmund, bishop, 1569
Bosgrave, Thomas, Blessed
Boste, John, Saint
Bourne, Gilbert, bishop, 1569
Bowes, Marmaduke, Venerable, layman, 1585
Bowes, Richard, priest, 1590
Boxall, John, priest, 1571
Bradley, Richard, Jesuit, 1645
Branton, Stephen, layman, 1591
Brazier (Grimes), Matthew, Jesuit, 1650
Bredstock, William, layman, 1590
Briant, Alexander, Blessed
Brindholme, Edmund, Venerable, priest, 1540-1544
Britton, John, Venerable, layman, 1598
Brookby, Anthony, Venerable, O. , 1537-1538
Brown, James, Benedictine, 1640-1651
Brown, William, Venerable, layman, 1604
Browne, Humphrey, Jesuit
Brownel, Thomas, Brigittine laybrother
Brushford, James, priest, 1593
Buckley, John, Saint
Budge, Lucy, lay person, 1587-88
Bullaker, Thomas, Blessed
Burden, Edward, Venerable, priest, 1538
Burraby, William, priest, 1537
Buxton, Christopher, Venerable, priest, died Canterbury, 1588
Cadwallador, Roger, Blessed
Campion, Edmund, Blessed
Cannon, Edmund, priest, 1640-1651
Cansfield, Brian, Venerable, Jesuit, 1643
Carew, Sir Nicholas, 1538
Carey, John, Blessed
Carter, William, Blessed
Catheriok, Edmund, Venerable, priest, 1642
Chalmar, John
Chalmer, Isabel, lay person
Chaplain, William, layman, 1584
Chedsey, William, priest, 1561
Claxton (Clarkson), James, Venerable, priest, 1588
Clayton, James, priest, 1588
Clitherow, Margaret, Saint
Cockerell, James, prior of Guisborough, 1537
Coe, William, monk, 1537
Cole, Henry, priest, 1579-1580
Coleman, Edward, Blessed
Coleman, Walter, Franciscan, 1645
Collier, Laurence, Franciscan, 1590
Collins, John, priest, 1584
Comberford, Henry, priest, 1584
Constable, Benedict, Benedictine, 1683
Constable, John, died York gaol, 1581
Constable, Robert, layman, 1537
Cook, Lawrence, O. prior of Doncaster, 1540
Cooper, John, layman, 1580
Coppinger, Richard, Benedictine, 1558
Corbie, Ralph, Venerable, Jesuit, 1644
Cornelius, John, Blessed
Cort, Thomas, Venerable, Franciscan, 1537-38
Cosen, Thomas, layman, 1589
Cotesmore, Thomas, priest, 1584
Cottam, Thomas, Blessed
Coudres, Martin, Augustinian, 1544
Courtney, Henry, Marquess of Exeter, 1538
Cowling (Collins), Ralph, layman, 1587
Cowper, William, monk, 1537
Cox, Robert, Benedictine, 1650
Creagh
Martyrs, English - ...
Abbot, Austin (alias John Rivers), priest
Abbot, Henry, Blessed
Abbot, John, layman, 1597
Abel, Thomas, Blessed
Ackridge, John, priest, 1585
Ackridge, Thomas, Franciscan, 1583
Adams, John, Venerable
Adams, Richard, priest
Ailworth (Aylword) William, layman, 1580
Aldham (Adelham), Placid, Benedictine, 1679
Alfield, Thomas, Blessed
Allen, John, priest, 1538
Allison, William, priest, 1681
Almond, John, Saint
Almond, John, Cistercian, 1585
Amias, John, Blessed
Anderton, Robert, Blessed
Andleby, William, Blessed
Arden, Edward, layman, 1584
Arrowsmith, Edmund, Saint
Arrowsmith, Thurstan, layman, 1583
Ash, Anthony, layman
Ashby (Asleby), George, monk, 1537
Ashby, Thomas, Venerable
Ashley, Ralph, Blessed
Ashton, Roger, Venerable
Aske, Robert, layman, 1537
Atkins, William, Jesuit, 1681
Atkinson, James, layman, 1595
Atkinson, Nicholas, priest, 1610
Atkinson, Thomas, Blessed
Bailey, Lawrence, Venerable
Baldwin (Bawden), William, priest, 1588
Bales, Christopher, Blessed
Bales, Alexander, layman
Bamber, Edward, Blessed
Bannersley, William, priest
Barkworth, Mark, Blessed
Barlow, Ambrose Edward, Saint
Barnes, Ralph, monk, 1537
Barrow, William
Barton, Elizabeth
Battie, Anthony
Bayle, Ralph, bishop, 1559
Beche, John, Blessed
Bedal, Thomas, priest, 1568-1590
Bedingfeld, Thomas, Venerable, Jesuit, 1678
Beesley, George, Blessed
Belohiam, Thomas, Venerable, O. , 1537-1538
Bell, Arthur, Blessed
Bell, James, Blessed
Belser, Thomas, priest
Belson, Thomas, Venerable, layman, 1589
Bentney (alias Bennet), William, Jesuit, 1692
Bere, Richard, Blessed
Berisford, Humphrey, layman, 1588
Bickerdyke, Robert, Venerable, layman, 1595
Bigod, Sir Francis, 1537
Bird, James, Blessed
Bird, Robert, priest, 1540
Bird, William, priest, 1540
Birkett, Richard, priest, 1680
Bishop, Thomas, layman, 1569-1570
Blackburne, William, priest, 1586
Blake, Alexander, Venerable, layman, 1590
Blenkinsop, Thomas, layman, 1593
Blonham, Laurence, monk, 1537
Blount, Thomas, priest, 1647
Bocking, Edward, Benedictine, 1537
Bodey, John, Blessed
Bolbet, Richard, layman, 1589
Bonner, Edmund, bishop, 1569
Bosgrave, Thomas, Blessed
Boste, John, Saint
Bourne, Gilbert, bishop, 1569
Bowes, Marmaduke, Venerable, layman, 1585
Bowes, Richard, priest, 1590
Boxall, John, priest, 1571
Bradley, Richard, Jesuit, 1645
Branton, Stephen, layman, 1591
Brazier (Grimes), Matthew, Jesuit, 1650
Bredstock, William, layman, 1590
Briant, Alexander, Blessed
Brindholme, Edmund, Venerable, priest, 1540-1544
Britton, John, Venerable, layman, 1598
Brookby, Anthony, Venerable, O. , 1537-1538
Brown, James, Benedictine, 1640-1651
Brown, William, Venerable, layman, 1604
Browne, Humphrey, Jesuit
Brownel, Thomas, Brigittine laybrother
Brushford, James, priest, 1593
Buckley, John, Saint
Budge, Lucy, lay person, 1587-88
Bullaker, Thomas, Blessed
Burden, Edward, Venerable, priest, 1538
Burraby, William, priest, 1537
Buxton, Christopher, Venerable, priest, died Canterbury, 1588
Cadwallador, Roger, Blessed
Campion, Edmund, Blessed
Cannon, Edmund, priest, 1640-1651
Cansfield, Brian, Venerable, Jesuit, 1643
Carew, Sir Nicholas, 1538
Carey, John, Blessed
Carter, William, Blessed
Catheriok, Edmund, Venerable, priest, 1642
Chalmar, John
Chalmer, Isabel, lay person
Chaplain, William, layman, 1584
Chedsey, William, priest, 1561
Claxton (Clarkson), James, Venerable, priest, 1588
Clayton, James, priest, 1588
Clitherow, Margaret, Saint
Cockerell, James, prior of Guisborough, 1537
Coe, William, monk, 1537
Cole, Henry, priest, 1579-1580
Coleman, Edward, Blessed
Coleman, Walter, Franciscan, 1645
Collier, Laurence, Franciscan, 1590
Collins, John, priest, 1584
Comberford, Henry, priest, 1584
Constable, Benedict, Benedictine, 1683
Constable, John, died York gaol, 1581
Constable, Robert, layman, 1537
Cook, Lawrence, O. prior of Doncaster, 1540
Cooper, John, layman, 1580
Coppinger, Richard, Benedictine, 1558
Corbie, Ralph, Venerable, Jesuit, 1644
Cornelius, John, Blessed
Cort, Thomas, Venerable, Franciscan, 1537-38
Cosen, Thomas, layman, 1589
Cotesmore, Thomas, priest, 1584
Cottam, Thomas, Blessed
Coudres, Martin, Augustinian, 1544
Courtney, Henry, Marquess of Exeter, 1538
Cowling (Collins), Ralph, layman, 1587
Cowper, William, monk, 1537
Cox, Robert, Benedictine, 1650
Creagh
Saint Thomas, Virgin Islands, Diocese of - Elevated to the diocese of Saint Thomas on April 20, 1977. Org
diocese of Saint Thomas
Ignorance: Possible in Most Constant Hearers - 'Thomas, where do you think your soul will go?' ...
'Soul! soul!' said Thomas. Wesley, 'do you not know what your soul is?' ...
'Ay, surely,' said Thomas; 'why, it is a little bone in the back that lives longer than the body. Lupton, who had it from his father, 'had Thomas learned from hearing sermons, and exceedingly good sermons, for forty years
Didymus - —The alternative name of the Apostle Thomas, given in three passages in the Fourth Gospel (John 11:15; John 20:24; John 21:2 Θωμᾶς ὁ λεγόμενος Δίδυμος). Westcott suggests that Thomas may have been familiarly known in Asia Minor among the Gentile Christians as Didymus. John 4:25 (‘Messiah … which is called Christ’) shows that Thomas was not called Didymus as an additional name. See Thomas
Didymus - See Thomas
Allies, Mary Helen - (1852-1927) Writer, daughter of [1], born Henley in Arden, Warwickshire, England. Among her works are "Life of Pius VII," "History of the Church in England," and "Thomas William Allies
Didymus - See Thomas
Thomas - It seems, from his name, that the apostle Thomas was a twin. The names Thomas and Didymus come from the words for ‘twin’ in the Aramaic and Greek languages respectively (Matthew 10:3; John 11:16). ...
Three incidents show that Thomas was a straightforward person who expressed his feelings openly. When Jesus made it clear that he was determined to go, Thomas showed his courage and his pessimism by suggesting that they go with him so that they might die with him (John 10:39; John 11:7-8; John 11:16). He reminded his disciples that they knew where he was going, but Thomas, with characteristic bluntness, replied that they did not (John 14:1-5). ...
The third incident occurred soon after the resurrection, when Thomas refused to believe the report that Jesus was alive. ...
Thomas was one of the eleven apostles to hear Jesus’ command to evangelize the world (Matthew 28:16-20; Acts 1:6-13)
Didymus - A name for Saint Thomas the Apostle ...
Thomist - ) A follower of Thomas Aquinas
Thomas - Matthew modestly puts himself after Thomas in the second quaternion of the twelve; Mark and Luke give him his rightful place before Thomas. Thomas, after his doubts were removed (John 20:28), having attained eminent faith (for sometimes faith that has overcome doubt is hardier than that of those who never doubt), is promoted above Bartholomew and Matthew in Acts. John records three incidents throwing strong light on his character:...
(1) (John 11:8; John 11:15-16) When Jesus, for Lazarus' sake, proposed to go into Judaea again the disciples remonstrated, "Master, the Jews of late have sought to stone Thee, and goest Thou there again?" On Jesus' reply that His day was not yet closed, and that He was going to awake Lazarus out of the death sleep, and that He was glad of his death "to the intent that they might believe," Thomas evinced his devoted love on the one hand, ready to follow Jesus unto death (compare Paul, Acts 21:13), on the other hand ignoring, with characteristic slowness to believe, Jesus' plain statement as to His going to raise Lazarus. ...
(2) (John 14:4-6) cf6 "Where I go ye know, and the way ye know;" Thomas saith, "Lord, we know not where Thou goest (yet Jesus had answered Peter's question, John 13:36), 'Lord, where goest Thou?' and plainly told the disciples He was going to cf6 'His Father's house', John 14:2, ascending to where He had been before, John 6:62), and how can we know the way?" Thomas still cannot raise his mind to the unseen future home where Jesus is going, or realize the way as through Jesus. ...
(3) (John 20:20; John 20:24-29) Thomas with morbid brooding over doubts had absented himself from the disciples' assembly on the first Lord's day, when "He showed unto them His hands and His side"; so he missed the immediate blessing (compare Hebrews 10:25). The disciples did not stand aloof from Thomas though he had stood aloof from them; they told him, "we have seen the Lord. ...
A week of gloom to Thomas elapsed, the retribution in kind for his obstinate unbelief. Though Jesus might have cast him off yet He would not break the bruised reed; He condescends to Thomas' culpable weakness. On the next Lord's day, Thomas, laying aside his morbid isolation, attended the weekly assembly of disciples; though the doors were shut Jesus came and stood in the midst with His wonted salutation, cf6 "Peace be unto you"; then saith He to Thomas, with grave yet tender reproof (showing that He knew all that had passed in Thomas's mind and all he had said to his fellow disciples), cf6 "reach here thy finger, and behold My hands, and reach here thy hand, and thrust it into My side; and be ("become", ginou ) not faithless but believing". Thomas said unto Him, My Lord and my God!"...
A refutation of Socinianism, because Thomas addresses these words to Jesus. " Like Mary Magdalene (John 20:13) Thomas appropriates Jesus to himself, "my Lord and, my God. " From the overwhelming proofs before him of Jesus' humanity Thomas believes in His Divinity. Jesus spoke for all our dispensation what He said to Thomas, "because thou hast seen Me thou hast believed; blessed are they that have not seen and yet have believed" (2 Corinthians 5:7). Thomas was permitted to doubt, that we might not doubt ("Αb eo dubitatum est, ne a nobis dubitaretur" ; Augustine). Thomas is named next to Peter among the seven on the sea of Galilee, a proof that he was a fisherman like Peter (John 21:2). The case of Thomas does not sanction but condemns skepticism, for if others were to demand the same tangible visible proofs as Thomas demanded miracles would have to be so continual as to cease to be miraculous, and sight would supersede faith. The unbelief of Thomas drew forth such an infallible proof of the identity between the crucified and the risen Lord that he who any longer disbelieves and is consequently condemned is left without excuse
Hobbist - ) One who accepts the doctrines of Thomas Hobbes
Jeffersonian - ) Pertaining to, or characteristic of, Thomas Jefferson or his policy or political doctrines. to, or characteristic of, Thomas Jefferson (third President of the United States) or his political doctrines, which were those of the Republicanism of his time, as opposed to those of the Federalists
Didymus - Thomas, q
Thomaism - ) The doctrine of Thomas Aquinas, esp
Rule, Builder's - Emblem in art associated with Saint Thomas the Apostle
Didymus - Greek: "twin" equates to Hebrew: "Thomas"
Thomas - THE character of Thomas is an anatomy of melancholy. If "to say man is to say melancholy," then to say Thomas, called Didymus, is to say religious melancholy. Peter was of such an ardent and enthusiastical temperament that he was always speaking, whereas Thomas was too great a melancholian to speak much, and when he ever did speak it was always out of the depths of his hypochondriacal heart. ...
It was already the last week of his Master's life before we have Thomas so much as once opening his mouth. " "Master," they answered, "the Jews of late have been seeking opportunity to stone Thee to death, and goest Thou thither again?" And it was when Thomas saw that his Master was walking straight into the jaws of certain destruction that he said, in sad abandonment of all his remaining hope, "Let us also go, that we may die with Him," Thomas felt sure in his foreboding heart that his Master would never leave Judea alive; Thomas loved his Master more than life, and therefore he determined to die with Him. And, indeed, that determination was not very difficult for Thomas to take. Life had not yielded much to Thomas. And its best promises, more and more delayed, and more and more deluding him, were taking less and less hold of Thomas's heart as the years went on. But at that time, and especially that week, Thomas had only too good ground for all his anxiety, and despondency, and melancholy. And a whole lifetime of melancholy, constitutional and circumstantial, had by this time settled down on Thomas, and had taken absolute and tyrannical possession of him. And then His certainly impending death, and the unaccountable delay and disappearance of His promised kingdom: all that doubt, and fear, and despondency, and despair, met in Thomas's melancholy heart till it all took absolute possession of him. The discipleship-life, at its very best, had never been very satisfying to Thomas's heart; and, of late, it had been becoming absolutely unbearable to this melancholy and morose man. "...
The next time that Thomas speaks is when Jesus and His disciples are still in the upper room where the last passover had just been celebrated and the Lord's Supper instituted. " The other disciples may know whither their Master is going, and they may know the way, but Thomas knows neither. The other disciples, as a matter of fact, know quite as little, and even less, about this whole matter than Thomas knows: only they think they know, when they do not: they have not knowledge enough to know that they know nothing. 'His Father's house?' said Thomas to himself. 'What does He mean? Why does He not speak plainly?' Thomas must understand his Master's meaning. Thomas is one of those unhappy men who cannot he put off with mere words. Thomas must see to the bottom before be can pretend to believe. Thomas was the first of those disciples, and a primate among them, in whose restless minds doubt, like a shoot, springs round the stock of truth. ...
At the same time, Thomas in his melancholy candour and saddened plainness of speech was but ministering an opportunity to his Master to utter one of His most golden oracles. Jesus saith unto Thomas, "I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father but by Me. " We cannot much regret that restless and realistic melancholy of Thomas since it has procured for us such a satisfying and ennobling utterance as that. But what days! The betrayal, the arrest, the trial, the crucifixion, the burial, and the resurrection of Thomas's Master. " But Thomas was not with them when Jesus came. Where was Thomas that glorious Sabbath evening? Why was he not with the rest? How shall we account for the absence of Thomas? It could not have been by accident. What conceivable cause, then, could have kept Thomas away? Whatever it was that kept Thomas away, he was terribly punished for his absence. He not only lost that benediction, but the joy of the other disciples who bad received it filled the cup of Thomas's misery full. The first appearance of their risen Master, that had lifted all the other disciples up to heaven, was the last blow to cast Thomas down to hell. The darkness, the bitterness, the sullenness, the pride, that had its seat so deep down in Thomas's heart, all burst out in the presence of his brethren's joy. Thomas would have none of their joy. Thomas would not believe it. And the pride, and jealousy, and bitterness of his heart, full drove Thomas into a deeper rage and a deeper rebellion. " We all understand Thomas's misery. When any good comes to others that we should have been sharers in, when we are absent through our own fault, and when those who were present come to tell us about all that we have lost, we have all been like Thomas. Thomas is told us for our learning. We see ourselves in Thomas as in a glass. Thomas, in all his melancholy and resentment, is ourselves. ...
And after eight days the disciples were again within, and this time Thomas was with them. It had taken the disciples all their might all these eight days to prevail with and to persuade Thomas. And all of us who know what it is to wage a war with our own wounded pride, and with nothing but our own sullenness, and stubbornness, and mulishness to oppose to the pleadings of truth and love, we know something of what Thomas came through before he consented to accompany the other disciples to the upper room at the end of those eight days. Then saith He to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold My hands; and reach hither thy hand and thrust it into My side, and be not faithless but believing. " How Thomas would hate himself when his own scornful, unbelieving, contemptuous words came back to him from his Master's gracious lips! How utterly odious his own words would sound as his Master repeated them. And worst of all when his risen Master humbled Himself to meet Thomas's unbelieving words and to satisfy them! Thomas would have killed himself with shame and self-condemnation, had it not been given him at that grandest moment of his whole life to say, "My Lord and my God!" Jesus saith unto him, "Thomas, because thou hast seen Me, thou hast believed; blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed!"...
Now, my brethren, do you clearly understand and accept this peculiar blessedness of believing without seeing? Do you clearly see and fully accept the blessedness of a strong and an easy acting faith in the things of Christ? Faith is always easy where love and hope are strong. What with Thomas's temperament of melancholy; what with his not having hid in his heart the things that our Lord had so often said about His coming death for sin and His resurrection for salvation; and then his hot jealousy and ill-will at the joyful news of the disciples; with all that Thomas's heart was in a state most deadly to faith. Had Thomas's heart been tender, had he had seven devils cast out of his heart like Mary Magdalene, he also would have gone out to the sepulchre while it was yet dark, and would have been the first of all the disciples to see his risen Lord. '...
Now, from Thomas and his Lord that night let us learn this also, and take it away. To Thomas He was crucified yesterday
Washington, District of Columbia, Archdiocese of - Suffragen dioceses include ...
Saint Thomas, Virgin Islands
See also ...
