What does Sycamore mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
συκομορέαν a sycomore tree. 1
וְהַשִּׁקְמִים֙ sycamore tree (bearing figs). 1
שִׁקְמִֽים sycamore tree (bearing figs). 1
וְ֝שִׁקְמוֹתָ֗ם sycamore tree (bearing figs). 1

Definitions Related to Sycamore

H8256


   1 Sycamore tree (bearing figs).
   

G4809


   1 a sycomore tree.
   

Frequency of Sycamore (original languages)

Frequency of Sycamore (English)

Dictionary

Smith's Bible Dictionary - Sycamore
(Heb. shikmah ). Although it may be admitted that the sycamine is properly, and in ( Luke 17:6 ) the mulberry, and the sycamore the mulberry, or sycamore-fig ( Ficus sycomorus ), yet the latter is the tree generally referred to in the Old Testament and called by the Septuagint sycamine, as ( 1 Kings 10:27 ; 1 Chronicles 27:28 ; Psalm 78:47 ; Amos 7:14 ) The Sycamore or fig-mulberry, is in Egypt and Palestine a tree of great importance and very extensive use. It attains the size of a walnut tree has wide-spreading branches and affords a delightful shade. On this account it is frequently planted by the waysides. Its leaves are heart-shaped, downy on the under side, and fragrant. The Fruit grows directly from the trunk itself on little sprigs, and in clusters like the grape. To make It eatable, each fruit, three or four days before gathering, must, it is said, be punctured with a sharp instrument or the finger-nail. This was the original employment of the prophet Amos, as he says. (Amos 7:14 ) So great was the value of these trees that David appointed for them in his kingdom a special overseer, as he did for the olives (1 Chronicles 27:28 ) and it is mentioned as one of the heaviest of Egypt's calamities that her sycamore were destroyed by hailstones.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Sycamore
More properly sycomore (Heb. shikmoth and shikmim, Gr. sycomoros), a tree which in its general character resembles the fig-tree, while its leaves resemble those of the mulberry; hence it is called the fig-mulberry (Ficus sycomorus). At Jericho, Zacchaeus climbed a sycomore-tree to see Jesus as he passed by (Luke 19:4 ). This tree was easily destroyed by frost (Psalm 78:47 ), and therefore it is found mostly in the "vale" (1 Kings 10:27 ; 2 Chronicles 1:15 : in both passages the RSV has properly "lowland"), i.e., the "low country," the shephelah, where the climate is mild. (Amos 7:14 ) refers to its fruit, which is of an inferior character; so also probably (Jeremiah 24:2 ). It is to be distinguished from our sycamore (the Acer pseudo-platanus), which is a species of maple often called a plane-tree.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Sycamore
(ssihc' uh mohre) A combination “fig” and “mulberry” tree (Ficus sycomorus) indicating the fig tree in the Jordan valley that had leaves like our mulberry tree. Its fruit was inferior to the fig tree and had to be punctured to make the fruit edible. Amos was employed as “one who took care of sycamore-fig trees” (Amos 7:14 NIV; compare Psalm 78:47 ). This tree has no relation to the American sycamore tree. It was used as food for the poor and bore fruit several times a year. See 1 Kings 10:27 ; 2 Chronicles 1:15 ; 2 Chronicles 9:27 . It was often planted along roadways for its shade (see Luke 19:4 ). Poor people used its wood rather than expensive cedar (Isaiah 9:10 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Dresser of Sycamore Trees
One of the occupations of the prophet Amos (Amos 7:14 ). The tending involved slitting the top of each piece of fruit to hasten its ripening and to produce a sweeter, more edible fruit. Fruit infested with insects might be discarded at this time as well. The significance of Amos' trade is twofold: (1) He was a prophet solely because of the call of God, not because of training in a prophetic school; and (2) contrary to the accusation of the priest Amaziah (Amos 7:12 ), Amos did not earn his living by prophesying.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Sycamore
