What does Stephen mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
στέφανον one of the seven deacons in Jerusalem and the first Christian martyr. 3
στεφάνῳ one of the seven deacons in Jerusalem and the first Christian martyr. 2
στεφάνου one of the seven deacons in Jerusalem and the first Christian martyr. 1
στέφανος one of the seven deacons in Jerusalem and the first Christian martyr. 1

Definitions Related to Stephen

G4736


   1 one of the seven deacons in Jerusalem and the first Christian martyr.
   Additional Information: Stephen = “crowned”.
   

Frequency of Stephen (original languages)

Frequency of Stephen (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Langton, Stephen
Cardinal, Archbishop of Canterbury, died Sussex, England, 1228. Combining scholarship and statesmanship, he is noted for his division of the Bible into chapters, and as leader of the barons in their struggle against King John for constitutional liberty, Langton wrote the Magna Carta, and with the barons, forced John to sign it (1265). He drew up an important code of canons for the See of Canterbury.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mallory, Stephen Russell
Lawyer and statesman, born Trinidad, West Indies, 1813; died Pensacola, Florida, 1873. He took part in the Seminole War and later represented Florida in the United States Senate. In the Civil War he joined the Confederates, distinguishing himself as Secretary of the Navy by building the entire Confederate navy.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Stephen
STEPHEN . Early in the history of the Christian Church it was found necessary for the Apostles to devolve some of their duties on others. There is no reason for supposing (with Prof. Ramsay) that presbyters had yet been appointed, though they soon followed; but in Acts 6:1-15 seven persons, commonly (but not in NT) called ‘deacons,’ all but one probably Hellenistic or Greek-speaking Jews (see art. Nicolas), were appointed to manage the distribution of alms to the Hellenist widows. Of the Seven, Stephen was the most prominent. Their duties were not eleemosynary only; Stephen at once undertook evangelistic work and won great success, persuading many, and working miracles. His success resulted in the first persecution of the Church, and false witnesses were brought who accused him of blasphemy, and of speaking against the Temple and the Law. He made a long defence ( Acts 7:2-53 ), which is not easy of interpretation. He summarizes OT history from the call of Abraham to the building of Solomon’s Temple (cf. St. Paul’s sermon in Acts 13:1-52 ), in a manner which shows that he depended partly on tradition, for there are many discrepancies between his speech and OT. He speaks with great respect of the Mosaic Law ( Acts 7:35-38 ; Acts 7:53 ). Some think that he disparages the Temple as having been built against God’s will ( Acts 13:48 ff.). But this is very improbable. Perhaps the defence was not completed; yet what was delivered gives its drift. The Jews had misunderstood their own Law. God had not confined His presence to the Tabernacle and the Temple; He had appeared to Abraham and others before the Law was given; Isaiah ( Isaiah 66:1 f.) had preached that God’s worship was not confined to one place. But the people had persecuted the prophets as they now had killed Jesus. This defence provoked the Jews so much that they cast Stephen out of the city and stoned him undoubtedly an illegal murder, not sanctioned by the Roman law. Stephen, whose dying prayer for his murderers ( Acts 7:60 ) recalls that of his Master, thus became the first Christian martyr. His death led to a persecution, and to a dispersal of the disciples from Jerusalem. This caused the spread of the gospel to many lands. But the most prominent fruit of the martyrdom, doubtless, was the conversion of Saul of Tarsus, who was present ( Acts 7:58 , Isaiah 8:1 ), and of whom, as is generally acknowledged, Stephen was in his preaching the forerunner.
A. J. Maclean.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Stephen
When some of the Greek-speaking Jews in the early Jerusalem church complained that their widows were being neglected, Stephen was one of seven men chosen to help sort out the problem. He was a man full of the Holy Spirit, strong in faith, gifted in the working of miracles and brilliant in debating with the opponents of Christianity (Acts 6:1-10).
Being a Greek-speaking Jew himself, Stephen went to the synagogue for Greek-speaking Jews in Jerusalem to try to turn his fellow Jews to Christ. But instead, they turned against him (Acts 6:11). Stephen saw that Christianity was not simply a remodelled Judaism. Through the life and work of Jesus, everything had changed. The Jewish laws, ceremonies, temple and priesthood had fulfilled their purpose and were no longer necessary. When Stephen preached these things, the Jews accused him of blasphemy and brought him before their Council, the Sanhedrin (Acts 6:12-15).
In defending his preaching, Stephen gave an outline of Israel’s history, his aim being to demonstrate two main points. He showed firstly that God had never limited himself to one location (Acts 7:2; Acts 7:9; Acts 7:30; Acts 7:44; Acts 7:48), and secondly that the people of Israel had always rejected God’s messengers (Acts 7:9; Acts 7:25; Acts 7:35; Acts 7:40). He applied these two points to the Jews of his time by saying that they were mistaken in thinking God dwelt in the Jerusalem temple, and that their rejection of Christ was in keeping with the stubbornness of their forefathers (Acts 7:48-53).
Furious at Stephen’s words, the Jews rushed upon him, dragged him out of the city and stoned him to death (Acts 7:54-60). They then drove all the other Greek-speaking Jewish Christians out of Jerusalem (Acts 8:1-3). The result, however, was that Christianity spread throughout the region, as the expelled Christians preached the gospel wherever they went (Acts 8:4; Acts 11:19).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Stephen
(sstih' fehn) Personal name meaning, “crown.” The first Christian martyr; foremost of those chosen to bring peace to the quarreling church (Acts 6:1-7 ) and so mighty in the Scriptures that his Jewish opponents in debate could not refute him (Acts 6:10 ) as he argued that Jesus was the Messiah. Saul of Tarsus heard Stephen's speech to the Jewish Sanhedrin accusing the Jewish leaders of rejecting God's way as their forefathers had (Acts 6:12-7:53 ). Saul held the clothes of those who stoned Stephen to death; he saw him die a victorious death. Stephen may well have been the human agency that God used to conquer him who would become the great Christian missionary.
Stephen was in the forefront of those who saw Christianity as much more than a Jewish sect. They took seriously the commission of Jesus to carry the gospel to the whole world and led to the founding of the world mission movement that took the gospel to the whole Roman Empire in the first century. The believers had to flee Jerusalem after Stephen's death while the apostles alone remained there (Acts 8:1 ).
Fred L. Fisher
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Stephen
Of Stephen we know nothing beyond the abort notice of him contained in the two chapters (6 and 7) of Acts. He is said by Epiphanius [Haer. xx. 4) to have been one of the Seventy; but such a statement has little weight. All we can say for certain is that, when elected to be one of the Seven, he was a man of position both within and without the Christian community (Acts 6:3). The office to which he was appointed was that of administering alms to the widows of Hellenists (i.e. Greek-speaking Jews) who considered themselves overlooked in the daily distribution from the common fund of food or money. But to this work Stephen, like others of the Seven, notably Philip, by no means restricted himself. He was ‘full of grace and power’ (Acts 6:8), and was impelled to engage in controversy with members of the Hellenistic synagogues established in Jerusalem, and ‘they were not able to withstand the wisdom and the Spirit by which he spake’ (Acts 6:10). It is generally supposed that, as he devoted himself to the members of these Hellenistic synagogues, he was himself a Hellenist. The inference, not unreasonable in itself, is confirmed by his name, and by the familiarity which he seems to show with the Septuagint version of the Scriptures, perhaps even by what seems to have been the tenor of his teaching. To the Hellenist Jews with whom he argued that tenor must have been unmistakable, even from the outset. He was at once accused of undermining the authority of the Law of Moses, denying the permanent sanctity even of the Temple (Acts 6:14-15).
Those who brought these charges are called false witnesses. False witnesses they undoubtedly were, as they interpreted the words of warning and of insight which he uttered as threats thrown out against the Temple and the Law. In this it was with Stephen as it had been previously with our Lord, Our Lord Himself had said that He was to become the world’s temple in the future, and was condemned for blasphemy for speaking ill words against the Temple in Jerusalem; Stephen proclaimed that Temple and Law had done their work and were to give place in time to a more spiritual temple, a more universal law, and was denounced for blasphemy. The speech which he delivers when summoned before the Sanhedrin makes it plain that this was his position; and the fullness with which the speech is given, as a sort of introduction to the section of the Acts which traces the gradual reception of the Gentiles into the Christian Church, makes it obvious that this is the right construction to be put upon his words.
The speech itself contains three lines of thought, sometimes kept separate, but oftener interlaced, all leading up to one and the same conclusion. The first line is this-that the original covenant made between God and Israel was concluded not with Moses but long before with Abraham and the patriarchs, and, since the Mosaic covenant had been thus preceded by an earlier and more spiritual one, it might also be followed by a later and more spiritual one (‘A covenant confirmed beforehand by God, the law, which came four hundred and thirty years after, doth not disannul, so as to make the promise of none effect’ (Galatians 3:17). Secondly, there is the suggestion that since God was worshipped acceptably long before temple or even tabernacle (after which the Temple was modelled, the tabernacle itself being but a copy of the heavenly tabernacle seen on the mount) was built, and again since God was acceptably worshipped in spots far removed from the Land of Canaan, and Solomon, at the very moment of building the Temple, declared that God dwells not in ‘houses made with hands’ (Acts 7:48), it is at least possible that God may be worshipped, and worshipped acceptably, elsewhere than in the Temple. Thirdly, the speech ends with the warning to which all the earlier part-the fate of Joseph, the fate of Moses-had led up: ‘Ye stiffnecked and uncircumcised in heart and ears, ye do always resist the Holy Ghost: as your fathers did, so do ye’ (Acts 7:51). It was this last lesson so emphatically driven home that immediately produced that outbreak of rage in the Sanhedrin which brought about Stephen’s death. Its members condemned him to be guilty of blasphemy: he had justified, not denied or even softened down, his previous utterances; they rushed upon him, and, when he stated that he saw the heavens opened and Jesus standing to welcome him on the right hand of God, the vision did, in this view, but increase the blasphemy, so they dragged him out of the city and stoned him. Saul, then a young man, presided at the stoning and gave hearty assent and approval to his death (Acts 7:60, Acts 8:1).
Two questions relating to this stoning have to be answered: (1) How did it take place at all, seeing that the Jews had not the power of life and death? (2) What was the date at which it occurred? As to the first point, the actual martyrdom of Stephen seems to have been something of the nature of a tumultuous outbreak. It was a sudden fit of rage that brought it about, similar to that through which St. Paul so nearly lost his life had he not been rescued by the Roman soldiers (Acts 22:23 ff.). As to the second question, it has been suggested that this outbreak took place during a temporary vacancy in the provincial authority, which will not, however, fix the date, as the Roman governors were frequently changed during this period; or, as some have thought, it may have occurred during a vacancy in the Imperial throne. Tiberius died and Caius became Emperor early in a.d. 37, and Stephen’s martyrdom has been put at this time. This is almost the latest date assigned, and there is more, perhaps, to be said for an earlier date such as Ramsay suggests-a.d. 32 or 33 (St. Paul the Traveller and the Roman Citizen, p. 376). All that we can gather with fair certainty is that St. Paul’s conversion followed soon after; but the date of this event is itself involved in much obscurity, depending, as it does, on whether we identify the visit to Jerusalem mentioned in Galatians 2 with the visit of Paul and Barnabas described in Acts 11, 12 or with that described in Acts 15. As Harnack, The Acts of the Apostles, p. 29, concludes, it is impossible to settle this point with certainty, because St. Luke, probably having himself no exact date to rely upon, has left the chronology of this section of the Acts in intentional obscurity.
Literature.-J. P. Norris, Key to Narrative of the Acts of the Apostles, London, 1885; R. B. Rackham, The Acts of the Apostles, do., 1901; W. M. Ramsay, St. Paul the Traveller and the Roman Citizen, do., 1895; A. Harnack, The Acts of the Apostles, Eng. translation , do., 1909, Luke the Physician, Eng. translation , do., 1907.
W. A. Spooner.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Stephen
One of theseven chosen in the church at Jerusalem to minister the alms of the saints. He was a Greek-speaking Jew, who, though appointed to an office, yet in the energy of the Holy Ghost, bore witness of the power consequent on Christ being glorified, and the Holy Spirit here. 1 Timothy 3:13 . Stephen was able to speak with such wisdom and power that his hearers could not withstand him. They suborned evil men to falsely accuse him, and he was dragged before the Jewish council, to whom his face appeared like that of an angel. He sketched the history of the people from Abraham, with which they were all familiar; but he laid bare from the outset the opposition of the Jews and of their fathers. Joseph they had refused; Moses they had repelled; they had turned to idolatry; had slain the prophets; had always resisted the Holy Ghost; and had been the betrayers and murderers of the Just One. Such was man's history under culture and probation.
His hearers were cut to the heart, but did not repent: they gnashed their teeth at him. He, lifting up his eyes to heaven, saw the glory of God, and Jesus standing on the right hand of God, and bore testimony to this. But they rushed upon him, cast him out of the city, and stoned him. He, like Jesus, prayed that their sin might not be laid to their charge, and, commending his spirit to the Lord, fell asleep.
Stephen's martyrdom formed an epoch in the history of the church. Being a Hellenist, he in this respect differed from the apostles. He was chosen for the first martyr. To him the heaven was opened, and he bore witness to Jesus, the second Man, being at the right hand of God. It is at this juncture that Saul, who was destined to carry on the ministry of the gospel of the glory of Christ, is brought into view. He was then a young man, at whose feet the witnesses laid their clothes. Acts 6:5-15 ; Acts 7 ; Acts 8:2 ; Acts 11:19 ; Acts 22:20 .
It has been asserted, by some critics, that Stephen made several mistakes in his address to the council! It is said, however, in scripture that he was "full of the Holy Ghost." See SHECHEM.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Stephen
The first of the seven appointed to minister as a deacon in distributing alms, so that the Grecian widows should not be neglected while the Hebrew widows were served (Acts 6; 7). (See DEACON.) His Grecian name (meaning "crown"; by a significant coincidence he was the first who received the crown of martyrdom) and his anti-Judaistic speech indicate that he was a Hellenist or Greek speaking foreign Jew as contrasted with a home born Hebrew speaking Jew. (See GRECIAN.) "He did great miracles and wonders among the people," in confirmation of the gospel. He was, like the rest of the seven, "of honest report, full of the Holy Spirit and wisdom"; also "full of faith and power," so that the disputants of the synagogue of the Libertines, Cyrenians, Alexandrians, Cilicians, all like himself Grecian Jews, "were not able to resist the wisdom and the spirit by which he spoke." So they charged him before the Sanhedrin by suborned witnesses with speaking against Moses and God, the temple and the law, and asserting that, Jesus of Nazareth should destroy the temple and change the customs that Moses had delivered.
Doubtless, he showed that Jesus really "fulfilled" the law while setting aside that part of its letter which was designed to continue only until the gospel realized its types. His Hellenistic life away from the temple and its rites made him less dependent on them and readier to comprehend the gospel's freedom from legal bonds. The prophets similarly had foretold the superseding of the legal types and the temple by the Antitype (Jeremiah 7:4; Jeremiah 31:31-34). His judges looking steadfastly on him "saw his face as it had been the face of an angel," like that of Moses after talking with God on the mountain (Exodus 34:29-35; 2 Corinthians 3:18; Ecclesiastes 8:1). They were at first awestruck, as the band that fell backward at Jesus' presence in Gethsemane. Then the high priest appealed to Stephen himself as Caiaphas had to Jesus. His speech is not the unconnected narrative that many suppose, but a covert argument which carries his hearers unconsciously along with him until at the close he unveils the drift of the whole, namely, to show:
(1) That in Israel's past history God's revelation of Himself was not confined to the holy land and the temple, that Abraham had enjoyed God's revelations in Mesopotamia, Haran, and Canaan before he possessed a foot of the promised land; so also Israel and Moses in the strange land of Egypt, and in Midian and Sinai, which was therefore "holy ground" (Acts 7:33), and in the wilderness 40 years.
(2) That in their past history from the first the same failure to recognize their true friends appeared as in their present rejection of the great Antitype Messiah and His ministers: "ye stiffnecked and uncircumcised in heart and ears, ye do always resist the Holy Spirit, as your fathers did so do ye"; so the brethren toward Joseph, the Israelites towards Moses (Acts 7:9; Acts 7:35; Acts 7:40), and worst of all toward God, whom they forsook for a calf and for Moloch.
(3) That God nevertheless by ways seeming most unlikely to man ultimately exalted the exile Abraham, the outcast slave Joseph, and the despised Moses to honour and chiefship; so it will be in Messiah's case in spite of the humiliation which makes the Jews reject Him.
(4) That Solomon the builder of the temple recognized that which the Jews lose sight of, namely, that the Most High dwelleth not in temples made with hands, as though His presence was confined to a locality (1 Kings 8:27; 2 Chronicles 2:6; 2 Chronicles 6:18), and which Jehovah through Isaiah (Isaiah 66:1) insists on.
Therefore spiritual worship is the true worship for which the temple was but a preparation. The alleged discrepancies between the Old Testament and Stephen's speech are only in appearance. He under the Holy Spirit supplements the statements in Exodus 7:7, Moses "fourscore years old" at his call, 40 years in the wilderness, 120 at his death (Deuteronomy 29:5; Deuteronomy 31:2; Deuteronomy 34:7), by adding that he was 40 at his visiting his Israelite brethren and leaving Egypt for Midian, and stayed there 40 (Acts 7:23-30). Also he combines, as substantially one for his immediate object, the two statements (Genesis 15:16), "after that they shall come here (to Canaan) again," and Exodus 3:12, "ye shall serve God upon this mountain" (Horeb), by Acts 7:7, "after that they shall come forth and serve Me in this place" (Canaan).
