What does Talent mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
τάλαντον the scale of a balance 2
כִּכַּר־ round. 2
וְכִכַּ֥ר round. 2
כִּכָּ֛ר round. 2
ταλαντιαία a weight or worth of a talent. 1
τάλαντόν the scale of a balance 1
כִכַּר־ round. 1
כִּכַּ֤ר round. 1
כִּכָּ֥ר round. 1

Definitions Related to Talent

H3603


   1 round.
      1a a round district (environs of the Jordan valley).
      1b a round loaf (of bread).
      1c a round weight, Talent (of gold, silver, bronze, iron).
      

G5007


   1 the scale of a balance, a balance, a pair of scales.
   2 that which is weighed, a Talent.
      2a a weight varying in different places and times.
      2b a sum of money weighing a Talent and varying in different states and according to the changes in the laws regulating currency.
         2b1 the Attic Talent was equal to 60 Attic minae or 6000 drachmae.
         2b2 a Talent of silver in Israel weighed about 100 pounds (45 kg).
         2b3 a Talent of gold in Israel weighed about 200 pounds (91 kg).
         

G5006


   1 a weight or worth of a Talent.
      1a a Talent of silver weighed about 100 pounds (45 kg).
      1b a Talent of gold, 200 pounds (91 kg).
      

Frequency of Talent (original languages)

Frequency of Talent (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Talent
TALENT . See Money, Weights and Measures.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Talent
[1]
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Talent
As a translation of the adjectival ταλαντιαία (fem. sing. [1] ), ‘weighing a talent,’ this word is found only in Revelation 16:21. The reference is to weight, and not to money. Even with the recovery of a supposed actual specimen (see article ‘Weights and Measures’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) iv. 906) we are still dependent on an average estimate of the weight of a talent. This may be given as a little over 90 lb. avoirdupois (= 125 librae, Roman). This means that each hailstone was about as much as a man of average strength can lift. It is usual to compare Josephus, Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) V. vi. 3, where stones cast by engines of war are spoken of in similar terms.
W. Cruickshank.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Talent
Figuratively, signifies any gift or opportunity God gives to men for the promotion of his glory. "Every thing almost, " says Mr. Scott, "that we are, or possess, or meet with, may be considered as a talent; for a good or a bad use may be made of every natural endowment, or providential appointment, or they may remain unoccupied through inactivity and selfishness. Time, health, vigour of body, and the power of exertion and enduring fatigue
the natural and acquired abilities of the mind, skill in any lawful art or science, and the capacity for close mental application
the gift of speech, and that of speaking with fluency and propriety, and in a convincing, attractive, or persuasive manner
wealth, influence, or authority
a man's situation in the church, the community, or relative life
and the various occurences which make way for him to attempt any thing of a beneficial tendency; these, and many others that can scarcely be enumerated, are talents which the consistent Christian will improve to the glory of God, and the benefit of mankind. Nay, this improvement procures an increase of talents, and gives a man an accession of influence, and an accumulating power of doing good; because it tends to establish his reputation for prudence, piety, integrity, sincerity, and disinterested benevolence: it gradually forms him to an habitual readiness to engage in the beneficent designs, and to conduct them in a gentle, unobstrusive and unassuming manner: it disposes others to regard him with increasing confidence and affection, and to approach him with satisfaction; and it procures for him the countenance of many persons, whose assistance he can employ in accomplishing his own salutary purposes."
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Talent
Of silver contained 3,000 shekels (Exodus 38:25,26 ), and was equal to 94 3/7 lbs. avoirdupois. The Greek talent, however, as in the LXX., was only 82 1/4 lbs. It was in the form of a circular mass, as the Hebrew name Kikkar Denotes. A talent of gold was double the weight of a talent of silver ( 2 Samuel 12:30 ). Parable of the talents (Matthew 18:24 ; 25:15 ).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Talent (2)
TALENT.—See Money.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Talent
The talent was the heaviest weight used in Israel in Bible times. It weighed approximately 50 kilogram (110 pounds), was equal to 3,000 shekels, and was used mainly in weighing metals (Exodus 38:27). Large quantities of money were usually weighed in talents, smaller quantities in shekels (1 Kings 10:10; 2 Kings 15:19; 2 Kings 18:14).
Silver was the metal most commonly used for money. Unless otherwise stated, a talent, when used as a monetary unit, meant a talent of silver (1 Kings 16:24; Ezra 8:25-27; Matthew 18:23-24; Matthew 25:14-16). (See also COINS; WEIGHTS.)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Talent
See Weights and Measures .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Talent
(See MONEY.) Attic talent = 193 British pounds, 15 shillings. The Hebrew talent was 3,000 shekels; if the shekel is 2 shillings, 6 pence = 375 British pounds. Hebrew kibbar , "a globe."
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Talent
Called in Hebrew Chiquar. In gold, it was worth 54,752 1. and in silver 342 1. or thereabouts.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Talent
Zechariah 5:7 (b) Some students think that this represents the weight of sin that will encompass the business dealings of Israel. It may indicate that false weights and balances are used in their commerce.
Matthew 25:15 (b) The talents represent the quality of the gifts given to Christians for the service of the Lord. Some are unusually gifted for great works and deeds in the Gospel and in the church. Others are not so well gifted, but are able to do their work according to their knowledge, education and zeal. (See under "POUND").
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Talent
See WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Talent
Talent. See Measures and Weights. Exodus 25:39; Exodus 37:24; 2 Samuel 12:30; Matthew 25:25. A Jewish talent in weight contained about 3000 shekels, and is estimated to equal 125 pounds Troy measure. Reckoning silver at about 60 cents an ounce, a talent of silver would then be equal to about $1000. A talent of gold by the Oxford tables is estimated equal to $28,280, and about $27,300 by Bagster's Bible tables. An Attic talent was equal to about $960. This may be alluded to in Matthew 18:24. Talents of silver, by weight, are frequently mentioned in the Old Testament. Exodus 38:27; 1 Kings 20:39; 1 Kings 2:1-46; 1 Chronicles 29:7. Talents of gold are also noticed. Exodus 25:39; 2 Chronicles 36:3; 1 Chronicles 29:7. Also a talent of lead. Zechariah 5:7. See Money.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Talent
a measure of weight among the ancients, equivalent to sixty maneh, or one hundred and thirteen pounds ten ounces one pennyweight and ten grains. The value of a talent of silver was three hundred and forty- two pounds three shillings and nine-pence, and a talent of gold was equal to five thousand four hundred and seventy-five pounds sterling. In the writings of the evangelists, the term is employed to denote the various gifts or opportunities for usefulness which the Lord of heaven confers upon his servants, and for which he will call them to give in their account at the last day, Matthew 25:15 ; Luke 19:12 .
