What does Temperance mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Temperance
TEMPERANCE . 1. In the RV [1] ‘temperance’ is the tr. [2] of the Gr. word enkrateia , the root-meaning of which is ‘power over oneself,’ ‘self-mastery.’ It is a comprehensive virtue, and on this account ‘ self-control ,’ the tr. [2] of RVm [4] , is to be preferred ( Acts 24:25 , Galatians 5:23 , 2 Peter 1:5 ). The corresponding adjective is found only in Titus 1:8 , and the verb only in 1 Corinthians 7:9 ; 1 Corinthians 9:25 . The negative form of the adjective is translated ‘without self-control’ ( 2 Timothy 3:3 ), and of the noun ‘excess’ ( Matthew 23:25 ), and ‘incontinency’ ( 1 Corinthians 7:5 ). The RV [1] tr. [2] another Gr. word ( nçphalios ) ‘temperate’ in 1 Timothy 3:2 ; 1 Timothy 3:11 , Titus 2:2 ; its root-meaning points to the avoidance of intemperance in the form of drunkenness, but in actual usage it condemns all forms of self-indulgence. This extension of its significance must be remembered in expounding the passages in which the corresponding verb is found, for the RV [1] always tr. [2] it ( nçphein ) ‘to be sober ’ ( 1Th 5:6 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:8 , 2Ti 4:5 , 1 Peter 1:18 ; 1 Peter 4:7 ; 1 Peter 5:8 ).
2. From the philosophical point of view, ‘self-control’ is mastery over the passions; it is the virtue which holds the appetites in check; the rational will has power to regulate conduct without being unduly swayed by sensuous appetites. From the NT point of view the grace of ‘self-control’ is the result of the Holy Spirit’s indwelling; it is the Spirit-controlled personality alone that is ‘strengthened with power’ ( Ephesians 3:18 ; cf. Ephesians 5:18 ) to control rebellious desires and to resist the allurements of tempting pleasures.
3. The NT passages in which reference is made to this virtue form an instructive study. To Felix, with an adulteress by his side, St. Paul discoursed of ‘self-control,’ directing his stern condemnation against the vice of unchastity (cf. 1 Corinthians 7:5 ; 1 Corinthians 7:9 ). But to every form of ‘excess’ ( Matthew 23:25 ) it is directly opposed. In 1 Timothy 3:3 ‘not given over to wine’ ( paroinos , AV [9] ‘brawler,’ cf. RVm [4] ) balances ‘temperate’ ( 1 Timothy 3:2 , cf. 1 Timothy 3:8 ), and from this chapter it is plain that the Apostle regards violent quarrelling ( 1 Timothy 3:3 ), false and reckless speech ( 1 Timothy 3:8 ), self-conceit ( 1 Timothy 3:6 ), greed of filthy lucre ( 1 Timothy 3:8 ), as well as fondness for much wine ( 1 Timothy 3:8 ), as manifold forms of Intemperance by whose means men ‘fall into reproach and the snare of the devil’ ( 1 Timothy 3:7 ).
4. ‘Self-control,’ in its widest sense, as including mastery over all tempers, appetites, and passions, has a prominent place in two NT lists of the Christian graces. In 2 Peter 1:6 , faith is regarded as the germ of every virtue; it lays hold of the ‘divine power’ which makes possible the life of godliness ( 2 Peter 1:3 ). The evolution of faith in ‘manliness, knowledge, self-control’ is the reward of its ‘diligent’ culture ( 2 Peter 1:8 ). This ‘self-control,’ as Principal Iverach says, ‘grows out of knowledge, it is using Christian knowledge for the guidance of life’ ( The Other Side of Greatness , p. 110). In Galatians 5:23 , ‘self-control’ closes the list of the graces which are all ‘the fruit of the Spirit,’ just as ‘drunkenness and revellings’ close the list of ‘the works of the flesh’ ( Galatians 5:21 ). The flesh and the Spirit! these, indeed, are ‘contrary the one to the other’ ( Galatians 5:17 ). The flesh triumphs when the Spirit is quenched; but the Spirit’s victory is gained, not by suppressing, but by controlling, the flesh. Those who are ‘led by the Spirit’ ( Galatians 5:18 ), who ‘live by the Spirit’ and ‘by the Spirit also walk’ ( Galatians 5:25 ) attain, in its perfection, the grace of complete ‘self-control.’
J. G. Tasker.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Temperance
TEMPERANCE.—In the Sermon on the Mount Christ dwells on the restraint under which not only our actions and our words must be held, but also our thoughts. He sees in the angry thought the germ of murder, in the impure thought the germ of adultery, and so He goes to the root of the matter. It is of no use to try to cleanse the stream at a certain point in its course, if the fountain from which it flows is impure; if the stream is to be kept pure the fountain must be kept pure; and if the words and actions are to be under control, the thoughts of the heart must be under control. It is from within, out of the heart, that all kinds of irregularities proceed, therefore ‘keep thy heart with all diligence,’ or, as in the marginal note, ‘above all that thou guardest, for out of it are the issues of life’ (Proverbs 4:23).
In the parable of the Prodigal Son we see the depth of degradation into which a man is brought when he breaks away from his God. In the case of the prodigal, the initial step was taken when the undisciplined thought was harboured in the heart. His mind fretted and rebelled against the restraints of his father’s house, he wished to go out into the world and to see life, he wanted to be free from all control. The next step was the undisciplined word, ‘Give me the portion of thy substance that falleth to me.’ And the final step was the undisciplined act, ‘He took his journey into a far country, and there he wasted his substance with riotous living.’ Here the thought first ran riot, and the rest followed.
Christianity, therefore, is a religion not merely for a part of our being, but for the whole man; it touches him in every relationship of life and in every aspect of that relationship. It teaches him to ‘live soberly, righteously, and godly in this present world’ (Titus 2:12). While righteousness represents his attitude towards his fellow-men and godliness his attitude towards God, soberness represents his attitude towards himself. Soberness (σωφροσύνη) is a right balance in all things; it is the bringing of the lower part of the nature into subjection to the higher, the flesh into subjection to the spirit; it means the spirit of man, guided by the Holy Spirit of God, governing the soul or intellect; then the soul or intellect, thus sanctified, governing the flesh; and the whole man, body, soul, and spirit, kept under control, held in hand, just as a spirited horse is held in hand by an experienced rider; moving on, not torn asunder by conflicting interests, but advancing steadily in one direction upwards and heavenwards.