Israel's being brought forth to worship Jehovah in Horeb, and subsequent worshipping Him in Canaan their inheritance, were but different stages in the same deliverance, not needing to be distinguished for Stephen's purpose. Moses' trembling (Acts 7:32) was a current belief which Stephen endorses under the Spirit. Again as to Acts 7:15-16, "Jacob and our fathers were carried over into Sychem, and laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought of Emmor," Stephen with elliptical brevity refers to six different chapters, summing up in one sentence, which none of his hearers could misunderstand from their familiarity as to the details, the double purchase (from Ephron the Hittite by Abraham, and from Hamor of Shechem by Jacob: Genesis 23:16; Genesis 33:19), the double burial place (Machpelah's cave and the ground at Shechem), and the double burial (Jacob in Machpelah's cave: Genesis 50:13, and Joseph in the Shechem ground of Jacob, Genesis 50:25; Exodus 13:19; Joshua 24:32).
The burials and purchases were virtually one so far as his purpose was concerned, namely, to show the faith of the patriarchs and their interest in Canaan when to the eye of sense all seemed against the fulfillment of God's promise; Stephen hereby implying that, however visionary Jesus' and His people's prospects might seem, yet they are as certain as were the patriarchs' prospects when their only possession in Canaan was a tomb. These seeming discrepancies with the Old Testament are just what a forger would avoid, they confirm, the genuineness of S.' s speech as we have it. So as to other supplementary notices in it as compared with Old Testament (Acts 7:2 with Genesis 12:1; Acts 7:4 with Genesis 11:32; Acts 7:14 with Genesis 46:27; Acts 7:20 with Exodus 2:2; Acts 7:22 with Exodus 4:10; Acts 7:21 with Exodus 2:10; Acts 7:53 with Deuteronomy 33:2; Acts 7:42-43 with Amos 5:26).
The fascination with which at first Stephen's beaming heavenly countenance had overawed his stern judges gave place to fury when they at last saw the drift of his covert argument. Perceiving their resistance to the truth he broke off with a direct charge: "ye stiffnecked (with unbending neck and head haughtily thrown back), and (with all your boast of circumcision) uncircumcised in heart and ears (which ye close against conviction!), ye do always resist the Holy Spirit" (compare Nehemiah 9:29-30); with all your phylacteries "ye have not kept (efulaxate ) the law," of which you boast. They were cut to the heart (Greek: "sawn asunder") and gnashed on him with set teeth. But Stephen, full of the Holy Spirit," strained his eyes with steadfast look into heaven" (atenisas , the same word as describes the disciples' look after the ascending Saviour: Acts 1:10). There he saw "standing (to help (Psalms 109:31), plead for and receive him, not as elsewhere sitting in majestic repose) the Son of man" (a phrase used elsewhere in New Testament by Jesus Himself).
The members of the council, remembering probably the use of similar language by Jesus when on trial before them (Matthew 26:64), being at all events resolved to treat as blasphemy Stephen's assertion of the divine exaltation of Him whom they had crucified, cried aloud, stopped their ear's (unconsciously realizing Stephen's picture of them: Acts 7:51; Psalms 58:4), ran upon him with one accord (contrast "with one accord," Acts 4:24), and cast him out of the city (as was the custom in order to put out from the midst of them such a pollution: 1 Kings 21:13; Luke 4:29; Hebrews 13:12) and stoned him, all sharing in the execution, the witnesses casting the first stones (Deuteronomy 13:9-10; Deuteronomy 17:7; John 8:7), after having stripped off the outer garments for greater ease in the bloody work, and laid them at the feet of Saul who thereby signified his consent to Stephen's execution (Acts 8:1; Acts 22:20).
The act was in violation of Roman authority, which alone had power of life or death, a sudden outbreak as in John 8:59. Like Jesus in his recognition of the glory of "the Son of man," he also resembled his Lord in his last two cries, the second uttered on bended knee to mark the solemnity of his intercession, "Lord Jesus (as Jesus had invoked the Father), receive my spirit." "Lord lay not this sin to their charge" (Luke 23:34; Luke 23:46). Thus Stephen was laid "asleep" (the term for death after Jesus' pattern: John 11:11, compare Deuteronomy 31:16; Daniel 12:2; 1 Corinthians 15:18; 1 Corinthians 15:51). Devout proselytes, a class related to the Hellenists to whom Stephen belonged, carried him to his burial and made great lamentation over him. His holy day is put next after Christmas, the martyr having the nearest place to the great Sufferer. It is the Lord's becoming man to die for man that nerves man to be willing to die for the Lord.
The gate opening on the descent to the valley of the Kedron is called Stephen's gate. Stephen was first of the earliest Christian ministry, "the archdeacon," as the Eastern church calls him. To Stephen first the name "martyr" is applied (Acts 22:20). The forerunner of Paul, whose conversion was the first fruit of his prayer for his murderers; among the pricks of conscience which Saul vainly strove to resist (Acts 9:5) the foremost was remorse at the remembrance of the part he took in the last touching scene of the holy martyr's execution. The first martyr foreran the first apostle of the Gentiles; Stephen anticipated that worldwide universality of spirit which Paul advocated everywhere in opposition to the narrow prejudices of Judaism.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Stephen
the first martyr. He is always put at the head of the seven deacons; and it is believed he had studied at the feet of Gamaliel. As he was full of the Holy Ghost, and of zeal, Acts 6:5-6 , &c, he performed many wonderful miracles: and those of the synagogue of the Libertines, of the Cyrenians, of the Alexandrians, and others, disputing with him, could not withstand the wisdom and the power with which the spoke. Then having suborned false witnesses, to testify that they had heard him blaspheme against Moses, and against God, they drew him before the sanhedrim. Stephen appeared in the midst of this assembly, with a countenance like that of an angel; and the high priest asking him what he had to answer, in his defence, he rapidly traced the history of the Jews, showing that they had always opposed themselves to God and his prophets; faithfully upbraided them with the hardness of their hearts, with their putting the prophets to death, and, lastly, with slaying Christ himself. At these words they were filled with rage, and gnashed their teeth against him. But Stephen, lifting up his eyes to heaven, calmly exclaimed, "I see the heavens opened, and the Son of man standing at the right hand of God." Then the Jews cried out, and stopped their ears as though they had heard blasphemy, and falling on him, they drew him out of the city, and stoned him. The witnesses laid down their clothes at the feet of a young man called Saul, afterward St. Paul, who then appears to have commenced his career of persecution. "And they stoned Stephen, calling upon God, and saying, Lord Jesus, receive, my spirit; and he kneeled down and cried with a loud voice, Lord, lay not this sin to their charge. And when he had said this, he fell asleep," an example of the majesty and meekness of true Christian heroism, and as the first, so also the pattern, of all subsequent martyrs. His Christian brethren forsook not the remains of this holy man; but took care to bury him, and accompanied his funeral with great mourning, Acts 8:2 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Stephen
Stephen (stç'vn), a chaplet, crown. One of the seven and the first martyr of the Christian church. Acts 6:5; After a noble defence, he was dragged without the city, where, while praying, he was stoned to death. Acts 6:11-15; Acts 7:1-60; Acts 8:2; Acts 11:19; Acts 22:20.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Badin, Stephen Theodore
(1768-1853) Pioneer missionary in Kentucky, born Orléans, France; died Cincinnati, Ohio. He entered the Sulpician Seminary at Orléans, completing his studies in America, where he was ordained, the first in the United States, May 25, 1793. Appointed to the Kentucky mission, he labored for many years, forming congregations and building churches. After a sojourn in France, 1819-1828, he returned to America and undertook missionary work among the Pottowattomies, being named Vicar-General of Kentucky, 1837. In 1846 he became rector of a French mission in Illinois. His published works include a history of the Kentucky missions, two Latin poems, and Letters to an Episcopalian Friend.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Stephen Brinkley
(born c.1550)English confessor of the Faith, imprisoned and tortured as manager of a secret press for the publication of devotional and controversial works. Among these were a treatise by Parsons, and Campion's famous "Ten Reasons." He belonged to George Gilbert's association of unmarried men of property, who pledged their wealth to assist the Church, aiding disguised priests and laboring to convert heretics. On his release from prison, he continued to issue Catholic works in France.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Stephen Langton
Cardinal, Archbishop of Canterbury, died Sussex, England, 1228. Combining scholarship and statesmanship, he is noted for his division of the Bible into chapters, and as leader of the barons in their struggle against King John for constitutional liberty, Langton wrote the Magna Carta, and with the barons, forced John to sign it (1265). He drew up an important code of canons for the See of Canterbury.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Stephen Perry
Jesuit astronomer; born London, England, 1833; died 1889. He devoted himself to astronomy and as director of Stonyhurst Observatory studied, in particular, solar spots and faculre. He was sent by the British Government on numerous scientific expeditions, observing the transits of Venus at Kerguelen (1874) and Madagascar (1882), and the solar eclipse at the Isles de Salut (1889), dying a few weeks later at sea. He was buried at Georgetown, Demerara.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Stephen Mallory
Lawyer and statesman, born Trinidad, West Indies, 1813; died Pensacola, Florida, 1873. He took part in the Seminole War and later represented Florida in the United States Senate. In the Civil War he joined the Confederates, distinguishing himself as Secretary of the Navy by building the entire Confederate navy.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Stephen
One of the seven deacons first chosen by the church at Jerusalem, and distinguished among them as "a man full of faith and of the Holy Ghost." He seems from his name to have been a Hellenistic Jew, (see GRECIANS,) and to have been chosen in part as being familiar with the language, opinions, and customs of the Greeks, Acts 6:1-6 . His mighty works and unanswerable argument roused the bitterest hostility against him, and he was brought before the Sanhedrin for trial, on the charge of blasphemy and heresy. His speech in his own defense, probably recorded only in part, shows historically that the opponents of Christianity were but the children and imitators of those who had always opposed true religion. His enraged hearers hurried him to death, a judicial tribunal becoming a riotous mob for the occasion. Compare John 18:31 . With Christ-like magnanimity he forgave his murderers, and "fell asleep" amid their stones, with his eyes upon the Savior "standing at the right hand of God," as if rising from his throne to protect and receive the first martyr of his church, Acts 7:1-60 .
The results of Stephen's death illustrates the saying of Tertrullian, "the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church," Acts 8:1,4 11:19-21 . Augustine observes that the church owes the conversion and ministry of Paul to the prayer of Stephen. Paul, himself a Cilician, Acts 6:9 22:3 , had undoubtedly felt the force of his arguments in the discussions which preceded his arrest; and long afterwards alluded to his own presence at the martyr's death, Acts 22:19,20 that triumph of Christian faith and love which has taught so many martyrs and Christians how to die. Yet nothing he heard or witnessed availed for his conversion, till he saw the Savior himself, Acts 9:1-43 . The scene of Stephen's martyrdom is placed by modern tradition on the east side of Jerusalem, near the gate called after his name. Earlier traditions located it more to the north.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Stephen
Same as Stephanas
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Stephen, Festival of Saint
A Holy Day of the Church observed onDecember 26, in memory of St. Stephen the Proto-martyr, i.e.,the first Christian martyr. The position of the three Holy Daysafter Christmas is remarkable. We have here brought into immediatenearness to the Birth of Christ the three kinds of members who arejoined to Him by martyrdom, viz., those who are martyrs both inwill and deed, as St. Stephen; those who are martyrs in will butnot in deed, i.e., escaped with life as St. John; and lastly,those who are martyrs in deed, but had no wills of their own tosacrifice to God, as the Holy Innocents. The Festival of St. Stephendates as far back as the Fourth Century. The reason for itsinstitution is thus given by an ancient writer, "Christ wasborn on earth that Stephen might be born in heaven." Nothing is knownof St. Stephen before his selection for ordination as a Deacon, butin the 6th and 7th chapters of the Book of the Acts of the Apostlesis given a very full account of his being made a Deacon; of hisdoing "great wonders and miracles among the people," because hewas "full of faith and power"; of his accusation and eloquentdefense, and finally of his martyrdom by stoning, in the midst ofwhich, like his Divine Master, he prayed for his murderers. Inecclesiastical art, St. Stephen is represented as a Deacon holdingstones in a napkin or in his robe or in his hand.

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Stephen, Festival of Saint - Stephen the Proto-martyr, i. Stephen; those who are martyrs in will butnot in deed, i. Stephendates as far back as the Fourth Century. The reason for itsinstitution is thus given by an ancient writer, "Christ wasborn on earth that Stephen might be born in heaven. Stephen before his selection for ordination as a Deacon, butin the 6th and 7th chapters of the Book of the Acts of the Apostlesis given a very full account of his being made a Deacon; of hisdoing "great wonders and miracles among the people," because hewas "full of faith and power"; of his accusation and eloquentdefense, and finally of his martyrdom by stoning, in the midst ofwhich, like his Divine Master, he prayed for his murderers. Stephen is represented as a Deacon holdingstones in a napkin or in his robe or in his hand
Astericus Anastasius, Saint - He entered the Benedictine Order and became co-operator with Saint Stephen in establishing the Catholic religion in Hungary, being sent by the latter to beg papal approval for the organization of the Church there and to ask for he crown of that kingdom. In 1000 he crowned Stephen first King of Hungary
Astrik-Anastaz, Saint - He entered the Benedictine Order and became co-operator with Saint Stephen in establishing the Catholic religion in Hungary, being sent by the latter to beg papal approval for the organization of the Church there and to ask for he crown of that kingdom. In 1000 he crowned Stephen first King of Hungary
Protomartyr - to Stephen, the first Christian martyr
Stephanus, Bishop of Ephesus - of Ephesus, against Stephen, who was in advanced age, having been then 50 years one of the clergy of Ephesus. 448, and succeeded by Stephen. The name of Stephen of Ephesus is attached to a MS
Sychem - In Stephen's speech, Acts 7:16, He tells us that the other patriarchs as well as Joseph were buried there (Joshua 24:32). (See Stephen
Stephanus i., Bishop of Rome - If Lucius died, as is supposed, on Mar 5, 254, Stephen was appointed after a vacancy of 61 days. ...
In the autumn of 254 a council was held at Carthage, the first during the episcopate of Stephen, on the matter of two Spanish bishops, Basilides and Martialis, deposed for compliance with idolatry. Basilides had been to Rome to represent his case to Stephen and procure reinstatement in his see; and Stephen had apparently supported him. The action of Stephen was put aside as of no account, though excused as due to the false representations of Basilides (Cyp. A letter from Cyprian to Stephen himself, probably written soon after the council and in the same year, is further significant of the relations between Carthage and Rome. Stephen seems to have been determined to act independently in virtue of the supposed prerogatives of his see, while Cyprian shews himself equally determined to ignore such prerogatives. of Arles, who had adopted Novatianist views, and whose deposition Stephen is urged to bring about by letters to the province and people of Arles. The letter shews that Faustinus of Lyons had repeatedly written to Cyprian on the subject, having also, together with other bishops of the province, in vain solicited Stephen to take action. of Rome, Cornelius and Lucius, whose example he exhorts Stephen to follow, Cyprian seems to imply a doubt whether the latter was disposed to do his duty ( ib. Stephen took a view opposite to that of Cyprian. Cyprian would baptize all schismatics, whether heretical in doctrine or no; Stephen would apparently rebaptize none, whatever their heresies or the form of their baptism (Cyp. Cyprian then sent to Stephen a formal synodal letter, agreed on in a synod at Carthage, probably at Easter, 256, in which the necessity of baptizing heretics and of the exclusion from clerical functions of apostate clergy on their readmission into the church, is urged. Stephen may retain his own views if he will without breaking the bond of peace with his colleagues, every prelate being free to take his own line, and responsible to God (Ep. ...
Stephen's reply, written, according to Cyprian, "unskilfully and inconsiderately," contained things "either proud, or irrelevant, or self-contradictory. " Cyprian charges Stephen with "hard obstinacy," "presumption and contumacy," referring, by way of contrast, to St. Paul's admonition to Timothy, that a bishop should not be "litigious," but "mild and docile," and replying to the arguments advanced by Stephen. Stephen had so far apparently not broken off communion with those who differed from him (Ep. of Neocaesarea, wrote his long letter to Cyprian, from which it appears that Stephen had by this time renounced communion with both the Asian and African churches, calling Cyprian a false Christ, a false apostle, a deceitful worker. The question has been raised whether Stephen's action was an excommunication of the Eastern and African churches, or only a threat. Stephen claimed authority beyond other bishops as being St. Stephen seems to have taken the position, carried to its full extent by subsequent popes, of claiming a peculiar supremacy for the Roman see, and requiring uniformity as a condition of communion. ...
The arguments of Stephen were mainly these: "We have immemorial custom on our side, especially the tradition of St. "...
Stephen's martyrdom under Valerian is asserted in the Felician Catalogue, but not in the earlier Liberian Catalogue
Stephen - When some of the Greek-speaking Jews in the early Jerusalem church complained that their widows were being neglected, Stephen was one of seven men chosen to help sort out the problem. ...
Being a Greek-speaking Jew himself, Stephen went to the synagogue for Greek-speaking Jews in Jerusalem to try to turn his fellow Jews to Christ. Stephen saw that Christianity was not simply a remodelled Judaism. When Stephen preached these things, the Jews accused him of blasphemy and brought him before their Council, the Sanhedrin (Acts 6:12-15). ...
In defending his preaching, Stephen gave an outline of Israel’s history, his aim being to demonstrate two main points. ...
Furious at Stephen’s words, the Jews rushed upon him, dragged him out of the city and stoned him to death (Acts 7:54-60)
King, Apostolic - Saint Stephen (c
Apostolic King - Saint Stephen (c
Montgolfier - ) A balloon which ascends by the buoyancy of air heated by a fire; a fire balloon; - so called from two brothers, Stephen and Joseph Montgolfier, of France, who first constructed and sent up a fire balloon
Stephen - Saul of Tarsus heard Stephen's speech to the Jewish Sanhedrin accusing the Jewish leaders of rejecting God's way as their forefathers had (Acts 6:12-7:53 ). Saul held the clothes of those who stoned Stephen to death; he saw him die a victorious death. Stephen may well have been the human agency that God used to conquer him who would become the great Christian missionary. ...