Catholic-Hierarchy
Thomas - THOMAS. When Jesus is about to return to Judaea because of the death of Lazarus, and the disciples are afraid of Jewish hostility, Thomas says, ‘Let us also go, that we may die with him’ (John 11:16). In the conversation after the Supper, Thomas interjects the remark, ‘Lord, we know not whither thou goest; and how can we know the way?’ (John 14:5); and thereby elicits the great saying, ‘I am the way, the truth, and the life’ (John 14:6). When Jesus appeared to the disciples on the evening of the Resurrection day, Thomas was absent, and was unable afterwards to accept the testimony, ‘We have seen the Lord. A week later Thomas is present when Jesus again appears; and then his doubts vanish, and he rises to the completest confession of faith recorded in the Gospels, ‘My Lord and my God’ (John 20:26-29). Thomas is mentioned also in John 21:2 as one of the group to whom Jesus appeared on the morning by the Lake-side. ...
Later traditions of Thomas, obviously of little value, are mentioned in Eusebius and in the Apocryphal Acts of Thomas. ...
The personality of Thomas has a clear and consistent expression in the incidents which the Fourth Gospel records. ‘In Thomas we have a man incredulous but tenacious; despondent but true; with little hope but much courage; sincere in love though perplexed in faith; neither rushing to the right conclusion as Peter might have done, nor rushing away from it into danger and dishonour as Peter did’ (T. ...
The scepticism of Thomas has a real apologetic value. Thomas believed because the fact which was too good to hope for became too certain to reject. —Among expository sermons on Thomas may be named F
Shrines in Great Britain And Ireland - In England, famous shrines of Our Lady were at ...
Abingdon
Canterbury
Caversham
Coventry
Ely
Evesham
Glastonbury
Ipswich
Lincoln
Tewkesbury
Walsingham
Worcester
in Scotland, at ...
Aberdeen
Edinburgh
Haddington
Musselburgh
in Ireland, at ...
Dublin
Muckross
Navan
Trim
Celebrated shrines of the saints were those of ...
Aidan
Alban
Cuthbert of Lindisfarne
Edmund the Martyr
Edward the Confessor
Gilbert of Sempringham
Hugh of Lincoln
Kentigern of Scotland
Ninian
Osmund
Oswald of Northumbria
Patrick
Swithin
Thomas Becket
Thomas of Hereford
Wilfrid
Wulstan
Carthusian Martyrs - ...
Blessed Humphrey Middlemore...
Blessed James Walworth...
Blessed John Davy...
Blessed John Rochester...
Blessed Richard Bere...
Blessed Robert Salt...
Blessed Sebastian Newdigate, choir monk of the London Charterhouse, executed at Tyburn, London, on June 19,1535...
Blessed Thomas Green (perhaps alias Thomas Greenwood), choir monk of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 10,1537...
Blessed Thomas Johnson, choir monk of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on September 20,1537...
Blessed Thomas Redyng, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 16,1537...
Blessed Thomas Scryven, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 15,1537...
Blessed Walter Pierson, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 10,1537...
Blessed William Exmew, procurator of the London Charterhouse, executed at Tyburn, London, on June 19,1535...
Blessed William Greenwood, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 6,1537...
Blessed William Horne, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, hanged, disembowelled, and quartered at Tyburn, London on August 4,1540...
Saint Augustine Webster...
Saint John Houghton...
Saint Robert Lawrence...
Additional Information Carthusian Martyrs of London, by Barry Bossa...
Catholic Online...
Catholic Online...
Saints Alive, by Father Robert F McNamara...
Wikipedia...
The Book of Saints, by the Monks of Ramsgate...
Our Sunday Visitor's Encyclopedia of Saints, by Matthew Brunson ...
Martyrs, Carthusian - ...
Blessed Humphrey Middlemore...
Blessed James Walworth...
Blessed John Davy...
Blessed John Rochester...
Blessed Richard Bere...
Blessed Robert Salt...
Blessed Sebastian Newdigate, choir monk of the London Charterhouse, executed at Tyburn, London, on June 19,1535...
Blessed Thomas Green (perhaps alias Thomas Greenwood), choir monk of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 10,1537...
Blessed Thomas Johnson, choir monk of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on September 20,1537...
Blessed Thomas Redyng, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 16,1537...
Blessed Thomas Scryven, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 15,1537...
Blessed Walter Pierson, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 10,1537...
Blessed William Exmew, procurator of the London Charterhouse, executed at Tyburn, London, on June 19,1535...
Blessed William Greenwood, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 6,1537...
Blessed William Horne, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, hanged, disembowelled, and quartered at Tyburn, London on August 4,1540...
Saint Augustine Webster...
Saint John Houghton...
Saint Robert Lawrence...
Additional Information Carthusian Martyrs of London, by Barry Bossa...
Catholic Online...
Catholic Online...
Saints Alive, by Father Robert F McNamara...
Wikipedia...
The Book of Saints, by the Monks of Ramsgate...
Our Sunday Visitor's Encyclopedia of Saints, by Matthew Brunson ...
Saint Thomas Christians - A body of Christians in India who claim spiritual descent from the Apostle Saint Thomas, Bishop of Mylapore, who was martyred in 68, according to strong local tradition and collateral evidence. Various witnesses have recorded that from earliest times a body of Christians dwelt in India and its environs, and, though Saint Thomas is for the first time mentioned in documents c. Up to 496 it is certain that all the bishops were Catholic; from then the prelates came from Babylon, but for a long time the Thomas Christians were deprived of bishops, and when finally that patriarchate sent them priests and prelates, these must have been Nestorians, whom the people, in their anxiety for a hierarchy, unquestionably accepted, doubtless unaware that the Nestorian heresy existed. When the Portuguese missionaries arrived in 1500 they considered the Saint Thomas Christians Nestorians (despite protestations to the contrary not voiced until three centuries later), and, laboring to reclaim them, a Synod was held in 1599, at Dampier (Udiamparur), where Saint Thomas priests and laymen promised submission to Rome
Bodleian - ) Of or pertaining to Sir Thomas Bodley, or to the celebrated library at Oxford, founded by him in the sixteenth century
University of Saint Thomas - Founded in 1885 as a seminary, and named for Saint Thomas Aquinas. Consists of a preparatory school, known as Saint Thomas Military Academy; schools of arts and sciences, commerce, education, and law; graduate and summer schools
Saint Thomas, University of - Founded in 1885 as a seminary, and named for Saint Thomas Aquinas. Consists of a preparatory school, known as Saint Thomas Military Academy; schools of arts and sciences, commerce, education, and law; graduate and summer schools
Ainsborough Hat - A woman's broad-brimmed hat of a form thought to resemble those shown in portraits by Thomas Gainsborough, the English artist (1727-88)
Marshall, Arthur Featherstone - Brother of Thomas William Marshall
Matthew's Bible - The Thomas Matthew Bible was a revision of Tyndale's and Coverdale's versions likely prepared by John Rogers in 1537 in Antwerp
Apologia - A defense or vindication, such as Plato's Apology of Socrates, Apology of Thomas More, Newman's Apologia Pro Vita Sua (Vindication of His Own Life)
Arthur Marshall - Brother of Thomas William Marshall
Tipper - ) A kind of ale brewed with brackish water obtained from a particular well; - so called from the first brewer of it, one Thomas Tipper
Thomas (st.) the Apostle - Thomas, who was called by our Lord to bean Apostle. Thomas, but there are four sayings of his recorded which areindicative of his character. Thomas, (1) the spirit of inquiry,(2) bravery in the face of danger, (3) his doubt and unbelief, and(4) strong conviction and the triumph of faith. Thomas we are more confirmedin our belief than by the faith of the other Apostles. Thomas issaid to have carried the Gospel to the Parthians, Medes, Persiansand Chaldeans, among whom he founded the Church. Thomas is represented ashandling our Lord's wounds; or in reference to his martyrdom, witha lance or spear; also, holding a carpenter's square
Thomas - The apocryphal book, The Acts of Thomas , uses the literal meaning of his name (“twin”) in making him the twin of Jesus Himself! His personality was complex, revealing a pessimism mixed with loyalty and faith (John 11:16 ). Thomas sought evidence of Jesus' resurrection (John 20:25 ), but when convinced of the miracle made an historic confession of faith (John 20:28 )
Itanagar, India, Diocese of - Founded on December 7, 2005 by Pope Benedict XVI; its first bishop was John Thomas Kattrukudiyil
ba Ria, Viet Nam, Diocese of - Founded on November 22, 2005; its first bishop of Thomas Nguyên Van Trâm
Thomean - ) A member of the ancient church of Christians established on the Malabar coast of India, which some suppose to have been originally founded by the Apostle Thomas
Avila, University of - The Dominican College of Saint Thomas at Avila, Spain, was made a university, 1550
University of Avila - The Dominican College of Saint Thomas at Avila, Spain, was made a university, 1550
Dies Irre, Dies Ilia - It was written in the 13th century by Thomas of Celauo. There is no record of the authorship or origin of the old ecclesiastical melody; it was probably either written by Thomas of Celano himself, or else adapted to his hymn as soon as the latter was finished
That Day of Wrath, That Dreadful Day - It was written in the 13th century by Thomas of Celauo. There is no record of the authorship or origin of the old ecclesiastical melody; it was probably either written by Thomas of Celano himself, or else adapted to his hymn as soon as the latter was finished
Scotist - 1308), who maintained certain doctrines in philosophy and theology, in opposition to the Thomists, or followers of Thomas Aquinas, the Dominican scholastic
Salt, Robert, Blessed - Imprisoned for refusing the Oath of Supremacy, and starved to death along with Thomas Johnson and the other Carthusians
Robert Salt, Blessed - Imprisoned for refusing the Oath of Supremacy, and starved to death along with Thomas Johnson and the other Carthusians
Lance - Emblem in art associated with ...
Saint Longinus, the centurion who pierced the side of Christ with his lance
Saint Matthew, due to his martyrdom
Saint Simon the Apostle
Saint Thomas, due to his martyrdom
Thomas - Thomas . Thus, when Jesus on the evening of the Resurrection-day appeared to the Apostles in the room at Jerusalem where they were assembled with closed doors, Thomas was absent, buried in despair; and when he heard that they had seen the Lord, he would not believe it. The next Sunday evening Jesus appeared as before, and gave Thomas the evidence he had craved. Despondent though he was, Thomas was no coward, and he had a great devotion to Jesus. )...
Thomas is not really a name but an epithet, meaning, like its Greek equivalent Didymus ( John 11:16 ; John 20:24 ; John 21:2 ), ‘the Twin
Cashel, Ireland, Archdiocese of - (4Jun 1567 Appointed - 1578 Died)
Blessed Dermot O'Hurley (11Sep 1581Appointed - 1584Martyred)
David Kearney (May 21, 1603Appointed - 14Aug 1624Died)
Thomas Walsh (27 Apr 1626 Appointed - May 5, 1654Died)
William Burgat (11Jan 1669 Appointed - 1674Died)
John Brenan (8 Mark 1677 Appointed - 1693Died)
Edward Comerford (14Nov 1695 Appointed - 21Feb 1710 Died)
Christopher Butler (1Sep 1711Appointed - 4Sep 1757 Died)
James Butler (1st) (4Sep 1757 Succeeded - May 17, 1774Resigned)
James Butler (2nd) (May 17, 1774Succeeded - 29 Jul 1791Died) who moved the diocesan seat to Thurles where it has remained; compiled Butler's Catechism
Thomas Bray (20 Jul 1792Appointed - 15 Dec 1820 Died)
Patrick Everard (15 Dec 1820 Succeeded - 31Mar 1821Died)
Robert Laffan (18 Mark 1823Appointed - 1833Died)
Michael Slattery (22Dec 1833Appointed - 4Feb 1857 Died)
Patrick Leahy (27 Apr 1857 Appointed - 26 Jan 1875 Died)
Thomas William Croke
Thomas Fennelly (23Jul 1902Succeeded - 7 Mark 1913Resigned)
John Mary Harty (2Dec 1913Appointed - 1Sep 1946 Died)
Jeremiah Kinane (11Sep 1946 Succeeded - 18 Feb 1959 Died)
Thomas Morris (21Dec 1959 Appointed - 12Sep 1988 Resigned)
Dermot Clifford (12Sep 1988 Succeeded - )
See also ...
Catholic-Hierarchy
Larke, John, Blessed - He was rector of Saint Ethelburga's, London, of Woodford, Essex, and of Chelsea, and the parish priest and friend of Thomas More
John Larke, Blessed - He was rector of Saint Ethelburga's, London, of Woodford, Essex, and of Chelsea, and the parish priest and friend of Thomas More
Ely, England, Diocese of - The last Catholic bishop, Thomas Thirlby, was imprisoned by Elizabeth, when the diocese became the present Anglican see
at This Our Solemn Feast - It was written by Saint Thomas Aquinas
Sacris Solemniis Juncta Sint Gaudia - It was written by Saint Thomas Aquinas
Esser, Thomas - In 1877 he went to Vienna and received the Dominican habit as Father Thomas. Appointed to the chair for the study of Saint Thomas at Maynooth College, he was recalled, 1891, to lecture on canon law at the University of Freiburg, Switzerland. Summoned to Rome, 1894, to edit the new Index Librorum Prohibitorum, he became professor of canon law at the University of Saint Thomas
Thomas Esser - In 1877 he went to Vienna and received the Dominican habit as Father Thomas. Appointed to the chair for the study of Saint Thomas at Maynooth College, he was recalled, 1891, to lecture on canon law at the University of Freiburg, Switzerland. Summoned to Rome, 1894, to edit the new Index Librorum Prohibitorum, he became professor of canon law at the University of Saint Thomas
John Shert, Blessed - He was executed with Blessed Thomas Ford
Hobbism - ) The philosophical system of Thomas Hobbes, an English materialist (1588-1679); esp
Tom - ) A familiar contraction of Thomas, a proper name of a man
Shert, John, Blessed - He was executed with Blessed Thomas Ford
Basic Slag - Called also Thomas slag, phosphatic slag, and odorless phosphate
Basic Process - Called also Thomas process
Cape of Good Hope, Western Vicariate Apostolic of - Vicars Apostolic: Patrick Griffith (1837-1862), Thomas Grimley (1862-1871), John Leonard (1872-1909), John Rooney (1909-1925), Bernard O'Riley (1926); residence at Cape Town
Scotists - Duns Scotus, a Scottish cordelier, who maintained the immaculate conception of the Virgin, or that she was born without original sin, in opposition to Thomas Aquinas and the Thomists
Lust - And so, as Thomas Adams says, there can be a lusting of the Spirit, for the Spirit lusteth against the flesh ( Galatians 5:17 )
Abbey of Abingdon - The last abbot, Thomas Pentecost, surrendered the abbey to the Crown, 1538
Aureole of the Saints - According to Thomas Aquinas, the three aureoles are particular rewards added to the essential happiness of eternity, three special points of resemblance to Christ: victory over the flesh in virginity, victory over the world
Abingdon, Abbey of - The last abbot, Thomas Pentecost, surrendered the abbey to the Crown, 1538
Western Vicariate Apostolic of Cape of Good Hope - Vicars Apostolic: Patrick Griffith (1837-1862), Thomas Grimley (1862-1871), John Leonard (1872-1909), John Rooney (1909-1925), Bernard O'Riley (1926); residence at Cape Town
Mendel Medal - An award, given annually by the Augustinian College of Saint Thomas of Villanova, Villanova, Pennsylvania, to honor the memory of Gregor Mendel, the Augustinian friar and Abbot of the Monastery of Saint Thomas the Apostle, in Brünn, Moravia, the discoverer and first exponent of the principles of heredity known now as the Mendelian Law
Medal, Mendel - An award, given annually by the Augustinian College of Saint Thomas of Villanova, Villanova, Pennsylvania, to honor the memory of Gregor Mendel, the Augustinian friar and Abbot of the Monastery of Saint Thomas the Apostle, in Brünn, Moravia, the discoverer and first exponent of the principles of heredity known now as the Mendelian Law
Fisher, Philip - Real name: Thomas Copley
Averroes - Thomas Aquinas, although refuting him, spoke of his views with respect
Thomas Copley - Real name: Thomas Copley
Canonize - ) To declare (a deceased person) a saint; to put in the catalogue of saints; as, Thomas a Becket was canonized
Utopia - ) An imaginary island, represented by Sir Thomas More, in a work called Utopia, as enjoying the greatest perfection in politics, laws, and the like
Ghent, Belgium, Diocese of - Org
patron saints index
Notable folks with connections to the diocese include ...
Blessed Thomas Holland
Saint Amalberga
Saint Bavo of Ghent
Saint Hildebert of Ghent
Saint John of Ghent
Saint Macaire of Ghent
Thomas - Thomas (tŏm'as), twin. In the character of Thomas we observe a desire for a sufficient evidence of facts. There is nothing in Thomas' behavior to surprise those accustomed to analyze the workings of the human mind
Giles de Coninck - A moral theologian of distinction, he is noted for his commentary and exposition of the entire teaching of Saint Thomas, and his work concerning morality
Hereford, England, Diocese of - Included among its bishops is Saint Thomas of Hereford, the last English saint canonized
Canterbury - It is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury (primate of all England), and contains the shrine of Thomas a Becket, to which pilgrimages were formerly made
Adam's Peak - Mountain, Ceylon, at summit of which is a depression in the rock, 5 feet long, resembling a human foot-print, attributed by legend to Thomas the Apostle
Thomas Apameensis, Bishop of Apamea - Thomas (9) Apameensis , bp. Two contemporary historians, Procopius and Evagrius (the latter praises Thomas as a "man most mighty in word and in deed"), record his tact and courage when a great peril threatened his city. Thomas fixed a day for its exhibition, to which the people of the neighbouring towns also eagerly repaired; among them the parents of Evagrius, bringing with them the future historian, who vividly describes the crowds pressing to see, and seeking to kiss, the sacred wood. Thomas produced last of all the casket that enshrined the cross, and, shewing its contents to the king, said, "This alone is left; take the gold and gems—I grudge them not; only leave us the precious wood of salvation. Thomas conciliated Chosroes by assiduously courting his favour
Coincidence - ) The condition or fact of happening at the same time; as, the coincidence of the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson
Avranches - The Council of Avranches, 1172, imposed penance on Henry II of England for the murder of Thomas Becket, forbade the conferring of benefices on children, and recommended observance of the Advent fast
Abrincalae - The Council of Avranches, 1172, imposed penance on Henry II of England for the murder of Thomas Becket, forbade the conferring of benefices on children, and recommended observance of the Advent fast
Fitzherbert, Maria Anne - The daughter of Walter Smythe of Brambridge, Hampshire, and the widow of Edward Weld, and of Thomas Fitzherbert, she married George, Prince of Wales, 1785
Maria Anne Fitzherbert - The daughter of Walter Smythe of Brambridge, Hampshire, and the widow of Edward Weld, and of Thomas Fitzherbert, she married George, Prince of Wales, 1785
Pange Lingua Gloriosi [Corporis] - Written by Saint Thomas Aquinas, it has approximately twenty-five translations; the one given is by E
Bibles, Rhymed - Among English rhymed versions, mostly of the Psalms, are those of Thomas Brampton (1414), Sir Philip Sydney (1580), and Lord Bacon (1600)
Albert the Great, Saint - He taught at Cologne and Paris, where he had Thomas Aquinas among his pupils, and compiled an encyclopedia of the learning of his day
Gardiner, German, Blessed - His courage was aroused by the example of the martyrs, especially Blessed Thomas More, and he suffered the death of a traitor
Erastianism - A system based on an analogy between the Christian and Jewish dispensations, founded in the 16th century by Erastus, a follower of Zwingli, whose real name was Thomas Liebr
Sodor And Man - The last Catholic bishop was Thomas Stanley
German Gardiner, Blessed - His courage was aroused by the example of the martyrs, especially Blessed Thomas More, and he suffered the death of a traitor
Sing, my Tongue, the Saviour's Glory - Written by Saint Thomas Aquinas, it has approximately twenty-five translations; the one given is by E
Rhymed Bibles - Among English rhymed versions, mostly of the Psalms, are those of Thomas Brampton (1414), Sir Philip Sydney (1580), and Lord Bacon (1600)
Irish Martyrs - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P. MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Martyrs, Irish - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P. MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Henry ii, King - He at once took up the work of constitutional and legal reform inaugurated by his grandfather, with the assistance of Archbishop Theobald, and Chancellor Thomas Becket. Henry's course of action brought him into conflict with Thomas Becket, who in 1162 had become Archbishop of Canterbury
Erastian - ) One of the followers of Thomas Erastus, a German physician and theologian of the 16th century
Gilbert, Rosa Mulholland - Novelist and poet, wife of Sir John Thomas Gilbert, born Belfast, Ireland, 1841; died Dublin, Ireland, 1921
Rosa Gilbert - Novelist and poet, wife of Sir John Thomas Gilbert, born Belfast, Ireland, 1841; died Dublin, Ireland, 1921
Saint Asaph, Wales, Diocese of - The last Catholic bishop, both of the diocese and of the ancient hierarchy, was Thomas Goldwell in 1555
Discretion, Age of - Thomas Paine wrote his "Age of Reason" in a French prison, 1794; it is a rough-and-ready presentment of Deism
Age of Discretion - Thomas Paine wrote his "Age of Reason" in a French prison, 1794; it is a rough-and-ready presentment of Deism
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Boston) - Established at Jamaica Plain in 1873, from the Brooklyn foundation at the request of Father Thomas Magennis; novitiate opened at Jamaica Plain in 1876, and after three transfers, established at Framingham, Massachusetts, mother-house at Brighton
Reason, Age of (2) - Thomas Paine wrote his "Age of Reason" in a French prison, 1794; it is a rough-and-ready presentment of Deism
Devotion, Days of - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
Days of Devotion - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
John Shepherd - 1512;died there c1563 A chorister under Thomas Mulliner at Saint Paul's, he became in 1542 choir-master and organist at Magdalen College, Oxford, and in 1549 gained a fellowship
Ox - Emblem in art associated with ...