A temperate man is one who rules himself, who lets every act that he performs have its own proper place, who gives everything its own due proportion, who does not eat too much, drink too much, sleep too much, talk too much, or do anything in excess. We live in days when there is an inordinate craving for amusement: amusements have their place, and, within limits, are not only necessary but good for us; but when they absorb so large a portion of our life that its more serious duties have to give place to them, then they become extremely hurtful. They should be regarded as sidings off the main line of our life, opportunities for recruiting our tired and weary energies, so that we may return to our work with renewed vigour; and when thus used they are very helpful. A temperate man will exercise self-control with regard to these as well as in all other matters.
But while temperance is an all-round virtue, the term has come to be used very largely with reference to self-control in a particular direction, viz. in the matter of strong drink. When we speak of ‘the Temperance cause’ or ‘Temperance work,’ we generally mean the efforts that are being made to suppress intemperance in the use of alcohol. Our Temperance Societies are directed towards this object, and so the word ‘temperance’ has come to be used almost exclusively in this connexion; and it cannot be denied that there is some justification for it, because the effects of the abuse of strong drink are so patent and so terrible that they attract attention in a way that few other sins do. Temperance is not necessarily total abstinence; it is the use, as distinct from the abuse, of strong drink. Total abstinence may be necessary; for the inveterate drunkard it is necessary; for him the only remedy, under God, is to abstain altogether from that which he cannot use in strict moderation (cf. Jesus’ words in Matthew 5:29-30). Again it may be necessary for others besides drunkards, viz., for those who are to rescue the victims of strong drink, for we all know that example is far more powerful than precept; we are far more likely to be able to help those who have fallen into this abyss by saying to them, ‘Do as we do,’ than by saying, ‘Do as we tell you.’
But while total abstinence may be necessary for some, especially for those of us who are working in the slums of our large towns, it is not enjoined upon all; the strictly moderate use of alcohol cannot be said to be a sin; and to speak of it as though it were a sin, as has sometimes been done, is only to weaken the cause that we have at heart; it is the abuse of it that is a sin, and therefore, while abstinence is not enjoined upon all, temperance is enjoined upon every Christian man and woman.
Our Lord tells us what is the end and aim of our fallen but redeemed and regenerate humanity, ‘Ye therefore shall be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect’ (Matthew 5:48). This is the goal set before us; and to reach this goal our attitude must be that of the spiritual athlete, straining every nerve and exerting every muscle, keeping under the body and bringing it into subjection, running the race set before us, ‘looking unto Jesus’ (Hebrews 12:2), looking unto Him as our example, looking unto Him for strength, pressing onward from stage to stage, from strength to strength, from one degree of perfection unto another, ‘unto a full-grown man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ’ (Ephesians 4:13).
And here our Lord stands before us as our Ideal. The Jesus of the Gospels presents to us a life which is the very embodiment of temperance, a life of perfect self-restraint, of complete self-mastery; a life free from excess on the one hand and defect on the other, well-balanced, well-proportioned, without flaw, without spot, perfect in all its parts; a life which had for its object the glory of God, from the time when He came into the world, saying, ‘Lo, I come to do thy will, O my God’ (Hebrews 10:7), to the time when, having finished all, He exclaimed with the voice of a conqueror, ‘I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do’ (John 17:4). To copy this perfect Ideal and to reach this goal we, by a life lived in union with Him and by the power of the Holy Ghost, must strive to be temperate in all things. See, further, art. Self-Control.
Rowland Ellis.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Temperance
That virtue which a man is said to possess who moderates and restrains his sensual appetites. It is often, however, used in a much more general sense, as synonymous with moderation, and is then applied indiscriminately to all the passions. "Temperance, " says Addison, "has those particular advantages above all other means of health, that it may be practised by all ranks and conditions at any season or in any place. It is a kind of regimen into which every man may put himself without interruption to business, expense of money, or loss of time. Physic, for the most part, is nothing else but the substitute of exercise, or temperance." In order to obtain and practice this virtue, we should consider it:
1. As a divine command, Philippians 4:5 . Luke 21:34 . Proverbs 23:1-3 .
2. As conductive to health.
3. As advantageous to the powers of the mind.
4. As a defense against injustice, lust, imprudence, detraction, poverty, &c.
And, lastly, the example of Christ should be a most powerful stimulus to it.
See INTEMPERANCE, SOBRIETY.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Church Temperance Society
This Society was organized in 1881,and has for its object the promotion of temperance in itsstrict meaning. Its adult membership combines those who temperatelyuse and those who totally abstain from intoxicating liquors asbeverages. It works on the lines of moral as well as legal suasion,and its practical objects are: 1. Training the young in habits oftemperance. 2. Rescue of the drunkard. 3. Restriction of the saloonby legislation, and 4. Counteractive agencies, such as coffee-houses,working-men's clubs, reading-rooms and other attractive wholesomeresorts. The Church Temperance Legion deals with boys, seeking toinduce them to keep sober, pure, and reverent from the earliestyears of manhood and it endeavors to perpetuate those habits in men.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Temperance
See Self-control .
Webster's Dictionary - Woman's Christian Temperance Union
An association of women formed in the United States in 1874, for the advancement of temperance by organizing preventive, educational, evangelistic, social, and legal work.
Webster's Dictionary - Temperance
(1):
(v. t.) Habitual moderation in regard to the indulgence of the natural appetites and passions; restrained or moderate indulgence; moderation; as, temperance in eating and drinking; temperance in the indulgence of joy or mirth; specifically, moderation, and sometimes abstinence, in respect to using intoxicating liquors.
(2):
(v. t.) State with regard to heat or cold; temperature.