Webster's Dictionary - Talent
(1):
(v. t.) Among the ancient Greeks, a weight and a denomination of money equal to 60 minae or 6,000 drachmae. The Attic talent, as a weight, was about 57 lbs. avoirdupois; as a denomination of silver money, its value was £243 15s. sterling, or about $1,180.
(2):
(v. t.) Inclination; will; disposition; desire.
(3):
(v. t.) Intellectual ability, natural or acquired; mental endowment or capacity; skill in accomplishing; a special gift, particularly in business, art, or the like; faculty; a use of the word probably originating in the Scripture parable of the talents (Matt. xxv. 14-30).
(4):
(v. t.) Among the Hebrews, a weight and denomination of money. For silver it was equivalent to 3,000 shekels, and in weight was equal to about 93/ lbs. avoirdupois; as a denomination of silver, it has been variously estimated at from £340 to £396 sterling, or about $1,645 to $1,916. For gold it was equal to 10,000 gold shekels.
King James Dictionary - Talent
TAL'ENT, n. L. talentum Gr. to bear, allied to L. tollo. The word is said to have originally signified a balance or scales.
1. Among the ancients, a weight, and a coin. The true value of the talent cannot well be ascertained, but it is known that it was different among different nations. The Attic Talent, the weight, contained 60 Attic minae, or 6000 Attic drachmae, equal to 56 pounds, eleven ounces, English troy weight. The mina being reckoned equal to f3 4s.7d. sterling, or fourteen dollars and a third nearly, the talent was of the value of f193 15s sterling, about dollars. Other computations make it f225 sterling. The Romans had the great talent and the little talent the great talent is computed to be equal to f99 6s. 8d. sterling, and the little talent to f75 sterling.
2. Talent, among the Hebrews, was also a gold coin, the same with a shekel of gold called also stater, and weighing only four drachmas. But the Hebrew talent of silver, called cicar, was equivalent to three thousand shekels, or one hundred and thirteen pounds, ten ounces and a fraction, troy weight.
3. Faculty natural gift or endowment a metaphorical application of the word, said to be borrowed from the Scriptural parable of the talents. Matthew 25 He is chiefly to be considered in his three different talents, as a critic, a satirist, and a writer of odes.
'Tis not my talent to conceal my thoughts.
4. Eminent abilities superior genius as, he is a man of talents. Talent, in the singular, is sometimes used in a like sense.
5. Particular faculty skill. He has a talent at drawing. 6. Sp. talante, manner of performing any thing, will, disposition. Quality disposition.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Talent
This was a weight used among the Jews, Greeks, and Romans, but varying exceedingly in different countries and in different parts of the same country. The Jewish talent is usually estimated at about 125 pounds troy weight, though others estimate it a little less then 114 pounds troy. The common Attic talent was equal, on the usual estimate, to about 56 lbs. 11 oz. troy. In the New Testament, a talent is a denomination of money, which was anciently reckoned by weight. The value of the talent, therefore, varied in different countries, in proportion to the different weights of the talent. The Jewish talent appear, from Exodus 38:25,26 , to have been equal to 3,000 shekels; and as the shekel is estimated at about fifty cents, the value of the talent would be about 1,5000 dollars. The Attic talent is usually reckoned at about 225 pounds sterling, or 1,000 dollars, though others make it only about 860 dollars. The talent spoken of in the New Testament is probably the Jewish, and is used only of an indefinitely large sum, Matthew 18:24 ; 25:14-30 .
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Talent
A — 1: τάλαντον (Strong's #5007 — Noun Neuter — talanton — tal'-an-ton ) originally "a balance," then, "a talent in weight," was hence "a sum of money" in gold or silver equivalent to a "talent." The Jewish "talent" contained 3,000 shekels of the sanctuary, e.g., Exodus 30:13 (about 114 lbs.). In NT times the "talent" was not a weight of silver, but the Roman-Attic "talent," comprising 6,000 denarii or drachmas, and equal to about f240. It is mentioned in Matthew only, Matthew 18:24 ; 25:15,16,20 (twice in the best texts),22 (thrice),24,25,28 (twice). In Matthew 18:24 the vastness of the sum, 10,000 talents (f2,400,000), indicates the impossibility of man's clearing himself, by his own efforts, of the guilt which lies upon him before God.
Note: That the "talent" denoted "something weighed" has provided the meaning of the Eng. word as "a gift or ability," especially under the influence of the parable of the talents (Matthew 25:14-30 ).
B — 1: ταλαντιαῖος (Strong's #5006 — Adjective — talantiaios — tal-an-tee-ah'-yos ) denotes "of a talent's weight," Revelation 16:21 .

Sentence search

Pound - ) A Greek pound; a money of account; 60 in the Talent; the weight depended on that of the Talent. The Attic Talent then was usual in Palestine
Talent - The Jewish Talent is usually estimated at about 125 pounds troy weight, though others estimate it a little less then 114 pounds troy. The common Attic Talent was equal, on the usual estimate, to about 56 lbs. In the New Testament, a Talent is a denomination of money, which was anciently reckoned by weight. The value of the Talent, therefore, varied in different countries, in proportion to the different weights of the Talent. The Jewish Talent appear, from Exodus 38:25,26 , to have been equal to 3,000 shekels; and as the shekel is estimated at about fifty cents, the value of the Talent would be about 1,5000 dollars. The Attic Talent is usually reckoned at about 225 pounds sterling, or 1,000 dollars, though others make it only about 860 dollars. The Talent spoken of in the New Testament is probably the Jewish, and is used only of an indefinitely large sum, Matthew 18:24 ; 25:14-30
Talent - Talentum Gr. The true value of the Talent cannot well be ascertained, but it is known that it was different among different nations. The Attic Talent, the weight, contained 60 Attic minae, or 6000 Attic drachmae, equal to 56 pounds, eleven ounces, English troy weight. sterling, or fourteen dollars and a third nearly, the Talent was of the value of f193 15s sterling, about dollars. The Romans had the great Talent and the little Talent the great Talent is computed to be equal to f99 6s. sterling, and the little Talent to f75 sterling. Talent, among the Hebrews, was also a gold coin, the same with a shekel of gold called also stater, and weighing only four drachmas. But the Hebrew Talent of silver, called cicar, was equivalent to three thousand shekels, or one hundred and thirteen pounds, ten ounces and a fraction, troy weight. Faculty natural gift or endowment a metaphorical application of the word, said to be borrowed from the Scriptural parable of the Talents. Matthew 25 He is chiefly to be considered in his three different Talents, as a critic, a satirist, and a writer of odes. ...