Stephen was in the forefront of those who saw Christianity as much more than a Jewish sect. The believers had to flee Jerusalem after Stephen's death while the apostles alone remained there (Acts 8:1 )
Stephen - Stephen . Of the Seven, Stephen was the most prominent. Their duties were not eleemosynary only; Stephen at once undertook evangelistic work and won great success, persuading many, and working miracles. This defence provoked the Jews so much that they cast Stephen out of the city and stoned him undoubtedly an illegal murder, not sanctioned by the Roman law. Stephen, whose dying prayer for his murderers ( Acts 7:60 ) recalls that of his Master, thus became the first Christian martyr. But the most prominent fruit of the martyrdom, doubtless, was the conversion of Saul of Tarsus, who was present ( Acts 7:58 , Isaiah 8:1 ), and of whom, as is generally acknowledged, Stephen was in his preaching the forerunner
Stoning - Of Achan (Joshua 7:25 ), Naboth (1 Kings 21 ), Stephen (Acts 7:59 ), Paul (Acts 14:19 ; 2 co 11:25 )
Stephanus i., Patriarch of Antioch - Stephen having sent a synodic letter to Acacius bp. The partisans of Peter the Fuller accused Stephen to Zeno of Nestorian heresy, and demanded to have his soundness in the faith investigated by a synod. Stephen's enemies, rendered furious by defeat, made an onslaught on the church of St. According to some authorities it was Stephen's successor, another Stephen, who was thus murdered
Acta Sanctorum Hiberniae - , assisted-by Hugh Ward and Michael O'Cleary of the same order, and Stephen White, S
Irish College of Lisbon - The celebrated Stephen White, S
Lisbon, Irish College of - The celebrated Stephen White, S
Stephen - Stephen (stç'vn), a chaplet, crown
Abbey, Faversham - A former Benedictine monastery of the Cluniac Congregation near Canterbury, founded by King Stephen and Queen Matilda
Faversham Abbey - A former Benedictine monastery of the Cluniac Congregation near Canterbury, founded by King Stephen and Queen Matilda
Chiun - translated the word by Rhephan, which became corrupted into Remphan, as used by Stephen ( Acts 7:43 ; but RSV, "Rephan")
Thessalonica - Stephen of Byzantium says that it was improved and beautified by Philip, king of Macedon, and called Thessalonica in memory of the victory that he obtained over the Thessalians
Romanorum, Patricius - (Latin: noble of the Romans) ...
Title conferred on Pepin, King of the Franks, by Pope Stephen II, 754, and later assumed by the emperors of the Holy Roman Empire
Canaan - Stephen, in making reference to the famine which sent Jacob’s sons into Egypt; and by St
Fullness of Grace - Abundance or superabundance of sanctifying grace or interior holiness, predicated by Sacred Scripture of Our Lord, of Saint Stephen, of the Apostles, and of Our Blessed Lady
Deacons, Seven - They were Saint Stephen the Martyr, Saint Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolas (Acts 6)
John ix, Pope - He held several synods at Rome to correct the prevalent disorders in Christendom, condemned the synod of Stephen (VI) VII, which was held in 897; and sanctioned a hierarchy for the Moravians against the wishes of the German bishops
Lucius of Cyrene - He probably was one of the "men of Cyrene" who heard the tongues and then Peter's Pentecostal sermon (Acts 2:10), and of the "men of Cyrene" who when "scattered abroad upon the persecution that arose about Stephen" went to Antioch, "preaching the Lord Jesus" (Acts 11:19-20)
Seven Deacons - They were Saint Stephen the Martyr, Saint Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolas (Acts 6)
Remphan - Stephen was quoting Amos 5:25,26 from the LXX, which has RAEPHAN
Devout - ...
Devout men carried Stephen to his burial
John Mincius - He was elected in opposition to Pope Nicholas II by a faction of the Roman nobility after the death of Stephen (IX) X, who had commanded before he died that no election should take place until Hildebrand returned from Germany
Mincius, John - He was elected in opposition to Pope Nicholas II by a faction of the Roman nobility after the death of Stephen (IX) X, who had commanded before he died that no election should take place until Hildebrand returned from Germany
Benedict x Anti-Pope - He was elected in opposition to Pope Nicholas II by a faction of the Roman nobility after the death of Stephen (IX) X, who had commanded before he died that no election should take place until Hildebrand returned from Germany
Ladislaus, Saint - In the government of his realm he followed the illustrious example of Saint Stephen, thus winning the respect and love of his subjects
Martyr - Stephen was the first christian martyr
Appeal - Stephen died "calling upon the Lord," Acts 7:59
Remphan - We nowhere meet with the name of this idol in the sacred Scriptures but in one place, and that is in Stephen's address before the Sanhedrim. (Acts 7:43) And in this very passage which Stephen is quoting, it is from the writings of the prophet Amos 5:25-26 -but it is remarkable that Stephen doth not quote it as the original is, or even the translation, but in the place of Chiun substitutes Remphan
Stephen - Stephen appeared in the midst of this assembly, with a countenance like that of an angel; and the high priest asking him what he had to answer, in his defence, he rapidly traced the history of the Jews, showing that they had always opposed themselves to God and his prophets; faithfully upbraided them with the hardness of their hearts, with their putting the prophets to death, and, lastly, with slaying Christ himself. But Stephen, lifting up his eyes to heaven, calmly exclaimed, "I see the heavens opened, and the Son of man standing at the right hand of God. "And they stoned Stephen, calling upon God, and saying, Lord Jesus, receive, my spirit; and he kneeled down and cried with a loud voice, Lord, lay not this sin to their charge
Martyr - In this sense Stephen was the first martyr
Feast of Asses - Stephen; entered into the sanctuary, placed herself near the altar, and then celebrated mass; not forgetting to explain the fine qualities of the animal, and exhorting him to make a devout genuflection, with a variety of other fooleries
Libertines (1) - According to some, were such Jews as were free citizens of Rome: they had a separate synagogue at Jerusalem, and sundry of them concurred in the persecution of Stephen, Acts 6:9
Rebaptism - The controversy on rebaptism between Pope Saint Stephen and Saint Cyprian of Carthage is celebrated
Canterbury, England - Notable bishops include ...
Cardinal Reginald Pole, last Catholic archbishop of the diocese
Lanfranc
Deusdedit, 655-664, first English bishop
Saint Anselm of Canterbury
Saint Augustine of Canterbury, first bishop
Saint Dunstan of Canterbury
Saint Edmund Rich
Saint Theodore (668-690)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury
Stephen Langton
Stigand (1052-1070), last of the Saxons
Disposition - In Acts 7:53 Stephen mentions the angels to stress the majesty of the Law
Abbey of Citeaux - Saint Alberic and Saint Stephen Harding were his two immediate successors; twenty-three of the abbots are venerated in the order as saints or blessed
Stoning - In the case of Stephen he kneeled down
Fifteen, Fifteenth - translations give the number as 75 in Genesis 46:27 and in Exodus 1:5 , and this Stephen follows, being a Grecian Jew
Traitor, - Stephen charged the council with being the betrayers (the same Greek word) and murderers of the Just One
Deacon - Of the seven there named, Philip and Stephen are afterwards found laboring as evangelists
Calandio or Calendio, Bishop of Antioch - Calandio or Calendio ( Καλανδίων ), succeeded Stephen II. There is a large body of evidence (not, however, to be admitted without grave question) that Calandio's election was of the same uncanonical character as that of his predecessor in the see Influence of the Church on Civil Law - The right of sanctuary and the "Truce of God" were innovations by the Church; and trial by ordeal was condemned by the following popes: Nicholas I (858-867), Stephen V (VI) (885-891), Alexander II (1061-1073), Celestine III (1191-1198), Innocent III (1198-1216), and Honorius III (1216-1218)
Law, Influence of the Church on Civil Law - The right of sanctuary and the "Truce of God" were innovations by the Church; and trial by ordeal was condemned by the following popes: Nicholas I (858-867), Stephen V (VI) (885-891), Alexander II (1061-1073), Celestine III (1191-1198), Innocent III (1198-1216), and Honorius III (1216-1218)
Freedmen, Synagogue of the - A Greek-speaking synagogue in Jerusalem involved in instigating the dispute with Stephen (Acts 6:9 ; KJV “Synagogue of the Libertines”)
Sinai - Stephen (Acts 7:30) recalls how an angel of the Lord appeared to Moses ‘in the wilderness of mount Sinai, in a flame of fire in a bush
Cyrene - Stephen, Acts 11:20
Occurrence of Holy Days - Stephen, St
Hamor - Abraham bought only a burying place, Jacob a dwelling place, which long after was also Joseph's burial place (Joshua 24:32) referred to by Stephen (Acts 7:16). ...
Stephen with elliptical brevity sums up from six chaps, of Old Testament in one sentence the double purchase (by Abraham from Ephron the Hittite, Genesis 23; and by Jacob from the children of Hamor), the double burial place (Abraham's cave of Machpelah and Jacob's ground near Shechem), and the double burial (of Jacob in the cave of Machpelah, and of Joseph in the ground at Shechem), just because the details were familiar to both himself and the Jewish council; not, as rationalism objects, because he was ignorant of or forgot the historical facts so notorious from the Old Testament
Hierotheus, a Writer - 290, 291) that Stephen Bar-Sudaili, abbat of a monastery at Edessa, published a book under the name of Hierotheus to support his own mystic doctrines. Frothingham, Stephen Bar-Sudaili and the Book of Hierotheos (Leyden, 1886)
Furness Abbey - Stephen, later King of England, in 1127 gave the valuable forest of Furness to monks of the Savigny Reform
Ethiopian Eunuch - According to Acts 8:27 , an Ethiopian eunuch, minister of Candace , queen of the Ethiopians, who was over all her treasure, was met shortly after the martyrdom of Stephen by the deacon Philip when returning from a religious journey to Jerusalem, and converted to Christianity
Abbey, Furness - Stephen, later King of England, in 1127 gave the valuable forest of Furness to monks of the Savigny Reform
Feast of the Holy Name - There is a commemoration in the Mass of the Octave of Saint Stephen if the feast is kept on the second, of Saint John on the third, and of the Holy Innocents on the fourth of January
Holy Name, Feast of the - There is a commemoration in the Mass of the Octave of Saint Stephen if the feast is kept on the second, of Saint John on the third, and of the Holy Innocents on the fourth of January
Stephen - Then the high priest appealed to Stephen himself as Caiaphas had to Jesus. The alleged discrepancies between the Old Testament and Stephen's speech are only in appearance. ...
Israel's being brought forth to worship Jehovah in Horeb, and subsequent worshipping Him in Canaan their inheritance, were but different stages in the same deliverance, not needing to be distinguished for Stephen's purpose. Moses' trembling (Acts 7:32) was a current belief which Stephen endorses under the Spirit. Again as to Acts 7:15-16, "Jacob and our fathers were carried over into Sychem, and laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought of Emmor," Stephen with elliptical brevity refers to six different chapters, summing up in one sentence, which none of his hearers could misunderstand from their familiarity as to the details, the double purchase (from Ephron the Hittite by Abraham, and from Hamor of Shechem by Jacob: Genesis 23:16; Genesis 33:19), the double burial place (Machpelah's cave and the ground at Shechem), and the double burial (Jacob in Machpelah's cave: Genesis 50:13, and Joseph in the Shechem ground of Jacob, Genesis 50:25; Exodus 13:19; Joshua 24:32). ...
The burials and purchases were virtually one so far as his purpose was concerned, namely, to show the faith of the patriarchs and their interest in Canaan when to the eye of sense all seemed against the fulfillment of God's promise; Stephen hereby implying that, however visionary Jesus' and His people's prospects might seem, yet they are as certain as were the patriarchs' prospects when their only possession in Canaan was a tomb. ...
The fascination with which at first Stephen's beaming heavenly countenance had overawed his stern judges gave place to fury when they at last saw the drift of his covert argument. But Stephen, full of the Holy Spirit," strained his eyes with steadfast look into heaven" (atenisas , the same word as describes the disciples' look after the ascending Saviour: Acts 1:10). ...
The members of the council, remembering probably the use of similar language by Jesus when on trial before them (Matthew 26:64), being at all events resolved to treat as blasphemy Stephen's assertion of the divine exaltation of Him whom they had crucified, cried aloud, stopped their ear's (unconsciously realizing Stephen's picture of them: Acts 7:51; Psalms 58:4), ran upon him with one accord (contrast "with one accord," Acts 4:24), and cast him out of the city (as was the custom in order to put out from the midst of them such a pollution: 1 Kings 21:13; Luke 4:29; Hebrews 13:12) and stoned him, all sharing in the execution, the witnesses casting the first stones (Deuteronomy 13:9-10; Deuteronomy 17:7; John 8:7), after having stripped off the outer garments for greater ease in the bloody work, and laid them at the feet of Saul who thereby signified his consent to Stephen's execution (Acts 8:1; Acts 22:20). Thus Stephen was laid "asleep" (the term for death after Jesus' pattern: John 11:11, compare Deuteronomy 31:16; Daniel 12:2; 1 Corinthians 15:18; 1 Corinthians 15:51). Devout proselytes, a class related to the Hellenists to whom Stephen belonged, carried him to his burial and made great lamentation over him. ...
The gate opening on the descent to the valley of the Kedron is called Stephen's gate. Stephen was first of the earliest Christian ministry, "the archdeacon," as the Eastern church calls him. To Stephen first the name "martyr" is applied (Acts 22:20). The first martyr foreran the first apostle of the Gentiles; Stephen anticipated that worldwide universality of spirit which Paul advocated everywhere in opposition to the narrow prejudices of Judaism
Filippo Lippi - Two of his first works are "The Vision of Saint Bernard" (National Gallery, London) and "The Death of Saint Stephen" in the cathedral of Prato
Lippi, Fra Filippo - Two of his first works are "The Vision of Saint Bernard" (National Gallery, London) and "The Death of Saint Stephen" in the cathedral of Prato
Remphan - Stephen, quoting this passage of Amos, says, "Ye took up the tabernacle of Moloch, and the star of your god Remphan," Acts 7:43 , which has given occasion to a variety of conjectures
Libertines - They originated the persecution against Stephen, which resulted in his martyrdom
Severus, Bishop of Monorca - Stephen in the church at Magona (Port Mahon), where there were a large number of Jews, one of whom, the rabbi Theodorus, was defensor civitatis
Sixtus ii., Bishop of Rome - of Rome after Stephen for about one year, martyred under Valerian Aug. His predecessor Stephen had been at issue with Cyprian of Carthage as to the rebaptism of heretics. Stephen, to his predecessor, is satisfactorily shewn by Lipsius (op
Philip the Evangelist - As in Stephen’s case, so in Philip’s-we have no previous mention of him till he was elected to be one of the Seven (Acts 6:5). In the list of the Seven he comes second, next to Stephen. The same emphatic praise is not accorded to him by the author of the Acts as to Stephen, and probably while Stephen lived Philip was overshadowed by his more striking personality. It seems, however, probable that the account we have of the appointment of the Seven, of the trial of Stephen (though not his speech, which was more probably derived from the reminiscences of St. As with respect to Stephen so with respect to Philip we should infer that he was a Hellenist, and therefore a suitable agent for extending the gospel to those who were not strictly Jews; but the inference is not certain in either case. Philip belonged to a band who were scattered from Jerusalem in consequence of the persecution which followed on the death of Stephen (Acts 8:4)
Lawrence, Saint - He was buried in the cemetery of Saint Cyriaca on the road to Tivoli, and his tomb was opened by Pelagius to place in it the body of Saint Stephen, the Protomartyr
Delaware - Reverend Stephen Faure, who had accompanied them, was Father Sittensperger's successor, assisted by an Augustinian, Reverend John Rosseter, who had been an officer in Rochambeau's army
Gates of Jerusalem And the Temple - On the east, entrance from the Kidron Valley was signed principally through the Sheep Gate (modern Stephen or Lion Gate) in New Testament times and by a recently found gate (Spring, 1986) south of the modern city walls in Old Testament times
Libertines - Acts 7:8 brings the Libertines forward as a group or synagogue amongst the Hellenistic Jews concerned in the prosecution of Stephen. Hence they were natural leaders in the opposition to Stephen’s destructive criticism of Jewish institutionalism
Joshua - Stephen in his apologia speaks of the fathers entering with Joshua into the possession of the nations (Acts 7:45); and the writer of Hebrews, imbued with Alexandrian-i
Henry ii, King - He was the grandson of Henry I, married Eleanor of Aquitaine, and succeeded Stephen on the English throne in 1154
lu'Cius - Peter preached on the day of Pentecost, (Acts 2:10 ) and there can hardly be a doubt that he was one of "the men of Cyrene" who, being "scattered abroad upon the persecution that arose about Stephen," went to Antioch preaching the Lord Jesus
Jebusites - Stephen Davis...
...
Blasphemy - Stephen were condemned to death by the Jews
Ohio - When Father Stephen Badin visited the settlement in 1796 he found their numbers fast dwindling and the church neglected. ...
Catholic influence on place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Isle Saint George
Saint Bernard
Saint Clairsville
Saint Henry
Saint James
Saint John's
Saint Louisville
Saint Martin
Saint Mary's
Saint Stephen
Santa Fe
Ecclesiastically the state is governed by the archdiocese of ...
Cincinnati
and the dioceses of ...