(3):
(v. t.) Moderation of passion; patience; calmness; sedateness.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Temperance, Temperate
A — 1: ἐγκράτεια (Strong's #1466 — Noun Feminine — enkrateia — eng-krat'-i-ah ) from kratos, "strength," occurs in Acts 24:25 ; Galatians 5:23 ; 2 Peter 1:6 (twice), in all of which it is rendered "temperance;" the RV marg., "self-control" is the preferable rendering, as "temperance" is now limited to one form of self-control; the various powers bestowed by God upon man are capable of abuse; the right use demands the controlling power of the will under the operation of the Spirit of God; in Acts 24:25 the word follows "righteousness," which represents God's claims, self-control being man's response thereto; in 2 Peter 1:6 , it follows "knowledge," suggesting that what is learned requires to be put into practice.
B — 1: ἐγκρατής (Strong's #1468 — Adjective — enkrates — eng-krat-ace' ) akin to A, denotes "exercising self-control," rendered "temperate" in Titus 1:8 .
B — 2: νηφάλιος (Strong's #3524 — Adjective — nephalios — nah-fal'-eh-os, nay-fal'-ee-os ) for which see SOBER , is translated "temperate" in 1 Timothy 3:2 , RV (AV, "vigilant"); in 1 Timothy 3:11 ; Titus 2:2 , RV (AV, "sober").
Note: In Titus 2:2 , AV, sophron, "sober," is rendered "temperate" (RV, "soberminded").
C — 1: ἐγκρατεύομαι (Strong's #1467 — Verb — enkrateuomai — eng-krat-yoo'-om-ahee ) akin to A and B, No. 1, rendered "is temperate" in 1 Corinthians 9:25 , is used figuratively of the rigid self-control practiced by athletes with a view to gaining the prize. See CONTINENCY.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sons of Temperance
An organization whose members are so bound to secrecy that they may not disclose its purposes, practises, or activities to competent civilor ecclesiastical authority. As such secrecy may be and commonly is used as an instrument for the benefit of the members to the disadvantage of others in the community, and as it has been too frequently used to control and use civilauthority lor questionable political purposes, usually to the detriment of religion, the Church considers such organizations unlawful. Some of them, moreover, as for instance the Freemasons, are really sectarian bodies, having their own formulas of belief about God, the soul, conscience, etc., and their own secret as well as public ritual, so that a Catholic may not consistently belong to them any more than he may be a member of any other Church than his own. Among the societies, specially forbidden are the Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, and Sons of Temperance.
Masons or Freemasons
An international fraternal organization, dating in its present form from the first quarter of the 18th century, although reputed by some to date from earliest antiquity. The Universal Manual of Freemasonry defines it as, "the activity of closely united men who, employing symbolical forms borrowed principally from the mason's trade and from architecture, work for the welfare of mankind, striving morally to enoble themselves and others and thereby to bring about a universal league of mankind, which they aspire to exhibit even now on a small scale." Freemasonry professes the empiric or positivist geometrical method of reason and deduction in the investigation of truth, is essentially Naturalism, hence opposed to Supernaturalism, and is opposed not only to Catholicism and Christianity, but also to the whole system of supernatural truth. It systematically promotes religious indifferentism, and its ultimate purpose is "the overthrow of the whole religious, political, and social order based on Christian institutions and the establishment of a new state of things according to their own ideas and based in its principles and laws on pure Naturalism." Although claiming religious toleration as one of its principles. it openly attacks Catholicity. Since 1738 Catholics are under penalty of excommunication incurred ipso facto and reserved to the pope, strictly forbidden to enter Masonic societies or promote them in any way.
Independent Order of Odd Fellows
An international, fraternal, beneficiary society with headquarters in the United States. It was formed in England in 1812 as an outgrowth of rivalry to the Masons, introduced into America in 1819. Its distinctive feature is financial care of sick and distressed members and their families.
Knights of Pythias
A benevolent and charitable society founded in Washington, DC in 1864 by prominent Freemasons headed by J. H. Rathbone.
Sons of Temperance
An order founded in New York in 1842, and introduced into England in 1846, with the object of making permanent the temperance movement of that time. The organization had a highly restricted membership as a man had to be nominated by an existing member and pass an investigation by three other brothers. There was a two-dollar initiation fee, equal to a week’s wages of an ordinary worker. It had secret rituals, signs, passwords, hand grips and regalia, acted as an insurance company, required its members to visit the sick, and paid death benefits and funeral expenses.
A decree of January 18, 1896 allows a nominal membership in the last three, if these conditions are fulfilled:
that the society was entered in good faith,
that there be no scandal,
that grave temporal injury would result from withdrawal, and
that there be no danger of perversion
King James Dictionary - Temperance
TEM'PERANCE, n. L. temperantia, from tempero.
1. Moderation particularly, habitual moderation in regard to the indulgence of the natural appetites and passions restrained or moderate indulgence as temperance in eating and drinking temperance in the indulgence of joy or mirth. Temperance in eating and drinking is opposed to gluttony and drunkenness, and in other indulgences, to excess. 2. Patience calmness sedateness moderation of passion. He calm'd his wrath with goodly temperance. Unusual.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Temperance
(See CHURCH TEMPERANCE SOCIETY.)
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Temperance
TEMPERANCE.—In the Sermon on the Mount Christ dwells on the restraint under which not only our actions and our words must be held, but also our thoughts. He sees in the angry thought the germ of murder, in the impure thought the germ of adultery, and so He goes to the root of the matter. It is of no use to try to cleanse the stream at a certain point in its course, if the fountain from which it flows is impure; if the stream is to be kept pure the fountain must be kept pure; and if the words and actions are to be under control, the thoughts of the heart must be under control. It is from within, out of the heart, that all kinds of irregularities proceed, therefore ‘keep thy heart with all diligence,’ or, as in the marginal note, ‘above all that thou guardest, for out of it are the issues of life’ (Proverbs 4:23).
In the parable of the Prodigal Son we see the depth of degradation into which a man is brought when he breaks away from his God. In the case of the prodigal, the initial step was taken when the undisciplined thought was harboured in the heart. His mind fretted and rebelled against the restraints of his father’s house, he wished to go out into the world and to see life, he wanted to be free from all control. The next step was the undisciplined word, ‘Give me the portion of thy substance that falleth to me.’ And the final step was the undisciplined act, ‘He took his journey into a far country, and there he wasted his substance with riotous living.’ Here the thought first ran riot, and the rest followed.