'Tis not my Talent to conceal my thoughts. Eminent abilities superior genius as, he is a man of Talents. Talent, in the singular, is sometimes used in a like sense. He has a Talent at drawing
Talent - Talent. A Jewish Talent in weight contained about 3000 shekels, and is estimated to equal 125 pounds Troy measure. Reckoning silver at about 60 cents an ounce, a Talent of silver would then be equal to about $1000. A Talent of gold by the Oxford tables is estimated equal to $28,280, and about $27,300 by Bagster's Bible tables. An Attic Talent was equal to about $960. Talents of silver, by weight, are frequently mentioned in the Old Testament. Talents of gold are also noticed. Also a Talent of lead
Talent - ) Attic Talent = 193 British pounds, 15 shillings. The Hebrew Talent was 3,000 shekels; if the shekel is 2 shillings, 6 pence = 375 British pounds
Talent - A — 1: τάλαντον (Strong's #5007 — Noun Neuter — talanton — tal'-an-ton ) originally "a balance," then, "a Talent in weight," was hence "a sum of money" in gold or silver equivalent to a "talent. " The Jewish "talent" contained 3,000 shekels of the sanctuary, e. In NT times the "talent" was not a weight of silver, but the Roman-Attic "talent," comprising 6,000 denarii or drachmas, and equal to about f240. In Matthew 18:24 the vastness of the sum, 10,000 Talents (f2,400,000), indicates the impossibility of man's clearing himself, by his own efforts, of the guilt which lies upon him before God. ...
Note: That the "talent" denoted "something weighed" has provided the meaning of the Eng. word as "a gift or ability," especially under the influence of the parable of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30 ). ...
B — 1: ταλαντιαῖος (Strong's #5006 — Adjective — talantiaios — tal-an-tee-ah'-yos ) denotes "of a Talent's weight," Revelation 16:21
Talent - The Greek Talent, however, as in the LXX. A Talent of gold was double the weight of a Talent of silver ( 2 Samuel 12:30 ). Parable of the Talents (Matthew 18:24 ; 25:15 )
Hundredweight - The underlying Greek means “about the weight of a Talent” (KJV). Most modern translations equate the Talent with 100 pounds (NAS, NIV, NRSV, TEV)
Talent (2) - TALENT
Talent - Talent
Measure - See SHEKELS, Talent , BATH, or Ephah, EPHAH , etc
Talented - ) Furnished with Talents; possessing skill or Talent; mentally gifted
Talent - The Talent was the heaviest weight used in Israel in Bible times. Large quantities of money were usually weighed in Talents, smaller quantities in shekels (1 Kings 10:10; 2 Kings 15:19; 2 Kings 18:14). Unless otherwise stated, a Talent, when used as a monetary unit, meant a Talent of silver (1 Kings 16:24; Ezra 8:25-27; Matthew 18:23-24; Matthew 25:14-16)
Ostracism - ) Banishment by popular vote, - a means adopted at Athens to rid the city of a person whose Talent and influence gave umbrage
Talent - The value of a Talent of silver was three hundred and forty- two pounds three shillings and nine-pence, and a Talent of gold was equal to five thousand four hundred and seventy-five pounds sterling
Ability - ; - in the plural, faculty, Talent
Poetical - ) Of or pertaining to poetry; suitable for poetry, or for writing poetry; as, poetic Talent, theme, work, sentiments
o'Higgins, Ambrose Bernard - His Talent and energy were recognized and he was ultimately made Marquis of Orsorno and Viceroy of Peru
Ambrose o'Higgins - His Talent and energy were recognized and he was ultimately made Marquis of Orsorno and Viceroy of Peru
Clever - ) Possessing quickness of intellect, skill, dexterity, Talent, or adroitness; expert
Talent - ]'>[1] ), ‘weighing a Talent,’ this word is found only in Revelation 16:21. 906) we are still dependent on an average estimate of the weight of a Talent
Weights - ...
...
Talent of silver (2 Kings 5:22 ), equal to 3,000 shekels, i. ...
...
Talent of gold (Exodus 25:39 ), double the preceding, i
Sala, George Augustus Henry - He was a man of versatile gifts; his literary Talent attracted the attention of Dickens, and he was a special correspondent of the Daily Telegraph
George Sala - He was a man of versatile gifts; his literary Talent attracted the attention of Dickens, and he was a special correspondent of the Daily Telegraph
Drachma - A Greek silver coin, the six-thousandth part of a Talent
Malcam - The weight is said to have been "a Talent of gold" (above 100 lbs
Executive - ) Designed or fitted for execution, or carrying into effect; as, executive Talent; qualifying for, concerned with, or pertaining to, the execution of the laws or the conduct of affairs; as, executive power or authority; executive duties, officer, department, etc
Paulinus, Disciple of Ephraem Syrus - 1062) gives a short account of him, speaking of his great Talent, knowledge of Scripture, and power as a preacher
Heady - ...
All the Talent required,is to be heady, to be violent on one side or the other
Pound - In the parable of the ten pounds, ( Luke 19:12-27 ) the reference appears to be to a Greek pound, a weight used as a money of account, of which sixty went to the Talent
John Regis, Saint - Gifted with a marvelous Talent for missions, he labored for the conversion of the Huguenots, assisted the needy, and aided in the rescue of wayward women
Regis, John Francis, Saint - Gifted with a marvelous Talent for missions, he labored for the conversion of the Huguenots, assisted the needy, and aided in the rescue of wayward women
Coins - Larger amounts were measured by the Talent, which was about fifty kilograms (1 Kings 9:14; 1 Kings 16:24; 1 Kings 20:39). Sixty minas equalled one Talent. The Talent was not a coin, but a unit used in counting large amounts of money. It is referred to in two other parables of Jesus (Matthew 18:24; Matthew 25:15; see Talent)
Tables of Measures Weights And Money in the Bible - Exodus 25:29); or king's Talent, ...
158...
240...
5. 80...
50 manehs = 1 Talent,...
$2190. 00...
60 manehs or minas = 1 Talent,...
1920. 00...
100 manehs = 1 Talent,...
53,500. 60...
60 manehs or minas = 1 Talent,...
28,800. 10...