Luke 19:4. Often planted by the wayside for shade. Τristram ("Land of Israel") found an old sycamore at the broken aqueduct of Herod's Jericho. The fig mulberry or sycamore fig (Amos 7:14). (See SYCAMINE.) The size of a walnut tree; the leaves heart shaped, downy underneath and fragrant; the fruit growing in clusters on little sprigs from the trunk. Amos was a gatherer employed about sycamore fruit (Hebrew); but Septuagint makes him a "puncturer (knizon ) of sycamore fruit." Pliny says they made an incision in the fruit when of a certain size, and on the fourth day it ripened. The KJV is compatible with the Hebrew. If not gathered, it spoils by gnats. It is inferior to the fig. The tree is always green, and bears fruit often throughout the year, so that it is of much value to the poor. The wood, though porous, is durable, and suffers neither from moisture nor heat; Egyptian mummy coffins of it are sound after entombment for thousands of years. The destruction of sycamore trees by hailstones was among Egypt's heavy losses (margin Psalms 78:47). David had an overseer over his sycamore trees (1 Chronicles 26:28; compare also 1 Kings 10:27).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Sycamore,
shiqmah, συκομωραία. This is a tree large enough for a man to rest in its branches, as Zacchaeus did. Luke 19:4 . It was known in Egypt, and was plentiful in Palestine. Amos was a 'gatherer of sycamore fruit.' David had a special overseer of such trees. 1 Kings 10:27 ; 1 Chronicles 27:28 ; Psalm 78:47 ; Isaiah 9:10 ; Amos 7:14 . It is supposed to be the sycamore-fig, or fig-mulberry (Ficus sycomorus ). Its wood is very durable. The Egyptian mummy coffins made of it have remained sound after the entombment of thousands of years.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Sycamore
שקמות , שקמים , 1 Kings 10:27 ; 1 Chronicles 27:28 ; 2 Chronicles 1:15 ; Psalms 78:47 ; Isaiah 9:9 ; Amos 8:14 ; συκομορεα , Luke 19:4 ; a large tree, according to the description of Theophrastus, Dioscorides, and Galen, resembling the mulberry-tree in the leaf, and the fig in its fruit; hence its name, compounded of συκεν , fig, and μορος , mulberry; and some have fancied that it was originally produced by ingrafting the one tree upon the other. Its fruit is palatable.
When ripe it is soft, watery, somewhat sweet, with a little of an aromatic taste. The trees are very common in Palestine, Arabia, and Egypt; grow large, and to a great height; and though their grain is coarse, are much used in building. To change sycamores into cedars, Isaiah 9:10 , means, to render the buildings of cities, and the state of the nation, much more magnificent than before. Dr. Shaw remarks, that as the grain and texture of the sycamore is remarkably coarse and spongy, it could therefore stand in no competition at all with the cedar for beauty and ornament. We meet with the same opposition of cedars to sycamores in 1 Kings 10:27 , where Solomon is said to have made silver as the stones, and cedars as the sycamores of the vale for abundance. "By this mashal, or figurative and sententious speech," says Bishop Lowth, "they boast, in the place of Isaiah, that they shall be easily able to repair their present losses, suffered, perhaps, by the first Assyrian invasion under Tiglath-Pileser, and to bring their affairs to a more flourishing condition than ever." The wood of this tree is very durable. "The mummy chests," says Dr. Shaw, "and whatever figures and instruments of wood are found in the catacombs, are all of them of sycamore, which, though spongy and porous to appearance, has, notwithstanding, continued entire and uncorrupted for at least three thousand years. From its value in furnishing wood for various uses, from the grateful shade which its wide-spreading branches afforded, and on account of the fruit, which Mallet says the Egyptians hold in the highest estimation, we perceive the loss which the ancient inhabitants of Egypt must have felt when their vines were destroyed with hail, and their sycamore trees with frost," Psalms 78:47 . "The sycamore," says Mr. Norden, "is of the height of a beech, and bears its fruit in a manner quite different from other trees; it has them on the trunk itself, which shoots out little sprigs, in form of grape stalks, at the end of which grow the fruit close to one another, almost like clusters of grapes. The tree is always green, and bears fruit several times in the year, without observing any certain seasons; for I have seen some sycamores that have given fruit two months after others. The fruit has the figure and smell of real figs, but is inferior to them in the taste, having a disgustful sweetness. Its colour is a yellow, inclining to an ochre, shadowed by a flesh colour. In the inside it resembles the common figs, excepting that it has a blackish colouring with yellow spots. This sort of tree is pretty common in Egypt; the people, for the greater part, live upon its fruit, and think themselves well regaled when they have a piece of bread, a couple of sycamore figs, and a pitcher of water." There might be many of these trees in Judea. David appointed a particular officer, whose sole duty it was to watch over the plantations of sycamore and olive-trees, 1 Chronicles 28:28; and being joined with the olive, the high estimation in which it was held is intimated; for the olive is considered as one of the most precious gifts which the God of nature has bestowed on the oriental nations. There seem to have been great numbers of them in Solomon's time, 1 Kings 10:27 ; and in the Talmud they are mentioned as growing in the plains of Jericho.