Christianity, therefore, is a religion not merely for a part of our being, but for the whole man; it touches him in every relationship of life and in every aspect of that relationship. It teaches him to ‘live soberly, righteously, and godly in this present world’ (Titus 2:12). While righteousness represents his attitude towards his fellow-men and godliness his attitude towards God, soberness represents his attitude towards himself. Soberness (σωφροσύνη) is a right balance in all things; it is the bringing of the lower part of the nature into subjection to the higher, the flesh into subjection to the spirit; it means the spirit of man, guided by the Holy Spirit of God, governing the soul or intellect; then the soul or intellect, thus sanctified, governing the flesh; and the whole man, body, soul, and spirit, kept under control, held in hand, just as a spirited horse is held in hand by an experienced rider; moving on, not torn asunder by conflicting interests, but advancing steadily in one direction upwards and heavenwards.
A temperate man is one who rules himself, who lets every act that he performs have its own proper place, who gives everything its own due proportion, who does not eat too much, drink too much, sleep too much, talk too much, or do anything in excess. We live in days when there is an inordinate craving for amusement: amusements have their place, and, within limits, are not only necessary but good for us; but when they absorb so large a portion of our life that its more serious duties have to give place to them, then they become extremely hurtful. They should be regarded as sidings off the main line of our life, opportunities for recruiting our tired and weary energies, so that we may return to our work with renewed vigour; and when thus used they are very helpful. A temperate man will exercise self-control with regard to these as well as in all other matters.
But while temperance is an all-round virtue, the term has come to be used very largely with reference to self-control in a particular direction, viz. in the matter of strong drink. When we speak of ‘the Temperance cause’ or ‘Temperance work,’ we generally mean the efforts that are being made to suppress intemperance in the use of alcohol. Our Temperance Societies are directed towards this object, and so the word ‘temperance’ has come to be used almost exclusively in this connexion; and it cannot be denied that there is some justification for it, because the effects of the abuse of strong drink are so patent and so terrible that they attract attention in a way that few other sins do. Temperance is not necessarily total abstinence; it is the use, as distinct from the abuse, of strong drink. Total abstinence may be necessary; for the inveterate drunkard it is necessary; for him the only remedy, under God, is to abstain altogether from that which he cannot use in strict moderation (cf. Jesus’ words in Matthew 5:29-30). Again it may be necessary for others besides drunkards, viz., for those who are to rescue the victims of strong drink, for we all know that example is far more powerful than precept; we are far more likely to be able to help those who have fallen into this abyss by saying to them, ‘Do as we do,’ than by saying, ‘Do as we tell you.’
But while total abstinence may be necessary for some, especially for those of us who are working in the slums of our large towns, it is not enjoined upon all; the strictly moderate use of alcohol cannot be said to be a sin; and to speak of it as though it were a sin, as has sometimes been done, is only to weaken the cause that we have at heart; it is the abuse of it that is a sin, and therefore, while abstinence is not enjoined upon all, temperance is enjoined upon every Christian man and woman.
Our Lord tells us what is the end and aim of our fallen but redeemed and regenerate humanity, ‘Ye therefore shall be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect’ (Matthew 5:48). This is the goal set before us; and to reach this goal our attitude must be that of the spiritual athlete, straining every nerve and exerting every muscle, keeping under the body and bringing it into subjection, running the race set before us, ‘looking unto Jesus’ (Hebrews 12:2), looking unto Him as our example, looking unto Him for strength, pressing onward from stage to stage, from strength to strength, from one degree of perfection unto another, ‘unto a full-grown man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ’ (Ephesians 4:13).
And here our Lord stands before us as our Ideal. The Jesus of the Gospels presents to us a life which is the very embodiment of temperance, a life of perfect self-restraint, of complete self-mastery; a life free from excess on the one hand and defect on the other, well-balanced, well-proportioned, without flaw, without spot, perfect in all its parts; a life which had for its object the glory of God, from the time when He came into the world, saying, ‘Lo, I come to do thy will, O my God’ (Hebrews 10:7), to the time when, having finished all, He exclaimed with the voice of a conqueror, ‘I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do’ (John 17:4). To copy this perfect Ideal and to reach this goal we, by a life lived in union with Him and by the power of the Holy Ghost, must strive to be temperate in all things. See, further, art. Self-Control.
Rowland Ellis.

Sentence search

Temperance - Moderation particularly, habitual moderation in regard to the indulgence of the natural appetites and passions restrained or moderate indulgence as Temperance in eating and drinking Temperance in the indulgence of joy or mirth. Temperance in eating and drinking is opposed to gluttony and drunkenness, and in other indulgences, to excess. He calm'd his wrath with goodly Temperance
Moderation - See Temperance
Temperancy - ) Temperance
Attemperance - ) Temperance; attemperament
Self-Control - See Temperance
Sobriety - See Temperance, 1
Temperance - (See CHURCH Temperance SOCIETY
Wine - See Abstinence, Drunkenness, Eucharist, Temperance
Wine - See Abstinence, Drunkenness, Eucharist, Temperance
Abstinence - In the latter sense, it may coincide with Temperance, but in general, it denotes a more sparing use of enjoyments than Temperance. Besides, abstinence implies previous free indulgence Temperance does not
Temperateness - ) The quality or state of being temperate; moderateness; Temperance
Temperance - ) Habitual moderation in regard to the indulgence of the natural appetites and passions; restrained or moderate indulgence; moderation; as, Temperance in eating and drinking; Temperance in the indulgence of joy or mirth; specifically, moderation, and sometimes abstinence, in respect to using intoxicating liquors
Virtues, Cardinal - The four principal virtues upon which the rest of the moral virtues turn, namely justice, prudence, Temperance, and fortitude
Mediocrity - ) Moderation; Temperance
Cardinal Virtues - Justice, prudence, Temperance, and fortitude, are called the four cardinal virtues, as being the basis of all the rest
Woman's Christian Temperance Union - An association of women formed in the United States in 1874, for the advancement of Temperance by organizing preventive, educational, evangelistic, social, and legal work
Abstemiousness - It expresses a greater degree of abstinence than Temperance
Mathew, Theobald - Also known as Apostle of Temperance ...