60 minas or shekels = 1 Talent (Attic),...
1,146
Money - " The Attic Talent was the standard one under Alexander, and subsequently down to Roman times; the drachma however becoming depreciated from 67. ) It corresponds to the tetradrachma or didrachma of the earlier Phoenician Talent under the Persian rule. The Attic Talent (the one current in New Testament period) had 100 drachmas, the drachma being = 7 3/4d. ; the mina was 3 British pounds, 4 shillings, 7 pence, and the Talent 193 British pounds, 15 shillings. ...
The Talent was not a coin but a sum. The Hebrew Talent = 3,000 shekels, or 375 British pounds (about the weight of the Aegina Talent), for 603,550 persons paid 100 Talents and 1,775 shekels of silver, i. , as each paid a half shekel, 301,775 whole shekels; so that 100 Talents contained 300,000 shekels. The gold Talent was 100 manehs or minae , and the gold muneh was 100 shekels of gold; the gold Talent weighed 1,290,000 grains, a computation agreeing with the shekels extant. The Talent of copper had probably 1,500 copper shekels, copper being to silver as 1 to 72
Native - Produced by nature original born with the being natural not acquired as native genius native affections a native Talent or disposition native cheerfulness native simplicity
Hail - The seventh angel having poured his bowl upon the air, ‘great hail, every stone about a Talent in weight, cometh down out of heaven upon men’ (Revelation 16:21). -the sixtieth part of a Talent
Weights And Measures -
The AEginetan Talent is stated to have contained 60 minae, 6000 drachme. ...
The Attic Talent is the standard weight introduced by Solon. ...
The Babylonian Talent may be determined from existing weights found by. ...
The Euboic Talent though bearing a Greek name, is rightly held to have been originally an eastern system. The proportion of the Euboic Talent to the Babylonian was probably as 60 to 72, or 5 to ...
Taking the Babylonian maneh at 7992 grs. , we obtain 399,600 for the Euboic Talent. ...
The Hebrew Talent or Talents and divisions. A Talent of silver is mentioned in Exodus, which contained 3000 shekels, distinguished as "the holy shekel," or "shekel of the sanctuary. " The gold Talent contained 100 manehs, 10,000 shekels. The silver Talent contained 3000 shekels, 6000 bekas, 60,000 gerahs. , Talent ; (i. The Talent of this system was just double that of the silver standard; if was divided into 100 manehs , and each maneh into 100 shekels, as follows: (3) There appears to have been a third standard for copper, namely, a shekel four times as heavy as the gold shekel (or 528 grains), 1500 of which made up the copper Talent of 792,000 grains
Capacity - ) Ability; power pertaining to, or resulting from, the possession of strength, wealth, or Talent; possibility of being or of doing
Ift - ) Some quality or endowment given to man by God; a preeminent and special Talent or aptitude; power; faculty; as, the gift of wit; a gift for speaking
Eginhard - His Talent in mathematics and architecture was so great that he was charged with the construction of such buildings as the Cathedral of Aachen
Einhard - His Talent in mathematics and architecture was so great that he was charged with the construction of such buildings as the Cathedral of Aachen
Money - The names Gerah, Bekah, Shekel, Maneh, and Talent, being used for weights as well as money, the two are better considered together
Weights And Measures - 800...
Talent, kikkah (50 maneh). 000...
Talent of Lead (Zechariah 5:7 ), 'weighty piece,' margin. ...
Talent (Revelation 16:21 ): if Attic = about 55 lbs. ...
Talent of Silver………………………. ...
Talent of Gold………………………… ??? Exodus 25:39 . ...
Talent (Roman) τάλαντον…………………
Coins - ...
The Talent was another weight frequently associated in the Old Testament with gold and silver. The crown that David took from the king of the Ammonites weighed one Talent (2 Samuel 12:30 ). Although its weight varied slightly from one country to another, the Talent was approximately 75 pounds. ...
From two parables told by Jesus we get the impression that the word “talent” had come in New Testament times to represent a large sum of money instead of just a measure of weight. In Matthew 18:24 , He told of a man who owed a certain king “ten thousand Talents. At the reckoning time he rebuked the one who had merely hidden his Talent by saying that at least he could have deposited the money to let it earn interest (Matthew 25:27 ). Such a Talent had been estimated to have a current value of about one thousand dollars
Talent - The Attic Talent, as a weight, was about 57 lbs. ) Intellectual ability, natural or acquired; mental endowment or capacity; skill in accomplishing; a special gift, particularly in business, art, or the like; faculty; a use of the word probably originating in the Scripture parable of the Talents (Matt
Weights - The shekel, the half shekel, the manch, the Talent, are not only denominations of money, of certain values in gold and silver, but also of certain weights
Isaiah - Among the other prophets each of the more important ones is distinguished by some one particular excellence and some one peculiar Talent; in Isaiah all kinds of Talent and all beauties of prophetic discourse meet together, so as mutually to temper and qualify each other; it is not so much any single feature that distinguishes him as the symmetry and perfection as a whole
Chlodowech - He displayed great Talent in governing, and made Paris his capital
Chlodwig - He displayed great Talent in governing, and made Paris his capital
Dyck, Anthony Van - He was the pupil of Hendrik Van Balen and showed such precocious Talent that he assisted Rubens in his studio from 1615-1620
Dyck, Anthoon Van - He was the pupil of Hendrik Van Balen and showed such precocious Talent that he assisted Rubens in his studio from 1615-1620
Anthony Van Dyck - He was the pupil of Hendrik Van Balen and showed such precocious Talent that he assisted Rubens in his studio from 1615-1620
Anthoon Van Dyck - He was the pupil of Hendrik Van Balen and showed such precocious Talent that he assisted Rubens in his studio from 1615-1620
Bernard of Clairvaux, Saint - Particular care was taken with his education, because his great destiny had been predicted before his birth; he showed remarkable interest and Talent in litcrature
Ludwig Von Pastor - Dr Johannes Janssen, the historian of the German people, recognized his pupil's extraordinary Talent
Time - That it is a Talent committed to our trust
Candlestick, - With its various appurtenances it required a Talent of "pure gold;" and it was not moulded, but "of beaten work," and has been estimated to have been worth in our money over ,000
Candlestick, - With its various appurtenances it required a Talent of "pure gold;" and it was not moulded, but "of beaten work," and has been estimated to have been worth in our money over ,000
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - As we heard the servant with the five Talents introduced, and then the servant with the two Talents, and then the servant with the one Talent, we would have felt sure that some very severe things were soon to be said about the greatly gifted among men, and the continually prosperous. All our sympathies would have been with that under-estimated and overlooked servant who had only one Talent entrusted to him. And at the beginning of this parable we would have felt sure that before it closed the Divine Preacher would take the side of the despised and untalented servant, and would say some of His severest things about the rich, and about the great, and about those who were full of all manner of prosperity. The Talented and the privileged and the prosperous in life are always the few and not the many. It is the untalented and the unsuccessful and the obscure and the overlooked who are always the multitude. ...