One curious particular in the cultivation of the fruit must not be passed over. Pliny, Dioscorides, and Theophrastus observe that the fruit must be cut or scratched, either with the nail or with iron, or it will not ripen; but four days after this process it will become ripe. To this same purpose Jerom, on Amos 7:14 , says, that without this management the figs are excessively bitter. These testimonies, together with the Septuagint and Vulgate version, are adduced to settle the meaning of the word בולס , in Amos 7:14 , which must signify scraping, or making incisions in the sycamore fruit; an employment of Amos before he was called to the prophetic office: "I was no prophet, neither was I a prophet's son; but I was a herdman, and a gatherer of sycamore fruit." Hasselquist, describing the ficus sycamorus, or Scripture sycamore, says, "It buds the latter end of March, and the fruit ripens in the beginning of June. At the time when the fruit has arrived to the size of an inch diameter, the inhabitants pare off a part at the centre point. They say that without this paring it would not come to maturity." The figs thus prematurely ripened are called djumeis baedri, that is, "precocious sycamore figs." As the sycamore is a large spreading tree, sometimes shooting up to a considerable height, we see the reason why Zaccheus climbed up into a sycamore tree to get a sight of our Saviour. This incident also furnishes a proof that the sycamore was still common in Palestine; for this tree stood to protect the traveller by the side of the highway.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Sycamore Tree
Sycamore Tree. The tree so called in Scripture is not the sycamore of this country, which is a species of maple. It rather belongs to the genus Ficus, and may be identified with the Ficus sycomoris, or sycamore fig. It to common both in Egypt and Syria. It is a tender tree, flourishing in sandy plains and warm valleys, but is not hardy enough for the mountain, and would be killed by a sharp frost. Psalms 78:47. It is lofty and wide-spreading, often planted by the wayside, over which its arms extend, just adapted to the purpose for which Zaccheus selected it. Luke 19:4. The sycamore yields several crops of figs in the year, which grow on short stems along the trunk and large branches. These figs are often small and insipid. Amos 7:14.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Sycamore or Sycamine
Luke 17:6 , a curious tree, which seems to partake of the nature of both the mulberry and the fig, the former in its leaf, and the latter in its fruit. Hence its name in Greek, meaning the mulberryfig. The sycamore is thus described by Norden: "I shall remark that they have in Egypt divers sorts of figs; but if there is any difference between them, a particular kind differs still more. I mean that, which the sycamore bears, that they name in Arabic giomez. It was upon a tree of this sort that Zaccheus got up, to see our Savior pass through Jericho, Luke 19:4 . This sycamore is of the height of a beech, and bears its fruit in a manner quite different from other trees. It has them on the trunk itself, which shoots out little sprigs in form of a grape-stalk, at the end of which grows the fruit, close to one another, much like bunches of grapes. The tree is always green, and bears fruit several times in the year, for I have seen some sycamores which had fruit has the figure and smell of real figs, but is inferior to them in the taste, having a disgustful sweetness. (Compare Amos 7:17 ) Its color is a yellow, inclining to an ochre, shadowed by a flesh color; in the inside, it resembles the common fig, excepting that it has a blackish coloring, with yellow spots. This sort of tree is pretty common in Egypt. The people, for the greater part, live on its fruit."