Profile Joined the Capuchin Order in 1808. In 1838, in order to combat the widespread drunkenness in Ireland, he inaugurated the Temperance movement which has become historic
Church Temperance Society - This Society was organized in 1881,and has for its object the promotion of Temperance in itsstrict meaning. Training the young in habits oftemperance. The Church Temperance Legion deals with boys, seeking toinduce them to keep sober, pure, and reverent from the earliestyears of manhood and it endeavors to perpetuate those habits in men
Theobald Mathew - Also known as Apostle of Temperance ...
Profile Joined the Capuchin Order in 1808. In 1838, in order to combat the widespread drunkenness in Ireland, he inaugurated the Temperance movement which has become historic
Washingtonian - ) Designating, or pertaining to, a Temperance society and movement started in Baltimore in 1840 on the principle of total abstinence
Meekness - It is reducible to Temperance
Intemperance - ...
See article Temperance
Venerable - The virtues are the Theological Virtues of faith, hope and charity and the Cardinal Virtues of prudence, justice, fortitude and Temperance
Abstemious - ) Sparingly used; used with Temperance or moderation; as, an abstemious diet
Temperate - ) Proceeding from Temperance
Infused Virtue - , prudence or Temperance, but is caused, or given, or poured into our souls from above and is therefore supernatural, like faith, hope, charity, and also the natural virtues, when sanctifying grace is given to us in order to practise them more easily and perfectly
Drusilla - She was present with Felix when Paul reasoned of "righteousness, Temperance, and judgment to come" (Acts 24:24 )
Virtue, Infused - , prudence or Temperance, but is caused, or given, or poured into our souls from above and is therefore supernatural, like faith, hope, charity, and also the natural virtues, when sanctifying grace is given to us in order to practise them more easily and perfectly
Temperance - "Temperance, " says Addison, "has those particular advantages above all other means of health, that it may be practised by all ranks and conditions at any season or in any place. Physic, for the most part, is nothing else but the substitute of exercise, or Temperance. ...
See INTEMPERANCE, SOBRIETY
Mean, Golden - (Latin: medium, middle) ...
The mid-way or mean between extremes; the law or norm of virtue according to the Roman adage: In media stat virtus (virtue is in the middle), like the fulcrum of a balance; the supreme characteristic and merit of the Catholic Church, always avoiding excess and deficiency, as in the matter of Temperance, recreation, labor, Sunday observance, and in all other regulations of Christian life
Modesty - It is a part of Temperance, and its outward expression
Golden Mean - (Latin: medium, middle) ...
The mid-way or mean between extremes; the law or norm of virtue according to the Roman adage: In media stat virtus (virtue is in the middle), like the fulcrum of a balance; the supreme characteristic and merit of the Catholic Church, always avoiding excess and deficiency, as in the matter of Temperance, recreation, labor, Sunday observance, and in all other regulations of Christian life
Virtues, the Cardinal - The four virtues, namely, Prudence, Justice,Temperance and Fortitude, which Solomon sets forth in the Book ofWisdom, VIII, 7, are called Cardinal Virtues because they are mostimportant in the Christian Life
Chaplain - ; as, a chaplain of a Masonic or a Temperance lodge
Drusilla - Paul reasoning on ‘righteousness and Temperance and the judgment to come’ ( Acts 24:25 )
Spirit, Fruits of the - Paul sets forth the Fruits of the Spirit asnine in number, viz: (1) Love, (2) Joy, (3) Peace, (4) Longsuffering,(5) Gentleness, (6) Goodness, (7) Faith, (8) Meekness, (9)Temperance. , "meekness andtemperance"—"meekness," by which is meant a due estimate of theplace which self ought to hold, and "Temperance," the rigorousdetermination to see to it that self is kept in place
Friendly - Temperance is friendly to longevity
Heroic Virtue - It means eminence in practise of the social or cardinal virtues, prudence, justice, Temperance, and fortitude, and in the theological or godly virtues, faith, hope, and charity
Virtue, Heroic - It means eminence in practise of the social or cardinal virtues, prudence, justice, Temperance, and fortitude, and in the theological or godly virtues, faith, hope, and charity
Temperance, Temperate - A — 1: ἐγκράτεια (Strong's #1466 — Noun Feminine — enkrateia — eng-krat'-i-ah ) from kratos, "strength," occurs in Acts 24:25 ; Galatians 5:23 ; 2 Peter 1:6 (twice), in all of which it is rendered "temperance;" the RV marg. , "self-control" is the preferable rendering, as "temperance" is now limited to one form of self-control; the various powers bestowed by God upon man are capable of abuse; the right use demands the controlling power of the will under the operation of the Spirit of God; in Acts 24:25 the word follows "righteousness," which represents God's claims, self-control being man's response thereto; in 2 Peter 1:6 , it follows "knowledge," suggesting that what is learned requires to be put into practice
Temperance - TEMPERANCE. ...
But while Temperance is an all-round virtue, the term has come to be used very largely with reference to self-control in a particular direction, viz. When we speak of ‘the Temperance cause’ or ‘Temperance work,’ we generally mean the efforts that are being made to suppress intemperance in the use of alcohol. Our Temperance Societies are directed towards this object, and so the word ‘temperance’ has come to be used almost exclusively in this connexion; and it cannot be denied that there is some justification for it, because the effects of the abuse of strong drink are so patent and so terrible that they attract attention in a way that few other sins do. Temperance is not necessarily total abstinence; it is the use, as distinct from the abuse, of strong drink. ’...
But while total abstinence may be necessary for some, especially for those of us who are working in the slums of our large towns, it is not enjoined upon all; the strictly moderate use of alcohol cannot be said to be a sin; and to speak of it as though it were a sin, as has sometimes been done, is only to weaken the cause that we have at heart; it is the abuse of it that is a sin, and therefore, while abstinence is not enjoined upon all, Temperance is enjoined upon every Christian man and woman. The Jesus of the Gospels presents to us a life which is the very embodiment of Temperance, a life of perfect self-restraint, of complete self-mastery; a life free from excess on the one hand and defect on the other, well-balanced, well-proportioned, without flaw, without spot, perfect in all its parts; a life which had for its object the glory of God, from the time when He came into the world, saying, ‘Lo, I come to do thy will, O my God’ (Hebrews 10:7), to the time when, having finished all, He exclaimed with the voice of a conqueror, ‘I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do’ (John 17:4)
Temperance - TEMPERANCE. ...