The servant with the one Talent started on his stewardship with a great grudge at his master. No wonder that he took up his one Talent with a scowl, and cast it into a hole of the earth with disgust, saying as he did so that a harder or a more unjust master no honest servant ever had. Those five Talents, and those two Talents, and then that one Talent, all rankled in his heart, till he was the most embittered and resentful and rebellious of men. ...
This servant who hid his Talent in the earth was the father of that young Highland minister also who hid his sermon in the snow. He had for long been ambitious of the city, and he had a sharp punishment that day for despising his small congregation; for hiding his Talent at home because there would not be enough people to appreciate it. If they had as large a field as that five-talented fellow-servant of theirs; if they had a city pulpit; if they had a people or education and intelligence, they would prepare for the Sabbath in a very different fashion from what they do. Eugenia also, you will all see, is one of his daughters who said: If I had had five Talents committed to me, or even two, I would have traded with the same and made them other five Talents and other two. In our mission district in Fountainbridge you will find a prepared scope for all your Talents of every number and of every kind. They need above everything else an elder sister and a more Talented sister just like you. You may not have many Talents, you may not be rich, you may not be very clever, or very far on yourself in the best things, but you are better off, a thousand times, than those poor sisters of yours out there. At your very poorest and very least Talented you can teach two or three neglected children for an hour every Sabbath day. Come out and make a beginning with your one Talent this very week. Let the five-talented, and the two-talented, and the one-talented, and the no-talented at all, come. Come away then, O servant of God with the one Talent! Come and light a lamp, like Samuel
Money (2) - ...
1 Talent (£240)...
=...
60 Minas. These are the Talent and the mina. Talent (τάλαντον, Matthew 18:24; Luke 19:12-27; Matthew 25:20; Matthew 25:22; Matthew 25:24-25; Matthew 25:28) is originally the name of the highest weight in the various systems of antiquity, hence the sum of money represented by that weight in gold or silver. The Talent of the Gospels, which is, of course, a Talent of silver, might conceivably be the Phœnician Talent, but is far more probably to be identified with the Talent on the reduced Attic scale which bad been formally recognized by the Romans (see above). ...
The Talent is mentioned twice by our Lord. In the parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:23-35) the one servant owes the king 10,000 Talents, or nearly two-and-a-half millions of our money—an enormous sum, of which the 100 denarii (= £4) owed him by his fellow-servant represents but an insignificant fraction (1/6000). It may be remarked that the juxtaposition in this parable of the Talent and the denarius is a confirmation of the view that it is the Attic Talent that is meant). In the parable of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30) the master intrusts his capital of eight Talents or £1920 to his three servants in sums of £1200, £480, and £240 respectively. It will be seen that even he who received but one Talent had yet quite a respectable capital to trade with, so that the excuse which is sometimes made by commentators on his behalf, viz. Mina (μνᾶ, Luke 19:13; Luke 19:16; Luke 19:18; Luke 19:20; Luke 19:24-25 Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 pound) is the sixtieth part of the Talent. The smallness of the sum in such a connexion is remarkable, especially when compared with the companion parable of the Talents. Thus in the parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:28, see above under ‘Talent’) a sum of 100 denarii is mentioned, while in the parable of the Two Debtors (Luke 7:41) the two debts are stated at 500 and 50 denarii respectively (£20 and £2)
Crown - Such was probably the crown which weighed (or rather "was worth") a Talent, mentioned in ( 2 Samuel 12:30 ) taken by David from the king of Ammon at Rabbah, and used as the state crown of Judah
Talent - Scott, "that we are, or possess, or meet with, may be considered as a Talent; for a good or a bad use may be made of every natural endowment, or providential appointment, or they may remain unoccupied through inactivity and selfishness. Time, health, vigour of body, and the power of exertion and enduring fatigue...
the natural and acquired abilities of the mind, skill in any lawful art or science, and the capacity for close mental application...
the gift of speech, and that of speaking with fluency and propriety, and in a convincing, attractive, or persuasive manner...
wealth, influence, or authority...
a man's situation in the church, the community, or relative life...
and the various occurences which make way for him to attempt any thing of a beneficial tendency; these, and many others that can scarcely be enumerated, are Talents which the consistent Christian will improve to the glory of God, and the benefit of mankind. Nay, this improvement procures an increase of Talents, and gives a man an accession of influence, and an accumulating power of doing good; because it tends to establish his reputation for prudence, piety, integrity, sincerity, and disinterested benevolence: it gradually forms him to an habitual readiness to engage in the beneficent designs, and to conduct them in a gentle, unobstrusive and unassuming manner: it disposes others to regard him with increasing confidence and affection, and to approach him with satisfaction; and it procures for him the countenance of many persons, whose assistance he can employ in accomplishing his own salutary purposes
Sermons: Bad Not to be Listened to - Mere Talent ought not to attract us ; carrion, well dressed and served upon Palissy ware, is still unfit for men. Who thrusts his arm into the fire because its flame is brilliant? Who knowingly drinks from a poisoned cup because the beaded bubbles on the brim reflect the colours of the rainbow? As we would not be fascinated by the azure hues of a serpent, so neither should we be thrown off our guard by the Talents of an unsound theologian
Weights And Measures - So, for example, the Babylonian system used a Talent of sixty minas, a mina of sixty shekels, and a shekel of twenty-four gerahs . ...
Multiples of the shekel were the mina and the Talent . According to the account of the sanctuary tax (Exodus 38:25-26 ), three thousand shekels were in a Talent, probably sixty minas of fifty shekels each. This Talent may have been the same as the Assyrian weight, since both 2 Kings 18:14 and Sennacherib's inscriptions mention the tribute of King Hezekiah as thirty Talents of silver and of gold. 424 grams is as follows:...