Cleveland
Columbus
Steubenville
Toledo
Youngstown
See also, ...
patron saints index
Ste'Phen, - This local worship, with the Jewish customs belonging to it, Stephen denounced. It would seem that, just at the close of his argument, Stephen saw a change in the aspect of his judges, as if for the first time they had caught the drift of his meaning. Stephen spoke as if to himself, describing the glorious vision; and in so doing, alone of all the speakers and writers in the New Testament except, only Christ himself, uses the expressive phrase "the Son of man. John 8:7 In this instance they were the witnesses who had reported or misreported the words of Stephen. [1] As the first volley of stones burst upon him, Stephen called upon the Master whose human form he had just seen in the heavens, and repeated almost the words with which he himself had given up his life on the cross, "O Lord Jesus receive my spirit. The importance of Stephen's career may be briefly summed up under three heads:
He was the first great Christian ecclesiastic, "the Archdeacon," as he is called in the eastern Church
Devotion, Days of - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
Days of Devotion - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
Notre Dame, Paris - The site was occupied by a pagan temple during the Roman Empire, by the Church of Saint Stephen during the 5th century, and finally by Saint Marie, or Notre-Dame, Cathedral
Martyr - Since the time of Stephen, Acts 7:59 22:20 , myriads of martyrs have sealed the truth of Christianity by a painful death; which they willingly endured through faith, rather than to deny Christ, and which they often eagerly desired as a special privilege
Cilicia - Paul himself may have taken part in the public discussion with Stephen, Acts 6:9 7:58
Pharaoh Pharaohis Daughter - Stephen proves God’s care for Joseph and Moses by the confidence Pharaoh placed in the former, and the protection given to the latter by the daughter of the reigning king
Stephen - Stephen was able to speak with such wisdom and power that his hearers could not withstand him. ...
Stephen's martyrdom formed an epoch in the history of the church. ...
It has been asserted, by some critics, that Stephen made several mistakes in his address to the council! It is said, however, in scripture that he was "full of the Holy Ghost
Esarhaddon - Stephen Davis...
...
Red Sea - Stephen mentions it as manifesting the glory of Moses
Sanhedrin or Sanhedrim - The Lord, Luke 22:66 ; Peter and John, Acts 4:1-23 ; Acts 5:17-41 ; Stephen, Acts 6:12-15 ; and Paul, Acts 22:30 ; Acts 23:1-10 ; were arraigned before the Sanhedrin
Witness, Martyr - Thus, early in the Book of Acts (Acts 7:1 ), Stephen became the first martyr. That very word comes from martureo and really states that Stephen was first and foremost a witness, giving testimony. ...
The death of Stephen serves as a stark reminder that true and faithful testimony to Christ requires total commitment, even one's life
Mainz, Germany, City of - The university (founded, 1477) and the Gothic church of Saint Stephen (1257-1328) are other noteworthy buildings
Mass, Saints of the - Before the Consecration, in the prayer Communicantes, commemoration is made of ...
Our Lady
twelve Apostles (including Saint Paul, but excluding Judas Iscariot)
Pope Saint Linus
Pope Saint Cletus
Pope Saint Clement
Pope Saint Sixtus
Pope Saint Cornelius
Saint Cyprian of Carthage
Saint Lawrence
Saint Chrysogonus
Saint John the Martyr
Saint Paul the Martyr
Saint Cosmas
Saint Damian
After the Consecration, in the prayer Nobis quoque peccatoribus, we pray for fellowship with certain other apostles and martyrs ...
Saint John the Baptist
Saint Stephen the First Martyr
Saint Matthias the Apostle
Saint Barnabas the Apostles
Saint Ignatius of Antioch
Pope Saint Alexander I
Saint Marcellinus
Saint Peter the Exorcist
Saint Felicitas
Saint Perpetua
Saint Agatha
Saint Lucy
Saint Agnes
Saint Cecilia
Saint Anastasia
It is noteworthy that all the above are martyrs, and either Romans or saints popular at Rome, as our Mass is the local liturgy of the city of Rome
Formosus, Pope - She revenged herself after Formosus's death by forcing Pope Stephen (VI) VII to pronounce a condemnatory judgment on his corpse, which was then mutilated and sunk in the Tiber
Josue, Book of - Saint Paul, Saint James, and Saint Stephen accepted the facts narrated as history, and this has ever been the opinion in the Catholic Church
Joshua, Book of - Saint Paul, Saint James, and Saint Stephen accepted the facts narrated as history, and this has ever been the opinion in the Catholic Church
Feasts or Festivals - Stephen the Martyr
Homines, Boni - ...
The Boni Homines of Grammont were founded in France in the 11th century by Saint Stephen of Muret
Kedron - Stephen's gate, the traveller comes to the bed of the brook Kedron, which is but a few paces over. Stephen; and they say, that when there is water, unless the torrent swells much, which very rarely occurs, it all runs under ground to the north of this bridge
Chronology of the New Testament - ...
Death of Stephen
Saints of the Mass - Before the Consecration, in the prayer Communicantes, commemoration is made of ...
Our Lady
twelve Apostles (including Saint Paul, but excluding Judas Iscariot)
Pope Saint Linus
Pope Saint Cletus
Pope Saint Clement
Pope Saint Sixtus
Pope Saint Cornelius
Saint Cyprian of Carthage
Saint Lawrence
Saint Chrysogonus
Saint John the Martyr
Saint Paul the Martyr
Saint Cosmas
Saint Damian
After the Consecration, in the prayer Nobis quoque peccatoribus, we pray for fellowship with certain other apostles and martyrs ...
Saint John the Baptist
Saint Stephen the First Martyr
Saint Matthias the Apostle
Saint Barnabas the Apostles
Saint Ignatius of Antioch
Pope Saint Alexander I
Saint Marcellinus
Saint Peter the Exorcist
Saint Felicitas
Saint Perpetua
Saint Agatha
Saint Lucy
Saint Agnes
Saint Cecilia
Saint Anastasia
It is noteworthy that all the above are martyrs, and either Romans or saints popular at Rome, as our Mass is the local liturgy of the city of Rome
Bonifacius ii, Pope - A petition was presented to him (in which he is styled "Universal Bishop") by Stephen, archbp. of Larissa, metropolitan of Thessaly, complaining of the encroachments of the patriarch of Constantinople, who had suspended Stephen from his office
Stephen - Of Stephen we know nothing beyond the abort notice of him contained in the two chapters (6 and 7) of Acts. But to this work Stephen, like others of the Seven, notably Philip, by no means restricted himself. In this it was with Stephen as it had been previously with our Lord, Our Lord Himself had said that He was to become the world’s temple in the future, and was condemned for blasphemy for speaking ill words against the Temple in Jerusalem; Stephen proclaimed that Temple and Law had done their work and were to give place in time to a more spiritual temple, a more universal law, and was denounced for blasphemy. It was this last lesson so emphatically driven home that immediately produced that outbreak of rage in the Sanhedrin which brought about Stephen’s death. ...
Two questions relating to this stoning have to be answered: (1) How did it take place at all, seeing that the Jews had not the power of life and death? (2) What was the date at which it occurred? As to the first point, the actual martyrdom of Stephen seems to have been something of the nature of a tumultuous outbreak. 37, and Stephen’s martyrdom has been put at this time
Fra Angelico - " His finest work is in the chapel of Nicholas V in the Vatican, a series of frescos depicting the lives of Saint Stephen and Saint Lawrence
Innocent Iii, Pope - He asserted his papal rights in every large European country at the time, particularly in England, where King John accepted the lawfully-elected Archbishop of Canterbury, Stephen Langton
Deacon - Both Philip and Stephen, who were of "the seven," preached; they did "the work of evangelists
Lotario de' Conti - He asserted his papal rights in every large European country at the time, particularly in England, where King John accepted the lawfully-elected Archbishop of Canterbury, Stephen Langton
Gamaliel - Saul his pupil was a leading persecutor when Stephen opposed Pharisaism; and probably Gamaliel would not altogether disapprove of his zeal in such a cause, though his own tendency was to leave the claims of Christianity to be tested by time
Angelico, Fra - " His finest work is in the chapel of Nicholas V in the Vatican, a series of frescos depicting the lives of Saint Stephen and Saint Lawrence
Cyrenius - ...
Stephen Dollar...
...
Martyr - Stephen was a martyr, Acts 22:20 ; also Antipas, Revelation 2:13
Blasphemy - This we find executed on the son of Shelomith, Leviticus 24:10-16; and it was on this charge, though a false one, that our Lord and Stephen were condemned
Claudius, the Emperor - The "strangers of Rome Jews and proselytes " (Act_2:10) who were at Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost or some of the "synagogue of the Libertines" (Act_6:9) yielding to the arguments of Stephen may have brought it thither. (On other points connected with the rise and progress of Christianity at Rome under Claudius see "Aquila and Priscilla," and the "Proto-martyr Stephen," in the writer's Biblical Studies
Stoning - ...
Two instances of stoning call for special consideration-that of the proto-martyr Stephen (Acts 7:58-60), and that of St. The stoning of Stephen. Stephen was simply done to death by a fanatical mob without even the pretence of a hearing, and the idea of a trial before the Sanhedrin, followed by a regular Jewish stoning, must be summarily dismissed (Paul: his Life and Works, Eng. ‘Stephen’s arrest,’ says Moffatt, ‘was the result of a popular émeute, which restrained itself just long enough to allow him to defend himself before a suspicious and exasperated audience, which numbered-perhaps unofficially-several members of the Sanhedrin’ (article ‘Stephen’ in Encyclopaedia Biblica iv. ‘It is plain,’ he adds, ‘that Stephen died, not on the testimony of witnesses (Acts 6:13, Acts 7:58 b), but on account of his own recent word and confession’ (ib. But, if the occasion which led to Stephen’s being put on his defence was the accusation of blasphemy brought against him by the witnesses (and the statement of Acts 6:13 can hardly be challenged), it is difficult to conceive of a self-constituted tribunal attempting to adjudicate upon a grave charge of the sort, involving the penalty of death, with which the supreme court of justice alone among the Jews had authority to deal. ‘Stephen was formally accused and brought to trial before the Sanhedrim; it is probable that he was formally condemned by that body, and that his death was not the result of a mere tumult, as the account of Luke might seem to imply. This probability is strengthened by the fact that his death was by the legal mode prescribed for the crime of blasphemy, and that the stoning was done not by the crowd in general, but by Stephen’s accusers in the orderly Jewish way’ (A. There is no reason to suppose, however, that the historian of the Acts sought to aggravate the crime of Stephen’s death by leaving the impression that it was the result of a popular tumult rather than of a fair trial conducted to an orderly conclusion. [1] 466) that ‘it was Stephen’s garments which were ceremonially laid at the feet of Paul’ (by the witnesses Sanhedrin - Later, Stephen was stoned to death after a hearing before the Sanhedrin, but this may have been more a mob action than a legal execution authorized by the Sanhedrin (Acts 6:12-15 ; Acts 7:54-60 ). Stephen had to appear before the Sanhedrin on charges that sounded like the false charges against Jesus (Acts 6:12-15 )
Council - On this allegation Jesus, and subsequently Peter, John, Stephen, and Paul were brought before them (John 11:47). The stoning of Stephen (Acts 7:56, etc
Philip: Deacon And Evangelist - ' And thus it was that the banishment of Philip from Jerusalem was the salvation of Samaria, and thus it was also that the martyrdom of Stephen was the conversion of Saul. ...
Stephen was the first martyr, and Philip was the first missionary. Stephen and Philip were not apostles to begin with; they were simply deacons. But you cannot limit, and narrow, and bind down to the serving of tables two powerful and original men like Stephen and Philip. Paul had Stephen and Philip in his mind when he said to Timothy long afterwards, that they who have used the office of a deacon well, purchase to themselves a good degree, and great boldness in the faith which is in Christ Jesus. All of which both Stephen and Philip had emphatically done. Both Stephen and Philip were by far the subordinates or Peter and John. They did not grudge, nor resent, nor suspect, nor despise the success of Stephen in Jerusalem, nor of Philip in Samaria. ...
Both Stephen and Philip have made this impression also upon me that they were born preachers, as we say. Stephen and Philip were born with such a fire in their bones that no man could put it out
Grecians - The first church at Jerusalem was composed of these two classes, the "Hebrew" and the "Grecian" Jews; from whence, when the Grecian widows complained of being "neglected in the daily ministrations" of alms, the seven chosen to rectify matters were all "Grecians," judging from their Greek names, Stephen, Prochorus, etc. Acts 11:20, "Greeks" is the reading of the Alexandrinus manuscript rightly for "Grecians," for the "Grecians",were long before a recognized portion of the church (Acts 6:1), and some of those "scattered abroad" were among them (for none of the seven" Grecian" deacons, except Stephen, was as yet martyred) (See CHRISTIAN); the new name marking the new epoch in the church. Their Grecian or foreign culture and education made them clever disputants; hence, their keenness in controverting the new convert who had before sided with them against Stephen; the latter also was once a Grecian (Hellenist) Jew before his conversion to Christianity (Acts 7:58; Acts 6:9-14)
Euphrates And Tigris Rivers - Stephen Davis...
...
Christian - Stephen, some of the disciples who had to flee for theirlives came to Antioch
Jesus - Joshua the son of Nun, who led Israel into Canaan; referred to by Stephen in his speech before the council (Acts 7:45) and by the writer to the Hebrews (Hebrews 4:8)
Jesus - Joshua the son of Nun, who led Israel into Canaan; referred to by Stephen in his speech before the council (Acts 7:45) and by the writer to the Hebrews (Hebrews 4:8)
Son of Man - The only instance in the NT outside the Gospel records of a direct reference to Jesus as ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου occurs in the speech of Stephen before the Jewish Sanhedrin (Acts 7:56). The rage of Stephen’s audience, on hearing the words of the speaker, is accounted for only on the supposition that ‘the Son of man’ was recognized as the Jesus whom they had so recently done to death, and who now is described as occupying the transcendent position, and discharging the functions, of Messiah. ’ It is not, however, so easy to see why the same should be said of ‘the use of the phrase by the martyr Stephen in the Acts and the martyr James the Just in Eusebius and by the angels in Luke after the Resurrection’ (E. The vision of Stephen gives a wider and deeper significance to the Messianic activities of the ascended Jesus. ), and that we cannot equate his expression with the θεωρῶ … τὸν υἱὸν τοῦ ἀνθρώπου of Stephen (see H
Son of Man - The only instance in the NT outside the Gospel records of a direct reference to Jesus as ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου occurs in the speech of Stephen before the Jewish Sanhedrin (Acts 7:56). The rage of Stephen’s audience, on hearing the words of the speaker, is accounted for only on the supposition that ‘the Son of man’ was recognized as the Jesus whom they had so recently done to death, and who now is described as occupying the transcendent position, and discharging the functions, of Messiah. ’ It is not, however, so easy to see why the same should be said of ‘the use of the phrase by the martyr Stephen in the Acts and the martyr James the Just in Eusebius and by the angels in Luke after the Resurrection’ (E. The vision of Stephen gives a wider and deeper significance to the Messianic activities of the ascended Jesus. ), and that we cannot equate his expression with the θεωρῶ … τὸν υἱὸν τοῦ ἀνθρώπου of Stephen (see H
Kentucky - The apostle of the region was Father Stephen Theodore Badin, a Sulpician, later assisted by Father Charles Nerinckx. In 1813 the bishop established his seminary in a log building at Saint Stephen's
Philip - After the killing of Stephen and the expulsion of Christians from Jerusalem, Philip went to Samaria, where many responded to his preaching (Acts 8:4-13)
Hungary - Christianity was introduced into the region in the 8th century when the greater part of Hungary was included in the Diocese of Esztergom, raised to metropolitan rank by Saint Stephen (c
Repentance of God - Stephen Davis...
...
Rephan - Stephen in his speech is quoting from Septuagint of Amos 5:26. Stephen’s purpose, namely, to show that the foreign idolatrous planet-worship had crept in and meant apostasy from the true worship of Jahweh
Just - Stephen, had ample opportunities of learning’ (Expos
Circumcision - ' Stephen charged the Jewish council with being 'uncircumcised in heart and ears
Horeb - 3and as it is explained by Stephen, Acts 7:30-32
Chrysippus, Guardian of the Holy Cross - Stephen were to be found
Philip - After the death of Stephen all the Christians, except the Apostles, having left Jerusalem, and being dispersed in several places, Philip went to preach at Sebaste or Samaria, where he performed several miracles, and converted many persons, Acts 8:1-3 , &c
Philip - After the death of Stephen when the Christians were driven from Jerusalem, except the apostles, he preached the gospel in Samaria with great success, and wrought many miracles
Persecution - The martyrdom of Stephen was the signal for a fierce outburst of persecution against the Christians of Jerusalem, by which they were scattered in all directions
South Carolina - Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Angelus
Mount Carmel
Saint Charles
Saint George
Saint Matthews
Saint Paul
Saint Stephen
See also patron saints index
Lucius (1) i - In a letter to his successor Stephen ( Ep
Temple - Until the appearance of Stephen created a new situation, the apostles were daily in the Temple, teaching and preaching Jesus as the Messiah. Stephen and the Temple. ) also thinks that the building of the Temple is represented by Stephen as an unauthorized and presumptuous act. Teaching of such a kind, however, would have brought Stephen into collision not only with the Hellenistic Jews, but with the whole body of Christians in Jerusalem. ‘To call Stephen a forerunner of Paul, and to think of him as anticipating in any way Paul’s treatment of the Jewish law and his assertion of a free Gentile Christianity, is to misunderstand him’ (McGiffert, op
Magna Carta - The Archbishop of Canterbury, Stephen Langton, played a prominent part in the negotiations leading up to the drafting and acceptance of Magna Carta and it contained five guarantees of value to the Church
Carta, Magna - The Archbishop of Canterbury, Stephen Langton, played a prominent part in the negotiations leading up to the drafting and acceptance of Magna Carta and it contained five guarantees of value to the Church
Sanhedrim - Peter and John were also brought before it for promulgating heresy (Acts 4:1-23 ; 5:17-41 ); as was also Stephen on a charge of blasphemy (6:12-15), and Paul for violating a temple by-law (22:30; 23:1-10)
Age - 754, when his temporal power began by Pepin's grant of Ravenna, the Lombard kingdom, and Rome to Stephen II
Ashurbanipal - Stephen Davis...