The sycamore has a very large trunk, which breaks up onto five or six stout branches not many feet above the ground; it is planted by the roadside, and often where two ways meet; and sends its enormous roots deeply into the ground in every direction, so that few trees can compare with it in steadfast firmness. The power that could say to it, "Be thou plucked up by the root, and be thou planted in the sea," and it should obey, must be of God, Luke 17:6 . From 1 Kings 10:27 1 Chronicles 27:28 2 Chronicles 1:15 , it is evident that this tree was quite common it Palestine, as well as in Egypt; and from its being joined with the vines in Psalm 78:47 , as well as from the circumstance of David's appointing a particular officer to superintend the plantations of them, it seems to have been as much valued in ancient as in modern times. From Isaiah 9:10 , we find that the timber of the sycamore was used in the construction of buildings; and notwithstanding its porous and spongy appearance, it was of extreme durability.
Describing the catacombs and mummies of Egypt, Dr. Shaw states that he found the mummy chests, and that little square boxes containing various figures, which are placed at the feet of each mummy, to be both made of sycamore and uncorrupted for at least three thousand years.

Sentence search

Daroo - ) The Egyptian Sycamore (Ficus Sycamorus). See Sycamore
Sicamore - ) See Sycamore
Sycamore - Τristram ("Land of Israel") found an old Sycamore at the broken aqueduct of Herod's Jericho. The fig mulberry or Sycamore fig (Amos 7:14). Amos was a gatherer employed about Sycamore fruit (Hebrew); but Septuagint makes him a "puncturer (knizon ) of Sycamore fruit. The destruction of Sycamore trees by hailstones was among Egypt's heavy losses (margin Psalms 78:47). David had an overseer over his Sycamore trees (1 Chronicles 26:28; compare also 1 Kings 10:27)
Sycamore Tree - Sycamore Tree. The tree so called in Scripture is not the Sycamore of this country, which is a species of maple. It rather belongs to the genus Ficus, and may be identified with the Ficus sycomoris, or Sycamore fig. The Sycamore yields several crops of figs in the year, which grow on short stems along the trunk and large branches
Sycamine Tree - This must be carefully distinguished from the Sycamore
Sycamore - Although it may be admitted that the sycamine is properly, and in ( Luke 17:6 ) the mulberry, and the Sycamore the mulberry, or Sycamore-fig ( Ficus sycomorus ), yet the latter is the tree generally referred to in the Old Testament and called by the Septuagint sycamine, as ( 1 Kings 10:27 ; 1 Chronicles 27:28 ; Psalm 78:47 ; Amos 7:14 ) The Sycamore or fig-mulberry, is in Egypt and Palestine a tree of great importance and very extensive use. (Amos 7:14 ) So great was the value of these trees that David appointed for them in his kingdom a special overseer, as he did for the olives (1 Chronicles 27:28 ) and it is mentioned as one of the heaviest of Egypt's calamities that her Sycamore were destroyed by hailstones
Baalhanan - Superintendent of David's olive and Sycamore trees
Zaccheus - See PUBLICANS and See Sycamore
Sycamore, - Amos was a 'gatherer of Sycamore fruit. It is supposed to be the Sycamore-fig, or fig-mulberry (Ficus sycomorus )
Buttonwood - ) The Platanus occidentalis, or American plane tree, a large tree, producing rough balls, from which it is named; - called also buttonball tree, and, in some parts of the United States, Sycamore