Saint Ambrose of Milan
Saint Blandina; it was the means of her martyrdom
Saint Eustachius who was martyred with his family in a bronze bull
Saint Luke, symbolic of sacrifice and thus of death on the Cross
Saint Saturninus who was martyred by being dragged to death by a bull
Saint Thomas Aquinas, who was called The Dumb Ox for his early problems at school
Mazzella, Camillo - President of the Academy of Saint Thomas
John Beche, Blessed - In 1534 he took the Oath of Supremacy, but later incurred the king's resentment by expressing admiration for the martyrs, Blessed John Fisher and Blessed Thomas More
Camillo Mazzella - President of the Academy of Saint Thomas
Marshall, Thomas - In 1534 he took the Oath of Supremacy, but later incurred the king's resentment by expressing admiration for the martyrs, Blessed John Fisher and Blessed Thomas More
o'Carolan, Turlogh - " Many of his poems are of a lively Pindaric nature, and full of curious turns and twists of meter to suit his airs, and have been utilized by Thomas Moore for many of his "Melodies
Beche, John, Blessed - In 1534 he took the Oath of Supremacy, but later incurred the king's resentment by expressing admiration for the martyrs, Blessed John Fisher and Blessed Thomas More
Shepherd, John - 1512;died there c1563 A chorister under Thomas Mulliner at Saint Paul's, he became in 1542 choir-master and organist at Magdalen College, Oxford, and in 1549 gained a fellowship
Thomas Marshall 16th Century - In 1534 he took the Oath of Supremacy, but later incurred the king's resentment by expressing admiration for the martyrs, Blessed John Fisher and Blessed Thomas More
Turlogh o'Carolan - " Many of his poems are of a lively Pindaric nature, and full of curious turns and twists of meter to suit his airs, and have been utilized by Thomas Moore for many of his "Melodies
Science - Science is defined by Saint Thomas Aquinas as the knowledge of things from their causes
Dallas, Texas, Diocese of - Bishops: Thomas F
Institute of the Divine Compassion - Founded in New York City, 1873, by Right Reverend Thomas Preston, for the reformation of erring girls, and the religious, mental, and industrial training of girls in moral danger from ignorance, indolence, waywardness, or dangerous influences
Heckerism - ) The teaching of Isaac Thomas Hecker (1819-88), which interprets Catholicism as promoting human aspirations after liberty and truth, and as the religion best suited to the character and institutions of the American people
Bermondsey - A hospital and relief house of Saint Thomas in Southwark, founded by the prior, 1213, was attached to the monastery for over 200 years
Lincoln, England, Diocese of - The last Catholic bishop, and also the last in England, was Thomas Watson (died 1584)
Indifferent Acts - Saint Thomas is of opinion that acts of a deliberate agent, aware of the significance of the circumstances in which he acts and especially of the end which his act serves, cannot escape the imputation of morality; they will be either good or bad
o'Meara, Kathleen - Mohl, Thomas Grant, the Cure d'Ars, and "Frederick Ozanam, Professor at the Sorbonne, His Life and Works," her masterpiece
Kathleen o'Meara - Mohl, Thomas Grant, the Cure d'Ars, and "Frederick Ozanam, Professor at the Sorbonne, His Life and Works," her masterpiece
American Rescue Workers - A group of workers under Thomas E
Grand Island, Nebraska, Diocese of - Comprises the counties of Arthur, Banner, Blaine, Box Butte, Brown, Buffalo, Cherry, Cheyenne, Custer, Dawes, Deuel, Garfield, Grant, Greeley, Hooker, Howard, Keyapaha, Kimball, Logan, Loup, McPherson, Rock, Scott's Bluff, Sheridan, Sherman, Wheeler, Sioux, Thomas, Valley, and those portions of Dawson, Hall, Lincoln, and Keith lying north of the South Platte River; area, 40,000 square miles; erected at Kearney, March 8, 1912; transferred to Grand Island, April 11, 1917; suffragan of Dubuque
American Salvation Army - A group of workers under Thomas E
Acts, Indifferent - Saint Thomas is of opinion that acts of a deliberate agent, aware of the significance of the circumstances in which he acts and especially of the end which his act serves, cannot escape the imputation of morality; they will be either good or bad
Salvation Army of America - A group of workers under Thomas E
Thomas Edessenus - Thomas (8) Edessenus appears in the Life of Mar Abas. The latter, originally Magian by religion, was converted to Christianity, learnt Syriac at Nisibis, and Greek at Edessa from Thomas a Jacobite, whom he afterwards took with him to Alexandria and there with his help translated the Scriptures ( or , the books) from Greek into Syriac (Gregory Bar-hebr. 411) reckons "Thomas of Edessa," no doubt his former teacher drawn by him from the opposing sect into Nestorianism
Thom'as - But it may also be that; Thomas was a surname. Thomas said to his fellow disciples, "Let us also go, that we may die with him. " (John 11:16 ) His unbelief appeared in his question during the Last Supper: "Thomas saith unto him Lord we know not whither thou goest, and how can we: know the way?" (John 14:5 ) It was the prosaic, incredulous doubt as to moving a step in the unseen future, and yet an eager inquiry as to how this step was to be taken. He uttered the same salutation, "Peace be unto you;" and then turning to Thomas, as if this had been the special object of his appearance, uttered the words which convey as strongly the sense of condemnation and tender reproof as those of Thomas had shown the sense of hesitation and doubt. " (John 20:29 ) In the New Testament we hear of Thomas only twice again, once on the Sea of Galilee with the seven disciples, where he is ranked next after Peter, (John 21:2 ) and again in the assemblage of the apostles after the ascension
Lauda Sion Salvatorem - It was written by Saint Thomas Aquinas (1227-1274)
Zephaniah - 1:14, 15, "The great day of Jehovah is near" (in the Latin version Dies iræ, dies illa), has furnished the basis for the sublime hymn of the Middle Ages, the Dies Iræ ascribed to Thomas a Celano, and often translated
Healy, George Peter Alexander - He studied in Europe, 1834-1850, a pupil of Baron Antoine Gros and Thomas Couture among others, and lived there again from 1869-1890
George Healy - He studied in Europe, 1834-1850, a pupil of Baron Antoine Gros and Thomas Couture among others, and lived there again from 1869-1890
Print - Augustine preferred the word ‘cicatrix,’ in one place (on 1 John 1:3) quoting Thomas’ words as ‘non credam nisi digitos meos misero in locum clavorum, et cicatrices ejus tetigero’; in another (on Psalms 21:17 (Psalms 22:17), ‘nisi misero digitos meos in cicatrices vulnerum, non credam. The reading τόπος would bring out more strongly what is implied in the story, that Thomas required the evidence of his senses, both of seeing and feeling; he wished to see the τύπος, and put his finger into the τόπος; cf. ...
When Jesus appeared on the evening of the Resurrection to His disciples during the absence of Thomas, it is related that He showed them His hands and His feet, evidently bearing the marks of the wounds, in order to convince them of the reality and identity of His risen body (Luke 24:39, cf. ’ Thomas refused to accept their account of what had taken place, and required that he himself should have proof similar to or even stronger than what they had received. A week later Christ appeared again to the disciples, Thomas being present, and offered him just the test he had demanded, giving him back his own words, but making no mention of the prints of the nails, for ‘He does not recall the malice of His enemies’ (Alford). It is a moot question whether Thomas availed himself of this offer. Tertullian, Ambrose, Cyril, and others suppose that he did, but it is psychologically more probable that Thomas rose above such a material test; the presence of his Master, and the proof of His omniscience, shown in His knowledge of what Thomas had said on the former occasion, were sufficient; with a bound he rose to the vision of highest faith (so Meyer, Alford, Westcott, Edersheim, Dods, et al. They prove the reality of the Resurrection body, and its continuity with that body which was crucified; though Christ glorified was in many respects changed, yet He was essentially the same who suffered, seeing that the prints could become visibly present to Thomas and the others
Little, Bartholomew the - He translated the Psalter, and some works of Saint Augustine and Saint Thomas Aquinas, into Armenian
Apostles - Their names are as follows (Matthew 10; Mark 3; Luke 6): ...
Andrew
Bartholomew
James the Greater
James the Lesser
John
Matthew
Matthias (elected in place of Judas)
Philip
Simon Peter
Simon
Thaddeus or Jude
Thomas
Though not one of the twelve Apostles, Saint Paul is numbered as an Apostle of the first rank
Newdigate, Sebastian, Blessed - Tried before the council, he was condemned to the Tower, and executed with Thomas Exmew and Humphrey Middlemore
Francis Cruise - He wrote on medical topics, such as cholera and hypnotism, but is known for his critical work, "Thomas A Kempis and the Authorship of the Imitation
Orlando Bandinelli - He excommunicated Emperor Frederick I, who submitted after seventeen years, and in England upheld the rights for which Saint Thomas Becket suffered martyrdom, finally exacting them from King Henry II
Scriptures: Reading of - We would say with Thomas a Kempis, 'I would be always in a nook with a book
Gregory Viii, Pope - He was a Premonstratensian, cardinal-priest, and chancellor, in which capacity he was sent to England to investigate the murder of Saint Thomas a Becket
Gaetano Sanseverino - After a comparative study of philosophic systems he determined to restore the study of the Schoolmen, especially of Thomas Aquinas, and taught logic and metaphysics in the seminary at Naples and ethics in the university
Arundell, Thomas 1584 - Son of Thomas Arundell, died Oxford, England
Bartholomew - He translated the Psalter, and some works of Saint Augustine and Saint Thomas Aquinas, into Armenian
Bartholomew Parvus - He translated the Psalter, and some works of Saint Augustine and Saint Thomas Aquinas, into Armenian
Bartholomew the Little - He translated the Psalter, and some works of Saint Augustine and Saint Thomas Aquinas, into Armenian
Alexander Iii, Pope - He excommunicated Emperor Frederick I, who submitted after seventeen years, and in England upheld the rights for which Saint Thomas Becket suffered martyrdom, finally exacting them from King Henry II
Bandinelli, Orlando - He excommunicated Emperor Frederick I, who submitted after seventeen years, and in England upheld the rights for which Saint Thomas Becket suffered martyrdom, finally exacting them from King Henry II
Sebastian Newdigate, Blessed - Tried before the council, he was condemned to the Tower, and executed with Thomas Exmew and Humphrey Middlemore
Sanseverino, Gaetano - After a comparative study of philosophic systems he determined to restore the study of the Schoolmen, especially of Thomas Aquinas, and taught logic and metaphysics in the seminary at Naples and ethics in the university
Daughter, Scavenger's - Saint Luke Kirby and Blessed Thomas Cottam suffered torture by this cruel machine
Missionary Servants of the Most Holy Trinity - Religious community of priests and brothers in the United States, founded by the Reverend Thomas Augustine Judge, C
Pain - ...
Pain of loss results:
in Hell, from the eternal loss of God, whose possession alone in the Beatific Vision can completely satisfy the desire of intelligent beings for happiness
in Purgatory, from the temporary deprivation of Him, whom the soul realizes to be the source of all happiness
in Limbo there will be no subjective pain of loss (not an article of faith, but the opinion of Saint Thomas
Pain of sense principally consists in the torment of fire
Francis Crawford - He was the son of Thomas Crawford, the American sculptor, was educated in American, English, and German colleges and the Roman University, and became a journalist and critic
Ernakulam-Angamaly, India, Archdiocese of - Saint Thomas the Apostle brought Christianity to the people of Malabar in the 1century
Eternal Creation - Saint Thomas and Suarez deny that we can prove from reason that eternal creation was impossible, that this world could not have existed from all eternity
Scavenger's Daughter - Saint Luke Kirby and Blessed Thomas Cottam suffered torture by this cruel machine
Divine Comedy, the - The poet, writing in the vernacular, shows his knowledge of the literature of antiquity, the philosophy of Aristotle and Saint Thomas, the theology of the Fathers, and the mysticism of Saints Augustine and Saint Bernard
Divina Commedia, la - The poet, writing in the vernacular, shows his knowledge of the literature of antiquity, the philosophy of Aristotle and Saint Thomas, the theology of the Fathers, and the mysticism of Saints Augustine and Saint Bernard
Molina, Luis de - Installed as professor of philosophy at Coimbra, and later promoted to the chair of theology at Evora, Father Molina expounded for 20 years the "Summa" of Saint Thomas
Catholic Boys Brigade of the United States - A semi-military organization founded in New York City, 1911, through the efforts of Reverend Thomas Lynch and Michael Lonergan, with the approval of Cardinal Farley
Canterbury, England - Notable bishops include ...
Cardinal Reginald Pole, last Catholic archbishop of the diocese
Lanfranc
Deusdedit, 655-664, first English bishop
Saint Anselm of Canterbury
Saint Augustine of Canterbury, first bishop
Saint Dunstan of Canterbury
Saint Edmund Rich
Saint Theodore (668-690)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury
Stephen Langton
Stigand (1052-1070), last of the Saxons
Thomas - From the circumstance that in the lists of the apostles he is always mentioned along with Matthew, who was the son of Alphaeus (Mark 3:18 ), and that these two are always followed by James, who was also the son of Alphaeus, it has been supposed that these three, Matthew, Thomas, and James, were brothers
Dies Irae - It is supposed to have beenwritten in the Twelfth Century by Thomas of Celano
Luis de Molina - Installed as professor of philosophy at Coimbra, and later promoted to the chair of theology at Evora, Father Molina expounded for 20 years the "Summa" of Saint Thomas
Henry Rawes - Translated the treatises of Saint Thomas Aquinas on the Blessed Sacrament and the Lord's Prayer
Apostle - ...
7 Thomas
Thomas - Thomas
Rawes, Henry Augustus - Translated the treatises of Saint Thomas Aquinas on the Blessed Sacrament and the Lord's Prayer
Redemptoristines - Community of nuns, founded: at Scala, Italy, 1731, by Father Thomas Falcoia, with a rule based on that of Saint Augustine
Saint Paul's School - 1111) which Saint Thomas Becket, it is said, attended
University of Oxford -
Lincoln, founded 1427, by Richard Fleming and Thomas Rotherham, Bishops of Lincoln, in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary and All Saints, to educate divines to preach against the Wycliffian heresy.
Pembroke, founded 1624, by James I through endowments of Thomas Tesdale and Richard Wightwick.
Saint John's, on the site of a house of studies for Cistercian monks, founded by Archbishop Chichele, 1437, and dedicated to Saint Bernard of Clairvaux; refounded 1555, by Sir Thomas White, in honor of Saint John the Baptist.
Trinity, founded by Sir Thomas Pope, 1554, on the site of the 13th century Durham College, for the Benedictines of Durham Abbey; Cardinal Newman was a scholar here in 1819.
Worcester, founded 1283, as Gloucester Hall, for Benedictine novices from Gloucester Abbey; refounded and endowed by Sir Thomas Cookes, 1714
Thaddaeus - ]'>[3] renders ‘ brother of James’), and with the ‘Judas, not Iscariot,’ of John 14:22 , though some Syrian writers have made this last Judas to be the same as the Apostle Thomas (syr sin reads here ‘Thomas,’ syr cur reads ‘Judas Thomas’), Thomas being confessedly only a surname, ‘the Twin
Following of Christ - Its authorship, once in dispute, is now attributed to Thomas a Kempis, a Canon of Windesheim, Netherlands, whose autographed manuscript of the work appeared in 1441
Cajetan, Tommaso de Vio Gaetani - Leo XIII ordered his commentaries to be incorporated with the text of the "Summa" in the official Leonine edition of the complete works of Saint Thomas
Imitation of Christ - Its authorship, once in dispute, is now attributed to Thomas a Kempis, a Canon of Windesheim, Netherlands, whose autographed manuscript of the work appeared in 1441
Union to Christ - : Thomas Adams
Addition - ; Robert Dale, Mason; Thomas Way, of New York; a mark of distinction; a title
Bangor, Carnarvonshire, North Wales, Diocese of - Included in the episcopal list are Anian (1267-1305), who baptized Edward II, and Thomas Skevington, or Pace (1509-1533), who completed the cathedral
Tommaso de Vio Gaetani Cajetan - Leo XIII ordered his commentaries to be incorporated with the text of the "Summa" in the official Leonine edition of the complete works of Saint Thomas
Sentences, Book of the - The work was the standard textbook on theology down to the 16th century, and greatly influenced the work of Saint Thomas Aquinas
Order of Friars Preachers - The school of philosophy and theology of two of their number, Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas, holds a unique place in the life of the Church. ...
Dominican saints and beati include ...
Saint Albert the Great
Blessed Ambrose Sansedoni of Siena
Saint Antonius of Florence
Saint Catherine del Ricci
Saint Catherine of Siena
Blessed Christopher of Milan
Saint Dominic de Guzman
Blessed Fra Angelico
Saint Henry Suso
Saint Hyacinth
Saint Jordan of Pisa
Saint Jordan of Saxony
Saint Louis Bertran
Saint Louis Marie de Montfort
Saint Maria Bagnesi
Saint Martin de Porres
Blessed Osanna Andreasi
Blessed Peter de Geremia
Saint Peter Gonzalez
Saint Peter Verona
Pope Saint Pius V
Saint Raymond of Penyafort
Saint Rose of Lima
Saint Thomas Aquinas
Saint Vincent Ferrer
Saint Zedislava Berka
Order of Preachers - The school of philosophy and theology of two of their number, Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas, holds a unique place in the life of the Church. ...
Dominican saints and beati include ...
Saint Albert the Great
Blessed Ambrose Sansedoni of Siena
Saint Antonius of Florence
Saint Catherine del Ricci
Saint Catherine of Siena
Blessed Christopher of Milan
Saint Dominic de Guzman
Blessed Fra Angelico
Saint Henry Suso
Saint Hyacinth
Saint Jordan of Pisa
Saint Jordan of Saxony
Saint Louis Bertran
Saint Louis Marie de Montfort
Saint Maria Bagnesi
Saint Martin de Porres
Blessed Osanna Andreasi
Blessed Peter de Geremia
Saint Peter Gonzalez
Saint Peter Verona
Pope Saint Pius V
Saint Raymond of Penyafort
Saint Rose of Lima
Saint Thomas Aquinas
Saint Vincent Ferrer
Saint Zedislava Berka
Dominicans - The school of philosophy and theology of two of their number, Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas, holds a unique place in the life of the Church. ...
Dominican saints and beati include ...