...
Arise - A persecution arose about Stephen
Alexandria - ...
The educated Jews of Alexandria contended with Stephen (Acts 6:9 )
Gamaliel - Barnabas and Stephen are also supposed to have been among the number of his pupils
Fulness - And whereas men are said to be filled with the Holy Ghost, as John the Baptist, Luke 1:15 ; and Stephen, Acts 6:5 ; this differs from the fulness of Christ in these three respects:...
(1
Cilicia - The region was home to some of the people who opposed Stephen (Acts 6:9 )
Stephen - ...
The results of Stephen's death illustrates the saying of Tertrullian, "the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church," Acts 8:1,4 11:19-21 . Augustine observes that the church owes the conversion and ministry of Paul to the prayer of Stephen. The scene of Stephen's martyrdom is placed by modern tradition on the east side of Jerusalem, near the gate called after his name
Sidon - The gospel was proclaimed to the Jews at Sidon after the martyrdom of Stephen, Acts 11:19 , and there was a Christian church there, when Paul visited it on his voyage to Rome, Acts 27:3
States, Papal - They had their origin in the two donations made in 754,756 by Pepin, King of the Franks, to Pope Stephen II, of the Duchy of Rome, the Exarchate of Ravenna, and the Marches of Ancona, which had been recovered for the Holy See by Pepin from Aistulf the Lombard invader
Theodotus, Bishop of Laodicea - Eusebius gives him a high character for skill as a physician of both body and soul, remarkable for kindness, sympathy, sincerity, and zeal to help all who needed aid, reinstating the church in its prosperity which had suffered much by the cowardice of its last bishop, Stephen, who seems to have renounced the faith in the persecution of Diocletian (Eus
Philip the Evangelist - ) Philip stands in the list next Stephen, they two being prominent and the only ones noticed subsequently. Philip, breaking through Jewish anti-Samaritan prejudice, was the first to follow Jesus' steps (John 4) and His command (Acts 1:8) to preach the gospel as a witness in Samaria; so he was virtually a forerunner of Paul "the apostle of the Gentiles" in his field of labour, as Stephen was in his doctrine
Acts of the Apostles - Peter, Stephen, etc. Stephen, being accused before the Sanhedrim, rehearsed the history of Israel from the beginning, and charged them with resisting the Holy Spirit, as their fathers had done. The indictment of Israel as man in the flesh, and the exposure of his enmity to God led to the final sin of rejecting the glorified Christ, expressed by the stoning of Stephen who calling upon the Lord not to lay the sin to their charge, exemplified the life of Christ in his body
Monks, White - The statutes were drafted by Saint Stephen Harding and approved by Pope Callistus II, 1119; decisions of the general chapters were codified, 1133,1240, 1316, and 1335
Order of Citeaux - The statutes were drafted by Saint Stephen Harding and approved by Pope Callistus II, 1119; decisions of the general chapters were codified, 1133,1240, 1316, and 1335
Mourn - Abraham mourned for Sarah (Genesis 23:2 ); Jacob for Joseph (37:34,35); the Egyptians for Jacob (50:3-10); Israel for Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ), for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ), and for Samuel (1 Samuel 25:1 ); David for Abner (2 Samuel 3:31,35 ); Mary and Martha for Lazarus (John 11 ); devout men for Stephen (Acts 8:2 ), etc
Jeroboam - Stephen Davis...
...
Stone - See 1 Samuel 17:49 ) and about the enemies of the Christian faith stoning Stephen (Acts 7:58 )
Ascension of Christ - Stephen, Paul, and John saw him in his ascended state, Acts 7:55-56
White Monks - The statutes were drafted by Saint Stephen Harding and approved by Pope Callistus II, 1119; decisions of the general chapters were codified, 1133,1240, 1316, and 1335
Phil'ip the Evangelist - Paul in his work, as Stephen had been in his teaching
Nicolaitanes, a Heretical Sect - ...
Stephen Gobar (cf
Epiphanius, Patriarch of Constantinople - In 531 the dispute between Rome and Constantinople was revived by the appeal of Stephen, metropolitan of Larissa, to pope Boniface, against the sentence of Epiphanius. Stephen was eventually deposed, notwithstanding his appeal
Libertines - Stephen’s trial, speech, and death (The Acts of the Apostles, pp. Stephen’s death was a subject of life-long self-reproach (Acts 22:20). Stephen and St. Stephen had not kept off this dangerous ground. Woodhouse), ‘Stephen’ (J
Ur - Stephen places it, by implication, in Mesopotamia
Heaven - Whence the Lord descended and to which He ascended, and where He was seen by Stephen
Caiaphas - He is probably the high priest referred to in Acts 5:17-21; Acts 5:27; Acts 7:1; Acts 9:1 who imprisoned Peter and John, presided at the trial of Stephen, caused the persecution recorded in Acts 8, and gave Saul of Tarsus letters to Damascus to apprehend the Christians there
Shechem - Bengel says of this alleged discrepancy in Stephen's address, that "the brevity which was best suited to the ardour of the Spirit gave Stephen just occasion, in the case of a fact so well known, to compress these details in the way he has done. "*...
* For further details concerning Stephen's address see "Bible Handbook, New Testament," pages 144-6
Deacon - " And the saying pleased the whole multitude; and they (the multitude) chose Stephen, and six others, whom they set before the Apostles, &c
Ascension of Christ - Stephen, Paul, and John saw him in his ascended state, Acts 7:55-56 ; Acts 9; Revelation 1
Execution - Yet when the Jews illegally stoned Stephen to death, the Roman authorities took no action against them
New Testament - Pentecost...
30-34 The events from Pentecost to Stephen. Acts 2 — Acts 7 ...
35 Martyrdom of Stephen
Philip - He was one of those who were "scattered abroad" by the persecution that arose on the death of Stephen
Sanhedrin - The Jews’ execution of Stephen was also illegal, but the Roman authorities probably considered it safer to ignore the incident and so avoid trouble with the Jews (Acts 7:57-58; cf
Eraclius, Deacon of the Church of Hippo - 425, had inherited considerable property, part of which he spent in raising a "memoria" of the martyr [1]; the rest he offered as a gift to the church
Blasphemy - The two meanings of βλασφημία are combined in Acts 6:11, where Stephen is accused of Speaking blasphemous words (ῥήματα βλάσφημα) against Moses and God (εἰς Μωσῆν καὶ τὸν θεόν). Though they attempted to observe the regular forms in their trial of Stephen for blasphemy, his death was not a judicial execution, but the illegal act of a solemn Sanhedrin changed by fanatical hatred into a murderous mob
Amos - The canonicity of the book is vouched for by a citation in Tobias (2:6) and two citations in the Acts of the Apostles, where Saint Stephen (Acts 7:42) quotes from Amos 5, and Saint James (Acts 15:16) quotes from Amos 9
Jesus - 'Lord Jesus' is the normal usage, as in Acts 8:16 ; 19:5,17 ; see also the reports of the words of Stephen, Acts 7:59 , of Ananias, Acts 9:17 , and of Paul, Acts 16:31 ; though both Peter, Acts 10:36 , and Paul, Acts 16:18 , also used 'Jesus Christ
Perfect - ...
Stephen S
Catch - 1, "to snatch, to seize, to keep a firm grip of," is used only by Luke, and translated "caught" in the AV of Luke 8:29 , of demon-possession; in Acts 6:12 , of the act of the elders and scribes in seizing Stephen, RV, more suitably, "seized
Deacon - " The result was, "the word of God increased, and the number of the disciples multiplied in Jerusalem greatly, and a great company of the priests were obedient to the faith; and Stephen (one of the seven), full of faith and power, did great wonders and miracles among the people
Cyprus - ...
Moreover those scattered abroad in the persecution whereby Stephen suffered "traveled as far as Cyprus, preaching the word to none but unto the Jews only
Concordance - Stephen, has given an excellent Greek concordance for the New Testament the best edition of which is that of Lepsic, anno 1717
Kinsman-Redeemer - ...
Stephen J
Cyrene - Other NT references to Cyrenian Jews are: Acts 2:10 (at Pentecost), 6:9 (members of special synagogue at Jerusalem, opposing Stephen), 11:20 (preaching at Antioch to Greeks [3]), 13:1 (Lucius of Cyrene, probably one of these preachers, a prophet or teacher at Antioch)
Caius, Pope - He is probably the same as Caius the deacon, imprisoned with pope Stephen, a
Anguish - In one place it is used of the stopping of their ears by those who killed Stephen
Son of Man - The title "the Son of man" in the New Testament Jesus alone uses, and of Himself, except Stephen in dying, "I see the Son of man standing on the right hand of God," referring not to His humiliation on earth but to His heavenly exaltation (compare John 12:23; John 12:34; John 6:62; John 3:13; Acts 7:56); standing to assist, plead for (Psalms 109:31), and receive the dying martyr. ...
Stephen speaking "full of the Holy Spirit" repeats Jesus' prophecy before the council, foretelling His exaltation as the Son of man; only there it is "sitting on the right hand of power," because there majestic repose, here rising to His servant's help, is the thought. Stephen's assertion stirred their rage, that Jesus who had been crucified for claiming to be "the Son of God" stands at God's right hand as being "the Son of man
Paul - Luke introduced Paul in the Book of Acts at the execution of Stephen. Now Stephen was executed because he placed Jesus (1) superior to the law and (2) superior to the Temple. Paul, from his training, vigorously disagreed with Stephen's point of view. Stephen opposed the very foundations of Judaism since the days of Moses. Stephen's sermon apparently stimulated Paul's persecution of the church (Acts 8:1-3 , Acts 9:1-2 ; Acts 26:9-11 ; Philippians 3:6 ; Acts 22:21-22 ). See Acts of the Apostles; Stephen . The voice asked: “Why persecutest thou me,” and identified the speaker as Jesus—the very one whom Stephen had seen at the right hand of God when Paul witnessed Stephen's stoning. The church at Antioch had been founded by Hellenistic Christian believers like Stephen (Acts 11:19-26 )
Typology - ...
In Acts 7:44 , Stephen said that the whole tabernacle, which he called “the Tent of the Testimony” (REB), was made according to “the pattern” that Moses had seen. Image or Status In Acts 7:1 , Stephen said that Israel took up “the tent of Moloch and the constellation of the god Rephan—images, statues , which you made to worship them” (Acts 7:43 ). Pattern as a mold or norm While Stephen pointed out a bad pattern in the case of idolatry, Paul emphasized a good pattern in Romans 6:17
Deposing Power, Papal - Not a few princes (Stephen of Hungary, 1000, and Roger II of Sicily, 1130) offered their kingdoms as fiefs to the Holy See, acknowledging themselves as its vassals
Charlemagne - He was the eldest son of Pepin the Short, mayor of the palace, whom Pope Stephen III anointed as king (752)
Charles the Great - He was the eldest son of Pepin the Short, mayor of the palace, whom Pope Stephen III anointed as king (752)
Josiah - Stephen Davis...
...
Blasphemy - Stoning was the penalty, as upon the son of Shelomith, a woman of Dan, and of an Egyptian father (Leviticus 24:11); Stephen was so treated by a sudden outbreak of Jewish zeal (Acts 7:57-60)
Guilt - ...
Stephen Motyer...
See also Forgiveness ; Sin ...
Bibliography
Saints, Litany of the - ...
Saint Stephen, Pray for us
Pastor - Thus in the Acts of Nemesius pope Stephen is said to have held a baptism there (Baronius a
Version, the Authorised - ...
It is commonly understood that the Authorised Version corresponds with the 'common Greek text,' as given, for instance, in Stephen's 1550. Beza's text came after that of Stephen, and those of Elzevir were not then published. in about 28 places follows neither Stephen nor Beza, so that it appears they did not follow any strict rule as to the text they adopted
John Carroll - Bishop Carroll conferred Holy Orders, for the first time within the territory of the thirteen States, on Reverend Stephen Badin in 1793
Carroll, John - Bishop Carroll conferred Holy Orders, for the first time within the territory of the thirteen States, on Reverend Stephen Badin in 1793
Pilate, Pontius - The fact that Jesus was brought to Pilate at all probably means that He had not been formally tried and convicted by the Sanhedrin, or Jewish ruling Council (if he had, he would probably have been stoned to death like Stephen, or like James the Just in A
San'Hedrin - Jesus was arraigned before this body as a false prophet, (John 11:47 ) and Peter, John, Stephen and Paul as teachers of error and deceivers of the people
Scribe - (3) On the other hand, Acts 6:12 mentions scribes among those who proceeded against Stephen
Orphan - ...
Stephen G
Feet - The clothes of the ‘witnesses’ who stoned Stephen were laid at the feet of Saul, already prominent against the new sect (Acts 7:58)
Antioch - The persecution that arose over Stephen resulted in Jewish believers scattering to Cyprus, Cyrene, and Antioch ( Acts 11:19 )
Moloch - Hence the prophet Amos, (Amos 5:25 and following verses, laments it also, And Stephen, the first martyr, charged it upon the Sanhedrim
Moloch - Stephen, reproach them with having carried in the wilderness the tabernacle of their god Moloch, Acts 7:43
Julius, Bishop of Puteoli - of Puteoli between Theodore and Stephen
Sanhedrin - ), Stephen was condemned by it because of blasphemy ( Acts 7:57-58 ), and Paul was charged with transgression of the Mosaic Law ( Acts 22:30 ). It was only in cases when the sentence of death was pronounced that the latter had to be ratified by the Roman authorities ( John 18:31 ); the case of the stoning of Stephen must be regarded as an instance of mob-justice
Cyprus - As a result of the persecution associated with the martyrdom of Stephen in Jerusalem, Jewish Christians journeyed to Cyprus and preached the gospel to the Jewish community on the island (Acts 11:19-20 )
Laetare Medal - " Following is a partial list of the recipients of the award: ...
1883 - John Gilmary Shea, historian
1884 - Patrick J Keeley, architect
1885 - Eliza Allen Starr, artist
1886 - General John Newton, army engineer
1887 - Edward Preuss, journalist
1888 - Patrick V Hickey, founder "Catholic Review"
1889 - Anna Hanson Dorsey, novelist
1890 - William T Onahan, organizer Catholic Congress
1891 - Daniel Dougherty, orator
1892 - Henry F Brownson, philosopher
1893 - Patrick Donahoe, founder "Boston Pilot"
1894 - Augustin Daly, theatrical manager
1895 - Mrs James Sadlier, writer
1896 - General William S Rosecrans, leader Army of Cumberland
1897 - Thomas Addis Emmett, surgeon
1898 - Timothy E Howard, jurist
1899 - Mary Gwendolin Caldwell, benefactor Catholic University
1900 - John Creighton, founder Creighton University
1901 - William Bourke Cockran, orator
1902 - John B Murphy, surgeon
1903 - Charles J Bonaparte, attorney-general
1904 - Richard C Kerens, philanthropist
1905 - Thomas B Fitzpatrick, business man
1906 - Francis Quinlan, medical specialist
1907 - Katherine E Conway, author
1908 - James C Monaghan, lecturer
1909 - Frances Tiernan, (Christian Reid), litterateur
1910 - Maurice Francis Egan, writer
1911 - Agnes Repplier, essayist
1912 - Thomas M Mulry, charity worker
1913 - Charles G Herbermann, editor-in-chief "Catholic Encyclopedia"
1914 - Edward Douglas White, chief justice of the United States
1915 - Mary V Merrick, founder, Christ Child Society
1916 - James J Walsh, physician and author
1917 - William Shepherd Benson, admiral
1918 - Joseph Scott, lawyer
1919 - George Duval, philanthropist
1920 - Lawrence F Flick, physician
1921 - Elizabeth Nourse, artist
1922 - Charles P Neil, economist
1923 - Walter George Smith, lawyer
1924 - Charles D Maginnis, architect
1925 - Albert Francis Zahm, scientist
1926 - Edward N Hurley, business man
1927 - Margaret Anglin, actress
1928 - Jack J Spalding, lawyer
1929 - Alfred Emmanuel Smith, statesman
1930 - Frederick P Kenkel, director of Central Bureau of the Central Verein
1931 - James J Phelan, philanthropist
1932 - Stephen J Maher, tuberculosis expert
1933 - John McCormack, vocalist
1934 -
1935 - Frank H Spearman, author
1936 -
1937 -
1938 -
1939 -
1940 -
1941 -
1942 - Helen Constance White, teacher and author
1943 -
1944 -
1945 -
1946 -
1947 -
1948 -
1949 -
1950 -
1951 -
1952 -
1953 -
1954 -
1955 - George Meaney, labour leader
1956 -
1957 -
1958 -
1959 -
1960 -
1961 -
1962 -
1963 -
1964 -
1965 - Frederick Dominic Rossini, teacher and scientist
1966 -
1967 -
1968 -
1969 -
1970 -
1971 -
1972 - Dorothy Day, activist
1973 -
1974 -
1975 -
1976 -
1977 -
1978 -
1979 -
1980 -
1981 -
1982 -
1983 -
1984 - John T Noonan, jurist
1985 - Guido Calabresi, jurist
1986 -
1987 -
1988 -
1989 -
1990 -
1991 -
1992 - Daniel Patrick Moynihan, US senator
1993 - L John Durney, teacher and journalist
1994 -
1995 -
1996 - Sister Helen Prejean, anti-death penalty activist
1997 - Father Virgilio Elizondo, theologian and writer
1998 -
1999 -
2000 - Andrew J McKenna, businessman
2001 - Monsignor George G Higgins, labour activist priest
2002 - Father John Smyth, educator
2003 - Peter and Peggy Steinfels, writers
2004 - Father Bryan Hehir, theologian
2005 - Joseph E Murray, organ transplant pioneer
Chicago, Illinois - Dunne, formerly mayor of Chicago; and Stephen A
Solomon - Stephen noted that though David sought to find a place for God, it was Solomon who “built a house for him” (Acts 7:47 )
Blasphemy - The proto-martyr Stephen lost his life, too, on a charge of blasphemy ( Acts 6:13 ; Acts 7:58 ), when his enemies, in a violent and sudden fit of rage, forgot the limitation imposed on them as vassals of the Roman Empire (cf
Cilicia - Among the Jews of Jerusalem who rose against Stephen there was a synagogue of Cilicians (Acts 6:9)
Chorazin - ]'>[1] of the NT spell Χοραζ(ε)ίν, others, especially in Luke, Χωραζίν; so Stephen in Luke, but not Elzevir, Mill; D Witness - Stephen also was a true witness, and his testimony led to his becoming a martyr (μάρτυς)
Dorcas - Peter’s sojourn in the plain of Western Palestine after the dispersion of the Jerusalem Church on the martyrdom of Stephen (Acts 9:36-42)
Acts of the Apostles - The principal facts recorded in it are, the choice of Matthias to be an Apostle in the room of the traitor Judas; the descent of the Holy Ghost on the day of pentecost; the preaching, miracles, and sufferings of the Apostles at Jerusalem; the death of Stephen, the first martyr; the persecution and dispersion of the Christians; the preaching of the Gospel in different parts of Palestine, especially in Samaria; the conversion of St
Calf - Stephen calls it plainly ειδωλον , an idol, Acts 7:41
Romania - Stephen the Great (1457-1504) organized the Church, erected a new bishopric, and founded several churches and monasteries
Rumania - Stephen the Great (1457-1504) organized the Church, erected a new bishopric, and founded several churches and monasteries
Philip - During the persecution which followed the martyrdom of Stephen, he preached in Samaria ( Acts 8:4-8 )
Gospel - ...