1 Talent (3000 shekels)...
34. In the New Testament, the Talent and mina were large sums of money (Matthew 25:15-28 ; compare Luke 19:13-25 ), and the pound of precious ointment (John 12:3 ) is probably the Roman standard of twelve ounces
Candlestick, Seven-Branched - It was made of one Talent (c
Menahem - Menahem, at the cost of 1,000 Talents of silver (400,000 British pounds, reckoning the silver Talent 400 British pounds), induced him to "confirm the kingdom in his hand
Slothfulness - It is the man of one Talent, and he who has buried the same, that is guilty of the sin of sloth. Stewardship of five Talents has been neglected, and equally in that case the ‘precipitate’ of character has been sloth. —Bruce, Parabolic Teaching of Christ, ‘The Talents’; Horton, Proverbs, ‘Idleness’; Barrow, Sermons, on ‘Industry’; Drummond, Natural Law in the Spiritual World, ‘Degeneration’; Stalker, Seven Deadly Sins (1901), 115
Seven-Branched Candlestick - It was made of one Talent (c
Indolence - The hid Talent will reproach the indolent in the day of reckoning (Matthew 25:18)
Precious - ...
First, yâqâr means “precious” in the sense of being rare and valuable: “And he took their king’s crown from off his head, the weight whereof was a Talent of gold with the precious stones: and it was set on David’s head” ( Necho or Pharaoh-Necho - Then coming to Jerusalem, he set up Eliakim, or Jehoiakim, in his place, and exacted the payment of one hundred Talents of silver and one Talent of gold
Bag, Purse, Wallet - ( e ) Another word is used both for a large bag, capable of holding a Talent of silver ( 2 Kings 5:23 ), and for the dainty lady’s satchel ( Isaiah 3:22 RV Money - He acquaints us that the Israelites offered for the works of the tabernacle seventy-two thousand Talents of brass, Exodus 38:29 . The weight, a Talent, a shekel, a gerah or obolus, the weight of the sanctuary, and the king's weight. The impression of the coinage is not referred to; but it is said they weighed the silver, or other commodities, by the shekel and by the Talent. This shekel, therefore, and this Talent, were not fixed and determined pieces of money, but weights applied to things used in commerce. The Talent was fifty minas; and its value, therefore, three hundred and eighty-seven pounds ten shillings. A Talent of gold consisted of three thousand shekels
Candlestick - It was made of fine gold, and with the utensils belonging to it was a Talent in weight
Weights And Measures - , and the Talent with 60 minae, hence the scale:...
 ...
Dr. ...
Talent. ...
Talent. (41900 grammes), used as a heavy Talent weight. ]'>[1] (talent, Matthew 18:24; Matthew 25:15-28) occur, but not as the names of weights; they are the designations of coins (see Money)
Feed - ) To satisfy; grafity or minister to, as any sense, Talent, taste, or desire
Measures - The shekel, the maneh, and the Talent, were all originally names of weights. The Talent, 2 Samuel 12:30, 3000 shekels, 30 maneh, 1500 ounces, equal to 93 pounds 12 ounces avoirdupois, see Money
Gehazi - He follows the cavalcade of Naaman, and, fabricating a message from his master, begs a Talent of silver and two changes of raiment for two young men of the sons of the prophets, who are supposed to be on a visit to Elisha
Part - ) A constituent of character or capacity; quality; faculty; Talent; - usually in the plural with a collective sense
Money - ]'>[2] ‘ pound ’) or mina , which weighed 7580 grains on the light, and 15,160 on the heavy standard, was divided into 60 shekels , while 60 minas went to the higher denomination, the Talent. ...
As this weight-system spread westwards with the march of Babylonian civilization and commerce, it came into conflict with the decimal system of calculation, and a compromise was effected, which resulted in the mina being reduced to 50 shekels, while the Talent remained at 60 minas, although reduced in weight to 3000 shekels. That the Hebrew Talent by which the precious metals were weighed contained 3000, not 3600, shekels may be seen by a simple calculation from the data of Exodus 38:25 ff. 102 10 0 Talent = 3000 758,000 grs. ) Talent 673,500 grs. On the other hand, where gold is concerned, as in the case of the 30 Talents which Sennacherib ‘appointed unto Hezekiah’ ( 2 Kings 18:14 ), we may with some confidence assume the gold standard common to Palestine and Assyria. ...
A noteworthy feature of the entries of prices in the pre-exilic writings of the Hebrews is the disappearance of the mina, the sums being stated in terms of shekels and Talents exclusively. The tribute paid by the Jews to the third Ptolemy did not exceed the modest sum of 20 Talents of silver, or circa £4360. The drachms (To 5:14, 2Ma 4:19 ; 2Ma 12:43 ) and Talents (6000 drachms) of the Books of Maccabees are to be regarded as on this Syrian-Attic standard. ...
There remain the two larger denominations, the Talent and the pound or mina, neither of which was any longer, as in the earlier period, a specific weight of bullion, but a definite sum of money. ( i ) The Talent now contained 6000 denarius-drachms, which made 240 aurei or £240 (so Matthew 18:24 RVm Embalm - " The dearest process (that used in Jacob's and Joseph's case) cost a silver Talent (250 British pounds)
Evangelist - We conclude, therefore, that the evangelist as such was not an official, but one who, without having the higher powers of Apostleship or prophecy, or any special Talent for teaching or pastoral work, had a gift for proclaiming the gospel as a message of saving love a gift which was chiefly exercised, no doubt, by moving as Philip had done from place to place
Ift - ...
Psalm 68:18 (b) This refers to the Talents and various abilities given to Christians to fit them for special and efficient service. ...