Saint Albert the Great
Blessed Ambrose Sansedoni of Siena
Saint Antonius of Florence
Saint Catherine del Ricci
Saint Catherine of Siena
Blessed Christopher of Milan
Saint Dominic de Guzman
Blessed Fra Angelico
Saint Henry Suso
Saint Hyacinth
Saint Jordan of Pisa
Saint Jordan of Saxony
Saint Louis Bertran
Saint Louis Marie de Montfort
Saint Maria Bagnesi
Saint Martin de Porres
Blessed Osanna Andreasi
Blessed Peter de Geremia
Saint Peter Gonzalez
Saint Peter Verona
Pope Saint Pius V
Saint Raymond of Penyafort
Saint Rose of Lima
Saint Thomas Aquinas
Saint Vincent Ferrer
Saint Zedislava Berka
Chippendale - ) Designating furniture designed, or like that designed, by Thomas Chippendale, an English cabinetmaker of the 18th century
Aufklarung - In Germany, Lessing, Mendelssohn, and Herder were representative thinkers, while the political doctrines of the leaders of the American Revolution and the speculations of Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Paine represented the movement in America
Glastonbury Thorn - A variety of hawthorn which originated from a tree on Wearyall Hill Glastonbury, England, and which has the peculiarity of flowering both at Christmas time and in May; this is recorded in a letter written in 1535 to Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex
Apostle - The twelve apostles of Jesus were Simon Peter, Andrew, James the son of Zebedee, John, Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, Thaddaeus, Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot
Thorn, Glastonbury - A variety of hawthorn which originated from a tree on Wearyall Hill Glastonbury, England, and which has the peculiarity of flowering both at Christmas time and in May; this is recorded in a letter written in 1535 to Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex
Thomas Bridgett - His writings include "Spirit and Truth," "Our Lady's Dowry," "The History of the Holy Eucharist in Great Britain," which contains the most eloquent plea for Catholic ceremonial ever written, "The Life of Blessed John Fisher," "The True Story of the Catholic Hierarchy deposed by Queen Elizabeth," "Blunders and Forgeries," "Life of Blessed Thomas More," "Lyra Hieratica," and "Sonnets and Epigrams
Occurrence of Holy Days - Thomas Day; while theFeasts of St
Will (2) - —‘Every man,’ says Thomas Reid (Works, 1863 ed. —NT Commentaries; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible ; the works of Thomas Reid; R
Dunkards - Men like Thomas a Kempis, who wrote a life of De Groote, Pope Adrian VI, and Gabriel Biel, were trained in their schools, which were almost all swept away during the Reformation
Fawkes, Guy - After trial he was executed, January 1606, at the Tower with Thomas Winter, Rokewood, and Keyes
Bigotry - 'At Wimbledon,' says he, 'not far from me, a warrener promised Thomas, Earl of Exeter, that he should have a burrow of rabbits, all of them of what colour he pleased
Guy Fawkes - After trial he was executed, January 1606, at the Tower with Thomas Winter, Rokewood, and Keyes
Acts of the Apostles - Thomas, St
Nathanael - John's Gospel, that our Saviour, after his resurrection, manifested himself to Peter, Thomas, Nathanael, and the sons of Zebedee, as they were fishing in the lake of Gennesareth
Nail - A — 1: ἧλος (Strong's #2247 — Noun Masculine — helos — hay'-los ) occurs in the remarks of Thomas regarding the print of the nails used in Christ's crucifixion, John 20:25
Astronomer -
OTHER CHRISTIAN ASTRONOMERS ...
Johann Bayer
Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel
Tycho Brahe
Sir Thomas Makdougall Brisbane
Johann Franze Encke
John Flamsteed
Sir William Herschel
Sir John Frederick William Herschel
Johann Hevelius
Sir William Huggins
Johann Kepler
Joseph Louis Lagrange
Canon A
Johannes de Saresberia - Like his friend Thomas Becket, he incurred the displeasure of Henry II and was forced to leave England for six years
Johannes Parvus - Like his friend Thomas Becket, he incurred the displeasure of Henry II and was forced to leave England for six years
John of Salisbury - Like his friend Thomas Becket, he incurred the displeasure of Henry II and was forced to leave England for six years
Giles of Rome - He studied under Thomas Aquinas at Paris, and was the first Augustinian to teach in that university
Astronomy -
OTHER CHRISTIAN ASTRONOMERS ...
Johann Bayer
Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel
Tycho Brahe
Sir Thomas Makdougall Brisbane
Johann Franze Encke
John Flamsteed
Sir William Herschel
Sir John Frederick William Herschel
Johann Hevelius
Sir William Huggins
Johann Kepler
Joseph Louis Lagrange
Canon A
Agrapha - “Whoever is near to me is near to the fire, but whoever is far from me is far from the Kingdom” is from the Gospel of Thomas, an extrabiblical gnostic agrapha
Egidio Colonna - He studied under Thomas Aquinas at Paris, and was the first Augustinian to teach in that university
Rome, Giles of - He studied under Thomas Aquinas at Paris, and was the first Augustinian to teach in that university
Salisbury, John of - Like his friend Thomas Becket, he incurred the displeasure of Henry II and was forced to leave England for six years
Saresberia, Johannes de - Like his friend Thomas Becket, he incurred the displeasure of Henry II and was forced to leave England for six years
Matthew - Mark (Mark 2:14, compare Mark 3:18) and Luke (Luke 5:27, compare with Luke 6:15) veil his former less honorable occupation of a publican under his original name Levi; but Matthew himself gives it, and humbly puts himself after Thomas, an undesigned mark of genuineness; whereas Mark (Mark 3:18) and Luke (Luke 6:15) put Matthew before Thomas in the list of apostles
Missionary Society of Saint Paul the Apostle - Founded in New York, 1858, by Father Isaac Thomas Hecker, formerly with the Redemptorists but dispensed from his vows owing to a misunderstanding
John Newton - The son of General Thomas Newton, he graduated at the United States Military Academy, 1842, was commissioned major, 1861, distinguished himself in the Civil War, in 1865 was brevetted major-general of volunteers, brigadier-general and major-general of regulars
Newton, John - The son of General Thomas Newton, he graduated at the United States Military Academy, 1842, was commissioned major, 1861, distinguished himself in the Civil War, in 1865 was brevetted major-general of volunteers, brigadier-general and major-general of regulars
Cambridge Summer School of Catholic Studies, the - The character of the work accomplished by the Cambridge Summer School may be estimated from the following volumes already published: "The Religion of the Scriptures," 1921; "Catholic Faith in the Holy Eucharist," 1922; "The Papacy," 1923; "Saint Thomas Aquinas," 1924; "The Incarnation," 1925; "The Atonement," 1926; "The Church," 1927; and "The English Martyrs" (edited by Reverend Dom Bede Camm, O
Murray, Thomas Edward - At an early age he was an expert machinist and showed signs of inventive genius which culminated in his obtaining patents for 1100 inventions, more than any other inventori except Thomas Edison
Purpose: Unity of - It is said of Thomas Pett, the miser, that his pulse rose and fell with the funds
Trinity: Its Mystery - ': Thomas Adams
Babylon - Present patriarch, appointed, 1900, Emmanuel Thomas, residing at Mosul, Iraq
Thomas Murray - At an early age he was an expert machinist and showed signs of inventive genius which culminated in his obtaining patents for 1100 inventions, more than any other inventori except Thomas Edison
Thomas - Thomas, because they report that this apostle preached the gospel there
la Farge, John - He was a pupil of Thomas Couture in Paris after 1856, traveled much in Europe, and on his return in 1859 studied with William Morris Hunt
John la Farge - He was a pupil of Thomas Couture in Paris after 1856, traveled much in Europe, and on his return in 1859 studied with William Morris Hunt
Marble - Arundel marbles, ...
Arundelian marbles, marble pieces with a chronicle of the city of Athens inscribed on them presented to the university of Oxford, by Thomas, earl of Arundel
English College - , Thomas Tichborne, S
New Jersey - The first priests to visit the scattered Catholics of northern New Jersey were two Jesuits, Father Thomas Harvey and Father Charles Gage, who had come from England in 1682 with Governor Thomas Dongan of New York
Doctors of the Church - The next to be declared a Doctor was Saint Thomas Aquinas in 1567. ...
The following are Doctors of the Church: ...
Albertus Magnus
Alphonsus Maria de Liguori
Ambrose of Milan
Anselm of Canterbury
Anthony of Padua
Athanasius
Augustine of Hippo
Basil the Great
Bede the Venerable
Bernard of Clairvaux
Bonaventure
Catherine of Siena
Cyril of Alexandria
Cyril of Jerusalem
Ephrem of Syria
Francis of Sales
Gregory Nanzianzen
Gregory the Great
Hilary of Poitiers
Isidore
Jerome
John Chrystostom
John Damascene
John of the Cross
Lawrence of Brindisi
Leo the Great
Peter Canisius
Peter Chrysologus
Peter Damian
Robert Bellarmine
Teresa of Avila
Therese of Lisieux
Thomas Aquinas
Maryland - He and Father John Altham, with a lay-brother, Thomas Gervase, had accompanied the expedition in the Ark and the Dove from England, and when the permanent site was chosen, March 27, at Saint Mary's, on tke river of the same name, about 12 miles above the mouth of the Potomac, the wigwam of one of the Indian chiefs was given over to them to be transformed into the first chapel. Within a few years Father John Brock was stationed at Saint Inigoes, southeast of Saint Mary's, where tradition says the colonists had made a preliminary stop, Father Altham on Kent Island, Father Philip Fisher (Thomas Copley) at Saint Mary's, and Father White at Kittamaquindi, capital of Piscataway, an Indian village about 15 miles south of Washington. Since Catholics were proscribed from institutions of higher learning, the Jesuits founded their own classical academy at Bohemia Manor, 1745, the foundation there having been made by Father Thomas Mansell, 1706
Apocrypha, New Testament - The two earliest infancy gospels, from which most of the later literature developed, are the Protoevangelium of James and the Infancy Gospel of Thomas . The Infancy Gospel of Thomas depicts Jesus in a crude manner as a wonder boy, using his miraculous powers as a matter of personal convenience. These include the Gospel of the Twelve Apostles and the gospels of Philip, Thomas, Matthias, Judas, and Bartholomew. 400, the Gospel of Thomas (of no relation to the Infancy Gospel of Thomas ) is a collection of 114 secret sayings “which Jesus the living one spoke and Didymus Judas Thomas wrote down. The heretical emphases of the Gospel of Thomas are countered in advance by the canonical Epistle of 1John, which emphasizes the gospel of Jesus Christ as the message of life, available for every person to experience. ...
The Acts of Thomas is a third-century work, thought by most scholars to have originated in Syriac Christianity. It tells how Judas Thomas, “Twin of the Messiah,” was given India when the apostles divided the world by casting lots. Thomas, though he went as a slave, was responsible for the conversion of many well-known Indians. The ascetic element is again present in Thomas' emphasis on virginity. Other apocalypses include the Apocalypse of James, of Stephen, of Thomas, of the Virgin Mary , and several works discovered at Nag Hammadi
Liguori, Alphonsus, Saint - In 1732, with the help of bishop Thomas Falcoia of Castellamare, he founded the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer at Scala
Christadelphians - Dr John Thomas, an Englishman, came to the United States in 1844 and organized a number of societies (also in Canada and Great Britain), using for his central idea "taking out of the gentiles a people for His name
Naples, Italy, City of - Its famous churches, among which are the Gothic Cathedral of Saint Januarius, begun in 1272, which shelters the martyr's relics, the baroque church of Saint Philip Neri, the Church of Saint Clare and the Monastery of San Domenico Maggiore (1255), containing the cell of Saint Thomas Aquinas, are rich in art treasures, and the secular buildings, including the royal palace and the museum have interesting archmological collections
Douay Bible - The greater part was translated by Gregory Martin; his text was revised by Thomas Worthington, Richard Bristowe, John Reynolds, and Cardinal Allen
Medical Science - The science comprising: ...
anatomy, which treats of organic structure
bacteriology, the science of bacteria
cytology, the spience of cell organisms
embryology, which treats of the early development of organisms
hygiene, which treats of health improvement and preservation
physiology, which deals with the functions and processes of living organisms
surgery
The following names are distinguished in the various branches of the science: ...
CATHOLICS ...
Bedford, Gunning Samuel
Bernard, Claude
Caldani, Leopoldo Marco Antonio
Carnoy, Jean Baptiste
Dwight, Thomas
Eustachius, Bartolomeo
Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Hieronymus
Fallopio, Gabriello
Laennec, Rene Theophile Hyacinthe
Larrey, Baron Dominique Jean
Malpighi, Marcello
Morgagni, Giovanni Battista
Müller, Johannes Peter
Nelaton, Auguste
Noble, Daniel
O'Dwyer, Joseph
Paracelsus, Theophrastus
Renaudot, Theophraste
Schwann, Theodor
Semmelweiss, Ignaz Philipp
Skoda, Josef
Spallanzani, Lazzaro
Steno, Nicolaus
Vesalius, Andreas
OTHER CHRISTIANS ...
Baglivi, Giorgio
Bell, Charles
Boerhaave, Hermann
Cooper, Astley Paston
Flourens, Marie Jean Pierre
Hahnemann, Christian Friedrich Samuel
Hall, Marshall
Haller, Albrecht von
Harvey, William
Hufeland, Christoph Wilhelm
Hyrtl, Josef
Koch, Heinrich Hermann Robert
Lister, Joseph
Paget, James
Simpson, James Young
Vierordt, Karl von
Volkmann, Alfred Wilhelm
Wagner, Rudolph
Bible, Douay - The greater part was translated by Gregory Martin; his text was revised by Thomas Worthington, Richard Bristowe, John Reynolds, and Cardinal Allen
Supererogation - Thomas in the thirteenth: according to which, it was pretended that there actually existed an immense treasure of merit, composed of the pious deeds and virtuous actions which the saints had performed beyond what was necessary for their own salvation, and which were, therefore, applicable to the benefit of others; that the guardian and dispenser of this precious treasure was the Roman pontiff; and that, of consequence, he was empowered to assign to such as he thought proper, a portion of this inexhaustible source of merit, suitable to their respective guilt, and sufficient to deliver them from the punishment due to their crimes
Science, Medical - The science comprising: ...
anatomy, which treats of organic structure
bacteriology, the science of bacteria
cytology, the spience of cell organisms
embryology, which treats of the early development of organisms
hygiene, which treats of health improvement and preservation
physiology, which deals with the functions and processes of living organisms
surgery
The following names are distinguished in the various branches of the science: ...
CATHOLICS ...
Bedford, Gunning Samuel
Bernard, Claude
Caldani, Leopoldo Marco Antonio
Carnoy, Jean Baptiste
Dwight, Thomas
Eustachius, Bartolomeo
Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Hieronymus
Fallopio, Gabriello
Laennec, Rene Theophile Hyacinthe
Larrey, Baron Dominique Jean
Malpighi, Marcello
Morgagni, Giovanni Battista
Müller, Johannes Peter
Nelaton, Auguste
Noble, Daniel
O'Dwyer, Joseph
Paracelsus, Theophrastus
Renaudot, Theophraste
Schwann, Theodor
Semmelweiss, Ignaz Philipp
Skoda, Josef
Spallanzani, Lazzaro
Steno, Nicolaus
Vesalius, Andreas
OTHER CHRISTIANS ...
Baglivi, Giorgio
Bell, Charles
Boerhaave, Hermann
Cooper, Astley Paston
Flourens, Marie Jean Pierre
Hahnemann, Christian Friedrich Samuel
Hall, Marshall
Haller, Albrecht von
Harvey, William
Hufeland, Christoph Wilhelm
Hyrtl, Josef
Koch, Heinrich Hermann Robert
Lister, Joseph
Paget, James
Simpson, James Young
Vierordt, Karl von
Volkmann, Alfred Wilhelm
Wagner, Rudolph
Matthew (Apostle) - In all these the surname ‘Matthew’ is given, not ‘Levi,’ just as ‘Bartholomew’ and ‘Thomas’ are surnames; and in all four Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, and James the (son) of Alphæus are mentioned together, though not always in the same order
Laetare Medal - " Following is a partial list of the recipients of the award: ...
1883 - John Gilmary Shea, historian
1884 - Patrick J Keeley, architect
1885 - Eliza Allen Starr, artist
1886 - General John Newton, army engineer
1887 - Edward Preuss, journalist
1888 - Patrick V Hickey, founder "Catholic Review"
1889 - Anna Hanson Dorsey, novelist
1890 - William T Onahan, organizer Catholic Congress
1891 - Daniel Dougherty, orator
1892 - Henry F Brownson, philosopher
1893 - Patrick Donahoe, founder "Boston Pilot"
1894 - Augustin Daly, theatrical manager
1895 - Mrs James Sadlier, writer
1896 - General William S Rosecrans, leader Army of Cumberland
1897 - Thomas Addis Emmett, surgeon
1898 - Timothy E Howard, jurist
1899 - Mary Gwendolin Caldwell, benefactor Catholic University
1900 - John Creighton, founder Creighton University
1901 - William Bourke Cockran, orator
1902 - John B Murphy, surgeon
1903 - Charles J Bonaparte, attorney-general
1904 - Richard C Kerens, philanthropist
1905 - Thomas B Fitzpatrick, business man
1906 - Francis Quinlan, medical specialist
1907 - Katherine E Conway, author
1908 - James C Monaghan, lecturer
1909 - Frances Tiernan, (Christian Reid), litterateur
1910 - Maurice Francis Egan, writer
1911 - Agnes Repplier, essayist
1912 - Thomas M Mulry, charity worker
1913 - Charles G Herbermann, editor-in-chief "Catholic Encyclopedia"
1914 - Edward Douglas White, chief justice of the United States
1915 - Mary V Merrick, founder, Christ Child Society
1916 - James J Walsh, physician and author
1917 - William Shepherd Benson, admiral
1918 - Joseph Scott, lawyer
1919 - George Duval, philanthropist
1920 - Lawrence F Flick, physician
1921 - Elizabeth Nourse, artist
1922 - Charles P Neil, economist
1923 - Walter George Smith, lawyer
1924 - Charles D Maginnis, architect
1925 - Albert Francis Zahm, scientist
1926 - Edward N Hurley, business man
1927 - Margaret Anglin, actress
1928 - Jack J Spalding, lawyer
1929 - Alfred Emmanuel Smith, statesman
1930 - Frederick P Kenkel, director of Central Bureau of the Central Verein
1931 - James J Phelan, philanthropist
1932 - Stephen J Maher, tuberculosis expert
1933 - John McCormack, vocalist
1934 -
1935 - Frank H Spearman, author
1936 -
1937 -
1938 -
1939 -
1940 -
1941 -
1942 - Helen Constance White, teacher and author
1943 -
1944 -
1945 -
1946 -
1947 -
1948 -
1949 -
1950 -
1951 -
1952 -
1953 -
1954 -
1955 - George Meaney, labour leader
1956 -
1957 -
1958 -
1959 -
1960 -
1961 -
1962 -
1963 -
1964 -
1965 - Frederick Dominic Rossini, teacher and scientist
1966 -
1967 -
1968 -
1969 -
1970 -
1971 -
1972 - Dorothy Day, activist
1973 -
1974 -
1975 -
1976 -
1977 -
1978 -
1979 -
1980 -
1981 -
1982 -
1983 -
1984 - John T Noonan, jurist
1985 - Guido Calabresi, jurist
1986 -
1987 -
1988 -
1989 -
1990 -
1991 -
1992 - Daniel Patrick Moynihan, US senator
1993 - L John Durney, teacher and journalist
1994 -
1995 -
1996 - Sister Helen Prejean, anti-death penalty activist
1997 - Father Virgilio Elizondo, theologian and writer
1998 -
1999 -
2000 - Andrew J McKenna, businessman
2001 - Monsignor George G Higgins, labour activist priest
2002 - Father John Smyth, educator
2003 - Peter and Peggy Steinfels, writers
2004 - Father Bryan Hehir, theologian
2005 - Joseph E Murray, organ transplant pioneer
Individual - The intrinsic principle of individuation, that which constitutes a singular substance the individual it is, is according to Saint Thomas the matter endowed with certain definite quantitative dimensions (materia signata quantitate), according to Suarez the whole entity of the singular substance, and according to Scotus an added formality known as haecceitas (thisness)
Judgment - Saint Thomas has defined it as the act by which the mind combines or separates two terms by affirmation or denial
Christians of st Thomas - Thomas, which was laid before that society by F
Relief - Thomas Gillespie being deposed for refusing to assist at the admission of a minister to a parish who were unwilling to receive him
Addition - Richard Roe, Gent Robert Dale, Mason Thomas Way, of New York
Guild of Saint Luke, Saint Cosmas, And Saint Damia - It was founded, July 27, 1910, by Surgeon-General Thomas Maunsell, C
Alexandrian Manuscript - from Cyrillus Lucaris, patriarch of Constantinople, by Sir Thomas Rowe, ambassador from England to the grand Seignior, about the year 1628
Bartholomew - The supposition also acquires additional probability from considering, that Nathanael is particularly mentioned among the Apostles to whom Christ appeared at the sea of Tiberias, after his resurrection; Simon Peter, Thomas, and Nathanael, of Cana in Galilee; the sons of Zebedee, namely, James and John; with two other of his disciples, probably Andrew and Philip, John 21:2
Thaddaeus - 13) gives a story, which he says he found in the archives of Edessa, that after the ascension of our Lord, the apostle Judas Thomas sent Thaddaeus, one of the seventy disciples, to Edessa, to king Abgarus the Black, and that he cured the king of a serious illness, converted him with all his people to Christianity, and died at Edessa after many years of successful labours
Apocrypha - ...