Early Christian preachers, such as Peter, John, Stephen and Paul, preached the same message
Leontius, Bishop of Antioch - When the see of Antioch became vacant by the removal of Stephen, the emperor Constantius effected the appointment of Leontius, who strove to avoid giving offence to either Arians or orthodox
Patience - ' Stephen, dying under a shower of stones, prays for his enemies: 'Lord, lay not this sin to their charge. ' ...
But a greater than Joseph, or David, or Stephen, is here
Dionysius of Alexandria - ); and with better results counselled moderation in dealing with the rebaptism of heretics, in a correspondence with popes Stephen and Sixtus (a. —To Stephen of Rome, the Roman presbyters Dionysius and Philemon, Sixtus II
English Martyrs - , 1537-1538
Bell, Arthur, Blessed
Bell, James, Blessed
Belser, Thomas, priest
Belson, Thomas, Venerable, layman, 1589
Bentney (alias Bennet), William, Jesuit, 1692
Bere, Richard, Blessed
Berisford, Humphrey, layman, 1588
Bickerdyke, Robert, Venerable, layman, 1595
Bigod, Sir Francis, 1537
Bird, James, Blessed
Bird, Robert, priest, 1540
Bird, William, priest, 1540
Birkett, Richard, priest, 1680
Bishop, Thomas, layman, 1569-1570
Blackburne, William, priest, 1586
Blake, Alexander, Venerable, layman, 1590
Blenkinsop, Thomas, layman, 1593
Blonham, Laurence, monk, 1537
Blount, Thomas, priest, 1647
Bocking, Edward, Benedictine, 1537
Bodey, John, Blessed
Bolbet, Richard, layman, 1589
Bonner, Edmund, bishop, 1569
Bosgrave, Thomas, Blessed
Boste, John, Saint
Bourne, Gilbert, bishop, 1569
Bowes, Marmaduke, Venerable, layman, 1585
Bowes, Richard, priest, 1590
Boxall, John, priest, 1571
Bradley, Richard, Jesuit, 1645
Branton, Stephen, layman, 1591
Brazier (Grimes), Matthew, Jesuit, 1650
Bredstock, William, layman, 1590
Briant, Alexander, Blessed
Brindholme, Edmund, Venerable, priest, 1540-1544
Britton, John, Venerable, layman, 1598
Brookby, Anthony, Venerable, O
Burial - The earliest Christians, being Jews, continued the practice, burying Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:6-10 ) and Stephen (Acts 8:2 )
Biblical Chronology - The stoning of Saint Stephen occurred somewhat later, probably just after the deposition of Pilate in
Martyrs, English - , 1537-1538
Bell, Arthur, Blessed
Bell, James, Blessed
Belser, Thomas, priest
Belson, Thomas, Venerable, layman, 1589
Bentney (alias Bennet), William, Jesuit, 1692
Bere, Richard, Blessed
Berisford, Humphrey, layman, 1588
Bickerdyke, Robert, Venerable, layman, 1595
Bigod, Sir Francis, 1537
Bird, James, Blessed
Bird, Robert, priest, 1540
Bird, William, priest, 1540
Birkett, Richard, priest, 1680
Bishop, Thomas, layman, 1569-1570
Blackburne, William, priest, 1586
Blake, Alexander, Venerable, layman, 1590
Blenkinsop, Thomas, layman, 1593
Blonham, Laurence, monk, 1537
Blount, Thomas, priest, 1647
Bocking, Edward, Benedictine, 1537
Bodey, John, Blessed
Bolbet, Richard, layman, 1589
Bonner, Edmund, bishop, 1569
Bosgrave, Thomas, Blessed
Boste, John, Saint
Bourne, Gilbert, bishop, 1569
Bowes, Marmaduke, Venerable, layman, 1585
Bowes, Richard, priest, 1590
Boxall, John, priest, 1571
Bradley, Richard, Jesuit, 1645
Branton, Stephen, layman, 1591
Brazier (Grimes), Matthew, Jesuit, 1650
Bredstock, William, layman, 1590
Briant, Alexander, Blessed
Brindholme, Edmund, Venerable, priest, 1540-1544
Britton, John, Venerable, layman, 1598
Brookby, Anthony, Venerable, O
Blasphemy - ...
Stephen Motyer...
Bibliography
Religion - … Here Ἰουδαϊσμός denotes Jewish partisanship, and accurately describes the bitter party spirit which prompted Saul to take the lead in the martyrdom of Stephen and the persecution of the Church, … He advanced beyond his fellows in sectarian prejudice and persecuting zeal’ (F
Euthymius (4), Abbat in Palestine - When the council of Chalcedon issued its decrees (451), two of his disciples, Stephen and John, who had been present, brought them to their master
Martyr - The word is used in practically the same sense in Revelation 2:13 (Antipas) and Acts 22:20 (Stephen), but is in both passages translated ‘witness. -Among those who were done to death in the Jewish persecutions mentioned in the Acts the names of two only are preserved-Stephen, and James the son of Zebedee. Stephen was nominally charged with blasphemy, but the proceedings were no trial in any legal sense, and, if the Sanhedrin were ever called to account for them, they doubtless pleaded that a sudden and uncontrollable tumult had occurred
Judaizing - On the other hand, the keen intellect of a Stephen or a Paul saw at once that any attempt to enforce the Mosaic Law or even the initiatory rite of circumcision upon the Gentiles, meant stagnation and death to the Church. Stephen, (b) the conversion of Cornelius, and (c) the Council at Jerusalem. Stephen’s speech consists in the principles which underlie the historical summary which is its main feature
Death, Death-Stroke - signifies "a taking up or off" (ana, "up," airo, "to take"), as of the taking of a life, or "putting to death;" it is found in Acts 8:1 , of the murder of Stephen
Pharisees - ...
This attitude of tolerance towards Christians changed suddenly when the Pharisees understood Stephen to have spoken against the law of Moses
Persecution in the Bible - Paul (1 Corinthians 4:11-13 ; 2 Corinthians 4:8-12 ; 2 Corinthians 6:4-10 ; 2 Corinthians 11:24-27 ; Galatians 5:11 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:2 ; 1 Thessalonians 3:4 ; Acts 17:5-10 ; Acts 18:12-17 ; Psalm 137:1 ; Acts 23:12-35 ), as well as Stephen (Acts 6:8-7:60 ), James (Acts 12:2 ), and Peter (Acts 12:3-5 ), together with many anonymous martyrs experienced the truth of the Johannine saying: “If they have persecuted me, they will also persecute you” (John 15:20 ; see Acts 4:3 ; Acts 5:17-42 ; Acts 8:1 ; Acts 12:1 ; Revelation 2:26 ,Revelation 2:26,2:9-10 ,Revelation 2:9-10,2:13 ,Revelation 2:13,2:19 ; Revelation 3:8-10 ; Revelation 6:9 ; Revelation 16:6 ; Revelation 17:6 ; Revelation 18:24 ; Revelation 20:4 )
Deacon - Acts 6:5 ) are higher than those laid down in 1 Timothy for the office of the deacon; and Stephen and Philip, the only two of their number of whom we know anything, exercise functions far above those of the later diaconate ( 1 Timothy 6:8 ff
Romans, Epistle to the - On the day of Pentecost ( Acts 2:10 ) carried back the earliest tidings of the new doctrine; or the gospel may have first reached the imperial city through those who were scattered abroad to escape the persecution which followed on the death of Stephen
Julianus, Bishop of Cos - In the matter of the claims of BASSIAN and Stephen to the see of Ephesus, he gives his voice first for setting both aside, then for allowing a local council to choose (701 D, 703 D)
Mourning - The term κοπετόν (used in Acts 8:2 to indicate the lamentation of the devout men over Stephen; cf
Law - Stephen, who anticipated St. Stephen, as a Hellenist, could of course more easily than St. Stephen should have wrought powerfully on the young Pharisee Saul (7:58). Stephen, and in any case the latter’s great vindicatory speech must have still further opened the eyes of the zealous Pharisee to the inherently non-legal nature of the gospel, and rekindled his persecuting zeal against the followers of Jesus ( Stephen had preached the gospel in Antioch even to the Gentiles, and that the numerous converts whom they had won from heathendom were recognized as brethren by the community in Jerusalem (Acts 11:20-24)
Moses - More especially in the speech of Stephen a strong emphasis is laid upon the prophetic character of Moses (Acts 7:37); here, moreover, Moses does not merely foretell the coming of Christ, but in his calling, and even in his experiences, he is also, as indicated in the passage cited from Dt. In the speech of Stephen the life of Moses is sketched at some length, and is furnished with certain particulars which were derived from the oral tradition of the Synagogue (the Haggâdâ), as e. the charge against Stephen, Acts 6:11)
Eusebius, Bishop of Dorylaeum - 449 to attend the council, he apparently lodged with Stephen of Ephesus ( ib. 699 A) voted for the deposition of both claimants to the see of Ephesus, Bassian and Stephen, as being both alike irregularly consecrated
Stars - Stephen ( Acts 7:43 ), where the expression is rendered ‘the star of the god Rephan
Irish Martyrs - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P. MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Deacon - On the other hand, two of the seven, Stephen and Philip, are known to us as prominent preachers and evangelists, roles which may not have been common for deacons
Martyrs, Irish - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P. MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
New Birth - Charnock, The Works of Stephen Charnock, vol
Ear - ...
The only significant act named in this literature in reference to the ear is that of those who hear Stephen declare his vision of Jesus at the right hand of God: they stop their ears, that the blasphemy may not enter (Acts 7:57)
Alexandrians - Stephen were ‘certain of them that were of the synagogue called the synagogue … of the Alexandrians’ (Ἀλεξανδρέων, Acts 6:9)
Dionysius (19), Monk in Western Church - Stephen, to whom he dedicates his collection of Canons, he admits the existence of an earlier, but defective, Latin translation, of which copies have been printed and named, after his naming of it, Prisca Versio by Justellus and others
Answer - Stephen before the Sanhedrin (Acts 7)
Possidius, Bishop of Calama - Stephen, by which many cures were wrought ( Civ
Paul Apprehended of Christ Jesus - THE first time we see Saul of Tarsus he is silently consenting to Stephen's death. Why the fierce young Pharisee did not take a far more active part in the martyrdom of Stephen we do not know; we can only guess. That a young zealot of Saul's temperament should be content to sit still that day, and merely keep the clothes of the witnesses who stoned Stephen, makes us wonder what it meant. But, beginning with his silent consent to the death of Stephen, Saul soon went on to plan and to perpetrate the most dreadful deeds on his own account
Old Testament in the New Testament, the - , Stephen's speech in Acts 7:2-53 ); pesher, a style found particularly in the Dead Sea Scrolls, in which Old Testament texts are connected with specific contemporary events (e. But Jesus does!...
Stephen's powerful speech (Acts 7:2-53 ) turns on the thought that the promise given to Abraham in Genesis 15:13-14— ;paraphrased by Stephen as "you will worship me in this place" (v. Stephen traces a history in which all the significant encounters with God occurred away from "this place, " and then points to the ambivalent Old Testament traditions concerning the temple, the "place" above all where God was meant to be worshiped yet a "place" where by definition he cannot dwell (vv. ...
Stephen Motyer...
Bibliography
Names of Our Lord - ...
IN THE OLD TESTAMENT ...
Almighty Word, Wisdom of Solomon 18:15
Brightness of Eternal Light, Wisdom of Solomon 7:26
Child, Isaiah 9:6
Counsellor, Isaiah 9:6
Desire of Eternal Hills, Genesis 49:26
Desired of all nations, Aggeus 2:8
Emmanuel, Isaiah 7:14
Expectation of nations, Genesis
Father of World to Come, Isaiah
God the Mighty, Isaiah 9:6
Holy One of Israel, Isaiah 43:3
Holy One, Psalms 15:10
Just Branch, Jeremiah 23:5
Just, Isaiah 45:8
King of Glory, Psalms 23:7
Lord of Hosts, Isaiah 9:7
Lord Our Just One, Jeremiah 23:6
Man of Sorrows, Isaiah 53:3
Man, Michah 5:5
My Just One, Isaiah 41:10
Orient, Zachariah 6:12
Prince of Peace, Isaiah 9:6
Root of Jesse, Isaiah 11:10
Ruler of the Earth, Isaiah 16:1
Sun of Justice, Malachi 4:2
Wonderful, Isaiah 9:6
USED BY HIMSELF ...
Bread of Life, John 6:35
Door, John 10:9
Good Shepherd, John 10:11
Life, John 11:25
Light of the World, John 9:5
Lord, John 13:13
Master, John 13:13
Resurrection and Life, John 11:25
Son of Man, Matthew 8:2O
Son, John 5:22
Vine, John 15:1
Way, Truth, and Life, John 14:6
USED BY THE APOSTLES and EVANGELISTS ...
Advocate, 1 John 2:1
Almighty, Apocalypse 1:8
Alpha and Omega, Apocalypse 1:8
Amen, Apocalypse 3:14
Author and Finisher of Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Author of Life, Acts 3:15
Beginning and End, Apocalypse 1:8
Blessed God, Mark 14:61
Child Jesus, Luke 2:43
Christ Jesus, 1 Timothy 1:1
Christ, Matthrew 1:18
Corner-Stone, Epheisans 2:21
Day Star, 2 Peter 1:19
Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Faithful Witness, Apocalypse 1:5
First and Last, Apocalypse 1:17
First Born from the Dead, Apocalypse 1:5
Galitean, Matthew 26:69
God of the Jews, Romans 3:29
Great Pastor, Hebrews 13:20
He that is to come, Hebrews 10:37
Head, Ephesians 4:15
High Priest, Hebrews 2:17
Jesus Christ the Just, 1 John 2:1
Jesus, Matthew 27:17
Key of David, Apocalypse 3:7
King of Kings, Apocalypse 19:16
Lamb of God, John 1:29
Life Eternal, 1 John 1:2
Lion of the Tribe of Juda, Apocalypse 5:5
Living Stone, 1 Peter 2:4
Lord Jesus Christ, Acts 10:48
Lord of All, Galatians 4:1
Lord of Lords, Apocalypse 19:16
Lord Our God, Apocalypse 4:11
Mediator, Hebrews 9:15
Messias, John 1:41 (passim)
Only Begotten of the Father, John 1:14
Our Lord Jesus Ghrist, Romans 1:4
Pascha Nostrum, 1 Corinthians 5:7
Power of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Priest, Hebrews 8:4
Prince of the kings of the earth, Apocalypse 1:5
Rabbi, John 1:18
Rock of Scandal, Romans 9:33
Root of David, Apocalypse 5:6
Saviour of the world, John 4:42
Saviour, Luke 2:11
Son of David, Mark 12:86
Son of God, Matthew 8:29
Son of Joseph, Luke 3:23
Son of the Living God, Matthew 16:16
Star of the morning, Apocalypse 2:23
Stone of stumbling, 1 Peter 2:8
Stone, Matthew 21:42
Teacher, John 3:2
That which was from the beginning, 1 John 1:1
Victim, Ephesians 5:2
Wisdom of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Word, John 1:1
Word of God, Apocalypse 19:13
Word of Life, 1 John 1:1
USED BY OTHERS ...