But while Temperance is an all-round virtue, the term has come to be used very largely with reference to self-control in a particular direction, viz. When we speak of ‘the Temperance cause’ or ‘Temperance work,’ we generally mean the efforts that are being made to suppress intemperance in the use of alcohol. Our Temperance Societies are directed towards this object, and so the word ‘temperance’ has come to be used almost exclusively in this connexion; and it cannot be denied that there is some justification for it, because the effects of the abuse of strong drink are so patent and so terrible that they attract attention in a way that few other sins do. Temperance is not necessarily total abstinence; it is the use, as distinct from the abuse, of strong drink. ’...
But while total abstinence may be necessary for some, especially for those of us who are working in the slums of our large towns, it is not enjoined upon all; the strictly moderate use of alcohol cannot be said to be a sin; and to speak of it as though it were a sin, as has sometimes been done, is only to weaken the cause that we have at heart; it is the abuse of it that is a sin, and therefore, while abstinence is not enjoined upon all, Temperance is enjoined upon every Christian man and woman. The Jesus of the Gospels presents to us a life which is the very embodiment of Temperance, a life of perfect self-restraint, of complete self-mastery; a life free from excess on the one hand and defect on the other, well-balanced, well-proportioned, without flaw, without spot, perfect in all its parts; a life which had for its object the glory of God, from the time when He came into the world, saying, ‘Lo, I come to do thy will, O my God’ (Hebrews 10:7), to the time when, having finished all, He exclaimed with the voice of a conqueror, ‘I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do’ (John 17:4)
Virtue - ) A particular moral excellence; as, the virtue of Temperance, of charity, etc
Temperate - Proceeding from Temperance as temperate sleep
Consist - ...
Health consists with Temperance alone
Templar - Also, one of an order among Temperance men, styled Good Templars
Essenes', - Self-denial, Temperance and labor --especially agriculture-- were the marks of the outward life of the Essenes; purity and divine communion the objects of their aspiration
Felix - Paul, when sent a prisoner to Caesarea, appeared before Felix; and again before him and his wife Drusilla; and as Paul reasoned of righteousness, Temperance and judgement to come, Felix trembled, and said when he had a convenient season he would send for him
Odd Fellows, Order of - Among the societies, specially forbidden are the Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, and Sons of Temperance. ...
Sons of Temperance ...
An order founded in New York in 1842, and introduced into England in 1846, with the object of making permanent the Temperance movement of that time
Freemasonry - Among the societies, specially forbidden are the Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, and Sons of Temperance. ...
Sons of Temperance ...
An order founded in New York in 1842, and introduced into England in 1846, with the object of making permanent the Temperance movement of that time
Independent Order of Odd Fellows - Among the societies, specially forbidden are the Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, and Sons of Temperance. ...
Sons of Temperance ...
An order founded in New York in 1842, and introduced into England in 1846, with the object of making permanent the Temperance movement of that time
Knights of Pythias - Among the societies, specially forbidden are the Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, and Sons of Temperance. ...
Sons of Temperance ...
An order founded in New York in 1842, and introduced into England in 1846, with the object of making permanent the Temperance movement of that time
International Order of Odd Fellows - Among the societies, specially forbidden are the Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, and Sons of Temperance. ...
Sons of Temperance ...
An order founded in New York in 1842, and introduced into England in 1846, with the object of making permanent the Temperance movement of that time
Masonry - Among the societies, specially forbidden are the Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, and Sons of Temperance. ...
Sons of Temperance ...
An order founded in New York in 1842, and introduced into England in 1846, with the object of making permanent the Temperance movement of that time
Masons - Among the societies, specially forbidden are the Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, and Sons of Temperance. ...
Sons of Temperance ...
An order founded in New York in 1842, and introduced into England in 1846, with the object of making permanent the Temperance movement of that time
Sons of Temperance - Among the societies, specially forbidden are the Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, and Sons of Temperance. ...
Sons of Temperance ...
An order founded in New York in 1842, and introduced into England in 1846, with the object of making permanent the Temperance movement of that time
Secret Societies - Among the societies, specially forbidden are the Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, and Sons of Temperance. ...
Sons of Temperance ...
An order founded in New York in 1842, and introduced into England in 1846, with the object of making permanent the Temperance movement of that time
Societies, Secret - Among the societies, specially forbidden are the Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows, and Sons of Temperance. ...
Sons of Temperance ...