The following is a list of the Apocrypha: ...
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Jewish Apocalypses ...
Book of Henoch
Assumption of Moses
Fourth Book of Esdras
Apocalypse of Baruch
Apocalypse of Abraham
Legendary Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Book of Jubilees, or Little Genesis
Third Book of Esdras
Third Book of Machabees
History and Maxims of Ahikar, the Assyrian
Apocryphal Psalms and Prayers ...
Psalms of Solomon
Prayer of Manasses
Jewish Philosophy ...
Fourth Book of Machabees
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin with Christian Accretions ...
Sibylline Oracles
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Ascension of Isaias
Apocrypha Of Christian Origin ...
Apocryphal Gospels of Catholic Origin ...
Protoevangelium Jacobi, or Infancy Gospel of James, describing the birth, education, and marriage of the Blessed Virgin
Gospel of the Pseudo-Matthew
Arabic Gospel of the Infancy
History of Joseph the Carpenter
Transitu Marire, or Evangelium Joannis, describing the death and assumption of the Blessed Virgin
Judaistic and Heretical Gospels ...
Gospel according to the Hebrews
Gospel according to the Egyptians
Gospel of Peter
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Thomas
Gospel of Marcion
Gospel of Bartholomew
Gospel of Matthias
Gospel of Nicodemus
Gospel of the Twelve Apostles
Gospel of Andrew
Gospel of Barnabas
Gospel of Thaddeus
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Eve
Gospel of Judas Iscariot
Pilate Literature and Other Apocrypha concerning Christ ...
Report of Pilate to the Emperor
Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea
Pseudo-Correspondence of Jesus and Abgar, King of Edessa
Gnostic Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter
Acts of John
Acts of Andrew
Acts and Martyrdom of Matthew
Acts of Thomas
Acts of Bartholomew
Catholic Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter and Paul
Acts of Paul
Acts of Paul and Thecla
Acts of Philip
Acts of Matthew
Acts of Simon and Jude
Acts of Barnabas
Acts of James the Greater
Apocryphal Doctrinal Works ...
Testamentum Domini
Nostri Jesu
Preaching of Peter, or Kerygma Petri
Apocryphal Epistles ...
Pseudo-Epistle of Peter
Pseudo-Epistles of Paul
Pseudo-Epistles to the Laodiceans
Pseudo-Correspondence of Paul and Seneca
Christian Apocryphal Apocalypses ...
Apocalypse of Peter
Apocalypse of Paul
Monumental Brasses - Among the best of those still existing are those of Sir John d'Aubernoun, at Stoke d'Abernon, Surrey (1277); of Nicholas, Lord Burnell, at Acton Burnell, Shropshire (1382); and of Thomas Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and his wife Margaret, formerly in Saint Mary's church, Warwick (1401)
Latten - Among the best of those still existing are those of Sir John d'Aubernoun, at Stoke d'Abernon, Surrey (1277); of Nicholas, Lord Burnell, at Acton Burnell, Shropshire (1382); and of Thomas Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and his wife Margaret, formerly in Saint Mary's church, Warwick (1401)
Feasts or Festivals - Thomas the Apostle
Innocents, Slaughter of the - However, it can be found in ancient nonbiblical documents, such as the Protoevangelium of James , Infancy Gospel of Thomas , and Gospel of Pseudo- Matthew
Memorial Brasses - Among the best of those still existing are those of Sir John d'Aubernoun, at Stoke d'Abernon, Surrey (1277); of Nicholas, Lord Burnell, at Acton Burnell, Shropshire (1382); and of Thomas Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and his wife Margaret, formerly in Saint Mary's church, Warwick (1401)
Edward Fenwick - Here Saint Thomas College was opened in 1807
Scholasticism - However, the most typical Scholasticism is that of the 13th century when it attained its highest development and was represented by such thinkers as Saint Albertus Magnus, Saint Bonaventura, Saint Thomas Aquinas, and Blessed John Duns Scotus
Acts of the Apostles (Apocryphal) - -The most important of the Apocryphal Acts are the five (Peter, Paul, John, Andrew, Thomas) which sometimes are referred to as ‘the Leucian Acts,’ because they are supposed to have been composed by a certain Leucius. It is therefore desirable to examine earlier literature for (1) mention of Leucius, (2) mention of the five Acts of Peter, John, Andrew, Thomas, and Paul, either as a corpus or as separate writings. ” ’...
As is shown later, Augustine was acquainted with the Apocryphal Acts of Peter, Andrew, Thomas, John, and Paul, of which the first four were accepted only by Manichaeans, the last (Paul) probably by Catholics also. Thomas is excluded, as we probably have the complete text, and the passage is unlike what we possess of the Acts of Peter or Paul. -After rejecting as apocryphal the Acts of Andrew, Thomas, Peter, and Philip, the writer goes on to give a list of Apocryphal Gospels, and then continues: ‘Libri omnes quos fecit Leucius discipulus diaboli, apocryphi. ’ Here clearly Leucius is regarded as the author of the Acts of John, and presumably not of the others-though, if a certain laxity of syntax be conceded, the Acts of Andrew might be added-certainly not of the Acts of Thomas. (b) A quite late tradition regarded him as the author of the corpus of five Acts-Paul, Peter, John, Andrew, and Thomas-which the Manichaeans used as a substitute for the canonical Acts, and the Priscillianists in addition to the canonical Acts. (c) External evidence suggests that Leucius was probably the author of the Acts of John, and, with less clearness, of Andrew, but not of Peter, Paul, or Thomas; and this conclusion is supported by internal evidence. ’...
Whatever may be the true text of this passage, it clearly implies (a) that the Manichaeans used a corpus of Apocryphal Acts in place of the canonical Acts of the Apostles; (b) that this corpus contained the Acts of Andrew, John, Peter, and Paul; (c) the Acts of Thomas is not mentioned (Schmidt
As Schmidt says, it is clear that Faustus gave up the use of the Acts of Andrew, John, Peter, and Thomas, because his opponents refused to recognize their authority, but relied on a Pauline document relating to Thekla. This selection is, however, unfortunately no longer extant, but it is plain that he was acquainted with the Acts of Thomas, Andrew, and John (for text see above, 1. The Acts of Thomas are not quoted, nor is any reference made to Leucius. -In the Panarion Epiphanius mentions the Acts of Thomas, Andrew, and John in connexion with the Encratites (Pan. But he does not appear to place it with the Acts of Andrew and John and ‘the other apostles’ (perhaps the Acts of Peter and Thomas) which are ἄτοπα πάντη καὶ δυσσεβῆ
Nevada - ...
Catholic influence on place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Saint Clair
Saint George
Saint Thomas
San Jacinto
Ecclesiastically the state is governed by the dioceses of ...
Las Vegas
Reno
See also ...
patron saints index
Chalice - ...
It is also an emblem associated with ...
Saint Barbara
Saint Bruno of Querfort
Saint John the Evangelist who is represented with a chalice and a serpent issuing therefrom, referring to an unsuccessful attempt to poison the Host, the serpent symbolizing the poison
Saint Louis Bertran who is show with a chalice surmounted by a serpent
Saint Thomas Aquinas
Catholic Foreign Mission Society of America - Founded, with the sanction of Pope Pius X, by Reverend Thomas F
Catholic Encyclopedia - , Thomas J
Humanism - From Italy the movement spread throughout Europe; into Germany under Reuchlin (1455-1522) and Erasmus (1466-1536), who both exemplified its Christian spirit; into England where Sir Thomas More (1478-1535) was its chief exponent; into the French universities
Maryknoll - Founded, with the sanction of Pope Pius X, by Reverend Thomas F
North Dakota - ...
Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Mount Carmel
Saint Anthony
Saint John
Saint Thomas
Ecclesiastically the state is governed by the dioceses of ...
Bismarck
Fargo
See also, ...
patron saints index
Apostolici - They appealed chiefly to the apocryphal Acts of Andrew and of Thomas
Encyclopedia, Catholic - , Thomas J
Trinity Sunday - 1260 that it was firstdirected by the Synod of Aries to be observed by the whole Church asTrinity Sunday, although Thomas a Beckett is said to have institutedthis Festival in England in A
Apostle - 7 Thomas. ...
7 Thomas and 8 Matthew. 7 Thomas. 7 Thomas
Tutor - ...
Thomas Nicol
Thompson, William - Macquom
Siemens, Werner von
Stokes, George Gabriel
Strutt, John William
Thompson, Benjamin
Thompson, William
Young, Thomas
William Thompson - Macquom
Siemens, Werner von
Stokes, George Gabriel
Strutt, John William
Thompson, Benjamin
Thompson, William
Young, Thomas
Names - The name was selected in honour of a parent or relative (Luke 1:59), or because of some circumstance connected with the birth of the child, as in the case of Thomas (Aram. The Greek for Thomas (‘twin’) was Didymus (John 11:16); for Cephas (כּיפָא ‘stone’) it was Peter (Πέτρος, John 1:42)
Ostensorium - ...
In art it is associated with ...
Saint Alphonsus Liguori because of his particular devotion to the Eucharist
Saint Clare of Assisi in allusion to the miraculous dispersion of the Saracens by it; it is her proper attribute
Saint Frances of Rome
Saint Joseph
Blessed Juliana of Cornillon
Saint Thomas Aquinas who composed the office of the Sacrament; it is still in use
Monstrance - ...
In art it is associated with ...
Saint Alphonsus Liguori because of his particular devotion to the Eucharist
Saint Clare of Assisi in allusion to the miraculous dispersion of the Saracens by it; it is her proper attribute
Saint Frances of Rome
Saint Joseph
Blessed Juliana of Cornillon
Saint Thomas Aquinas who composed the office of the Sacrament; it is still in use
New Zealand - The first Catholic in New Zealand was Thomas Poynton, an Irishman who settled in Hokianga in 1828
Theatines - In France they built the church of Saint Anne la Royale; in Spain under Philip II, the Theatine cardinal Paolo Burali d'Arezzo filled various embassies at the command of the vIceroy of Naples; in Portugal John IV, 1648, gave them a house and a college for the education of noble youth; in England, under Henry VIII, Thomas Goldwell, bishop of Saint Asaph, entered the order
Order of Clerks Regular - In France they built the church of Saint Anne la Royale; in Spain under Philip II, the Theatine cardinal Paolo Burali d'Arezzo filled various embassies at the command of the vIceroy of Naples; in Portugal John IV, 1648, gave them a house and a college for the education of noble youth; in England, under Henry VIII, Thomas Goldwell, bishop of Saint Asaph, entered the order
Natural Law - The due regulation of our free actions in conformity with its prescriptions secures their right ordering in which consists the natural perfection of our rational nature, and which at the same time constitutes a necessary condition for supernatural perfection, for, according to Saint Thomas, "Just as grace presupposes nature, the Divine Law presupposes the natural law
Law, Natural - The due regulation of our free actions in conformity with its prescriptions secures their right ordering in which consists the natural perfection of our rational nature, and which at the same time constitutes a necessary condition for supernatural perfection, for, according to Saint Thomas, "Just as grace presupposes nature, the Divine Law presupposes the natural law
Theories of Population - The first person to present an elaborate theory of the relation between population and food supply was Thomas Malthus (1766-1834), an Anglican clergyman
Logic - In accordance with Aristotle, founder of logic, Saint Thomas defines logic as the science or the art of exact reasoning: "Logic is the science and art which directs the act of reason, by which man is able to proceed in the pursuit of truth without error, confusion, or difficulty
Apostle - The names of the twelve are, Simon Peter; Andrew, his brother; James, the son of Zebedee, called also "the greater;" John, his brother; Philip; Bartholomew; Thomas; Matthew, or Levi; Simon the Canaanite; Lebbeus, surnamed Thaddeus, also called Judas or Jude; James, "the less," the son of Alphaeus; and Judas Iscariot, Matthew 10:2-4 Mark 3:16 Luke 6:14
Feast of the Body of Christ - The office for the day, the most beautiful in the Roman Liturgy, was written by Saint Thomas Aquinas and the customary procession was approved and encouraged by Pope Martin V and Pope Eugene IV
Feast of Corpus Chrisi - The office for the day, the most beautiful in the Roman Liturgy, was written by Saint Thomas Aquinas and the customary procession was approved and encouraged by Pope Martin V and Pope Eugene IV
Freiburg im Breisgau, University of - Among the notable professors of this period were the Carthusian Gregorius Reisch, Jacob Locher, Henricus Loriti, and the theologians Geiler of Kaisersberg, Johann Eck, Thomas Murner, and Erasmus of Rotterdam
Desiderius Erasmus - The remainder of his life was spent in wandering from place to place and included two sojourns in England, during which he made the acquaintance of the foremost English: scholars, including Sir Thomas More
Cancellarius - Cardinal Wolsey, Archbishop Arundell (1386-1388), and Sir Thomas More (1529-1534), the last-named the first layman thus honored, are famous English Catholic chancellors
Chancellor - Cardinal Wolsey, Archbishop Arundell (1386-1388), and Sir Thomas More (1529-1534), the last-named the first layman thus honored, are famous English Catholic chancellors
Cardinal - Their duties according to the statutes of the cathedral of 1396 are "continually to visit the sick and minister unto them as often as shall be needful"; the poet Richard Harris Barham ("Thomas Ingoldsby") held one of these offices
Catholic Latin Literature - The drama, an outgrowth of Church liturgy, included such writers as ...
Andreas Fabricius
Beccadelli
Bruni
Cornelius Crocus
Cornelius Laurimanus
Dati
De Loches
Filelfo
Hannardus Gamerius
Holonius
Jacob Locher
Johann von Kitzcher
Levin Brecht
Mussato
Poggio
Reuchlin
Wimpfeling
Among the poets of this period may be mentioned: ...
Adam Widl
Famian Strada
Hieronymus Petrucci
Hosschius
Jacob Masen
Johannes Dantiscus
John Bissel
John Salmon
Nicola Avancini
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Bellarmine
Sarbiewski
Simon Rettenbacher
Tarquinius Galuzzi
Vida
The writers of the neo-Latin epic included: ...
Saint Alcuin
Saint Aldhelm
Saint Boniface
Saint Columbanus
Saint Thomas More
Venerable Bede
Balde
Dante Alighieri
Flodoard
Hildebert of Tours
Hroswitha
John of Salisbury
Maffeo Vegio
Marbod
Petrarch
Sadolet
Theodulf the Goth
Venantius Fortunatus
Walafrid Strabo
the five Ekkehards
the four Notkers
Doxology - The doxologies which have been and still are used most commonly in the Christian church are the Gloria in excelsis Deo (“Glory to God in the highest,” an expansion of Luke 2:14 which is often called the “Greater Doxology”), the Gloria Patri (“Glory be to the Father,” the “Lesser Doxology”), and Thomas Ken's “Praise God from Whom All Blessings Flow” (familiarly known simply as “The Doxology”)
Greece - Saint Thomas and Saint Matthew also are said to have visited Greece, which formed part of Illyricum and was dependent on the Patriarchate of Rome
Erasmus, Desiderius - The remainder of his life was spent in wandering from place to place and included two sojourns in England, during which he made the acquaintance of the foremost English: scholars, including Sir Thomas More
Mandrake - Bochart, Calmet, and Sir Thomas Browne, suppose the citron intended; Celsius is persuaded that it is the fruit of the lote tree; Hiller, that cherries are spoken of; and Ludolf maintains that it is the fruit which the Syrians call mauz, resembling in figure and taste the Indian fig; but the generality of interpreters and commentators understand by dudaim, mandrakes, a species of melon; and it is so rendered in the Septuagint, and in both the ...
Targums, in Genesis 30:14
Names - But sometimes it was exchanged for the Greek word of the same meaning, though very different in form; Thomas became Didymus, and Tabitha, Dorcas
University of Freiburg im Breisgau - Among the notable professors of this period were the Carthusian Gregorius Reisch, Jacob Locher, Henricus Loriti, and the theologians Geiler of Kaisersberg, Johann Eck, Thomas Murner, and Erasmus of Rotterdam
South Carolina - In 1790 he was succeeded by Father Thomas Keating who purchased and renovated the shabby building, which was later replaced by Saint Mary's Church
Lord's Prayer, - Thomas' Genius of the Gospels
Sunday-Schools - Thomas Steck, who afterwards,in 1780, called in Mr
Bartholomew - In the Gospels he comes next after Philip (who in all four lists heads the second quaternion), and is followed by Matthew and Thomas: in Acts the order is ‘Philip and Thomas, Bartholomew and Matthew
New York, City of - Thomas Dongan, Catholic Governor of New York enacted, 1683, the first law establishing religious liberty passed in New York, and, 1685, the first Catholic educational institution in New York State, the New York Latin School, was established by the Jesuits Father Thomas Harvey, Father Henry Harrison, and Father Charles Gage. MacNeven, professor at College of Physicians and Surgeons, first Catholic physician to attain eminence in America; John Newton, engineer, famed for renowned work on Hell Gate; Lorenzo da Ponte, first instructor of Italian at Columbia and first in the United States to point out the beauties of Dante; Denis O'Brien, first Catholic judge of Court of Appeals; Thomas O'Conor, a pioneer American Catholic editor, published "Shamrock, or Hibernian Chronicle," 1810, compiled a history of the War of 1812; Conde Pallen poet, philosopher, and educator; Thomas Fortune Ryan, financier
Cuneiform - ...
Thomas Smothers...
...
Decapolis - Thomas Sawyer...
...
Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel - ...
Carmelite saints include ...
Albert of Jerusalem
Albert of Sicily
Andrew Corsini
Angelus of Jerusalem
Anne of Saint Bartholomew
Cyril of Constantinople
Denis of the Nativity
Elizabeth of the Trinity
Jacobinus de Canepaci
Jane of Toulouse
Joaquina Vedruna de Mas
John Baptist Spagnuolo
John of the Cross
John Soreth
Maria Lopez of Jesus
Marie of the Incarnation
Mary Fontanella
Mary Magdalen of Pazzi
Nuno Alveres Pereira
Peter Thomas
Raphael Kalinowski
Redemptorus of the Cross
Romeo of Limoges
Rose Chretien
Simon Stock
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross
Teresa Margaret Redi
Teresa Maria of the Cross
Teresa of Avila
Teresa of the Andes
Theresa of Lisieux
Carmelite Order - ...
Carmelite saints include ...
Albert of Jerusalem
Albert of Sicily
Andrew Corsini
Angelus of Jerusalem
Anne of Saint Bartholomew
Cyril of Constantinople
Denis of the Nativity
Elizabeth of the Trinity
Jacobinus de Canepaci
Jane of Toulouse
Joaquina Vedruna de Mas
John Baptist Spagnuolo
John of the Cross
John Soreth
Maria Lopez of Jesus
Marie of the Incarnation
Mary Fontanella
Mary Magdalen of Pazzi
Nuno Alveres Pereira
Peter Thomas
Raphael Kalinowski
Redemptorus of the Cross
Romeo of Limoges
Rose Chretien
Simon Stock
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross
Teresa Margaret Redi
Teresa Maria of the Cross
Teresa of Avila
Teresa of the Andes
Theresa of Lisieux
Carmelites - ...
Carmelite saints include ...
Albert of Jerusalem
Albert of Sicily
Andrew Corsini
Angelus of Jerusalem
Anne of Saint Bartholomew
Cyril of Constantinople
Denis of the Nativity
Elizabeth of the Trinity
Jacobinus de Canepaci
Jane of Toulouse
Joaquina Vedruna de Mas
John Baptist Spagnuolo
John of the Cross
John Soreth
Maria Lopez of Jesus
Marie of the Incarnation
Mary Fontanella
Mary Magdalen of Pazzi
Nuno Alveres Pereira
Peter Thomas
Raphael Kalinowski
Redemptorus of the Cross
Romeo of Limoges
Rose Chretien
Simon Stock
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross
Teresa Margaret Redi
Teresa Maria of the Cross
Teresa of Avila
Teresa of the Andes
Theresa of Lisieux
Feast - Thomas, St
Fifth Monarchy Men - Their leader was Thomas Venner, a wine cooper, who, in his little conventicle in Coleman-street, warmed his admirers with passionate expectations of a fifth universal monarchy, under the personal reign of King Jesus upon earth, and that the saints were to take the kingdom to themselves
Hans Holbein the Younger - The same year he went to London with letters from Erasmus to Sir Thomas More
Eight - "...