(b) It may refer also to the Talents and attainments of an individual through the exercise of which he becomes famous. Edison exercised his gift of invention and was brought before great men; Houdini exercised his gift of magic and appeared before the wealthy; Paderewski exercised his musical Talent and played for royalty
Crown - Gold was the chief material of the king's crown (Psalms 21:3); compare 2 Samuel 12:30, the Ammonites' crown, with its precious stones, was worth (rather than "weighed") a Talent of gold
Order - ) A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a group or division of men in the same social or other position; also, a distinct character, kind, or sort; as, the higher or lower orders of society; Talent of a high order
Crown - David took the crown of the king of the Ammonites from off his head; the crown weighed a Talent of gold, and was moreover enriched with jewels, 2 Samuel 12:30 ; 1 Chronicles 20:2
Judgement - Has he used the Talent committed to him ? Some may have laboured with improper materials, and such work will be burned up, and the workman will lose his reward, though he himself will be saved yet so as through fire. These passages apply to the Christian's service, to each of whom a Talent is given
Second Coming, the - In His parable of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30 ), Jesus reserved His condemnation for the man who did nothing, simply taking his Talent and hiding it
Candlestick - Talent of pure gold, symbolizing preciousness and sacredness and incorruptibility (Exodus 25:31-39); of beaten work, 5 feet high and 3 1/2 between the outside branches, according to the rabbis
Painting, Religious - The cloister offered an ideal atmosphere of peace and leisure for fostering artistic Talent, and the illumination of Bible or missal led naturally, in the case of the gifted, to the decoration of church or monastery walls
Religious Painting - The cloister offered an ideal atmosphere of peace and leisure for fostering artistic Talent, and the illumination of Bible or missal led naturally, in the case of the gifted, to the decoration of church or monastery walls
ju'Das Iscar'Iot - (Why was such a man chosen to be one of the twelve? -- (1) There was needed among the disciples, as in the Church now, a man of just such Talents as Judas possessed, --the Talent for managing business affairs
Pound - It was the 60th part of a Talent. (including Calvin) treat the story of the Pounds (Luke 19:11-27) as a variant of the parable of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30). Talents)
Talents - TALENTS (Parable of). —In Matthew 25:14-30 we have the story of a man who went away on a journey into a far country, and entrusted to one of his slaves five Talents, to another two, and to another one. (a) In the parable of the Talents we have three slaves mentioned, who seem from the expression chosen—‘his own slaves’—to stand in a relation of peculiar intimacy to their master. He is, therefore, already familiar with their capacity, and allots the Talents he distributes to them in harmony with his knowledge. To the most capable he gives five Talents, to one not so capable he entrusts two, and to a third with less ability than either he entrusts one. Lazy as he was, he ought not to have grudged the trouble involved in taking the Talent and flinging it down at the banker’s, so that the capital might at least have accumulated interest. He is accordingly deprived of his Talent, and it is given to him who has ten. Pound) has many significant points of contrast with that of the Talents, and the contrasts harmonize with the difference of the situation presupposed. The other parable went on similar lines to the parable of the Talents, the differences being due either to a difference in the lesson Jesus intended to teach, or to variations of the story that grew up as it was told and retold in the Christian Church. In the parable of the Talents we have apparently to do with a merchant whose object is to make money. When we compare the treatment of the two servants in the parable of the Talents, the difference becomes significant. It is, of course, obvious that the slave who has received a pound will treat it otherwise than the slave who has received a Talent: the large sum is naturally buried in the earth, the smaller one is carefully put by in a napkin. Possibly the words, ‘I will set thee over many things,’ are an intrusion in the story of the Talents. Apparently the main portion of the master’s capital has already been entrusted to his slaves (Matthew 25:14), so that there is an incongruity when the five Talents are called ‘few things,’ and that over which the slave is to be set is called ‘many things. There the contrast between the one pound and the ten cities might well be described in the terms employed in the parable of the Talents. In the parable of the Talents the lesson is, that difference in endowment or opportunity involves no difference in the reward. And, in any case, the slave had his orders, tacitly, it is true, in the parable of the Talents, but explicitly in the parable of the Pounds. The eschatological colour is not so deep in the parable of the Talents, still it is present. There is no need to suppose that the parables of the Pounds and the Talents are a development of Mark 13:34-37, or to think that the experience of delay in the early Church created the parables
Minister - They are also called divines, and may be distinguished into polemic, or those who possess controversial Talents; casuistic, or those who resolve cases of conscience; experimental, those who address themselves to the feelings, cases, and circumstances of their hearers; and, lastly, practical, those who insist upon the performance of all those duties which the word of God enjoins. They should be superior as to their knowledge and Talents. No brightness of Talent, no superiority of intellect, no extent of knowledge, will ever be a substitute for this
Nazareth - All the time that His Talent (if the word may here be used) was growing in stillness, His character was being formed in the stream of the world
Nazareth - All the time that His Talent (if the word may here be used) was growing in stillness, His character was being formed in the stream of the world
Shame - Though the word is not mentioned, it is presumably the feeling of the man who hid his Talent or pound, when brought face to face with his master (Matthew 25:24, Luke 19:20); and it is certainly implied in John 8:9, whether the words ‘convicted by their conscience’ are genuine or not
Shame - Though the word is not mentioned, it is presumably the feeling of the man who hid his Talent or pound, when brought face to face with his master (Matthew 25:24, Luke 19:20); and it is certainly implied in John 8:9, whether the words ‘convicted by their conscience’ are genuine or not
the Mother of Zebedee's Children - At every Talent that has been committed to you; at every added Talent that you make for yourself and for the Church and for Christ; at every sweet word of praise that sounds around your honoured name; at every step you are summoned to take up to higher service; there are men all around you eyeing you with an evil eye
Sedulius, 5th-Cent. Poet - Thenceforward he devoted his Talents to the service of Christ, living as a priest (cf. Sedulius, too, longed to devote his Talent to God and to strengthen his own spiritual life by exhorting others
Jehoiakim - ) Pharaoh bound Jehoiakim to exact tribute from Judah, for Josiah's having taken part with Babylon against him: one Talent of gold and 100 Talents of silver (40,000 British pounds)
Elisha - He ran after Naaman, and in Elisha's name begged a Talent of silver, and two changes of garments. Naaman gave him two Talents
David - ...
In Saul's Court David's musical Talent, combined with his reputation as a fighter, led one of Saul's servants to recommend David as the person to play the harp for Saul when the evil spirit from God troubled him (1 Samuel 16:18 )
Friend, Friendship - ...
In the New Testament Paul shows a Talent for gaining friends
Simeon - And with that awful warning, and after nineteen centuries of His grace and truth, no man of any individuality, and Talent, and initiative for good, can, to this day, do his proper work without straightway becoming a sign to be spoken against
Unitarians - Arius, a presbyter in the church of Alexandria, a man of consummate Talent and address, but of a cold and speculative mind, impiously maintained that there had been a time when the Son of God was not; that he was capable of virtue and vice; and that he was a creature, and mutable as creatures are! It is true that Arius held a qualified preexistence, when he said that God created the Son from nothing before he created the world; in other words, that the Son was the first of created beings; but such preexistence does not imply coexistence or coeternity with the Father
Arians - Some of the clergy thought their bishop too forbearing, and it is possible he felt his inferiority of Talent; for Arius was a man of accomplished learning, and commanding eloquence; venerable in person, and fascinating in address. Arius now retired into Palestine, where his Talents and address soon made a number of converts; and among the rest, the celebrated Eusebius, bishop of Nicomedia, and other bishops and clergy of those parts, who assembled in council, and received the excommunicated presbyter into their communion
Slave, Slavery (2) - And Nicanor endeavoured to raise the Roman tribute of 2000 Talents by the sale of Jews at the rate of ninety per Talent (2 Maccabees 8:10 f
Jeremiah - His thoughts, indeed, are somewhat less elevated, and he is commonly more large and diffuse in his sentences; but the reason of this may be, that he is mostly taken up with the gentler passions of grief and pity, for the expression of which he has a peculiar Talent
Commerce - They range from the Talent (2 Samuel 12:30 ; 2 Kings 18:14 ) to the mina (Ezra 2:69 NAS), the shekel ( 2 Samuel 14:26 ; Ezekiel 4:10 ), and various smaller weights. ...