Adonai, O Antiphons
Angel in the liturgy of the Mass
Captain of our salvation, Ephiphany, Matins
Captain of the Martyrs, Octain of Saint Stephen, Matins
Carpenter's Son, Matthew 13:55
Christ our King, First Wednesday in Advent, Matins
Christ the Lord, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Eagle, Saint Maximus, Homily 42
Eternal, Christmas Day, Lauds
Eternal Word of God made Flesh, Ember Saturday in Advent, Martins
Glory of Thy people Israel, Luke 2:32
God of God, title in Gloria
God our Saviour, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
God the Son, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Great Prophet, First Sunday in Advent, Lauds
Heavenly Bridegroom, Epiphany, Lauds
Holy, Luke 1:35
Holy One of God, Luke 4
King of all the earth, Second Monday in Advent, Vespers
King of Angel Hosts above, Circumcision, Matins
King of Heaven, Christmas Day, Matins
King of Israel, Mark 15:32
King of Righteousness, Third Thursday in Advent, Matins
King of the Gentiles, O Antiphons
King of the Jews, Matthew 2:2
King Peaceful, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
Light to the revelation of the Gentiles, Luke 2:32
Light of Light, title in Gloria
Lord of Angels, Eve of Epiphany, Matins
Lord Our King, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Lawgiver, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Saviour, Circumcision, Matins
Lord that shall rule, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord the King, Ephiphany, Matins
Lord the Ruler, Second Sunday in Advent, Matins
Voice - The phrase ‘the voice of the Lord’ used in Psalms 29 metaphorically of thunder is quoted in Acts 7:31 by Stephen of God’s self-revelation to Moses
Sleep - Stephen is said to have fallen asleep when he died as the effects of stoning (Acts 7:60)
Judas Iscariot - Stephen (τοῦ δικαίου οὗ νῦν ὑμεῖς προδόται καὶ φονεῖς ἐγένεσθε)
Jacobus Sarugensis, Bishop of Batnae - to Stephen bar-Sudaïl of Edessa proving from reason and Scripture the eternity of heaven and hell
Sleep - Stephen is said to have fallen asleep when he died as the effects of stoning (Acts 7:60)
Hellenists - For, though Hebrew and Jew are convertible terms, when opposed to Gentiles, as denoting the seed of Abraham, and professors of the Mosaic religion, see Jeremiah 34:9 ; yet, as opposed to the ‘Ελληνισται , they are not convertible terms, there being Hebrew Jews and Hellenistic Jews; for it is said, that when "they, who were scattered by the persecution that arose about Stephen, travelled into several countries, preaching the word to none but Jews only," yet they spoke, προς τους ‘Ελληνιστας , to the Hellenists or Grecians, Acts 11:19-20 . On which account Grotius, understanding by the ‘Ελληνισται , or "Grecians, to whom some of those who were dispersed on the persecution which arose about Stephen: preached the Lord Jesus," Acts 11:19-20 , Greeks by nation, concludes there is a mistake in the text, and alters it according to the Syriac and Vulgate versions: "Certe legendum, [1] saith he, " προς τους Ελληνας
Deacon, Deaconess - That these men served in a manner transcending the traditional notion of deacon is clearly seen in the prophetic teaching activity of Stephen (Acts 6-7 ) and the evangelistic ministry of Philip (Acts 8 )
Cross - Jesus bore His own cross toward Golgotha outside the city (Hebrews 13:12; so Stephen, Acts 7:58), but sinking exhausted probably He was relieved, and it was transferred to Simon of Cyrene; prefigured in Isaac carrying the wood (Genesis 22:6; contrast Isaiah 9:6, "the government shall be upon His shoulder"
Amos - ...
Stephen (Acts 7:42) quotes Amos 5:25-27; and James (Acts 15:16) quotes Amos 9:11
Paul the Apostle - (Stephen in Acts 7:1-8 ; [1]; likewise traces the gospel message back to God's promise to Abraham is Paul Luke's source for what Stephen said on that occasion? Did Stephen have a hand in instructing Paul? ) The foundation of the gospel Paul preached was the covenant God made with Abraham (see Genesis 12:1-3 ; 15:1-21 )
the Man Which Sowed Good Seed in His Field But His Enemy Came And Sowed Tares Among the Wheat - In Fitzjames Stephen's brilliant four-days' speech before the Court of Arches, that learned and eloquent counsel said,-"My Lord, such differences have always existed in the Church. " I will not quote what Stephen said about the other party. "...
And a greater than Fitzjames Stephen, the Golden-mouth of the English Church himself, says in his Discourse of the Liberty of Prophesying-"Let all errors be as much and as zealously suppressed as may be: but let it be done by such means as are proper instruments for their suppression; by preaching and disputation, by charity and sweetness, by holiness of life, by assiduity of exhortation, by the Word of God and prayer. "...
And on the same subject a greater than either Stephen or Taylor has said: has sung-Let not the people be too swift to judge,As one that reckons on the blades in field,Or ere the corn be ripe
Circumcision - Stephen reinforced this by accusing contemporary Judaism of the very tendencies that Jeremiah had condemned (Acts 7:51 )
Foreigner - ...
Stephen G
Evangelist - ’ It is when the first Christians were ‘scattered abroad, and went about preaching the word’ after the martyrdom of Stephen, that the verb ‘to publish the good tidings’ is often used by St
Evangelist - ’ It is when the first Christians were ‘scattered abroad, and went about preaching the word’ after the martyrdom of Stephen, that the verb ‘to publish the good tidings’ is often used by St
Eustathius (3), Bishop of Berrhoea - Among those whom he refused to receive were Stephen Leontius ὁ ἀπὸκοπος and Eudoxius (who successively occupied his episcopal seat after his deposition) George of Laodicea Theodosius of Tripolis and Eustathius of Sebaste (Athan
Nazareth - The accusers of Stephen refer with contemptuous anger to ‘this Jesus the Nazarene’ (Acts 6:14), whom the heretic would fain set above Moses
Nazareth - The accusers of Stephen refer with contemptuous anger to ‘this Jesus the Nazarene’ (Acts 6:14), whom the heretic would fain set above Moses
Upper Room (2) - Stephen (a. 415): ‘Then, with psalms and hymns, they carried the relics of the most blessed Stephen to the holy church of Sion, where also the Archdeacon had been ordained
Sychar - ]'>[6] 368), that the Evangelist, who had such a good acquaintance with the OT, could not, in face of Genesis 33:19 and Joshua 24:32, have substituted (in error) Sychar for Sychem, and that if he possessed only such knowledge of the locality as the OT gave him, he would have used the name Συχέμ (like Stephen in Acts 7:16)
Resurrection of Jesus Christ - ...
The risen Christ appeared to Stephen (Acts 7:55-56 ), to Saul/Paul (Acts 9:1-6 ), and to John the Seer (Revelation 1:1 )
Tradition - Stephen to the burial of Jacob and all his children in Sychem, to Moses’ learning ‘in all the wisdom of the Egyptians,’ and to the presence of angels at the giving of the Law (Acts 7:15 f
Shekinah - Stephen speaks of ‘the God of glory,’ i
Desert, Wilderness - Stephen and St
the Angel of the Lord - Stephen, in alluding to this part of the history of Moses, in his speech before the council, says, "There appeared to Moses in the wilderness of Mount Sinai, an Angel of the Lord in a flame of fire," showing that that phraseology was in use among the Jews in his day, and that this Angel and Jehovah were regarded as the same being; for he adds, "Moses was in the church in the wilderness with the Angel which spoke unto him in Mount Sinai
Hebrews, Letter to the - ...
The content of the sermon makes it clear that the writer based his teachings on the same foundational beliefs as taught by other preachers such as Stephen, Peter, Paul and John
Cyprus - When the Jews killed Stephen and drove the Christians from Jerusalem, some of those Christians took the gospel to Cyprus (Acts 11:19)
Theodosius ii., Emperor - Stephen and Zechariah the prophet (ix
Christ, Christology - ’...
In the Acts of the Apostles moat of the material is contained in the five speeches of Peter and the speech of Stephen, those of Peter being (a) on the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:14 ff. It is ‘Jesus’ whom Stephen sees standing at the right hand of God (Acts 7:55), and ‘Jesus’ who speaks to Saul from heaven. -This title for Jesus occurs once only-in the account of the martyrdom of Stephen ( Christian Life - Stephen, the leader of the Hellenists, who paid the penalty of his undisguised anti-Judaism in martyrdom. Stephen anticipated the essential principles of Pauline Christianity, and further, that they were in advance of minds like that of St. Stephen and that of St
Jerusalem - Here also Stephen was thought to be martyred (still later). Stephen. Stephen with the Caenaculum dates from the 8th cent. Stephen’s Gate) from the 15th century. Stephen perished (between a. Stephen’s Gate (Sanday, Sacred Sites, p
Olives, Mount of - the mountain approaches the wall, separated only by a narrow ravine, Kedron, to which the descent from the Golden gate, or the gate of Stephen, is steep, and the ascent from the valley bed up the hill equally so. of the central mount are: the tomb of the Virgin, then successively up the hill, namely, an olive garden, cavern of Christ's prayer and agony, rock where the disciples slept, place of Jesus' capture, spot from whence the Virgin saw Stephen stoned, spot where her girdle dropped at her assumption, spot of Jesus' lament over Jerusalem (Luke 19:41), tombs of the prophets, including Haggai and Zechariah (the Jews say; Matthew 23:29), place of the ascension, and church
Sepulchre - ’ Stephen here seems to have confused OT statements with ancient Jewish tradition. Stephen, accordingly, only enlarges upon the statements of the OT in keeping with both tradition and possibility
Divination - Maspero, Dawm of Civilization2, 1896; Stephen Langdon, ‘Private Penance,’ in Transactions of the Third International Congress for the History of Religions, 1908, p. Paul (Acts 9:17; Acts 9:27; Acts 26:16) and to Stephen (Acts 7:56), and His Spirit prohibited action (Acts 16:7), where an itinerant preacher was received as a messenger of God, or even as Christ Jesus re-incarnated (Galatians 4:14); where the Holy Spirit was a distinct living personality, where the assertion that a man was the Son of God made a Roman governor tremble (John 19:8), and the patience of His death caused a Roman centurion to exclaim: ‘This was a Son of God’ (Matthew 27:54)
Various Readings - ...
The Editions of Stephen, a printer in Paris, followed. " It is the one commonly reprinted on the continent: and is the same in the main as that of Stephen reprinted in England, there being only about 287 minor differences between them. He had laboured for thirty years in his work: he reprinted Stephen's 1550 edition, and gave the fruits of his research in notes and appendix
Simon Maccabaeus - The only contemporary document which mentions him is the Acts of the Apostles; and we there read, that, when Philip the deacon preached the Gospel in Samaria after the death of Stephen, "there was a certain man, called Simon, which beforetime in the same city used sorcery, and bewitched the people of Samaria, giving out that himself was some great one; to whom they all gave heed, from the least to the greatest, saying, This man is the great power of God. According to my calculation, the death of Stephen happened in the same year with the crucifixion of our Lord; and it appears from the passage now quoted, that Simon's celebrity had begun some time before
Tribulation - ‘The tribulation which arose about Stephen’ (Acts 11:19 Revised Version ) was of course ‘persecution’ (Authorized Version )
Levite - ...
Stephen J
Antioch - To these Greeks, in particular, certain Cypriot and Cyrenian converts, who had fled from the persecution which followed the death of Stephen, addressed themselves; "and a great number believed, and turned unto the Lord
Mount Mountain - -In the first of these passages (Acts 7:30; Acts 7:38) the martyr Stephen recalls to his murderers’ minds Moses’ vision of the Burning Bush (Exodus 3:1 ff
Mount Mountain - -In the first of these passages (Acts 7:30; Acts 7:38) the martyr Stephen recalls to his murderers’ minds Moses’ vision of the Burning Bush (Exodus 3:1 ff
Paul - Among the synagogue disputants with Stephen were men "of Cilcia" (Acts 6:9), probably including Saul; at all events it was at his feet, while be was yet "a young man," that the witnesses, stoning the martyr, laid down their clothes (Acts 6:9; Acts 7:58; Deuteronomy 17:7). "Saul was consenting unto his death" (Acts 6; 7); but we can hardly doubt that his better feelings must have had some misgiving in witnessing Stephen's countenance beaming as an angel's, and in hearing his loving prayer for his murderers. His Grecian education adapted him for successfully, like Stephen, disputing against the Grecians. Meantime at Antioch the gospel was preached to Gentile "Greeks" (Hellenas in the Alexandrinus manuscript, not "Grecians," Acts 11:20) by men of Cyprus and Cyrene scattered abroad at the persecution of Stephen; Barnabas went down then from Jerusalem, and glad in seeing this special grace of God, "exhorted them that with purpose of heart they would cleave unto the Lord
Mediation Mediator - His death was not of a piece with that of Stephen and James, who died as martyrs. Stephen called Jesus ‘the Righteous One’ (Acts 7:52), and died saying, ‘Lord Jesus, receive my spirit’ (Acts 7:59)
Gestures - Stephen (Acts 7:55), Cornelius (Acts 10:4), St. Stephen (Acts 7:60), and probably of St
Justice - ...
Stephen Charles Mott...
...
Paul - He considered that Stephen was a rebel against the law and that therefore he deserved execution (Acts 6:13; Acts 7:58; Acts 8:1; Philippians 3:6)
Son of Man - In Acts 7:56 , Stephen beheld the ascended Son of man standing beside the throne of God to receive him
Lie, Lying - ...
Stephen J
Israel - Stephen (Acts 7:23; Acts 7:37; Acts 7:42), and by St
Scribes - And Stephen, Acts vii, just before his death, addresses the multitude by an appeal to the law and the prophets, and reprobates in the most severe terms the teachers who misled the people
Petrus, Saint, Archbaptist of Alexandria - Thus Stephen and James were arrested; so was Peter who "was finally crucified in Rome"; so Paul who was beheaded in the same city
Nehemiah - Ezra was an old preacher, full of years, full of learning, and full of an experienced piety, giving himself continually to prayer and to the ministry of the Word, while young Nehemiah, like Stephen in the Acts, served tables in the new Jerusalem. Let him be honoured, and trusted, and elected like Stephen to be a deacon
Drink - " ...
Stephen J
Appear, Appearance - Stephen refers to this central feature of Jewish religion (Acts 7:2 )
Persecution - Examples in the New Testament include John the Baptist, who spoke out against the adultery of Herod Antipas and was beheaded (Mark 6:21-29 ); Stephen, the deacon, who, preaching the gospel before the Sanhedrin and proclaiming God's judgment because of the sins of the people, was rejected and stoned (Acts 6:5 ; 7:1-60 ); Paul, who was persecuted, beaten, and imprisoned as he preached from place to place, and was finally killed in Rome (2 Timothy 4:6-8 ); and climactically, Jesus himself who preached God's grace and judgment (Matthew 4:17 ; 11:28-29 ), was persecuted by his hearers (Luke 4:28-30 ), plotted against by his adversaries (Mark 3:6 ), rejected (Luke 13:34 ; John 6:66 ), tried (John 18:12-40 ), and finally crucified (John 19:16-37 ; Philippians 2:9 )
American Martyrology -
Stephen te Ganonakoa, Indian, tortured to death by Cayuga Indians at Onondaga, October 25, 1690
Paul - He is first introduced to us as a young man, by name SAUL, at whose feet the witnesses who stoned Stephen laid their clothes
Moravians - Being anxious to preserve among themselves regular episcopal ordination, and, at a synod held at Lhota in 1467, taking into consideration the scarcity of ministers regularly ordained among them, they chose three of their priests ordained by Calixtine bishops, and sent them to Stephen, bishop of the Waldenses, then residing in Austria, by whom they were consecrated bishops; co-bishops and conseniores being appointed from the rest of their presbyters
Paul - Saul was yet "a young man," (Acts 7:58 ) when the Church experienced that sudden expansion which was connected with the ordaining of the seven appointed to serve tables, and with the special power and inspiration of Stephen. Among those who disputed with Stephen were some "of them of Cilicia. " We naturally think of Saul as having been one of these, when we find him afterward keeping the clothes of those suborned witnesses who, according to the law, (17:7) were the first to cast stones at Stephen
Paul - At length Stephen, one of the seven deacons, gave forth more public and aggressive testimony that Jesus was the Messiah, and this led to much excitement among the Jews and much disputation in their synagogues. Persecution arose against Stephen and the followers of Christ generally, in which Saul of Tarsus took a prominent part
Exodus - This passage is quoted by Stephen in his defence before the council (Acts 7:6 )
Call, Calling - ...
Stephen Motyer...
Bibliography
Truth - Stephen in his defence charged those who denied Jesus Christ and His gospel with the crime of resisting the Holy Ghost as their fathers had been guilty likewise in persecuting the prophets (Acts 7:51-52), while St
Moses - The sermon of Stephen before the Sanhedrin quotes Moses several times (Acts 7:20-44 )
Glory (2) - With this passage should be compared the visions of Stephen in Acts 7:55; of Saul of Tarsus (Acts 9:3; Acts 22:6-11; Acts 26:13), and of St
Samaria - After the death of Stephen, Micah 1:6 , when the disciples were dispersed through the cities of Judea and Samaria, Philip made several converts in this city
Lay - 1), always in the Middle Voice in the NT, is used metaphorically in Hebrews 12:1 "laying aside (every weight);" in James 1:21 , AV, "lay apart," RV, "putting away;" in Acts 7:58 of "laying" down garments, after taking them off, for the purpose of stoning Stephen
Miracles - In Acts 6:8 Stephen works wonders and signs; in Acts 8:6; Acts 8:13 Philip works signs and powers at Samaria
Alexandria - Stephen with his plain declaration of facts (Acts 6:9 )
Pharisees - On the other hand, in the case of Stephen we know that Saul the Pharisee ‘was consenting unto his death’ (Acts 8:1)
Missions - Lastly, some of those who were scattered abroad upon the persecution which arose about Stephen went as far as to Antioch, and preached the word to the Greeks (“Ελληνας, the reading adopted by Tischendorf, Nestle, etc. The trouble which arose about Stephen marked the close of the comparatively peaceful progress of the Church
Jacob - Stephen mentioned the famine and Jacob's journey to Egypt in the course of his defense before the Sanhedrin (Acts 7:8-16 )
Sea - There are three references to it in apostolic history: (a) Stephen in his memorable apology speaks of Moses thus: ‘This man led them forth, having wrought wonders and signs in Egypt, and in the Red sea, and in the wilderness forty years’ (Acts 7:36)
Apocalyptic - ...