Sycamore - To change Sycamores into cedars, Isaiah 9:10 , means, to render the buildings of cities, and the state of the nation, much more magnificent than before. Shaw remarks, that as the grain and texture of the Sycamore is remarkably coarse and spongy, it could therefore stand in no competition at all with the cedar for beauty and ornament. We meet with the same opposition of cedars to Sycamores in 1 Kings 10:27 , where Solomon is said to have made silver as the stones, and cedars as the Sycamores of the vale for abundance. Shaw, "and whatever figures and instruments of wood are found in the catacombs, are all of them of Sycamore, which, though spongy and porous to appearance, has, notwithstanding, continued entire and uncorrupted for at least three thousand years. From its value in furnishing wood for various uses, from the grateful shade which its wide-spreading branches afforded, and on account of the fruit, which Mallet says the Egyptians hold in the highest estimation, we perceive the loss which the ancient inhabitants of Egypt must have felt when their vines were destroyed with hail, and their Sycamore trees with frost," Psalms 78:47 . "The Sycamore," says Mr. The tree is always green, and bears fruit several times in the year, without observing any certain seasons; for I have seen some Sycamores that have given fruit two months after others. This sort of tree is pretty common in Egypt; the people, for the greater part, live upon its fruit, and think themselves well regaled when they have a piece of bread, a couple of Sycamore figs, and a pitcher of water. David appointed a particular officer, whose sole duty it was to watch over the plantations of Sycamore and olive-trees, 1 Chronicles 28:28; and being joined with the olive, the high estimation in which it was held is intimated; for the olive is considered as one of the most precious gifts which the God of nature has bestowed on the oriental nations. These testimonies, together with the Septuagint and Vulgate version, are adduced to settle the meaning of the word בולס , in Amos 7:14 , which must signify scraping, or making incisions in the Sycamore fruit; an employment of Amos before he was called to the prophetic office: "I was no prophet, neither was I a prophet's son; but I was a herdman, and a gatherer of Sycamore fruit. " Hasselquist, describing the ficus sycamorus, or Scripture Sycamore, says, "It buds the latter end of March, and the fruit ripens in the beginning of June. " The figs thus prematurely ripened are called djumeis baedri, that is, "precocious Sycamore figs. " As the Sycamore is a large spreading tree, sometimes shooting up to a considerable height, we see the reason why Zaccheus climbed up into a Sycamore tree to get a sight of our Saviour. This incident also furnishes a proof that the Sycamore was still common in Palestine; for this tree stood to protect the traveller by the side of the highway
Chestnut Tree - This tree thrives best in low and rather moist situations in the north of Palestine, and resembles our Sycamore or buttonwood ( Platanus occidentalis )
Sycamore - Amos was employed as “one who took care of Sycamore-fig trees” (Amos 7:14 NIV; compare Psalm 78:47 ). This tree has no relation to the American Sycamore tree
Baal-Hanan - Official under David in charge of olive and Sycamore trees growing in Judean plain or Shephalah (1 Chronicles 27:28 )
Sycamine Tree - is mentioned only in (Luke 17:6 ) There is no reason to doubt that the sycamine is distinct from the Sycamore of the same evangelist
Sycamore or Sycamine - The Sycamore is thus described by Norden: "I shall remark that they have in Egypt divers sorts of figs; but if there is any difference between them, a particular kind differs still more. I mean that, which the Sycamore bears, that they name in Arabic giomez. This Sycamore is of the height of a beech, and bears its fruit in a manner quite different from other trees. The tree is always green, and bears fruit several times in the year, for I have seen some Sycamores which had fruit has the figure and smell of real figs, but is inferior to them in the taste, having a disgustful sweetness. " ...