An order founded in New York in 1842, and introduced into England in 1846, with the object of making permanent the Temperance movement of that time
Repair - Temperance and diet may repair a broken or enfeebled constitution
Wine - " This declarationby both these bodies was called forth by the agitation of the"Temperance people
Edward vi - "Grammar schools" imputed to Edward's foundation, were but the partial restoration of the chantry and monastery schools disbanded under Henry; the necessity for "temperance" and "poor" laws was the result of the disappearance of the moral and material influence of the old religious order
Organizations, Church - Barnabasfor Nurses; Church Temperance Society; Missions among Deaf Mutes;etc
Transformations of Grace - Where fetid exhalations of vice alone ascended, prayer and praise are to be found; where moral miasmata had their lair, righteousness and Temperance pitch their tent
Drusilla - Paul had audience of Felix, and used the opportunity to reason ‘of righteousness, and Temperance, and the judgment to come
Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius - Directions are supplied on the use of these exercises, on prayer, the Sacraments, Temperance, almsgiving, orthodox thinking, and the management of the movements of the soul
Manning, Henry Edward - His League of the Cross advanced the cause of Temperance, and in 1889 he successfully mediated between the employers and workers in the great London Dock strike
Henry Manning - His League of the Cross advanced the cause of Temperance, and in 1889 he successfully mediated between the employers and workers in the great London Dock strike
Temperance - Temperance . ]'>[1] ‘temperance’ is the tr. word ( nçphalios ) ‘temperate’ in 1 Timothy 3:2 ; 1 Timothy 3:11 , Titus 2:2 ; its root-meaning points to the avoidance of intemperance in the form of drunkenness, but in actual usage it condemns all forms of self-indulgence. 1 Timothy 3:8 ), and from this chapter it is plain that the Apostle regards violent quarrelling ( 1 Timothy 3:3 ), false and reckless speech ( 1 Timothy 3:8 ), self-conceit ( 1 Timothy 3:6 ), greed of filthy lucre ( 1 Timothy 3:8 ), as well as fondness for much wine ( 1 Timothy 3:8 ), as manifold forms of Intemperance by whose means men ‘fall into reproach and the snare of the devil’ ( 1 Timothy 3:7 )
Prudence - Plato styles prudence the leading virtue; and Cicero observes, "that not one of the virtues can want prudence, " which is certainly most true, since without prudence to guide them, piety would degenerate into superstition, zeal into bigotry, Temperance into austerity, courage into rashness, and justice itself into folly
Hypatia, Lady in Alexandria - She was reverenced and admired even the more for it, by reason of the noble Temperance of her disposition
Principles - ): ‘Since milk is the food of infants, but cakes of wheat (τὰ ἐκ πυρῶν πέμματα) are the food of full-grown men, so also the soul must have a milk-like nourishment in its age of childhood, namely, the elementary lessons of art and science (τὰ τῆς ἐγκυκλίου μουσικῆς προπαιδεύματα), but the perfect food which is for men is education in prudence, Temperance, and every virtue
Theodotus, Patriarch of Antioch - He is described by Theodoret, at one time one of his presbyters, as "the pearl of Temperance," "adorned with a splendid life and a knowledge of the divine dogmas" (Theod
Confidence - ’ He mentions, too, many wonderful gifts of God-‘life in immortality, splendour in righteousness, truth in boldness, faith in confidence, and Temperance in sanctification’ (xxxv
Felix - At the second Paul, before Felix and Drusilla, Felix's Jewish wife, who was curious to "hear him concerning the faith of Christ," so reasoned of "righteousness and Temperance (both of which Felix outraged as a governor and a man, having seduced from her husband) and judgment to come" that Felix "trembled" before his prisoner, but deferred repentance, saying, "when I have a convenient season I will call for thee
Prosperity - The principal virtue of prosperity, is Temperance; the principal virtue of adversity, is fortitude, which in morality is allowed to be the most heroical virtue; prosperity best discovers vice, adversity best discovers virtue, which is like those perfumes that are most fragrant when burnt or bruised
Claudius - The Apostle spoke with his usual boldness, and discoursed to them on justice, Temperance, and the last judgment
Pagan - Plato held that the highest good consisted in imitation of God, the Absolute Good, only partly realizable in this life; virtue was the ordering of conduct according to the dictates of right reason, and included justice, Temperance, fortitude, and wisdom
Paganism - Plato held that the highest good consisted in imitation of God, the Absolute Good, only partly realizable in this life; virtue was the ordering of conduct according to the dictates of right reason, and included justice, Temperance, fortitude, and wisdom
Discipline - Matthew 6:19-20, 2 Timothy 2:16,); Temperance (Acts 24:25, 1 Corinthians 9:25, Galatians 5:23; cf. ’ If men are to become partakers of the Divine nature, and to escape the corruption that is in the world by lust, they must heed the injunction: ‘For this very cause adding on your part all diligence, in your faith supply virtue; and in your virtue knowledge; and in your knowledge Temperance; and in your Temperance patience; and in your patience godliness; and in your godliness love of the brethren; and in your love of the brethren love’ (see also 1 Corinthians 13 and 1 John 4:16)
Epicureans - The diseases of the body are to be prevented by Temperance, or cured by medicine, or endured tolerably by patience. Against the diseases of the mind philosophy provides sufficient antidotes; the virtues are its instruments for this purpose; the radical spring of which is prudence, or wisdom, and this instructs men to free their understanding from the clouds of prejudice; to exercise Temperance and fortitude in the government of themselves; and to practise justice toward all others
Parents - As it relates to the present life, habits of courage, application, trade, prudence, labour, justice, contentment, Temperance, truth, benevolence, &c
Hesychius (25), Presbyter of Jerusalem - Two Centuries of Moral Maxims on Temperance and Virtue and Instructions on Prayer, addressed to one Theodotus
Caesarea - ‘In the demonstration of the Spirit and of power,' the mighty advocate for the Christian faith had before ‘reasoned of righteousness, Temperance, and judgment to come,' till the Roman governor, Felix, trembled as he spoke
Excommunication - That it has been made an engine for the gratification of private malice and revenge, and been perverted to purposes the most unjustifiable and even diabolical, the history of the world but too lamentably proves; yet this, though unquestionably a consideration which ought to inculcate the necessity of prudence, as well as impartiality and Temperance in the use of it, affords no valid argument against its legitimate exercise
Feasts - Sometimes very large numbers were present, Esther 1:3,5 Luke 14:16-24 ; and on such occasions a "governor of the feast" was appointed, whose social qualities, tact, firmness, and Temperance fitted him to preside, John 2:8
Love-Feasts - Then, after water to wash our hands, and lights brought in, every one is moved to sing some hymn to God, either out of Scripture, or, as he is able, of his own composing, and by this we judge whether he has observed the rules of Temperance in drinking
Proverbs, Book of - If there is a Temperance lesson, it is only for the king; the advice to the poor and oppressed is very different (see Proverbs 30:6-7 )
Samson - But what avail'd this Temperance not completeAgainst another object more enticing?What boots it at one gate to make defence,And at another to let in the foe,Effeminately vanquished?. What avails this 'temperance not complete'?...
Young men are not raised up among us nowadays with Samson's size and strength
Wise, Skilled - “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, long-suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, Temperance: against such there is no law” ( Obsolete or Obscure Words in the English av Bible - ...