John 20:26 (b) This is a new revelation to Thomas and a new confession from him
Gain - ‘Qui invenit Jesum,’ says Thomas à Kempis, ‘invenit thesaurum bonum; immo bonum, super omne bonum. —Augustine, Confessions; Francis de Sales, The Spirit; Thomas à Kempis, The Imitation of Christ; Theologia Germanica (translation by S
Leucius, Author of n.t. Apocryphal Additions - 114), who describes a book, called The Circuits of the Apostles, which contained the Acts of Peter, John, Andrew, Thomas, and Paul, and purported to have been written by Leucius Charinus. 447) appeals to Acts of the four apostles mentioned by Photius (Peter, Andrew, Thomas, and John), charging the Catholic party with wrongly excluding them from their canon. 1041) he condemns documents bearing the name of Matthew, of James the Less, of Peter and Paul written by Leucius, of Andrew written by Xenocharis and Leonidas the philosophers, and of Thomas. , from whom we learn that they were used by the Priscillianists, and that the Acts of Thomas related a baptism, not in water but in oil, according to the Manichean fashion; and by Pseudo-Mellitus (Fabric. 154) speaks of books called the Travels ( περίοδοι ) of Peter, of John, and of Thomas; and by the second the Leucian story is probably intended. 47) states that the Encratites used Acts of Andrew, John, and Thomas; that the Apostolici relied on Acts of Andrew and Thomas ( ib. It is worth remarking that it is of the three apostles, Thomas, Andrew, and John, whose travels were written by Leucius, that Origen ( ap. But no Marcionite would have chosen for the heroes of his narrative the Jewish apostles, John, Thomas, and Andrew. that told in the Acts of Thomas (Tischendorf, Acta Apoc
Immortality - The doctrine received its complete philosophical elaboration from Saint Thomas Aquinas in the 13th century
India - Tradition claims that the body of Saint Thomas the Apostle was buried at Mylapore after his efforts to Christianize the Hindus, but nothing certain is known of early missionary work in India until the arrival of the Franciscans from Portugal, c
Names in New Testament - , ...
Barabbas, son of the learned man
Barnabas, son of consolation
Barsabas, son of Sabas
Bartimeus, son of Timai
Bartholomew, son of Tolmai
There is only one word derived from a color, ...
Rufus, red
Names derived from kindred are ...
Thomas and Didymus, twin
Trophimus, foster-child
New Testament, Names in - , ...
Barabbas, son of the learned man
Barnabas, son of consolation
Barsabas, son of Sabas
Bartimeus, son of Timai
Bartholomew, son of Tolmai
There is only one word derived from a color, ...
Rufus, red
Names derived from kindred are ...
Thomas and Didymus, twin
Trophimus, foster-child
Missouri - ...
Catholic influence on the place-names of the state include, ...
Conception
Mount Carmel
Saint Anne
Saint Antony
Saint Aubert
Saint Catherine
Saint Charles
Saint Clair
Saint Genevieve
Saint Elizabeth
Saint Francisville
Saint Francois
Saint George
Saint James
Saint Johns
Saint Joseph
Saint Louis
Saint Marys
Saint Patrick
Saint Paul
Saint Peters
Saint Thomas
Santa Fe
Santa Rosa
Vera Cruz
Ecclesiastically, the state is governed by the archdiocese of ...
Saint Louis
and the dioceses of ...
Jefferson City
Kansas City-Saint Joseph
Springfield-Cape Girardeau
See also, ...
patron saints index
Schoolmen - Hales, Bonaventure, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and Durandus
Camp, Encampment - ...
Thomas A
Banquet - Thomas Sawyer...
...
Slowness of Heart - Thomas, on the other hand, illustrates slowness of heart, while Christ’s treatment of him shows us how He deals with such slow believers and quickens their faith into great confessions (John 20:24-29)
Aristotle - They, and principally Saint Thomas Aquinas, purged the system of the materialistic and pantheistic elements the Arabians had introduced into it and by means of it established the consistency of reason with faith
Baptism - Saint Thomas says it is the "external ablution of the body performed with the prescribed form of words
Akkadian - ...
Thomas Smothers...
...
Mustard - "This expression will not appear strange," says Sir Thomas Browne, "if we recollect that the mustard seed, though it be not simply and in itself the smallest of seeds, yet may be very well believed to be the smallest of such as are apt to grow unto a ligneous substance, and become a kind of tree
Scepticism - " More recent sceptics are: ...
Theodore Jouffroy (1796-1842) who asserted that "Scepticism is the final pronouncement of the human mind"
David Hume (1711-1776) who makes all forms of synthesis and relation subjective in origin
Berkeley, to whom the corporeal world is a mere phenomenon of consciousness, the only objects, distinct from the mind, being spiritual substances: God, the soul, angels; in general the Idealists for whom esse est percipi (to be is to be; perceived)
Sound philosophy, under the leadership of Aristotle and Saint Thomas; teaches: ...
that the Senses and the intellect normally are infallible with regard to their proper object
that the ultimate criterion of truth is objective evidence
that Scepticism is impossible in fact, because every man is conscious of certain truths, e
Society of Our Lady of Good Counsel - It is placed under the patronage of Saint Thomas More, lord high chancellor of England
New York, State of - The first priests to reside in New York City were the English Jesuits, Father Thomas Harvey, Father Henry Harrison, and Father Charles Gage, the first of whom came over in 1683 with the Catholic governor, Thomas Dongan, appointed by the Duke of York
Apocrypha - Many of them, such as the Gospel of Thomas, the Gospel of Mary, and the Dialogue of the Savior, were composed by heretical groups like the Gnostics and purport to give "secret, " unorthodox teachings of Jesus. The Infancy Gospel of Thomas narrates Jesus' childhood from age five to age twelve, with the child Jesus performing numerous miracles, sometimes to the point of absurdity (e. ...
The apocryphal Acts (Acts of Andrew, Acts of John, Acts of Paul, Acts of Peter, and Acts of Thomas) purport to trace the journeys of the apostles, with Thomas going all the way to India. Third, they glorify martyrdom, especially among the apostles: Andrew is crucified, Paul is beheaded, Peter is crucified upside down, and Thomas is executed with spears; only John is spared a martyr's death
Book, Book of Life - ...
Thomas W
Way (2) - Thomas and Philip gave expression to the perplexity of the rest
Doubt - Some of the disciples, including Thomas, doubted the reality of the resurrected Lord ( Luke 24:38 ; John 20:27 ). Thomas is not severely rebuked, but nether is his skepticism commended
Doubt - ...
[4]
Unbelief (2) - ...
It has become customary to speak of the ‘doubt’ of Thomas. And this attitude of his, how is it to be explained? Is it really the case that he is to be regarded as the ‘rationalist among the Apostles’; that with him the reflective powers are stronger than the susceptive (see Robertson’s sermon on The Doubt of Thomas, ii. Thomas is so constituted that he will always take the darker view of things. ...
It is difficult, then, to see in Thomas one who will painfully think out truth in order that when once found it may be the more firmly grasped. For with all his defects of character, Thomas has nothing shallow about him; nothing to suggest the undeveloped intellect
Catholic Church Extension Society of England And w - Nine English pilgrimages are also conducted annually: ...
Canterbury
Chelsea (Blessed Sir Thomas More)
Chichester
Glastonbury
Hastings
King's Lynn (the shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham)
Padley Wood
Saint Albans
York
The Guild of Ransom engaged in outdoor preaching for some 30 years before the Catholic Evidence Guilds were established
Albany - The city became the charge of John Carroll, Bishop of Baltimore, in 1790, and in 1797 Saint Mary's church, the first church in the city and diocese, was begun and the corner-stone laid by Thomas Barry, a trustee
Guild of Our Lady of Ransom - Nine English pilgrimages are also conducted annually: ...
Canterbury
Chelsea (Blessed Sir Thomas More)
Chichester
Glastonbury
Hastings
King's Lynn (the shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham)
Padley Wood
Saint Albans
York
The Guild of Ransom engaged in outdoor preaching for some 30 years before the Catholic Evidence Guilds were established
Happiness - Saint Thomas taught that happiness, the supreme end of man, is open to all but is unattainable in this life
Henry Viii, King - Thomas Cromwell, Cranmer's abettor, who had first suggested this step, inaugurated a reign of terror; priests and nuns were put to death, over 8,000 religious were expelled from their homes, more than 200 monasteries and churches confiscated and plundered, under grossly exaggerated accusations of monastic immorality
Jubilee - granted the privilege of holding jubilees to several princes and monasteries; for instance, to the monks of Canterbury, who had a jubilee every fifty years, when people flocked from all parts to visit the tomb of Thomas-a-Becket
Apostle - In the second division Matthew modestly puts himself after Thomas; Mark and Luke give him his rightful place before Thomas. Thomas, after his doubts were removed (John 20:28), having attained distinguished faith, is promoted above Bartholomew (or Nathanael) and Matthew in Acts
England - In the reign of Henry II occurred the martyrdom of his archbishop, Thomas Becket, in 1170. After his death the direction of ecclesiastical affairs passed to Thomas Cranmer, who legalized the marriage of the clergy, advocated the substitution of tables for altars, and took part in the compilation of the second Prayer-book of Edward VI. The ancient Catholic hierarchy ended in 1585 with the death of Thomas Goldwell, Bishop of Saint Asaph, but despite the cruelty of Elizabeth the clergy of the English missions continued their labors, and in 1598 Catholics were placed in charge of archpriests
Dove - ...
In art it is the emblem of the following saints, ...
Saint Agnes of Rome - woman with a dove holding a ring in its beak
Saint Ambrose of Milan
Blessed Ambrose Sansedoni of Siena - Dominican with a dove (the Holy Spirit) whispering in his ear as he preaches
Saint Augustine of Hippo
Saint Basil the Great - the dove is near the supernational fire that indicates descent of the Holy Spirit on Basil
Saint Colman of Lindisfarne - the name Colman means dove
Saint Colomba of Rieti - Dominican tertiary with a dove indicating the Holy Spirit
Saint Dathus - chosen as bishop when a dove descended on him and those present took it as a sign
Saint David of Wales - as proof of the truth of his preaching, a dove settled on his shoulder as he spoke
Saint Devota - as her martyred body was being taken home, a storm threatened to wreck the boat; a dove emerged from her mouth, and the storm stopped
Saint Dunstan of Canterbury - man writing with a dove (the Holy Spirit) nearby
Saint Eulalia of Merida
Pope Saint Fabian - chosen pope when a dove settled on his head and the people took it as a sign
Pope Saint Gregory the Great
Saint Ida of Herzfield - woman with a dove hovering over her head
Saint Ivo of Kermartin - lawyer surrounded by doves (the Holy Spirit)
Saint Joachim - elderly man carrying a basket of doves
Saint John Chrysostom
Saint Oliva
Saint Oswald
Saint Remigius
Saint Scholastica - at her death, her brother, Saint Benedict of Nursia, saw her soul ascend to heaven as a dove
Saint Teresa of Avila - Carmelite nun with a dove (the Holy Spirit) nearby while she writes
Saint Thomas Aquinas - Dominican with a dove (the Holy Spirit) speaking in his ear as he writes
Pope Saint Zachary - with a dove and olive branch to indicate his work as a peace maker
Faith (2) - ...
Now, what will the soldier do? If he imitates those who before believing wish to see and feel, and like the apostle Thomas wait for palpable proof before relying upon testimony, he will say, 'a captain of the guard always wears a captain's uniform, and mine is only that of a common soldier
Justifying One's Self - Griffith Thomas
Sifting - For, as Thomas Fuller says somewhere, when Satan comes with his sieve, he desires to find the chaff and not the wheat
Alphaeus - But in the lists Matthew and James are separated by Thomas in St
Jubilee - Boniface IX granted the privilege of holding jubilees to several princes and monasteries; for instance, to the monks of Canterbury, who had a jubilee every fifty years; when people flocked from all parts to visit the tomb of Thomas a Becket
Moses of Khoren - , and Explanations of Armenian Church Offices , of which we have only some fragments in Thomas Ardzrouni (cent
Polycarpus, Moyses of Aghel - " The same facts are stated in a note purporting to be written by Thomas OF HARKEL in 616, appended in slightly varying forms to many MSS. as it was before Thomas of Harkel revised it, we only know with certainty the few small fragments of St. Here also we have material to determine the mutual relation between his work and Thomas's revision of it, and we conclude that the latter work is not (as has been taken for granted by many) a merely corrected re-issue of the earlier one, with merely linguistic alterations in the text and variants inserted on its margin; but is substantially a new version, proceeding on the lines of the former, but freely quitting them when the translator saw fit
Gospels (Uncanonical) - Hennecke’s Neutestamentliche Apokryphen (Tübingen and Leipzig, 1904) there are valuable translations, with introductions and notes, or the Gospel of the Hebrews, the Gospel of the Ebionites, the Protevangelium Jacobi, and the Gospel of the Thomas (by A. Wright’s Contributions to the Apocryphal Literature of the New Testament, London, 1865, Syriac versions of the protevangelium Jacobi (a fragment) and the Gospel of Thomas the Israelite were published and translated with notes. 23) ends his catalogue of the canonical or accepted Scriptures with the remark that his object in drawing it up has been ‘that we may know both these works and those cited by heretics under the name of the apostles, including, for example, such books as the Gospels of Peter, of Thomas, of Matthias, or of any others besides them … They are not to be placed even among the rejected writings (ἐν νόθοις), but are all to be put aside as absurd and impious. the Gospel of the Twelve, the Gospel of Basilides, the Gospel of Thomas, and the Gospel of Matthias (‘novi aliud scriptum secundum Matthian’). After quoting Luke’s preface, he applies its language to Gospels ‘like that according to the Egyptians, and according to Thomas, and according to Matthias, and according to Bartholomew, also the Gospel of the Twelve Apostles, and of Basilides, and of Apelles, as well as others which it would take a very long time to enumerate. The majority of theologians treated books like the Gospels of James and Thomas not indeed as canonical but still as genuinely apostolic. The Gospels of Thomas and of Nicodemus are instances in point. More attention has been paid to the influence of Buddhistic and Egyptian religion upon the matter of Gospels like those of the Egyptians, of Thomas, and of Peter
Name - A name may be attached to an individual only, and is then proper or appropriate, as John, Thomas, London, Paris or it may be attached to a species, genus, or class of things, as sheep, goat, horse, tree, animal, which are called common names, specific or generic
Faithful, Faithfully, Faithless - " In John 20:27 the context requires the Active sense, as the Lord is reproaching Thomas for his want of "faith
Resurrection of Christ - ...
...
To the ten disciples (Thomas being absent) and others "with them," at Jerusalem on the evening of the resurrection day. ...
...
To the disciples again (Thomas being present) at Jerusalem (Mark 16:14-18 ; Luke 24:33-40 ; John 20:26-28
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - The story of the bird was evidently suggested to Mohammed by the account of the creation of twelve sparrows from mud, recorded in the apocryphal Gospel of Thomas the Israelite. Jesus went with his twelve disciples, and on arriving near the place said: ‘Who of you will go and announce to the people of this place my arrival?’ James and Thomas and Simon Peter went. Then James and Thomas entered the city, and cried out, ‘Jesus the Prophet of God and the Spirit of God has come to the city. ’ The people seized Thomas and took him to the king, who said: ‘Who has spoken here of a prophet, and God, and the Spirit of God? if he does not repent, I will kill him. ’ Thomas said: ‘I will not repent. ’ Then by the order of the king the people cut off the hands and feet of Thomas, and left him in an unclean place. Simon then came and sought the audience of the king, and begged to be allowed to interrogate Thomas. Thomas replied that Jesus worked miracles, for the blind and lame and sick were healed. ’ Thomas said: ‘He raises by the order of God the dead to life. ’ Simon then said to the king: ‘If this is so, it is advisable that your honour should send for Jesus, and see whether what Thomas says is right: if he raises the dead he is a true prophet. Simon said to heal the hands and feet of Thomas; then to state what each one in the assembly had eaten, and what stores he had; then to make mud birds fly
Paul's Great Heaviness And Continual Sorrow of Heart - As Thomas Boston also has it in one of his Shakespearian passages: "Man is born crying, lives complaining, and dies disappointed from that quarter. "...
...
Why are the ungodly generally so jocund? asks Thomas Shepard. Thomas Shepard's Ten Virgins, and his Zacchœus, are perfect mines of the profoundest and most experimental truth. Brodie was not Paul, nor Pascal, nor Bunyan, nor even Thomas Shepard, but he had sufficient heaviness of mind and sorrow of heart to purchase him a right and a title to be listened to on this matter now in hand. And instead of offering you my own weak words on such a high subject, take this classical passage out of the diary of Thomas Shepard's great pupil in the things of the soul, the greatest man, Dr
Typology - Blow, strike, mark A literal meaning tupos is found in the narrative about Thomas' skepticism: “If I do not see in his hands the mark ( tupos ) of the nails and place my finger into the mark of the nails and place my hand into his side, I will not believe” ( John 20:25 ). Jesus invited Thomas to examine His hands and side. Thomas showed he did just that when he exclaimed, “My Lord and My God” (John 20:28 )
Bartholomew - Thomas is put before him and after Matthew in Acts 1:13 (See APOSTLE), perhaps because of his taking a more prominent position spiritually after his doubts were removed
Intermediate State - ...
Thomas D
Breathing - Even of the Eleven we know that Thomas at least was absent (John 20:24)
Resurrection of Jesus Christ - The second appearance to the disciples may be equated with Jesus' presentation of Himself to Thomas a week after the first appearance to the apostles (John 20:24-29 ). ” Jesus appeared twice to the disciples in the upper room, the second time a week after the first for the sake of the unbelieving Thomas
Monasteries, Suppression of - Thomas Cromwell, appointed by the king to visit the religious houses and to report on conditions found therein, delegated the task to certain commissioners
John Carroll - He was consecrated in the chapel of Thomas Weld at Lulworth Castle, England, August 15, 1790, by the Right Reverend Charles Walmesley, Vicar Apostolic of London
Carroll, John - He was consecrated in the chapel of Thomas Weld at Lulworth Castle, England, August 15, 1790, by the Right Reverend Charles Walmesley, Vicar Apostolic of London
Cup - ...
Thomas W
Demon Possession - ...
Thomas D
Rejection - ...
Thomas Nicol
Schoolmaster - ’...
Thomas Nicol
Considerateness - Thomas (John 20:27), and to St
Apostle - " These twelve were arranged in three groups, Simon Peter and his brother Andrew, with James and John, the two sons of Zebedee; then Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, and Matthew; and, lastly, James, the son of Alpheus, Lebbeus (called Thaddeus, Judas, and Jude), Simon Zelotes or the Canaanite, and Judas Iscariot
Renaissance - The leaders of the movement were ...
Erasmus
Melanchthon
Reuchlin
Von Hutten
In France it took the form of a reaction against Scholasticism, headed by ...
Rabelais
Ronsard
University of Paris
Villon
In England the humanists ...
Ascham
Colet
Saint Thomas More
inaugurated a movement which resulted in what is known as the Elizabethan period in English literature
Suppression of Monasteries - Thomas Cromwell, appointed by the king to visit the religious houses and to report on conditions found therein, delegated the task to certain commissioners
Disciple (2) - ...
 ...
Thomas. ...
 ...
Thomas. ...
 ...
Thomas. ...
 ...
Thomas
Nail - The print of the nails in Jesus' hands and feet were Thomas' test of the reality of the resurrection (John 20:25)
Babylon - ...
Thomas W
Ark - ...
Thomas W
Brotherly Love - Thomas Sawyer...
...