Stephen Motyer...
See also Revelation, Theology of ...
Bibliography
Samaria - The dispersion which followed the death of Stephen brought many preachers ‘to the regions of … Samaria’ (Acts 8:1; Acts 8:4)
Antichrist - In 754 the temporal power of the popes began by Pepin's grant to Pope Stephen III
Paul as a Preacher - So did Paul as long as he was still alive, and kept the clothes of them that stoned Stephen
Widow - ...
Stephen G
Alexandria - There was a synagogue of Alexandrians in Jerusalem (Acts 6:9), fanatical defenders of the Mosaic faith, roused to indignation by the heresies of Stephen
Peter - ...
The persecution consequent on the martyrdom of Stephen, by scattering the believers, inaugurated a fresh development of Christianity, involving a bitter controversy
Ordination - Whatever their exact office was-and it is not likely, in view of the solemn procedure adopted, to have been only an office of serving tables, a supposition which seems also to be contrary to the evidence of evangelistic activity by Stephen, Philip, and the rest-the people (‘the whole multitude’) elected (ἐξελέξαντο, ‘chose for themselves,’ Acts 6:5) the Seven and presented them to the apostles (Acts 6:6), who after election ‘appointed’ them (Acts 6:3, καταστήσομεν) and prayed and laid their hands on them (Acts 6:6). Stephen was already ‘a man full of faith and Holy Spirit’ (Acts 6:5)
Old Testament (i. Christ as Fulfilment of) - Is it not possible that the speech of Stephen before the Sanhedrin gives us very nearly the character of the teaching of Jesus? This is an argument from broad historical analogies and principles rather than a use of particular passages. It was recognized by Stephen in his address before the Sanhedrin
Hebrews - Luke, Clement of Rome, Priscilla, Barnabas, Apollos, or a Hellenist like Stephen have all been suggested
Daniel, the Book of - The closing one week (or seven years) includes the 3 1/2, years of Jesus' own preaching to the Jews, and 3 1/2 of the apostles' preaching to the Jews only; then the persecution as to Stephen drove the evangelists from Jerusalem to Samaria
Seventy (2) - ) as follows:—James (brother of the Lord), Timothy, Titus, Barnabas, Ananias, Stephen, Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Simon, Nicolas, Parmenas, Cleopas, Silas, Silvanus, Crescens, Epenetus, Andronicus, Amplias, Urbanus, Stachys, Apelles, Aristobulus, Narcissus, Herodion, Rufus, Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Hermas, Patrobas, Rhodion, Jason, Agabus, Linus, Gaius, Philologus, Olympas, Sosipater, Lucius, Tertius, Erastus, Phygellus, Hermogenes, Dermas, Quartus, Apollos, Cephas, Sosthenes, Epaphroditus, Caesar, Marcus, Joseph Barsabbas, Artemas, Clemens, Onesiphorus, Tychicus, Carpus, Euodius, Philemon, Zenas, Aquila, Priscas, Junias, Marcus (2), Aristarchus, Pudens, Trophimus, Lucas the Eunuch, Lazarus
Stranger, Alien, Foreigner - Stephen (Acts 7:29, ἐγένετο πάροικος), we should read ‘became a sojourner,’ and in that of St
Bible, Canon of the - Stephen Langton introduced the chapters into the Latin Bible prior to his death in 1228, and Stephanus added the verses in the New Testament in 1551 and his publication of a Greek and Latin edition of the New Testament
Illustrations - When Stephen stood before the Sanhedrin, he said: ‘Ye stiff-necked and uncircumcised in heart and ears, ye do always resist the Holy Ghost: as your fathers did, so do ye’ … (Acts 7:51 ff
Popery - Moses (say they) was such a mediator for the Israelites; Job for his three friends; Stephen for his persecutors
Glory - To this the term δόξα is frequently applied-at Bethlehem (Luke 2:9), and at the Transfiguration (2 Peter 1:17); the ‘glory’ of God is the light of the New Jerusalem; Stephen looking up saw the ‘glory of God’ (Acts 7:55); and the redeemed are at last presented faultless before the presence of His glory (Judges 1:24; Jude cf
Antioch - Stephen, Christian fugitives from persecution fled as far north as Antioch, began to preach to the Greeks there ( Acts 11:19 ), and a great number believed
Constantius ii, Son of Constantius - of Antioch, Stephen, against the messengers of Constans were happily discovered, and the faith of Constantius in the party was somewhat shaken (St
Prayer - ’...
Following the example of our Lord, both kneeling and prostration were also adopted; Stephen (Acts 7:60), Peter (Acts 9:40), Paul (Acts 20:36, Acts 21:5), all knelt
Law - Stephen seems to have been the first Christian to see clearly that Christianity was not part of the Jewish system and was not bound by the Jewish law (Acts 6:13-14)
Vincentius Lirinensis - Antiquity was on the side of pope Stephen bp
Paul - Stephen, A. Stephen was followed by a severe persecution of the church at Jerusalem, and St
Chronology of the New Testament - We have to include in this period the spread of the Church among the Hellenists, the election of the Seven, and the death of Stephen, followed closely by St
Bible, Texts And Versions - When the Christians, fleeing from the persecution in which Stephen died, arrived in Antioch, they needed to use Syriac to evangelize the surrounding areas
Wages - ...
Stephen G
Genesis, Theology of - ...
Stephen, in his Acts 7 speech, briefly recounts the story of Genesis (vv
Session - Stephen a beautiful explanation of the ‘standing’ has long been given, viz. Stephen’s Day, and Alford’s note on Acts 7:55, where he inclines to a different interpretation
Church Government - Probably they were temporary officials, scattered by the persecution which was fatal to Stephen, and never re-established
the Angel of the Church in Smyrna - Stephen was the first of them who stood all trials for the sake of the truth
Prayer - In the Christian church, kneeling only: (Acts 7:60) Stephen, (Acts 9:40) Peter, (Acts 20:36; Acts 21:5) Paul imitating Christ in Gethsemane
Apocrypha, New Testament - Other apocalypses include the Apocalypse of James, of Stephen, of Thomas, of the Virgin Mary , and several works discovered at Nag Hammadi
Church - They spoke and wrote Greek as their primary language, gave their children Greek names (such as Stephen which means “crown” in Greek), and were more willing to relate to Gentiles
Deuteronomy, the Book of - , Acts 7:37, Peter and Stephen both quote it as fulfilled in Jesus
Croisade, or Crusade - Giles; the celebrated Godfrey of Bouillon, duke of Lorrain, with his brothers Baldwin and Eustace; Stephen, earl of Chartres and Blois; Hugo, count of St
Unpardonable Sin - Jesus might have affirmed of them, as Stephen afterwards affirmed in the face of the Sanhedrin, ‘Ye do always resist the Holy Ghost’ (Acts 7:51)
Eternal Punishment - , for a striking presentation of retribution as determined by the nature of sin; Stephen, Essays in Ecclesiastical Biography, the Epilogue
Christian (the Name) - ); Sanday in Church Times (June 21), 1901; and Leslie Stephen, An Agnostic’s Apology (pop
the Ethiopian Eunuch - ...
Was it the eunuch's own serious instincts, I wonder, that led him to the fifty-third of Isaiah? Or had he heard that profound and perplexing chapter disputed over by Stephen and Saul in one of the synagogues of Jerusalem? I cannot tell
Acts - ...
The death of Stephen in Acts 7:1 marks the beginning of a transition in the story as heightened pressure from Jewish authorities forced many Christians to leave Jerusalem
Antioch - The diaspora that followed the death of Stephen brought many fugitive Jewish Christian preachers to Antioch, and some Cypriotes and Cyrenians among them inaugurated a new era by going beyond the Hellenist Jews for an audience and preaching to ‘the Greeks also’ (Acts 11:20)
Barnabas - ...
As we read on in the Acts of the Apostles we come to the sad story of Ananias and Sapphira; then to the creation of the office of the deaconship; then to the great services and the triumphant translation of Stephen; and, then, the east begins to break in the conversion of Saul of Tarsus
Apostle - Stephen, several of the leading men among the Christians were dispersed; some of them travelled through the regions of Judea and Samaria, and others to Damascus, Phoenicia, the Island of Cyprus, and various parts of Syria; but the twelve Apostles remained, with undaunted firmness, at Jerusalem, avowing their attachment to the persecuted interest of Christ, and consulting how they might best provide for the emergencies of the church, in its infant and oppressed state
Joannes, Bishop of Ephesus - Together with Paul of Aphrodisias (subsequently patriarch of Antioch), Stephen, bp
Ibas, Bishop of Edessa - Stephen, the conspirators chose that moment for action
Winter - Luke 2:47 σύνεσις and Luke 4:22 λόγοι χάριτος), of the endowment of the Twelve with the Spirit (Luke 21:15), of the Seven (Acts 6:3), of Stephen (Acts 6:10), of Joseph (Acts 7:10), of Moses (Acts 7:22)
Joseph - The patriarchs, moved with envy, says Stephen in the Acts, sold Joseph into Egypt And Jacob, on his death-bed, when he was blessing Joseph, said of him that the archers had hated him, and had shot their arrows at him, and had sorely wounded him
Miracle - Many different believers perform miracles, not just the twelve (Stephen and Philip in Acts 6:8 and Acts 8:13 ), and they continue with about the same frequency throughout the book
Jerusalem - In Jerusalem Stephen delineated the differences between Christianity and mainstream Judaism
Leadership - There the Twelve led the congregation to select seven men for that Job (though Stephen and Philip at least were also known as preachers and teachers of the Word)
Influence - He did not speak of the Gentiles as His servant Paul did, nor of the Temple as Stephen did
Christ, Christology - The “Son of man” in Daniel 7:22 , Daniel 7:27 is the head of a worldwide kingdom, far outstripping the narrow confines of Jewish hopes; and (3) to find a missionary impulse which led these believers, notably under the leadership of Stephen and his followers, to reach out to non-Jews ( Acts 7:59-8:1 ; Acts 11:19-21 ; Acts 13:1-3 )
Jacob - ...
In Egypt the transformation took place; the civilization, arts, and sciences of Egypt adapted it well for the divine purpose of training Israel in this second stage of their history; Jacob and his family, numbering 70, or as Stephen from Septuagint reads, 75 souls (Acts 7:14), according as Joseph's children only or his grandchildren also are counted
Sanhedrin (2) - The stoning of Stephen (Acts 7:57 ff
Unity (2) - Thus Firmilian writes (with reference to the excommunication by Stephen of Rome of those who disallowed the baptism of heretics): ‘While thou thinkest that all may be excommunicated by thee, thou hast excommunicated thyself alone from all’ (Epp
Holy Spirit, Gifts of - Stephen and PhilipActs 6-8 )
Kingdom Kingdom of God - Outside the Gospels it occurs only once-in the mouth of Stephen; here too of the glorified state of the Messiah (Acts 7:56)
Election - In the NT we find the verb used, always in the middle voice, of our Lord’s choice of the Twelve from the company of the disciples (Luke 6:13, John 6:70; John 13:18; John 15:19, Acts 1:2); of the choice of an apostle in the place of Judas (Acts 1:24); of Stephen and his colleagues (Acts 6:5); of God’s choice of the patriarchs (Acts 13:17); and of the choice of delegates to carry the decisions of the Apostolic Council to the Gentile churches (Acts 15:22; Acts 15:25)
Ascension - where Stephen sees the Lord ‘standing’ at the right hand of God-ready (such seems to be the meaning) to help His martyr (cf
Roman Law in the nt - The stoning of Stephen was no doubt an illegal murder (Acts 7:58), and other deaths of Christians would fall under the same head (Acts 5:33, Acts 22:4, Acts 26:10); but the Sanhedrin could arrest persons, and inflict imprisonment and flogging (Acts 5:18; Acts 5:40, Acts 22:4, Acts 26:10; cf
Righteousness - ’ Golgotha - , fixes this as the place of the stoning of Stephen
Jerusalem - Stephen's gate on the east. Only during the past six centuries have traditions connected the martyr Stephen with the present St. Stephen's gate; before that they were located to the north about the Damascus gate
Atonement (2) - Moreover, He was present in power as exalted to God’s right hand, not therefore limited by time and space, but acting under Divine, eternal conditions, arising to succour His martyr Stephen (Acts 7:55; Acts 7:59), manifesting Himself as the Righteous One to St
Jesus Christ - The committing to the soul to God at death is a sacred act of worship: in the performance of this act, Stephen died, saying, Lord Jesus, receive my spirit, Acts 7:59
Progress - For any outspoken and persistent attack on Judaism on the point in question would have been sure to arouse against Him overwhelming opposition, as is manifest from what happened to Stephen the proto-martyr
Thecla - 232), first among women as Stephen among men
Fire - Stephen, Essays in Ecclesiastical Biography, 1907, Epilogue: A
Oracle - So Moses is said by Stephen to have received the "lively oracles" to give unto the Israelites
Fire - Stephen, Essays in Ecclesiastical Biography, 1907, Epilogue: A
Moses - Stephen (Acts 7:25; Acts 7:35) implies that Moses meant by the act to awaken in the Hebrew a thirst for the freedom and nationality which God had promised and to offer himself as their deliverer
Aristion (Aristo) - Besides this, Stephen of Byzantium, who knows of no Aristo of Pella, mentions an Aristo of Gerasa (less than 25 miles distant) simply as an ἀστεῖος ῥήτωρ
Redemption - The Israelites had demanded of Moses, ‘Who made thee a ruler and a judge?’ Stephen, driving home his lesson, declares that him who was thus rejected as ‘ruler and judge’ God has sent ‘both as ruler and as redeemer
Bible - But it may be that he borrowed these divisions from an earlier scholar, possibly Lanfranc, or Stephen Langton. Henry Stephens states that his father Robert Stephens made verse divisions in the NT during the intervals of a journey on horseback from Paris to Lyons. Whether he actually invented these arrangements or copied them from some predecessor, they were first published in Stephens’ Greek Testament of 1551
Gospels (2) - The expansion of the Church beyond Judaea began possibly immediately after the Pentecostal outpouring of the Holy Spirit; it certainly was in operation after the martyrdom of Stephen (Acts 11:19)
Mediator - Stephen direct to Him his dying prayer, and Saul declare that He is the Son of God (Acts 9:20)
Hellenism - Stephen, one of the Seven, was accused of having spoken against the Temple and the Law, and by a sudden outbreak of popular hatred he was put to death (with no authorization on the part of the Romans)
Arius, Followers of - The proceedings at Philippopolis and the outrageous conduct of Stephen, then patriarch of Antioch, gave offence even in the East, and the decision of the Western bishops to hold no communion with their Eastern brethren while the existing state of things lasted produced a reaction
Work - ...
Stephen G
Faith - ...
It is noteworthy that in describing both Stephen and Barnabas it is said of each that he was ‘full of faith and of the Holy Spirit’ (Acts 6:5; Acts 11:24), and probably it is implied that each had received not only the permanent gift of the Spirit (δωρεάν, Acts 2:38) but also the graces (χαρίσματα, 1 Corinthians 12:9) imparted by Him through a full and obedient faith
Ascension (2) - Stephen declares the same (Acts 7:55-56)
Faith - ...
It is noteworthy that in describing both Stephen and Barnabas it is said of each that he was ‘full of faith and of the Holy Spirit’ (Acts 6:5; Acts 11:24), and probably it is implied that each had received not only the permanent gift of the Spirit (δωρεάν, Acts 2:38) but also the graces (χαρίσματα, 1 Corinthians 12:9) imparted by Him through a full and obedient faith
Joseph - Stephen and the apostles evidently contemplated Joseph as type of Jesus (Acts 7:9-14; 1618417881_5)
Text of the Gospels - Other important editions are those of Robert Stephen (especially the folio of 1550, which is regarded by many as the standard text), Theodore de Bèze (Beza), and the brothers Elzevir
Bible - Some attribute it to Stephen Langton, archbishop of Canterbury, in the reigns of John and Henry III
Trial-at-Law - The bolder outlook and speech of Stephen rendered him liable to the same charge of blasphemy as his Master had faced; but so infuriated were his judges by the aggressive tone of his defence that they hurried him out to execution without even the semblance of a formal condemnation (Acts 7:57 f
Moravians - ...
There being at this time no bishops in the Bohemian church who had not submitted to the papal jurisdiction, three priests of the society of United Brethren were, about the year 1467, consecrated by Stephen, bishop of the Waldenses, in Austria, (see WALDENSES;) and these prelates, on their return to their own country, consecrated ten co-bishops, or co-seniors, from among the rest of the presbyters
Sacrifice (2) - The accusation of having put the Holy One to death is brought home most forcibly in the speeches of Peter and Stephen (Acts 2:23; Acts 3:13-15; Acts 7:52); but the Cross is not once spoken of as necessary to salvation
Persecution - Stephen re-echced his Master’s interpretation of the nation’s attitude when he asked ‘which of the prophets did not your fathers persecute?’ (Acts 7:52)
Paul - Stephen
Pharisees (2) - Stephen was stoned for blaspheming God, Moses, and the customs of the Pharisees, and doing so in the name of Jesus Christ
Vulgate - The present chapter division of the Bible text is said to have been first made by Stephen Langton (archbishop of Canterbury, 1207 1228), while a doctor at Paris; and the 13th cent
Law (2) - The authenticity of the utterance is guaranteed by the use made of it in the trial of Jesus (Mark 14:58), and the similar accusation at the trial of Stephen (Acts 6:14), as well as the taunt addressed to Jesus on the cross (Mark 15:29)
Dioscorus (1), Patriarch of Alexandria - " Stephen of Ephesus then narrated the violence done to his secretaries: Acacias of Arianathia described the coercion scene
Expiation - Stephen, or St