The Sycamore has a very large trunk, which breaks up onto five or six stout branches not many feet above the ground; it is planted by the roadside, and often where two ways meet; and sends its enormous roots deeply into the ground in every direction, so that few trees can compare with it in steadfast firmness. From Isaiah 9:10 , we find that the timber of the Sycamore was used in the construction of buildings; and notwithstanding its porous and spongy appearance, it was of extreme durability. Shaw states that he found the mummy chests, and that little square boxes containing various figures, which are placed at the feet of each mummy, to be both made of Sycamore and uncorrupted for at least three thousand years
Sycamine - This is a different tree from the Sycamore, mentioned Luke 19:4 . Dioscorides says that this tree is the mulberry, though he allows that some apprehend that it is the same with the Sycamore
Naughty Figs - "The bad figs may have been such either from having decayed, and thus been reduced to a rotten condition, or as being the fruit of the Sycamore, which contains a bitter juice" (Tristram, Nat
Sycamine Tree - Luke 17:6; distinct from the Sycamore (Luke 19:4; Septuagint in Old Testament translated the latter however sycamine , meaning the Egyptian sycamine )
Treacle - ) A saccharine fluid, consisting of the inspissated juices or decoctions of certain vegetables, as the sap of the birch, Sycamore, and the like
Maple - campestre, the Sycamore maple is A
Sycamine Tree - Some contend, however, that this name denotes the Sycamore-fig of Luke 19:4
Amos - A contemporary of Hosea, Isaiah and Micah, a wealthy man, he tended sheep and Sycamore trees before G-d called upon him to prophesy in 621 BCE
Sycomore - This tree must not be confused with the ‘sycamore’ ( Acer pseudo-platanus ) of our home lands, which is a species of maple
a'Mos - (burden ), native of Tekoa in Judah, about six miles south of Bethlehem, originally a shepherd and dresser of Sycamore trees, who was called by God s Spirit to be a prophet, although not trained in any of the regular prophetic schools
Climb - And he ran before and climbed up into a Sycamore tree
Zaccheus - Just, from the Hebrew Zaccai, Nehemiah 7:14 , a worthy tax-gatherer at Jericho, who in order to see Christ took a position in a Sycamore-tree, by which He was about to pass
Sycamore - It is to be distinguished from our Sycamore (the Acer pseudo-platanus), which is a species of maple often called a plane-tree
Zacchae'us - (pure ), a tax-collector near Jericho, who, being short in stature climbed up into a Sycamore tree in order to obtain a sight of Jesus as he passed through that place
Zacchaeus - " Being short of stature, he hastened on before the multitude who were thronging about Christ as he passed through Jericho on his way to Jerusalem, and climbed up a Sycamore tree that he might be able to see him
Sycomore - The sycomore, which must not be confounded with the British Sycamore (A cer pseudo-Platanus), flourishes best in districts having a warm, equable climate
Ohio - After the consecration of Bishop Fenwick in 1822, the little church was moved by oxen into the city to a site on Sycamore Street, above Sixth
Embalm - ...
The brain and the intestines, with a probe and a sharp Etiopian black flint or agate to make an incision in the side, were extracted, and spices, myrrh, and cassia introduced; the body, washed and wrapped in fine linen was plastered in side with gum, was then laid in a mummy case shaped as a man, generally of Sycamore, as is that of king Mycerinus found in the third pyramid of Memphis
Lydda - ...
Lydda is now ‘a flourishing little town, embosomed in noble orchards of olive, fig, pomegranate, mulberry, Sycamore, and other trees, and surrounded every way by a very fertile neighbourhood
Jericho - Its Sycamore trees were quite valuable
on (2) - ) Tradition makes On the place visited by Joseph, Mary, and our Lord, and a Sycamore is shown under which they rested in their flight (Hosea 11:1; Matthew 2:15)
Shepherd - He was exposed to the extremes of heat and cold, (Genesis 31:40 ) his food frequently consisted of the precarious supplies afforded by nature, such as the fruit of the "sycamore" or Egyptian fig, (Amos 7:14 ) the "husks" of the carob tree, (Luke 15:16 ) and perchance the locusts and wild honey which supported the Baptist, (Matthew 3:4 ) he had to encounter the attacks of wild beasts, occasionally of the larger species, such as lions, nerves, panthers and bears, (1 Samuel 17:34 ; Isaiah 31:4 ; Jeremiah 5:6 ; Amos 5:12 ) nor was he free from the risk of robbers or predators hordes
Zacchaeus - ...