Incense - Griffith Thomas
Incense - Griffith Thomas
Praedestinatus, an Author - Thus he makes the apostle Thomas confute Saturninus, Barnabas in Cyprus the Carpocratians; he makes Alexander, who was bp
the Angel of the Church in Philadelphia - As Walter Marshall sought out Thomas Goodwin, and as Thomas Scott sought out John Newton, so did David White sit at Daniel Cormick's feet. As I remember Thomas Shepard also always did: and as, I feel sure, the angel of Philadelphia also did. ' As John Newton took Thomas Scott's crown as long as Scott neglected his dying parishioners till they sent for Newton
Matthias the Successor to Judas Iscariot - His words to Thomas, I mean. Jesus saith to him "Thomas, because thou hast seen, thou hast believed; blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed. " And you will all recall Sir Thomas Browne's noble protestation: "Now, honestly, I bless myself that I never saw Christ nor His disciples. Let any of our students company with Christ all the time He went in and out in that manner, and he may depend upon it that the beautiful benediction which our Lord addressed in reproof to Thomas will be richly fulfilled to that wise-hearted student all his happy ministerial days, and through him to his happy people
Apostle - Their names were, Simon Peter; Andrew, his brother; James the greater, the son of Zebedee; and John his brother, who was the beloved disciple; Philip of Bethsaida; Bartholomew; Thomas, called Didymus, as having a twin brother; Matthew or Levi, who had been a publican; James, the son of Alpheus, called James the less; Lebbeus, surnamed Thaddeus, and who was also called Judas or Jude, the brother of James; Simon, the Canaanite, so called, as some have thought, because he was a native of Cana, or, as Dr. Socrates says, that Thomas took Parthia for his lot; Matthew, Ethiopia, and Bartholomew, India. Eusebius gives the following account: "Thomas, as we learn by tradition, had Parthia for his lot; Andrew, Scythia; John, Asia, who having lived there a long time, died at Ephesus. Heraclion, cited by Clemens Alexandrinus, reckons among the Apostles who did not suffer martyrdom, Matthew, Thomas, Philip, and Levi, probably meaning Lebbeus
Self-Examination - Thomas à Kempis, in the Imitation of Christ, is much occupied with this duty; and Jeremy Taylor, in Rules and Exercises of Holy Dying (chapter ii. ‘On the Daily Examination of our Actions’; Thomas à Kempis, Of the Imitation of Christ, Bk
Law - "It is an ordination of reason for the common good promulgated by him invested with the care of the community" (Saint Thomas, I-II, V:90, a
Office, Divine - "It is the common prayer which is offered to God by the minister of the Church in the person of all the faithful" (Saint Thomas)
Divine Office - "It is the common prayer which is offered to God by the minister of the Church in the person of all the faithful" (Saint Thomas)
Right (2) - Griffith Thomas
Adam - ...
Thomas G
Apparition - 9, and Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theol
Upper Room (2) - When they have come there, suitable hymns for the day and place are said, prayer is made, and that passage from the Gospel is read in which, on the same day, in the same place where the church itself in Sion now is, the Lord came in to the disciples when the doors were shut, that is, when one of the disciples, namely, Thomas, was not there. When they have come there, suitable hymns for the place and day are said, and that passage from the Gospel is read in which, eight days after the Resurrection, the Lord came in where the disciples were, and rebuked Thomas for his want of belief. There also He showed the prints of the nails to Thomas
Abgar - Judas, also called Thomas, is said to have sent Thaddaeus, one of the Seventy, to Edessa, soon after the ascension of Jesus. He represents the reply of Jesus as having been written on His behalf by Thomas the Apostle
Nestorians - Thomas, who dwell along the coast of Malabar
Nestorians - Thomas, who dwell along the coast of Malabar
Gospels, Apocryphal - Gospel of Nicodemus, Protevangelium of James, Gospel according to Thomas, Arabic Gospel of Infancy, Arabic Gospel of Joseph, Passing of Mary). The Gospel according to Thomas . Hippolytus quotes from a Gospel according to Thomas which was being used by the Naassenes. ...
The Gospel of Thomas is an account of the childhood of Jesus, and consists largely of stories of His miraculous power and knowledge, the most interesting of the latter being the account of Jesus’ visit to school, and of the former, the well-known story of His causing twelve sparrows of clay to fly. The original Gospel of Thomas, the nature of which is, however, very much in dispute, may have been in existence in the middle of the 2nd century. Its earlier sections are apparently derived from the Protevangelium, and its later from the Gospel of Thomas
Gospels (Apocryphal) - Similarly, the Childhood Gospel of Thomas, with its repulsive stories of the child Christ’s miraculous power and knowledge, would never have found acceptance in Christian circles had it not been for the witness which the miracles were supposed to bear to Christ’s supernatural origin. ...
When, for example, one reads in the Childhood Gospel of Thomas the account of the miracles wrought by the child Christ, and marks the spirit of diablerie so frequently exhibited, one is conscious of nothing but a painful feeling of wonder, that fables so bizarre and so revolting could ever have been tolerated in a community of Christians. Though worthless as an account of Christ’s childhood, the Gospel of Thomas is yet a mirror in which we see reflected the curious condition of the society which accepted it. Buddhistic influences are possibly responsible for the childhood stories in the Gospel of Thomas. The Childhood Gospel of Thomas, useless as it is as a source of information about Christ’s youth, gives a remarkably vivid and convincing picture of Jewish village life. The Gospel of Thomas shows that the circles in which it found acceptance held to the doctrine of Christ’s human and Divine natures
Regeneration - ...
Thomas D
Saints - Griffith Thomas
Nag Hammadi - In this category are such works as The Gospel of Philip , The Gospel of Truth , and perhaps the most important work found at Nag Hammadi, The Gospel of Thomas , which purports to be a collection of sayings of Jesus
Economics - Saint Thomas considered ownership as a consequence of man's dominion over creatures, and, with other SchooImen, believed that whatever is above one's necessary outlay should be given in alms
Vine - "It is their manner in many places," says Sir Thomas Rowe's chaplain, speaking of the country of the Great Mogul, "to plant about and among their buildings, trees which grow high and broad, the shadow whereof keeps their houses by far more cool: this I observed in a special manner, when we were ready to enter Amadavar; for it appeared to us as if we had been entering a wood rather than a city
Obedience - ...
In conclusion, reference may be made to a passage in which Thomas Aquinas endeavours to define the special virtue of obedience (Summa Theologiae, II
Surname - 112, 138; Thomas Carlyle, Frederick the Great, 10 vols. ]'>[15] Thomas ὁ λεγόμενος Δίδυμος,16 Reprobate - ...
Thomas Nicol
Ways - The emperor of Hindostan, in his progress through his dominions, as described in the narrative of Sir Thomas Roe's embassy to the court of Delhi, was preceded by a very great company, sent before him to cut up the trees and bushes, to level and smooth the road, and prepare their place of encampment
Lily - God has so adorned these flowers and plants of the field, which retain their beauty and vigour but for a few days, and are then applied to some of the meanest purposes of life: will he not much more take care of his servants, who are so precious in his sight, and designed for such important services in the world? This passage is one of those of which Sir Thomas Browne says, "The variously interspersed expressions from plants and flowers elegantly advantage the significancy of the text
Omnipotence - , in Thomas Aquinas, who strives to bring the Divine omnipotence of Christ into harmony with His human life, by affirming that He shared in the Divine omnipotence only so far as He needed it in His mission, and, further, that He ordinarily limited His own power voluntarily so as to be able to partake of human weakness. ; Thomas Aquinas, Summa, iii
Egypt - ...
Thomas W
Altar - ...
Thomas W
Miracles, Signs, Wonders - Others (like Thomas Aquinas) have maintained miracles stand outside the laws of nature
Self- Examination - 241); or by Thomas à Kempis, humilis tui cognitio certior via est ad Deum, quam profunda scientiae inquisitio (de Imit
Evolution - Saint Thomas even forecast the discovery of the Copernican system, and held that "The earth was formerly in a potential state, its parts diffused"
Seceders - Thomas Mair, minister at Orwel, Mr. Thomas Narin, minister at Abbotshall, protested against the sentence of the commission, and that it should be lawful for them to complain of it to any subsequent general assembly of the church. Alexander Moncrief, Thomas Mair, Adam Gib, and others, contended, on the other hand, that the swearing of the above clause was a virtual renunciation of their testimony; and this controversy was so keenly agitated, that they split into two different parties, and now meet in different synods
Paul's Blamelessness as a Minister - On that impressive sheet we are shown the situation of the church and the manse; the farm-towns where all Thomas Boston's elders lived who had a brow for a good cause; the hamlets also where he held his district prayer-meetings, and so on. And just as in Thomas Boston's parish there are pillars and crosses set up to mark and to record to all time in Scotland his great victories won over himself, and his corresponding victories won over his people; so does Paul set up this and that great stone of ministerial remembrance and has had these instructive things engraved upon it: "by pureness, by knowledge, by long-suffering, by kindness, by the Holy Ghost, by love unfeigned, by the word of truth, by the power of God, by the armour of righteousness on the right hand and on the left. ...
Thomas Goodwin, that great minister, tells us that always when he was tempted to be high-minded and to forget to fear, he was wont to go back and take a turn up and down in his unregenerate state
Presence (2) - ’ The doctrine of Transubstantiation became the keystone of the ecclesiastical edifice, and was maintained as a theory, by means of the prevalent philosophy of Realism, whose greatest exponent was Thomas Aquinas. The Germans Eckhart and Tauler, the Dutch Thomas à Kempis, and others took up the theme, and wove it into a kind of new Stoicism, by way of purification, illumination, and union. ‘They taught (following Thomas Aquinas) that the soul can even here upon earth so receive God within itself as to enjoy in the fullest sense the vision of His being, and dwell in heaven itself’ (Harnack, Outlines of the Hist
Versions of the Scripture, Ancient - It having been revised and modified by one called Thomas of Harkel, very little of the original translation is left, except in one copy at Rome uncollated. It is also called the HARKLEIAN from Thomas of Harkel
Impostors - Israel Tonge and Titus Oates are infamous for the concoction of a mythical plot between the pope and the Jesuits; they were emulated by Thomas Dangerfield, an impersonator of the Duke of Monmouth; to these must be added William Fuller
Supernatural - ...
Thomas B
Lord's Prayer (i) - [7]5 Acts of Thomas have the plural for ‘thy will’ as the first hand of Cod. Lewis’ MS of the Acts of Thomas. ]'>[11] cur sin and Acts of Thomas ‘the continual bread’ (לחמא אמינא); the same tradition seems to be followed by the cotidianus of the Latin, the sinteinan of the Gothic, especially by לחמנו חמירי of Shemtob ben Shafrut, with which cf
Paul as a Man of Prayer - Thomas Goodwin, by far the princeliest preacher of the Puritan pulpit, to counsel the divinity students of Oxford to "thicken" both their devotions to God, and their exhortations to their people, with apostolic doctrine. Speaking of Paul's physician, I shall close with a few lines on this subject, out of the private papers of Sir Thomas Browne, a man of prayer, not unworthy to be named with the Apostle himself: "To pray in all places where quietness inviteth; in any house, highway, or street; and to know no street in this city that may not witness that I have not forgotten God and my Saviour in it: and that no parish or town where I have been may not say the like. " Had Sir Thomas Browne lived in Paul's day the praying Apostle would have ranked him with Luke and would have called them his two beloved physicians
the Wedding Guest Who Sat Down in the Lowest Room - And the best kind of humility is that kind which Thomas Shepard, so far as I know, was the first to call "evangelical humility. If you would have all the chief rooms to yourselves, and to your children, frequent those feasts, and engineer to get your children invited to those feasts, to which none but Thomas Shepard's disciples are invited
the Man Who Took a Rain of Mustard Seed And Sowed it in His Field - Our Lord Himself stood upon a pulpit of the same wood; and so did Paul, and so did Chrysostom, and so did Augustine, and so did Calvin, and so did Thomas Goodwin, and so did Matthew Henry, and a multitude of pulpit expositors of the Word of God which no man can number. ...
Thomas à Kempis's genesis of a fatal temptation is another instance of a mustard seed
Humanity - ...
Thomas Finger...
...
Mary Magdalene - It was Thomas' need too; Jesus' condescension in stooping to his weakness and granting him the fleshly touch was to raise him to the higher one of faith
Graciousness - ...
This peculiar graciousness was displayed in such acts as washing the feet of His disciples, and in His patient tolerance of the scepticism of Thomas
Lebbaeus - The Syriac lexicographer Bar Bahlul explained that Judas Thomas was called Lebbaeus and Thaddaeus on account of his wisdom
American Church, the - Thomas John Claggett, the firstBishop of Maryland, in whose consecration all four of the AmericanBishops united
Paul in Arabia - Even grace itself is but flesh and blood compared with Christ, says Thomas Shepard. Jesus of Nazareth appeared to Saul the persecutor, as He had already appeared to Mary Magdalene, and to the ten disciples, and to Thomas
the Angel of the Church of Ephesus - It means to me old Thomas Shepard more than any other minister that I know. And to all who among ourselves have preached and prayed and have examined themselves in and after their preaching and praying, as it would seem that this angel at one time did, and as Thomas Shepard always did, their Master will signalise and appreciate and praise their "painfulness" in their own so expressive old English, and they will appreciate and appropriate His so suitable word and will appreciate and praise Him back again for it
Apostle - The ‘all’ probably looks back to ‘the twelve’ in 1 Corinthians 15:10, which is an official and not a numerical designation, for only ten were there, Thomas and Judas being absent. ‘Then to all the apostles’ probably means that on that occasion the apostolic company was complete (for Thomas was present) rather than that some were there who were called apostles although they were not of the original Twelve
Hebrew - ...
Thomas Smothers...
...
Version - " ...
This was followed by Tyndale's translation (1525-1531); Miles Coverdale's (1535-1553); Thomas Matthew's (1537), really, however, the work of John Rogers, the first martyr under the reign of Queen Mary
Foreknowledge - ...
Thomas Nicol
Encratites - Epiphanius mentions that they used other apocryphal writings such as the Acts of Andrew John and Thomas
Maronites - Their labours consist in preaching in their church, in instructing children in the catechism, Thomas a Kempis, and the Psalms, and in teaching them to read and write
Psalmody - Thomas Bradbury used to call this time "a long leg and a short one
Sympathy - He could deal with the unbelief of Thomas and the fall of Peter. It is true that ‘he had compassion on the multitude,’ but He had also discriminating, special tenderness for erring Peter and Thomas
Shimei - But after he has said all that it is possible to say upon it, he exclaims, Oh! what a deep is here, that created wit cannot take up! Jonathan Edwards takes it up with all his matchless wit in his fine letter to Thomas Gillespie of Carnock, and elsewhere in his golden works. Death,' says Thomas Shepard, 'is the very best of all our gospel ordinances
Simon Magus - But the most Simon Maguslike of all sanctified ministers I know is Thomas Shepard, and that just because he is the most self-discerning, the most honest, and the most outspoken about himself of us all. Beat him black and blue, as Paul tells us he did, and as Thomas Shepard tells us he did, every time he shows his self-admiring face
Peter - Thomas would appear to have been melancholy and morose. "Christ gives him a little touch," says Thomas Goodwin, "of some wildness and youthfulness that had been in Peter's spirit before Christ had to do with him
Lord, Lordship - Thomas, when he realized the significance of the presence of a mortal wound in the body of a living man, immediately joined with it the absolute title of Deity, saying, 'My Lord and my God,' John 20:28
Sabbath - " On the same day, the first day of the week, he appeared among his assembled disciples; and on the next recurrence of the day he was again with them, and revealed himself to Thomas
Manes, Called Also Mani - by Thomas on Recent Pehlvi Decipherments in Jour
Philoxenus, a Monophysite Leader - known as the "Philoxenian Version," subsequently revised by Thomas of Harkel, in which form alone we possess it, was executed in 508 at his desire by his chorepiscopus Polycarp (Moses Agnellus, ap
Man (2) - It is significant also that one of the strongest utterances of devotion is recorded of Thomas. But when Jesus expressed His determination to go up to Bethany and wake His friend Lazarus out of his sleep, it was Thomas who first saw his Master’s danger, and that death was near at hand, and who exclaimed with vehemence, ‘Let us go up also with him, that we may die with him’ (John 11:16)
Egypt - ...
According to the Gospel of Thomas, ch
Immanence - Mundi; Spinoza, Ethica; Hegel, Logic; Caird, The Evolution of Religion; Royce, God and the Individual; Illingworth, Divine Immanence; Thomas à Kempis, Imitatio Christi; Eckhart, Writings; Allan, Continuity of Christian Thought; Flint, Anti-Theistic Theories, p
Self-Denial - Hannay, The Wisdom of the Desert (1904); Thomas à Kempis, The Imitation of Christ; Baxter, Self-Denial
Authors of Articles - Griffith Thomas, D
Faithfulness - Thomas, in Westminster Bible Conference, Mundesley, 1912, p
Attributes of Christ - παρά John 17:8, ἀπό John 13:3), words which ‘can only be interpreted of the true divinity of the Son of which the Father is the source and fountain’ (Westcott); He claimed the power of interpreting and revising the Mosaic law (Matthew 5:27 f, Mark 10:4 f); He acted in the temple as its master (John 2:14 f, Matthew 21:12); He accepted from Thomas the supreme title (John 20:28), and joined His name permanently with that of the Father (Matthew 28:19)
Angel - His schema was later adopted by Thomas Aquinas and was not seriously challenged until the Protestant Reformation
John - ...
How did John sink so deep into the unsearchable things of his Master, while all the other disciples stood all their discipleship days on the surface? What was it in John that lifted him so high above Peter, and Thomas, and Philip, and made him first such a disciple, and then such an apostle, of wisdom and of love? For one thing it was his gift and grace of meditation
Egypt - ...
According to the Gospel of Thomas, ch
Bible - Tindal, assisted by Miles Coverdale, printed abroad in 1526; but most of the copies were bought up and burnt by bishop Tunstal and Sir Thomas More. He dedicated the whole to Henry VIII, in 1537, under the borrowed name of Thomas Matthews; whence this has been usually called Matthew's Bible. : however, many of the copies were seized by the queen's searchers, and confiscated; and Thomas Cartwright was solicited by secretary Walsingham to refute it; but, after a good progress made therein, archbishop Whitgift prohibited his further proceeding, as judging it improper that the doctrine of the church of England should be committed to the defense of a puritan; and appointed Dr
English Versions - Egerton MSS 617, 618), which once belonged to Thomas, Duke of Gloucester, uncle of Richard II. Sir Thomas More, whose good faith there is no reason to question, appears to have done so; otherwise it can only be supposed that the orthodox English Bibles of which he speaks, and which he expressly distinguishes from the Bible which caused the condemnation of Richard Hun, have wholly disappeared, which is hardly likely. Thomas seith to him, Lord, we witen not whidir thou goist, and hou moun we wite the weie
Socialism - ’ But a man may be against Individualism or Anarchism, and to that extent a Socialist, and yet may be opposed to the current conceptions both of economic and political Socialism; he may possibly regard the growth of municipal undertakings with alarm, and he may even look, as Thomas Carlyle did, to the ‘strong man,’ and not to the democracy, for deliverance from the evils of insufficiently restricted competition. Thomas Aquinas; just as the modern trade unionist finds that the great Christian trade gilds were carrying out his principles of fellowship even among the peasantry before the modern era began. Nitti, Catholic Socialism (1895); Laveleye, Le Socialisme Contemporain (Soeialism of To-day) (1890); Feugueray, Essais sur les doctrines politiques de Saint Thomas d’Aquin (1857) (ch
Faith - When Thomas hails Jesus as ‘My Lord and my God!’ he ‘ has believed ’; this process is complete in the mind of the slowest disciple; the two faiths are now welded inseparably; the Son is known through the Father, and the Father through the Son, and Thomas gives full affiance to both in one
Paul as a Student - I have a thousand times had Thomas Boston's experience of good books. " But you will correct me that Paul could not ply the great books that Thomas Boston plied to his own salvation, and to the salvation of his people in Simprin and Ettrick
Acts of the Apostles - )...
(2) Besides the Peshiṭta we have the Harklean made by Thomas of Heraclea. Thomas of Heraclea revised the Philoxenian with the help of Greek Manuscripts in the Library of the Enaton at Alexandria, and enriched his edition with a number of critical notes giving the variants of these Greek Manuscripts which often have a most remarkable text agreeing more closely with Codex Bezae than with any other known Greek manuscript
Offices of Christ - Thomas Aquinas departs from the triple division of the offices, and makes them coincide with the two states of humiliation and exaltation; the high-priestly office, to which the prophetic is merely introductory, coinciding with the state of humiliation, while the kingly is to be reserved for the state of exaltation (Dorner, op
Versions - ...
THOMAS MATTHEW'S folio Bible, dedicated to the king, appeared in 1537; printed to the end of Isaiah abroad, thenceforward by the London printers Grafton and Whitechurch. ...