Temperance, Galatians 5:23—moderation; sedateness; self-control
Flavianus (4) i, Bishop of Antioch - Chrysostom, in his highly coloured eulogium pronounced on receiving priest's orders at his hands, records that he was remarkable from his earliest years for Temperance and contempt of luxury, although early deprived of parental control and exposed to temptations incident to youth, wealth, and good birth
Character - ’ In Galatians 5:22-23 they are thus given: ‘love, joy, peace, long-suffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, meekness, Temperance’; and in 2 Peter 1:5-8 : ‘faith, virtue, knowledge, Temperance, patience, godliness, brotherly kindness, and love
Hopkinsians - Universal good-will also implies the whole of the duty we owe to our neighbour, for justice, truth, and faithfulness, are comprised in universal benevolence; so are Temperance and chastity
Hopkinsians - So are Temperance and chastity; for an undue indulgence of our appetites and passions is contrary to benevolence, as tending to hurt ourselves or others, and so opposite to the general good, and the divine command
Hermas Shepherd of - The next three Mandates expand the provisions of the first-faith, fear, and Temperance. Contrasts are drawn between the two ways (and the two angels) of righteousness and wickedness, between the fear of God and the fear of the devil, and between Temperance as to what is evil, and indulgence in what is good
Manichees - The auditors were allowed to possess houses, lands, and wealth; to feed on flesh, to enter into the bonds of conjugal tenderness; but this liberty was granted them with many limitations, and under the strictest conditions of moderation and Temperance
Manliness - (3) There must be the moral qualities of courage, Temperance or self-control, perseverance, and love of personal honour
Knowledge - To reach its fullness it must be accompanied by abnegation (Philippians 3:6), by fellowship with God and with brethren (1 John 1:3), by obedience to God’s commands (1 John 2:3), by attention to apostolic teaching (1 John 4:6), and by faith, virtue, Temperance, patience, godliness, love of the brethren, and love (2 Peter 1:6)
Enoch - And though his family, and his friends, and his enemies did not know so much as the very name of the fruit of the Spirit, they all ate and drank that fruit in Enoch's walk and conversation; for the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, long-suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, Temperance, and such like
Peter (2) - It may be assumed from his later life that he was brought up by them in habits of Temperance, frugality, diligence, and piety
Ham - If a father would pray every day to God to inspire his children with true piety, great humility, and strict Temperance, what could be more likely to make the father himself become exemplary in these virtues? How naturally would he grow ashamed of wanting such virtues as he thought necessary for his children
Ethics - Faith, hope, love, transfigure and supplement the ancient virtues, Temperance, courage, wisdom, justice, while around them grow many gentle excellences not recognized before Christ gave them their true rank; and yet it is not by its wealth of moral teaching so much as by its assurance of ability to resist temptation and to attain spiritual manhood that Christianity has gained preeminence
Ethics - The Greek philosophers, while they differed in their views of that constituted the chief good, were agreed in accepting what are known as the four cardinal virtues-prudence, Temperance, fortitude, and justice-as the basis of their classification
Self-Control - Temperance
David - in His Races - ' Would you know? asks William Law in his beautiful chapter on singing psalms-would you know who is the greatest saint in the world? Well, it is not he who prays most or fasts most; it is not he who gives most alms, or is most eminent for Temperance, chastity, or justice; but it is he who is always thankful to God, who wills everything that God wills, and who receives everything as an instance of God's goodness, and has a heart always ready to praise God for His goodness
Ephesians Epistle to the - Temperance and orderly thanksgiving in public worship, and in particular at the love-feasts (in the spirit of 1 Corinthians 11-14)
Christian Life - The gentler virtues which found no place in pagan ethics, such as sincerity, humility, reasonableness (Philippians 4:5), patience, meekness, brotherly love, kindness (Galatians 5:22), are united with love and Temperance or self-control; while joy, peace, and thankfulness (cf
Conscience - Paul reasoned of righteousness, Temperance, and judgment to come (Acts 24:25)-all these are examples of the authority of conscience
Jesus Christ - His Temperance has not the dark shades of austerity; his meekness does not degenerate into apathy; his humility is signal, amidst a splendour of qualities more than human; his fortitude is eminent and exemplary in enduring the most formidable external evils, and the sharpest actual sufferings
Thecla - In this house Paul began at once to preach "the word of God concerning Temperance and the resurrection"; his discourse consisting of a series of beatitudes in form like those of the Sermon on the Mount but in substance taken up with the commendation of asceticism and celibacy
Holiness - … The most probable way to make Felix tremble is to reason with him of righteousness, Temperance, and judgment to come
Acts of the Apostles (2) - Paul discourses (Acts 24:24) of ‘the faith in Christ Jesus,’ the subjects of his address are given in Acts 24:25 as ‘righteousness, Temperance, and judgment to come
Faith - is at one with all the apostles in saying to Christians that when they become partakers of the Divine nature (2 Peter 1:4) they are bound to add to the faith-that is fundamental-virtue, knowledge, Temperance, patience, godliness, love of the brethren, love
Faith - is at one with all the apostles in saying to Christians that when they become partakers of the Divine nature (2 Peter 1:4) they are bound to add to the faith-that is fundamental-virtue, knowledge, Temperance, patience, godliness, love of the brethren, love
Socialism - Individual character cannot be regenerated while it is being destroyed by bad housing, or by intemperance, or by commercial selfishness and dishonesty, or while multitudes are ‘submerged’ and ‘sweated. As for the prayer against temptation, the Temperance movement alone shows that British Christianity has appreciated the social significance of that clause; and in other matters it is clear that, if the worship of Mammon be the antithesis of the worship of God, a society based upon commercial competition is constantly leading its members into the gravest temptation of all
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - ...
We have said enough about the Christian life; about faith, repentance, love, Temperance, sobriety, patience, righteousness, truth, longsuffering
Worship - And Clemens of Alexandria says, in reference to the signet rings of the Christians, "Let our signet rings consist of a dove," the emblem of the Holy Ghost, "or a fish, or a ship sailing toward heaven," the emblem of the Christian church, or of individual Christian souls, "or a lyre," the emblem of Christian joy, "or an anchor," the emblem of Christian hope; "and he who is a fisherman, let him remember the Apostle, and the children who were dragged out from the water; for those men ought not to engrave idolatrous forms, to whom the use of them is forbidden; those can engrave no sword and no bow, who seek for peace; the friends of Temperance cannot engrave drinking cups
Jesus Christ - His Temperance has not the dark shades of austerity; his meekness does not degenerate into apathy