Zacchaeus could not see Jesus "for the press, because he was little of stature"; but where there is the will there is a way; he ran before (eagerness and determination, Hebrews 12:1; but God's love ran first toward Zacchaeus, Luke 19; Luke 15:20), and climbed up into a Sycamore to see Jesus as He was to pass that way
Baal - The name of one of David's officers, who had the superintendence of his olive and Sycamore plantations
Amos - A shepherd (probably owning flocks) and dresser of Sycamore fig trees; specially called of the Lord to prophesy, though not educated in the prophets' schools (Amos 1:1; Amos 7:14-15)
Gad (1) - , with Sycamore, beech, terebinth, ilex, cedar, arbutus, and enormous fig trees
Food - Some of the better known fruits were figs, grapes, olives, pomegranates, apples, dates, Sycamore, pistachio nuts and almonds (Genesis 43:11; Deuteronomy 8:8; Deuteronomy 34:3; Song of Song of Solomon 7:8; Song of Solomon 8:5; Amos 7:14; Matthew 7:16; see FIGS; GRAPES; OLIVES)
Amos - ...
Amos was a layperson who disclaimed professional status as a prophet: “I am no prophet, nor a prophet's son, but I am a herdsman, and a dresser of Sycamore trees, and the Lord took me from following the flock, and the Lord said to me, Go, prophesy to my people Israel'” (Amos 7:14-15 RSV)
House - The wood for the roof-beams was furnished mostly by the common Sycamore, cypress ( Song of Solomon 1:17 ) and cedar ( 1 Kings 6:9 ) being reserved for the homes of the wealthy. Hence the point of Isaiah’s contrast between the humble houses of crude brick, roofed with Sycamore, and the stately edifices of hewn stone roofed with cedar ( Isaiah 9:10 )
Palesti'na - The larger towns, as Gaza and Ashdod, which stand near the shore, are surrounded with huge groves of olive, Sycamore and, as in the days King David. There is also the carob or locust tree ( Ceratonia siliqua ), the pine, Sycamore, poplar and walnut
Cooking And Heating - Other trees provided basic food which was eaten either raw or stewed—figs, Sycamore figs, pomegranates, and nuts
Dwelling - Other materials were timber, such as cedar, shittim (acacia), Sycamore, olive, and in palaces algum and cypress
Egypt - The eighth, the locusts eating every tree, attacked what the Egyptians so prized that Egypt was among other titles called "the land of the Sycamore. son of the Sycamore) in one of the oldest papyri relates that he, an Amu, under the 12th dynasty, rose to high rank under Pharaoh, and after a long exile abroad was restored and made "counselor among the chosen ones," to develop the resources of Egypt (just as Joseph), taking precedence among the courtiers
Jerusalem - "Solomon made silver in Jerusalem (common) as stones, and cedars as Sycamore trees" (1 Kings 10:27; 2 Chronicles 9:27; Ecclesiastes 2:9)
Palestine - Olive, Sycamore, and palm encircle Gaza and Ashdod in the plain along the shore
Canaan - Among other indigenous productions may be enumerated the cedar and other varieties of the pine, the cypress, the oak, the Sycamore, the mulberry tree, the fig tree, the willow, the turpentine tree, the acacia, the aspen, the arbutus, the myrtle, the almond tree, the tamarisk, the oleander, the peach tree, the chaste tree, the carob or locust tree, the oskar, the doom, the mustard plant, the aloe, the citron, the apple, the pomegranate, and many flowering shrubs
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - On the contrary, he was a most successful shepherd in Tekoa and a grower of Sycamore-fig fruit (1:1; 7:14)