Rogers, by aid probably of Poyntz, the Antwerp merchant who had helped Tyndale, got as far as Isaiah; Grafton and Whitechurch took up the speculation then, suppressing the name of Rogers known as Tyndale's friend, and substituting Thomas Matthew
John, the Gospel of - Thomas's doubt was overcome, and Thomas voiced the Gospel's climactic confession: “My Lord, and my God!” (John 20:28 )
Benedictus of Nursia, Abbott of Monte Cassino - The mountain, with a town and stream at its base, all of the same name, stands on the borders of what were formerly Latium and Campania, nearer to Naples than Rome, a few miles from the birthplace of the great Dominican, Thomas Aquinas
Commentary - Thomas Taylor
Parable - , Mark 4:14-20 ) as later misinterpretations, even though the earliest written gospels have the highest percentage of allegorical elements, and the latest, the Gospel of Thomas, has the least
Gnosticism - Griffith Thomas
Appreciation (of Christ) - He sees through the pure-minded hesitancy of Nathanael (John 1:47), He recognizes the true value of the widow’s mite (Luke 21:1-4), He draws Nicodemus the timid to Him (John 3:1), He knows what will satisfy Thomas (John 20:27), and what will please and win Zacchaeus (Luke 19:5); and His immediate followers include a Mary Magdalene as well as a Mary of Bethany, a Judas as well as a John
Fish, Fisher, Fishing - According to John 21:2 Thomas and Nathanael (of Cana) appear also to have been fishermen, at least occasionally
Gospels - )...
Matthew in naming the twelve (Matthew 10:3) modestly places himself after Thomas as "Matthew the publican. " Mark and Luke place him before Thomas and omit the humiliating epithet also they do not join his former profession with the apostolic name Matthew, but hide it under his lesser-known name Levi (Matthew 9:9; Mark 2:14; Luke 5:27)
Adam - But all the time, as Thomas Goodwin says, the true Garden of Eden was in the gardener's own heart. Thomas à Kempis used to say that his idea of perfect rest and perfect happiness was 'to sit with a little book in a little nook
Ugarit - ...
Thomas Smothers...
...
Marks Stigmata - Francis of Assisi by Thomas de Celano (ed
Georgius (43), Patron Saint of England - In 1349 Edward joined battle with the French near Calais, when, "moved by a sudden impulse," says Thomas of Walsingham, "he drew his sword with the exclamation, Ha! St
Twelve - Thomas: a twin
Discourse - (a) Short occasional discourses: the explanation of the Parable of the Tares, with the short parables that follow (Matthew 13:36-52); the caution against Pharisaic Leaven (Matthew 16:4-12, Mark 8:13-21); remarks about His Church upon Peter’s confession (Matthew 16:13-20, Mark 8:27-30, Luke 9:18-21); the immediately following discourse on His Death and on Self-Denial (Matthew 16:21-28, Luke 10:1-2497 to Mark 9:1, Luke 9:22-27); talk after the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:9-13, Mark 9:9-13); a second foretelling of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 17:22-23, Mark 9:30-32, Luke 9:43-45); discourses at the Mission and Return of the Seventy (1618399614_1); teaching as to Prayer, with parable of the Friend at Midnight (Luke 11:1-13); parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-13); teaching as to Offences, Faith, Service (1618399614_93); third prediction of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 20:17-19, Mark 10:32-34, Luke 18:31-34); talk about Faith suggested by the Withered Fig-tree (Matthew 21:20-22, Mark 11:20-26); talk following the Washing of the Disciples’ Feet (John 13:12-20); institution of the Lord’s Supper (Matthew 26:26-29, Mark 14:22-25, Luke 22:19-20); after the resurrection, talk with the Two Disciples on the way to Emmaus (Luke 24:17-27); with the Apostles, Thomas absent (Luke 24:36-49, John 20:19-25); talk with some of the Apostles at the Sea of Galilee (John 21:4-23); the Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-19)
Eye - A son of the Great Mogul was actually suffering this punishment when Sir Thomas Roe visited the court of Delhi
Name - Japp, Life of Thomas De Quincy, 1890, p
Childhood - ...
The Apocryphal writings which, in particular, abound in these tales of the childhood of Jesus, are the Gospel of pseudo-Matthew, the Protevangelium of James, the Arabic Gospel of the Infancy, and the Gospel of Thomas in its various forms. The Thomas Gospel is mainly answerable for the stories of vindictive miracles referred to above
Nestorian Church - Thomas the Apostle, passing through this country on his way to India, was co-founder of the church with them. Histories ; Book of Governors (Thomas of Marga, ed
Jesus Christ - Thomas, known for his doubting, should also be remembered for faith's greatest application about Christ: “My Lord and my God” (John 20:28 )
Sayings (Unwritten) - 7) quotes the Gospel according to Thomas thus:...
‘He that seeketh me shall find me in children from seven years old onwards, for there I am manifested, though hidden in the fourteenth age
Pilgrimage - Thomas-Becket was the chief resort of the pious, and in Scotland, St
the Angel of the Church in Thyatira - We have never had deeper-wading preachers than Jonathan Edwards and Thomas Boston, and never since the garden of Eden has there been two ministers happier at home than they were
Elisha - On December the 21st, 1719, Thomas Boston writes this in his journal: A poor boy came into the house begging, having such a defect in his speech that he pronounced the words father and mother fao and moa, at which my wife and others smiling, desired him to speak over again what he had said
Nathanael - Experience of Christ’s miraculous knowledge had convinced him, as it convinced the Samaritan woman (John 4:29) and Thomas (John 20:27-28), that Jesus stood in the closest relation to God
Manuscripts - ...
This, the youngest of the Syrian versions, is a revision by Thomas of Harkel (Heraclea) in the first half of the 7th cent. The earlier translation was perhaps made from the Peshitta by reference to the ‘corrected’ form of the Greek text, and Thomas found in Egypt older Greek Manuscripts , which had escaped the enthusiasm of the destroyers, who favoured the ‘corrected’ text, and inserted some readings from them, adding others in the margin
Boyhood - ...
It is curious that the Apocryphal Gospels have a legend about our Lord modelling birds out of moist clay (Syriac Boyhood of the Lord Jesus 1, pseudo-Matthew 27, Thomas 11, Arabio Gospel of the Infancy 36 etc. Does a foundation of fact, or at least vraisemblance, lie beneath the legends of our Lord’s treatment by His schoolmaster? (Gospel of pseudo-Matthew 31; Gospel of Thomas 14, 15; ib
Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis - And if ever any one came who had been a follower of the elders, I would inquire as to the discourses of the elders, what was said by Andrew, or what by Peter, or what by Philip, or what by Thomas or James, or what by John or Matthew or any other of the disciples of the Lord; and the things which Aristion and the elder John, the disciples of the Lord, say. John's Gospel, placing Andrew before Peter, and includes some such as Thomas and Philip, who outside that Gospel have little prominence in the Gospel record, and that it gives to our Lord the Johannine title, the Truth
the Unprofitable Servant - But not one of them all is so much to my own remorseful taste in this matter, as is Thomas Shepard, the Pilgrim Father
the Penitent Thief - It was of the thief, and of his alone and so transcendent faith, that our Lord spoke in such praise and in such reproof to Thomas eight days afterwards, and said, 'Blessed is he in heaven with Me this day, who saw nothing but shame, and defeat, and death in Me, and yet so believed in Me, and so cheered Me that day
Heracleon, a Gnostic - The first confession may be made by a hypocrite: and it is one not required of all; there are many who have never been called on to make it, as for instance Matthew, Philip, Thomas, Levi [1]; the other confession must be made by all
the Angel of the Church of the Laodiceans - " On the margin of a copy of Thomas Adam' Private Thoughts now preserved among the treasures of the British Museum, Coleridge has written these pencilled lines: "For a great part of my life I did not know that I was poor, and naked, and blind, and miserable
Versions of the Scripture, English - ...
To show the opposition of the Papists to these copies of the scripture being brought into England, Sir Thomas More may be quoted: "
Evangelist (2) - Thus he relates that the Apostle Thomas sent Thaddaeus to Edessa as a preacher and evangelist of the teaching of Christ (Historia Ecclesiastica i
Manichees - He left several disciples; and among others, Addas, Thomas, and Hermas
Nimrod - Newman says of Thomas Scott, that he owes him his own soul
Discipline - ...
Thomas E
Scripture - And, as they neither would nor could deceive the world, so they either could nor would be deceived themselves; for they were days, months, and years, eye and ear-witnesses of the things which they relate; and, when they had not the fullest evidence of important facts, they insisted upon new proofs, and even upon sensible demonstrations; as, for instance, Thomas, in the matter of our Lord's resurrection, John 20:25 ; and to leave us no room to question their sincerity, most of them joyfully sealed the truth of their doctrines with their own blood
Lots - ‘Oraculum,’ ‘Sortes’; Thomas Gataker, Treatise of the Nature and Use of Lots2, 1627, and A just Defence of certain Passages in [the preceding]'>[2] Treatise, 1623, p. ‘Oraculum,’ ‘Sortes’; Thomas Gataker, Treatise of the Nature and Use of Lots2, 1627, and A just Defence of certain Passages in [the preceding]'>[2] the election was by ballot
Infancy - An important problem, however, is presented by a comparison of these narratives with the conspicuous features of certain of the Apocryphal Gospels, particularly the Protevangelium of James, the Gospel according to Thomas, and the Arabic Gospel of the Childhood
the Samaritan Who Shewed Mercy - "It will be obvious to the intelligent reader," says Thomas Boston's son in editing his father's priceless Autobiography, "that the radical principle upon which this narration is founded, is that God hath preordained whatsoever comes to pass
the Importunate Widow - And say at every patient's door with Sir Thomas Browne, Peace be to this house, and health from the God of their salvation
Joannes Presbyter - What concerns us here is that Papias, speaking of his care in collecting oral traditions of the apostolic times, says, "on any occasion when a person came in my way, who had been a follower of the elders, I would inquire about the discourses of the elders—what was said by Andrew, or by Peter, or by Philip, or by Thomas or James, or by John or Matthew or any other of the Lord's disciples, and what Aristion and the Elder John, the disciples of the Lord say" (Lightfoot's trans
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - John’s Gospel appears to have been the immediate cause of the plot against the life of Jesus; the washing of the disciples’ feet at the Last Supper; the conversation with Pilate at the trial; the presence of the beloved disciple and Mary at the Cross; the appearance to Thomas after the Resurrection. Lastly, the words to Thomas in John 20:29—the last beatitude—more than reconcile us to the loss of any description of the Ascension
Christ in Reformation Theology - The Summa of Thomas Aquinas gives little insight into the deep and genuine religious experience of the writer, and gets no inspiration there. ...
The reader of the second part of the second book of the Summa Theologiae of Thomas Aquinas cannot help seeing that the really evangelical aspirations of the great Schoolmen are everywhere thwarted and finally slain outright because the theologian has to start with the thought that God has been first defined as either the Absolute, or the Primum Movens, or the Causa efficiens prima, or the Intelligens a quo omnes res naturales ordinantur in finem—conceptions which can never imprison, without destroying, the vision of the Father who has revealed Himself to us in Jesus Christ
Apostles - The remaining five names—Thomas, James the son of Alphaeus, Simon the Zealot, Judas or Lebbaeus or Thaddaeus, and Judas Iscariot are new. The second is made up of Philip, Nathanael, Thomas, and Matthew
Virgin Birth - Proto-Gospel of James, 17-21; Infancy Gospel of Thomas )
Virgin Virginity - At first this custom may have arisen from the highest spiritual motives among those to whom sexual intercourse even in marriage was degrading, and it may have been practised by married persons who resolved to live in absolute chastity;† Corinthians, Second Epistle to - Griffith Thomas
Individuality - Andrew and Nathanael, Philip and Thomas are mere names and shadows in the other Gospels, while in John they have each one his own characteristic note
Lord (2) - The adoring cry of Thomas, ‘My Lord and my God’ (ὁ κύριός μου καὶ ὁ θεός μου) John 20:28, is an illustration of how among Jewish Christians the title of respect addressed to a teacher became one of Divine honour
Devotion - Mary’s ‘Rabboni’ (John 20:16) and Thomas’ ‘My Lord’ (John 20:28) express absorbed attachment as well as conviction
the Man Who Found Treasure Hid in a Field - "...
Incomparable Thomas Goodwin,-incomparable to me, at any rate,-says that Paul will be the second man in heaven, the Man Christ Jesus being the first man
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - One of the last things that Sir Thomas Grainger Stewart said to me on his death-bed was this:-"Sometimes make them understand the psalm before you invite them to sing it, for we have often sung it in my time not knowing what it meant
the Angel of the Church in Sardis - " It was with the minister of Sardis somewhat as it was with Thomas Scott when he was first awaking to his proper work
Paul as a Controversialist - Cross a sinner and you will have a devil, said Thomas Shepard
Apostolic Constitutions And Canons - 14, 18: ‘We now assembled, Peter and Andrew, James and John, Philip and Bartholomew, Thomas and Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, and Lebbaeus who is surnamed Thaddaeus, and Simon the Canaanite, and Matthias who instead of Judas was numbered with us, and James the brother of our Lord and bishop of Jerusalem, and Paul … and have written to you this catholic doctrine [1] we have sent by our fellow-minister Clement
Nabal - 'A devil at home' is one of the sure marks of Thomas Shepard's 'evangelical hypocrite
Individuality - Andrew and Nathanael, Philip and Thomas are mere names and shadows in the other Gospels, while in John they have each one his own characteristic note
Obedience (2) - Peter who denied Him, Thomas who could not believe His resurrection, John and James who were fired by an unholy ambition, were the chief among the Twelve, and doubtless as successful as the others
Revelation - Griffith Thomas
Trinity - Griffith Thomas
Ibas, Bishop of Edessa - Thomas the Apostle, who was said, after preaching in Parthia, to have been buried there (Socr
Homosexuality - ...
Thomas E
Saul - ...
Oh! exclaims Thomas Shepard, the grievous shipwrecks of some great ships! We see some boards and planks lying in the mud at low water, but that is all!...
Beda, Historian - ," by Thomas Miller, was contributed to Quellen und Forschungen zur Sprach- und Culturgeschichte der germanischen Völker (Strassburg, 1896)
the Man Which Sowed Good Seed in His Field But His Enemy Came And Sowed Tares Among the Wheat - Thomas Boston used to say, that of all men who needed the imputation of Christ's all-round righteousness, preachers and pastors were those men
Word - When you come to analyze the Gospel of St John, you will find that the first eighteen verses contain the positions laid down by the Apostle, in order to meet the errors of Cerinthus; that these positions, which are merely affirmed in the introduction, are proved in the progress of the Gospel, by the testimony of John the Baptist, and by the words and the actions of our Lord; and that after the proof is concluded by the declaration of Thomas, who, upon being convinced that Jesus had risen, said to him, ‘My Lord, and my God,' St
Predestination - ‘I could no more,’ says Erskine of Linlathen, writing to Thomas Chalmers from Herrnhut (Letters, 1800-1840, ed
Lots - ‘Oraculum,’ ‘Sortes’; Thomas Gataker, Treatise of the Nature and Use of Lots2, 1627, and A just Defence of certain Passages in [the preceding]'>[2] Treatise, 1623, p
Peter (2) - Thomas, The Apostle Peter (1904); H
Pseudo-Chrysostomus - In the Catena Aurea of Thomas Aquinas it is largely employed; and Fabricius quotes Dionysius the Carthusian as saying that he would rather have this imperfect work perfect than be lord of all Paris
Gospel - Among these works are The Gospel of the Ebionites , The Gospel According to the Hebrews , The Gospel According to the Egyptians , The Gospel of the Naassenes , The Gospel of Peter , and The Gospel of Thomas
David - in His Races - Thomas GOODWIN says that David's youthful virtues differed from his old-age graces somewhat as wild marjoram differs from sweet
Achan - ...
Everybody who reads the best books will have long had by heart Thomas a Kempis's famous description of the successive steps of a successful temptation
Eternal Life, Eternality, Everlasting Life - For Aristotle, as for Thomas Aquinas who followed him at this point, eternity "becomes known from two characteristics: first, from the fact that whatever is in eternity is interminable, that is, lacking beginning and end ; second, from the fact that eternity itself lacks successiveness, existing entirely at once [3]" (Aquinas, Summa, I, 10,1)
Universalism (2) - The most earnest and ardent supporters in Great Britain of the universalist doctrine have been Thomas Erskine of Linlathen (in his later years; d
Election - ...
Thomas Nicol
Ascension - Thomas perhaps did not actually touch the Lord when invited to do so-and possibly John 20:17); the appearances to St
Perseverance - Thomas Aquinas systematized the general idea of St
Wisdom - Thomas Chalmers draws a sad picture of the failure of his earlier ministry, when he preached apart from the Centre, or, as St
Judas Iscariot (2) - In the Fourth Gospel the phrase is used once of another than Judas; like a note of exclamation, it expresses surprise that Thomas, a member of the Apostolic band, was absent when the risen Saviour appeared to His disciples (John 20:24)
Animals - ...
On this Sir Thomas Browne notes: ‘a coarse garment, a cilicious or sackcloth garment, suitable to the austerity of his life—the severity of his doctrine, repentance—and the place thereof, the wilderness—his food and diet, locusts and wild honey
Proverbs - ...
‘I have observed,’ says old Thomas Fuller, ‘some at the church door cast in sixpence with such ostentation that it rebounded from the bottom and rang against both sides of the bason (so that the same piece of silver was the alms and the giver’s trumpet), whilst others have dropped down silent five shillings without any noise
Aristion (Aristo) - He ‘used to inquire of those who came his way what had been said (τί εἶπεν) by Andrew, Peter, Philip, Thomas, James, John or Matthew, or any other of the Lord’s disciples; as well as what was being said (ἅτε λέγουσιν) by Aristion and the Elder John
John, Theology of - This happens at the opening of the Gospel (1:1) and at the Gospel's closing frame when Thomas names Jesus "my Lord and my God" (20:28)
Gnosticism - Then we know something of works deeply tinged with Gnosticism, such as the Acts of Thomas
Magi - Thomas
John, Gospel of - He is saluted not only by Mary as Rabboni, but by Thomas as ‘my Lord and my God
Innocentius, Bishop of Rome - Lastly, a list is given of the canonical books of Scripture, the same as are now received by the church of Rome; while certain books, bearing the names of Matthias, James the Less, Peter, John, and Thomas, are repudiated and condemned
Announcements of Death - Thomas has the courage of despair (John 11:16) in the gloomy situation, but Jesus speaks of His own glorification (John 11:4; John 11:40)
John, the Gospel by - Thomas, who saw and believed, represents the Jewish remnant in the latter day, who will believe when they see the Lord
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola - , Andrew, Luke, Thomas, and others of less note, including St
Mss - was made by Thomas of Harkel, who converted its idiomatic freedom into extreme literalness, and added various readings in critical notes, which show an acquaintance with a Greek MS or MSS having a text akin to that of Cod
Moravians - Thomas; New Perrnhut, Nisky
John (the Apostle) - If, then, anyone came who had been a follower of the elders, I questioned him in regard to the words of the elders—what Andrew or what Peter said, or what was said by Philip, or by Thomas, or by James, or by John, or by Matthew, or by any other of the disciples of the Lord, and what things Aristion and the presbyter John, the disciples of the Lord, say
Jesus Christ - These fall into three groups according as they deal with the history of Joseph and Mary ( Protevangelium of James ), the Infancy ( Gospel of Thomas ), and Pilate ( Acts of Pilate )
John, Theology of - The former belief would not necessarily change their views of the Godhead; the latter, if intelligently held and interpreted in the light of Thomas’ confession (for instance), would undoubtedly affect in some direction the intense monotheism of one who was born and bred a Jew
Papias - But if haply one also who had been a companion of the Elders came (my way), I used to make careful inquiry into the discourses of the Elders—what had been said by Andrew, or what by Peter, or what by Philip, or what by Thomas or by James, or what by John or Matthew, or by any other of the Lord’s disciples, and what things Aristion and the Elder John, disciples of the Lord, have to say (λέγουσιν)
Gnosticism - Peter; gospels were in circulation among them which purported to have been written by Philip, Thomas, and other apostles; and they professed to be able to find their doctrines in the canonical scriptures by methods of allegorical interpretation which, however forced, could easily be paralleled in the procedure of orthodox writers
John, Gospel of (Critical) - Moreover, if met with anyone on any occasion who had attended the elders, I used to inquire about the words of the elders; what Andrew or what Peter said, or what Philip, or what Thomas, or James or John or Matthew, or any other of the disciples of the Lord said, and what Aristion and the elder John, disciples of the Lord, say
Christ in the Middle Ages - ]'>[1] , Anselm of Canterbury, Bernard of Clairvaux, Abelard, Peter Lombard, Thomas Aquinas, etc
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - Thomas, on the seashore of Drypia, about nine miles from the city, which the empress had instituted in a fit of religious excitement
Odes of Solomon - See, further, the following passages of Syrian authors which would be too long to quote here: Acts of Judas Thomas, ed
Nestorius And Nestorianism - Thomas on the Malabar coast, remain to represent the church once dominant in the far East