The parables of the pounds and the Talents suggest the existence of a sophisticated banking and investment community, which lent out sums for commercial enterprises and garnered profits for those who left their money with them
Nimrod - What, asks Freher at himself and at the Spirit of his Master-what is an honest, simple Christian to do amidst such a variety of sects and contentions? He is to keep out of them; and he is to thank God that he has neither the call, nor the Talent, nor the temptation to enter into them
Vincentius Lirinensis - The deposit is the Talent of the Catholic faith which the man of God must like a spiritual Bezaleel adorn arrange and display to others but not injure by novelties (cc
Gospels, Apocryphal - ...
‘The Gospel which has come down to us in Hebrew characters gave the threat as made not against him who hid (his Talent), but against him who lived riotously; for (the parable) told of three servants, one who devoured his lord’s substance with harlots and flute-girls, one who gained profit many fold, and one who hid his Talent; and how in the issue one was accepted, one merely blamed, and one shut up in prison’ (Euseb
Tabernacle - Here, instead of limited gifts and no participation (32:3-4), everyone has something to contribute, whether in Talent or material (35:4-10)
Naaman - They have a miraculous Talent of style, those Old Testament authors. And in your best moments you would give ten Talents of silver, and six thousand pieces of gold, and ten changes of raiment to be for ever rid of it
Occupations And Professions in the Bible - The mason sold his Talent of cutting stone for building purposes ( 2 Kings 12:12 ), while 27. Prominent, throughout the Bible, are various occupations related to musical Talents
Antioch - ...
‘The only Talent which indisputably belonged to them-their mastery of ridicule-they exercised not merely against the actors of their stage, but no less against the rulers sojourning in the capital of the East, and the ridicule was quite the same against the actor as against the emperor
Economic Life - , barter and specified weights (shekel, mina, Talent) of precious metals were used as rates of exchange
Paul the Aged - Make pictures by that splendid Talent that God has given you for the very purpose of making pictures to yourself of Christ
Philip: Deacon And Evangelist - Now, that there were two men of such rare genius among the first seven deacons is a remarkable proof of the insight of the congregation that elected them, as well as of the wealth of all kinds of Talent in the Apostolic Church
Sarah - And Sarah had made trial of the girl in the place, and had been glad to find that she had all the Talent and all the character she had been certificated to have
Solomon - If the kingdom of heaven was ever like a lord's servant with five Talents, who went and traded with the same and made them other five Talents, it was Solomon. Besides my innumerable sins, I confess before Thee that I am debtor to Thee for the gracious Talent of Thy gifts and graces, winch I have neither put into a napkin nor put it as I ought to exchangers, but have mis-spent it in things for which I was least fit, so as I may truly say my soul hath been a stranger in the house of my pilgrimage
Paul as a Student - To annotate the Iliad, or the Symposium, or the Commedia; to build up and administer an empire; to command in a battle for freedom by sea or by land; to create and bequeath a great and enriching business; to conduct an influential newspaper; to be the rector of a great school, and so on,-these are all great services done to our generation when we have the Talent, and the character, and the opportunity, to do them. But to master Paul, as Paul mastered Moses and Christ; to annotate, and illustrate, and bring freshly home to ten thousand readers, the Galatians, or the Romans, or the Colossians; to have eyes to see what Israel ought to do, and to have the patience, and the courage, to lead a church to do it; to feed, and to feed better and better for a lifetime, the mind and the heart of a congregation of God's people, and then to depart to be with Christ,-let the finest minds and the deepest and richest hearts in every new generation fall down while they are yet young and say, Lord Jesus, what wilt Thou have me to do with my life, and with whatsoever Talents Thou hast intrusted to me?...
And, then, the best of all callings being chosen, the better his mind and the better his heart are, the more profit, to employ Paul's own word about himself, will be made by the true student
Egypt - The tribute was to be one hundred Talents of silver and a Talent of gold
Wisdom of Solomon - ...
Similarly, whereas, according to the author of the Book of Kings, Solomon was told in a dream to make a wish and chose wisdom, the account of the matter in this book is much less fantastic; he was, he says, a lad of great Talent, and pursued the study with all his might, employing among other expedients prayer
Roman Law in the nt - The marvellous Talent of the Roman authorities for organization, and especially their wise adaptability, which saved them from enforcing a rigid uniformity in legal details in all the countries which they conquered, were to a large degree instrumental, under Divine providence, in furthering Christianity throughout the Empire, Though the Emperors and their officials became, at a comparatively late date (see below, 4) persecutors, yet there can be no doubt that the Roman system of law and organization was a most powerful help to the apostles in preaching the gospel
Samuel - No amount of Talent; no amount of loyalty; no amount of humility, even, can make up in the young-in young statesmen and in young churchmen-for the wisdom, and the experience, and the standing, and the influence of the aged. And what did Samuel do to occupy his Talents in his ripe age, and still to serve God and God's people? Never mortal man did a better, or a more fruitful thing than Samuel now did
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - know nothing of their contents;" take care lest you be called "a book's-grave," or "moth-feeder"; then comes a serious allusion to the buried Talent (i
Physician - He migrated from Crotona to aegina, where he was made medical officer with a salary of one Talent (about £240) a year
Josephus - It is not, however, the man that concerns us here, but the historian; and if, even in that capacity, his Talent was of a distinctly mediocre order, yet, in virtue of our interest in his subject, he is for us one of the most important historical authors we have
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - " His literary Talent was by no means idle during this period. But he was entirely unfitted by character and habit of mind for an office which has always required the Talents of the statesman and man of the world, rather than those of the student, and he had offended every part of the community
Gregorius (14) Nazianzenus, Bishop of Sasima And of Constantinople - He was aware of the objections of priests that the candle should be placed on the candlestick, and the Talent not hidden; but no time of preparation for the priesthood can be too long, and haste is full of danger